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Sample records for understanding vascular endothelium

  1. Vascular endothelium receptors and transduction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Gillis, C; Ryan, Una; Proceedings of the Advanced Studies Institute on "Vascular Endothelium: Receptors and Transduction Mechanisms"

    1989-01-01

    Beyond their obvious role of a barrier between blood and tissue, vascular endothelial cells are now firmly established as active and essential participants in a host of crucial physiological and pathophysiological functions. Probably the two most important factors responsible for promoting the current knowledge of endothelial functions are 1) observations in the late sixties-early seventies that many non-ventilatory properties of the lung could be attributed to the pulmonary endothelium and 2) the establishment, in the early and mid-seventies of procedures for routine culture of vascular endothelial cells. Many of these endothelial functions require the presence of receptors on the surface of the plasma membrane. There is now evidence for the existence among others of muscarinic, a-and /3-adrenergic, purine, insulin, histamine, bradykinin, lipoprotein, thrombin, paf, fibronectin, vitronectin, interleukin and albumin receptors. For some of these ligands, there is evidence only for the existence of endothelial ...

  2. A Role for the Endothelium in Vascular Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yucheng; Jumabay, Medet; Ly, Albert; Radparvar, Melina; Cubberly, Mark R.; Boström, Kristina I.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Vascular calcification is a regulated process that involves osteoprogenitor cells and frequently complicates common vascular disease such as atherosclerosis and diabetic vasculopathy. However, it is not clear if the vascular endothelium has a role in contributing osteoprogenitor cells to the calcific lesions. Objective To determine if the vascular endothelium contributes osteoprogenitor cells to vascular calcification. Methods and Results In this study, we use two mouse models of vascular calcification, mice with gene deletion of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a BMP-inhibitor, and Ins2Akita/+ mice, a diabetes model. We show that enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in both types of mice stimulates the vascular endothelium to contribute osteoprogenitor cells to the vascular calcification. The enhanced BMP signaling results in endothelial-mesenchymal transitions and the emergence of multipotent cells, followed by osteoinduction. Endothelial markers co-localize with multipotent and osteogenic markers in calcified arteries by immunostaining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Lineage tracing using Tie2-Gfp transgenic mice supports an endothelial origin of the osteogenic cells. Enhancement of MGP expression in Ins2Akita/+ mice, as mediated by an Mgp transgene limits the generation of multipotent cells. Moreover, MGP-depleted human aortic endothelial cells in vitro acquire multipotency rendering the cells susceptible to osteoinduction by BMP and high glucose. Conclusions Our data suggest that the endothelium is a source of osteoprogenitor cells in vascular calcification that occurs in disorders with high BMP activation such as deficiency of BMP inhibitors and diabetes. PMID:23852538

  3. Nitric oxide and coronary vascular endothelium adaptations in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Levy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andrew S Levy*, Justin CS Chung*, Jeffrey T Kroetsch*, James WE RushDepartment of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: This review highlights a number of nitric oxide (NO-related mechanisms that contribute to coronary vascular function and that are likely affected by hypertension and thus become important clinically as potential considerations in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary complications of hypertension. Coronary vascular resistance is elevated in hypertension in part due to impaired endothelium-dependent function of coronary arteries. Several lines of evidence suggest that other NO synthase isoforms and dilators other than NO may compensate for impairments in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS to protect coronary artery function, and that NO-dependent function of coronary blood vessels depends on the position of the vessel in the vascular tree. Adaptations in NOS isoforms in the coronary circulation to hypertension are not well described so the compensatory relationship between these and eNOS in hypertensive vessels is not clear. It is important to understand potential functional consequences of these adaptations as they will impact the efficacy of treatments designed to control hypertension and coronary vascular disease. Polymorphisms of the eNOS gene result in significant associations with incidence of hypertension, although mechanistic details linking the polymorphisms with alterations in coronary vasomotor responses and adaptations to hypertension are not established. This understanding should be developed in order to better predict those individuals at the highest risk for coronary vascular complications of hypertension. Greater endothelium-dependent dilation observed in female coronary arteries is likely related to endothelial Ca2+ control and eNOS expression and activity. In hypertension models, the coronary vasculature has not been

  4. Dynamic, nondestructive imaging of a bioengineered vascular graft endothelium.

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    Bryce M Whited

    Full Text Available Bioengineering of vascular grafts holds great potential to address the shortcomings associated with autologous and conventional synthetic vascular grafts used for small diameter grafting procedures. Lumen endothelialization of bioengineered vascular grafts is essential to provide an antithrombogenic graft surface to ensure long-term patency after implantation. Conventional methods used to assess endothelialization in vitro typically involve periodic harvesting of the graft for histological sectioning and staining of the lumen. Endpoint testing methods such as these are effective but do not provide real-time information of endothelial cells in their intact microenvironment, rather only a single time point measurement of endothelium development. Therefore, nondestructive methods are needed to provide dynamic information of graft endothelialization and endothelium maturation in vitro. To address this need, we have developed a nondestructive fiber optic based (FOB imaging method that is capable of dynamic assessment of graft endothelialization without disturbing the graft housed in a bioreactor. In this study we demonstrate the capability of the FOB imaging method to quantify electrospun vascular graft endothelialization, EC detachment, and apoptosis in a nondestructive manner. The electrospun scaffold fiber diameter of the graft lumen was systematically varied and the FOB imaging system was used to noninvasively quantify the affect of topography on graft endothelialization over a 7-day period. Additionally, results demonstrated that the FOB imaging method had a greater imaging penetration depth than that of two-photon microscopy. This imaging method is a powerful tool to optimize vascular grafts and bioreactor conditions in vitro, and can be further adapted to monitor endothelium maturation and response to fluid flow bioreactor preconditioning.

  5. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

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    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2017-04-01

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Aspirin induces nitric oxide release from vascular endothelium: a novel mechanism of action

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    Taubert, D; Berkels, R; Grosser, N; Schröder, H; Gründemann, D; Schömig, E

    2004-01-01

    The study was designed to test the hypothesis that aspirin may stimulate nitric oxide (NO) release from vascular endothelium, a pivotal factor for maintenance of vascular homeostasis.Clinical evidence suggests that low-dose aspirin may improve vascular endothelial function. Since other cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors showed no beneficial vascular effects, aspirin may exhibit a vasculoprotective, COX-independent mechanism.Luminal NO release was monitored in real time on dissected porcine coron...

  7. Stress susceptibility as a determinant of endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity in rat mesenteric arteries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Cools, A.R.; Siero, H.L.M.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Smits, B.W.; Russel, F.G.M.; Smits, P.

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the consequences of stress susceptibility on vascular function, the authors assessed the respective contributions of nitric oxide (NO), prostanoids, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to the vascular tone in rats with a constitutionally determined high and low

  8. Junctional transfer in cultured vascular endothelium: II. Dye and nucleotide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.M.; Sheridan, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cultures, derived from large vessels, retain many of the characteristics of their in vivo counterparts. However, the observed reduction in size and complexity of intercellular gap and tight junctions in these cultured cells suggests that important functions, thought to be mediated by these structures, may be altered in vitro. In continuing studies on intercellular communication in vessel wall cells, the authors have quantitated the extent of junctional transfer of small molecular tracers (the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH and tritiated uridine nucleotides) in confluent cultures of calf aortic (BAEC) and umbilical vein (BVEC) endothelium. Both BAEC and BVEC show extensive (and quantitatively equivalent) dye and nucleotide transfer. As an analogue of intimal endothelium, the authors have also tested dye transfer in freshly isolated sheets of endothelium. Transfer in BAEC and BVEC sheets was more rapid, extensive and homogeneous than in the cultured cells, implying a reduction in molecular coupling as endothelium adapts to culture conditions. In addition, they have documented heterocellular nucleotide transfer between cultured endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells, of particular interest considering the prevalence of ''myo-endothelial'' junctions in vivo. These data yield further information on junctional transfer in cultured vascular endothelium and have broad implications for the functional integration of the vessel wall in the physiology and pathophysiology of the vasculature

  9. Transport of Gold Nanoparticles by Vascular Endothelium from Different Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromnicova, Radka; Kaya, Mehmet; Romero, Ignacio A.; Williams, Phil; Satchell, Simon; Sharrack, Basil; Male, David

    2016-01-01

    The selective entry of nanoparticles into target tissues is the key factor which determines their tissue distribution. Entry is primarily controlled by microvascular endothelial cells, which have tissue-specific properties. This study investigated the cellular properties involved in selective transport of gold nanoparticles (nanoparticles than brain endothelium (hCMEC/D3), reflecting their biodistribution in vivo. Nanoparticle uptake and subcellular localisation was quantified by transmission electron microscopy. The rate of internalisation was approximately 4x higher in kidney endothelium than brain endothelium. Vesicular endocytosis was approximately 4x greater than cytosolic uptake in both cell types, and endocytosis was blocked by metabolic inhibition, whereas cytosolic uptake was energy-independent. The cellular basis for the different rates of internalisation was investigated. Morphologically, both endothelia had similar profiles of vesicles and cell volumes. However, the rate of endocytosis was higher in kidney endothelium. Moreover, the glycocalyces of the endothelia differed, as determined by lectin-binding, and partial removal of the glycocalyx reduced nanoparticle uptake by kidney endothelium, but not brain endothelium. This study identifies tissue-specific properties of vascular endothelium that affects their interaction with nanoparticles and rate of transport. PMID:27560685

  10. Pulmonary vascular endothelium: the orchestra conductor in respiratory diseases: Highlights from basic research to therapy.

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    Huertas, Alice; Guignabert, Christophe; Barberà, Joan A; Bärtsch, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jahar; Bhattacharya, Sunita; Bonsignore, Maria R; Dewachter, Laurence; Dinh-Xuan, Anh Tuan; Dorfmüller, Peter; Gladwin, Mark T; Humbert, Marc; Kotsimbos, Tom; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Sanchez, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Testa, Ugo; Wilkins, Martin R

    2018-04-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Seminar entitled "Pulmonary vascular endothelium: orchestra conductor in respiratory diseases - highlights from basic research to therapy" brought together international experts in dysfunctional pulmonary endothelium, from basic science to translational medicine, to discuss several important aspects in acute and chronic lung diseases. This review will briefly sum up the different topics of discussion from this meeting which was held in Paris, France on October 27-28, 2016. It is important to consider that this paper does not address all aspects of endothelial dysfunction but focuses on specific themes such as: 1) the complex role of the pulmonary endothelium in orchestrating the host response in both health and disease (acute lung injury, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high-altitude pulmonary oedema and pulmonary hypertension); and 2) the potential value of dysfunctional pulmonary endothelium as a target for innovative therapies. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  11. Relationship between vascular endothelium and periodontal disease in atherosclerotic lesions: Review article

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    Saffi, Marco Aurélio Lumertz; Furtado, Mariana Vargas; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Montenegro, Márlon Munhoz; Ribeiro, Ingrid Webb Josephson; Kampits, Cassio; Haas, Alex Nogueira; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease. Recent studies suggest that periodontal infection and the ensuing increase in the levels of inflammatory markers may be associated with myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease. The present article aimed at reviewing contemporary data on the pathophysiology of vascular endothelium and its association with periodontitis in the scenario of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25632316

  12. Dysfunction of pulmonary vascular endothelium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: basic considerations for future drug development.

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    Yang, Qin; Underwood, Malcolm J; Hsin, Michael K Y; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; He, Guo-Wei

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading health problems worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The clinical features of COPD are chronic obstructive bronchiolitis and emphysema. Pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic pathological finding of COPD at different stages of the disease. Functional changes of pulmonary endothelial cells in COPD include antiplatelet abnormalities, anticoagulant disturbances, endothelial activation, atherogenesis, and compromised regulation of vascular tone which may adversely affect the ventilation-perfusion match in COPD. As the most important risk factor of COPD, cigarette smoking may initiate pulmonary vascular impairment through direct injury of endothelial cells or release of inflammatory mediators. Morphological changes such as denudation of endothelium and endothelial cell apoptosis have been observed in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD patients as well as functional alterations. Changes in the expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), thrombomodulin, selectins, and adhesion molecules in pulmonary endothelial cells as well as complex regulation and interaction of vasoactive substances and growth factors released from endothelium may underlie the mechanisms of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in COPD. The mechanism of endothelial repair/regeneration in COPD, although not fully understood, may involve upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factors in the early stages along with an increased number of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. These factors should be taken into account when developing new strategies for the pharmacological therapy of patients with COPD.

  13. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilator effects of eugenol in the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

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    Criddle, David Neil; Madeira, Socorro Vanesca Frota; Soares de Moura, Roberto

    2003-03-01

    The possible involvement of the endothelium in the vasodilator action of eugenol was investigated in the mesenteric vascular bed (MVB) of the rat. Bolus injections of eugenol (0.2, 2 and 20 micromol) and acetylcholine (ACh; 10, 30 and 100 pmol) induced dose-dependent vasodilator responses in noradrenaline-precontracted beds that were partially inhibited by pretreatment of the MVB with deoxycholate (1 mg mL(-1)) to remove the endothelium (approximately 14% and approximately 30% of the control response remaining at the lowest doses of ACh and eugenol, respectively). The vasodilator effect of glyceryl trinitrate (1 micromol) was unaltered by deoxycholate. In the presence of either N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (300 microM) or tetraethylammonium (1 mM)the response to ACh was partially reduced, whereas eugenol-induced vasodilation was unaffected. Similarly the vasodilator effect of eugenol was not inhibited by indometacin (3 microM). Under calcium-free conditions the vasoconstrictor response elicited by bolus injections of noradrenaline (10 nmol) was dose-dependently and completely inhibited by eugenol (0.1-1 mM). Additionally, the pressor effects of bolus injections of calcium chloride in potassium-depolarized MVBs were greatly reduced in the presence of eugenol (0.1 mM), with a maximal reduction of approximately 71% of the control response. Our data showed that eugenol induced dose-dependent, reversible vasodilator responses in the rat MVB, that were partially dependent on the endothelium, although apparently independent of nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor or prostacyclin. Furthermore, an endothelium-independent intracellular site of action seemed likely to participate in its smooth muscle relaxant properties.

  14. A key role for the endothelium in NOD1 mediated vascular inflammation: comparison to TLR4 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Gatheral

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which pathogens induce vascular inflammation and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets in sepsis and related conditions. The intracellular receptor NOD1 recognises peptidoglycan which features in the cell wall of gram negative and some gram positive bacteria. NOD1 engagement generates an inflammatory response via activation of NFκB and MAPK pathways. We have previously shown that stimulation of NOD1 directly activates blood vessels and causes experimental shock in vivo. In this study we have used an ex vivo vessel-organ culture model to characterise the relative contribution of the endothelium in the response of blood vessels to NOD1 agonists. In addition we present the novel finding that NOD1 directly activates human blood vessels. Using human cultured cells we confirm that endothelial cells respond more avidly to NOD1 agonists than vascular smooth muscle cells. Accordingly we have sought to pharmacologically differentiate NOD1 and TLR4 mediated signalling pathways in human endothelial cells, focussing on TAK1, NFκB and p38 MAPK. In addition we profile novel inhibitors of RIP2 and NOD1 itself, which specifically inhibit NOD1 ligand induced inflammatory signalling in the vasculature. This paper is the first to demonstrate activation of whole human artery by NOD1 stimulation and the relative importance of the endothelium in the sensing of NOD1 ligands by vessels. This data supports the potential utility of NOD1 and RIP2 as therapeutic targets in human disease where vascular inflammation is a clinical feature, such as in sepsis and septic shock.

  15. ROCK2 primes the endothelium for vascular hyperpermeability responses by raising baseline junctional tension

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    Beckers, Cora M.L.; Knezevic, Nebojsa; Valent, Erik T.; Tauseef, Mohammad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Rajendran, Kavitha; Hardin, C. Corey; Aman, Jurjan; van Bezu, Jan; Sweetnam, Paul; van Hinsbergh, Victor W.M.; Mehta, Dolly; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.

    2015-01-01

    Rho kinase mediates the effects of inflammatory permeability factors by increasing actomyosin-generated traction forces on endothelial adherens junctions, resulting in disassembly of intercellular junctions and increased vascular leakage. In vitro, this is accompanied by the Rho kinase-driven formation of prominent radial F-actin fibers, but the in vivo relevance of those F-actin fibers has been debated, suggesting other Rho kinase-mediated events to occur in vascular leak. Here, we delineated the contributions of the highly homologous isoforms of Rho kinase (ROCK1 and ROCK2) to vascular hyperpermeability responses. We show that ROCK2, rather than ROCK1 is the critical Rho kinase for regulation of thrombin receptor-mediated vascular permeability. Novel traction force mapping in endothelial monolayers, however, shows that ROCK2 is not required for the thrombin-induced force enhancements. Rather, ROCK2 is pivotal to baseline junctional tension as a novel mechanism by which Rho kinase primes the endothelium for hyperpermeability responses, independent from subsequent ROCK1-mediated contractile stress-fiber formation during the late phase of the permeability response. PMID:25869521

  16. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  17. The standardized Ginkgo biloba extract Egb-761 protects vascular endothelium exposed to oxidized low density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, S V; Lesnik, P; Moreau, M; Bonello, L; Droy-Lefaix, M-T; Sennoune, S; Duran, M-J; Pressley, T A; Sampol, J; Chapman, J; Maixent, J-M

    2008-10-26

    Dietary antioxidants are frequently proposed as protective agents for the vascular endothelium during the onset of atherosclerosis. This protection may occur at two distinct levels. First, they prevent oxidative modification of atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL). Second, they can provide a cellular protection against oxidized LDL-mediated endothelium dysfunction, although this mechanism remains poorly considered in many instances. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying such cellular protection against oxidized LDL, we examined the impact of a popular traditional medicine, an extract from Ginkgo biloba with well-known antioxidant properties, on two endothelial cells properties: cell adhesion and ionic homeostasis. Cellular lipoperoxides levels were also measured as a marker of cellular oxidative stress. Human umbilical-vein endothelial cells were exposed to native (nat-) or oxidized (ox-) LDL, the latter prepared to be compatible with clinically observed levels of oxidation. Although nat-LDL had little effect, ox-LDL increased endothelial adhesive properties (35%, pGinkgo biloba EGb-761 totally protected adhesive properties and endothelial lipoperoxide levels. Moreover, it limited the decrease in Na,K-ATPase activity induced by ox-LDL to levels similar to nat-LDL. This suggests that EGb-761 protects endothelial adhesive properties and helps prevent the disruption of ionic homeostasis. The EGb-761-mediated inhibition of ox-LDL-induced lipoperoxide levels in endothelial cells appears to be an important mechanism by which Ginkgo biloba extract protects endothelial properties.

  18. Endothelium-derived fibronectin regulates neonatal vascular morphogenesis in an autocrine fashion.

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    Turner, Christopher J; Badu-Nkansah, Kwabena; Hynes, Richard O

    2017-11-01

    Fibronectin containing alternatively spliced EIIIA and EIIIB domains is largely absent from mature quiescent vessels in adults, but is highly expressed around blood vessels during developmental and pathological angiogenesis. The precise functions of fibronectin and its splice variants during developmental angiogenesis however remain unclear due to the presence of cardiac, somitic, mesodermal and neural defects in existing global fibronectin KO mouse models. Using a rare family of surviving EIIIA EIIIB double KO mice, as well as inducible endothelial-specific fibronectin-deficient mutant mice, we show that vascular development in the neonatal retina is regulated in an autocrine manner by endothelium-derived fibronectin, and requires both EIIIA and EIIIB domains and the RGD-binding α5 and αv integrins for its function. Exogenous sources of fibronectin do not fully substitute for the autocrine function of endothelial fibronectin, demonstrating that fibronectins from different sources contribute differentially to specific aspects of angiogenesis.

  19. Vascular Cognitive Impairment Linked to Brain Endothelium Inflammation in Early Stages of Heart Failure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, Mateusz G; Sternak, Magdalena; Mohaissen, Tasnim; Kaczor, Dawid; Wierońska, Joanna M; Malinowska, Monika; Czaban, Iwona; Byk, Katarzyna; Lyngsø, Kristina S; Przyborowski, Kamil; Hansen, Pernille B L; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2018-03-26

    Although advanced heart failure (HF) is a clinically documented risk factor for vascular cognitive impairment, the occurrence and pathomechanisms of vascular cognitive impairment in early stages of HF are equivocal. Here, we characterize vascular cognitive impairment in the early stages of HF development and assess whether cerebral hypoperfusion or prothrombotic conditions are involved. Tgαq*44 mice with slowly developing isolated HF triggered by cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of G-αq*44 protein were studied before the end-stage HF, at the ages of 3, 6, and 10 months: before left ventricle dysfunction; at the stage of early left ventricle diastolic dysfunction (with preserved ejection fraction); and left ventricle diastolic/systolic dysfunction, respectively. In 6- to 10-month-old but not in 3-month-old Tgαq*44 mice, behavioral and cognitive impairment was identified with compromised blood-brain barrier permeability, most significantly in brain cortex, that was associated with myelin sheet loss and changes in astrocytes and microglia. Brain endothelial cells displayed increased E-selectin immunoreactivity, which was accompanied by increased amyloid-β 1-42 accumulation in piriform cortex and increased cortical oxidative stress (8-OHdG immunoreactivity). Resting cerebral blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging in vivo was preserved, but ex vivo NO-dependent cortical arteriole flow regulation was impaired. Platelet hyperreactivity was present in 3- to 10-month-old Tgαq*44 mice, but it was not associated with increased platelet-dependent thrombogenicity. We report for the first time that vascular cognitive impairment is already present in the early stage of HF development, even before left ventricle systolic dysfunction. The underlying pathomechanism, independent of brain hypoperfusion, involves preceding platelet hyperreactivity and brain endothelium inflammatory activation. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  20. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-01-01

    Widely used chemotherapeutic breast cancer drugs such as Tamoxifen citrate (TC), Capecitabine (CP) and Epirubicin (EP) are known to cause various cardiovascular side-effects among long term cancer survivors. Vascular modulation warrants nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction, which targets the vascular endothelium. We hypothesize that TC, CP and EP interference with the nitric oxide downstream signaling specifically, could lead to cardiovascular dysfunctions. The results demonstrate that while all three drugs attenuate NO and cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) production in endothelial cells, they caused elevated levels of NO in the plasma and RBC. However, PBMC and platelets did not show any significant changes under treatment. This implies that the drug effects are specific to the endothelium. Altered eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) localization patterns in endothelial cells were observed following drug treatments. Similarly, the expression of phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) protein was decreased under the treatment of drugs. Altered actin polymerization was also observed following drug treatment, while addition of SpNO and 8Br-cGMP reversed this effect. Incubation with the drugs decreased endothelial cell migration whereas addition of YC-1, SC and 8Br-cGMP recovered the effect. Additionally molecular docking studies showed that all three drugs exhibited a strong binding affinity with the catalytic domain of human sGC. In conclusion, results indicate that TC, CP and EP cause endothelial dysfunctions via the NO–sGC–cGMP pathway and these effects could be recovered using pharmaceutical agonists of NO signaling pathway. Further, the study proposes a combination therapy of chemotherapeutic drugs and cGMP analogs, which would confer protection against chemotherapy mediated vascular dysfunctions in cancer patients. - Highlights: • NO production is reduced in endothelial cells under breast cancer drug treatment. • Cellular cGMP level is decreased under

  1. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro, E-mail: soovro@yahoo.ca

    2013-06-01

    Widely used chemotherapeutic breast cancer drugs such as Tamoxifen citrate (TC), Capecitabine (CP) and Epirubicin (EP) are known to cause various cardiovascular side-effects among long term cancer survivors. Vascular modulation warrants nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction, which targets the vascular endothelium. We hypothesize that TC, CP and EP interference with the nitric oxide downstream signaling specifically, could lead to cardiovascular dysfunctions. The results demonstrate that while all three drugs attenuate NO and cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) production in endothelial cells, they caused elevated levels of NO in the plasma and RBC. However, PBMC and platelets did not show any significant changes under treatment. This implies that the drug effects are specific to the endothelium. Altered eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) localization patterns in endothelial cells were observed following drug treatments. Similarly, the expression of phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) protein was decreased under the treatment of drugs. Altered actin polymerization was also observed following drug treatment, while addition of SpNO and 8Br-cGMP reversed this effect. Incubation with the drugs decreased endothelial cell migration whereas addition of YC-1, SC and 8Br-cGMP recovered the effect. Additionally molecular docking studies showed that all three drugs exhibited a strong binding affinity with the catalytic domain of human sGC. In conclusion, results indicate that TC, CP and EP cause endothelial dysfunctions via the NO–sGC–cGMP pathway and these effects could be recovered using pharmaceutical agonists of NO signaling pathway. Further, the study proposes a combination therapy of chemotherapeutic drugs and cGMP analogs, which would confer protection against chemotherapy mediated vascular dysfunctions in cancer patients. - Highlights: • NO production is reduced in endothelial cells under breast cancer drug treatment. • Cellular cGMP level is decreased under

  2. Lack of glutathione peroxidase-1 facilitates a pro-inflammatory and activated vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arpeeta; Yuen, Derek; Huet, Olivier; Pickering, Raelene; Stefanovic, Nada; Bernatchez, Pascal; de Haan, Judy B

    2016-04-01

    A critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is vascular inflammation leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED). Reactive oxygen species and inflammation are inextricably linked and declining antioxidant defense is implicated in ED. We have previously shown that Glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1) is a crucial antioxidant enzyme in the protection against diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. In this study we aimed to investigate mechanisms by which lack of GPx1 affects pro-inflammatory mediators in primary aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) isolated from GPx1 knockout (GPx1 KO) mice. Herein, we demonstrate that lack of GPx1 prolonged TNF-α induced phosphorylation of P38, ERK and JNK, all of which was reversed upon treatment with the GPx1 mimetic, ebselen. In addition, Akt phosphorylation was reduced in GPx1 KO PAECs, which correlated with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability as compared to WT PAECs. Furthermore, IκB degradation was prolonged in GPx1 KO PAECS suggesting an augmentation of NF-κB activity. In addition, the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) was significantly increased in GPx1 KO PAECs and aortas. Static and dynamic flow adhesion assays showed significantly increased adhesion of fluorescently labeled leukocytes to GPx1 KO PAECS and aortas respectively, which were significantly reduced by ebselen treatment. Our results suggest that GPx1 plays a critical role in regulating pro-inflammatory pathways, including MAPK and NF-κB, and down-stream mediators such as VCAM-1, in vascular endothelial cells. Lack of GPx1, via effects on p-AKT also affects signaling to eNOS-derived NO. We speculate based on these results that declining antioxidant defenses as seen in cardiovascular diseases, by failing to regulate these pro-inflammatory pathways, facilitates an inflammatory and activated endothelium leading to ED and atherogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  4. Serum galectin-2, -4, and -8 are greatly increased in colon and breast cancer patients and promote cancer cell adhesion to blood vascular endothelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrow, Hannah; Guo, Xiuli; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion of disseminating tumor cells to the blood vascular endothelium is a pivotal step in metastasis. Previous investigations have shown that galectin-3 concentrations are increased in the bloodstream of patients with cancer and that galectin-3 promotes adhesion of disseminating tumor cells...... to vascular endothelium in vitro and experimental metastasis in vivo. This study determined the levels of galectin-1, -2, -3, -4, -8, and -9 in the sera of healthy people and patients with colon and breast cancer and assessed the influence of these galectins on cancer-endothelium adhesion....

  5. Molecular imaging of the human pulmonary vascular endothelium in pulmonary hypertension: a phase II safety and proof of principle trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harel, Francois [Montreal Heart Institute, Research Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Langleben, David; Abikhzer, Gad [McGill University, Lady Davis Institute and Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Provencher, Steve; Guimond, Jean [Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fournier, Alain; Letourneau, Myriam [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, Quebec (Canada); Finnerty, Vincent; Nguyen, Quang T.; Levac, Xavier [Montreal Heart Institute, Research Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Mansour, Asmaa; Guertin, Marie-Claude [Montreal Health Innovation Coordination Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Dupuis, Jocelyn [Montreal Heart Institute, Research Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    The adrenomedullin receptor is densely expressed in the pulmonary vascular endothelium. PulmoBind, an adrenomedullin receptor ligand, was developed for molecular diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease. We evaluated the safety of PulmoBind SPECT imaging and its capacity to detect pulmonary vascular disease associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) in a human phase II study. Thirty patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, n = 23) or chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH, n = 7) in WHO functional class II (n = 26) or III (n = 4) were compared to 15 healthy controls. Lung SPECT was performed after injection of 15 mCi {sup 99m}Tc-PulmoBind in supine position. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of lung uptake were performed. Reproducibility of repeated testing was evaluated in controls after 1 month. PulmoBind injection was well tolerated without any serious adverse event. Imaging was markedly abnormal in PH with ∝50% of subjects showing moderate to severe heterogeneity of moderate to severe extent. The abnormalities were unevenly distributed between the right and left lungs as well as within each lung. Segmental defects compatible with pulmonary embolism were present in 7/7 subjects with CTEPH and in 2/23 subjects with PAH. There were no segmental defects in controls. The PulmoBind activity distribution index, a parameter indicative of heterogeneity, was elevated in PH (65% ± 28%) vs. controls (41% ± 13%, p = 0.0003). In the only subject with vasodilator-responsive idiopathic PAH, PulmoBind lung SPECT was completely normal. Repeated testing 1 month later in healthy controls was well tolerated and showed no significant variability of PulmoBind distribution. In this phase II study, molecular SPECT imaging of the pulmonary vascular endothelium using {sup 99m}Tc-PulmoBind was safe. PulmoBind showed potential to detect both pulmonary embolism and abnormalities indicative of pulmonary vascular disease in PAH. Phase III studies with this novel tracer and

  6. Pathological aging of the vascular endothelium: are endothelial progenitor cells the sentinels of the cardiovascular system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Voghel, Guillaume; Gendron, Marie-Eve; Krummen, Stephane; Farhat, Nada; Drouin, Annick; Perrault, Louis P; Thorin, Eric

    2005-10-01

    Aging is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction, which ultimately leads to atherosclerosis. On the other hand, it is clear that in young patients with risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), endothelial dysfunction is an early marker of the ongoing atherogenic process. It is therefore tempting to speculate that risk factors for CVD accelerate the aging process. The aging of an endothelial cell (EC) is not chronological but rather dependent on its replication rate. ECs have a finite number of divisions and enter replicative senescence after exhaustion of this potential. Telomere attrition is believed to be responsible for this phenomenon. Upon reaching a critical minimal telomere length, ECs enter a nondividing state of replicative senescence. Recently, endothelial progenitor cells originating from the bone marrow have been isolated from the circulation. They integrate into the endothelial layer of the vessel and contribute to healing, ischemic repair and angiogenesis. A completely new field of investigation is now open. Are endothelial progenitor cells sensitive to the aging process? Do they prevent endothelial dysfunction? Are they the ultimate shield against the damages induced by risk factors for CVD? There are no definite answers to these questions, but the potential of these cells is tremendous and understanding their physiology is essential.

  7. Excretory/secretory antigens from Dirofilaria immitis adult worms interact with the host fibrinolytic system involving the vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miguel, Javier; Morchón, Rodrigo; Mellado, Isabel; Carretón, Elena; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto; Simón, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is the causative agent of canine and feline heartworm disease. The parasite can survive for long periods of time (7 years or more) in the circulatory system of immunocompetent reservoirs, producing usually a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. In addition, the simultaneous death of groups of adult worms can trigger an acute disease characterized by the exacerbation of inflammatory reactions and the emergence of serious thromboembolic events. In the context of the D. immitis/host relationships, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the excretory/secretory antigens from D. immitis adult worms (DiES) and the fibrinolytic system of the host. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we showed that DiES extract is able to bind plasminogen and generate plasmin, although this fact requires the presence of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Moreover, we established that DiES extract enhances t-PA expression in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Additionally, 10 plasminogen-binding proteins from DiES extract were identified by mass spectrometry (HSP60, actin-1/3, actin, actin 4, transglutaminase, GAPDH, Ov87, LOAG_14743, galectin and P22U). The data suggest that DiES antigens interact with the environment of the parasite regulating the activation of the fibrinolytic system of the host with involvement of the vascular endothelium in the process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of decellularized human umbilical vein (HUV) for vascular tissue engineering - comparison with endothelium-denuded HUV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Silvia; Schrammel, Siegfried; Huber, Georgine; Niemeyer, Markus; Schmid, Christof; Stangassinger, Manfred; Hoenicka, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical vessels have been recognized as a valuable and widely available resource for vascular tissue engineering. Whereas endothelium-denuded human umbilical veins (HUVs) have been successfully seeded with a patient-derived neoendothelium, decellularized vessels may have additional advantages, due to their lower antigenicity. The present study investigated the effects of three different decellularization procedures on the histological, mechanical and seeding properties of HUVs. Vessels were decellularized by detergent treatment (Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, IGEPAL-CA630), osmotic lysis (3 m NaCl, distilled water) and peroxyacetic acid treatment. In all cases, nuclease treatments were required to remove residual nucleic acids. Decellularization resulted in a partial loss of fibronectin and laminin staining in the subendothelial layer and affected the appearance of elastic fibres. In addition to removing residual nucleic acids, nuclease treatment weakened all stainings and substantially altered surface properties, as seen in scanning electron micrographs, indicating additional non-specific effects. Detergent treatment and osmotic lysis caused failure stresses to decrease significantly. Although conditioned medium prepared from decellularized HUV did not severely affect endothelial cell growth, cells seeded on decellularized HUV did not remain viable. This may be attributed to the partial removal of essential extracellular matrix components as well as to changes of surface properties. Therefore, decellularized HUVs appear to require additional modifications in order to support successful cell seeding. Replacing the vessels' endothelium may thus be a superior alternative to decellularization when creating tissue-engineered blood vessels with non-immunogenic luminal interfaces. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Epigenetics in the Vascular Endothelium: Looking From a Different Perspective in the Epigenomics Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Matthew S; Marsden, Philip A

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are commonly thought to be complex, non-Mendelian diseases that are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. A growing body of evidence suggests that epigenetic pathways play a key role in vascular biology and might be involved in defining and transducing cardiovascular disease inheritability. In this review, we argue the importance of epigenetics in vascular biology, especially from the perspective of endothelial cell phenotype. We highlight and discuss the role of epigenetic modifications across the transcriptional unit of protein-coding genes, especially the role of intragenic chromatin modifications, which are underappreciated and not well characterized in the current era of genome-wide studies. Importantly, we describe the practical application of epigenetics in cardiovascular disease therapeutics. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Human endothelium on vascular prostheses modified by extracellular matrix proteins in a flow experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Filová, Elena; Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Remy-Zolghadri, M.; Bareille, R.; Fernandez, P.; Daculsi, R.; Bordenave, L.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 58-60 (2006), s. 10-13 ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011301; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4050202; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400500507; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500110564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : bioartificial vascular prostheses * laminin * fibrin Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  11. Vascular endothelium as a novel source of stem cells for bioengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susienka, Michael J.; Medici, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial plasticity, the ability of endothelial cells to alter their lineage commitment to generate other cell types, is involved in many developmental and pathological processes. It was recently shown that vascular endothelial cells are converted to a mesenchymal stem cell phenotype through a process known as endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). EndMT is characterized as a morphological and phenotypical transformation of endothelial cells that has been implicated in cardiac development, cancer, fibrosis and heterotopic ossification. Here we describe the molecular and cellular basis for EndMT-dependent generation of endothelial-derived stem cells and their potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:23603799

  12. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in inhibited by in vivo depletion of vascular thiol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, J B; Boesgaard, S; Trautner, S

    2001-01-01

    Thiols like glutathione may serve as reducing cofactors in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and protect NO from inactivation by radical oxygen species. Depletion of thiol compounds reduces NO-mediated vascular effects in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms underlying these actions are not clear...... superoxide anion (O2.-) production in conscious chronically catheterized rats. Thiol depletion induced by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, 1 g i.p. within 24 h) decreased the hypotensive effect of Ach by 30% (MAP reduction before BSO 27 +/- 3 mmHg, 19 +/- 3 mmHg after BSO, (mean +/- SEM), p

  13. Evidence for a Role of Vascular Endothelium in the Control of Arterial Wall Viscosity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Frederic; Iacob, Michele; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Bellien, Jeremy; Joannides, Robinson

    2018-01-01

    Arterial wall viscosity (AWV) is a major cause of energy dissipation along the arterial tree. Its determinants remain controversial but an active endothelial regulation has been suggested. Our objective was to assess in humans the physiological role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and the effect of modulating smooth muscle tone in the regulation of AWV. We simultaneously measured radial artery diameter, wall thickness, and arterial pressure in healthy volunteers during the local infusion of inhibitors of NO-synthase ( N G -monomethyl-l-arginine), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids synthesis by cytochrome P450 (fluconazole), the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids cellular targets calcium-activated potassium channels (tetraethylammonium), alone and in combination. AWV was estimated from the relative viscosity expressed as the ratio of the area of the hysteresis loop of the pressure-diameter relationship to the area under the loading phase. Arterial tone was assessed by measuring change in wall stiffness and midwall stress. N G -monomethyl-l-arginine paradoxically reduced relative viscosity (34.9±8.9%-28.9±8.6%). Conversely, relative viscosity was not modified by fluconazole (33.5±15.5%-32.0±13.6%) but increased by tetraethylammonium (31.7±6.6%-35.7±8.0%). This increase was more marked with N G -monomethyl-l-arginine+fluconazole (31.1±10.7%-43.3±13.2%) and N G -monomethyl-l-arginine+tetraethylammonium (29.5±2.3%-41.5±11.1%) compared with inhibitors alone. Sodium nitroprusside decreased AWV (35.4±2.9%-28.7±2.0%). These effects were associated with parallel change in tone but of different magnitude for similar variations in viscosity, suggesting tone-dependent and independent mechanisms. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that the endothelial factors, NO and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, regulate AWV in humans and support the role of arterial tone in this regulation. URL: https://eudract.ema.europa.eu. Unique identifier: RCB2007-A

  14. Microparticle-Induced Activation of the Vascular Endothelium Requires Caveolin-1/Caveolae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Andrews

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are small membrane fragments shed from normal as well as activated, apoptotic or injured cells. Emerging evidence implicates MPs as a causal and/or contributing factor in altering normal vascular cell phenotype through initiation of proinflammatory signal transduction events and paracrine delivery of proteins, mRNA and miRNA. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which MPs influence these events. Caveolae are important membrane microdomains that function as centers of signal transduction and endocytosis. Here, we tested the concept that the MP-induced pro-inflammatory phenotype shift in endothelial cells (ECs depends on caveolae. Consistent with previous reports, MP challenge activated ECs as evidenced by upregulation of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression. ICAM-1 upregulation was mediated by activation of NF-κB, Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. This response was absent in ECs lacking caveolin-1/caveolae. To test whether caveolae-mediated endocytosis, a dynamin-2 dependent process, is a feature of the proinflammatory response, EC's were pretreated with the dynamin-2 inhibitor dynasore. Similar to observations in cells lacking caveolin-1, inhibition of endocytosis significantly attenuated MPs effects including, EGFR phosphorylation, activation of NF-κB and upregulation of ICAM-1 expression. Thus, our results indicate that caveolae play a role in mediating the pro-inflammatory signaling pathways which lead to EC activation in response to MPs.

  15. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph; Bernatchez, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. ► Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. ► Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  16. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin-Hee Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  17. Malaria and Vascular Endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Aristóteles Comte Filho de, E-mail: aristoteles.caf@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de [Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu (Unesp), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients with infectious and parasitic diseases can result from both intrinsic mechanisms of the disease and drug intervention. Malaria is an example, considering that the endothelial injury by Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes can cause circulatory disorders. This is a literature review aimed at discussing the relationship between malaria and endothelial impairment, especially its effects on the cardiovascular system. We discuss the implications of endothelial aggression and the interdisciplinarity that should guide the malaria patient care, whose acute infection can contribute to precipitate or aggravate a preexisting heart disease.

  18. Soluble adenylyl cyclase in vascular endothelium: gene expression control of epithelial sodium channel-α, Na+/K+-ATPase-α/β, and mineralocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; Nedele, Johanna; Guske, Katrin; Maase, Martina; Lenders, Malte; Schelleckes, Michael; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2014-04-01

    The Ca(2+)- and bicarbonate-activated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) has been identified recently as an important mediator of aldosterone signaling in the kidney. Nuclear sAC has been reported to stimulate cAMP response element-binding protein 1 phosphorylation via protein kinase A, suggesting an alternative cAMP pathway in the nucleus. In this study, we analyzed the sAC as a potential modulator of endothelial stiffness in the vascular endothelium. We determined the contribution of sAC to cAMP response element-mediated transcriptional activation in vascular endothelial cells and kidney collecting duct cells. Inhibition of sAC by the specific inhibitor KH7 significantly reduced cAMP response element-mediated promoter activity and affected cAMP response element-binding protein 1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, KH7 and anti-sAC small interfering RNA significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of epithelial sodium channel-α and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-α. Using atomic force microscopy, a nano-technique that measures stiffness and deformability of living cells, we detected significant endothelial cell softening after sAC inhibition. Our results suggest that the sAC is a regulator of gene expression involved in aldosterone signaling and an important regulator of endothelial stiffness. Additional studies are warranted to investigate the protective action of sAC inhibitors in humans for potential clinical use.

  19. Apollo Lunar Astronauts Show Higher Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: Possible Deep Space Radiation Effects on the Vascular Endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Michael D; Charvat, Jacqueline M; Limoli, Charles L; Globus, Ruth K; Ghosh, Payal

    2016-07-28

    As multiple spacefaring nations contemplate extended manned missions to Mars and the Moon, health risks could be elevated as travel goes beyond the Earth's protective magnetosphere into the more intense deep space radiation environment. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether mortality rates due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, accidents and all other causes of death differ in (1) astronauts who never flew orbital missions in space, (2) astronauts who flew only in low Earth orbit (LEO), and (3) Apollo lunar astronauts, the only humans to have traveled beyond Earth's magnetosphere. Results show there were no differences in CVD mortality rate between non-flight (9%) and LEO (11%) astronauts. However, the CVD mortality rate among Apollo lunar astronauts (43%) was 4-5 times higher than in non-flight and LEO astronauts. To test a possible mechanistic basis for these findings, a secondary purpose was to determine the long-term effects of simulated weightlessness and space-relevant total-body irradiation on vascular responsiveness in mice. The results demonstrate that space-relevant irradiation induces a sustained vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. Such impairment is known to lead to occlusive artery disease, and may be an important risk factor for CVD among astronauts exposed to deep space radiation.

  20. Vascular endothelium derived endothelin-1 is required for normal heart function after chronic pressure overload in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susi Heiden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 participates in the pathophysiology of heart failure. The reasons for the lack of beneficial effect of endothelin antagonists in heart failure patients remain however speculative. The anti-apoptotic properties of ET-1 on cardiomyocytes could be a reasonable explanation. We therefore hypothesized that blocking the pro-apoptotic TNF-α pathway using pentoxifylline could prevent the deleterious effect of the lack of ET-1 in a model for heart failure. METHODS: We performed transaortic constriction (TAC in vascular endothelial cells specific ET-1 deficient (VEETKO and wild type (WT mice (n = 5-9 and treated them with pentoxifylline for twelve weeks. RESULTS: TAC induced a cardiac hypertrophy in VEETKO and WT mice but a reduction of fractional shortening could be detected by echocardiography in VEETKO mice only. Cardiomyocyte diameter was significantly increased by TAC in VEETKO mice only. Pentoxifylline treatment prevented cardiac hypertrophy and reduction of fractional shortening in VEETKO mice but decreased fractional shortening in WT mice. Collagen deposition and number of apoptotic cells remained stable between the groups as did TNF-α, caspase-3 and caspase-8 messenger RNA expression levels. TAC surgery enhanced ANP, BNP and bcl2 expression. Pentoxifylline treatment reduced expression levels of BNP, bcl2 and bax. CONCLUSIONS: Lack of endothelial ET-1 worsened the impact of TAC-induced pressure overload on cardiac function, indicating the crucial role of ET-1 for normal cardiac function under stress. Moreover, we put in light a TNF-α-independent beneficial effect of pentoxifylline in the VEETKO mice suggesting a therapeutic potential for pentoxifylline in a subpopulation of heart failure patients at higher risk.

  1. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule Are Induced by Ionizing Radiation on Lymphatic Endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, María E., E-mail: mrruiz@unav.es [Division of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Radiation Oncology, University Clinic, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Garasa, Saray; Rodriguez, Inmaculada [Division of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Solorzano, Jose Luis; Barbes, Benigno [Radiation Oncology, University Clinic, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Yanguas, Alba [Division of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Teijeira, Alvaro; Etxeberria, Iñaki [Division of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Aristu, José Javier [Radiation Oncology, University Clinic, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Halin, Cornelia [Pharmaceutical Immunology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Melero, Ignacio [Division of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Radiation Oncology, University Clinic, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Rouzaut, Ana [Division of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The goal of this study was to assess the effects of ionizing radiation on the expression of the integrin ligands ICAM-1 and VCAM that control leucocyte transit by lymphatic endothelial cells. Materials/Methods: Confluent monolayers of primary human lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) were irradiated with single dose of 2, 5, 10 or 20 Gy, with 6 MeV-x-rays using a Linear-Accelerator. ICAM-1 and VCAM expression was determined by flow cytometry. Human tissue specimens received a single dose of 20 Gy with 15 MeV-x-rays. MC38, B16-OVA or B16-VEGF-C tumors grown in C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with single dose of 20Gy using a Linear-Accelerator fitted with a 10mm Radiosurgery collimator. Clinical samples were obtained from patients previous and 4 weeks after complete standard radiotherapy. ICAM-1 and VCAM expression was detected in all tissue specimens by confocal microscopy. To understand the role of TGFβ in this process anti-TGFβ blocking mAb were injected i.p. 30min before radiotherapy. Cell adhesion to irradiated LEC was analyzed in adhesion experiments performed in the presence or in the absence of anti- TGFβ and /or anti-ICAM1 blocking mAb. Results: We demonstrate that lymphatic endothelial cells in tumor samples experience induction of surface ICAM-1 and VCAM when exposed to ionizing radiation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These effects can be recapitulated in cultured LEC, and are in part mediated by TGFβ. These data are consistent with increases in ICAM-1 and VCAM expression on LYVE-1+ endothelial cells in freshly explanted human tumor tissue and in mouse transplanted tumors after radiotherapy. Finally, ICAM-1 and VCAM expression accounts for enhanced adherence of human T lymphocytes to irradiated LEC. Conclusion: Our results show induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM on LVs in irradiated lesions and offer a starting point for elucidating the biological and therapeutic implications of targeting leukocyte traffic in combination to

  2. A vascular mechanistic approach to understanding Raynaud phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavahan, Nicholas A

    2015-03-01

    During exposure to cold, our bodies attempt to maintain normal core temperature by restricting heat loss through cutaneous vasoconstriction, and by increasing heat production through shivering and nonshivering thermogenesis. In selected areas of human skin (including on the fingers and toes), the vascular system has specialized structural and functional features that enable it to contribute to thermoregulation. These features include arteriovenous anastomoses, which directly connect the arterial and venous systems and bypass the nutritional capillaries supplying blood to the skin tissue. Of note, Raynaud phenomenon predominantly affects the arterial territories supplying these specialized areas of skin. Indeed, Raynaud phenomenon can be considered a disorder of vascular thermoregulatory control. This Review presents an understanding of Raynaud phenomenon in the context of vascular and thermoregulatory control mechanisms, including the role of unique thermosensitive vascular structural and functional specialization, and describes the potential role of thermogenesis in this disorder. This new approach provides remarkable insight into the disease process and builds a framework to critically appraise the existing knowledge base. This paradigm also explains the deficiencies in some current therapeutic approaches, and highlights new areas of potential relevance to the pathogenesis and treatment of Raynaud phenomenon that should be expanded and explored.

  3. Recent Advances in Understanding Audiovestibular Loss of a Vascular Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Acute audiovestibular loss is characterized by abrupt onset of prolonged (lasting days) vertigo and hearing loss. Acute ischemic stroke in the distribution of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) is known to be the leading cause of acute audiovestibular loss. So far, eight subgroups of AICA territory infarction have been identified according to the patterns of audiovestibular dysfunctions, among which the most common pattern is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Unlike inner ear dysfunction of a viral cause, which can commonly present as an isolated vestibular (i.e., vestibular neuritis) or cochlear loss (i.e., sudden deafness), labyrinthine dysfunction of a vascular cause rarely results in isolated loss of vestibular or auditory function. As audiovestibular loss may precede the central symptoms or signs of an ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation, early diagnosis and proper management of audiovestiubular loss may provide a window to prevent the progression of infarction to larger areas of the posterior circulation. A clinician should consider the possibility that acute audiovestibular loss may herald impending AICA territory infarction, especially when patients have basilar artery occlusive disease close to the origin of the AICA on brain MRA. This review aims to highlight the recent advances in understanding audiovestibular loss of a vascular cause and to address its clinical significance.

  4. How does spa treatment affect cardiovascular function and vascular endothelium in patients with generalized osteoarthritis? A pilot study through plasma asymmetric di-methyl arginine (ADMA) and L-arginine/ADMA ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Fatih; Ozkuk, Kagan; Seringec Karabulut, Serap; Bekpinar, Seldag; Karagulle, Mufit Zeki; Erdogan, Nergis

    2017-12-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of spa treatment on vascular endothelium and clinical symptoms of generalized osteoarthritis. Forty generalized osteoarthritis (GOA) patients referred to a government spa hospital, and 40 GOA patients followed on university hospital locomotor system disease ambulatory clinics were included as study and control groups, respectively. Study group received spa treatment including thermal water baths, physical therapy modalities, and exercises. Control group was followed with home exercises for 15 days. Plasma ADMA, L-arginine, L-arginine/ADMA ratio, routine blood analyses, 6-min walking test, including fingertip O2 saturation, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and pulse rate, were measured at the beginning and at the end of treatment. Groups were evaluated with VAS pain, patient, and physician global assessment; HAQ; and WOMAC at the beginning, at the end, and after 1 month of treatment. In study group, L-arginine and L-arginine/ADMA ratio showed statistically significant increase after treatment. Plasma ADMA levels did not change. There is no significant difference in intergroup comparison. Study group displayed statistically significant improvements in all clinical parameters. The study showed that spa treatment does not cause any harm to the vascular endothelium through ADMA. Significant increase in plasma L-arginine and L-arginine/ADMA ratio suggests that balneotherapy may play a preventive role on cardiovascular diseases. Balneotherapy provides meaningful improvements on clinical parameters of GOA.

  5. Role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarization in the vasodilatation of rat intrarenal arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinilla, Estéfano; Sánchez-Pina, Ana; Muñoz Picos, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Endothelium-dependent vasodilation plays an important role in the regulation of vascular tone in different vascular beds. Besides the release of prostacyclin (PGI2) and nitric oxide (NO), the endothelium mediates vasodilation through endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (...

  6. Análise do efeito imediato do jato de CO2 sobre o endotélio vascular de caprinos Analyses of the immediate effect of CO2 flow on vascular endothelium in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eucário Leite Monteiro Alves

    2006-09-01

    : Thirty-six male goats were submitted to a surgical procedure. Histological analysis was carried out using the immunoperoxidase reaction to mark the endothelium through the detection of VIII Coagulation Factor. Measurement was made by Quantimet following the Ip scale for vascular injury. RESULTS: Within control groups, with and without humidification, both for AIVA and LITA, there was no endothelial injury. The flow rate of 5 L/min provoked moderately significant endothelial injury of the AIVA without humidification, whereas with humidification the endothelial injury was seen but without statistical significance. The flow rate of 5 L/min, with or without humidification, provoked insignificant endothelial injury at LITA. With a flow rate of 10 L/min, there was highly significant endothelial injury, both for the LITA and AIVA and whether humidified or not. CONCLUSION: In conclusion endothelial injury is flow-dependent with greater injury when using CO2 at a flow rate of 10 L/min and less at 5 L/min. The arteries involved in anastomosis (LITA and AIVA are both affected, but there is a greater effect on the AIVA.

  7. Soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R) mediates colonic tumor cell adherence to the vascular endothelium: a mechanism for metastatic initiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowdall, J F

    2012-02-03

    The mechanisms by which surgery increases metastatic proliferation remain poorly characterized, although endotoxin and immunocytes play a role. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial adherence of tumor cells may be important in the formation of metastases. Soluble receptors of interleukin-6 (sIL-6R) shed by activated neutrophils exert IL-6 effects on endothelial cells, which are unresponsive under normal circumstances. This study examined the hypothesis that sIL-6R released by surgical stress increases tumor cell adherence to the endothelium. Neutrophils (PMN) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Soluble IL-6R release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Colonic tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein and endothelial cells were exposed to sIL-6R, and tumor cell adherence and transmigration were measured by fluorescence microscopy. Basal release of sIL-6R from PMN was 44.7 +\\/- 8.2 pg\\/ml at 60 min. This was significantly increased by endotoxin and CRP (131 +\\/- 16.8 and 84.1 +\\/- 5.3, respectively; both P < 0.05). However, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not significantly alter sIL-6R release. Endothelial and tumor cell exposure to sIL-6R increased tumor cell adherence by 71.3% within 2 h but did not significantly increase transmigration, even at 6 h. Mediators of surgical stress induce neutrophil release of a soluble receptor for IL-6 that enhances colon cancer cell endothelial adherence. Since adherence to the endothelium is now considered to be a key event in metastatic genesis, these findings have important implications for colon cancer treatment strategies.

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  9. Endothelium-independent and endothelium-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This endothelium-independent relaxant effect was also sensitive to combination of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazole-[4,3-á]-quinoxalin- 1-one (ODQ, 10 ìM, soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) and N-[2-(p-Bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline sulfonamide dihydrochloride (H89, 100 nM, Protein Kinase A inhibitor). Taken together ...

  10. Ultrastructural changes of endothelium associated with thrombocytopenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchens, C.S.; Weiss, L.

    1975-10-01

    In a study of the relationship between thrombocytopenia and increased vascular fragility, changes in the endothelium of capillaries and postcapillary venules of the tongue were examined by electron microscopy. Adult male albino rabbits (4 kg) were maintained thrombocytopenic (platelets <20,000/cu mm) up to 24 hr by one to three injections of guinea pig antirabbit platelet serum. Within 6 hr the normal projections and folds of the lumenal surface of the endothelial surface were largely effaced. In addition, the endothelium became thinner. In places, pores and membranous diaphragms were observed. Endothelial junctions appeared normal. Identical findings were observed if rabbits were made thrombocytopenic by administration of intraperitoneal busulfan. Intravenously administered Thorotrast was observed in endothelial cells and in the extravascular spaces within 3 min after injection into thrombocytopenic animals, while it was seen only intravascularly in control rabbits. With the spontaneous restoration of circulating platelets, the endothelium reverted to normal.

  11. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitric oxide: Orchestrator of endothelium-dependent responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Félétou, Michel; Köhler, Ralf; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The present review first summarizes the complex chain of events, in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, that leads to endothelium-dependent relaxations (vasodilatations) due to the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and how therapeutic...... interventions may improve the bioavailability of NO and thus prevent/cure endothelial dysfunction. Then, the role of other endothelium-derived mediators (endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing (EDHF) and contracting (EDCF) factors, endothelin-1) and signals (myoendothelial coupling) is summarized also...

  13. The vascular phenotype in pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related disorders: Contribution of a genetic disease to the understanding of vascular calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eLeftheriotis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is a complex and dynamic process occurring in various physiological conditions such as aging and exercise or in acquired metabolic disorders like diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Arterial calcifications are also observed in several genetic diseases revealing the important role of unbalanced or defective anti- or pro-calcifying factors. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE is an inherited disease (OMIM 264800 characterized by elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft conjunctive tissues including the skin, eyes and arterial media. The PXE disease results from mutations in the ABCC6 gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter primarily expressed in the liver, kidneys suggesting that it is a prototypic metabolic soft-tissue calcifying disease of genetic origin. The clinical expression of the PXE arterial disease is characterized by an increased risk for coronary (myocardial infarction, cerebral (aneurysm and stroke and lower limb peripheral artery disease. However, the structural and functional changes in the arterial wall induced by PXE are still unexplained. The use of a recombinant mouse model inactivated for the Abcc6 gene is an important tool for the understanding of the PXE pathophysiology although the vascular impact in this model remains limited to date. Overlapping of the PXE phenotype with other inherited calcifying diseases could bring important informations to our comprehension of the PXE disease.

  14. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor: basic review and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, R A

    1991-02-01

    EDRF is a potent, endogenous vasodilator that is produced and released from endothelial cells and subsequently causes the relaxation of VSM through the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and an increase in VSM cyclic GMP. Structurally, EDRF is likely to be NO or a related nitrogen oxide-containing compound. It is synthesized in endothelial and other cell types from L-arginine by a calcium-calmodulin and NADPH-dependent enzyme. Its action is very similar to the nitrovasodilators that act directly on VSM. EDRF is present in all vascular beds, large and small vessels, and in a wide range of species. Its role in human vascular physiology and pathophysiology is just beginning to be understood. EDRF is a potent endogenous vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation and adhesion. Its activity is impaired in hypertension and atherosclerosis, and its absence due to endothelial damage may play a role in cerebral and coronary vasospasm. It is a mediator of flow-dependent vasodilation, and its inhibition by hypoxia may contribute to the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor response. Endothelial cell damage and impairment of EDRF production may also contribute to acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension. A further understanding of the chemical nature and synthetic pathways of EDRF should lead to the production of analogs and antagonists, which may play an important role in future treatments for atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, angina, hypertension, and other vascular diseases. The recent realization that EDRF serves as the second messenger for guanylate cyclase activation and cyclic GMP production in a variety of cell types outside of the cardiovascular system, including renal and respiratory epithelium, cerebellar neurons, macrophages, and adrenocytes, suggests even broader implications. The importance of EDRF to the anesthesiologist may go beyond an understanding of its role in cardiovascular physiological and pathophysiological states. Initial studies have

  15. Human obesity and endothelium-dependent responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an ongoing worldwide epidemic. Besides being a medical condition in itself, obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to stem from multiple abnormalities in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, disrupt vascular homeostasis by causing an imbalance between the NO pathway and the endothelin 1 system, with impaired insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that the vascular dysfunction of obesity is not just limited to the endothelium, but also involves the other layers of the vessel wall. In particular, obesity-related changes in medial smooth muscle cells seem to disrupt the physiological facilitatory action of insulin on the responsiveness to vasodilator stimuli, whereas the adventitia and perivascular fat appear to be a source of pro-inflammatory and vasoactive factors that may contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction, and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. While obesity-induced vascular dysfunction appears to be reversible, at least in part, with weight control strategies, these have not proved sufficient to prevent the metabolic and cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. While a number of currently available drugs have shown potentially beneficial vascular effects in patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome, elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular damage in obese patients is necessary to identify additional pharmacologic targets to prevent the cardiovascular complications of obesity, and their human and economic costs. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21895631

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide and Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Bełtowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, synthesized enzymatically from l-cysteine or l-homocysteine, is the third gasotransmitter in mammals. Endogenous H2S is involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, including vascular tone. Although initially it was suggested that in the vascular wall H2S is synthesized only by smooth muscle cells and relaxes them by activating ATP-sensitive potassium channels, more recent studies indicate that H2S is synthesized in endothelial cells as well. Endothelial H2S production is stimulated by many factors, including acetylcholine, shear stress, adipose tissue hormone leptin, estrogens and plant flavonoids. In some vascular preparations H2S plays a role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by activating small and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. Endothelial H2S signaling is up-regulated in some pathologies, such as obesity and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. In addition, H2S activates endothelial NO synthase and inhibits cGMP degradation by phosphodiesterase 5 thus potentiating the effect of NO-cGMP pathway. Moreover, H2S-derived polysulfides directly activate protein kinase G. Finally, H2S interacts with NO to form nitroxyl (HNO—a potent vasorelaxant. H2S appears to play an important and multidimensional role in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

  17. Influence of endothelium on the membrane-stabilizing effect of calcium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These relaxation responses were attenuated in endothelium-denuded rings as well as following exposure to methylene blue. Conclusion: The results show that relaxation responses induced by high Ca2+ due to membrane stabilization is endothelium-dependent. Keywords: Calcium, rabbit aorta, Vascular smooth muscle, ...

  18. Endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félétou, Michel; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin but also by other pathways causing hyperpolarization of the underlying smooth muscle cells. This characteristic was at the origin of the denomination endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). We know now that this acronym includes different mechanisms. In general, EDHF-mediated responses involve an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration, the opening of calcium-activated potassium channels of small and intermediate conductance and the hyperpolarization of the endothelial cells. This results in an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells, which can be evoked by direct electrical coupling through myo-endothelial junctions and/or the accumulation of potassium ions in the intercellular space. Potassium ions hyperpolarize the smooth muscle cells by activating inward rectifying potassium channels and/or Na+/K(+)-ATPase. In some blood vessels, including large and small coronary arteries, the endothelium releases arachidonic acid metabolites derived from cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EET) generated are not only intracellular messengers but also can diffuse and hyperpolarize the smooth muscle cells by activating large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. Additionally, the endothelium can produce other factors such as lipoxygenases derivatives or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These different mechanisms are not necessarily exclusive and can occur simultaneously.

  19. The Role of the Endothelium in HPS Pathogenesis and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gavrilovskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available American hantaviruses cause a highly lethal acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. Hantaviruses nonlytically infect endothelial cells and cause dramatic changes in barrier functions of the endothelium without disrupting the endothelium. Instead hantaviruses cause changes in the function of infected endothelial cells that normally regulate fluid barrier functions of capillaries. The endothelium of arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels is unique and central to the function of vast pulmonary capillary beds, which regulate pulmonary fluid accumulation. The endothelium maintains vascular barrier functions through a complex series of redundant receptors and signaling pathways that serve to both permit fluid and immune cell efflux into tissues and restrict tissue edema. Infection of the endothelium provides several mechanisms for hantaviruses to alter capillary permeability but also defines potential therapeutic targets for regulating acute pulmonary edema and HPS disease. Here we discuss interactions of HPS causing hantaviruses with the endothelium, potential endothelial cell-directed permeability mechanisms, and therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of HPS disease.

  20. The role of endothelium and endogenous vasoactive substances in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsovolis, G; Kallaras, K

    2010-04-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are great challenges for the doctors who treat critically ill patients. A big part of the scientific community is performing researches about the pathophysiology and treatment of this clinical problem. The endothelium has a very significant role in the alterations that sepsis causes especially to the circulatory system. The disorders of the normal function of the endothelium include derangement of the vascular tone, increase of endothelium permeability, activation of the endothelial cells, production of various regulators and disorders of coagulation. Nitric oxide is the modulator that mediates the action of most vasodilators. The overproduction of nitric oxide during sepsis is possibly the most important cause of the vasopressor-resistant hypotension which characterizes septic shock. The levels of natriuretic peptides are also increased. These peptides act through several ways on the circulatory system both peripherally and directly on the myocardium. Endothelin, vasopressin, adrenomedullin and prostacyclin are vasoactive substances that have their own role in the regulation of the circulatory system during sepsis.

  1. Identification of a potent endothelium-derived angiogenic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankowski, Vera; Tölle, Markus; Tran, Thi Nguyet Anh

    2013-01-01

    -time comparison. Beside a strong angiogenic effect on the yolk sac membrane and the developing rat embryo itself, Up4U increased the proliferation rate of endothelial cells and, in the presence of PDGF, of vascular smooth muscle cells. Up4U stimulated the migration rate of endothelial cells via P2Y2-receptors......The secretion of angiogenic factors by vascular endothelial cells is one of the key mechanisms of angiogenesis. Here we report on the isolation of a new potent angiogenic factor, diuridine tetraphosphate (Up4U) from the secretome of human endothelial cells. The angiogenic effect of the endothelial...... sufficient to induce angiogenic and proliferative effects (1.34 ± 0.26 nmol L(-1)). In conclusion, Up4U is a novel strong human endothelium-derived angiogenic factor....

  2. Vascular branches from cutaneous nerve of the forearm and hand: application to better understanding raynaud's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, K; Ohmichi, M; Ohmichi, Y; Yakura, T; Hammer, N; Mizuno, D; Naito, M; Nakano, T

    2017-09-29

    Cutaneous nerves have branches called vascular branches (VBs) that reach arteries. VBs are thought to be involved in arterial constriction, and this is the rationale for periarterial sympathectomy as a treatment option for Raynaud's disease. However, the branching patterns and distribution areas of the VBs remain largely unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anatomical structures of the VBs of the cutaneous nerves. Forty hands and forearms were examined to assess the branching patterns and distribution areas of the VBs of the superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN), the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LACN), the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN), and the palmar cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (PCUN). VBs reaching the radial and ulnar arteries were observed in all specimens. The branching patterns were classified into six types. The mean distance between the radial styloid process and the point where the VBs reached the radial artery was 34.3 ± 4.8 mm in the SBRN and 38.5 ± 15.8 mm in the LACN. The mean distance between the ulnar styloid process and the point where the VBs reached the ulnar artery was 60.3 ± 25.9 mm in the MACN and 43.8 ± 26.0 mm in the PCUN. This study showed that the VBs of the cutaneous nerves have diverse branching patterns. The VBs of the SBRN had a more limited distribution areas than those of the other nerves. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nanotherapy for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: Targeting senile endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Joseph S

    2018-01-01

    Due to the complexity of Alzheimer's disease, multiple cellular types need to be targeted simultaneously in order for a given therapy to demonstrate any major effectiveness. Ultrasound-sensitive coated microbubbles (in a targeted lipid nanoemulsion) are available. Versatile small molecule drug(s) targeting multiple pathways of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis are known. By incorporating such drug(s) into the targeted "lipid-coated microbubble" [LCM]/"nanoparticle-derived" [ND] (or LCM/ND) nanoemulsion type, one obtains a multitasking combination therapeutic for translational medicine. This multitasking therapeutic targets cell-surface scavenger receptors (mainly class B type I), or SR-BI, making possible for various Alzheimer's-related cell types to be simultaneously searched out for localized drug treatment in vivo. Besides targeting cell-surface SR-BI, the proposed LCM/ND-nanoemulsion combination therapeutic(s) include a characteristic lipid-coated microbubble [LCM] subpopulation (i.e., a stable LCM suspension); such film-stabilized microbubbles are well known to substantially reduce the acoustic power levels needed for accomplishing temporary noninvasive (transcranial) ultrasound treatment, or sonoporation, if additionally desired for the Alzheimer's patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. PP064. Total vascular resistances in early pregnancy: A key to understand abnormal cardiovascular adaptation associated with spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Damiano; Scala, Roberta Licia; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Gagliardi, Giulia; Novelli, Gian Paolo; Vasapollo, Barbara; Valensise, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    From early pregnancy, maternal hemodynamic profile begins to change. The absence of these changes leads to increased risk of complication during the gestation. Aim of this study is to understand in early pregnancy the behaviour of total vascular resistances (TVR) as a sign of maternal cardiovascular adaptation to pregnancy. A cross section study was conducted. We followed 160 healthy women with singleton pregnancy during the first trimester of gestation. We evaluated cardiac output (CO) and TVR at 7, 9 and 11 weeks of gestation. We obtained the following haemodynamic measurements with the USCOM system, a non invasive method: heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), CO and TVR. 160 healthy pregnant women were selected, 8 patients, were excluded for a bad signal. Absolute values of the haemodynamic measures are shown in Fig. 1. 41 patients underwent spontaneous embryonic demise. This last group of patients showed in 54% (group A) TVR values within the normal limits (TVR1200) and CO values below the normal adaptation to pregnancy. Table 1 shows hemodynamic measures for the group A and group B; we found differences in term of CO, TVR and PAS between the two groups. Elevated TVR might indicate an abnormal vascular adaptation already in first weeks of pregnancy. Moreover, in women who undergo to abortion, elevated TVR could be use to distinguish genetic or environmental causes of miscarriage. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Human urotensin-II is an endothelium-dependent vasodilator in rat small arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Fiona E; Douglas, Stephen A; Hiley, C Robin; White, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The possible role of the endothelium in modulating responses to human urotensin-II (U-II) was investigated using isolated segments of rat thoracic aorta, small mesenteric artery, left anterior descending coronary artery and basilar artery.Human U-II was a potent vasoconstrictor of endothelium-intact isolated rat thoracic aorta (EC50=3.5±1.1 nM, Rmax=103±10% of control contraction induced by 60 mM KCl and 1 μM noradrenaline). However the contractile response was not significantly altered by removal of the endothelium or inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with L-NAME (100 μM). Human U-II did not cause relaxation of noradrenaline-precontracted, endothelium-intact rat aortae.Human U-II contracted endothelium-intact rat isolated left anterior descending coronary arteries (EC50=1.3±0.8 nM, Rmax=20.1±4.9% of control contraction induced by 10 μM 5-HT). The contractile response was significantly enhanced by removal of the endothelium (Rmax=55.4±16.1%). Moreover, human U-II caused concentration-dependent relaxation of 5-HT-precontracted arteries, which was abolished by L-NAME or removal of the endothelium.No contractile effects of human U-II were found in rat small mesenteric arteries. However the peptide caused potent, concentration- and endothelium-dependent relaxations of methoxamine-precontracted vessels. The relaxant responses were potentiated by L-NAME (300 μM) but abolished in the additional presence of 25 mM KCl (which inhibits the actions of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor).The present study is the first to show that human U-II is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator in some rat resistance vessels, and acts through release of EDHF as well as nitric oxide. Our findings have also highlighted clear anatomical differences in the responses of different vascular beds to human U-II which are likely to be important in determining the overall cardiovascular activity of this peptide. PMID:10952676

  6. Vascular Response of Ruthenium Tetraamines in Aortic Ring from Normotensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Conceição-Vertamatti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ruthenium (Ru tetraamines are being increasingly used as nitric oxide (NO carriers. In this context, pharmacological studies have become highly relevant to better understand the mechanism of action involved. Objective: To evaluate the vascular response of the tetraamines trans-[RuII(NH34(Py(NO]3+, trans-[RuII(Cl(NO (cyclan](PF62, and trans-[RuII(NH34(4-acPy(NO]3+. Methods: Aortic rings were contracted with noradrenaline (10−6 M. After voltage stabilization, a single concentration (10−6 M of the compounds was added to the assay medium. The responses were recorded during 120 min. Vascular integrity was assessed functionally using acetylcholine at 10−6 M and sodium nitroprusside at 10−6 M as well as by histological examination. Results: Histological analysis confirmed the presence or absence of endothelial cells in those tissues. All tetraamine complexes altered the contractile response induced by norepinephrine, resulting in increased tone followed by relaxation. In rings with endothelium, the inhibition of endothelial NO caused a reduction of the contractile effect caused by pyridine NO. No significant responses were observed in rings with endothelium after treatment with cyclan NO. In contrast, in rings without endothelium, the inhibition of guanylate cyclase significantly reduced the contractile response caused by the pyridine NO and cyclan NO complexes, and both complexes caused a relaxing effect. Conclusion: The results indicate that the vascular effect of the evaluated complexes involved a decrease in the vascular tone induced by norepinephrine (10−6 M at the end of the incubation period in aortic rings with and without endothelium, indicating the slow release of NO from these complexes and suggesting that the ligands promoted chemical stability to the molecule. Moreover, we demonstrated that the association of Ru with NO is more stable when the ligands pyridine and cyclan are used in the formulation of the compound.

  7. Alternative RNA splicing in the endothelium mediated in part by Rbfox2 regulates the arterial response to low flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butty, Vincent L; Boutz, Paul L; Begum, Shahinoor; Kimble, Amy L; Sharp, Phillip A; Burge, Christopher B

    2018-01-01

    Low and disturbed blood flow drives the progression of arterial diseases including atherosclerosis and aneurysms. The endothelial response to flow and its interactions with recruited platelets and leukocytes determine disease progression. Here, we report widespread changes in alternative splicing of pre-mRNA in the flow-activated murine arterial endothelium in vivo. Alternative splicing was suppressed by depletion of platelets and macrophages recruited to the arterial endothelium under low and disturbed flow. Binding motifs for the Rbfox-family are enriched adjacent to many of the regulated exons. Endothelial deletion of Rbfox2, the only family member expressed in arterial endothelium, suppresses a subset of the changes in transcription and RNA splicing induced by low flow. Our data reveal an alternative splicing program activated by Rbfox2 in the endothelium on recruitment of platelets and macrophages and demonstrate its relevance in transcriptional responses during flow-driven vascular inflammation. PMID:29293084

  8. The Role of the Endothelium during Antibody-Mediated Rejection: From Victim to Accomplice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Rachael Cross

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR of solid organ transplants is characterized by the activation and injury of the allograft endothelium. Histological and transcriptomic studies have associated microvascular inflammation and endothelial lesions with the severity of rejection and poor graft outcomes. The allograft endothelium forms the physical barrier between the donor organ and the recipient; this position directly exposes the endothelium to alloimmune responses. However, endothelial cells are not just victims and can actively participate in the pathogenesis of rejection. In healthy tissues, the endothelium plays a major role in vascular and immune homeostasis. Organ transplantation, however, subjects the endothelium to an environment of inflammation, alloreactive lymphocytes, donor-specific antibodies, and potentially complement activation. As a result, endothelial cells become activated and have modified interactions with the cellular effectors of allograft damage: lymphocytes, natural killer, and myeloid cells. Activated endothelial cells participate in leukocyte adhesion and recruitment, lymphocyte activation and differentiation, as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Ultimately, highly activated endothelial cells promote pro-inflammatory alloresponses and become accomplices to AMR.

  9. Cytoskeleton, cytoskeletal interactions, and vascular endothelial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jingli Wang,1 Michael E Widlansky1,21Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine Division, 2Department of Pharmacology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Far from being inert, the vascular endothelium is a critical regulator of vascular function. While the endothelium participates in autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine signaling, it also transduces mechanical signals from the cell surface involving key cell structural elements. In this review, we discuss the structure of the vascular endothelium and its relationship to traditional cardiovascular risk factors and clinical cardiovascular events. Further, we review the emerging evidence that cell structural elements, including the glycocalyx, intercellular junctions, and cytoskeleton elements, help the endothelium to communicate with its environment to regulate vascular function, including vessel permeability and signal transduction via nitric oxide bioavailability. Further work is necessary to better delineate the regulatory relationships between known key regulators of vascular function and endothelial cell structural elements.Keywords: endothelium, shear stress, eNOS, cardiovascular risk factors, glycocalyx

  10. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M.; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26590911

  12. NF1 Signal Transduction and Vascular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    the effects of losing a second allele of NF1 in the vascular endothelium of the adult mouse. This will be the first model of NF1 loss in the... adult endothelium and can serve as a model system for investigation of both cardiovascular effects and the tumor microenvironment. Body: Aim 1...would be to try and determine if there were defects in TGF-b signaling (Smad activation/EndMT) prior to doing a wholesale catalog of all the

  13. Effect of hypoxia on endothelium-dependent relaxation of canine and rabbit basilar arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, T; Kassell, N F; Sasaki, T; Hongo, K; Fujiwara, S; Lehman, R M; Vollmer, D G

    1989-01-01

    An important role of endothelium-dependent relaxation in the local regulation of vascular tone has been suggested. In the present study, the effect of hypoxia on endothelium-dependent relaxation was investigated in canine and rabbit basilar and in rabbit common carotid arteries in vitro, using an isometric tension recording method. Hypoxia was introduced by changing the gas mixture in the in vitro chamber from 95% O2-5% CO2 to 95% N2-5% CO2. Thrombin and acetylcholine were used to induce endothelium-dependent relaxation. Thrombin at 0.1 and 1.0 U/ml, respectively, caused dose-dependent relaxation of the canine basilar artery precontracted by 10(-6)M prostaglandin F2 alpha. Acetylcholine also evoked dose-dependent relaxation of rabbit basilar and common carotid arteries precontracted by serotonin. Under hypoxic conditions, the relaxing effect of thrombin or acetylcholine decreased both in canine and in rabbit arteries, although it was not significant in rabbit basilar arteries. It has been postulated that following subarachnoid haemorrhage, diffusion of oxygen to the walls of the major cerebral arteries might be impaired by the subarachnoid clot. This could cause hypoxia of the arteries and contribute to vasospasm by suppressing endothelium-dependent relaxation, as well as by enhancing the contractile responses of the cerebral arteries to the vasoconstrictor agents in the bloody cerebrospinal fluid.

  14. Identification of a potent endothelium-derived angiogenic factor.

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    Vera Jankowski

    Full Text Available The secretion of angiogenic factors by vascular endothelial cells is one of the key mechanisms of angiogenesis. Here we report on the isolation of a new potent angiogenic factor, diuridine tetraphosphate (Up4U from the secretome of human endothelial cells. The angiogenic effect of the endothelial secretome was partially reduced after incubation with alkaline phosphatase and abolished in the presence of suramin. In one fraction, purified to homogeneity by reversed phase and affinity chromatography, Up4U was identified by MALDI-LIFT-fragment-mass-spectrometry, enzymatic cleavage analysis and retention-time comparison. Beside a strong angiogenic effect on the yolk sac membrane and the developing rat embryo itself, Up4U increased the proliferation rate of endothelial cells and, in the presence of PDGF, of vascular smooth muscle cells. Up4U stimulated the migration rate of endothelial cells via P2Y2-receptors, increased the ability of endothelial cells to form capillary-like tubes and acts as a potent inducer of sprouting angiogenesis originating from gel-embedded EC spheroids. Endothelial cells released Up4U after stimulation with shear stress. Mean total plasma Up4U concentrations of healthy subjects (N=6 were sufficient to induce angiogenic and proliferative effects (1.34 ± 0.26 nmol L(-1. In conclusion, Up4U is a novel strong human endothelium-derived angiogenic factor.

  15. Adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to Dermal Vessels Leads to Local Vascular Damage and Purpura in a Humanized Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melican, Keira; Michea Veloso, Paula; Martin, Tiffany; Bruneval, Patrick; Duménil, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Septic shock caused by Neisseria meningitidis is typically rapidly evolving and often fatal despite antibiotic therapy. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease is necessary to reduce fatality rates. Postmortem samples from the characteristic purpuric rashes of the infection show bacterial aggregates in close association with microvessel endothelium but the species specificity of N. meningitidis has previously hindered the development of an in vivo model to study the role of adhesion on disease progression. Here we introduced human dermal microvessels into SCID/Beige mice by xenografting human skin. Bacteria injected intravenously exclusively associated with the human vessel endothelium in the skin graft. Infection was accompanied by a potent inflammatory response with the secretion of human inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of inflammatory cells. Importantly, infection also led to local vascular damage with hemostasis, thrombosis, vascular leakage and finally purpura in the grafted skin, replicating the clinical presentation for the first time in an animal model. The adhesive properties of the type IV pili of N. meningitidis were found to be the main mediator of association with the dermal microvessels in vivo. Bacterial mutants with altered type IV pili function also did not trigger inflammation or lead to vascular damage. This work demonstrates that local type IV pili mediated adhesion of N. meningitidis to the vascular wall, as opposed to circulating bacteria, determines vascular dysfunction in meningococcemia. PMID:23359320

  16. Cigarette smoke extract increases albumin flux across pulmonary endothelium in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, W.E.; Maier, J.M.; Malinow, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes lung inflammation, and a characteristic of inflammation is an increase in vascular permeability. To determine if cigarette smoke could alter endothelial permeability, we studied flux of radiolabeled albumin across monolayers of porcine pulmonary artery endothelium grown in culture on microporous membranes. Extracts (in either dimethylsulfoxide or phosphate-buffered saline) of cigarette smoke in a range estimate of concentrations simulating cigarette smoke exposure to the lungs in vivo caused a dose-dependent increase in albumin flux that was dependent on extracellular divalent cations and associated with polymerization of cellular actin. The effect was reversible, independent of the surface of endothelial cells exposed (either luminal or abluminal), and due primarily to components of the vapor phase of smoke. The effects occurred without evidence of cell damage, but subtle morphological changes were produced by exposure to the smoke extracts. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke can alter permeability of the lung endothelium through effects on cytoskeletal elements

  17. Role of endothelium in angiotensin II formation by the rat aorta and mesenteric arterial bed

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    R. Leite

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the angiotensin II (Ang II-generating system by analyzing the vasoconstrictor effect of Ang II, angiotensin I (Ang I, and tetradecapeptide (TDP renin substrate in the absence and presence of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in isolated rat aortic rings and mesenteric arterial beds with and without functional endothelium. Ang II, Ang I, and TDP elicited a dose-dependent vasoconstrictor effect in both vascular preparations that was completely blocked by the Ang II receptor antagonist saralasin (50 nM. The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor captopril (36 µM completely inhibited the vasoconstrictor effect elicited by Ang I and TDP in aortic rings without affecting that of Ang II. In contrast, captopril (36 µM significantly reduced (80-90% the response to bolus injection of Ang I, without affecting those to Ang II and TDP in mesenteric arteries. Mechanical removal of the endothelium greatly potentiated (70-95% the vasoconstrictor response to Ang II, Ang I, and TDP in aortic rings while these responses were unaffected by the removal of the endothelium of mesenteric arteries with sodium deoxycholate infusion. In addition, endothelium disruption did not change the pattern of response elicited by these peptides in the presence of captopril. These findings indicate that the endothelium may not be essential for Ang II formation in rat mesenteric arteries and aorta, but it may modulate the response to Ang II. Although Ang II formation from Ang I is essentially dependent on ACE in both vessels, our results suggest the existence of an alternative pathway in the mesenteric arterial bed that may play an important role in Ang II generation from TDP in resistance but not in large vessels during ACE inhibition

  18. Activation of nicotinic receptors can contribute to endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in the rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qian; Leung, Susan W S; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2012-06-01

    Acetylcholine causes endothelium-dependent relaxations in the rat aorta. Both muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in endothelial cells. It is generally accepted that mAChRs are responsible for the endothelium-dependent relaxations evoked by acetylcholine. The present study was designed to investigate whether nAChRs can also be involved in such responses evoked by the cholinergic transmitter. Rings with or without endothelium of aortae of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) normotensive rats were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of isometric tension. In WKY aortae the muscarinic antagonist atropine abolished the relaxations to increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, confirming that mAChRs are responsible mainly for the response under control conditions. In SHR aortae, atropine caused only partial inhibition of the endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine; the remaining decreases in tension were inhibited by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine, which did not significantly affect the response in the absence of atropine in either SHR or WKY preparations. Thus, when mAChRs are inhibited, nAChRs mediate relaxation to the cholinergic transmitter in the SHR but not the WKY aorta. Nicotine, a direct agonist of the nicotinic receptor, induced endothelium-dependent relaxations in both SHR and WKY rats via the activation of α7-nAChRs, but not by mecamylamine-sensitive nicotinic receptors (α3 subtype). The acetylcholine-induced, atropine-insensitive relaxations and those to nicotine both involve the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway. The present study demonstrates that the activation of nAChRs can contribute to acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent relaxations in the aortae of hypertensive animals and suggests that these receptors may contribute to the endothelium-dependent regulation of vascular tone.

  19. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) relaxes the isolated rat thoracic aorta through endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Young Joo; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2011-11-18

    The rhizome of the Cimicifuga racemosa (commonly known as black cohosh) has been used in treatment of climacteric complaints for decades in North America and Europe. A number of studies investigated the estrogenic potential of black cohosh, but its effectiveness is still controversial. Recently, it was reported that the extract of black cohosh acted as an agonist at the serotonin (5-HT) receptor and 5-HT derivative was isolated out of the black cohosh extract. Because it is well known that the 5-HT elicited the various cardiovascular effects including vasorelaxation, we investigated the vasorelaxant effects of the extract of black cohosh and its possible mechanisms of action. The extract of black cohosh (BcEx) was examined for its vasorelaxant effects in isolated rat aorta. The aortic rings were equilibrated under resting tension and induced reproducible contraction in organ bath. The control contraction was produced by 300 nM NE, and then BcEx were added. In experiments where specific inhibitors were used, they were added 20 min before NE contraction. BcEx elicited two phases of relaxation in rat aorta pre-contracted with norepinephrine. The first, a rapid relaxation, which occurred within seconds of BcEx administration, was eliminated by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) or methylene blue. The endogenous NO synthase substrate l-Arg markedly reversed the action of l-NNA, indicating that BcEx elicited the vasorelaxant effect via the NO/cGMP pathway. The second, slowly developing relaxation was not affected by the endothelium denudation. BcEx-induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation appears to involve the inhibition of calcium influx mediated by the opening of inward rectifier potassium channels. BcEx elicits the vasorelaxant effect via endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms and may contribute to a better understanding of a potential link between the use of black cohosh and its beneficial effects on vascular health. Copyright © 2011

  20. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.

    2007-05-01

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  1. Early vascular alterations in SLE and RA patients--a step towards understanding the associated cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Santos

    Full Text Available Accelerated atherosclerosis represents a major problem in both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, and endothelial damage is a key feature of atherogenesis. We aimed to assess early endothelial changes in SLE and RA female patients (127 SLE and 107 RA without previous CV events. Biomarkers of endothelial cell activation (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, thrombomodulin (TM, and tissue factor (TF were measured and endothelial function was assessed using peripheral artery tonometry. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI, an indicator of microvascular reactivity, and augmentation index (AIx, a measure of arterial stiffness, were obtained. In addition, traditional CV risk factors, disease activity and medication were determined. Women with SLE displayed higher sICAM-1 and TM and lower TF levels than women with RA (p = 0.001, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. These differences remained significant after controlling for CV risk factors and medication. Serum levels of vascular biomarkers were increased in active disease and a moderate correlation was observed between sVCAM-1 levels and lupus disease activity (rho = 0.246 and between TF levels and RA disease activity (rho = 0.301. Although RHI was similar across the groups, AIx was higher in lupus as compared to RA (p = 0.04. Also in active SLE, a trend towards poorer vasodilation was observed (p = 0.06. In conclusion, women with SLE and RA present with distinct patterns of endothelial cell activation biomarkers not explained by differences in traditional CV risk factors. Early vascular alterations are more pronounced in SLE which is in line with the higher CV risk of these patients.

  2. VASCULAR AGING IN WOMEN: IS ESTROGEN THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana eNovella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a physiological process associated with structural and functional changes in vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with an increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis. The risk of cardiovascular disease differs between men and women, remaining lower in women during their fertile years and reaching values similar to their male peers after menopause. Menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Therefore, estrogens have been implicated in premenopausal protection from cardiovascular disease, an assumption supported by experimental and some clinical studies, where estrogen induces protective effects in vascular endothelium. Indeed, estradiol promotes endothelial vasodilator synthesis, including NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 release; the thromboxane A2 pathway plays a key role in regulating vascular tone in females in both normal and in pathophysiologic states.Contrary to experimental results, some clinical trials found no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in aged postmenopausal women. These discrepancies could be due to the Timing Hypothesis which suggests that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits may occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature. Thus, there is still a gap in the knowledge, understanding, and general awareness of mechanisms for cardiovascular aging in women.In this review, we discuss clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens and hormonal replacement therapy on vascular function of females to delve into how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates the vascular responses at different ages.

  3. Metabolic syndrome enhances endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative stress and leukocyte-endothelium interactions in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, Celia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Martinez de Marañon, Aranzazu; Veses, Silvia; Jover, Ana; Gomez, Marcelino; Rocha, Milagros; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio; Victor, Victor M

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance, which can lead to metabolic syndrome (MetS). Oxidative stress and leukocyte-endothelium interactions are related to PCOS. Our aim was to evaluate whether the presence of MetS in PCOS patients can influence endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress and leukocyte-endothelium interactions. This was a prospective controlled study conducted in an academic medical center. The study population consisted of 148 PCOS women (116 without/32 with MetS) and 112 control subjects (87 without / 25 with MetS). Metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ER stress markers (GRP78, sXBP1, ATF6), leukocyte-endothelium interactions, adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-Selectin), TNF-α and IL-6 were determined. Total ROS, inflammatory parameters and adhesion molecules were enhanced in the presence of MetS (pPCOS+MetS group showed higher levels of IL-6 and ICAM-1 than controls (pPCOS and PCOS+MetS groups vs their respective controls (pPCOS groups (pPCOS+MetS patients exhibited higher GRP78 and ATF6 levels than controls and PCOS patients without MetS (pPCOS women, HOMA-IR was positively correlated with ICAM-1 (r=0.501; pPCOS, all of which are related to vascular complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Taurine depletion alters vascular reactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worku; Mozaffari, Mahmood S

    2003-09-01

    We recently showed that chronic taurine supplementation is associated with attenuation of contractile responses of rat aorta to norepinephrine and potassium chloride. However, the potential involvement of endogenous taurine in modulation of vascular reactivity is not known. Therefore, we examined the effect of beta-alanine-induced taurine depletion on the in vitro reactivity of rat aorta to selected vasoactive agents. The data indicate that both norepinephrine- and potassium-chloride-induced maximum contractile responses of endothelium-denuded aortae were enhanced in taurine-depleted rats compared with control animals. However, taurine depletion did not affect tissue sensitivity to either norepinephrine or potassium chloride. By contrast, sensitivity of the endothelium-denuded aortae to sodium nitroprusside was attenuated by taurine depletion. Similarly, taurine deficiency reduced the relaxant responses of endothelium-intact aortic rings elicited by submaximal concentrations of acetylcholine, and this effect was associated with decreased nitric oxide production. Taken together, the data suggest that taurine depletion augments contractility but attenuates relaxation of vascular smooth muscle in a nonspecific manner. Impairment of endothelium-dependent responses, which is at least in part associated with reduced nitric oxide generation, may contribute to the attenuation of the vasorelaxant responses. These vascular alterations could be of potential consequence in pathological conditions associated with taurine deficiency.

  5. Selective iNOS inhibition prevents hypotension in septic rats while preserving endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, V; Hahnenkamp, K; Schneuing, M; Fischer, L G; Rich, G F

    2001-03-01

    hypotension and attenuates metabolic derangements while preserving the important vascular function associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation in septic rats.

  6. Effects of PPARγ ligands on vascular tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2012-06-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ), originally described as a transcription factor for genes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, has been more recently studied in the context of cardiovascular pathophysiology. Here, we review the available data on PPARγ ligands as modulator of vascular tone. PPARγ ligands include: thiazolidinediones (used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus), glitazars (bind and activate both PPARγ and PPARα), and other experimental drugs (still in development) that exploit the chemistry of thiazolidinediones as a scaffold for PPARγ-independent pharmacological properties. In this review, we examine both short (mostly from in vitro data)- and long (mostly from in vivo data)-term effects of PPARγ ligands that extend from PPARγ-independent vascular effects to PPARγ-dependent gene expression. Because endothelium is a master regulator of vascular tone, we have attempted to differentiate between endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent effects of PPARγ ligands. Based on available data, we conclude that PPARγ ligands appear to influence vascular tone in different experimental paradigms, most often in terms of vasodilatation (potentially increasing blood flow to some tissues). These effects on vascular tone, although potentially beneficial, must be weighed against specific cardiovascular warnings that may apply to some drugs, such as rosiglitazone.

  7. Intradermal administration of endothelin-1 attenuates endothelium-dependent and -independent cutaneous vasodilation via Rho kinase in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Amano, Tatsuro; Halili, Lyra; Louie, Jeffrey C; Zhang, Sarah Y; McNeely, Brendan D; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-01-01

    We recently showed that intradermal administration of endothelin-1 diminished endothelium-dependent and -independent cutaneous vasodilation. We evaluated the hypothesis that Rho kinase may be a mediator of this response. We also sought to evaluate if endothelin-1 increases sweating. In 12 adults (25 ± 6 yr), we measured cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweating during 1) endothelium-dependent vasodilation induced via administration of incremental doses of methacholine (0.25, 5, 100, and 2,000 mM each for 25 min) and 2) endothelium-independent vasodilation induced via administration of 50 mM sodium nitroprusside (20-25 min). Responses were evaluated at four skin sites treated with either 1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), 2) 400 nM endothelin-1, 3) 3 mM HA-1077 (Rho kinase inhibitor), or 4) endothelin-1+HA-1077. Pharmacological agents were intradermally administered via microdialysis. Relative to the Control site, endothelin-1 attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilation (CVC at 2,000 mM methacholine, 80 ± 10 vs. 56 ± 15%max, P 0.05). Endothelium-independent vasodilation was attenuated by endothelin-1 compared with the Control site (CVC, 92 ± 13 vs. 70 ± 14%max, P 0.05). There was no between-site difference in sweating throughout (P > 0.05). We show that in young adults, Rho kinase is an important mediator of the endothelin-1-mediated attenuation of endothelium-dependent and -independent cutaneous vasodilation, and that endothelin-1 does not increase sweating. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Calycosin and Formononetin Induce Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation by the Activation of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels (BKCa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisa Hui Ling Tseng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calycosin and formononetin are two structurally similar isoflavonoids that have been shown to induce vasodilation in aorta and conduit arteries, but study of their actions on endothelial functions is lacking. Here, we demonstrated that both isoflavonoids relaxed rat mesenteric resistance arteries in a concentration-dependent manner, which was reduced by endothelial disruption and nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibition, indicating the involvement of both endothelium and vascular smooth muscle. In addition, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not the endothelium-independent vasodilation, was blocked by BKCa inhibitor iberiotoxin (IbTX. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs as a model, we showed calycosin and formononetin induced dose-dependent outwardly rectifying K+ currents using whole cell patch clamp. These currents were blocked by tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl, charybdotoxin (ChTX, or IbTX, but not apamin. We further demonstrated that both isoflavonoids significantly increased nitric oxide (NO production and upregulated the activities and expressions of endothelial NOS (eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS. These results suggested that calycosin and formononetin act as endothelial BKCa activators for mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation through enhancing endothelium hyperpolarization and NO production. Since activation of BKCa plays a role in improving behavioral and cognitive disorders, we suggested that these two isoflavonoids could provide beneficial effects to cognitive disorders through vascular regulation.

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associations of vascular plants confined to river valleys: towards understanding the river corridor plant distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobis, Agnieszka; Błaszkowski, Janusz; Zubek, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    The group of river corridor plants (RCP) includes vascular plant species which grow mainly or exclusively in the valleys of large rivers. Despite the long recognized fact that some plant species display a corridor-like distribution pattern in Central Europe, there is still no exhaustive explanation of the mechanisms generating this peculiar distribution. The main goal of this study was therefore to investigate whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and fungal root endophytes influence the RCP distribution. Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) were observed in 19 out of 33 studied RCP. Dark septate endophytes (DSE) and Olpidium spp. were recorded with low abundance in 15 and 10 plant species, respectively. The spores of AMF were found only in 32% of trap cultures established from the soils collected in the river corridor habitats. In total, six widespread AMF species were identified. Because the percentage of non-mycorrhizal species in the group of RCP is significant and the sites in river corridors are characterized by low AMF species diversity, RCP can be outcompeted outside river valleys by the widespread species that are able to benefit from AM associations in more stable plant-AMF communities in non-river habitats.

  10. Vascular Response of Ruthenium Tetraamines in Aortic Ring from Normotensive Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição-Vertamatti, Ana Gabriela; Ramos, Luiz Alberto Ferreira [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Calandreli, Ivy; Chiba, Aline Nunes [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Campus Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Franco, Douglas Wagner [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Campus São Carlos, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tfouni, Elia [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Campus Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Grassi-Kassisse, Dora Maria, E-mail: doramgk@unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) tetraamines are being increasingly used as nitric oxide (NO) carriers. In this context, pharmacological studies have become highly relevant to better understand the mechanism of action involved. To evaluate the vascular response of the tetraamines trans-[Ru{sup II}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}(Py)(NO)]{sup 3+}, trans-[Ru{sup II}(Cl)(NO) (cyclan)](PF{sub 6}){sub 2}, and trans-[Ru{sup II}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}(4-acPy)(NO)]{sup 3+}. Aortic rings were contracted with noradrenaline (10{sup −6} M). After voltage stabilization, a single concentration (10{sup −6} M) of the compounds was added to the assay medium. The responses were recorded during 120 min. Vascular integrity was assessed functionally using acetylcholine at 10{sup −6} M and sodium nitroprusside at 10{sup −6} M as well as by histological examination. Histological analysis confirmed the presence or absence of endothelial cells in those tissues. All tetraamine complexes altered the contractile response induced by norepinephrine, resulting in increased tone followed by relaxation. In rings with endothelium, the inhibition of endothelial NO caused a reduction of the contractile effect caused by pyridine NO. No significant responses were observed in rings with endothelium after treatment with cyclan NO. In contrast, in rings without endothelium, the inhibition of guanylate cyclase significantly reduced the contractile response caused by the pyridine NO and cyclan NO complexes, and both complexes caused a relaxing effect. The results indicate that the vascular effect of the evaluated complexes involved a decrease in the vascular tone induced by norepinephrine (10{sup −6} M) at the end of the incubation period in aortic rings with and without endothelium, indicating the slow release of NO from these complexes and suggesting that the ligands promoted chemical stability to the molecule. Moreover, we demonstrated that the association of Ru with NO is more stable when the ligands pyridine and cyclan are used

  11. Does Metformin Protect Diabetic Patients from Oxidative Stress and Leukocyte-Endothelium Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Lopez-Domenech, Sandra; Escribano-Lopez, Irene; Veses, Silvia; Jover, Ana; Rocha, Milagros; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio; Victor, Victor M

    2017-12-10

    Since metformin can exert beneficial vascular effects, we aimed at studying its effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, antioxidant enzyme expression, levels of adhesion molecules, and leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the leukocytes from type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients. The study was carried out in 72 T2D patients (41 of whom were treated with metformin for at least 12 months at a dose of 1700 mg per day), and in 40 sex- and age-matched control subjects. Leukocytes from T2D patients exhibited enhanced levels of mitochondrial ROS and decreased mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase 1 (gpx1) and sirtuin 3 (sirt3) with respect to controls, whereas metformin was shown to revert these effects. No changes were observed on total ROS production and the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 and catalase. Furthermore, increases in leukocyte-endothelial interactions and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin levels were found in T2D and were also restored in metformin-treated patients. Our findings raise the question of whether metformin could modulate the appearance of atherosclerosis in T2D patients and reduce vascular events by decreasing leukocyte oxidative stress through an increase in gpx1 and sirt3 expression, and undermining adhesion molecule levels and leukocyte-endothelium interactions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1439-1445.

  12. Cytokine pattern and endothelium damage markers in Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Carlo, Del Vecchio Giovanni; Penza, Rosa; Rosa, Penza; Altomare, Maria; Maria, Altomare; Piacente, Laura; Laura, Piacente; Aceto, Gabriella; Gabriella, Aceto; Lassandro, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Lassandro; De Mattia, Domenico; Domenico, De Mattia; Giordano, Paoala; Paola, Giordano

    2008-01-01

    In a longitudinal cohort study our aim was to evaluate the cytokine pattern of children affected by Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and to correlate this pattern to vascular endothelium damage and to nephropathy. The following parameters were monitored at the onset of the disease (T0) and after 6 months of follow-up (T1): clinical scores, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 2 (IL-2), soluble IL-2 receptor (IL-2sRalpha), fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor antigen (vWf:Ag) and soluble thrombomodulin (TMD) levels. A total of 24 children (9 M, 15 F), affected by HSP, aged between 3-14 years (median 6 years), were enrolled into the study. IL-2 serum levels were significantly increased at the onset of the disease compared to control group and T1. The same pattern was observed for IL-2sRalpha and TNF-alpha. Fibrinogen and vWf:Ag concentrations were significantly higher at the onset of disease than t1 and in control group. TMD levels resulted constantly within the normal range. Concerning the analyzed parameters, no significant difference resulted to be in subjects with and without renal involvement (hematuria and/or proteinuria). Finally, raised serum TNF-alpha concentration, related to vascular endothelium damage as shown by increased vWf:Ag levels, occurred invariably in children affected by HSP both with and without renal involvement.

  13. Adiponectin improves coronary no-reflow injury by protecting the endothelium in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue; Wu, Ye; Liu, Xin; Ma, Lu; Lv, Tingting; Sun, Qi; Xu, Wenli; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Ke; Wang, Wen; Ma, Xinliang; Liu, Huirong

    2017-08-31

    To determine the effect of adiponectin (APN) on the coronary no-reflow (NR) injury in rats with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 80 male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a high-sugar-high-fat diet to build a T2DM model. Rats received vehicle or APN in the last week and then were subjected to myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of the thoracic aorta was significantly decreased and serum levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were noticably increased in T2DM rats compared with rats without T2DM. Serum APN was positively correlated with the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, but negatively correlated with the serum level of ET-1. Treatment with APN improved T2DM-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, recovered cardiac function, and decreased both NR size and the levels of ET-1, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Hypoadiponectinemia was associated with the aggravation of coronary NR in T2DM rats. APN could alleviate coronary NR injury in T2DM rats by protecting the endothelium and improving microcirculation. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Effect of timolol on the permeability of corneal endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, R F; Coakes, R L; Bourne, W M

    1979-01-01

    The effect of short-term administration of timolol on the permeability of the corneal endothelium to fluorescein was measured in normal subjects (single drop) and in a small group of glaucoma patients (one week's treatment). No effect on the endothelium was found in the normal eyes. In the glaucomatous eyes, endothelial permeability was higher than normal when measured after one week without topical medications and normal when measured after one week on timolol treatment. No evidence was found that short-term administration of this drug disturbs the barrier function of the endothelium.

  15. Molecular characterization of human breast tumor vascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, Rajendra; Patterson, Cam; Livasy, Chad A; Fan, Cheng; Ketelsen, David; Hu, Zhiyuan; Reynolds, Evangeline; Tanner, Catherine; Moore, Dominic T; Gabrielli, Franco; Perou, Charles M; Klauber-DeMore, Nancy

    2008-05-01

    A detailed understanding of the assortment of genes that are expressed in breast tumor vessels is needed to facilitate the development of novel, molecularly targeted anti-angiogenic agents for breast cancer therapies. Rapid immunohistochemistry using factor VIII-related antibodies was performed on sections of frozen human luminal-A breast tumors (n = 5) and normal breast (n = 5), followed by laser capture microdissection of vascular cells. RNA was extracted and amplified, and fluorescently labeled cDNA was synthesized and hybridized to 44,000-element long-oligonucleotide DNA microarrays. Statistical analysis of microarray was used to compare differences in gene expression between tumor and normal vascular cells, and Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer was used to determine enrichment of gene ontology categories. Protein expression of select genes was confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Of the 1176 genes that were differentially expressed between tumor and normal vascular cells, 55 had a greater than fourfold increase in expression level. The extracellular matrix gene ontology category was increased while the ribosome gene ontology category was decreased. Fibroblast activation protein, secreted frizzled-related protein 2, Janus kinase 3, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2 proteins localized to breast tumor endothelium as assessed by immunohistochemistry, showing significantly greater staining compared with normal tissue. These tumor endothelial marker proteins also exhibited increased expression in breast tumor vessels compared with that in normal tissues. Therefore, these genetic markers may serve as potential targets for the development of angiogenesis inhibitors.

  16. Docking onto the endothelium: Trio directs leukocyte extravasation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation describes the process by which white blood cells (leukocytes) travel across the endothelium lining the vasculature, into the underlying tissue. Effi-cient and tightly controlled leukocyte extravasation is of key importance in physiological processes such as immune

  17. Vascular disease: Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    An understanding of the role of magnetic resonance (MR) in detection and characterization of vascular lesions is evolving. Improvements in spatial detail suggest great promise in delineation of structural vascular lesions, and insights into the appearance of evolving intraparenchymal hematoma have broadened the applications

  18. Acute effects of gamma irradiation on vascular arterial tone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourlier, V.; Diserbo, M.; Multon, E.; Verdetti, J.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    In rat aortic rings, we showed an increase in arterial tone during irradiation. This effect is acute reversible. This effect is only observed on pre-contracted rings and needs the integrity of vascular endothelium. The molecular mechanism of this effect is discussed. (author)

  19. Vascular adaptation in pregnancy and endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeldt, D S; Bird, I M

    2017-01-01

    Maternal vascular adaptation to pregnancy is critically important to expand the capacity for blood flow through the uteroplacental unit to meet the needs of the developing fetus. Failure of the maternal vasculature to properly adapt can result in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy such as preeclampsia (PE). Herein, we review the endocrinology of maternal adaptation to pregnancy and contrast this with that of PE. Our focus is specifically on those hormones that directly influence endothelial cell function and dysfunction, as endothelial cell dysfunction is a hallmark of PE. A variety of growth factors and cytokines are present in normal vascular adaptation to pregnancy. However, they have also been shown to be circulating at abnormal levels in PE pregnancies. Many of these factors promote endothelial dysfunction when present at abnormal levels by acutely inhibiting key Ca 2+ signaling events and chronically promoting the breakdown of endothelial cell-cell contacts. Increasingly, our understanding of how the contributions of the placenta, immune cells, and the endothelium itself promote the endocrine milieu of PE is becoming clearer. We then describe in detail how the complex endocrine environment of PE affects endothelial cell function, why this has contributed to the difficulty in fully understanding and treating this disorder, and how a focus on signaling convergence points of many hormones may be a more successful treatment strategy. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  20. Jabuticaba-Induced Endothelium-Independent Vasodilating Effect on Isolated Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Medeiros Lobo de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Despite the important biological effects of jabuticaba, its actions on the cardiovascular system have not been clarified. Objectives: To determine the effects of jabuticaba hydroalcoholic extract (JHE on vascular smooth muscle (VSM of isolated arteries. Methods: Endothelium-denuded aortic rings of rats were mounted in isolated organ bath to record isometric tension. The relaxant effect of JHE and the influence of K+ channels and Ca2+ intra- and extracellular sources on JHE-stimulated response were assessed. Results: Arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine showed concentration-dependent relaxation (0.380 to 1.92 mg/mL. Treatment with K+ channel blockers (tetraethyl-ammonium, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine hindered relaxation due to JHE. In addition, phenylephrine-stimulated contraction was hindered by previous treatment with JHE. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase did not change relaxation due to JHE. In addition, JHE inhibited the contraction caused by Ca2+ influx stimulated by phenylephrine and KCl (75 mM. Conclusion: JHE induces endothelium-independent vasodilation. Activation of K+ channels and inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the membrane are involved in the JHE relaxant effect.

  1. Effects of a Single Bout of Resistance Exercise in Different Volumes on Endothelium Adaptations in Healthy Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendonça Mota

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance exercise (RE has been recommended for patients with cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a few studies have demonstrated that the intensity of a single bout of RE has an effect on endothelial adaptations to exercise. However, there is no data about the effects of different volumes of RE on endothelium function. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of different volumes of RE in a single bout on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and nitric oxide (NO synthesis in the mesenteric artery of healthy animals. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Control (Ct; low-volume RE (LV, 5 sets x 10 repetitions and high-volume RE (HV, 15 sets x 10 repetitions. The established intensity was 70% of the maximal repetition test. After the exercise protocol, rings of mesenteric artery were used for assessment of vascular reactivity, and other mesenteric arteries were prepared for detection of measure NO production by DAF-FM fluorescence. Insulin responsiveness on NO synthesis was evaluated by stimulating the vascular rings with insulin (10 nM. Results: The maximal relaxation response to insulin increased in the HV group only as compared with the Ct group. Moreover, the inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (L-NAME completely abolished the insulin-induced vasorelaxation in exercised rats. NO production showed a volume-dependent increase in the endothelial and smooth muscle layer. In endothelial layer, only Ct and LV groups showed a significant increase in NO synthesis when compared to their respective group under basal condition. On the other hand, in smooth muscle layer, NO fluorescence increased in all groups when compared to their respective group under basal condition. Conclusions: Our results suggest that a single bout of RE promotes vascular endothelium changes in a volume-dependent manner. The 15 sets x 10 repetitions exercise plan induced the greatest levels of NO synthesis.

  2. Discovery of Endothelium and Mesenchymal Properties of Primo Vessels in the Mesentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Ping

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidences demonstrated that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT has a crucial role in cancer and is recognized as a unique source of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. Primo vascular system (PVS is a new circulatory system which may play an important role in cancer metastasis and regeneration. In the current study, we applied previously established time-saving method to identify primo vessels and further investigated the immunocytochemical properties of primo vessels. Both primo vessels and primary primo vessel cells in the mesentery expressed endothelial markers and fibroblast markers. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated that endothelial and fibroblast markers are coexpressed in primo vessels. In addition, under the stimulation of TGF-β1 in vitro, primary primo vessel cells differentiated into fibroblasts. Therefore, we found that primo vessels in the mesentery had a transitional structure between endothelium and mesenchymal. This is a new finding of EndMT in normal postnatal animals.

  3. Vascular Cures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vascular disease, such as stroke, aneurysm and pulmonary artery disease. Each one has their own unique story about their battle with vascular disease and their road to recovery. SEE PATIENT STORIES Our Supporters Caring ...

  4. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christopher P; Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼ 40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Low levels of cadmium chloride damage the corneal endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, W.J. [Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, Division of Biological Sciences, Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Sillman, A.J. [Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, Division of Biological Sciences, Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The effect of cadmium chloride on the integrity of the endothelium of isolated bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) corneas was examined by spectrophotometric analysis of corneal uptake of the vital stain Janus green and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The uptake of Janus green by the endothelium was dose related between 1.0 and 100.0 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. The effect of cadmium was significantly attenuated by the calcium channel blocker SKF 96365 and was augmented by the calcium ionophore A23187, indicating that cadmium influx through calcium channels is an important determinant of its cellular effect. The effect of cadmium was not altered by changes in the external calcium concentration, indicating that the mechanism does not involve competitive inhibition by calcium. SEM demonstrated significant structural damage to the corneal endothelium exposed to cadmium chloride, including focal disruption and denuding of the apical endothelial membrane. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  6. Peroxynitrate formed during a transient episode of brain ischemia increases endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type dilations in thromboxane/prostaglandin receptor stimulated rat cerebral arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Onetti, Yara; Dantas, Ana Y.; Perez, Belen; McNeish, Alister J.; Vila, Elisabet; Jimenez-Altyayo, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    Aim\\ud Increased thromboxane A2 and peroxynitrite are hallmarks of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Stimulation of thromboxane/prostaglandin receptors (TP) attenuates endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). We investigated whether EDH-type middle cerebral artery (MCA) relaxations following TP stimulation are altered after I/R and the influence of peroxynitrite.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud Vascular function was determined by wire myography after TP stimulation with the thromboxane A2 mimetic 9,...

  7. The partitioning of nanoparticles to endothelium or interstitium during ultrasound-microbubble-targeted delivery depends on peak-negative pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiang, Y.-H.; Song, J.; Price, R. J., E-mail: rprice@virginia.edu [University of Virginia, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Patients diagnosed with advanced peripheral arterial disease often face poor prognoses and have limited treatment options. For some patient populations, the therapeutic growth of collateral arteries (i.e. arteriogenesis) that bypass regions affected by vascular disease may become a viable treatment option. Our group and others are developing therapeutic approaches centered on the ability of ultrasound-activated microbubbles to permeabilize skeletal muscle capillaries and facilitate the targeted delivery of pro-arteriogenic growth factor-bearing nanoparticles. The development of such approaches would benefit significantly from a better understanding of how nanoparticle diameter and ultrasound peak-negative pressure affect both total nanoparticle delivery and the partitioning of nanoparticles to endothelial or interstitial compartments. Toward this goal, using Balb/C mice that had undergone unilateral femoral artery ligation, we intra-arterially co-injected nanoparticles (50 and 100 nm) with microbubbles, applied 1 MHz ultrasound to the gracilis adductor muscle at peak-negative pressures of 0.7, 0.55, 0.4, and 0.2 MPa, and analyzed nanoparticle delivery and distribution. As expected, total nanoparticle (50 and 100 nm) delivery increased with increasing peak-negative pressure, with 50 nm nanoparticles exhibiting greater tissue coverage than 100 nm nanoparticles. Of particular interest, increasing peak-negative pressure resulted in increased delivery to the interstitium for both nanoparticle sizes, but had little influence on nanoparticle delivery to the endothelium. Thus, we conclude that alterations to peak-negative pressure may be used to adjust the fraction of nanoparticles delivered to the interstitial compartment. This information will be useful when designing ultrasound protocols for delivering pro-arteriogenic nanoparticles to skeletal muscle.

  8. The partitioning of nanoparticles to endothelium or interstitium during ultrasound-microbubble-targeted delivery depends on peak-negative pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiang, Y.-H.; Song, J.; Price, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with advanced peripheral arterial disease often face poor prognoses and have limited treatment options. For some patient populations, the therapeutic growth of collateral arteries (i.e. arteriogenesis) that bypass regions affected by vascular disease may become a viable treatment option. Our group and others are developing therapeutic approaches centered on the ability of ultrasound-activated microbubbles to permeabilize skeletal muscle capillaries and facilitate the targeted delivery of pro-arteriogenic growth factor-bearing nanoparticles. The development of such approaches would benefit significantly from a better understanding of how nanoparticle diameter and ultrasound peak-negative pressure affect both total nanoparticle delivery and the partitioning of nanoparticles to endothelial or interstitial compartments. Toward this goal, using Balb/C mice that had undergone unilateral femoral artery ligation, we intra-arterially co-injected nanoparticles (50 and 100 nm) with microbubbles, applied 1 MHz ultrasound to the gracilis adductor muscle at peak-negative pressures of 0.7, 0.55, 0.4, and 0.2 MPa, and analyzed nanoparticle delivery and distribution. As expected, total nanoparticle (50 and 100 nm) delivery increased with increasing peak-negative pressure, with 50 nm nanoparticles exhibiting greater tissue coverage than 100 nm nanoparticles. Of particular interest, increasing peak-negative pressure resulted in increased delivery to the interstitium for both nanoparticle sizes, but had little influence on nanoparticle delivery to the endothelium. Thus, we conclude that alterations to peak-negative pressure may be used to adjust the fraction of nanoparticles delivered to the interstitial compartment. This information will be useful when designing ultrasound protocols for delivering pro-arteriogenic nanoparticles to skeletal muscle

  9. Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxant Effect of Butanolic Fraction from Caryocar brasiliense Camb. Leaves in Rat Thoracic Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Moraes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caryocar brasiliense Camb. “pequi” is a native plant from the Cerrado region of Brazil that contains bioactive components reported to be antioxidant agents. Previous work has demonstrated that dietary supplementation with pequi decreased the arterial pressure of volunteer athletes. We found that the crude hydroalcoholic extract (CHE of C. brasiliense leaves relaxed, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine, and that the butanolic fraction (BF produced an effect similar to that of the CHE. Aortic relaxation induced by BF was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylatecyclase inhibitor ODQ. However, incubation with atropine and pyrilamine had no effect on the BF-induced vasorelaxation. Moreover, this effect was not inhibited by indomethacin and tetraethylammonium. The concentration-response curve to calcium in denuded-endothelium rings was not modified after incubation with BF, and the vasorelaxation by BF in endothelium-intact rings precontracted with KCl was abolished after incubation with L-NAME. In addition, administration of BF in anesthetized rats resulted in a reversible hypotension. The results reveal that C. brasiliense possesses both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of BF involves stimulation of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway.

  10. Clinical CVVH model removes endothelium-derived microparticles from circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhafeez H. Abdelhafeez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelium-derived microparticles (EMPs are submicron vesicles released from the plasma membrane of endothelial cells in response to injury, apoptosis or activation. We have previously demonstrated EMP-induced acute lung injury (ALI in animal models and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vitro. Current treatment options for ALI are limited and consist of supportive therapies. We hypothesize that standard clinical continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH reduces serum EMP levels and may be adapted as a potential therapeutic intervention. Materials and methods: EMPs were generated from plasminogen activation inhibitor-1 (PAI-1-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Flow cytometric analysis was used to characterize EMPs as CD31- and annexin V-positive events in a submicron size gate. Enumeration was completed against a known concentration of latex beads. Ultimately, a concentration of ~650,000 EMP/mL perfusate fluid (total 470 mL was circulated through a standard CVVH filter (pore size 200 μm, flow rate 250 mL/hr for a period of 70 minutes. 0.5 mL aliquots were removed at 5- to 10-minute intervals for flow cytometric analysis. EMP concentration in the dialysate was measured at the end of 4 hours to better understand the fate of EMPs. Results: A progressive decrease in circulating EMP concentration was noted using standard CVVH at 250 mL/hr (a clinical standard rate from a 470 mL volume modelling a patient's circulation. A 50% reduction was noted within the first 30 minutes. EMPs entering the dialysate after 4 hours were 5.7% of the EMP original concentration. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that standard CVVH can remove EMPs from circulation in a circuit modelling a patient. An animal model of hemofiltration with induction of EMP release is required to test the therapeutic potential of this finding and potential of application in early treatment of ALI.

  11. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  12. Intermittent PTH 1-34 Administration Improves the Marrow Microenvironment and Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Bone Arteries of Aged Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungyong; Bice, Ashley; Hood, Brianna; Ruiz, Juan; Kim, Jahyun; Prisby, Rhonda D

    2018-02-08

    Inflammation coincides with diminished marrow function, vasodilation of blood vessels and bone mass. Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration independently improves marrow and vascular function, potentially impacting bone accrual. Currently, the influence of marrow and intermittent PTH administration on aged bone blood vessels have not been examined. Vasodilation of the femoral principal nutrient artery (PNA) was assessed in the presence and absence of marrow. Further, we determined the influence of PTH 1-34 on 1) endothelium-dependent vasodilation and signaling pathways (i.e., nitric oxide [NO] and prostacyclin [PGI 2 ]), 2) endothelium-independent vasodilation, 3) cytokine production by marrow cells, and 4) bone microarchitecture and bone static and dynamic properties. Young (4-6 mon) and old (22-24 mon) male Fisher-344 rats were treated with PTH 1-34 or a vehicle for 2 weeks. In the absence and presence of marrow, femoral PNAs were given cumulative doses of acetylcholine, with and without the NO and PGI 2 blockers, and DEA NONOate. Marrow-derived cytokines and bone parameters in the distal femur were assessed. Exposure to marrow diminished endothelium-dependent vasodilation in young rats. Reduced bone volume and NO-mediated vasodilation occurred with old age and was partially reversed with PTH. Additionally, PTH treatment in old rats restored endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the presence of marrow and augmented IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Endothelium-independent vasodilation was unaltered, and PTH treatment reduced osteoid surfaces in old rats. In conclusion, the marrow microenvironment reduced vascular function in young rats and PTH treatment improved the marrow microenvironment and vasodilation with age.

  13. Effect of subchronic exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lenasi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cigarette smoking is reported to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of 30-day exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke on vascular reactivity of rat abdominal aorta, carotid, renal and mesenteric artery. Separately, the NO-mediated and the EDHF-mediated, endothelium-dependent vascular relaxations were determined.Methods: Two groups of »Whistar Kyoto« rats were exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (2 hours/day, 5 days/week for 30 days and to fresh conditioned air, respectively. Rats were sacrificed on the second day after the last exposition to cigarette smoke. Vascular reactivity studies were performed on isolated, endothelium-intact, phenylephrine-preconstricted rat artery rings. Cumulative concentration-relaxation curves to acetylcholine (ACh were obtained in the absence and presence of the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS inhibitor N ω nitro L-arginine (L-NA and the cyclo-oxygenase (COX inhibitor diclofenac, respectively. After washing period of 1 hour, vessels were exposed either to the intracellular superoxide scavenger tiron, to the cytochrome P450 (CYP inhibitor miconazole or the Na-K-ATPase inhibitor ouabain before being preconstricted with phenylephrine and determining the concentration-response curve to ACh.Results: ACh induced concentration-dependent relaxations. In none of the vessels investigated did we observe a significant difference in the relaxations obtained in arteries from control rats and rats exposed to cigarettee smoke. Although smoking is known to cause an increase in oxidative stress, treatment of the vessels with tiron did not affect the NOmediated relaxations. To evaluate the contribution of EDHF to endothelium-dependent vasodilation rings were preincubated with L-NA. The EDHF-mediated relaxations were significantly attenuated compared to the NO-mediated relaxations in renal and mesenteric artery and almost completely abolished in aorta and

  14. Renal and cardiac microvascular endothelium: injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, NR

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the capillary endothelium can be devastating for renal and cardiac function. To halt the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and heart failure (HF) preservation of the microvascular endothelial cell (EC) function and structure is of great importance.1 Increasing knowledge about

  15. Helium induces preconditioning in human endothelium in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Kirsten F.; Oei, Gezina T. M. L.; Brevoord, Daniel; Stroes, Erik S.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schlack, Wolfgang S.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Weber, Nina C.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    Helium protects myocardium by inducing preconditioning in animals. We investigated whether human endothelium is preconditioned by helium inhalation in vivo. Forearm ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in healthy volunteers (each group n = 10) was performed by inflating a blood pressure cuff for 20 min.

  16. Vascular Aging: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebre, Yohannes T; Yakubov, Eduard; Wong, Wing Tak; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Sayed, Nazish; Sikora, Andrew G; Bonnen, Mark D

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease is highest among the elderly, in part, due to deleterious effects of advancing age on the heart and blood vessels. Aging, a known cardiovascular risk factor, is progressively associated with structural and functional changes to the vasculature including hemodynamic disturbance due to increased oxidative stress, premature cellular senescence and impairments in synthesis and/or secretion of endothelium-derived vasoactive molecules. These molecular and physiological changes lead to vessel wall stiffening and thickening, as well as other vascular complications that culminate to loss of vascular tone regulation and endothelial function. Intriguingly, the vessel wall, a biochemically active structure composed of collagen, connective tissue, smooth muscle and endothelial cells, is adversely affected by processes involved in premature or normal aging. Notably, the inner most layer of the vessel wall, the endothelium, becomes senescent and dysfunctional with advancing age. As a result, its ability to release vasoactive molecules such as acetylcholine (ACh), prostacyclin (PGI2), endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), and nitric oxide (NO) is reduced and the cellular response to these molecules is also impaired. By contrast, the vascular endothelium increases its generation and release of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species, vasoconstrictors such as endothelin (ET) and angiotensin (AT), and endogenous inhibitors of NO synthases (NOSs) to block NO. This skews the balance of the endothelium in favor of the release of highly tissue reactive and harmful molecules that promote DNA damage, telomere erosion, senescence, as well as stiffened and hardened vessel wall that is prone to the development of hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular risk factors. This Review discusses the impact of advancing age on cardiovascular health, and highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms

  17. Angiogenic endothelium shows lactadherin-dependent phagocytosis of aged erythrocytes and apoptotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fens, Marcel H. A. M.; Mastrobattista, Enrico; De Graaff, Anko M.; Flesch, Frits M.; Ultee, Anton; Rasmussen, Jan T.; Molema, Grietje; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenic endothelium plays a crucial role in tumor growth. During angiogenesis, complex alterations in the microenvironment occur. In response, the endothelium undergoes phenotypic changes, for example overexpression of alpha(v)-integrins. Here, we show that the overexpression of

  18. Patrolling Mechanics of Non-Classical Monocytes in Vascular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscher, Konrad; Marcovecchio, Paola; Hedrick, Catherine C; Ley, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical monocytes have emerged as the preeminent vascular housekeepers. Continuous intravascular screening is enabled by slow patrolling on the endothelium and allows a rapid response to local perturbations. Intravital imaging has been crucial to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and migratory phenotype of patrolling. In this review, we discuss technical requirements of intravital microscopy such as imaging modalities, labeling strategies, and data analysis. We further focus on patrolling kinetics and adhesion receptors in different organs and vascular beds including arteries during homeostasis and vascular inflammation and define pertinent questions in the field.

  19. Patrolling Mechanics of Non-Classical Monocytes in Vascular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Buscher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical monocytes have emerged as the preeminent vascular housekeepers. Continuous intravascular screening is enabled by slow patrolling on the endothelium and allows a rapid response to local perturbations. Intravital imaging has been crucial to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and migratory phenotype of patrolling. In this review, we discuss technical requirements of intravital microscopy such as imaging modalities, labeling strategies, and data analysis. We further focus on patrolling kinetics and adhesion receptors in different organs and vascular beds including arteries during homeostasis and vascular inflammation and define pertinent questions in the field.

  20. Sex-specific effects of cardiovascular risk factors on endothelium-dependent dilation and endothelin activity in middle-aged women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Vijaywant; Gill, Sartaj; Cardillo, Carmine; Tesauro, Manfredi; Panza, Julio A; Campia, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Healthy middle-aged postmenopausal women have higher endothelium-dependent dilation and lower vasoconstrictor activity of endothelin-1 than men. Whether these sex-specific differences extend to patients with cardiovascular risk factors has not been investigated. The current study aimed to determine whether, in patients with cardiovascular risk factors, sex-specific differences exist in endothelium-dependent dilation and endothelin-1 activity. Forearm blood flow responses were measured by strain-gauge plethysmography during the intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and the selective endothelin type A receptor blocker BQ-123 in 50 women and 64 men with cardiovascular risk factors. Acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside induced a significant vasodilation in women and men alike (p < 0.01 for both). Also BQ-123 caused a significant vasodilation (p < 0.001) in both groups. The vasodilator response to acetylcholine was greater in women compared to men; however there were no differences in the response to sodium nitroprusside and BQ-123 (p = NS for both) between the two sex groups. Middle-aged women with cardiovascular risk factors have significantly higher endothelium-dependent dilation than middle-aged men; however, vascular endothelin 1 activity is similar in the two groups. These findings suggest that the presence of cardiovascular risk factors is associated with sex-specific effects on endothelium-dependent dilation but not on endothelin 1 activity. Further study is needed to confirm our findings and to characterize the mechanisms underlying this sex-specific regulation of endothelial function.

  1. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages; Role de l'endothelium dans les dommages radio-induits aux tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliat, F

    2007-05-15

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  2. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature.

  3. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature.

  4. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  5. Diet-induced obesity impairs endothelium-derived hyperpolarization via altered potassium channel signaling mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Haddock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow. Altered endothelium-mediated vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms underlie key aspects of cardiovascular disease, including those in obesity. Whilst the mechanism of nitric oxide (NO-mediated vasodilation has been extensively studied in obesity, little is known about the impact of obesity on vasodilation to the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH mechanism; which predominates in smaller resistance vessels and is characterized in this study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Membrane potential, vessel diameter and luminal pressure were recorded in 4(th order mesenteric arteries with pressure-induced myogenic tone, in control and diet-induced obese rats. Obesity, reflecting that of human dietary etiology, was induced with a cafeteria-style diet (∼30 kJ, fat over 16-20 weeks. Age and sexed matched controls received standard chow (∼12 kJ, fat. Channel protein distribution, expression and vessel morphology were determined using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and ultrastructural techniques. In control and obese rat vessels, acetylcholine-mediated EDH was abolished by small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK(Ca/IK(Ca inhibition; with such activity being impaired in obesity. SK(Ca-IK(Ca activation with cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine (CyPPA and 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO, respectively, hyperpolarized and relaxed vessels from control and obese rats. IK(Ca-mediated EDH contribution was increased in obesity, and associated with altered IK(Ca distribution and elevated expression. In contrast, the SK(Ca-dependent-EDH component was reduced in obesity. Inward-rectifying potassium channel (K(ir and Na(+/K(+-ATPase inhibition by barium/ouabain, respectively, attenuated and abolished EDH in arteries from control and obese rats, respectively; reflecting differential K

  6. COX-2-derived prostanoids and oxidative stress additionally reduce endothelium-mediated relaxation in old type 2 diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Vessières

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction in resistance arteries alters end organ perfusion in type 2 diabetes. Superoxides and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 derivatives have been shown separately to alter endothelium-mediated relaxation in aging and diabetes but their role in the alteration of vascular tone in old diabetic subjects is not clear, especially in resistance arteries. Consequently, we investigated the role of superoxide and COX-2-derivatives on endothelium-dependent relaxation in 3 and 12 month-old Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and lean (LZ rats. Mesenteric resistance arteries were isolated and vascular tone was investigated using wire-myography. Endothelium (acetylcholine-dependent relaxation was lower in ZDF than in LZ rats (60 versus 84% maximal relaxation in young rats and 41 versus 69% in old rats. Blocking NO production with L-NAME was less efficient in old than in young rats. L-NAME had no effect in old ZDF rats although eNOS expression level in old ZDF rats was similar to that in old LZ rats. Superoxide level and NADPH-oxidase subunits (p67phox and gp91phox expression level were greater in ZDF than in LZ rats and were further increased by aging in ZDF rats. In young ZDF rats reducing superoxide level with tempol restored acetylcholine-dependent relaxation to the level of LZ rats. In old ZDF rats tempol improved acetylcholine-dependent relaxation without increasing it to the level of LZ rats. COX-2 (immunolabelling and Western-blot was present in arteries of ZDF rats and absent in LZ rats. In old ZDF rats arterial COX-2 level was higher than in young ZDF rats. COX-2 blockade with NS398 restored in part acetylcholine-dependent relaxation in arteries of old ZDF rats and the combination of tempol and NS398 fully restored relaxation in control (LZ rats level. Accordingly, superoxide production and COX-2 derivatives together reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in old ZDF rats whereas superoxides alone attenuated relaxation in young ZDF or old LZ rats.

  7. P2X1 receptors and the endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Harrington

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is now established as a principle vaso-active mediator in the vasculature. Its actions on arteries are complex, and are mediated by the P2X and P2Y receptor families. It is generally accepted that ATP induces a bi-phasic response in arteries, inducing contraction via the P2X and P2Y receptors on the smooth muscle cells, and vasodilation via the actions of P2Y receptors located on the endothelium. However, a number of recent studies have placed P2X1 receptors on the endothelium of some arteries. The use of a specific P2X1 receptor ligand, a, b methylene ATP has demonstrated that P2X1 receptors also have a bi-functional role. The actions of ATP on P2X1 receptors is therefore dependant on its location, inducing contraction when located on the smooth muscle cells, and dilation when expressed on the endothelium, comparable to that of P2Y receptors.

  8. Vulnerability of vascular endothelium in lipopolysaccharide toxicity: effect of (acyl carnitine on endothelial stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Hülsmann

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature presented illustrates that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, from bacterial cell walls, induces tumour necrosis factor (TNF synthesis in macrophages. TNF affects a number of cell types, amongst which are endothelial cells, within a few hours. Its injection has been shown to produce all symptoms of the toxic syndrome. In the present communication the vulnerability of endothelial cells will be stressed. These cells require carnitine not only for fatty acid oxidation but also for membrane protection and repair. As endothelial cells lose carnitine during hypoperfusion, it is speculated that the supply of carnitine during the early phase of LPS toxicity in rats might delay or avoid loss of endothelial functions. Earlier it was observed that hearts from rats, injected 3 h previously with LPS, showed strongly increased interstitial fluid production compared to hearts from control rats, even when TNF was present during a 3 h in vitro perfusion. It showed that LPS in vivo generates factors other than TNF, such as platelet activating factor (PAF, that are responsible for the increased capillary permeability.

  9. Tumor vascular endothelium : Barrier or target in tumor directed drug delivery and immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Ingrid; de Leij, Lou; Meijer, D.K F

    The therapy of solid tumors with conventional chemotherapeutics, drug delivery preparations and immunomodulatory agents directed against the tumor cells is corrupted by a major barrier presented by the tumor vasculature. Permeability of the tumor blood vessels for transport of small molecules and

  10. Radiation Sensitization Via Inhibiting Survival of Prostate Cancer and its Vascular Endothelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Bo

    2005-01-01

    .... We intend to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanism by which inhibition of Akt/mTOR or overexpression of PTEN in both prostate cancer and its vasculature results in radiosensitization...

  11. Radiation Sensitization Via Inhibiting Survival of Prostate Cancer and its Vascular Endothelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Bo

    2007-01-01

    .... We intend to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanism by which inhibition of Akt/mTOR or overexpression of PTEN in both prostate cancer and its vasculature results in radiosensitization...

  12. Genetic deficit of SK3 and IK1 channels disrupts the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor vasodilator pathway and causes hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brähler, Sebastian; Kaistha, Anuradha; Schmidt, Volker J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that activation of endothelial SK3 (K(Ca)2.3) and IK1 (K(Ca)3.1) K+ channels plays a role in the arteriolar dilation attributed to an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). However, our understanding of the precise function of SK3 and IK1 in the EDHF d...

  13. Chronic treatment with Vitamin D lowers arterial blood pressure and reduces endothelium-dependent contractions in the aorta of the SHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Michael S K; Delansorne, Remi; Svenningsen, Per

    2010-01-01

    control and treated groups. The endothelial ROS level was higher in SHR than WKY aortae, and reduced by the chronic treatment. The gene and protein expression studies indicated that the over-expression of COX-1 observed in SHR aorta was reduced by the chronic treatment. These results demonstrate...... that chronic treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 modulates vascular tone and this modulation is accompanied by a lowered blood pressure, reduced expression of COX-1 mRNA and protein and reduced ROS level in SHR. The reduction in endothelium-dependent contractions does not involve the surge in endothelial...... with or without endothelium were studied in conventional organ chambers for isometric force measurement. Confocal microscopy was used to measure the cytosolic-free calcium concentration (with the fluorescent dye Fluo-4) and reactive oxygen species (ROS; with dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate). Reverse...

  14. Analysis of biological characteristics of corneal endothelium in old patients with high myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Qiong Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze quantitatively the biological characteristics of corneal endothelium in old patients of high myopia with non-contact automatic corneal endothelial microscope.METHODS:A total of 189 old patients(197 eyeswere divided into the high myopia group and the normal control group according to refractive diopter, in which the former 98 cases(103 eyes, the latter 91 cases(94 eyes. The hexagonal cell(6A, the coefficient of variation(CV, the average cell area(AVE, the average cell density(CDand the central corneal thickness(CCTwere measured by non-contact automatic corneal endothelium. SPSS 14.0 software was used to analyze their percentage. Z-test was used to compare the mean and Chi-square test was used to compare the rate in between. RESULTS: The average cell density in high myopia patients decreased, but there were 14 eyes >3 000/mm2, 11 eyes 2 and 78 eyes in the 2 000~3 000/mm2, there were each 0 eye, 3 eyes and 91 eyes respectively in the normal control group. There was statistically significant difference between high myopia group and control(χ2=19.11, PPP>0.05. CONCLUSION: There will provide a reference valuable for clinical surgeon. Because according to the changes of parameters and morphology of the corneal endothelial cells, we can understand the repair ability, to predict the consequence of the treatment, in order to determine the design and the choice of a surgical.

  15. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf A. Khalil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN. In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC. PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and MAPK kinase (MEK, a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in

  16. Vascular Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Hashemilar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint in neurology and medicine. The most common causes of vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Meniere’s disease, and vascular disorders. Vertigo of vascular origin is usually limited to migraine, transient ischemic attacks, and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Vascular causes lead to various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo. This review provides an overview of epidemiology and clinical syndromes of vascular vertigo. Vertigo is an illusion of movement caused by asymmetrical involvement of the vestibular system by various causes. Migraine is the most frequent vascular disorder that causes vertigo in all age groups. Vertigo may occur in up to 25% of patients with migraine. The lifetime prevalence of migrainous vertigo is almost 1%. Cerebrovascular disorders are estimated to account for 3% to 7% of patients with vertigo. Vestibular paroxysmia has been diagnosed in 1.8% to 4% of cases in various dizziness units. Vasculitic disorders are rare in the general population, but vertigo may be seen in almost up to 50% of patients with different vasculitic syndromes. Conclusions: Migraine, cerebrovascular disorders especially involving the vertebrobasilar territory, cardiocirculatory diseases, neurovascular compression of the eighth nerve, and vasculitis are vascular causes of vertigo syndromes.

  17. Vascular relaxation induced by C-type natriuretic peptide involves the ca2+/NO-synthase/NO pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A Andrade

    Full Text Available AIMS: C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP and nitric oxide (NO are endothelium-derived factors that play important roles in the regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. We hypothesized that NO produced by the endothelial NO-synthase (NOS-3 contributes to the relaxation induced by CNP in isolated rat aorta via activation of endothelial NPR-C receptor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the putative contribution of NO through NPR-C activation in the CNP induced relaxation in isolated conductance artery. MAIN METHODS: Concentration-effect curves for CNP were constructed in aortic rings isolated from rats. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cytosolic calcium mobilization induced by CNP. The phosphorylation of the residue Ser1177 of NOS was analyzed by Western blot and the expression and localization of NPR-C receptors was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. KEY FINDINGS: CNP was less potent in inducing relaxation in denuded endothelium aortic rings than in intact ones. L-NAME attenuated the potency of CNP and similar results were obtained in the presence of hydroxocobalamin, an intracellular NO0 scavenger. CNP did not change the phosphorylation of Ser1177, the activation site of NOS-3, when compared with control. The addition of CNP produced an increase in [Ca2+]c in endothelial cells and a decrease in [Ca2+]c in vascular smooth muscle cells. The NPR-C-receptors are expressed in endothelial and adventitial rat aortas. SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that CNP-induced relaxation in intact aorta isolated from rats involves NO production due to [Ca2+]c increase in endothelial cells possibly through NPR-C activation expressed in these cells. The present study provides a breakthrough in the understanding of the close relationship between the vascular actions of nitric oxide and CNP.

  18. Endotoxin-induced and vaccine-induced systemic inflammation both impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not pulse wave reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lars Lind,1 Johannes Hulthe,2,3 Annika Johansson,3 Ewa Hedner31Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, 2Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg, 3AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, SwedenBackground: Inflammation induced by either endotoxin or vaccination has previously been shown to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV in healthy young individuals. However, the vascular effects of these two mechanisms of inducing inflammation have not been compared in the same individuals.Methods: Twelve young healthy males were studied at the same time of the day on three occasions in a random order; on one occasion 4 hours following an endotoxin injection (Escherichia coli endotoxin, 20 IU/kg, on another occasion 8 hours following vaccination against Salmonella typhi, and on a third occasion 4 hours following a saline control injection. EDV and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIDV were evaluated by local infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in the brachial artery, and forearm blood flow was measured with venous occlusion plethysmography. The augmentation index was determined by pulse wave analysis as an index of pulse wave reflection.Results: Both endotoxin and vaccination impaired EDV to a similar degree compared with the saline control (P = 0.005 and P = 0.014, respectively. EIDV was not significantly affected by inflammation. Endotoxin, but not vaccination, increased body temperature and circulating levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and interleukin-6. Augmentation index was not affected by the interventions.Conclusion: Despite the fact that endotoxin induced a more pronounced degree of inflammation than vaccination, both inflammatory challenges impaired EDV to a similar degree, supporting the view that different inflammatory stimuli could induce harmful effects on the vasculature.Keywords: endothelium, endotoxin, vaccination, vasodilation, inflammation

  19. Engineering the mechanical and biological properties of nanofibrous vascular grafts for in situ vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jeffrey J D; Yu, Jian; Wang, Aijun; Lee, Randall; Fang, Jun; Li, Song

    2017-08-17

    Synthetic small diameter vascular grafts have a high failure rate, and endothelialization is critical for preventing thrombosis and graft occlusion. A promising approach is in situ tissue engineering, whereby an acellular scaffold is implanted and provides stimulatory cues to guide the in situ remodeling into a functional blood vessel. An ideal scaffold should have sufficient binding sites for biomolecule immobilization and a mechanical property similar to native tissue. Here we developed a novel method to blend low molecular weight (LMW) elastic polymer during electrospinning process to increase conjugation sites and to improve the mechanical property of vascular grafts. LMW elastic polymer improved the elasticity of the scaffolds, and significantly increased the amount of heparin conjugated to the micro/nanofibrous scaffolds, which in turn increased the loading capacity of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prolonged the release of VEGF. Vascular grafts were implanted into the carotid artery of rats to evaluate the in vivo performance. VEGF treatment significantly enhanced endothelium formation and the overall patency of vascular grafts. Heparin coating also increased cell infiltration into the electrospun grafts, thus increasing the production of collagen and elastin within the graft wall. This work demonstrates that LMW elastic polymer blending is an approach to engineer the mechanical and biological property of micro/nanofibrous vascular grafts for in situ vascular tissue engineering.

  20. Sex differences in vascular endothelial function and health in humans: impacts of exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Hopkins, N.D.; Jones, H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Yeap, B.B.

    2016-01-01

    NEW FINDINGS: What is the topic of this review? This brief review discusses potential sex differences in arterial function across the age span, with special emphasis on the effects of oestrogen and testosterone on the vascular endothelium. What advances does it highlight? We discuss the relationship

  1. Impaired vascular function during short-term poor glycaemic control in Type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Clausen, P

    2005-01-01

    -dependent dilation) and to nitroglycerin (endothelium-independent dilation). Plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor antigen, adhesion molecules, vascular endothelial growth factor, homocystein and cholesterol were also measured. RESULTS: The median blood glucose levels in the 48 h before the examinations were...

  2. TNF-mediated damage to glomerular endothelium is an important determinant of acute kidney injury in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Chang, Anthony; Hack, Bradley K; Eadon, Michael T; Alper, Seth L; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2014-01-01

    Severe sepsis is often accompanied by acute kidney injury (AKI) and albuminuria. Here we studied whether the AKI and albuminuria associated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in mice reflects impairment of the glomerular endothelium with its associated endothelial surface layer. LPS treatment decreased the abundance of endothelial surface layer heparan sulfate proteoglycans and sialic acid, and led to albuminuria likely reflecting altered glomerular filtration permselectivity. LPS treatment decreased the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), while also causing significant ultrastructural alterations in the glomerular endothelium. The density of glomerular endothelial cell fenestrae was 5-fold lower, whereas the average fenestrae diameter was 3-fold higher in LPS-treated than in control mice. The effects of LPS on the glomerular endothelial surface layer, endothelial cell fenestrae, GFR, and albuminuria were diminished in TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) knockout mice, suggesting that these LPS effects are mediated by TNF-α activation of TNFR1. Indeed, intravenous administration of TNF decreased GFR and led to loss of glomerular endothelial cell fenestrae, increased fenestrae diameter, and damage to the glomerular endothelial surface layer. LPS treatment decreased kidney expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, our findings confirm the important role of glomerular endothelial injury, possibly by a decreased VEGF level, in the development and progression of AKI and albuminuria in the LPS model of sepsis in the mouse.

  3. Superoxide dismutase entrapped-liposomes restore the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of resistance arteries in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Manuela; Georgescu, Adriana; Manea, Adrian; Dragomir, Elena; Manduteanu, Ileana; Popov, Doina; Simionescu, Maya

    2004-01-19

    Diabetes is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation. We questioned whether administration of superoxide dismutase (superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) entrapped in long-circulating liposomes improves the vascular reactivity of the resistance arteries. Using the myograph technique, the vasodilation in response to acetylcholine was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries isolated from diabetic or normal hamsters treated for 3 days with superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes, with the same concentrations of free superoxide dismutase and plain liposomes, or untreated. Superoxide dismutase activity and nitric oxide (NO) levels were assayed by spectrophotometry, superoxide dismutase levels by Western blot and the role of N(pi)-nitro-L-arginine ethylester (L-NAME) on vasodilation by the myograph technique. Our data revealed that: (i) superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes restored to a great extent the endothelium-dependent relaxation of diabetic hamster resistance arteries; (ii) in superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes-treated diabetic animals, the activity and the level of superoxide dismutase in arterial homogenates as well as the serum nitrite levels were significantly higher than those in untreated hamsters or hamsters treated with free superoxide dismutase and plain liposomes: (iii) L-NAME inhibited the response of arteries to acetylcholine in superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes-treated diabetic hamsters. These results suggest that superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes is effective in scavenging superoxide anions, increases nitric oxide bioactivity and improves the vasorelaxation of resistance arteries in diabetic hamsters.

  4. Influence of endothelium in dose-dependent inhibition and potentiation by isoniazid of isosorbide dinitrate relaxation of rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H; Fernández, G

    2001-05-01

    The influence of in vivo administration of isoniazid on the relaxant effect of isosorbide dinitrate was determined by pretreating rats with various doses of isoniazid and obtaining concentration-response curves to isosorbide dinitrate in aortic rings from these animals. In rings with endothelium, isoniazid potentiated responses to isosorbide dinitrate at doses of 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg; 3 and 300 mg/kg were without effect. In endothelium-denuded preparations, potentiation was present only at 10 mg/kg; 3 and 300 mg/kg inhibited relaxation. Other experiments indicated that isoniazid potentiation was prevented by pyridoxine, was reproduced with theophylline, and did not occur with 3-morpholinosydnonimine or papaverine. These results were deemed compatible with the hypothesis that isoniazid inhibits transsulfuration of homocysteine and causes its accumulation in vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, where it functions as a thiol intermediate and leads to enhanced bioactivation of isosorbide dinitrate. Potentiation appeared to occur only with moderate increases of homocysteine.

  5. Endothelium and Its Alterations in Cardiovascular Diseases: Life Style Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Favero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium, which forms the inner cellular lining of blood vessels and lymphatics, is a highly metabolically active organ that is involved in many physiopathological processes, including the control of vasomotor tone, barrier function, leukocyte adhesion, and trafficking and inflammation. In this review, we summarized and described the following: (i endothelial cell function in physiological conditions and (ii endothelial cell activation and dysfunction in the main cardiovascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis, and hypertension and to diabetes, cigarette smoking, and aging physiological process. Finally, we presented the currently available evidence that supports the beneficial effects of physical activity and various dietary compounds on endothelial functions.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect of targeted delivery of SOD to endothelium: mechanism, synergism with NO donors and protective effects in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Shuvaev

    Full Text Available Pro-inflammatory activation of vascular endothelium is implicated in pathogenesis of severe conditions including stroke, infarction and sepsis. We have recently reported that superoxide dismutase (SOD conjugated with antibodies (Ab/SOD that provide targeted delivery into endothelial endosomes mitigates inflammatory endothelial activation by cytokines and agonists of Toll-like receptors (TLR. The goal of this study was to appraise potential utility and define the mechanism of this effect. Ab/SOD, but not non-targeted SOD injected in mice alleviated endotoxin-induced leukocyte adhesion in the cerebral vasculature and protected brain from ischemia-reperfusion injury. Transfection of endothelial cells with SOD, but not catalase inhibited NFκB signaling and expression of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 induced by both cytokines and TLR agonists. These results affirmed that Ab/SOD-quenched superoxide anion produced by endothelial cells in response to proinflammatory agents mediates NFκB activation. Furthermore, Ab/SOD potentiates anti-inflammatory effect of NO donors in endothelial cells in vitro, as well as in the endotoxin-challenged mice. These results demonstrate the central role of intracellular superoxide as a mediator of pro-inflammatory activation of endothelium and support the notion of utility of targeted interception of this signaling pathway for management of acute vascular inflammation.

  7. Endothelium-protective sphingosine-1-phosphate provided by HDL-associated apolipoprotein M

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Obinata, Hideru; Kumaraswamy, Sunil B

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the endothelium is provided by circulating sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which maintains vascular integrity. We show that HDL-associated S1P is bound specifically to both human and murine apolipoprotein M (apoM). Thus, isolated human ApoM(+) HDL contained S1P, whereas ApoM(-) HDL did...... not. Moreover, HDL in Apom(-/-) mice contains no S1P, whereas HDL in transgenic mice overexpressing human apoM has an increased S1P content. The 1.7-Å structure of the S1P-human apoM complex reveals that S1P interacts specifically with an amphiphilic pocket in the lipocalin fold of apoM. Human ApoM......(+) HDL induced S1P(1) receptor internalization, downstream MAPK and Akt activation, endothelial cell migration, and formation of endothelial adherens junctions, whereas apoM(-) HDL did not. Importantly, lack of S1P in the HDL fraction of Apom(-/-) mice decreased basal endothelial barrier function in lung...

  8. Kaempferol enhances endothelium-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary artery through activation of large-conductance a2+-activated K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y C; Leung, S W S; Leung, G P H; Man, R Y K

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Kaempferol, a plant flavonoid present in normal human diet, can modulate vasomotor tone. The present study aimed to elucidate the signalling pathway through which this flavonoid enhanced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Experimental Approach The effect of kaempferol on the relaxation of porcine coronary arteries to endothelium-dependent (bradykinin) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxing agents was studied in an in vitro organ chamber setup. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to determine the effect of kaempferol on potassium channels in porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (PCASMCs). Key Results At a concentration without direct effect on vascular tone, kaempferol (3 × 10−6 M) enhanced relaxations produced by bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside. The potentiation by kaempferol of the bradykinin-induced relaxation was not affected by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of NO synthase (10−4 M) or TRAM-34 plus UCL 1684, inhibitors of intermediate- and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, respectively (10−6 M each), but was abolished by tetraethylammonium chloride, a non-selective inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels (10−3 M), and iberiotoxin, a selective inhibitor of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa1.1; 10−7 M). Iberiotoxin also inhibited the potentiation by kaempferol of sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. Kaempferol stimulated an outward-rectifying current in PCASMCs, which was abolished by iberiotoxin. Conclusions and Implications The present results suggest that, in smooth muscle cells of the porcine coronary artery, kaempferol enhanced relaxations caused by endothelium-derived and exogenous NO as well as those due to endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization. This vascular effect of kaempferol involved the activation of KCa1.1 channels. PMID:25652142

  9. Kaempferol enhances endothelium-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary artery through activation of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y C; Leung, S W S; Leung, G P H; Man, R Y K

    2015-06-01

    Kaempferol, a plant flavonoid present in normal human diet, can modulate vasomotor tone. The present study aimed to elucidate the signalling pathway through which this flavonoid enhanced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. The effect of kaempferol on the relaxation of porcine coronary arteries to endothelium-dependent (bradykinin) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxing agents was studied in an in vitro organ chamber setup. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to determine the effect of kaempferol on potassium channels in porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (PCASMCs). At a concentration without direct effect on vascular tone, kaempferol (3 × 10(-6) M) enhanced relaxations produced by bradykinin and sodium nitroprusside. The potentiation by kaempferol of the bradykinin-induced relaxation was not affected by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of NO synthase (10(-4) M) or TRAM-34 plus UCL 1684, inhibitors of intermediate- and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, respectively (10(-6) M each), but was abolished by tetraethylammonium chloride, a non-selective inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels (10(-3) M), and iberiotoxin, a selective inhibitor of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa 1.1; 10(-7) M). Iberiotoxin also inhibited the potentiation by kaempferol of sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. Kaempferol stimulated an outward-rectifying current in PCASMCs, which was abolished by iberiotoxin. The present results suggest that, in smooth muscle cells of the porcine coronary artery, kaempferol enhanced relaxations caused by endothelium-derived and exogenous NO as well as those due to endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization. This vascular effect of kaempferol involved the activation of KCa 1.1 channels. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Altered Endothelium-Dependent Vasoreactivity of Aortic Rings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The use of L-arginine and potassium chloride separately as supplements has been reported to result in altered vascular reactivity. The concentration of either agent used has varied widely and there has been no report on the outcome of combined supplementation with both agents on vascular reactivity.

  11. Vascular dementia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2003-12-10

    Dec 10, 2003 ... ischaemic VaD includes multiple lacunes and subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease) and imaging shows multiple deep ... culitis, multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomy- ... Table I. The NINDS-AIREN criteria for the diagnosis of Vascular Dementia. 12. Require both ...

  12. VASCULAR SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-02

    Jun 2, 2016 ... with the literature from South Africa over the last four decades, and reflects the high rate of interpersonal violence in the country.14,15 As expected, cervical ... via the intact circle of Willis in young patients is the most likely explanation for the lack of strokes. Five patients were referred to the Durban vascular ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the ... is specialized and is best performed by a technologist and physician with experience in vascular ultrasound imaging. top of page Additional Information and Resources ...

  14. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  15. Blood flow restricted exercise and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Okita, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR) leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  16. Blood Flow Restricted Exercise and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  17. Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma R. Risler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic hemodynamic abnormality in hypertension is an increased peripheral resistance that is due mainly to a decreased vascular lumen derived from structural changes in the small arteries wall, named (as a whole vascular remodeling. The vascular wall is an active, flexible, and integrated organ made up of cellular (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, adventitia cells, and fibroblasts and noncellular (extracellular matrix components, which in a dynamic way change shape or number, or reorganize in response to physiological and pathological stimuli, maintaining the integrity of the vessel wall in physiological conditions or participating in the vascular changes in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Research focused on new signaling pathways and molecules that can participate in the mechanisms of vascular remodeling has provided evidence showing that vascular structure is not only affected by blood pressure, but also by mechanisms that are independent of the increased pressure. This review will provide an overview of the evidence, explaining some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms participating in the development of the vascular remodeling, in experimental models of hypertension, with special reference to the findings in spontaneously hypertensive rats as a model of essential hypertension, and in fructose-fed rats as a model of secondary hypertension, in the context of the metabolic syndrome. The understanding of the mechanisms producing the vascular alterations will allow the development of novel pharmacological tools for vascular protection in hypertensive disease.

  18. Microparticles, vascular function, and atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Amabile, Nicolas; Chironi, Gilles; Simon, Alain; Tedgui, Alain; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2011-08-19

    Membrane-shed submicron microparticles (MPs) are released after cell activation or apoptosis. High levels of MPs circulate in the blood of patients with atherothrombotic diseases, where they could serve as a useful biomarker of vascular injury and a potential predictor of cardiovascular mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events. Atherosclerotic lesions also accumulate large numbers of MPs of leukocyte, smooth muscle cell, endothelial, and erythrocyte origin. A large body of evidence supports the role of MPs at different steps of atherosclerosis development, progression, and complications. Circulating MPs impair the atheroprotective function of the vascular endothelium, at least partly, by decreased nitric oxide synthesis. Plaque MPs favor local inflammation by augmenting the expression of adhesion molecule, such as intercellular adhesion molecule -1 at the surface of endothelial cell, and monocyte recruitment within the lesion. In addition, plaque MPs stimulate angiogenesis, a key event in the transition from stable to unstable lesions. MPs also may promote local cell apoptosis, leading to the release and accumulation of new MPs, and thus creating a vicious circle. Furthermore, highly thrombogenic plaque MPs could increase thrombus formation at the time of rupture, together with circulating MPs released in this context by activated platelets and leukocytes. Finally, MPs also could participate in repairing the consequences of arterial occlusion and tissue ischemia by promoting postischemic neovascularization.

  19. Vascular adhesion molecules in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Dekker, N P; MacPhail, L A; Lozada-Nur, F; McCalmont, T H

    1996-06-01

    Because recruitment and retention of lymphoid cells appear to be critical components of the pathogenesis of lichen planus, we have compared the expression and distribution of a panel of vascular adhesion molecules (ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, CD34) and leukocyte adhesion molecule ligands (LFA-1, Mac-1, VLA4, L-selectin) in biopsies of this disease. Frozen sections of 12 clinically and histologically confirmed cases of lichen planus and 9 normal control tissues were evaluated immunohistochemically with a standard 1-day avidin-biotin peroxidase technique. Staining intensity of vascular endothelium was evaluated semiquantitatively. Three microvascular zones or compartments were defined and evaluated separately. Generally, different staining patterns were observed in association with the various endothelium-associated adhesion molecules. In normal controls, PECAM was intensely expressed and VCAM-1 was weakly expressed. Intermediate staining was associated with ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and CD34. Staining within the three microvascular compartments frequently showed variations in intensity. In lichen planus, increased staining for ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 was evident in one or more of the microvascular compartments. In the subepithelial vascular compartment where the infiltrate was the most dense, VCAM-1 appeared to show the greatest positive change. Almost all cells in the lichen planus infiltrates stained positive for ICAM-1, L-selectin, LFA-1, and VLA4, and large numbers of cells also exhibited VCAM-1, PECAM-1, and Mac-1 immunoreactivity. It appears that upregulation of ELAM-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 (especially by endothelial cells in the subepithelial vascular plexus) could play a role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus. The expression of leukocyte receptors L-selectin, LFA-1, and VLA4 by most of the cells in the lichen planus infiltrate suggest that these molecules may be responsible for recruitment as well as retention in the active

  20. The distribution and ultrastructure of the forming blood capillaries and the effect of apoptosis on vascularization in mouse embryonic molar mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guohua; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guobin; Yang, Jingwen; Wan, Chunyan; Zhang, Lu; Song, Guangtai; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2014-04-01

    Vascularization is essential for organ and tissue development. Teeth develop through interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme. The developing capillaries in the enamel organ, the dental epithelial structure, occur simultaneously by mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis at the onset of dentinogenesis. The vascular neoformation in the dental mesenchyme has been reported to start from the cap stage. However, the mechanisms of vascularization in the dental mesenchyme remain unknown. In the hope of understanding the mechanisms of the formation of dental mesenchymal vasculature, mouse lower molar germs from embryonic day (E) 13.5 to E16.5 were processed for immunostaining of CD31 and CD34, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, the role of apoptosis for the vascularization in dental mesenchyme was examined by in vitro culture of E14.0 lower molars in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) and a subsequent subrenal culture. Our results showed that CD31- and CD34-positive cells progressively entered the central part of the dental papilla from the peridental mesenchyme. For TEM, angioblasts, young capillaries with thick endothelium and endothelial cells containing vacuoles were observed in peripheral dental mesenchyme, suggesting vasculogenesis was taking place. The presence of lateral sprouting, cytoplasmic filopodia and transluminal bridges in the dental papilla suggested angiogenesis was also occurring. Inhibition of apoptosis delayed the angiogenic vascularization of the dental papilla. Therefore, these data demonstrated that molar mesenchyme is progressively vascularized by mechanisms of both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and apoptosis partially contributes to the vascularization of the dental papilla.

  1. Activation of the sweet taste receptor, T1R3, by the artificial sweetener sucralose regulates the pulmonary endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Elizabeth O; Vang, Alexander; Braza, Julie; Shil, Aparna; Chichger, Havovi

    2018-01-01

    A hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is pulmonary vascular permeability. In these settings, loss of barrier integrity is mediated by cell-contact disassembly and actin remodeling. Studies into molecular mechanisms responsible for improving microvascular barrier function are therefore vital in the development of therapeutic targets for reducing vascular permeability in ARDS. The sweet taste receptor T1R3 is a G protein-coupled receptor, activated following exposure to sweet molecules, to trigger a gustducin-dependent signal cascade. In recent years, extraoral locations for T1R3 have been identified; however, no studies have focused on T1R3 within the vasculature. We hypothesize that activation of T1R3, in the pulmonary vasculature, plays a role in regulating endothelial barrier function in settings of ARDS. Our study demonstrated expression of T1R3 within the pulmonary vasculature, with a drop in expression levels following exposure to barrier-disruptive agents. Exposure of lung microvascular endothelial cells to the intensely sweet molecule sucralose attenuated LPS- and thrombin-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Likewise, sucralose exposure attenuated bacteria-induced lung edema formation in vivo. Inhibition of sweet taste signaling, through zinc sulfate, T1R3, or G-protein siRNA, blunted the protective effects of sucralose on the endothelium. Sucralose significantly reduced LPS-induced increased expression or phosphorylation of the key signaling molecules Src, p21-activated kinase (PAK), myosin light chain-2 (MLC2), heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), and p110α phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (p110αPI3K). Activation of T1R3 by sucralose protects the pulmonary endothelium from edemagenic agent-induced barrier disruption, potentially through abrogation of Src/PAK/p110αPI3K-mediated cell-contact disassembly and Src/MLC2/HSP27-mediated actin remodeling. Identification of sweet taste sensing in the pulmonary vasculature may represent a novel

  2. Deficiency of superoxide dismutase promotes cerebral vascular hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dayal

    Full Text Available There is an emerging consensus that hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral vascular disease and that homocysteine-lowering therapy protects from ischemic stroke. However, the mechanisms by which hyperhomocysteinemia produces abnormalities of cerebral vascular structure and function remain largely undefined. Our objective in this study was to define the mechanistic role of superoxide in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced cerebral vascular dysfunction and hypertrophy. Unlike previous studies, our experimental design included a genetic approach to alter superoxide levels by using superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1-deficient mice fed a high methionine/low folate diet to produce hyperhomocysteinemia. In wild-type mice, the hyperhomocysteinemic diet caused elevated superoxide levels and impaired responses to endothelium-dependent vasodilators in cerebral arterioles, and SOD1 deficiency compounded the severity of these effects. The cross-sectional area of the pial arteriolar wall was markedly increased in mice with SOD1 deficiency, and the hyperhomocysteinemic diet sensitized SOD1-deficient mice to this hypertrophic effect. Analysis of individual components of the vascular wall demonstrated a significant increase in the content of smooth muscle and elastin. We conclude that superoxide is a key driver of both cerebral vascular hypertrophy and vasomotor dysfunction in this model of dietary hyperhomocysteinemia. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms by which hyperhomocysteinemia promotes cerebral vascular disease and ischemic stroke.

  3. Evaluation of intracameral injection of ranibizumab and bevacizumab on the corneal endothelium by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Seyhmus; Nergiz, Yusuf; Aksit, Ihsan; Sahin, Alparslan; Cingu, Kursat; Caca, Ihsan

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of intracameral injection of ranibizumab and bevacizumab on the corneal endothelium by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty-eight female rabbits were randomly divided into four equal groups. Rabbits in groups 1 and 2 underwent intracameral injection of 1 mg/0.1 mL and 0.5 mg/0.05 mL ranibizumab, respectively; group 3 was injected with 1.25 mg/0.05 mL bevacizumab. All three groups were injected with a balanced salt solution (BSS) into the anterior chamber of the left (fellow) eye. None of the rabbits in group 4 underwent an injection. Corneal thickness and intraocular pressure were measured before the injections, on the first day, and in the first month after injection. The rabbits were sacrificed and corneal tissues were excised in the first month after injection. Specular microscopy was used for the corneal endothelial cell count. Endothelial cell density was assessed and comparisons drawn between the groups and the control. Micrographs were recorded for SEM examination. The structure of the corneal endothelial cells, the junctional area of the cell membrane, the distribution of microvillus, and the cell morphology of the eyes that underwent intracameral injection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), BSS, and the control group were compared. Corneal thickness and intraocular pressure were not significantly different between the groups that underwent anti-VEGF or BSS injection and the control group on the first day and in the first month of injection. The corneal endothelial cell count was significantly diminished in all three groups; predominantly in group 1 and 2 (P<0.05). The SEM examination revealed normal corneal endothelial histology in group 3 and the control group. Eyes in group 1 exhibited indistinctness of corneal endothelial cell borders, microvillus loss in the luminal surface, excessive blebbing, and disintegration of intercellular junctions. In group 2, the cell structure of the corneal endothelium

  4. Sex-specific effects of cardiovascular risk factors on endothelium-dependent dilation and endothelin activity in middle-aged women and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaywant Brar

    Full Text Available Healthy middle-aged postmenopausal women have higher endothelium-dependent dilation and lower vasoconstrictor activity of endothelin-1 than men. Whether these sex-specific differences extend to patients with cardiovascular risk factors has not been investigated. The current study aimed to determine whether, in patients with cardiovascular risk factors, sex-specific differences exist in endothelium-dependent dilation and endothelin-1 activity.Forearm blood flow responses were measured by strain-gauge plethysmography during the intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and the selective endothelin type A receptor blocker BQ-123 in 50 women and 64 men with cardiovascular risk factors.Acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside induced a significant vasodilation in women and men alike (p < 0.01 for both. Also BQ-123 caused a significant vasodilation (p < 0.001 in both groups. The vasodilator response to acetylcholine was greater in women compared to men; however there were no differences in the response to sodium nitroprusside and BQ-123 (p = NS for both between the two sex groups.Middle-aged women with cardiovascular risk factors have significantly higher endothelium-dependent dilation than middle-aged men; however, vascular endothelin 1 activity is similar in the two groups. These findings suggest that the presence of cardiovascular risk factors is associated with sex-specific effects on endothelium-dependent dilation but not on endothelin 1 activity. Further study is needed to confirm our findings and to characterize the mechanisms underlying this sex-specific regulation of endothelial function.

  5. Vascular neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H B

    1980-07-01

    Vascular neoplasms in the broad sense represent a very common group of tumors or hamartomas that show great variability in gross appearance, microscopic appearance, and clinical course. Generally, neoplasms are composed of one cell type, but vascular neoplasms are collections of endothelial-lined tubes or tubules with connective tissue walls that may contain smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and nerve elements according to the specific tissues of origin. The classification of vascular neoplasms as outlined in this article attempts to delineate each tumor or hamartoma according to its histologic appearance and clinical behavior. The clinical course ranges from completely benign, self-involuting malformations such as the strawberry hemangioma to highly malignant angiosarcomas with their rapid growth and frequent metastases. Defects in the lymphatic system show gradations from simple lymphangiomas through lymphedema and lymphangiectasia, which can probably be explained by faulty embryologic development. Management of these lesions has been discussed, including brief descriptions of most of the currently accepted treatment methods for these frequently encountered clinical problems.

  6. Influence of endothelium on the membrane-stabilizing effect of calcium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    increase in [Ca2+]o (low bicarbonate PSS) from 5.0 to 25.0mM in rings with intact endothelium resulted in relaxation responses. These relaxation responses were attenuated in endothelium- denuded rings as well as following exposure to methylene blue. Conclusion: The results show that relaxation responses induced by ...

  7. The role of the neuro-astro-vascular unit in the etiology of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenoy eMeshulam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing recognition that brain pathologies do not affect neurons only but rather are, to a large extent, pathologies of glial cells as well as of the vasculature opens to new perspectives in our understanding of genetic disorders of the CNS. To validate the role of the neuron-glial-vascular unit in the etiology of genome instability disorders, we report about cell death and morphological aspects of neuro-glia networks and the associated vasculature in a mouse model of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T, a human genetic disorder that induces severe motor impairment. We found that AT-mutated protein deficiency was consistent with aberrant astrocytic morphology and alterations of the vasculature, often accompanied by reactive gliosis. Interestingly similar findings could also be reported in the case of other genetic disorders. These observations bolster the notion that astrocyte-specific pathologies, hampered vascularization and astrocyte-endothelium interactions in the CNS could play a crucial role in the etiology of genome instability brain disorders and could underlie neurodegeneration.

  8. Phototoxic effects of 8-methoxypsoralen on rabbit corneal endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, I.A.; Basu, P.K.; Hasany, S.M.; Persad, S.D. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    The phototoxic effects of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) were investigated using the rabbit corneal endothelium in organ culture. The corneas were divided into four groups: (a) irradiated with a mercury vapor lamp (emitting UVA and visible radiation) in the presence of 8-MOP (experimental), (b) irradiated without 8-MOP (control A), (c) incubated with 8-MOP (control B) and (d) incubated without 8-MOP (control C). Specular and light microscopic examination showed that the experimental corneas had greater cellular damage compared to the control corneas. The effects of 8-MOP were restricted to certain localized areas of the cornea. However there was no significant difference in the amounts of 51Cr released from the labelled experimental and control corneas. These results show phototoxic damage of the corneal endothelial cells.

  9. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Ezra A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Orbach, Darren B. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Neurointerventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  10. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, Ezra A.; Orbach, Darren B.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  11. CYP epoxygenase-derived H2O2 is involved in the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) and relaxation of intrarenal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Mercedes; López-Oliva, Maria Elvira; Pinilla, Estéfano; Martínez, María Pilar; Sánchez, Ana; Rodríguez, Claudia; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Rivera, Luis; Prieto, Dolores

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) are involved in the in endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type relaxant responses of coronary and mesenteric arterioles. The role of ROS in kidney vascular function has mainly been investigated in the context of harmful ROS generation associated to kidney disease. The present study was sought to investigate whether H 2 O 2 is involved in the endothelium-dependent relaxations of intrarenal arteries as well the possible endothelial sources of ROS generation involved in these responses. Under conditions of cyclooxygenase (COX) and nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition, acetylcholine (ACh) induced relaxations and stimulated H 2 O 2 release that were reduced by catalase and by the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimetic ebselen in rat renal interlobar arteries, suggesting the involvement of H 2 O 2 in the endothelium-dependent responses. ACh relaxations were also blunted by the CYP2C inhibitor sulfaphenazole and by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Acetylcholine stimulated both superoxide (O 2 •- ) and H 2 O 2 production that were reduced by sulfaphenazole and apocynin. Expression of the antioxidant enzyme CuZnSOD and of the H 2 O 2 reducing enzymes catalase and GPx-1 was found in both intrarenal arteries and renal cortex. On the other hand, exogenous H 2 O 2 relaxed renal arteries by decreasing vascular smooth muscle (VSM) intracellular calcium concentration [Ca 2+ ] i and markedly enhanced endothelial K Ca currents in freshly isolated renal endothelial cells. CYP2C11 and CYP2C23 epoxygenases were highly expressed in interlobar renal arteries and renal cortex, respectively, and were co-localized with eNOS in renal endothelial cells. These results demonstrate that H 2 O 2 is involved in the EDH-type relaxant responses of renal arteries and that CYP 2C epoxygenases are physiologically relevant endothelial sources of vasodilator H 2 O 2 in the kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  13. Polydatin Restores Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat Aorta Rings Impaired by High Glucose: A Novel Insight into the PPARβ-NO Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wu

    Full Text Available Polydatin, a natural component from Polygonum Cuspidatum, has important therapeutic effects on metabolic syndrome. A novel therapeutic strategy using polydatin to improve vascular function has recently been proposed to treat diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. However, the biological role and molecular basis of polydatin's action on vascular endothelial cells (VECs-mediated vasodilatation under diabetes-related hyperglycemia condition remain elusive. The present study aimed to assess the contribution of polydatin in restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation and to determine the details of its underlying mechanism. By measuring endothelium-dependent relaxation, we found that acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was impaired by elevated glucose (55 mmol/L; however, polydatin (1, 3, 10 μmol/L could restore the relaxation in a dose-dependent manner. Polydatin could also improve the histological damage to endothelial cells in the thoracic aorta. Polydatin's effects were mediated via promoting the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS, enhancing eNOS activity and decreasing the inducible NOS (iNOS level, finally resulting in a beneficial increase in NO release, which probably, at least in part, through activation of the PPARβ signaling pathway. The results provided a novel insight into polydatin action, via PPARβ-NO signaling pathways, in restoring endothelial function in high glucose conditions. The results also indicated the potential utility of polydatin to treat diabetes related cardiovascular diseases.

  14. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Significant Tumor Vascular Dysfunction and Increased Tumor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression Induced by High Single-Dose Irradiation in a Pancreatic Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Azusa [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Mujcic, Hilda [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wouters, Bradly G. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); DaCosta, Ralph S., E-mail: rdacosta@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on pancreatic tumor vasculature and microenvironment using in vivo imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: A BxPC3 pancreatic tumor xenograft was established in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model and a subcutaneous hind leg model. Tumors were irradiated with a single dose of 4, 12, or 24 Gy. The dorsal skinfold window chamber model was used to assess tumor response, vascular function and permeability, platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, and tumor hypoxia for up to 14 days after 24-Gy irradiation. The hind leg model was used to monitor tumor size, hypoxia, and vascularity for up to 65 days after 24-Gy irradiation. Tumors were assessed histologically to validate in vivo observations. Results: In vivo fluorescence imaging revealed temporary vascular dysfunction in tumors irradiated with a single dose of 4 to 24 Gy, but most significantly with a single dose of 24 Gy. Vascular functional recovery was observed by 14 days after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with 24 Gy caused platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium within hours to days after irradiation. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in irradiated tumors compared with nonirradiated controls 14 days after irradiation. This observation corresponded with increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in irradiated tumors. In the hind leg model, irradiation with a single dose of 24 Gy led to tumor growth delay, followed by tumor regrowth. Conclusions: Irradiation of the BxPC3 tumors with a single dose of 24 Gy caused transient vascular dysfunction and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Such biological changes may impact tumor response to high single-dose and hypofractionated irradiation, and further investigations are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  15. Does aldosterone play a significant role for regulation of vascular tone?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Kristina Sanne; Assersen, Kasper Bostlund; Dalgaard, Emil Geertsen

    2016-01-01

    receptors (MR) are present in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells and MR-independent pathways are also involved. The vascular effects of aldosterone are complex, both concentration, temporal and spatial aspects are relevant. The acute response includes vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide...... of reactive oxygen radicals, endothelia Na-influx and smooth muscle calcium channel expression and perivascular cells, e.g. mast cells, also participate. Moreover, the vascular effect of aldosterone depends on the status of the endothelium which is likely cause of the very different responses to aldosterone...

  16. Vascular expression of endothelial antigen PAL-E indicates absence of blood-ocular barriers in the normal eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Hofman, P.; Anderson, L.; Troost, D.; van der Gaag, R.

    1997-01-01

    The endothelium-specific antigen PAL-E is expressed in capillaries and veins throughout the body with the exception of the brain, where the antigen is absent from anatomical sites with a patent blood-brain barrier. In this study we determined vascular endothelial staining for PAL-E in the normal eye

  17. Jabuticaba-Induced Endothelium-Independent Vasodilating Effect on Isolated Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Daniela Medeiros Lobo de; Borges, Leonardo Luis; Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso da; Rocha, Matheus Lavorenti

    2016-09-01

    Despite the important biological effects of jabuticaba, its actions on the cardiovascular system have not been clarified. To determine the effects of jabuticaba hydroalcoholic extract (JHE) on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of isolated arteries. Endothelium-denuded aortic rings of rats were mounted in isolated organ bath to record isometric tension. The relaxant effect of JHE and the influence of K+ channels and Ca2+ intra- and extracellular sources on JHE-stimulated response were assessed. Arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine showed concentration-dependent relaxation (0.380 to 1.92 mg/mL). Treatment with K+ channel blockers (tetraethyl-ammonium, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine) hindered relaxation due to JHE. In addition, phenylephrine-stimulated contraction was hindered by previous treatment with JHE. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase did not change relaxation due to JHE. In addition, JHE inhibited the contraction caused by Ca2+ influx stimulated by phenylephrine and KCl (75 mM). JHE induces endothelium-independent vasodilation. Activation of K+ channels and inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the membrane are involved in the JHE relaxant effect. Embora a jabuticaba apresente importantes efeitos biológicos, suas ações sobre o sistema cardiovascular ainda não foram esclarecidas. Determinar os efeitos do extrato de jabuticaba (EHJ) sobre o músculo liso vascular (MLV) em artérias isoladas. Aortas (sem endotélio) de ratos foram montadas em banho de órgãos isolados para registro de tensão isométrica. Foram verificados o efeito relaxante, a influência dos canais de K+ e das fontes de Ca2+ intra- e extracelular sob a resposta estimulada pelo EHJ. Artérias pré-contraídas com fenilefrina apresentaram relaxamento concentração-dependente (0,380 a 1,92 mg/mL). O tratamento com bloqueadores de canais de K+ (tetraetilamônio, glibenclamida, 4-aminopiridina) prejudicaram o relaxamento pelo EHJ. A contração estimulada com fenilefrina tamb

  18. In Vitro Endothelialization of Biodegradable Vascular Grafts Via Endothelial Progenitor Cell Seeding and Maturation in a Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Bracaglia, Laura G.; Kimerer, Lucas K.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P.

    2016-01-01

    A critical challenge to the success of biodegradable vascular grafts is the establishment of a healthy endothelium. To establish this monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs), a variety of techniques have been developed, including cell seeding. Vascular grafts may be seeded with relevant cell types and allowed to mature before implantation. Due to the low proliferative ability of adult ECs and issues with donor site morbidity, there has been increasing interest in using endothelial progenitor cel...

  19. The effects of diabetes, hypothemia and nitric oxide sinthase blockade on vascular escape and tachyphylaxis in the rabbit isolated kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Lira de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    The endothelium plays a crucial role in the vascular tone, releasing relaxing and contracting factors â among the first ones the gas nitric oxide, produced from the amino acid L-arginine and a group of enzimes called nitric oxide synthases (NOS). This study evaluated the effects of L-arginine as well as NOS inibitors on vascular escape and tachyphylaxis of rabbit kidneys. Furthermore the effects of diabetes and hypothermia were studied also. Normal and alloxan treated diabetic rabbit kidne...

  20. Endothelial ATP-binding cassette G1 in mouse endothelium protects against hemodynamic-induced atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Shanshan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Xu; Shi, Ying; Li, Bochuan; Bao, Qiankun; Pang, Wei; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi; He, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Activated vascular endothelium inflammation under persistent hyperlipidemia is the initial step of atherogenesis. ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) is a crucial factor maintaining sterol and lipid homeostasis by transporting cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ABCG1 in endothelial inflammation activation during early-stage atherogenesis in mice and the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific ABCG1 transgenic (EC-ABCG1-Tg) mice were generated and cross-bred with low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient (Ldlr −/− ) mice. After a 4-week Western-type diet, the mice were sacrificed for assessing atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein ECs were treated with different flows, and ABCG1 was adenovirally overexpressed to investigate the mechanism in vitro. Compared with Ldlr −/− mouse aortas, EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr −/− aortas showed decreased early-stage lesions. Furthermore, the lesion area in the EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr −/− mouse aortic arch but not thoracic aorta was significantly reduced, which suggests a protective role of ABCG1 under atheroprone flow. In vitro, overexpression of ABCG1 attenuated EC activation caused by oscillatory shear stress. Overexpression of ABCG1 blunted cholesterol-activated ECs in vitro. In exploring the mechanisms of ABCG1 attenuating endothelial inflammation, we found that ABCG1 inhibited oscillatory flow-activated nuclear factor kappa B and NLRP3 inflammasome in ECs. ABCG1 may play a protective role in early-stage atherosclerosis by reducing endothelial activation induced by oscillatory shear stress via suppressing the inflammatory response. - Highlights: • EC-ABCG1-Tg mice in a Ldlr −/− background showed decreased atherosclerosis. • Overexpression of ABCG1 in ECs decreased OSS-induced EC activation. • NLRP3 and NF-κB might be an underlying mechanism of ABCG1 protective role.

  1. Phenotypic heterogeneity in the endothelium of the human vortex vein system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Paula K; Tan, Priscilla E Z; Cringle, Stephen J; McAllister, Ian L; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2013-10-01

    The vortex vein system is the drainage pathway for the choroidal circulation and serves an important function in the effective drainage of the exceptionally high blood flow from the choroidal circulation. As there are only 4-6 vortex veins, a large volume of blood must be drained from many choroidal veins into each individual vortex vein. The vortex vein system must also cope with passing through tissues of different rigidity and significant pressure gradient as it transverses from the intrao-cular to the extra-ocular compartments. However, little is known about how the vortex vein system works under such complex situations in both physiological and pathological condition. Endothelial cells play a vital role in other vascular systems, but they have not been studied in detail in the vortex vein system. The purpose of this study is to characterise the intracellular structures and morphology in both the intra-and extra-ocular regions of the human vortex vein system. We hypothesise the presence of endothelial phenotypic heterogeneity through the vortex vein system. The inferior temporal vortex vein system from human donor eyes were obtained and studied histologically using confocal microscopy. The f-actin cytoskeleton and nuclei were labelled using Alexa Fluor conjugated Phalloidin and YO-PRO-1. Eight regions of the vortex vein system were examined with the venous endothelium studied in detail with quantitative data obtained for endothelial cell and nuclei size and shape. Significant endothelial phenotypic heterogeneity was found throughout the vortex vein system with the most obvious differences observed between the ampulla and its downstream regions. Variation in the distribution pattern of smooth muscle cells, in particular the absence of smooth muscle cells around the ampulla, was noted. Our results suggest the presence of significantly different haemodynamic forces in different regions of the vortex vein system and indicate that the vortex vein system may play

  2. The effect of tempol on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Christensen, Frank Holden; Buus, Niels Henrik

    2009-05-01

    High blood pressure is associated with increased oxidative stress and increased amounts of reactive oxygen species in the vascular wall which results in impairment of endothelial function and a proinflammatory state (with accelerated development of atherosclerosis). One consequence of this is a reduced nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilatation which is also a prognostic marker of the severity of cardiovascular disease. Thus, improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation may be an important goal in antihypertensive treatment. The present review focuses on possible mechanisms of action for the nitroxide tempol with reference to NO-dependent endothelial function and blood pressure lowering effects. Tempol is a water-soluble and cell permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic which scavenges free radicals such as superoxide ions and hydroxyl radicals, but other mechanisms (including K channel opening) may also contribute to the effect of this drug. Indeed, tempol can: (i) normalize the NO-dependent vasodilatation induced by acetylcholine in aorta; and (ii) restore the NO-dependent vasodilatation in smaller resistance arteries from hypertensive rats. Furthermore, both short-term and long-term administrations of tempol reduce blood pressure in hypertensive rats and mini-pigs, and the drug may even prevent the development of high blood pressure. The in vivo effect of tempol may, in addition to scavenging superoxide, inhibit the sympathetic nervous system. The toxicity of tempol in rodents seems limited but, apart from external application, there are no reports of administration of the drug to humans. In summary, lowering of the oxidative stress by scavenging of free radicals may offer a new antihypertensive treatment strategy.

  3. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AND ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION: VASCULAR WALL AS THE TARGET ORGAN IN COMORBID PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Karoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of endothelial dysfunction in patients with respiratory diseases have become relevant in recent years. Perhaps endothelial dysfunction and high arterial stiffness bind bronchopulmonary and cardiovascular diseases.Aim. To reveal features of disturbances of arterial wall vasoregulatory function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the presence and absence of arterial hypertension (HT.Material and methods. The study included 50 patients with COPD with normal blood pressure (BP and 85 patients with COPD and HT. Control group was presented by 20 practically healthy men comparable in age with COPD patients. Tests with reactive hyperemia (endothelium-dependent dilation and nitroglycerin (endothelium-independent dilation were performed in order to evaluate endothelium function. The number of desquamated endotheliocytes in the blood was determined.Results. In patients with COPD and HT in comparison with COPD patients without HT and healthy individuals more pronounced damages of the vascular wall, endothelium vasoregulatory function disturbances and a tendency to the reduction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation were determined both during COPD exacerbation and remission. These differences were most pronounced during the COPD exacerbation. In patients with COPD and HT in comparison with COPD patients without HT the damage of the vascular wall was more pronounced during the remission and endothelium-dependent dilatation disorder – during the exacerbation. The revealed disorders in patients with COPD and HT were associated with smoking status (r=0.61, p<0.01, severity of bronchial obstruction (r=-0.49, p<0.05, and hypoxemia (r=-0.76, p<0.01. We noted relationships between the parameters of 24-hour BP monitoring and remodeling of the brachial artery (r=0.34, p<0.05, endothelium lesion (r=0.25, p<0.05, and impairment of its vasoregulating function (r=-0.58, p<0.05. At that, the following parameters were important: the

  4. Renal posttransplant's vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašić Dragoslav

    2003-01-01

    present study demonstrate that the rate of this complication in LD group was low, only 0.3%, but significantly higher in CD group - 11.8%. Many factors should be considered in order to understand for such significant difference among these groups. First of all, cadaveric transplant activity in our country is very low. In our series, median waiting period for renal transplantation was 2.8 years in LD group vs. 4.8 years in CD group (p<0.01. Also, vascular damages because of long term hemodialysis are contributing factors. Mean age of CD recipients was 7.4 years bigger vs. LD recipients. Primary cadaveric graft damage by accident and further manipulations during cadaveric donor nephrectomy, preservation and per-fusion are additional factors compromising the quality of cadaveric renal transplant outcome. Also, preoperative evaluation of cadaveric grafts is not as exact as in cases of LD grafts (excretory urography arteriography, etc. In the available transplant literature it is almost impossible to find data about vascular complications by different donor types. Mostly, authors offer experiences related to all transplants and most of them agree that in the present time better results are obtained using living donors [17].

  5. Biomechanics of the endothelium substrate influences leukocyte transmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    The effects of shear flow and cytokines on leukocyte transmigration are well understood. However, the effects of substrate stiffness on transmigration remain unexplored. We have developed an in vitro model that allows us to study leukocyte transmigration as a function of varying physiological substrate stiffness. Interestingly, leukocyte transmigration increased with increasing substrate stiffness below the endothelium. intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, stiffness, cytoskeletal arrangement, morphology, and cell-substrate adhesion could not account for the dependence of transmigration on substrate stiffness. We also explored the role of cell contraction and observed that (1) neutrophil transmigration caused large hole formation in monolayers on stiff substrates. (2) Neutrophil transmigration on soft substrates was increased by decreasing cell-cell adhesion. (3) Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase normalized the effects of substrate stiffness by reducing cell contraction on stiff substrates. These results demonstrate that neutrophil transmigration is regulated by MLCK-mediated generation of gaps at cell borders through substrate stiffness-dependent endothelial cell contraction.

  6. Active trafficking of alpha 1 antitrypsin across the lung endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelia D Lockett

    Full Text Available The homeostatic lung protective effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT may require the transport of circulating proteinase inhibitor across an intact lung endothelial barrier. We hypothesized that uninjured pulmonary endothelial cells transport A1AT to lung epithelial cells. Purified human A1AT was rapidly taken up by confluent primary rat pulmonary endothelial cell monolayers, was secreted extracellularly, both apically and basolaterally, and was taken up by adjacent rat lung epithelial cells co-cultured on polarized transwells. Similarly, polarized primary human lung epithelial cells took up basolaterally-, but not apically-supplied A1AT, followed by apical secretion. Evidence of A1AT transcytosis across lung microcirculation was confirmed in vivo by two-photon intravital microscopy in mice. Time-lapse confocal microscopy indicated that A1AT co-localized with Golgi in the endothelium whilst inhibition of the classical secretory pathway with tunicamycin significantly increased intracellular retention of A1AT. However, inhibition of Golgi secretion promoted non-classical A1AT secretion, associated with microparticle release. Polymerized A1AT or A1AT supplied to endothelial cells exposed to soluble cigarette smoke extract had decreased transcytosis. These results suggest previously unappreciated pathways of A1AT bidirectional uptake and secretion from lung endothelial cells towards the alveolar epithelium and airspaces. A1AT trafficking may determine its functional bioavailablity in the lung, which could be impaired in individuals exposed to smoking or in those with A1AT deficiency.

  7. Effects of iodinated contrast media on blood and endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelin, Peter; Stacul, Fulvio; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Morcos, Sameh K.; Molen, Aart J. van der

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of iodinated contrast media on blood components and endothelium based on experimental and clinical studies and to produce clinically relevant guidelines for reducing thrombotic and hematologic complications following the intravascular use of contrast media. A report was drafted after review of the literature and discussions among the members of the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology. The final report was produced following discussion at the 12th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Ljubljana, Slovenia (2005). Experimental data indicate that all iodinated contrast media produce an anticoagulant effect and that this effect is greater with ionic contrast media. Several of the in vitro and experimental in vivo studies on haematological effects of contrast media have not been confirmed by clinical studies. Low- or iso-osmolar contrast media should be used for diagnostic and interventional angiographic procedures, including phlebography. Meticulous angiographic technique is the most important factor for reducing the thrombotic complications associated with angiographic procedures. Drugs and interventional devices that decrease the risk of thromboembolic complications during interventional procedures minimize the importance of the effects of contrast media. (orig.)

  8. Vascularization regenerative medicine and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brey, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    A Complex and Growing Field The study of vascularization in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) and its applications is an emerging field that could revolutionize medical approaches for organ and tissue replacement, reconstruction, and regeneration. Designed specifically for researchers in TERM fields, Vascularization: Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering provides a broad overview of vascularization in TERM applications. This text summarizes research in several areas, and includes contributions from leading experts in the field. It defines the difficulties associated with multicellular processes in vascularization and cell-source issues. It presents advanced biomaterial design strategies for control of vascular network formation and in silico models designed to provide insight not possible in experimental systems. It also examines imaging methods that are critical to understanding vascularization in engineered tissues, and addresses vascularization issues within the context of specific...

  9. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Suwan; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Young-Mee; Pyo, Hongryull; Lee, Sunyoung

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To understand the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced vascular dysfunction, we employed two models. First, we examined the effect of X-ray irradiation on vasodilation in rabbit carotid arteries. Carotid arterial rings were irradiated with 8 or 16 Gy using in vivo and ex vivo methods. We measured the effect of acetylcholine-induced relaxation after phenylephrine-induced contraction on the rings. In irradiated carotid arteries, vasodilation was significantly attenuated by both irradiation methods. The relaxation response was completely blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a potent inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Residual relaxation persisted after treatment with L-N ω -nitroarginine (L-NA), a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), but disappeared following the addition of aminoguanidine (AG), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS). The relaxation response was also affected by tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor activity. In the second model, we investigated the biochemical events of nitrosative stress in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We measured iNOS and nitrotyrosine expression in HUVECs exposed to a dose of 4 Gy. The expression of iNOS and nitrotyrosine was greater in irradiated HUVECs than in untreated controls. Pretreatment with AG, L-N 6 -(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (a selective inhibitor of iNOS), and L-NA attenuated nitrosative stress. While a selective target of radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage was not definitely determined, these results suggest that NO generated from iNOS could contribute to vasorelaxation. These studies highlight a potential role of iNOS inhibitors in ameliorating radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage. (author)

  10. Effect of the Menstrual Cycle on Maximum Oxygen Consumption and Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrews, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    .... We studied endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the brachial artery during three phases of the menstrual cycle in 20 eumenorrheic subjects to determine the effect of endogenous estradiol and progesterone...

  11. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques.

  12. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques

  13. Heterogeneous Vascular Bed Responses to Pulmonary Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaeddin B. Abukabda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of research links engineered nanomaterial (ENM exposure to adverse cardiovascular endpoints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ENM exposure on vascular reactivity in discrete segments so that we may determine the most sensitive levels of the vasculature where these negative cardiovascular effects are manifest. We hypothesized that acute nano-TiO2 exposure differentially affects reactivity with a more robust impairment in the microcirculation. Sprague-Dawley rats (8–10 weeks were exposed to nano-TiO2via intratracheal instillation (20, 100, or 200 µg suspended per 250 µL of vehicle 24 h prior to vascular assessments. A serial assessment across distinct compartments of the vascular tree was then conducted. Wire myography was used to evaluate macrovascular active tension generation specifically in the thoracic aorta, the femoral artery, and third-order mesenteric arterioles. Pressure myography was used to determine vascular reactivity in fourth- and fifth-order mesenteric arterioles. Vessels were treated with phenylephrine, acetylcholine (ACh, and sodium nitroprusside. Nano-TiO2 exposure decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation in the thoracic aorta and femoral arteries assessed via ACh by 53.96 ± 11.6 and 25.08 ± 6.36%, respectively. Relaxation of third-order mesenteric arterioles was impaired by 100 and 20 µg nano-TiO2 exposures with mean reductions of 50.12 ± 8.7 and 68.28 ± 8.7%. Cholinergic reactivity of fourth- and fifth-order mesenteric arterioles was negatively affected by nano-TiO2 with diminished dilations of 82.86 ± 12.6% after exposure to 200 µg nano-TiO2, 42.6 ± 12.6% after 100 µg nano-TiO2, and 49.4 ± 12.6% after 20 µg nano-TiO2. Endothelium-independent relaxation was impaired in the thoracic aorta by 34.05 ± 25% induced by exposure to 200 µg nano-TiO2 and a reduction in response of 49.31 ± 25% caused by 100 µg nano-TiO2

  14. Semi-quantitative assessments of dextran toxicity on corneal endothelium: conceptual design of a predictive algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filev, Filip; Oezcan, Ceprail; Feuerstacke, Jana; Linke, Stephan J; Wulff, Birgit; Hellwinkel, Olaf J C

    2017-03-01

    Dextran is added to corneal culture medium for at least 8 h prior to transplantation to ensure that the cornea is osmotically dehydrated. It is presumed that dextran has a certain toxic effect on corneal endothelium but the degree and the kinetics of this effect have not been quantified so far. We consider that such data regarding the toxicity of dextran on the corneal endothelium could have an impact on scheduling and logistics of corneal preparation in eye banking. In retrospective statistic analyses, we compared the progress of corneal endothelium (endothelium cell loss per day) of 1334 organ-cultured corneal explants in media with and without dextran. Also, the influence of donor-age, sex and cause of death on the observed dextran-mediated effect on endothelial cell counts was studied. Corneas cultured in dextran-free medium showed a mean endothelium cell count decrease of 0.7% per day. Dextran supplementation led to a mean endothelium cell loss of 2.01% per day; this reflects an increase by the factor of 2.9. The toxic impact of dextran was found to be time dependent; while the prevailing part of the effect was observed within the first 24 h after dextran-addition. Donor age, sex and cause of death did not seem to have an influence on the dextran-mediated toxicity. Based on these findings, we could design an algorithm which approximately describes the kinetics of dextran-toxicity. We reproduced the previously reported toxic effect of dextran on the corneal endothelium in vitro. Additionally, this is the first work that provides an algorithmic instrument for the semi-quantitative calculation of the putative endothelium cell count decrease in dextran containing medium for a given incubation time and could thus influence the time management and planning of corneal transplantations.

  15. Corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, João A T; Laus, José L; Santos, Jaime M; Cerva, Cristine; Cunha, Luciana S; Ruoppolo, Valéria; Barros, Paulo S M

    2005-12-01

    The corneal endothelium is essential for the maintenance of the corneal transparency. The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of the endothelial surface and perform morphometric analysis of the normal corneal endothelial cells of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) using scanning electron microscopy. The present work demonstrates that the corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin is similar to those described in other vertebrates.

  16. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valent, Erik T.; Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P. van; Hinsbergh, Victor W.M. van; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. - Highlights: • Endothelial monolayers exert dynamic- and heterogeneous traction forces. • High traction forces correlate with junctional areas and the F-actin cytoskeleton. • Newly formed inter-endothelial gaps are characterized by opposing traction forces. • Force stability is a key feature controlling endothelial permeability.

  17. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valent, Erik T.; Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P. van; Hinsbergh, Victor W.M. van; Hordijk, Peter L., E-mail: p.hordijk@vumc.nl

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. - Highlights: • Endothelial monolayers exert dynamic- and heterogeneous traction forces. • High traction forces correlate with junctional areas and the F-actin cytoskeleton. • Newly formed inter-endothelial gaps are characterized by opposing traction forces. • Force stability is a key feature controlling endothelial permeability.

  18. Myocardial serotonin exchange: negligible uptake by capillary endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffett, T.C.; Chan, I.S.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of serotonin from the blood during transorgan passage through the heart was studied using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Outflow dilution curves of 131 I- or 125 I-labeled albumin, [ 14 C]sucrose, and [3H]serotonin injected simultaneously into the inflow were fitted with an axially distributed blood-tissue exchange model to examine the extraction process. The model fits of the albumin and sucrose outflow dilution curves were used to define flow heterogeneity, intravascular dispersion, capillary permeability, and the volume of the interstitial space, which reduced the degrees of freedom in fitting the model to the serotonin curves. Serotonin extractions, measured against albumin, during single transcapillary passage, ranged from 24 to 64%. The ratio of the capillary permeability-surface area products for serotonin and sucrose, based on the maximum instantaneous extraction, was 1.37 +/- 0.2 (n = 18), very close to the predicted value of 1.39, the ratio of free diffusion coefficients calculated from the molecular weights. This result shows that the observed uptake of serotonin can be accounted for solely on the basis of diffusion between endothelial cells into the interstitial space. Thus it appears that the permeability of the luminal surface of the endothelial cell is negligible in comparison to diffusion through the clefts between endothelial cells. In 18 sets of dilution curves, with and without receptor and transport blockers or competitors (ketanserin, desipramine, imipramine, serotonin), the extractions and estimates of the capillary permeability-surface area product were not reduced, nor were the volumes of distribution. The apparent absence of transporters and receptors in rabbit myocardial capillary endothelium contrasts with their known abundance in the pulmonary vasculature

  19. Advanced Maternal Age Worsens Postpartum Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude S. Morton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The age at which women experience their first pregnancy has increased throughout the decades. Pregnancy has an important influence on maternal short- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Pregnancy at an advanced maternal age increases maternal risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, placenta previa and caesarian delivery; complications which predict worsened cardiovascular health in later years. Aging also independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease; therefore, combined risk in women of advanced maternal age may lead to detrimental cardiovascular outcomes later in life. We hypothesized that pregnancy at an advanced maternal age would lead to postpartum vascular dysfunction. We used a reproductively aged rat model to investigate vascular function in never pregnant (virgin, previously pregnant (postpartum and previously mated but never delivered (nulliparous rats at approximately 13.5 months of age (3 months postpartum or equivalent. Nulliparous rats, in which pregnancy was spontaneously lost, demonstrated significantly reduced aortic relaxation responses (methylcholine [MCh] Emax: 54.2 ± 12.6% vs. virgin and postpartum rats (MCh Emax: 84.8 ± 3.5% and 84.7 ± 3.2% respectively; suggesting pregnancy loss causes a worsened vascular pathology. Oxidized LDL reduced relaxation to MCh in aorta from virgin and postpartum, but not nulliparous rats, with an increased contribution of the LOX-1 receptor in the postpartum group. Further, in mesenteric arteries from postpartum rats, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH-mediated vasodilation was reduced and a constrictive prostaglandin effect was apparent. In conclusion, aged postpartum rats exhibited vascular dysfunction, while rats which had pregnancy loss demonstrated a distinct vascular pathology. These data demonstrate mechanisms which may lead to worsened outcomes at an advanced maternal age; including early pregnancy loss and later life cardiovascular dysfunction.

  20. Angiogenesis, Cancer, and Vascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Moriya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have revealed that the angiogenic response to ischemic injury declines with age, which might account for the increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD among the elderly. While impairment of angiogenesis with aging leads to delayed wound healing or exacerbation of atherosclerotic ischemic diseases, it also inhibits the progression of cancer. Age-related changes of angiogenesis have been considered to at least partly result from vascular aging or endothelial cell senescence. There is considerable evidence supporting the hypothesis that vascular cell senescence contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related CVD, suggesting that vascular aging could be an important therapeutic target. Since therapeutic angiogenesis is now regarded as a promising concept for patients with ischemic CVD, it has become even more important to understand the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying impairment of angiogenesis in older patients. To improve the usefulness of therapeutic angiogenesis, approaches are needed that can compensate for impaired angiogenic capacity in the elderly while not promoting the development or progression of malignancy. In this review, we briefly outline the mechanisms of angiogenesis and vascular aging, followed by a description of how vascular aging leads to impairment of angiogenesis. We also examine potential therapeutic approaches that could enhance angiogenesis and/or vascular function in the elderly, as well as discussing the possibility of anti-senescence therapy or reversal of endothelial cell senescence.

  1. Preservation of vascular DDAH activity contributes to the protection of captopril against endothelial dysfunction in hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Feng, Mei; Lu, Chang-Wu; Lei, Yan-Ping; He, Zhi-Min; Xiong, Yan

    2017-03-05

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) has been recognized as an independent risk factor of endothelial dysfunction and the biomarker of atherosclerosis. This study was to investigate whether endogenous ADMA and its metabolic enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) were involved in mechanisms of captopril protection against endothelial dysfunction in high fat diet feeding rabbits. Half of model rabbits were treated with captopril (10mg/kg/d, i.g.) for 12w. Vascular morphology and serum lipid profiles were detected. Serum ADMA concentration were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Recombinant DDAH2 gene adenoviruses were ex vivo transferred to thoracic aortas of high fat diet feeding rabbits. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of aortas response to acetylcholine and DDAH activity were measured. Atherosclerosis was confirmed in high fat diet feeding rabbits by increased serum lipid profiles and morphologic changes of vascular wall. Serum ADMA levels were significantly increased in hyperlipidemic rabbits accompanied with impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibition of DDAH activity in thoracic aortas. Captopril treatment not only decreased vascular intima thickening and serum ADMA concentration but also preserved vascular DDAH activity and endothelium-dependent relaxation in hyperlipidemic rabbits without influence on serum lipid profiles. Similar beneficial effects on endothelial function and DDAH activity could be achieved by DDAH2 gene transfection. These results indicated that captopril could protect against injuries of vascular morphology and endothelial function in hyperlipidemic rabbits, the mechanisms may be related to the preservation of DDAH activity and decrease of ADMA accumulation in vascular endothelium. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. AP-2β Is a Downstream Effector of PITX2 Required to Specify Endothelium and Establish Angiogenic Privilege During Corneal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lisheng; Martino, Vanessa; Dombkowski, Alan; Williams, Trevor; West-Mays, Judith; Gage, Philip J

    2016-03-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor, PITX2, is at the apex of a genetic pathway required for corneal development, but the critical effector genes regulated by the PITX2 remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover and validate PITX2-dependent mechanisms required for specifying cell lineages and establishing angiogenic privilege within the developing cornea. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression in corneas isolated from temporal Pitx2 knockout embryos and control littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry was used to further validate Tfap2b expression differences in Pitx2 knockout versus control corneas. In situ hybridization and protein immunohistochemistry were used to assay eyes of a Tfap2b allelic series of embryos to identify differentiated cellular lineages in the cornea, blood vessel endothelium, or lymphatic vessel endothelium. We show that PITX2 is required for the expression of Tfap2b, encoding the AP-2β transcription factor, in the neural crest during corneal development. Markers of differentiated corneal epithelium and stroma are expressed in the absence of AP-2β. In contrast, markers of differentiated corneal endothelium are not expressed in the absence of AP-2β. Endomucin+ blood vessels are present throughout the developing corneal stroma in the absence of AP-2β, whereas LYVE1+ lymphatic vessels are not found. The AP-2β transcription factor is an important effector of PITX2 function during corneal development, required for differentiation of corneal endothelium and establishment of angiogenic privilege. Unlike PITX2, AP-2β is not required for the early expression of available lineage specific markers for the corneal epithelium and stroma during embryogenesis, nor establishment of lymphangiogenic privilege. Therefore, additional PITX2-dependent factors likely regulate these latter processes during embryonic development. These results extend our understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating cornea

  3. Effects of a Single Bout of Resistance Exercise in Different Volumes on Endothelium Adaptations in Healthy Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Macedo, Fabricio Nunes; Mesquita, Thássio Ricardo Ribeiro; Quintans, Lucindo José; Santana-Filho, Valter Joviniano de; Lauton-Santos, Sandra; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2017-05-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) has been recommended for patients with cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a few studies have demonstrated that the intensity of a single bout of RE has an effect on endothelial adaptations to exercise. However, there is no data about the effects of different volumes of RE on endothelium function. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of different volumes of RE in a single bout on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the mesenteric artery of healthy animals. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Control (Ct); low-volume RE (LV, 5 sets x 10 repetitions) and high-volume RE (HV, 15 sets x 10 repetitions). The established intensity was 70% of the maximal repetition test. After the exercise protocol, rings of mesenteric artery were used for assessment of vascular reactivity, and other mesenteric arteries were prepared for detection of measure NO production by DAF-FM fluorescence. Insulin responsiveness on NO synthesis was evaluated by stimulating the vascular rings with insulin (10 nM). The maximal relaxation response to insulin increased in the HV group only as compared with the Ct group. Moreover, the inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (L-NAME) completely abolished the insulin-induced vasorelaxation in exercised rats. NO production showed a volume-dependent increase in the endothelial and smooth muscle layer. In endothelial layer, only Ct and LV groups showed a significant increase in NO synthesis when compared to their respective group under basal condition. On the other hand, in smooth muscle layer, NO fluorescence increased in all groups when compared to their respective group under basal condition. Our results suggest that a single bout of RE promotes vascular endothelium changes in a volume-dependent manner. The 15 sets x 10 repetitions exercise plan induced the greatest levels of NO synthesis. O exercício resistido (ER) tem sido recomendado para pacientes com doen

  4. Endothelial ATP-binding cassette G1 in mouse endothelium protects against hemodynamic-induced atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Shanshan [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Department of Pediatrics, Baodi District People’s Hospital of Tianjin City, Tianjin, 301800 (China); Wang, Jiaxing [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191 (China); Zhang, Xu; Shi, Ying; Li, Bochuan; Bao, Qiankun [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Pang, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191 (China); Ai, Ding [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Zhu, Yi [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191 (China); He, Jinlong, E-mail: hejinlong@tmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China)

    2016-08-19

    Activated vascular endothelium inflammation under persistent hyperlipidemia is the initial step of atherogenesis. ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) is a crucial factor maintaining sterol and lipid homeostasis by transporting cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ABCG1 in endothelial inflammation activation during early-stage atherogenesis in mice and the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific ABCG1 transgenic (EC-ABCG1-Tg) mice were generated and cross-bred with low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient (Ldlr{sup −/−}) mice. After a 4-week Western-type diet, the mice were sacrificed for assessing atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein ECs were treated with different flows, and ABCG1 was adenovirally overexpressed to investigate the mechanism in vitro. Compared with Ldlr{sup −/−} mouse aortas, EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr{sup −/−} aortas showed decreased early-stage lesions. Furthermore, the lesion area in the EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr{sup −/−} mouse aortic arch but not thoracic aorta was significantly reduced, which suggests a protective role of ABCG1 under atheroprone flow. In vitro, overexpression of ABCG1 attenuated EC activation caused by oscillatory shear stress. Overexpression of ABCG1 blunted cholesterol-activated ECs in vitro. In exploring the mechanisms of ABCG1 attenuating endothelial inflammation, we found that ABCG1 inhibited oscillatory flow-activated nuclear factor kappa B and NLRP3 inflammasome in ECs. ABCG1 may play a protective role in early-stage atherosclerosis by reducing endothelial activation induced by oscillatory shear stress via suppressing the inflammatory response. - Highlights: • EC-ABCG1-Tg mice in a Ldlr{sup −/−} background showed decreased atherosclerosis. • Overexpression of ABCG1 in ECs decreased OSS-induced EC activation. • NLRP3 and NF-κB might be an underlying mechanism of ABCG1 protective role.

  5. Disruption of COX-2 and eNOS does not confer protection from cardiovascular failure in lipopolysaccharide-treated conscious mice and isolated vascular rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Mette; Madsen, Kirsten; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    (NS 398), disruption of COX-2, endothelium removal, or eNOS deletion (eNOS(-/-)) did not improve vascular reactivity after LPS, while the NO synthase blockers 1400W and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester prevented loss of tone. COX-2 and eNOS activities are not necessary for LPS-induced decreases...

  6. Intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity: findings on MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.Y.; Ahn, J.M.; Yoon, H.K.; Do, Y.S.; Kim, S.H.; Choo, S.W.; Choo, I.W.; Suh, Y.L.; Kim, S.M.; Kang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the findings of intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity on MR imaging and to correlate these findings with histopathologic examination.Design and patients. The findings on MR imaging and the medical records of 14 patients with an intramuscular vascular malformation of the extremity were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent surgical excision. Diagnoses were based on the results of pathologic examination. Findings on MR imaging were noted and correlated with the histopathologic findings.Results. Intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity showed multi-septate, honeycomb, or mixed appearance on MR imaging. Multi-septate areas correlated with dilated and communicating vascular spaces with flattened endothelium. Honeycomb areas corresponded to vascular spaces with inconspicuous small lumina and thickened vascular walls. Areas of increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images were found in all intramuscular vascular malformations. Infiltrative margins were more commonly seen in intramuscular lymphaticovenous malformations. Adherence to neurovascular structures and orientation of the lesion along the long axis of the affected muscle were more commonly seen in intramuscular venous malformations.Conclusions. Intramuscular vascular malformations showed either a multi-septate, honeycomb, or mixed appearance, reflecting the size of the vascular spaces and the thickness of the smooth muscles of the vessel walls. Prediction of the subtype of an intramuscular vascular malformation of an extremity on MR imaging seems to be difficult, although there are associated findings that may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of each subtype. (orig.)

  7. Endothelium and the effect of activated neutrophils on arterial smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the involvement of the endothelium in the effects of neutrophils (PMNL on phenylephrine-pre-contracted isolated rings of the rat thoracic aorta and to compare their effects with those of peroxynitrite (ONOO− and hypochlorous acid (HOCl. Activated PMNL-induced contraction of the precontracted aorta was prevented by the blockade of NO-synthase and by endothelium removal. In the endothelium-free preparations, the effect of PMNL reappeared in the presence of sodium nitroprusside. The effect of ONOO− and HOCl significantly differed from that of activated PMNL both in the presence and absence of the endothelium. It is therefore likely that neither ONOO− nor HOCl generated by transformation of superoxide anion radical (O2•− produced by PMNL is involved in their action. Reduction of the relaxant effect of nitric oxide derived from the endothelium by O2•− seems to be the keystone mechanism in generation of PMNL-induced contraction.

  8. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-06-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events.

  9. The Vascular Microenvironment and Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Frech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the vascular microenvironment in the pathogenesis Systemic Sclerosis (SSc is appreciated clinically as Raynaud's syndrome with capillary nail bed change. This manifestation of vasculopathy is used diagnostically in both limited and diffuse cutaneous subsets of SSc, and is thought to precede fibrosis. The degree of subsequent fibrosis may also be determined by the vascular microenvironment. This paper describes why the vascular microenvironment might determine the degree of end-organ damage that occurs in SSc, with a focus on vascular cell senescence, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC including multipotential mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, pericytes, and angiogenic monocytes. An explanation of the role of EPC, pericytes, and angiogenic monocytes is important to an understanding of SSc pathogenesis. An evolving understanding of the vascular microenvironment in SSc may allow directed treatment.

  10. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ruth A; Keen, John A; Walker, Brian R; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL) is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing's disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6) and horses with EL (n = 6) destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein) and the facial skin (facial skin arteries) by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10-9-10-5M) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10-9-10-5M) and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10-9-10-5M) was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01). In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006) and veins (P = 0.009) from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof.

  11. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A Morgan

    Full Text Available Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing's disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6 and horses with EL (n = 6 destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein and the facial skin (facial skin arteries by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10-9-10-5M and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10-9-10-5M and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10-9-10-5M was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01. In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006 and veins (P = 0.009 from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof.

  12. The role of inflammation in vascular insulin resistance with focus on IL-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Pedersen, B.K.

    2008-01-01

    The present review focuses on the possible role of interleukin-(IL)-6 in vascular insulin resistance. The endothelium plays an important role in regulating the tone of the vasculature by releasing nitric oxide (NO) to the smooth muscles of the vessels, thereby regulating the distribution of blood...... dysfunction and these cytokines. With regard to vascular insulin resistance, the available data point to a direct pathogenic role of TNF-alpha in mediating endothelial dysfunction, whereas with regard to IL-6 evidence is sparse and does not allow any firm conclusions Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9...

  13. Vascular reactivity in human arteries: from experimental study to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneyoshi, Isao

    2012-02-01

    The principal function of VSM cells in mature animals is contraction. The endothelium is now recognized to elaborate various vasoactive factors and to play a critical part in regulation of vascular tone. Many circulating mediators and hormones have effects on vascular tone that are mediated via multiple receptors. Vasoactive agents also exert their effects on tissues by acting on one or more processes in the contraction–relaxation cycle in VSM. In humans,systemic, pulmonary, and various organ circulation(s) are maintained by an intricate and complex cardiovascular system. We expect future studies to clarify the sophisticated but complex mechanisms of VSM in humans.

  14. Ultrastructure of endothelium in ovules of Penstemon gentianoides Poir. (Scrophulariaceae) at mature embryo sac phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Feruzan; Olgun, Göksel; Ekici, Nuran

    2007-06-01

    In this study ultrastructural differences between endothelial cells of different location in Penstemon gentianoides have been examined with electron microscope at mature embryo sac phase. Embryo sac is of the Polygonum type and surrounded by endothelium except the micropylar region. The cuticle is located primarily around the chalazal three-fourths of the embryo sac. Endothelium cells around the chalaza and toward the micropylar region are rich in cytoplasmic organelles. The cytoplasm of endothelial cells near the central cell has large vacuoles and few organelles. There are also plasmodesmas on the anticlinal walls of endothelial cells. The endothelium and the micropylar integumentary cells play a role in transport of metabolites into the embryo sac.

  15. Interventional vascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yune, H.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The papers published during this past year in the area of interventional vascular radiology presented some useful modifications and further experiences both in the area of thromboembolic therapy and in dilation and thrombolysis, but no new techniques. As an introductory subject, an excellent monograph reviewing the current spectrum of pharmacoangiography was presented in Radiographics. Although the presented material is primarily in diagnostic application of various pharmacologic agents used today to facilitate demonstration of certain diagnostic criteria of various disease processes, both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive reaction to these agents are widely used in various therapeutic vascular procedures. This monograph should be reviewed by every angiographer whether or not he or she performs interventional procedures, and it would be very convenient to have this table available in the angiography suite. In a related subject, Bookstein and co-workers have written an excellent review concerning pharmacologic manipulations of various blood coagulative parameters during angiography. Understanding the proper method of manipulation of the bloodclotting factors during angiography, and especially during interventional angiography, is extremely important. Particularly, the method of manipulating the coagulation with the use of heparin and protamine and modification of the platelet activity by using aspirin and dipyridamole are succinctly reviewed. The systemic and selective thrombolytic activities of streptokianse are also discussed

  16. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in inflammatory processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Koczy-Baron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is produced by different types of cells and has a major role in both, physiological and pathological angiogenesis. On the one hand VEGF is a strong mitotic and chemotactic factor for the endothelial cells, stimulating thus formation of new vessels, while on the other, it enhances the vascular endothelium permeability of the existing blood vessels which contributes to development and persistence of the inflammatory conditions. In the latter its activity is by 50 000 times higher than that of histamine. VEGF facilitates formation of oedema and leukocyte migration from the circulation to the site of inflammation. VEGF is also important in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, it has an important significance in regulation of the immunological response, therefore plays a role in autoaggressive phenomena as well as immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity. Its role in the pathogenesis of immunological and inflammatory diseases, including allergy, asthma and different skin disorders has been indicated.

  17. ROBO4-Mediated Vascular Integrity Regulates the Directionality of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Smith-Berdan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical therapy for over half a century, the mechanisms that regulate HSC trafficking, engraftment, and life-long persistence after transplantation are unclear. Here, we show that the vascular endothelium regulates HSC trafficking into and out of bone marrow (BM niches. Surprisingly, we found that instead of acting as barriers to cellular entry, vascular endothelial cells, via the guidance molecule ROBO4, actively promote HSC translocation across vessel walls into the BM space. In contrast, we found that the vasculature inhibits the reverse process, as induced vascular permeability led to a rapid increase in HSCs in the blood stream. Thus, the vascular endothelium reinforces HSC localization to BM niches both by promoting HSC extravasation from blood-to-BM and by forming vascular barriers that prevent BM-to-blood escape. Our results uncouple the mechanisms that regulate the directionality of HSC trafficking and show that the vasculature can be targeted to improve hematopoietic transplantation therapies.

  18. Design of biomimetic vascular grafts with magnetic endothelial patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Delphine; Le Visage, Catherine; Ino, Julia; Gazeau, Florence; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The development of small diameter vascular grafts with a controlled pluricellular organization is still needed for effective vascular tissue engineering. Here, we describe a technological approach combining a tubular scaffold and magnetically labeled cells to create a pluricellular and organized vascular graft, the endothelialization of which could be monitored by MRI prior to transplantation. A novel type of scaffold was developed with a tubular geometry and a porous bulk structure enabling the seeding of cells in the scaffold pores. A homogeneous distribution of human mesenchymal stem cells in the macroporous structure was obtained by seeding the freeze-dried scaffold with the cell suspension. The efficient covering of the luminal surface of the tube was then made possible thanks to the implementation of a magnetic-based patterning technique. Human endothelial cells or endothelial progenitors were magnetically labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles and successfully attracted to the 2-mm lumen where they attached and formed a continuous endothelium. The combination of imaging modalities [fluorescence imaging, histology, and 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] evidenced the integrity of the vascular construct. In particular, the observation of different cell organizations in a vascular scaffold within the range of resolution of single cells by 4.7 T MRI is reported.

  19. The Role of microRNA-126 in Vascular Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Solingen, Coen; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression that have been shown to be essential elements in the coordination of complex regulatory pathways. One of these short non-coding RNAs, microRNA-126, is highly enriched in the vascular endothelium and was shown to play distinct roles in angiogenesis, vasculogenesis and endothelial inflammation. Abrogation of this microRNA leads to severe complications in the response in vascular development as well as vital repair mechanisms carried out by endothelial cells. Interestingly, recent data suggest that the homeostatic role of microRNA-126 may reach far beyond its endothelial functions as this microRNA was also found to be present in cells of the hematopoietic system and in microvesicles or 'free-form' in the periphery. MicroRNA-126 is controlling the fate and/or function of a variety of cells differentiating from the hematopoietic lineage, including megakaryocytes and erythrocytes. Recent studies identified circulating microRNA-126 as a biomarker for myocardial injury and vascular damage in diabetes. Furthermore, reports have suggested a protective role of circulating microRNA-126 in murine models of organ ischemia. Here, we review current insights in the role of microRNA-126 in vascular homeostasis and conclude that this microRNA may serve to integrate and facilitate both local as well as systemic functions in vascular maintenance and repair.

  20. Electron histochemical and autoradiographic studies of vascular smooth muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Kohji; Aida, Takeo; Asano, Goro

    1982-01-01

    The authors have studied the vascular smooth muscle cell in the aorta and the arteries of brain, heart in autopsied cases, cholesterol fed rabbits and canine through electron histochemical and autoradiographic methods, using 3 H-proline and 3 H-thymidine. The vascular changes are variable presumably due to the functional and morphological difference of vessels. Aging, pathological condition and physiological requirement induce the disturbances of vascular functions as contractility. According to various pathological conditions, the smooth muscle cell altered their shape, surface properties and arrangement of subcellular organelles including changes in number. The morphological features of arteries during aging is characterized by the thickening of endothelium and media. Decreasing cellularity and increasing collagen contents in media. The autoradiographic and histochemical observations using periodic acid methenamine silver (PAM) and ruthenium red stains demonstrated that the smooth muscle cell is a connective tissue synthetic cell. The PAM impregnation have proved that the small bundle of microfilaments become associated with small conglomerate of collagen and elastic fibers. Cytochemical examination will provide sufficient evidence to establish the contribution of subcellular structure. The acid phosphatase play an important role in vascular disease and they are directly involved in cellular lipid metabolism in cholesterol fed animals, and the activity of Na-K ATPase on the plasma membrane may contribute to the regulation of vascular blood flow and vasospasms. Direct injury and subsequent abnormal contraction of smooth muscle cell may initiate increased permeability of plasma protein and lipid in the media layer and eventually may developed and enhance arteriosclerosis. (author)

  1. Regulation and function of endothelial glycocalyx layer in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieve, Irina; Münster-Kühnel, Anja K; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise

    2018-01-01

    In the vascular system, the endothelial surface layer (ESL) as the inner surface of blood vessels affects mechanotransduction, vascular permeability, rheology, thrombogenesis, and leukocyte adhesion. It creates barriers between endothelial cells and blood and neighbouring cells. The glycocalyx, composed of glycoconjugates and proteoglycans, is an integral component of the ESL and a key element in inter- and intracellular communication and tissue homeostasis. In pathophysiological conditions (atherosclerosis, infection, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes, trauma and acute lung injury) glycocalyx-degrading factors, i.e. reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, matrix metalloproteinases, heparanase and sialidases, damage the ESL, thereby impairing endothelial functions. This leads to increased capillary permeability, leucocyte-endothelium interactions, thrombosis and vascular inflammation, the latter further driving glycocalyx destruction. The present review highlights current knowledge on the vasculoprotective role of the ESL, with specific emphasis on its remodelling in inflammatory vascular diseases and discusses its potential as a novel therapeutic target to treat vascular pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  3. Vascular Anomalies in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Lisa S; Kulungowski, Ann M

    2015-08-01

    A standardized classification system allows improvements in diagnostic accuracy. Multidisciplinary vascular anomaly centers combine medical, surgical, radiologic, and pathologic expertise. This collaborative approach tailors treatment and management of vascular anomalies for affected individuals.

  4. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics FAQs Peripheral Vascular Disease Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) involves damage to or blockage in the blood ... the organs in and below your stomach area. PVD may also affect the arteries leading to your ...

  5. Classical cardiovascular disease risk factors associate with vascular function and morphology in rheumatoid arthritis: a six-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoo, Aamer; Chanchlani, Neil; Hodson, James; Smith, Jacqueline P; Douglas, Karen M; Kitas, George D

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). An early manifestation of CVD is endothelial dysfunction which can lead to functional and morphological vascular abnormalities. Classical CVD risk factors and inflammation are both implicated in causing endothelial dysfunction in RA. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of baseline inflammation, cumulative inflammation, and classical CVD risk factors on the vasculature following a six-year follow-up period. A total of 201 RA patients (155 females, median age (25th to 75th percentile): 61 years (53 to 67)) were examined at baseline (2006) for presence of classical CVD risk factors and determination of inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). At follow-up (2012) patients underwent assessments of microvascular and macrovascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, along with assessment of carotid atherosclerosis. The CRP and ESR were recorded from the baseline study visit to the follow-up visit for each patient to calculate cumulative inflammatory burden. Classical CVD risk factors, but not RA disease-related inflammation, predicted microvascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, macrovascular endothelium-independent function and carotid atherosclerosis. These findings were similar in a sub-group of patients free from CVD, and not receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors or biologics. Cumulative inflammation was not associated with microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function, but a weak association was apparent between area under the curve for CRP and carotid atherosclerosis. Classical CVD risk factors may be better long-term predictors of vascular function and morphology than systemic disease-related inflammation in patients with RA. Further studies are needed to confirm if assessments of vascular function and

  6. Nifedipine-sensitive vascular reactivity of femoral arteries in WKY: the effect of pertussis toxin pretreatment and endothelium removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Líšková, Silvia; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2007), s. 663-666 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : pertussis toxin * NE-induced contraction * Ca2+ influx Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  7. Maternal smoking and impaired endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of uterine small arteries in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene R; Uldbjerg, Niels; Stender, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy.......This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy....

  8. Endothelium protectant and contractile effects of the antivaricose principle escin in rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Omar F; Vidrio, Horacio

    2007-07-01

    The triterpene saponin escin is the active component of the extract of seeds of Aesculus hippocastanum used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. Escin is also used experimentally to increase membrane permeability in isolated cells. Since endothelial dysfunction is postulated to be involved in venous insufficiency, the possible endothelium-protectant effect of escin was explored in rat aortic rings, a model widely used to study such effects with cardiovascular agents. Escin enhanced endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine when such relaxation had been reduced by exposure to the superoxide ion generator pyrogallol. This effect was attributed to enhanced nitric oxide production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a calcium-dependent enzyme, activated by the increased endothelial cell permeability to calcium induced by escin. Another effect of escin thought to contribute to its therapeutic activity is its ability to produce venous contraction. The compound was found to induce concentration-related contraction also in rat aortic rings. This response was partially inhibited by removal of the endothelium or by preincubation with indomethacin, and was completely abolished by incubation in a calcium-free perfusion fluid. Contraction was considered to be due mainly to the aforementioned effect on calcium permeability, with some mediation by release of endothelial vasoconstrictor prostanoids. It was concluded that, in rat aorta, escin possesses an endothelium-protectant action and a direct contractile effect. The former could contribute to its beneficial effect in the treatment of venous insufficiency, while the latter could constitute a limiting side effect.

  9. Function of endothelium at adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity before and after rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miroshnichenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    Function of endothelium at 43 adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity before rehabilitation and at 33 healthy adolescents has been studied. Disorder of endothelial function has been established in 32 (74.4%) adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity and in 7 (21.2%) healthy adolescents. We showed the efficiency of the rehabilitation program on restoration of endothelial function at adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity.

  10. MORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM WITH 3 DIFFERENT SPECULAR MICROSCOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landesz, Monika; Kamps, A; SLART, R; SIERTSEMA, JV; Rij , van Gabriel

    1995-01-01

    The morphometry of the central corneal endothelium of 10 eyes in 10 subjects was analyzed with three different specular microscopes. Computer-assisted analysis was performed with only two microscopes (Zeiss and Keeler Konan sp 3300) because the third microscope (Topcon sp 1000) could not be adapted

  11. Glucose-Coated Gold Nanoparticles Transfer across Human Brain Endothelium and Enter Astrocytes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromnicova, Radka; Davies, Heather A.; Sreekanthreddy, Peddagangannagari; Romero, Ignacio A.; Lund, Torben; Roitt, Ivan M.; Phillips, James B.; Male, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier. PMID:24339894

  12. Glucose-coated gold nanoparticles transfer across human brain endothelium and enter astrocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Gromnicova

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Pharmacology of Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Relaxation of Rabbit Aorta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Vendelbo

    2001-01-01

    tetraethylammonium (TEA) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), but unaffected by glibenclamid. It is concluded that the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit aorta is dependent on: the endothelium; the activation of muscarinic receptors; independent of prostanoids; and mediatedn by NO alone. Th eNO released...

  14. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  15. [The endothelium injuries caused by homocysteine and treatmental effects of Tongxinluo powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun-Qing; Wu, Yi-Ling; Xu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Shao-Hua; Jia, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Wei, Cong; Dong, Xiao-Wei

    2008-02-01

    To observe the effect of homocysteine (HCY) on the function of endothelium cell, and to discuss the possible mechanisms that Tongxinluo super powder affected. Healthy male Wistar rats were divided into randomly the control group, the model group, the Tongxinluo group. The effect of Ach on isolated rat thoracic aorta in vitro was examined, the microcirculation was observed by microcirculation meter, the activity of SOD and GSH-PX and content of NO, MDA, ET, Ang II, TXA2, PGI2 was detected. Compared with control group, the effect of Ach on isolated rat thoracic aorta in vitro weakened markablely (P homocystein might cause the contracted and dilated function decreased, it might get involved in endothelium disfunction as a result of the massive free radicals production and diastolic-contract factors balance disorder induced by high homocystein. (2) Tongxinluo powder could improve the function of endothelium-dependment dilation induced by high homocystein, that associated with inhibitting the excessive production of free radicals, and improved function of endothelium.

  16. Human haemato-endothelial precursors: cord blood CD34+ cells produce haemogenic endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Pelosi

    Full Text Available Embryologic and genetic evidence suggest a common origin of haematopoietic and endothelial lineages. In the murine embryo, recent studies indicate the presence of haemogenic endothelium and of a common haemato-endothelial precursor, the haemangioblast. Conversely, so far, little evidence supports the presence of haemogenic endothelium and haemangioblasts in later stages of development. Our studies indicate that human cord blood haematopoietic progenitors (CD34+45+144-, triggered by murine hepatocyte conditioned medium, differentiate into adherent proliferating endothelial precursors (CD144+CD105+CD146+CD31+CD45- capable of functioning as haemogenic endothelium. These cells, proven to give rise to functional vasculature in vivo, if further instructed by haematopoietic growth factors, first switch to transitional CD144+45+ cells and then to haematopoietic cells. These results highlight the plasticity of haemato-endhothelial precursors in human post-natal life. Furthermore, these studies may provide highly enriched populations of human post-fetal haemogenic endothelium, paving the way for innovative projects at a basic and possibly clinical level.

  17. Developmental programming of eNOS uncoupling and enhanced vascular oxidative stress in adult rats after transient neonatal oxygen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Comte, Blandine; Huyard, Fanny; Cloutier, Anik; Germain, Nathalie; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2013-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that neonatal hyperoxic stress leads to high blood pressure, impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilatation, and increased vascular production of superoxide anion by NAD(P)H oxidase in adulthood. However, it is unknown whether changes in nitric oxide (NO) production and/or bioinactivation prevail and whether NO synthase (NOS) is also a source of superoxide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether adult animals exposed to neonatal hyperoxic stress have impaired vascular NO production associated with NOS uncoupling participating to vascular superoxide production and vascular dysfunction. In adult male rats exposed to 80% oxygen from day 3 to 10 of life (H, n = 6) versus room air controls (CTRL, n = 6), vascular (aorta) NO production is decreased at baseline (CTRL: 21 ± 1 vs. H: 16 ± 2 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate fluorescence intensity arbitrary units; P blood pressure after a brief neonatal oxygen exposure.

  18. Relationship between left ventricular mass and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in never-treated hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perticone, F; Maio, R; Ceravolo, R; Cosco, C; Cloro, C; Mattioli, P L

    1999-04-20

    Hypertensive patients are characterized by development of both left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and endothelial dysfunction We enrolled 65 never-treated hypertensive patients (36 men and 29 women aged 45.6+/-6.0 years) to assess the possible relationship between echocardiographic left ventricular mass (LVM) and endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Left ventricular measurements were performed at end diastole and end systole according to the recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography and the Penn Convention. LVM was calculated with the Devereux formula and indexed by body surface area and height raised to the 2.7th power. The endothelial function was tested as responses of forearm vasculature to acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator (7.5, 15, and 30 microg. mL-1. min-1, each for 5 minutes), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium-independent vasodilator (0.8, 1.6, and 3.2 microg. mL-1. min-1, each for 5 minutes). Drugs were infused into the brachial artery, and forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by strain-gauge plethysmography. A negative significant relationship between indexed LVM and peak of increase in FBF was found during ACh infusions (r=-0. 554; P<0.0001). In addition, hypertrophic patients had a significantly lower responsive to ACh than patients without LVH (the peak increase in FBF was 9.9+/-3.7 versus 16.1+/-8.1 mL per 100 mL of tissue per minute; P<0.0001). No significant correlation was observed between LVM and FBF during SNP infusion. Our data provide the first evidence that echocardiographic LVM in hypertensive patients is inversely related to FBF responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilating agent ACh, but it is likely that both endothelium and LVM are damaged by hypertension.

  19. Endothelium-derived relaxant factor inhibits effects of nitrocompounds in isolated arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, U; Busse, R

    1987-02-01

    We investigated the influence of endothelial cells on the smooth muscle vasodilator effects to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or Teopranitol (an organic mononitrate) in isolated segments of rabbit aorta and femoral artery. In the femoral artery, the vasodilator responses to both nitrocompounds were significantly higher in the absence of endothelial cells or after pretreatment with the endothelium-derived relaxant factor (EDRF) inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; 10 microM). Moreover, under conditions of stimulated EDRF release (induced by acetylcholine; 30-100 nM) the vasodilator responses to SNP were further attenuated in vessels with intact endothelium. By contrast, in the rabbit aorta, the vasodilator responses to the nitrocompounds were not significantly altered by either endothelium removal or treatment with NDGA. However, in the presence of the EDRF stimulator acetylcholine, the dose-response curve to SNP was shifted to right in the aorta as well. The role of EDRF in the endothelium-mediated attenuation of the dilator potency of SNP was further investigated by using EDRF released from cultured (bovine aortic) endothelial cells. The dilator effects of SNP were compared in endothelium denuded femoral or aortic segments in the presence or absence of EDRF. The vasodilator effects of SNP in both types of arteries were significantly reduced in the presence of EDRF. We conclude that EDRF attenuates the arterial vasodilation induced by SNP and Teopranitol. The results further suggest that endothelial cells exhibit a greater basal release of EDRF in the femoral artery than in the aorta, since under unstimulated conditions an EDRF-induced attenuation was seen only in femoral and not in aortic segments.

  20. Estrogen has opposing effects on vascular reactivity in obese, insulin-resistant male Zucker rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Asplund, Esther M.; Shoukas, Artin A.; Kim, Soon-Yul; Burke, Sean A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that estradiol treatment would improve vascular dysfunction commonly associated with obesity, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. A sham operation or 17beta-estradiol pellet implantation was performed in male lean and obese Zucker rats. Maximal vasoconstriction (VC) to phenylephrine (PE) and potassium chloride was exaggerated in control obese rats compared with lean rats, but estradiol significantly attenuated VC in the obese rats. Estradiol reduced the PE EC50 in all groups. This effect was cyclooxygenase independent, because preincubation with indomethacin reduced VC response to PE similarly in a subset of control and estrogen-treated lean rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation (VD) to sodium nitroprusside was similar among groups, but endothelium-dependent VD to ACh was significantly impaired in obese compared with lean rats. Estradiol improved VD in lean and obese rats by decreasing EC50 but impaired function by decreasing maximal VD. The shift in EC50 corresponded to an upregulation in nitric oxide synthase III protein expression in the aorta of the estrogen-treated obese rats. In summary, estrogen treatment improves vascular function in male insulin-resistant, obese rats, partially via an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase III protein expression. These effects are counteracted by adverse factors, such as hyperlipidemia and, potentially, a release of an endothelium-derived contractile agent.

  1. Vascular cognitive impairment in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherton-Beer, Christopher D

    2014-10-01

    Vascular risk factors and cerebrovascular disease are common causes of dementia. Shared risk factors for vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease, as well as frequent coexistence of these pathologies in cognitively impaired older people, suggests convergence of the aetiology, prevention and management of the commonest dementias affecting older people. In light of this understanding, the cognitive impairment associated with cerebrovascular disease is an increasingly important and recognised area of the medicine of older people. Although the incidence of cerebrovascular events is declining in many populations, the overall burden associated with brain vascular disease will continue to increase associated with population ageing. A spectrum of cognitive disorders related to cerebrovascular disease is now recognised. Cerebrovascular disease in older people is associated with specific clinical and imaging findings. Although prevention remains the cornerstone of management, the diagnosis of brain vascular disease is important because of the potential to improve clinical outcomes through clear diagnosis, enhanced control of risk factors, lifestyle interventions and secondary prevention. Specific pharmacological intervention may also be indicated for some patients with cognitive impairment and cerebrovascular disease. However the evidence base to guide intervention remains relatively sparse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term effect of phytoestrogens from Curcuma comosa Roxb. on vascular relaxation in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intapad, Suttira; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Chuncharunee, Aporn; Suvitayawat, Wisuda; Chokchaisiri, Ratchanaporn; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2012-01-25

    Phytoestrogens have been implicated as promising therapeutic agents to treat the vascular impairment seen in menopausal women. The present study investigated the long-term effects of phytoestrogens from Curcuma comosa Roxb. on vascular relaxation of isolated thoracic aorta from ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Treatment of OVX rats for 12 weeks with C. comosa powder, hexane extract, and a novel phytoestrogen, diarylheptanoid-D3, [(3R)-1,7-diphenyl-(4E,6E)-4,6-heptadien-3-ol] prevented impairment of the endothelium-dependent relaxation response to acetylcholine in OVX, but not the endothelium-denude aortic ring relaxation in response to sodium nitroprusside. These data suggest that the vascular relaxation effect of C. comosa is mediated via endothelial cells. Treatment with D3 also increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and estrogen receptor-α (ERα) protein expression in the aorta of OVX rats and suppressed elevated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in OVX aortic rings. These results indicate that C. comosa treatment prevents impairment of vascular relaxation in estrogen-deficient animals via the ER-eNOS pathway as well as through its ability to promote an anti-inflammatory response.

  3. Effects of exercise training on stress-induced vascular reactivity alterations: role of nitric oxide and prostanoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Bruder-Nascimento

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical exercise may modify biologic stress responses. Objective: To investigate the impact of exercise training on vascular alterations induced by acute stress, focusing on nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways. Method: Wistar rats were separated into: sedentary, trained (60-min swimming, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, carrying a 5% body-weight load, stressed (2 h-immobilization, and trained/stressed. Response curves for noradrenaline, in the absence and presence of L-NAME or indomethacin, were obtained in intact and denuded aortas (n=7-10. Results: None of the procedures altered the denuded aorta reactivity. Intact aortas from stressed, trained, and trained/stressed rats showed similar reduction in noradrenaline maximal responses (sedentary 3.54±0.15, stressed 2.80±0.10*, trained 2.82±0.11*, trained/stressed 2.97± 0.21*, *P<0.05 relate to sedentary. Endothelium removal and L-NAME abolished this hyporeactivity in all experimental groups, except in trained/stressed rats that showed a partial aorta reactivity recovery in L-NAME presence (L-NAME: sedentary 5.23±0,26#, stressed 5.55±0.38#, trained 5.28±0.30#, trained/stressed 4.42±0.41, #P<0.05 related to trained/stressed. Indomethacin determined a decrease in sensitivity (EC50 in intact aortas of trained rats without abolishing the aortal hyporeactivity in trained, stressed, and trained/stressed rats. Conclusions: Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial vasodilator prostaglandins and nitric oxide. Stress-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial nitric oxide. Beside the involvement of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway, the vascular response of trained/stressed rats involved an additional mechanism yet to be elucidated. These findings advance on the understanding of the vascular processes after exercise and stress alone and in combination.

  4. Vascular adaptive responses to physical exercise and to stress are affected differently by nandrolone administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bruder-Nascimento

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgenic anabolic steroid, physical exercise and stress induce cardiovascular adaptations including increased endothelial function. The present study investigated the effects of these conditions alone and in combination on the vascular responses of male Wistar rats. Exercise was started at 8 weeks of life (60-min swimming sessions 5 days per week for 8 weeks, while carrying a 5% body-weight load. One group received nandrolone (5 mg/kg, twice per week for 8 weeks, im. Acute immobilization stress (2 h was induced immediately before the experimental protocol. Curves for noradrenaline were obtained for thoracic aorta, with and without endothelium from sedentary and trained rats, submitted or not to stress, treated or not with nandrolone. None of the procedures altered the vascular reactivity to noradrenaline in denuded aorta. In intact aorta, stress and exercise produced vascular adaptive responses characterized by endothelium-dependent hyporeactivity to noradrenaline. These conditions in combination did not potentiate the vascular adaptive response. Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response was abolished by nandrolone. In contrast, the aortal reactivity to noradrenaline of sedentary rats and the vascular adaptive response to stress of sedentary and trained rats were not affected by nandrolone. Maximum response for 7-10 rats/group (g: sedentary 3.8 ± 0.2 vs trained 3.0 ± 0.2*; sedentary/stress 2.7 ± 0.2 vs trained/stress 3.1 ± 0.1*; sedentary/nandrolone 3.6 ± 0.1 vs trained/nandrolone 3.8 ± 0.1; sedentary/stress/nandrolone 3.2 ± 0.1 vs trained/stress/nandrolone 2.5 ± 0.1*; *P < 0.05 compared to its respective control. Stress and physical exercise determine similar vascular adaptive response involving distinct mechanisms as indicated by the observation that only the physical exercise-induced adaptive response was abolished by nandrolone.

  5. Examination of the mechanism by which heparin antagonizes activation of a model endothelium by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, M S; Rix, D A; Dark, J H; Talbot, D; Kirby, J A

    1997-03-01

    IFN-gamma increases the potential immunogenicity of vascular endothelial cells by up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and class I MHC antigen expression and by induction of class II MHC antigens and certain chemokines. In this study the mechanism by which the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin antagonizes the activation of a model endothelium by IFN-gamma was investigated. Radioligand binding assays demonstrated that total binding of 125I-IFN-gamma to the EAhy.926 endothelial hybridoma cell line was reduced in the presence of heparin or heparan sulphate (HS); the structurally dissimilar GAG chondroitin sulphate had no effect. Treatment of the cells with chlorate, a metabolic inhibitor of GAG sulphation, was found to reduce both the subsequent binding of IFN-gamma and its ability to induce expression of class II MHC antigens. Treatment with heparinase II dramatically reduced the binding of IFN-gamma, while chondroitin ABC lyase had no effect. A cationic peptide from the C-terminal region of IFN-gamma was also found to reduce binding of intact IFN-gamma to the cells. These results appear to demonstrate that IFN-gamma is sequestered at the surface of endothelial cells by electrostatic interaction between specific basic amino acid residues and sulphated domains on HS, the most abundant endothelial GAG. This interaction is competitively inhibited by heparin, which is structurally related to HS. These observations are consistent with the model that IFN-gamma is bound by membrane-associated HS before engagement with the high-affinity receptor and signal transduction. Inhibition of the interaction between proinflammatory cytokines and membrane-associated GAG molecules may provide a mechanism for inducing clinically useful immunosuppression.

  6. Examination of the mechanism by which heparin antagonizes activation of a model endothelium by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOUGLAS, M S; RIX, D A; DARK, J H; TALBOT, D; KIRBY, J A

    1997-01-01

    IFN-γ increases the potential immunogenicity of vascular endothelial cells by up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and class I MHC antigen expression and by induction of class II MHC antigens and certain chemokines. In this study the mechanism by which the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin antagonizes the activation of a model endothelium by IFN-γ was investigated. Radioligand binding assays demonstrated that total binding of 125I-IFN-γ to the EAhy.926 endothelial hybridoma cell line was reduced in the presence of heparin or heparan sulphate (HS); the structurally dissimilar GAG chondroitin sulphate had no effect. Treatment of the cells with chlorate, a metabolic inhibitor of GAG sulphation, was found to reduce both the subsequent binding of IFN-γ and its ability to induce expression of class II MHC antigens. Treatment with heparinase II dramatically reduced the binding of IFN-γ, while chondroitin ABC lyase had no effect. A cationic peptide from the C-terminal region of IFN-γ was also found to reduce binding of intact IFN-γ to the cells. These results appear to demonstrate that IFN-γ is sequestered at the surface of endothelial cells by electrostatic interaction between specific basic amino acid residues and sulphated domains on HS, the most abundant endothelial GAG. This interaction is competitively inhibited by heparin, which is structurally related to HS. These observations are consistent with the model that IFN-γ is bound by membrane-associated HS before engagement with the high-affinity receptor and signal transduction. Inhibition of the interaction between proinflammatory cytokines and membrane-associated GAG molecules may provide a mechanism for inducing clinically useful immunosuppression. PMID:9067536

  7. Maternal nutrient restriction during pregnancy impairs an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-like pathway in sheep fetal coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Praveen; Ghatta, Srinivas; Dubey, Nidhi; Lemley, Caleb O; Johnson, Mary Lynn; Modgil, Amit; Vonnahme, Kimberly; Caton, Joel S; Reynolds, Lawrence P; Sun, Chengwen; O'Rourke, Stephen T

    2014-07-15

    The mechanisms underlying developmental programming are poorly understood but may be associated with adaptations by the fetus in response to changes in the maternal environment during pregnancy. We hypothesized that maternal nutrient restriction during pregnancy alters vasodilator responses in fetal coronary arteries. Pregnant ewes were fed a control [100% U.S. National Research Council (NRC)] or nutrient-restricted (60% NRC) diet from days 50 to 130 of gestation (term = 145 days); fetal tissues were collected at day 130. In coronary arteries isolated from control fetal lambs, relaxation to bradykinin was unaffected by nitro-l-arginine (NLA). Iberiotoxin or contraction with KCl abolished the NLA-resistant response to bradykinin. In fetal coronary arteries from nutrient-restricted ewes, relaxation to bradykinin was fully suppressed by NLA. Large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel (BKCa) currents did not differ in coronary smooth muscle cells from control and nutrient-restricted animals. The BKCa openers, BMS 191011 and NS1619, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid [a putative endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)] each caused fetal coronary artery relaxation and BKCa current activation that was unaffected by maternal nutrient restriction. Expression of BKCa-channel subunits did not differ in fetal coronary arteries from control or undernourished ewes. The results indicate that maternal undernutrition during pregnancy results in loss of the EDHF-like pathway in fetal coronary arteries in response to bradykinin, an effect that cannot be explained by a decreased number or activity of BKCa channels or by decreased sensitivity to mediators that activate BKCa channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Under these conditions, bradykinin-induced relaxation is completely dependent on nitric oxide, which may represent an adaptive response to compensate for the absence of the EDHF-like pathway. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Vascularity in thyroid neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjaer; Andersen, Niels Frost; Melsen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of four different methods (vascular grading, Chalkley count, microvessel density (MVD) and stereological estimation) for quantifying intratumoral microvascularity in thyroid neoplasms, by comparing the variability within and between...... count should be the preferred method for assessing microvascularity in thyroid neoplasms. The diagnostic evaluation revealed a tendency towards higher degree of vascularity in FA compared to both FC and PC for all methods. No statistically significant association was seen between vascular density...

  9. Effects of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on venous vascular reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, O.S.; Paulitsch, F.S.; Pereira, A.P.C.; Teixeira, A.O. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Martins, C.N. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Silva, A.M.V. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Santa Maria, RS, Brasil, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Plentz, R.D.M. [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto do Coração, Unidade de Hipertensão, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Unidade de Hipertensão, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Signori, L.U. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Santa Maria, RS, Brasil, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-04-04

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a type of therapy used primarily for analgesia, but also presents changes in the cardiovascular system responses; its effects are dependent upon application parameters. Alterations to the cardiovascular system suggest that TENS may modify venous vascular response. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of TENS at different frequencies (10 and 100 Hz) on venous vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomized into three groups: placebo (n=10), low-frequency TENS (10 Hz, n=9) and high-frequency TENS (100 Hz, n=10). TENS was applied for 30 min in the nervous plexus trajectory from the superior member (from cervical to dorsal region of the fist) at low (10 Hz/200 μs) and high frequency (100 Hz/200 μs) with its intensity adjusted below the motor threshold and intensified every 5 min, intending to avoid accommodation. Venous vascular reactivity in response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent) was assessed by the dorsal hand vein technique. The phenylephrine effective dose to achieve 70% vasoconstriction was reduced 53% (P<0.01) using low-frequency TENS (10 Hz), while in high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz), a 47% increased dose was needed (P<0.01). The endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and independent (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not modified by TENS, which modifies venous responsiveness, and increases the low-frequency sensitivity of α1-adrenergic receptors and shows high-frequency opposite effects. These changes represent an important vascular effect caused by TENS with implications for hemodynamics, inflammation and analgesia.

  10. Effects of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on venous vascular reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, O.S.; Paulitsch, F.S.; Pereira, A.P.C.; Teixeira, A.O.; Martins, C.N.; Silva, A.M.V.; Plentz, R.D.M.; Irigoyen, M.C.; Signori, L.U.

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a type of therapy used primarily for analgesia, but also presents changes in the cardiovascular system responses; its effects are dependent upon application parameters. Alterations to the cardiovascular system suggest that TENS may modify venous vascular response. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of TENS at different frequencies (10 and 100 Hz) on venous vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomized into three groups: placebo (n=10), low-frequency TENS (10 Hz, n=9) and high-frequency TENS (100 Hz, n=10). TENS was applied for 30 min in the nervous plexus trajectory from the superior member (from cervical to dorsal region of the fist) at low (10 Hz/200 μs) and high frequency (100 Hz/200 μs) with its intensity adjusted below the motor threshold and intensified every 5 min, intending to avoid accommodation. Venous vascular reactivity in response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent) was assessed by the dorsal hand vein technique. The phenylephrine effective dose to achieve 70% vasoconstriction was reduced 53% (P<0.01) using low-frequency TENS (10 Hz), while in high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz), a 47% increased dose was needed (P<0.01). The endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and independent (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not modified by TENS, which modifies venous responsiveness, and increases the low-frequency sensitivity of α1-adrenergic receptors and shows high-frequency opposite effects. These changes represent an important vascular effect caused by TENS with implications for hemodynamics, inflammation and analgesia

  11. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Pomegranate Extract Enhances Endothelium-Dependent Coronary Relaxation in Isolated Perfused Hearts from Spontaneously Hypertensive Ovariectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Nathalie T. B.; Rouver, Wender do N.; Freitas-Lima, Leandro C.; de Paula, Tiago D.-C.; Duarte, Andressa; Silva, Josiane F.; Lemos, Virgínia S.; Santos, Alexandre M. C.; Mauad, Helder; Santos, Roger L.; Moysés, Margareth R.

    2017-01-01

    Decline in estrogen levels promotes endothelial dysfunction and, consequently, the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women. The use of natural therapies such as pomegranate can change these results. Pomegranate [Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae)] is widely used as a phytotherapeutic agent worldwide, including in Brazil. We hypothesized that treatment with pomegranate hydroalcoholic extract (PHE) would improve coronary vascular reactivity and cardiovascular parameters. At the beginning of treatment, spontaneously hypertensive female rats were divided into Sham and ovariectomized (OVX) groups, which received pomegranate extract (PHE) (250 mg/kg) or filtered water (V) for 30 days by gavage. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed by Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin was performed, followed by L-NAME inhibition. The protein expression of p-eNOS Ser1177, p-eNOS Thr495, total eNOS, p-AKT Ser473, total AKT, SOD-2, and catalase was quantified by Western blotting. The detection of coronary superoxide was performed using the protocol of dihydroethidium (DHE) staining Plasma nitrite measurement was analyzed by Griess method. Systolic blood pressure increased in both Sham-V and OVX-V groups, whereas it was reduced after treatment in Sham-PHE and OVX-PHE groups. The baseline coronary perfusion pressure was reduced in the Sham-PHE group. The relaxation was significantly higher in the treated group, and L-NAME attenuated the relaxation in all groups. The treatment has not changed p-eNOS (Ser1177), total eNOS, p-AKT (Ser473) and total AKT in any groups. However, in Sham and OVX group the treatment reduced the p-eNOS (Thr495) and SOD-2. The ovariectomy promoted an increasing in the superoxide anion levels and the treatment was able to prevent this elevation and reducing oxidative stress. Moreover, the treatment

  13. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Êurica Adélia Nogueira Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15α-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy. In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of the NO-synthase (NOS, indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, L-NAME + indomethacin, atropine, a nonselective antagonist of the muscarinic receptors, ODQ, selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, or hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger. The relaxation was completely reversed in the presence of L-NAME + 1 mM L-arginine or L-arginine, an NO precursor. Diterpene-induced relaxation was not affected by TEA, a nonselective inhibitor of K+ channels. The KA-acetoxy antagonized CaCl2-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and also inhibited an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction. The KA-acetoxy did not interfere with Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The vasorelaxant induced by KA-acetoxy seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx and also, at least in part, by endothelial muscarinic receptors activation, NO and PGI2 release.

  14. Relaxin as a natural agent for vascular health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Daniele BaniDepartment of Anatomy, Histology and Forensic Medicine, Sect. Histology, University of Florence, ItalyAbstract: Hypertension, atherothrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and renal failure are the main manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD, the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries. Continuing insight into the pathophysiology of CVD can allow identification of effective therapeutic strategies to reduce the occurrence of death and/or severe disabilities. In this context, a healthy endothelium is deemed crucial to proper functioning and maintenance of anatomical integrity of the vascular system in many organs. Of note, epidemiologic studies indicate that the incidence of CVD in women is very low until menopause and increases sharply thereafter. The loss of protection against CVD in post-menopausal women has been chiefly attributed to ovarian steroid deficiency. However, besides steroids, the ovary also produces the peptide hormone relaxin (RLX, which provides potent vasoactive effects which render it the most likely candidate as the elusive physiological shield against CVD in fertile women. In particular, RLX has a specific relaxant effect on peripheral and coronary vasculature, exerted by the stimulation of endogenous nitric oxide (NO generation by cells of the vascular wall, and can induce angiogenesis. Moreover, RLX inhibits the activation of inflammatory leukocytes and platelets, which play a key role in CVD. Experimental studies performed in vascular and blood cell in vitro and in animal models of vascular dysfunction, as well as pioneer clinical observations, have provided evidence that RLX can prevent and/or improve CVD, thus offering background to clinical trials aimed at exploring the broad therapeutic potential of human recombinant RLX as a new cardiovascular drug.Keywords: relaxin, blood vessels, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, nitric oxide

  15. Impairment of endothelium-dependent ACh-induced relaxation in aorta of diabetic db/db mice--possible dysfunction of receptor and/or receptor-G protein coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miike, Tomohiro; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Kanda, Mamoru; Azukizawa, Satoru; Kurahashi, Kazuyoshi; Shirahase, Hiroaki

    2008-06-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor of ischemic heart disease, cerebral ischemia, and atherosclerosis, in which endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathogenesis. We examined vascular responses in the aorta of pre-diabetic db/db mice with normoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia (6 weeks old), and diabetic db/db mice with hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia (11 weeks old) in comparison with age-matched non-diabetic db/+ mice. Prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha)-induced contraction was significantly enhanced in the aorta of diabetic but not pre-diabetic db/db mice compared to age-matched non-diabetic db/+ mice. Acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP), NaF, a G protein activator and A-23187, a Ca-ionophore, caused endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxation, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, caused endothelium-independent relaxation in the pre-contracted aorta of db/db mice. Maximal endothelium-dependent ACh-induced relaxation was reduced in diabetic but not pre-diabetic db/db mice compared to age-matched db/+ mice, while maximal SNP-induced relaxation was not different between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. ACh-induced relaxation in diabetic db/db mice was not affected by ozagrel, a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthetase inhibitor, or acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, suggesting no involvement of endogenous TXA2 or prostanoids in the reduction of relaxation. Maximal endothelium-dependent ADP-, A-23187-, and NaF-induced relaxation was not reduced in diabetic db/db mice. EC50 values for ACh- and SNP-induced relaxation were increased in diabetic but not pre-diabetic db/db mice, suggesting decreases in sensitivity to NO in diabetic mice. Two-week treatment with KV-5070, a PPARgamma agonist, lowered plasma glucose, triglyceride (TG), and insulin but not cholesterol, and reversed the reduced ACh-induced relaxation. In conclusion, ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation is impaired

  16. Comparison and Supervised Learning of Segmentation Methods Dedicated to Specular Microscope Images of Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Gavet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is the front of the eye. Its inner cell layer, called the endothelium, is important because it is closely related to the light transparency of the cornea. An in vivo observation of this layer is performed by using specular microscopy to evaluate the health of the cells: a high spatial density will result in a good transparency. Thus, the main criterion required by ophthalmologists is the cell density of the cornea endothelium, mainly obtained by an image segmentation process. Different methods can perform the image segmentation of these cells, and the three most performing methods are studied here. The question for the ophthalmologists is how to choose the best algorithm and to obtain the best possible results with it. This paper presents a methodology to compare these algorithms together. Moreover, by the way of geometric dissimilarity criteria, the algorithms are tuned up, and the best parameter values are thus proposed to the expert ophthalmologists.

  17. Mechanisms of endothelium-dependent relaxation evoked by anandamide in isolated human pulmonary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Kozłowska, Hanna; Kozłowski, Mirosław; Schlicker, Eberhard; Kloza, Monika; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Grzęda, Emilia; Malinowska, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Endocannabinoids contract, relax or do not affect vessels with different calibre and tone in the pulmonary circulation in four species. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in the anandamide-induced relaxation of human pulmonary arteries (hPAs). Studies were performed in the isolated hPAs pre-constricted with the prostanoid TP receptor agonist, U-46619. To detect fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) expression, Western blots were used. Anandamide concentration dependently relaxed the endothelium-intact hPAs pre-constricted with U-46619. The anandamide-induced relaxation was virtually abolished by removal of the endothelium and strongly attenuated by inhibitors of cyclooxygenases (indomethacin, COX-1/COX-2, and nimesulide, COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (N (G) -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) given separately or in combination, FAAH (URB597), and the prostanoid IP receptor antagonist, RO1138452. The anandamide-evoked relaxation in the endothelium-intact vessels was attenuated in KCl pre-constricted preparations or by the inhibitor of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, iberiotoxin. In experiments performed in the presence of URB597 to exclude effects of anandamide metabolites, the antagonist of the endothelial cannabinoid receptor, O-1918, diminished the anandamide-evoked relaxation whereas the antagonists of cannabinoid CB1, CB2 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptors, AM251, SR144528 and capsazepine, respectively, had no effect. Western blot studies revealed the occurrence of FAAH protein in the hPAs. The present study shows that anandamide breakdown products, cyclooxygenase pathways, nitric oxide, potassium channels and the O-1918-sensitive cannabinoid receptor play a role in the anandamide-induced relaxation of the hPAs with intact endothelium.

  18. [The effects of intraocular irrigating solutions on the human corneal endothelium (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekers, J F; Dethinne, M

    1978-11-01

    Human corneas from enucleated eyes get thicker during perfusion with B.S.S. On the contrary, their thickness decreases when perfused with T.C. Earle solution. Addition of reduced glutathion and adenosine does not change the results obtained with T.C. Earle. Histological study of the endothelium after a 24 hours perfusion demonstrates a better conservation of the cells with T.C. Earle and T.C. Earle glutathion--adenosine than with B.S.S.

  19. Deep Learning as a Tool for Automatic Segmentation of Corneal Endothelium Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Nurzynska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The automatic analysis of the state of the corneal endothelium is of much interest in ophthalmology. Up till now, several manual and semi-automatic methods have been introduced, but the need of fully-automatic segmentation of cells in the endothelium is still in search. This work addresses the problem of automatic delineation of cells in the corneal endothelium images and suggests to use the convolutional neural network (CNN to classify between cell center, cell body, and cell border in order to achieve precise segmentation. Additionally, a method to automatically select and split merged cells is given. In order to skeletonize the result, the best-fit method is used. The achieved outcomes are compared to manual annotations in order to define the mutual overlapping. The Dice index, Jaccard coefficient, modified Hausdorff distance, and several other metrics for mosaic overlapping are used. As a final check-up, the visual inspection is shown. The performed experiments revealed the best architecture for CNN. The correctness and precision of the segmentation were evaluated on Endothelial Cell “Alizarine” dataset. According to the Dice index and Jaccard coefficient, the automatically achieved cell delineation overlaps the original one with 93% precision. While modified Hausdorff distance shows 0.14 pixel distance, proving very high accuracy. These findings are confirmed by other metrics and also supported by presented visual inspection of achieved segmentations. To conclude, the methodology to achieve fully-automatic delineation of cell boundaries in the corneal endothelium images was presented. The segmentation obtained as a result of pixel classification with CNN proved very high precision.

  20. Primo Vascular System: An Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Potential Transitional Tissue Involved in Gastric Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Ping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fourth commonest cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Investigation of gastric cancer metastasis is one of the hottest and major focuses in cancer research. Growing evidence manifested that primo vascular system (PVS is a new kind of circulatory system beyond vascular and lymphatic system. Previous researches revealed that PVS is a specific tissue between endothelium and mesenchyme and is involved in cancer, especially in tumor metastasis and regeneration. In current study, we investigated the role of primo vessels in gastric cancer metastasis and its possible relationship to vascular vessels formation. Our results indicated that primo vessels were involved in gastric cancer metastasis. We observed blood vessel-mediated metastasis, primo vessel-mediated metastasis, and an intermediate state between them. We deduced that primo vessels may be precursors of blood vessels. These results possibly provided a thoroughly new theoretic development in cancer metastasis.

  1. Vascular factors and prevention of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Blossom C M; Brayne, Carol

    2008-08-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors that prevent dementia or slow its progression is a major public health priority. Vascular disease and its risk factors have been linked with cognitive decline and dementia, although the degree of association varies depending on differences in vulnerability related to age, ethnicity, disease co-morbidity and possibly brain reserve. Here we review current dementia prevention strategies linked to vascular modification to identify whether any approach exists that will reduce the population burden of dementia, and whether any exist that show evidence of being cost effective and safe for populations. As yet, there is no compelling evidence that dementia can be prevented through vascular manipulation by pharmacological or non-pharmacological trials. To date, no intervention can be recommended for dementia prevention at the population level including Alzheimer's Disease or Vascular Dementia. Advances in the prevention of dementia will be gained, it is argued, from a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology of disease and its causes, particularly in early life, within and across different populations and age groups. Furthermore, a more complete understanding of the earliest pre-clinical stage of disease is required for effective risk factor modification. Although the current state of knowledge cannot support public health policy for vascular manipulation for dementia prevention at the population level, this does not undermine the importance of vascular manipulation in its own right to promote healthier ageing.

  2. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... was moderately reproduced (kappa = 0.59). Vascular grade was significantly associated with axillary node involvement, tumour size, malignancy grade, oestrogen receptor status and histological type. In univariate analyses vascular grade significantly predicted recurrence free survival and overall survival for all...... impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  3. Activated astrocytes induce nitric oxide synthase-2 in cerebral endothelium via tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, R A; Murphy, S

    1997-12-01

    Astrocytes under pathological conditions become activated and produce a variety of cytokines and low molecular weight signal molecules. Previously we demonstrated that activated astrocytes release nitric oxide which can downregulate the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-2 in co-cultured cerebral endothelium, and also release a transcriptionally regulated factor that can induce NOS-2 expression in endothelium (Borgerding and Murphy: J Neurochem 65:1342, 1995). The activity of this NOS-2-inducing factor was impeded by inhibitors of tyrosine kinases and NF-kappaB activation. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha) alone, or in combination with IL-6, induced NOS-2 expression in endothelial cells. A neutralizing antibody against TNF alpha attenuated the NOS-2 expression in endothelial cells exposed to activated astrocytes. These results imply that cytokine-activated astrocytes release TNF alpha which can induce NOS-2 expression in endothelium and suggest that activated astrocytes within the CNS may induce expression of NOS-2 in cells of the adjacent microvasculature. The ensuing alterations in blood-brain barrier properties may be either beneficial or detrimental.

  4. HOXB4 Promotes Hemogenic Endothelium Formation without Perturbing Endothelial Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Teichweyde

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells, in vitro, holds great promise for regenerative therapies. Primarily, this has been achieved in mouse cells by overexpression of the homeotic selector protein HOXB4. The exact cellular stage at which HOXB4 promotes hematopoietic development, in vitro, is not yet known. However, its identification is a prerequisite to unambiguously identify the molecular circuits controlling hematopoiesis, since the activity of HOX proteins is highly cell and context dependent. To identify that stage, we retrovirally expressed HOXB4 in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Through the use of Runx1(−/− ESCs containing a doxycycline-inducible Runx1 coding sequence, we uncovered that HOXB4 promoted the formation of hemogenic endothelium cells without altering endothelial cell development. Whole-transcriptome analysis revealed that its expression mediated the upregulation of transcription of core transcription factors necessary for hematopoiesis, culminating in the formation of blood progenitors upon initiation of Runx1 expression. : In this article, Klump and colleagues demonstrate that the human homeotic selector protein HOXB4 promotes ESC-derived hematopoiesis by inducing hemogenic endothelium formation, in vitro. It propels hematopoietic specification by upregulating the transcription of genes essential for hematopoietic development, such as those encoding members of the so-called heptad transcription factors. Keywords: HOXB4, hematopoietic stem cells, hemangioblast, hemogenic endothelium, hematopoietic specification, EHT, RUNX1, pluripotent stem cells

  5. EFFECTS OF ENALAPRIL ON ENDOTHELIUM FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Katelnizkaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study endothelium vasomotor function (EF in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and the influence of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril (Enam, Dr .Reddy’s, India on it. Material and methods. 87 patients were examined totally. 49 patients were suffering from IHD: 18 patients were younger than 60 years old and 31 patients were older . The combination of arterial hypertension (HT and IHD were registered in 38 patients: 18 patients were below and 20 patients were above 60 years old. All patients additionally to basic IHD therapy took enalapril in dose 2,5-30 mg/daily during 12 weeks. Before the beginning and in the end of treatment cuff test, test with nitroglycerine, bicycle exercise test and Holter monitoring were made, the thickness of intima-media complex of carotid artery and the level of endothelin-1 in blood plasma were defined. Results. EF disorders were shown in IHD, maximal disorders were determined in patients with combination of IHD and HT. EF disorders were also more expressive in patients of elder group. Enalapril restored of cuff tests results, nitroglycerine tests results, reduced a number of myocardial ischemia episodes and provided target blood pressure in 60, 5% patients with HT. Conclusion. Enalapril improves endothelium vasomotor function, endothelium reaction on nitroglycerine and clinical course of IHD and HT.

  6. Cardiovascular effects of microgravity: evolution of understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of cardiovascular effects of spaceflight has evolved throughout the course of the American manned spaceflight program. Originally descriptive in nature, the present understanding is based on empiric measurements of vascular volume, cardiac output, vascular reflexes, and peripheral and central autonomic control. More detailed understanding of cardiovascular effects has allowed us to separate those symptoms from symptoms caused by musculoskeletal or neurovestibular abnormalities.

  7. Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-related relaxations diminish with age in murine saphenous arteries of both sexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chennupati, R.; Lamers, W. H.; Koehler, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We investigated the effects of aging on the contributions of NO and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) to endothelium-dependent relaxation in saphenous arteries of male and female C57BL/6J mice aged 12, 34 and 64 weeks. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Vasomotor responses...... of saphenous arteries were analysed by wire myography in the absence and presence of stimuli of the endothelium, inhibitors of NOS, and inhibitors and stimulants of small (K(Ca)2.3) and intermediate (K(Ca)3.1) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. KEY RESULTS Arterial relaxing responses to sodium...... nitroprusside and to ACh in the absence of pharmacological inhibitors (indomethacin and L-NAME), were similar in all age groups and sexes, but those mediated by endothelium-derived NO were slightly but significantly increased in 64-week-old male mice. In the presence of inhibitors, 12-week-old animals showed...

  8. Vascular hyperpolarization in human physiology and cardiovascular risk conditions and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, F; Tesauro, M; Cardillo, C

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization causing smooth muscle relaxation contributes to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, particularly in small-calibre arteries and arterioles. It may also become a compensatory vasodilator mechanism upregulated in states with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Bioassay of vascular hyperpolarization in the human circulation has been hampered by the complexity of mechanisms involved and the limited availability of investigational tools. Firm evidence, however, supports the notion that hyperpolarization participates in the regulation of resting vasodilator tone and vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. In addition, an enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization contributes to both resting and agonist-stimulated vasodilation in a variety of cardiovascular risk conditions and disease. Thus, hyperpolarization mediated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and H 2 O 2 has been observed in coronary arterioles of patients with coronary artery disease. Similarly, ouabain-sensitive and EETs-mediated hyperpolarization has been observed to compensate for NO deficiency in patients with essential hypertension. Moreover, in non-hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and in hypercholesterolaemia, K Ca channel-mediated vasodilation appears to be activated. A novel paradigm establishes that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an additional regulator of vascular tone/function and endothelium is not the only agent in vascular hyperpolarization. Indeed, some PVAT-derived relaxing substances, such as adiponectin and angiotensin 1-7, may exert anticontractile and vasodilator actions by the opening of K Ca channels in smooth muscle cells. Conversely, PVAT-derived factors impair coronary vasodilation via differential inhibition of some K + channels. In view of adipose tissue abnormalities occurring in human obesity, changes in PVAT-dependent hyperpolarization may be relevant for vascular dysfunction also in this condition. © 2015

  9. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxi Wu

    Full Text Available Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall.Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO, endothelial cells (VE-ARKO, or both (SM/VE-ARKO were compared with wild type (WT controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10-10-10-7M; 6 days.These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis.

  10. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowers James R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling. The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications.

  11. Leukocyte-derived microparticles in vascular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne

    2012-01-20

    Leukocyte-derived microparticles (LMPs) may originate from neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, and lymphocytes. They express markers from their parental cells and harbor membrane and cytoplasmic proteins as well as bioactive lipids implicated in a variety of mechanisms, maintaining or disrupting vascular homeostasis. When they carry tissue factor or coagulation inhibitors, they participate in hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes can be affected by LMPs, thus ensuring an appropriate inflammatory response. LMPs also play a dual role in the endothelium by either improving the endothelial function or inducing an endothelial dysfunction. LMPs are implicated in all stages of atherosclerosis. They circulate at a high level in the bloodstream of patients with high atherothrombotic risk, such as smokers, diabetics, and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea, where their prolonged contact with the vessel wall may contribute to its overall deterioration. Numbering microparticles, including LMPs, might be useful in predicting cardiovascular events. LMPs modify the endothelial function and promote the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the vascular wall, necessary processes for the progression of the atherosclerotic lesion. In addition, LMPs favor the neovascularization within the vulnerable plaque and, in the ruptured plaque, they take part in coagulation and platelet activation. Finally, LMPs participate in angiogenesis. They might represent a novel therapeutic tool to reset the angiogenic switch in pathologies with altered angiogenesis. Additional studies are needed to further investigate the role of LMPs in cardiovascular diseases. However, large-scale studies are currently difficult to set up because microparticle measurement still requires elaborate techniques which lack standardization.

  12. Resveratrol Protects and Restores Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbit Corpus Cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Nergiz; Korhan, Peyda; Kizer, Onur; Evcim, Sinem; Kefi, Aykut; Demir, Ömer; Gidener, Sedef; Atabey, Neşe; Esen, Ahmet Adil

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress dependent-decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays an integral role in hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction (ED). Resveratrol has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects against oxidative stress and improve NO bioavailability. The protective and restorative potentials of resveratrol on endothelium-dependent relaxations were evaluated in hypercholesterolemic rabbit corpus cavernosum (CC). Hypercholesterolemia was induced by administering 2% cholesterol diet (CD) (w/w) to the rabbits for 6 weeks. Two different protocols were applied to test the effects of resveratrol on hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. In Protocol-1 (P1), resveratrol was administrated to the rabbits simultaneously with CD in order to evaluate the protective effect, and for Protocol-2 (P2), resveratrol was administrated for 6 weeks after termination of CD in order to evaluate the restorative effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxations of CC were evaluated by using organ bath studies. In order to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms, we measured endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and phosphovasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) expressions and activations, NADPH oxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in cavernosal tissues obtained at the end of the study. Resveratrol showed an improvement in the endothelium-dependent relaxation responses in vitro. We demonstrated significantly increased activatory-phosphorylation (p[S1177]-eNOS) and activated phosphovasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (phospho-VASP) levels, but reduced phosphorylation (p[T495]-eNOS) of eNOS and NADPH oxidase activity in the resveratrol-administered HC animals compared with hypercholesterolemic control rabbits in the P1. In the P2, resveratrol exhibited an improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation responses and more pronounced effects on eNOS activation. Resveratrol administration, either simultaneously with HC diet

  13. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  14. Vascular Access in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Keller, Marc S.

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the “expert procedural pyramid” is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  15. Vascular malformations in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Shamdeen, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the cause of nearly all non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage in children beyond the neonatal stage. Therefore, any child presenting with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage should be evaluated for child abuse and for vascular malformations. Intracerebral malformations of the cerebral vasculature include vein of Galen malformations, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), cavernomas, dural arteriovenous fistulas, venous anomalies (DVA), and capillary teleangiectasies. Although a few familial vascular malformation have been reported, the majority are sporadic. Clinical symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic options are discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms

  17. Triiodothyronine Potentiates Vasorelaxation via PKG/VASP Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherin Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vascular relaxation caused by Triiodothyronine (T3 involves direct activation of endothelial cells (EC and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC. Activation of protein kinase G (PKG has risen as a novel contributor to the vasorelaxation mechanism triggered by numerous stimuli. We hypothesize that T3-induced vasorelaxation involves PKG/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP signaling pathway in VSMC. Methods: Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC and VSMC were treated with T3 for short (2 to 60 minutes and long term (24 hours. Nitric oxide (NO production was measured using DAF-FM. Expression of protein targets was determined using western blot. For functional studies, rat aortas were isolated and treated with T3 for 20 minutes and mounted in a wire myograph. Relaxation was measured by a concentration-dependent response to acetylcholine (ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Aortas stimulated with T3 exhibited augmented sensitivity to ACh and SNP-induced relaxation, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent responses, respectively. T3 directly increased vasorelaxation, which was abolished in the presence of a PKG inhibitor. T3 markedly induced phosphorylation of Akt, eNOS and consequently increased NO production in EC. Likewise, T3 induced phosphorylation of VASP at serine 239 via the PKG pathway in VSMC. Conclusion: Our findings have uncovered a PKG/VASP signaling pathway in VSMC as a key molecular mechanism underlying T3-induced vascular relaxation.

  18. Brief secondhand smoke exposure depresses endothelial progenitor cells activity and endothelial function: sustained vascular injury and blunted nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Christian; Amabile, Nicolas; Lee, Andrew C; Real, Wendy May; Schick, Suzaynn F; Lao, David; Wong, Maelene L; Jahn, Sarah; Angeli, Franca S; Minasi, Petros; Springer, Matthew L; Hammond, S Katharine; Glantz, Stanton A; Grossman, William; Balmes, John R; Yeghiazarians, Yerem

    2008-05-06

    This study sought to analyze the effects of acute secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure on the number and function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) over 24 h. Secondhand smoke increases the risk of vascular disease and is a major public health concern, but the mechanism(s) of action are not fully understood. Healthy nonsmokers (age SEM 30.3 +/- 1.3 years, n = 10) were exposed to 30 min of SHS yielding cotinine levels commonly observed in passive smokers and to smokefree air on 2 separate days. Measurements were taken before exposure (baseline), immediately after (0 h), and at 1 h, 2.5 h, and 24 h after. The EPCs (CD133(+)/KDR(+), CD34(+)/KDR(+)) and endothelial microparticles (EMPs: CD31(+)/CD41(-), CD144(+), CD62e(+)) were determined in blood using flow cytometry. The EPC chemotaxis toward vascular endothelial growth factor was measured. Endothelial function was assessed as flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using ultrasound. Secondhand smoke exposure increased EPCs and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor and completely abolished EPC chemotaxis during 24 h after exposure. Secondhand smoke increased EMPs and decreased FMD. Although FMD returned to baseline at 2.5 h, EMPs and vascular endothelial growth factor levels remained elevated at 24 h, suggesting endothelial activation and injury with functional impairment of the vascular endothelium. Exposure to smokefree air had no effect. Incubation of EPCs from nonexposed subjects with plasma isolated from SHS-exposed subjects in vitro decreased chemotaxis by blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated nitric oxide production. Brief exposure to real-world levels of SHS leads to sustained vascular injury characterized by mobilization of dysfunctional EPCs with blocked nitric oxide production. Our results suggest that SHS not only affects the vascular endothelium, but also the function of EPCs.

  19. Identification of novel vascular targets in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X; Herbert, J M J; Lodhia, P; Bradford, J; Turner, A M; Newby, P M; Thickett, D; Naidu, U; Blakey, D; Barry, S; Cross, D A E; Bicknell, R

    2015-02-03

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death, largely owing to the lack of effective treatments. A tumour vascular targeting strategy presents an attractive alternative; however, the molecular signature of the vasculature in lung cancer is poorly explored. This work aimed to identify novel tumour vascular targets in lung cancer. Enzymatic digestion of fresh tissue followed by endothelial capture with Ulex lectin-coated magnetic beads was used to isolate the endothelium from fresh tumour specimens of lung cancer patients. Endothelial isolates from the healthy and tumour lung tissue were subjected to whole human genome expression profiling using microarray technology. Bioinformatics analysis identified tumour endothelial expression of angiogenic factors, matrix metalloproteases and cell-surface transmembrane proteins. Predicted novel tumour vascular targets were verified by RNA-seq, quantitative real-time PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. Further detailed expression profiling of STEAP1 on 82 lung cancer patients confirmed STEAP1 as a novel target in the tumour vasculature. Functional analysis of STEAP1 using siRNA silencing implicates a role in endothelial cell migration and tube formation. The identification of cell-surface tumour endothelial markers in lung is of interest in therapeutic antibody and vaccine development.

  20. GPR68 Senses Flow and Is Essential for Vascular Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Mathur, Jayanti; Vessières, Emilie; Hammack, Scott; Nonomura, Keiko; Favre, Julie; Grimaud, Linda; Petrus, Matt; Francisco, Allain; Li, Jingyuan; Lee, Van; Xiang, Fu-Li; Mainquist, James K; Cahalan, Stuart M; Orth, Anthony P; Walker, John R; Ma, Shang; Lukacs, Viktor; Bordone, Laura; Bandell, Michael; Laffitte, Bryan; Xu, Yan; Chien, Shu; Henrion, Daniel; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2018-04-19

    Mechanotransduction plays a crucial role in vascular biology. One example of this is the local regulation of vascular resistance via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Impairment of this process is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and a precursor to a wide array of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Yet the molecules responsible for sensing flow (shear stress) within endothelial cells remain largely unknown. We designed a 384-well screening system that applies shear stress on cultured cells. We identified a mechanosensitive cell line that exhibits shear stress-activated calcium transients, screened a focused RNAi library, and identified GPR68 as necessary and sufficient for shear stress responses. GPR68 is expressed in endothelial cells of small-diameter (resistance) arteries. Importantly, Gpr68-deficient mice display markedly impaired acute FMD and chronic flow-mediated outward remodeling in mesenteric arterioles. Therefore, GPR68 is an essential flow sensor in arteriolar endothelium and is a critical signaling component in cardiovascular pathophysiology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica on vascular endothelial cells in psychological stress rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Shengyong; Yang, Xiaomei; Pang, Guangbao; Zheng, Hua; Shen, Bin; Li, Guanhong; Shi, Dianchun; Wang, Jienian; Feng, Liaoyun; Li, Mulan; Wei, Wuying; Qin, Wu; Xie, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Laminaria japonica is a popular seafood and medicinal plant in China. Laminaria japonica is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat and prevent hypertension and edema. The vascular protective activity and mechanism of sulfated polysaccharides were studied in adrenalin-induced vascular endothelial damage in rats after psychological stress (PS). Vehicle (sham and PS groups), sulfated polysaccharide from Laminaria japonica (LP; 1mg/kg and 5mg/kg) and enoxaparin sodium (1IU/kg, reference drug) were all administered for 10 days. Behavioral changes were recorded. Plasma levels of adrenalin, cortisol, monoamine oxidase (MAO), semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO), formaldehyde, H2O2, nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), 6-keto-prostaglandin F1a (6-keto-PGF1a), and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) were measured. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of the thoracic aorta was measured and transmission electron microscopy of aortic vessels was performed. Adrenalin metabolites in plasma were significantly lower (P<0.01) in rats after LP administration compared with those in the PS groups. The normalized ratios of plasma NO/ET-1 and 6-keto-PGF1a/TXB2 were maintained and endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta was greatly enhanced after LP treatment (P<0.05). Morphological alterations were observed in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) in PS rats, with a higher number of lysosomes and vague mitochondrial cristae compared with those in the sham group. However, these histopathological changes were markedly alleviated after LP treatment. This study shows a protective effect of LP on VECs in PS rats. LP can regulate plasma levels of NO, ET-1, and 6-keto-PGF1a, enhance endothelium-dependent relaxation, and alleviate histopathological changes of lysosomes and mitochondria in VECs. The potential mechanism of LP on VECs in PS rats is related to its function of reducing metabolites of adrenalin. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-03-06

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  3. Pathogenesis of vascular leak in dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavige, Gathsaurie Neelika; Ogg, Graham S

    2017-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction leading to vascular leak is the hallmark of severe dengue. Vascular leak typically becomes clinically evident 3-6 days after the onset of illness, which is known as the critical phase. This critical phase follows the period of peak viraemia, and lasts for 24-48 hr and usually shows rapid and complete reversal, suggesting that it is likely to occur as a result of inflammatory mediators, rather than infection of the endothelium. Cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α, which are known to be elevated in the critical phase of dengue, are likely to be contributing factors. Dengue NS1, a soluble viral protein, has also been shown to disrupt the endothelial glycocalyx and thus contribute to vascular leak, although there appears to be a discordance between the timing of NS1 antigenaemia and occurrence of vascular leak. In addition, many inflammatory lipid mediators are elevated in acute dengue viral infection such as platelet activating factor (PAF) and leukotrienes. Furthermore, many other inflammatory mediators such as vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin-2 have been shown to be elevated in patients with dengue haemorrhagic fever, exerting their action in part by inducing the activity of phospholipases, which have diverse inflammatory effects including generation of PAF. Platelets have also been shown to significantly contribute to endothelial dysfunction by production of interleukin-1β through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and also by inducing production of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes. Drugs that block down-stream immunological mediator pathways such as PAF may also be beneficial in the treatment of severe disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Congenital Vascular Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery or less invasive therapy of the enlarged superficial veins can also be helpful. T he V ascular D isease F oundation Established in 1998, t he Vascular Disease Foundation (VDF) develops educational information and initiatives for patients, ...

  5. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  6. Heart and vascular services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintain body temperature, among other things. CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE Cardiovascular medicine refers to the branch of health care that specializes in the treatment of diseases or conditions dealing with the heart and vascular systems. Common ...

  7. Vascular Access Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vascular access catheters: A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long catheter that extends from an ... central catheter may be larger caliber than a PICC, and is designed to be placed via a ...

  8. Vascular smooth muscle modulates endothelial control of vasoreactivity via reactive oxygen species production through myoendothelial communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Billaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial control of vascular smooth muscle plays a major role in the resulting vasoreactivity implicated in physiological or pathological circulatory processes. However, a comprehensive understanding of endothelial (EC/smooth muscle cells (SMC crosstalk is far from complete. Here, we have examined the role of gap junctions and reactive oxygen species (ROS in this crosstalk and we demonstrate an active contribution of SMC to endothelial control of vasomotor tone. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In small intrapulmonary arteries, quantitative RT-PCR, Western Blot analyses and immunofluorescent labeling evidenced connexin (Cx 37, 40 and 43 in EC and/or SMC. Functional experiments showed that the Cx-mimetic peptide targeted against Cx 37 and Cx 43 ((37,43Gap27 (1 reduced contractile and calcium responses to serotonin (5-HT simultaneously recorded in pulmonary arteries and (2 abolished the diffusion in SMC of carboxyfluorescein-AM loaded in EC. Similarly, contractile and calcium responses to 5-HT were decreased by superoxide dismutase and catalase which, catabolise superoxide anion and H(2O(2, respectively. Both Cx- and ROS-mediated effects on the responses to 5-HT were reversed by L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor or endothelium removal. Electronic paramagnetic resonance directly demonstrated that 5-HT-induced superoxide anion production originated from the SMC. Finally, whereas 5-HT increased NO production, it also decreased cyclic GMP content in isolated intact arteries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that agonist-induced ROS production in SMC targeting EC via myoendothelial gap junctions reduces endothelial NO-dependent control of pulmonary vasoreactivity. Such SMC modulation of endothelial control may represent a signaling pathway controlling vasoreactivity under not only physiological but also pathological conditions that often implicate excessive ROS production.

  9. Consequences of PAI-1 specific deletion in endothelium on radiation-induced intestinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced injury to healthy tissues is a real public health problem, since they are one of the most limiting factors that restrict efficiency of radiation therapy. This problematic is also part of the French Cancer Plan 2014-2017, and involves clinical research. Concepts surrounding the development of radiation-induced damage have gradually evolved into a contemporary and integrated view of the pathogenesis, involving all compartments of target tissue. Among them, endothelium seems to be central in the sequence of interrelated events that lead to the development of radiation-induced damage, although there are rare concrete elements that support this concept. By using new transgenic mouse models, this PhD project provides a direct demonstration of an endothelium-dependent continuum in evolution of radiation-induced intestinal damage. Indeed, changes in the endothelial phenotype through targeted deletion of the gene SERPINE1, chosen because of its key role in the development of radiation enteritis, influences various parameters of the development of the disease. Thus, lack of PAI-1 secretion by endothelial cells significantly improves survival of the animals, and limits severity of early and late tissue damage after a localized small bowel irradiation. Furthermore, these mice partially KO for PAI-1 showed a decrease in the number of apoptotic intestinal stem cells in the hours following irradiation, a decrease in the macrophages infiltrate density one week after irradiation, and a change in the polarization of macrophages throughout the pathophysiological process. In an effort to protect healthy tissues from radiation therapy side effects, without hindering the cancer treatment, PAI-1 seems to be an obvious therapeutic target. Conceptually, this work represents the direct demonstration of the link between endothelium phenotype and radiation enteritis pathogenesis. (author)

  10. Does high-density lipoprotein protect vascular function in healthy pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Wan N Wan; Caslake, Muriel J; Delles, Christian; Karlsson, Helen; Mulder, Monique T; Graham, Delyth; Freeman, Dilys J

    2016-04-01

    The maternal adaptation to pregnancy includes hyperlipidaemia, oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. In non-pregnant individuals, these processes are usually associated with poor vascular function. However, maternal vascular function is enhanced in pregnancy. It is not understood how this is achieved in the face of the adverse metabolic and inflammatory environment. Research into cardiovascular disease demonstrates that plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein), by merit of its functionality rather than its plasma concentration, exerts protective effects on the vascular endothelium. HDL has vasodilatory, antioxidant, anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and can protect against endothelial cell damage. In pregnancy, the plasma HDL concentration starts to rise at 10 weeks of gestation, peaking at 20 weeks. The initial rise in plasma HDL occurs around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation, a time when the trophoblast plugs in the maternal spiral arteries are released, generating oxidative stress. Thus there is the intriguing possibility that new HDL of improved function is synthesized around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation. In obese pregnancy and, to a greater extent, in pre-eclampsia, plasma HDL levels are significantly decreased and maternal vascular function is reduced. Wire myography studies have shown an association between the plasma content of apolipoprotein AI, the major protein constituent of HDL, and blood vessel relaxation. These observations lead us to hypothesize that HDL concentration, and function, increases in pregnancy in order to protect the maternal vascular endothelium and that in pre-eclampsia this fails to occur. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Relationship between vascular dysfunction in peripheral arteries and ischemic episodes during daily life in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva; Møller, Jacob E; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well established that endothelial dysfunction is present in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia. Some of these patients will have signs of transient myocardial ischemia during Holter monitoring. We sought to describe the correlation between daily life...... cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate a significant relationship between ischemic episodes and vascular dysfunction in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia and may justify an aggressive preventive therapy targeted directly at the endothelium....

  12. The NADPH organizers NoxO1 and p47phox are both mediators of diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Rezende

    2018-05-01

    Innovation and conclusion: ROS production stimulated by NoxO1 and p47phox limit endothelium-dependent relaxation and maintain blood pressure in mice. However, NoxO1 and p47phox cannot substitute each other despite their similar effect on vascular function. Deletion of NoxO1 induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype, whereas p47phox deletion rather elicited a hyper-inflammatory response.

  13. Novel approaches to improving endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    investigated three different approaches, with the aim of correcting endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease. Thus, (1) we evaluated the effect of a cell permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, on endothelial dysfunction in small arteries exposed to high pressure, (2) investigated...... the endothelial signal transduction pathways involved in vasorelaxation and NO release induced by an olive oil component, oleanolic acid, and (3) investigated the role of calcium-activated K channels in the release of NO induced by receptor activation. Tempol increases endothelium-dependent vasodilatation...

  14. The effects of particle size, shape, density and flow characteristics on particle margination to vascular walls in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Hang T; Truong, Nghia P; Whittaker, Andrew K; Davis, Thomas P; Peter, Karlheinz

    2018-01-01

    Vascular-targeted drug delivery is a promising approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis, due to the vast involvement of endothelium in the initiation and growth of plaque, a characteristic of atherosclerosis. One of the major challenges in carrier design for targeting cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is that carriers must be able to navigate the circulation system and efficiently marginate to the endothelium in order to interact with the target receptors. Areas covered: This review draws on studies that have focused on the role of particle size, shape, and density (along with flow hemodynamics and hemorheology) on the localization of the particles to activated endothelial cell surfaces and vascular walls under different flow conditions, especially those relevant to atherosclerosis. Expert opinion: Generally, the size, shape, and density of a particle affect its adhesion to vascular walls synergistically, and these three factors should be considered simultaneously when designing an optimal carrier for targeting CVD. Available preliminary data should encourage more studies to be conducted to investigate the use of nano-constructs, characterized by a sub-micrometer size, a non-spherical shape, and a high material density to maximize vascular wall margination and minimize capillary entrapment, as carriers for targeting CVD.

  15. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  16. Vascular morphologic and functional effect of endogenous androgens in an experimental atherosclerotic rabbits model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverry, Dario; Delgadillo, Alexandra; Montes, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Previous clinical and experimental studies suggest that androgens could have adverse, neutral or beneficial effect on atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations. Methods: an experimental, randomized controlled study in 40 New Zeland white male rabbits was realized. 20 rabbits underwent orchidectomy and 20 were fed with an atherogenic diet for 20 weeks. These were distributed in four groups: 1. non-castrated under normal diet, 2. Castrated under normal diet, 3. non-castrated under atherogenic diet, and 4. Castrated under atherogenic diet. Total cholesterol and free testosterone were measured. After euthanasia, arterial relaxation independent of endothelium was quantified in aorta, as well as the one depending on endothelium, in vitro, and histomorphometric analysis of thoracic aorta were made in order to quantify the atherosclerotic plaque formation. Results: animals that had a normal diet (n=20) had total cholesterol of 51.1 ± 8.5 mg/dl and those with atherogenic diet of 429.2 ± 262.0 mg/dl (p< 0.001). Testosterone levels in the non- castrated group were 2.1 ± 0.3 ng/ml and in the castrated were 0.8 ± 0.4 ng/ml (p= 0.024). In non-castrated rabbits the effect of hypercholesterolemia (366 ± 226.1 mg/dl) inducing atherosclerotic plaque and functional vascular alteration was mild. On the other hand, atherogenic diet in castrated rabbits induced an increment in total cholesterol from 387.6 ± 292.7 mg/dl (p <0.001) and severe morphological changes such as plaque area 2.6 ± 2.3mm (p <0.001), vessel plaque/area 0.25 ± 0.1 (p <0.001) and area index of plaque/area of the media 0.4 ± 0.3 (p <0.001). Endothelium independent relaxation percentage was 85.5 ± 14.3% (p = NS) and endothelium dependent relaxation was 38.5 ± 201% (p = 0.03). Conclusion: This study realized in rabbits demonstrates that endogenous testosterone might have a preventive effect on atherosclerosis and favor endothelium dependent vascular relaxation in the presence of severe

  17. Enhanced K+-channel-mediated endothelium-dependent local and conducted dilation of small mesenteric arteries from ApoE−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznai, Timea; Takano, Hiromichi; Hamill, Claire; Yarova, Polina; Douglas, Gillian; Channon, Keith; Dora, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Aims Agonists that evoke smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization have the potential to stimulate both local and conducted dilation. We investigated whether the endothelium-dependent vasodilators acetylcholine (ACh) and SLIGRL stimulated conducted dilation and whether this was altered by deficiency in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−). Methods and results Isolated mesenteric arteries were cannulated, pressurized, and precontracted with phenylephrine. Agonists were either added to the bath to study local dilation or were restricted to one end of arteries to study conducted dilation. An enhanced sensitivity to both ACh and SLIGRL was observed in mesenteric arteries from ApoE−/− mice compared with wild-type controls. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase blocked ACh responses, but had no effect on maximum dilation to SLIGRL. SLIGRL increased endothelial cell Ca2+, hyperpolarized smooth muscle cells, and fully dilated arteries. The NO-independent dilation to SLIGRL was blocked with high [KCl] or Ca2+-activated K+-channel blockers. The hyperpolarization and dilation to SLIGRL passed through the artery to at least 2.5 mm upstream. The conducted dilation was not affected by a deficit in ApoE and could also be stimulated by ACh, suggesting NO itself could stimulate conducted dilation. Conclusion In small mesenteric arteries of ApoE−/− mice, NO-independent dilation is enhanced. Since both NO-dependent and -independent pathways can stimulate local and conducted dilation, the potential for reducing vascular resistance is improved in these vessels. PMID:21690174

  18. Nucleotide Excision DNA Repair is Associated with Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durik, Matej; Kavousi, Maryam; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Isaacs, Aaron; Cheng, Caroline; Verdonk, Koen; Loot, Annemarieke E.; Oeseburg, Hisko; Musterd-Bhaggoe, Usha; Leijten, Frank; van Veghel, Richard; de Vries, Rene; Rudez, Goran; Brandt, Renata; Ridwan, Yanto R.; van Deel, Elza D.; de Boer, Martine; Tempel, Dennie; Fleming, Ingrid; Mitchell, Gary F.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Duckers, Henricus J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Danser, A.H. Jan; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.; Roks, Anton J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction in atherosclerosis and diabetes, as observed in the aging population of developed societies, is associated with vascular DNA damage and cell senescence. We hypothesized that cumulative DNA damage during aging contributes to vascular dysfunction. Methods and Results In mice with genomic instability due to the defective nucleotide excision repair genes ERCC1 and XPD (Ercc1d/− and XpdTTD mice), we explored age-dependent vascular function as compared to wild-type mice. Ercc1d/− mice showed increased vascular cell senescence, accelerated development of vasodilator dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness and elevated blood pressure at very young age. The vasodilator dysfunction was due to decreased endothelial eNOS levels as well as impaired smooth muscle cell function, which involved phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Similar to Ercc1d/− mice, age-related endothelium-dependent vasodilator dysfunction in XpdTTD animals was increased. To investigate the implications for human vascular disease, we explored associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of selected nucleotide excision repair genes and arterial stiffness within the AortaGen Consortium, and found a significant association of a SNP (rs2029298) in the putative promoter region of DDB2 gene with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Conclusions Mice with genomic instability recapitulate age-dependent vascular dysfunction as observed in animal models and in humans, but with an accelerated progression, as compared to wild type mice. In addition, we found associations between variations in human DNA repair genes and markers for vascular stiffness which is associated with aging. Our study supports the concept that genomic instability contributes importantly to the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22705887

  19. Postnatal Deletion of Podoplanin in Lymphatic Endothelium Results in Blood Filling of the Lymphatic System and Impairs Dendritic Cell Migration to Lymph Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Roberta; Russo, Erica; Bachmann, Samia B; Proulx, Steven T; Sesartic, Marko; Smaadahl, Nora; Watson, Steve P; Buckley, Christopher D; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system exerts major physiological functions in the transport of interstitial fluid from peripheral tissues back to the blood circulation and in the trafficking of immune cells to lymph nodes. Previous studies in global constitutive knockout mice for the lymphatic transmembrane molecule podoplanin reported perinatal lethality and a complex phenotype with lung abnormalities, cardiac defects, lymphedema, blood-filled lymphatic vessels, and lack of lymph node organization, reflecting the importance of podoplanin expression not only by the lymphatic endothelium but also by a variety of nonendothelial cell types. Therefore, we aimed to dissect the specific role of podoplanin expressed by adult lymphatic vessels. We generated an inducible, lymphatic-specific podoplanin knockout mouse model (Pdpn ΔLEC ) and induced gene deletion postnatally. Pdpn ΔLEC mice were viable, and their lymphatic vessels appeared morphologically normal with unaltered fluid drainage function. Intriguingly, Pdpn ΔLEC mice had blood-filled lymph nodes and vessels, most frequently in the neck and axillary region, and displayed a blood-filled thoracic duct, suggestive of retrograde filling of blood from the blood circulation into the lymphatic system. Histological and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses revealed normal lymph node organization with the presence of erythrocytes within lymph node lymphatic vessels but not surrounding high endothelial venules. Moreover, fluorescein isothiocyanate painting experiments revealed reduced dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes in Pdpn ΔLEC mice. These results reveal an important role of podoplanin expressed by lymphatic vessels in preventing postnatal blood filling of the lymphatic vascular system and in contributing to efficient dendritic cell migration to the lymph nodes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Notch1 acts via Foxc2 to promote definitive hematopoiesis via effects on hemogenic endothelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jang, Il Ho; Lu, Yi Fen; Zhao, Long

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic and vascular development share many common features, including cell surface markers and sites of origin. Recent lineage-tracing studies have established that definitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells arise from vascular endothelial-cadherin+ hemogenic endothelial cells of t...

  1. Endothelium-independent vasorelaxant activity of Trachyspermum ammi essential oil on rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargazi Zadeh, G; Panahi, N

    2017-01-01

    Several pharmacological activities of the essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi seeds (TAEO) have been previously studied. These include antitussive, antihypertensive, and antispasmodic effects. However, its action on isolated aorta has not yet been studied. This study was aimed to investigate the vasorelaxant activity of TAEO and characterize its mechanism of action. Extraction of TAEO was performed using Clevenger-type apparatus with the final content of 4.5% (v/w). To evaluate some probable mechanisms of action of TAEO, the action isometric tension was then measured in the aortic rings from Wistar rats which were precontracted with phenylephrine (PHE) (1 µM) or KCl (60 mM). The major constituents of TAEO included Thymol (38.1%), gamma-terpinene (33.3%), and p-cymene (23.1%), as was analyzed by GC-MS. The cumulative concentrations of TAEO reduced precontraction caused by PHE and KCl (p < 0.05) significantly, which was dose dependent. The vasorelaxation caused by TAEO was not influenced in the presence of methylene blue and L-NAME in the endothelium-intact and denuded aorta ring. The inhibitory effect of TAEO on the aortic rings precontracted with KCl and PHE was considerably reduced by nifedipine. These findings hypothesized that the vasorelaxation caused by TAEO is completely endothelium independent and the extracellular Ca 2+ influx was also inhibited by TAEO.

  2. Exogenous NO suppresses flow-induced endothelium-derived NO production because of depletion of tetrahydrobiopterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Seiichi; Sipkema, Pieter; Goto, Masami; Hiramatsu, Osamu; Nakamoto, Hiroshi; Toyota, Eiji; Kajita, Tatsuya; Shigeto, Fumiyuki; Yada, Toyotaka; Ogasawara, Yasuo; Kajiya, Fumihiko

    2005-02-01

    Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) suppresses endothelium-derived NO production. We were interested in determining whether this is also the case in flow-induced endothelium-derived NO production. If so, then is the mechanism because of intracellular depletion of tetrahydrobiopterin [BH4; a cofactor of NO synthase (NOS)], which results in superoxide production by uncoupled NOS? Isolated canine femoral arteries were perfused with 100 microM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; an NO donor) and/or 64 microM BH4. Perfusion of SNAP suppressed flow-induced NO production, which was evaluated as a change in the slope of the linear relationship between perfusion rate and NO production rate (P production (n = 7). Concomitant perfusion of SNAP and 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid (Tiron; 1 mM; a membrane-permeable superoxide scavenger) also retained the control-level NO production (n = 7), whereas perfusion of Tiron after SNAP could not return the NO production to the control level (P production by superoxide released from uncoupled NOS because of intracellular BH4 depletion.

  3. Comparative Ability of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Different Tissues to Limit Neutrophil Recruitment to Inflamed Endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafsa Munir

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are tissue-resident stromal cells capable of modulating immune responses, including leukocyte recruitment by endothelial cells (EC. However, the comparative potency of MSC from different sources in suppressing recruitment, and the necessity for close contact with endothelium remain uncertain, although these factors have implications for use of MSC in therapy. We thus compared the effects of MSC isolated from bone marrow, Wharton's jelly, and trabecular bone on neutrophil recruitment to cytokine-stimulated EC, using co-culture models with different degrees of proximity between MSC and EC. All types of MSC suppressed neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium but not neutrophil transmigration, whether directly incorporated into endothelial monolayers or separated from them by thin micropore filters. Further increase in the separation of the two cell types tended to reduce efficacy, although this diminution was least for the bone marrow MSC. Immuno-protective effects of MSC were also diminished with repeated passage; with BMMSC, but not WJMSC, completing losing their suppressive effect by passage 7. Conditioned media from all co-cultures suppressed neutrophil recruitment, and IL-6 was identified as a common bioactive mediator. These results suggest endogenous MSC have a homeostatic role in limiting inflammatory leukocyte infiltration in a range of tissues. Since released soluble mediators might have effects locally or remotely, infusion of MSC into blood or direct injection into target organs might be efficacious, but in either case, cross-talk between EC and MSC appears necessary.

  4. Reduced basal and stimulated leukocyte adherence in tumor endothelium of experimental pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J; Ryschich, E; Maksan, S M; Werner, J; Gebhard, M M; Herfarth, C; Klar, E

    1999-12-01

    The interaction between immunocompetent cells and tumor endothelium is essential for an effective immunological response. In the present study, we evaluated resting and CD11b/CD18-mediated leukocyte adhesion in tumor vessels of experimental pancreatic cancer and in healthy pancreatic venules in the rat. Solid tumor fragments (1 mm3) were interposed intrapancreatically between inert transparent polymethylmetacrylate plates for intravital microscopy (n = 12) by which tumor microcirculation, leukocyte-tumor-endothelium interaction, and the effect of the chemoattractants N-formyl-methioninleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on leukocyte adherence was investigated. Leukocyte adhesion in pancreatic tumor vessels was significantly reduced compared to healthy pancreatic venules. Both fMLP and PAF dramatically increased leukocyte adherence in normal pancreatic venules. No change in leukocyte adhesion was present in tumor vessels after exposure to these chemotactic substances. Resting and stimulated integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion is strongly reduced in malignant vessels of experimental pancreatic cancer, which may be an important mechanism to escape immune control.

  5. Endogenous ovarian hormones affect mitochondrial efficiency in cerebral endothelium via distinct regulation of PGC-1 isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Martin F; Zhao, Yuanzi; Duckles, Sue P; Krause, Diana N

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria support the energy-intensive functions of brain endothelium but also produce damaging-free radicals that lead to disease. Previously, we found that estrogen treatment protects cerebrovascular mitochondria, increasing capacity for ATP production while decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine whether these effects occur specifically in endothelium in vivo and also explore underlying transcriptional mechanisms, we studied freshly isolated brain endothelial preparations from intact and ovariectomized female mice. This preparation reflects physiologic influences of circulating hormones, hemodynamic forces, and cell-cell interactions of the neurovascular unit. Loss of ovarian hormones affected endothelial expression of the key mitochondrial regulator family, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1), but in a unique way. Ovariectomy increased endothelial PGC-1α mRNA but decreased PGC-1β mRNA. The change in PGC-1β correlated with decreased mRNA for crucial downstream mitochondrial regulators, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, as well as for ATP synthase and ROS protection enzymes, glutamate-cysteine ligase and manganese superoxide dismutase. Ovariectomy also decreased mitochondrial biogenesis (mitochondrial/nuclear DNA ratio). These results indicate ovarian hormones normally act through a distinctive regulatory pathway involving PGC-1β to support cerebral endothelial mitochondrial content and guide mitochondrial function to favor ATP coupling and ROS protection.

  6. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  7. TRPV1 channels in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: implications for vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Stephen J; Park, Song Young; Kwon, Oh Sung; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? We sought to determine whether human skeletal muscle feed arteries (SFMAs) express TRPV 1 channels and what role they play in modulating vascular function. What is the main finding and its importance? Human SMFAs do express functional TRPV 1 channels that modulate vascular function, specifically opposing α-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasocontraction and potentiating vasorelaxation, in an endothelium-dependent manner, as evidenced by the α 1 -receptor-mediated responses. Thus, the vasodilatory role of TRPV 1 channels, and their ligand capsaicin, could be a potential therapeutic target for improving vascular function. Additionally, given the 'sympatholytic' effect of TRPV 1 activation and known endogenous activators (anandamide, reactive oxygen species, H + , etc.), TRPV 1 channels might contribute to functional sympatholysis during exercise. To examine the role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV 1 ) ion channel in the vascular function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) and whether activation of this heat-sensitive receptor could be involved in modulating vascular function, SMFAs from 16 humans (63 ± 5 years old, range 41-89 years) were studied using wire myography with capsaicin (TRPV 1 agonist) and without (control). Specifically, phenylephrine (α 1 -adrenergic receptor agonist), dexmedetomidine (α 2 -adrenergic receptor agonist), ACh and sodium nitroprusside concentration-response curves were established to assess the role of TRPV 1 channels in α-receptor-mediated vasocontraction as well as endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation, respectively. Compared with control conditions, capsaicin significantly attenuated maximal vasocontraction in response to phenylephrine [control, 52 ± 8% length-tension max (LT max ) and capsaicin, 21 ± 5%LT max ] and dexmedetomidine (control, 29 ± 12%LT max and capsaicin, 2 ± 3%LT max ), while robustly enhancing maximal

  8. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  9. Functional vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia: mechanisms and consequences of cerebral autoregulatory dysfunction, endothelial impairment, and neurovascular uncoupling in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies indicate that age-related cerebromicrovascular dysfunction and microcirculatory damage play critical roles in the pathogenesis of many types of dementia in the elderly, including Alzheimer's disease. Understanding and targeting the age-related pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) are expected to have a major role in preserving brain health in older individuals. Maintenance of cerebral perfusion, protecting the microcirculation from high pressure-induced damage and moment-to-moment adjustment of regional oxygen and nutrient supply to changes in demand are prerequisites for the prevention of cerebral ischemia and neuronal dysfunction. This overview discusses age-related alterations in three main regulatory paradigms involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF): cerebral autoregulation/myogenic constriction, endothelium-dependent vasomotor function, and neurovascular coupling responses responsible for functional hyperemia. The pathophysiological consequences of cerebral microvascular dysregulation in aging are explored, including blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, exacerbation of neurodegeneration, development of cerebral microhemorrhages, microvascular rarefaction, and ischemic neuronal dysfunction and damage. Due to the widespread attention that VCID has captured in recent years, the evidence for the causal role of cerebral microvascular dysregulation in cognitive decline is critically examined. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Functional vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia: mechanisms and consequences of cerebral autoregulatory dysfunction, endothelial impairment, and neurovascular uncoupling in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Csiszar, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies indicate that age-related cerebromicrovascular dysfunction and microcirculatory damage play critical roles in the pathogenesis of many types of dementia in the elderly, including Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding and targeting the age-related pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) are expected to have a major role in preserving brain health in older individuals. Maintenance of cerebral perfusion, protecting the microcirculation from high pressure-induced damage and moment-to-moment adjustment of regional oxygen and nutrient supply to changes in demand are prerequisites for the prevention of cerebral ischemia and neuronal dysfunction. This overview discusses age-related alterations in three main regulatory paradigms involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF): cerebral autoregulation/myogenic constriction, endothelium-dependent vasomotor function, and neurovascular coupling responses responsible for functional hyperemia. The pathophysiological consequences of cerebral microvascular dysregulation in aging are explored, including blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, exacerbation of neurodegeneration, development of cerebral microhemorrhages, microvascular rarefaction, and ischemic neuronal dysfunction and damage. Due to the widespread attention that VCID has captured in recent years, the evidence for the causal role of cerebral microvascular dysregulation in cognitive decline is critically examined. PMID:27793855

  11. Hypoxia and Matrix Manipulation for Vascular Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan E.; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Gerecht, Sharon

    The great majority of cell types are known to be capable of sensing changes in O2 tension and in the extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in various responses depending on the cell type and other factors in the microenvironment, such as cell-cell interactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that hypoxia greatly influences the processes of angiogenesis/vasculogenesis through the transcription of several genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the major regulatory protein of angiogenesis/vasculogenesis. At the same time, the spatial and temporal distribution of ECM components affects ECM properties and growth factor (GF) availability, which, in turn, regulates vascular development. This chapter will discuss how hypoxia and the ECM influence vascular morphogenesis. It seeks a better understanding of vascular development by considering recent research and emerging technologies focused on controlling O2 tension and manipulating ECM properties. The first part of the chapter focuses on the influences of O2 tension and ECM distribution on vascular formation. The second part presents strategies for manipulating the microenvironment using synthetic biomaterials. Control over O2 in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments is thoroughly highlighted, along with the currently available O2 measurement techniques and mathematical models that are necessary to monitor O2 gradients in 3D microenvironments. Finally, the chapter discusses the state-of-the-art technology in microfluidics and smart biomaterials to provide insight into its future direction.

  12. Detection and Quantification of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Primary Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Proteins differ widely in their pattern of expression depending on organism, tissue, and regulation in response to changing conditions. In the mammalian vasculature, the endothelium responds to vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) via membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs) to modulate many aspects of vascular physiology including vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and blood pressure. Studies on VEGFR biology are thus dependent on detecting expression levels in different cell types and evaluating how changes in protein levels correlate with changing conditions including circulating VEGF levels. Here, we present a robust immunoblot-based protocol for detecting and quantifying VEGFRs in human endothelial cells. Using internal and external standards, we can rapidly evaluate receptor copy number and assess how this is altered in response to the cellular environment.

  13. Characterisation and vascular expression of nitric oxide synthase 3 in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melissa S; Trajanovska, Sofie; Forgan, Leonard G; Donald, John A

    2016-12-01

    In mammals, nitric oxide (NO) produced by nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) localised in vascular endothelial cells is an important vasodilator but the presence of NOS3 in the endothelium of amphibians has been concluded to be absent, based on physiological studies. In this study, a nos3 cDNA was sequenced from the toad, Rhinella marina. The open reading frame of R. marina nos3 encoded an 1170 amino acid protein that showed 81 % sequence identity to the recently cloned Xenopus tropicalis nos3. Rhinella marina nos3 mRNA was expressed in a range of tissues and in the dorsal aorta and pulmonary, mesenteric, iliac and gastrocnemius arteries. Furthermore, nos3 mRNA was expressed in the aorta of Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that removal of the endothelium of the lateral aorta of R. marina significantly reduced the expression of nos3 mRNA compared to control aorta with the endothelium intact. However, in situ hybridisation was not able to detect any nos3 mRNA in the dorsal aorta of R. marina. Immunohistochemistry using a homologous R. marina NOS3 antibody showed immunoreactivity (IR) within the basal region of many endothelial cells of the dorsal aorta and iliac artery. NOS3-IR was also observed in the proximal tubules and collecting ducts of the kidney but not within the capillaries of the glomeruli. This is the first study to demonstrate that vascular endothelial cells of an amphibian express NOS3.

  14. tion of vascular malformations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imaging is only required in cases where there is diag- nostic uncertainty or where interven- tion is required. Ultrasound (with doppler) will rapidly distinguish solid haemangiomas from vascular malfor- mations. Computed tomography. (CT) and magnetic resonance imag- ing (MRI) will help to assess the depth and extent of ...

  15. Acupuncture for vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, W N; Zhao, H; Liu, Z S; Wang, S

    2007-04-18

    Dementia is a widespread condition characterized by acquired global impairment of intellect, memory and personality, but with no impairment of consciousness. There is no definitive medical or surgical treatment for vascular dementia. Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese method which has been used for both the prevention and treatment of diseases for over three thousand years. Preliminary searches revealed more than 105 studies of acupuncture for treating vascular dementia. Benefit was reported in up to 70-91% of the treatment group. Body acupuncture and electroacupuncture were the most commonly used techniques. A comparison of electroacupuncture and acupuncture therapy alone suggested that the former was more effective in promoting the recovery of cognitive function. The objective is to assess the efficacy and possible adverse effects of acupuncture therapy for treating vascular dementia. The trials were identified from a search of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement group's Specialized Register on 2 February 2007 which contains records from all major health care databases and many ongoing trials databases. In addition the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database was searched and the web was searched using the search engine Copernic. Randomized controlled trials testing acupuncture therapy in the treatment of vascular dementia were included regardless of language and publication types. The intervention and control group had to receive identical treatment apart from the acupuncture intervention. In view of possible confounding, studies in which acupuncture was combined with other treatments were subjected to subgroup analyses. Titles and abstracts identified from the searches were checked by two reviewers. If it was clear that the study did not refer to a randomized controlled trial in vascular dementia, it was excluded. If it was not clear from the abstract and title, then the full text of study was obtained for an independent assessment by two reviewers

  16. Vascular Reactivity: Evaluation of an acute suprasystolic occlusion with impedance plethysmography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, M C [Departamento de BioingenierIa, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y TecnologIa, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman e INSIBIO, CONICET, Tucuman (Argentina); Bonaudo, M; Conde, A [Carrera de Ingenieria de Biomedica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y TecnologIa, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina); Palavecino, L [Carrera de Ingenieria de Biomedica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y TecnologIa, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In the clinical set, the evaluation of endothelium- dependent vasodilator response of large vessels is carried out using ultrasound equipment for vascular flow determinations and during administration of vasoactive drugs. This work proposes to use a substantially cheaper technique and a sustained cuff arterial occlusion in order to cause vasodilation. Impedance plethysmography is used to detect the arterial pulse wave over radial artery while the forearm is occluded by above the recording site. From these plethysmographic waves, three indexes and their changes -between control and maximal response post-occlusion- were calculated. 33 complete records obtained from healthy low-risk volunteers were analyzed. Between control and post-occlusion maximal response, 'average percentual change of pulse wave amplitude' were (35{+-}13)%, 'stiffness index' did not show significant differences (6,38{+-}0,98 vs 6,38{+-}0,94 and 'reflection index' was significant lower (58{+-}15 vs 35{+-}16)%. These results indicate that: 1- cuff occlusion maneuver was effective to cause endothelium-dependent vasodilation, 2-changes of pulse wave amplitude and reflection index could be used as markers of athero-arteriosclerotic damage in the vascular bed, even in sub-clinical conditions.

  17. A Randomized Trial of Vitamin D Supplementation on Vascular Function in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Kumar, Vinod; Singhal, Manphool; Billot, Laurent; Gupta, Krishan Lal; Banerjee, Debasish; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency associates with mortality in patients with CKD, and vitamin D supplementation might mitigate cardiovascular disease risk in CKD. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we investigated the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on vascular function in 120 patients of either sex, aged 18-70 years, with nondiabetic CKD stage 3-4 and vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D ≤20 ng/ml). We randomized patients using a 1:1 ratio to receive either two directly observed oral doses of cholecalciferol (300,000 IU) or matching placebo at baseline and 8 weeks. The primary outcome was change in endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilation at 16 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included changes in pulse wave velocity and circulating biomarkers. Cholecalciferol supplementation significantly increased endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilation at 16 weeks, whereas placebo did not (between-group difference in mean change: 5.49%; 95% confidence interval, 4.34% to 6.64%; P vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation may improve vascular function. This study is registered with the Clinical Trials Registry of India (no.: CTRI/2013/05/003648). Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Pulmonary allergic reactions impair systemic vascular relaxation in ragweed sensitive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Surovi; Van Scott, Michael R; Lust, Robert M; Wingard, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is often associated with cardiovascular complications, and recent observations in animal models indicate that induction of pulmonary allergic inflammation increases susceptibility of the myocardium to ischemia and reperfusion injury. In this study, we used a murine model of allergen sensitization in which aspiration of allergen induces pulmonary and systemic inflammation, to test the hypothesis that pulmonary exposure to allergen alters vascular relaxation responses. BALB/C mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ragweed and challenged by intratracheal instillation of allergen. Airway hyperreactivity and pulmonary inflammation were confirmed, and endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity of thoracic aorta rings were evaluated. Ragweed sensitization and challenge induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine and pulmonary inflammation, but did not affect constrictor responses of the aortic rings to phenylephrine and K+ depolarization. In contrast, maximal relaxation of aortic rings to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside decreased from 87.6±3.9% and 97.7±1.2% to 32±4% and 51±6%, respectively (p<0.05). The sensitivity to acetylcholine was likewise reduced (EC₅₀=0.26±0.05 μM vs. 1.09±0.16 μM, p<0.001). The results demonstrate that induction of allergic pulmonary inflammation in mice depresses endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular relaxation, which can contribute to cardiovascular complications associated with allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulation of specular microscopy images of corneal endothelium, a tool for control of measurement errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucht, Curry; Söderberg, Per; Manneberg, Göran

    2011-05-01

    We aimed at developing simulation software capable of producing images of corneal endothelium close to identical to images captured by clinical specular microscopy with defined morphometrical characteristics. It was further planned to demonstrate the usefulness of the simulator by analysing measurement errors associated with a trained operator using a commercially available semi-automatic algorithm for analysis of simulated images. Software was developed that allows creation of unique images of the corneal endothelium expressing morphology close to identical with that seen in images of corneal specular microscopy. Several hundred unique images of the corneal endothelium were generated with randomization, spanning a physiological range of endothelial cell density. As an example of the usefulness of the simulator for analysis of measurement errors in corneal specular microscopy, a total of 12 of all the images generated were randomly selected such that the endothelial cell density expressed was evenly distributed over the physiological range of endothelial cell density. The images were transferred to a personal computer. The imagenet-640 software was used to analyse endothelial cell size variation, percentage of hexagonal endothelial cells, and endothelial cell density. The simulator developed allows randomized generation of corneal specular microscopy images with a preset expected average and variation of cell structure. Calculated morphometric information of each cell is stored in the simulator. The image quality can secondarily be varied with a toolbox of filters to approximate a large spectrum of clinically captured images. As an example of the use of the simulator, measurement errors associated with one trained operator using the imagenet-640 software, and focusing on endothelial cell density, were examined. The functional dependence between morphometric information estimated with the imagenet-640 software algorithm and real morphometric information as provided

  20. Three-dimensional bioprinting of thick vascularized tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesky, David B.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Skylar-Scott, Mark A.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-03-01

    The advancement of tissue and, ultimately, organ engineering requires the ability to pattern human tissues composed of cells, extracellular matrix, and vasculature with controlled microenvironments that can be sustained over prolonged time periods. To date, bioprinting methods have yielded thin tissues that only survive for short durations. To improve their physiological relevance, we report a method for bioprinting 3D cell-laden, vascularized tissues that exceed 1 cm in thickness and can be perfused on chip for long time periods (>6 wk). Specifically, we integrate parenchyma, stroma, and endothelium into a single thick tissue by coprinting multiple inks composed of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human neonatal dermal fibroblasts (hNDFs) within a customized extracellular matrix alongside embedded vasculature, which is subsequently lined with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). These thick vascularized tissues are actively perfused with growth factors to differentiate hMSCs toward an osteogenic lineage in situ. This longitudinal study of emergent biological phenomena in complex microenvironments represents a foundational step in human tissue generation.

  1. Mesoglycan: Clinical Evidences for Use in Vascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Tufano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular glycosaminoglycans (GAG are essential components of the endothelium and vessel wall and have been shown to be involved in several biologic functions. Mesoglycan, a natural GAG preparation, is a polysaccharide complex rich in sulphur radicals with strong negative electric charge. It is extracted from porcine intestinal mucosa and is composed of heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, electrophoretically slow-moving heparin, and variable and minimal quantities of chondroitin sulfate. Data on antithrombotic and profibrinolytic activities of the drug show that mesoglycan, although not indicated in the treatment of acute arterial or venous thrombosis because of the low antithrombotic effect, may be useful in the management of vascular diseases, when combined with antithrombotics in the case of disease of cerebral vasculature, and with antithrombotics and vasodilator drugs in the case of chronic peripheral arterial disease. The protective effect of mesoglycan in patients with venous thrombosis and the absence of side effects, support the use of GAG in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and persistent venous ulcers, in association with compression therapy (zinc bandages, multiple layer bandages, etc., elastic compression stockings, and local care, and in the prevention of recurrences in patients with previous DVT following the standard course of oral anticoagulation treatment.

  2. Vascular Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim-Yeh, Susie; Rahangdale, Shilpa; Nguyen, Anh Tu Duy; Stevenson, Karen E.; Novack, Victor; Veves, Aristidis; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), the attributable vascular risk from each condition is unknown. We hypothesize that OSA may have a similar effect on vascular function as type 2 diabetes does. Healthy normal-weight subjects, healthy obese subjects, subjects with type 2 diabetes, and obese subjects with OSA were enrolled. Vascular function was assessed with brachial artery ultrasound for flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and in skin microcirculation by laser Doppler flowmetry. One hundred fifty-three subjects were studied: healthy normal-weight controls (NCs) (n = 14), healthy obese controls (OCs) (n = 33), subjects with DM (n = 68), and obese subjects with OSA (n = 38). The DM group did not undergo sleep study and thus may have had subclinical OSA. The OSA and type 2 diabetes groups had impaired FMD as compared to both the normal-weight and OC groups (5.8 ± 3.8%, 5.4 ± 1.6% vs. 9.1 ± 2.5%, 8.3 ± 5.1%, respectively, P < 0.001, post hoc Fischer test). When referenced to the NC group, a multiple linear regression model adjusting for covariates found that baseline brachial artery diameter (β = −3.75, P < 0.001), OSA (β = −2.45, P = 0.02) and type 2 diabetes status (β = −2.31, P = 0.02), negatively predicted % FMD. OSA status did not seem to affect nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation (endothelium-independent) of the brachial artery or vascular function in the skin microcirculation. OSA impairs endothelial function in the brachial artery to a similar degree as type 2 diabetes does. OSA, however, does not appear to affect brachial endothelium-independent vasodilation or skin microcirculatory function. Treatment of OSA in patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes, therefore, may be a potential therapeutic option to improve macro-, but not microvascular outcomes. PMID:20523303

  3. Temporal assessment of vascular reactivity and functionality using MRI during postischemic proangiogenenic vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsiang; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Lin, Teng-Nan; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chang, Chen

    2015-09-01

    Postischemic angiogenesis is an important recovery mechanism. Both arteries and veins are upregulated during angiogenesis, but eventually there are more angiogenic veins than arteries in terms of number and length. It is critical to understand how the veins are modulated after ischemia and then transitioned into angiogenic vessels during the proangiogenic stage to finally serve as a restorative strength to the injured area. Using a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia, the hypercapnic blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was used to evaluate vascular reactivity, while the hyperoxic BOLD and tissue oxygen level-dependent (TOLD) responses were used to evaluate the vascular functionality at 1, 3, and 7days after ischemia. Vessel-like venous signals appeared on R2* maps on days 3 and 7, but not on day 1. The large hypercapnic BOLD responses on days 3 and 7 indicated that these areas have high vascular reactivity. The temporal correlation between vascular reactivity and the immunoreactivity to desmin and VEGF further indicates that the integrity of vascular reactivity is associated with the pericyte coverage as regulated by the VEGF level. Vascular functionality remained low on days 1, 3, and 7, as reflected by the small hyperoxic BOLD and large hyperoxic TOLD responses, indicating the low oxygen consumption of the ischemic tissues. These functional changes in proangiogenic veins may be critical for angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Anti-Apoptotic Properties of APEX1 in the Endothelium Require the First 20 Amino Acids and Converge on Thioredoxin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyballa-Rukes, Nadine; Jakobs, Philipp; Eckers, Anna; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Serbulea, Vlad; Aufenvenne, Karin; Zschauer, Tim-Christian; Rabanter, Lothar L; Jakob, Sascha; von Ameln, Florian; Eckermann, Olaf; Leitinger, Norbert; Goy, Christine; Altschmied, Joachim; Haendeler, Judith

    2017-04-20

    The APEX nuclease (multifunctional DNA repair enzyme) 1 (APEX1) has a disordered N-terminus, a redox, and a DNA repair domain. APEX1 has anti-apoptotic properties, which have been linked to both domains depending on cell type and experimental conditions. As protection against apoptosis is a hallmark of vessel integrity, we wanted to elucidate whether APEX1 acts anti-apoptotic in primary human endothelial cells and, if so, what the underlying mechanisms are. APEX1 inhibits apoptosis in endothelial cells by reducing Cathepsin D (CatD) cleavage, potentially by binding to the unprocessed form. Diminished CatD activation results in increased Thioredoxin-1 protein levels leading to reduced Caspase 3 activation. Consequently, apoptosis rates are decreased. This depends on the first twenty amino acids in APEX1, because APEX1 (21-318) induces CatD activity, decreases Thioredoxin-1 protein levels, and, thus, increases Caspase 3 activity and apoptosis. Along the same lines, APEX1 (1-20) inhibits Caspase 3 cleavage and apoptosis. Furthermore, re-expression of Thioredoxin-1 via lentiviral transduction rescues endothelial cells from APEX1 (21-318)-induced apoptosis. In an in vivo model of restenosis, which is characterized by oxidative stress, endothelial activation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation, Thioredoxin-1 protein levels are reduced in the endothelium of the carotids. APEX1 acts anti-apoptotic in endothelial cells. This anti-apoptotic effect depends on the first 20 amino acids of APEX1. As proper function of the endothelium during life span is a hallmark for individual health span, a detailed characterization of the functions of the APEX1N-terminus is required to understand all its cellular properties. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 616-629.

  5. Impact of wall shear stress and ligand avidity on binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles to murine tumor endothelium under flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryschich, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial phenotype of tumor blood vessels differs from the liver and forms an important base for endothelium-specific targeting by antibody-coated nanoparticles. Although differences of shear stress and ligand avidity can modulate the nanoparticle binding to endothelium, these mechanisms are still poorly studied. This study analyzed the binding of antibody-coated nanoparticles to tumor and liver endothelium under controlled flow conditions and verified this binding in tumor models in vivo. Binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles, but not of antibody was significantly reduced under increased wall shear stress and the degree of nanoparticle binding correlated with the avidity of the coating. The intravascular wall shear stress favors nanoparticle binding at the site of higher avidity of endothelial epitope which additionally promotes the selectivity to tumor endothelium. After intravenous application in vivo, pegylated self-coated nanoparticles showed specific binding to tumor endothelium, whereas the nanoparticle binding to the liver endothelium was very low. This study provides a rationale that selective binding of mAb-coated nanoparticles to tumor endothelium is achieved by two factors: higher expression of endothelial epitope and higher nanoparticle shearing from liver endothelium. The combination of endothelial marker targeting and the use of shear stress-controlled nanoparticle capture can be used for selective intratumoral drug delivery. PMID:26503468

  6. Influence of metabolism modifiers of cyclic nucleotides on contractility of right ventricle of rat heart with intact and removed endocardial endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Slađana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endocardial endothelium, a natural biological barrier between circulating blood in heart ventricle and cells, creates a complex yet finely tuned balance of interactions with the immediate environment. Objective. We investigated the roles of theophylline, nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and imidazole, an activator of phosphodiesterase on contractility of the right ventricle of rat heart, with intact and removed endocardial endothelium. Methods. Adult rats, of both sexes, type Wistar albino, were used in this experiment. All experiments were conducted on the preparations of the right ventricle using two experimental models. In the first experimental model, an endocardial endothelium (EE was preserved, and in the second model, an endocardial endothelium (-EE was removed using 1% solution Triton X-100. Results. Theophylline (1x10-2 mol/l expressed the positive inotropic effect on the heart, regardless of the presence of the endocardial endothelium. Inotropic response as multiple process can be induced by inhibition of phosphodiesterase, accumulation of cyclic nucleotides and activation of Ca2+ channels. Imidazole (2x10-3 mol/l increased the contractility of the right ventricle of the heart with EE. The modulator effect of endocardial endothelium on contractility of imidazole proved to be significant. As imidazole influenced the contractility of the right ventricle only in the presence of the endocardial endothelium, it is assumed that its effect is mediated via deliverance of endothelial mediators with positive inotropic effect. Conclusion. An intact endocardial endothelium is necessary for completion of contractile performance of the heart.

  7. [Effects of nebivolol, metoprolol and enalapril maleate on the state of endothelium-dependent arteriolar vasodilation in patients with essential hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivoda, S N; Cherepok, A A; Solov'iuk, A O; Sychev, R A; Kurilo, O A

    2001-01-01

    Effects were studied of nebivolol, metoprolol and enalapril maleat on the state of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation of arterioles in patients with essential arterial hypertension. Nebivolol has been shown to effectively decrease blood pressure and restore endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to a grater degree, than enalapril or metoprolol.

  8. Stathmin 1 plays a role in endometrial decidualisation by regulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jinhai; Jia, Jia; Feng, Juntao; Zhao, Xia; Yi, Tao; Cui, Tao; Li, Zhengyu

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the potential mechanism underlying stathmin 1 (Stmn1) regulation of embryo implantation, as a continuation of previous proteomic research. Adult healthy female mice were mated naturally with fertile males. Murine uterine tissue was collected during the peri-implantation period. Local expression of Stmn1 during embryo implantation was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), which showed that Stmn1 was extensively expressed in endometrial glandular epithelium, vascular endothelium, luminal epithelium and the underlying stromal cells at the implantation site on Day 5. The role of Stmn1 during embryo implantation was evaluated by transient knockdown of Stmn1 in vivo using short interference (si) RNA, and some associated factors including Akt, phosphorylated (p-) Akt, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, prolactin (PRL), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were examined by western blotting analysis and ELISA. The number of embryos implanted after Stmn1-siRNA infusion into the lumen of one uterine horn was lower than that with normal pregnancies (2.2±1.5 vs 8.6±0.5 respectively; P<0.05). The expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, p-Akt and the decidualisation biomarkers PRL and IGFBP 1 was upregulated at the implantation site on Day 5, but downregulated after Stmn1-siRNA infusion. These findings suggest that during embryo implantation, knockdown of Stmn1 suppresses decidualisation by inhibiting the expression of p-Akt, HIF-1α and VEGF, thus leading to impaired embryo implantation. These findings provide clues for understanding the complicated process of embryo implantation and the potential role of Stmn1 during embryo implantation.

  9. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-12-15

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells do not contribute to regeneration of endothelium after murine arterial injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagensen, Mette; Raarup, Merete Krog; Mortensen, Martin Bødtker

    2012-01-01

    into endothelial cells (ECs). We tested this theory in a murine arterial injury model using carotid artery transplants and fluorescent reporter mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Wire-injured carotid artery segments from wild-type mice were transplanted into TIE2-GFP transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) in ECs. We found that the endothelium regenerated with GFP(+) ECs as a function of time, evolving from the anastomosis sites towards the centre of the transplant. A migration front of ECs at Day 7 was verified by scanning electron microscopy and by bright-field microscopy using recipient TIE2-lac......Z mice with endothelial β-galactosidase expression. These experiments indicated migration of flanking ECs rather than homing of circulating cells as the underlying mechanism. To confirm this, we interposed non-injured wild-type carotid artery segments between the denuded transplant and the TIE2-GFP...

  11. Serum alkaline phosphatase negatively affects endothelium-dependent vasodilation in naïve hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perticone, Francesco; Perticone, Maria; Maio, Raffaele; Sciacqua, Angela; Andreucci, Michele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Mallamaci, Francesca; Sesti, Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-10-01

    Tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, promoting arterial calcification in experimental models, is a powerful predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality in general population and in patients with renal or cardiovascular diseases. For this study, to evaluate a possible correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase levels and endothelial function, assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, we enrolled 500 naïve hypertensives divided into increasing tertiles of alkaline phosphatase. The maximal response to acetylcholine was inversely related to alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.55; Palkaline phosphatase and serum phosphorus on endothelial function. The steepness of the alkaline phosphatase/vasodilating response to acetylcholine relationship was substantially attenuated (Palkaline phosphatase unit, respectively), and this interaction remained highly significant (Palkaline phosphatase and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which was attenuated by relatively higher serum phosphorus levels.

  12. Protective effect of policosanol on endothelium and intimal thickness induced by forceps in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noa, Miríam; Más, Rosa; Lariot, Carlos

    2007-09-01

    Policosanol is a cholesterol-lowering drug isolated from sugar cane wax with concomitant antiplatelet effects that prevents lipofundin-induced atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits and rats, including foam cell formation, and also reduces foam cell formation in carrageenan-induced granulomas in rats, while it inhibits proliferation of smooth muscle cells induced in rabbit cuffed artery. This study was undertaken to determine whether policosanol prevents endothelium damage and increase in arterial wall thickness in rabbits with arterial walls damaged with a forceps. Artery forceps were placed over the central artery of the right ear of all rabbits, and each artery was injured eight times. Animals were randomly distributed into four groups: a positive control group treated with Tween 20/H2O vehicle, two groups treated with policosanol (5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively), and a group treated with aspirin (8 mg/kg). Treatments were given for 30 days. Damaged arteries were examined by light and electron (transmission and scanning) microscopy. To evaluate intimal thickening, areas of intima were measured, and a significant reduction in policosanol-treated animals was observed. The endothelial surface, studied with scanning electron microscopy, revealed several types of damage. In control group, the endothelial surface was severely damaged. De-endothelialized areas were reduced in policosanol-treated animals. Platelet adhesion to subendothelium was seen in all animals of the control group, whereas policosanol-treated groups exhibited significantly reduced platelet adhesion. Policosanol also reduced, dose-dependently, the platelet sequestration induced in the damaged vessel wall, partially preventing the reduction in platelet count. It is concluded that policosanol prevents endothelium injury and reduces significantly intimal thickness of rabbit arteries damaged with forceps.

  13. Net Fluorescein Flux Across Corneal Endothelium Strongly Suggests Fluid Transport is due to Electro-osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J M; Cacace, V; Kusnier, C F; Nelson, R; Rubashkin, A A; Iserovich, P; Fischbarg, J

    2016-08-01

    We have presented prior evidence suggesting that fluid transport results from electro-osmosis at the intercellular junctions of the corneal endothelium. Such phenomenon ought to drag other extracellular solutes. We have investigated this using fluorescein-Na2 as an extracellular marker. We measured unidirectional fluxes across layers of cultured human corneal endothelial (HCE) cells. SV-40-transformed HCE layers were grown to confluence on permeable membrane inserts. The medium was DMEM with high glucose and no phenol red. Fluorescein-labeled medium was placed either on the basolateral or the apical side of the inserts; the other side carried unlabeled medium. The inserts were held in a CO2 incubator for 1 h (at 37 °C), after which the entire volume of the unlabeled side was collected. After that, label was placed on the opposite side, and the corresponding paired sample was collected after another hour. Fluorescein counts were determined with a (Photon Technology) DeltaScan fluorometer (excitation 380 nm; emission 550 nm; 2 nm bwth). Samples were read for 60 s. The cells utilized are known to transport fluid from the basolateral to the apical side, just as they do in vivo in several species. We used 4 inserts for influx and efflux (total: 20 1-h periods). We found a net flux of fluorescein from the basolateral to the apical side. The flux ratio was 1.104 ± 0.056. That difference was statistically significant (p = 0.00006, t test, paired samples). The endothelium has a definite restriction at the junctions. Hence, an asymmetry in unidirectional fluxes cannot arise from osmosis, and can only point instead to paracellular solvent drag. We suggest, once more, that such drag is due to electro-osmotic coupling at the paracellular junctions.

  14. Time Window Is Important for Adenosine Preventing Cold-induced Injury to the Endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Xiao-Xia; Fu, Li; Chen, Jing; Lu, Li-He; Liu, Xiang; Xu, Zhe; Zhou, Li; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xi; Ou, Zhi-Jun; Ou, Jing-Song

    2017-06-01

    Cold cardioplegia is used to induce heart arrest during cardiac surgery. However, endothelial function may be compromised after this procedure. Accordingly, interventions such as adenosine, that mimic the effects of preconditioning, may minimize endothelial injury. Herein, we investigated whether adenosine prevents cold-induced injury to the endothelium. Cultured human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells were treated with adenosine for different durations. Phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), p38MAPK, ERK1/2, and p70S6K6 were measured along with nitric oxide (NO) production using diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA) probe. Cold-induced injury by hypothermia to 4°C for 45 minutes to mimic conditions of cold cardioplegia during open heart surgery was induced in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Under basal conditions, adenosine stimulated NO production, eNOS phosphorylation at serine 1177 from 5 minutes to 4 hours and inhibited eNOS phosphorylation at threonine 495 from 5 minutes to 6 hours, but increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and p70S6K only after exposure for 5 minutes. Cold-induced injury inhibited NO production and the phosphorylation of the different enzymes. Importantly, adenosine prevented these effects of hypothermic injury. Our data demonstrated that adenosine prevents hypothermic injury to the endothelium by activating ERK1/2, eNOS, p70S6K, and p38MAPK signaling pathways at early time points. These findings also indicated that 5 minutes after administration of adenosine or release of adenosine is an important time window for cardioprotection during cardiac surgery.

  15. AVE 0991, a nonpeptide mimic of the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) on the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemer, Gabriele; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Louka, Febee R; Malinski, Tadeusz; Heitsch, Holger

    2002-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-[1-7]) exhibits a favorable kinetic of nitric oxide (NO) release accompanied by extremely low superoxide (O2-) production. In this report we describe AVE 0991, a novel nonpeptide compound that evoked effects similar to Ang-(1-7) on the endothelium. AVE 0991 and unlabeled Ang-(1-7) competed for high-affinity binding of [125I]-Ang-(1-7) to bovine aortic endothelial cell membranes with IC50 values of 21+/-35 and 220+/-280 nmol/L, respectively. Stimulated NO and O2- release from bovine aortic endothelial cells was directly and simultaneously measured on the cell surface by selective electrochemical nanosensors. Peak concentrations of NO and O2- release by AVE 0991 and Ang-(1-7) (both 10 micromol/L) were not significantly different (NO: 295+/-20 and 270+/-25 nmol/L; O2-: 18+/-2 and 20+/-4 nmol/L). However, the released amount of bioactive NO was approximately 5 times higher for AVE 0991 in comparison to Ang-(1-7). The selective Ang-(1-7) antagonist [D-Ala(7)]-Ang-(1-7) inhibited the AVE 0991-induced NO and O2- production by approximately 50%. A similar inhibition level was observed for the Ang II AT1 receptor antagonist EXP 3174. In contrast, the Ang II AT2 receptor antagonist PD 123,177 inhibited the AVE 0991-stimulated NO production by approximately 90% but without any inhibitory effect on O2- production. Both NO and O2- production were inhibited by NO synthase inhibition ( approximately 70%) and by bradykinin B2 receptor blockade (approximately 80%). AVE 0991 efficiently mimics the effects of Ang-(1-7) on the endothelium, most probably through stimulation of a specific, endothelial Ang-(1-7)-sensitive binding site causing kinin-mediated activation of endothelial NO synthase.

  16. Major Vascular Neurocognitive Disorder: A Reappraisal to Vascular Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Kumral

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Major vascular neurocognitive disorder (NCD is the second leading form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for 17-20% of all dementias. Vascular NCD is a progressive disease caused by reduced cerebral blood flow related to multiple large volume or lacunar infarcts that induce a sudden onset and stepwise decline in cognitive abilities. Despite its prevalence and clinical importance, there is still controversy in the terminology of vascular NCD. Only after the release of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5 (2013 did the American Psychiatric Association define vascular dementia as “major vascular NCD”. This review includes an overview of risk factors, pathophysiology, types, diagnostic and clinical features of major vascular NCD, and current treatment options of vascular NCD regarding to DSM-5 criteria

  17. Rubbing salt into wounded endothelium: Sodium potentiates proatherogenic effects of TNF-α under non-uniform shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, J.; Soehnlein, O.; Dietel, B.; Urschel, K.; Garlichs, C. D.; Cicha, I.

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of sodium is a risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. In vivo studies indicated that high dietary sodium may have a direct negative influence on endothelium. We investigated the effects of high sodium on the endothelial activation during early steps of

  18. Growth differentiation factor 15 impairs aortic contractile and relaxing function through altered caveolar signaling of the endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazagova, Magdalena; Buikema, Hendrik; Landheer, Sjoerd W.; Vavrinec, Peter; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Henning, Robert H.; Deelman, Leo E.

    Mazagova M, Buikema H, Landheer SW, Vavrinec P, van Buiten A, Henning RH, Deelman LE. Growth differentiation factor 15 impairs aortic contractile and relaxing function through altered caveolar signaling of the endothelium. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 304: H709-H718, 2013. First published

  19. New ways in RGD-peptide mediated drug targeting to angiogenic endothelium : On the nature of drugs, linkers, and carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temming, Kai

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the vessels of the entire circulatory system, in arteries, veins and capillaries in each and every organ. In contrast to a previous assumption that the endothelium is only a physical barrier, research in the last four decades has shown that it presents a complex

  20. Clonal analysis identifies hemogenic endothelium as the source of the blood-endothelial common lineage in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón-Barthe, Laura; Temiño, Susana; Villa del Campo, Cristina; Carramolino, Laura; Isern, Joan; Torres, Miguel

    2014-10-16

    The first blood and endothelial cells of amniote embryos appear in close association in the blood islands of the yolk sac (YS). This association and in vitro lineage analyses have suggested a common origin from mesodermal precursors called hemangioblasts, specified in the primitive streak during gastrulation. Fate mapping and chimera studies, however, failed to provide strong evidence for a common origin in the early mouse YS. Additional in vitro studies suggest instead that mesodermal precursors first generate hemogenic endothelium, which then generate blood cells in a linear sequence. We conducted an in vivo clonal analysis to determine the potential of individual cells in the mouse epiblast, primitive streak, and early YS. We found that early YS blood and endothelial lineages mostly derive from independent epiblast populations, specified before gastrulation. Additionally, a subpopulation of the YS endothelium has hemogenic activity and displays characteristics similar to those found later in the embryonic hemogenic endothelium. Our results show that the earliest blood and endothelial cell populations in the mouse embryo are specified independently, and that hemogenic endothelium first appears in the YS and produces blood precursors with markers related to definitive hematopoiesis. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Vakhnina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology of the brain is the second most common cause of cognitive impairment after Alzheimer's disease. The article describes the modern concepts of etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical features and approaches to diagnosis and therapy of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Cerebrovascular accident, chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency and their combination, sometimes in combination with a concomitant neurodegenerative process, are shown to be the major types of brain lesions leading to VCI. The clinical presentation of VCI is characterized by the neuropsychological status dominated by impairment of the executive frontal functions (planning, control, attention in combination with focal neurological symptoms. The diagnosis is based on comparing of the revealed neuropsychological and neurological features with neuroimaging data. Neurometabolic, acetylcholinergic, glutamatergic, and other vasoactive drugs and non-pharmacological methods are widely used to treat VCI. 

  2. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  3. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasound for vascular access in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Ehrenfried; Schears, Gregory J; Hall, Stuart R; Yamamoto, Tomohiro

    2012-10-01

    In pediatric patients vascular access is often more difficult than in adults because of the smaller size of the vessels and the inability of the patient to cooperate without deep sedation or general anesthesia. Therefore Ultrasound has already become an invaluable tool for vascular access, but the full potential of ultrasound has yet to be fully realized. Improvements in image quality and a better understanding of optimal insertion techniques continue to help clinicians safely and efficiently place catheters with fewer complications. The probes used for the vascular access are mainly linear and convex type. Higher- frequency ultrasound provides a vivid image; however, the signals are remarkably attenuated. Therefore, the choice of the probe with appropriate frequency is essential. As blood vessels are relatively easily identified with ultrasound, ultrasound-guided vascular access does not require as sharp images as ultrasound-guided nerve block. For pediatric vascular access, the linear probe with 5-15 MHz, 2-5 cm depth is ideal and adequate for almost all cases. Ultrasound-guided vascular access has two main approaches: 'long-axis' or 'in-plane approach' and 'short-axis' or 'transverse approach'. The long-axis approach visualizes the vessel along the insertion pathway and is commonly used to monitor the entire approach of the needle into the vessel. The short-axis approach is easier to show the positional relationship and depth of target vessels, but it is much harder to follow the needle tip within the tissues. The use of 'real-time' ultrasound has been shown to increase first insertion success, reduce access time, have a higher overall success, and reduce arterial puncture. As the technology continues to improve the use of ultrasound will become as ubiquitous as the lines themselves. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in the uterine vascular bed of pregnant rats with adriamycin-induced nephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Mariam H; Adeagbo, Ayotunde S; Kadavil, Elizabeth A; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Oriowo, Mabayoje A

    2002-01-01

    This project was designed to study endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the uterine vascular bed during experimentally induced preeclampsia in rats. Uterine vascular beds were isolated from non-pregnant and pregnant rats with or without treatment with adriamycin (ADR) and perfused with physiological solution. Thereafter, vasodilator responses to acetylcholine were recorded. RECORDS: Pregnant ADR-treated rats displayed symptoms of preeclampsia including hypertension and proteinuria. Blood pressure was 110.0 +/- 4.7 mm Hg (n = 5) in control pregnant rats and 136.0 +/- 5.3 mm Hg (n = 5) in ADR-treated pregnant rats, and urinary protein concentrations were 0.35 mg/ml (n = 5) and 13.2 +/- 3.6 mg/ml (n = 9), respectively. Both blood pressure and proteinuria values were significantly (p acetylcholine-induced dose-dependent vasodilator responses in the vascular beds were not significantly different between the pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Although acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was significantly reduced by N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) in both groups, the residual response to acetylcholine was not affected by indomethacin, suggesting that prostanoids were not involved in this response. The L-NAME-resistant component, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), was greater in ADR-treated uterine beds than in those of the controls, indicating a significant contribution from EDHF in these vessels. In the presence of an elevated external potassium ion concentration, acetylcholine produced similar vasodilator responses, indicating that the release of nitric oxide was not impaired. These results indicate that endothelium-dependent vasodilation was not impaired in this model of preeclampsia.

  6. Vascular lesions of head and neck: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Masoom Syed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular lesions are among the most common congenital and neonatal abnormalities. These anomalies can occur throughout the whole body, with 60%, however, being located in the head and neck region probably due to its intricate vascular anatomy of region. There is a significant confusion in the literature because of the use of confusing descriptive terminology for the same vascular entity and eponyms. Correct naming of lesion, appropriate classification, and clinical appearance of vascular lesions have a direct impact on understanding of etiologies of these complex lesions, diagnosis, and in treating patients. Thus, the aim of this article is to provide comprehensive knowledge about classifications and to have an insight of various important vascular lesions affecting head and neck region based on its pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management.

  7. Diverse Imaging characteristics of a mandibular intraosseous vascular lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Hina; Naidu, Giridhar S.; Dara, Balaji Gandhi Babu; Deshpande, Ashwini; Raghavendra, Raju [Peoples Dental Academy, Bhopal (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Intraosseous vascular lesions of the maxillofacial region are rare, and the differential diagnosis of intraosseous vascular malformations from other jaw lesions can be challenging. In the present case, magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was used for diagnosis, and the lesion was treated with surgical excision. Diverse characteristics such as the 'honeycomb' and 'sunburst' radiographic appearances and the absence of major peripheral feeder vessels in the CTA were noted. Intraosseous vascular malformations have a varied radiographic appearance, and the nomenclature of these lesions is equally diverse, with several overlapping terms. Pathologists do not generally differentiate among intraosseous vascular lesions on the basis of histopathology, although these lesions may present with contrasting immunohistochemical and clinical behaviors requiring varied treatment strategies. This case report highlights the need for multiple imaging modalities to differentiate among vascular lesions, as well as to better understand the behaviors of these unique lesions.

  8. Engineered vascularized bone grafts

    OpenAIRE

    Tsigkou, Olga; Pomerantseva, Irina; Spencer, Joel A.; Redondo, Patricia A.; Hart, Alison R.; O’Doherty, Elisabeth; Lin, Yunfeng; Friedrich, Claudia C.; Daheron, Laurence; Lin, Charles P.; Sundback, Cathryn A.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Neville, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Clinical protocols utilize bone marrow to seed synthetic and decellularized allogeneic bone grafts for enhancement of scaffold remodeling and fusion. Marrow-derived cytokines induce host neovascularization at the graft surface, but hypoxic conditions cause cell death at the core. Addition of cellular components that generate an extensive primitive plexus-like vascular network that would perfuse the entire scaffold upon anastomosis could potentially yield significantly higher-quality grafts. W...

  9. Vascular lesions following radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.F.; Berthrong, M.

    1988-01-01

    The special radiation sensitivity of the vascular system is mainly linked to that of endothelial cells, which are perhaps the most radiation-vulnerable elements of mesenchymal tissues. Within the vascular tree, radiation injures most often capillaries, sinusoids, and small arteries, in that order. Lesions of veins are observed less often, but in certain tissues the veins are regularly damaged (e.g., intestine) or are the most affected structures (i.e., liver). Large arteries do suffer the least; however, when significant damage does occur in an elastic artery (e.g., thrombosis or rupture), it tends to be clinically significant and even fatal. Although not always demonstrable in human tissues, radiation vasculopathy generally is dose and time dependent. Like other radiation-induced lesions, the morphology in the vessels is not specific, but it is characteristic enough to be often recognizable. Vascular injury, especially by therapeutic radiation is not just a morphologic marker. It is a mediator of tissue damage; perhaps the most consistent pathogenetic mechanism in delayed radiation injury

  10. Ferulic acid combined with astragaloside IV protects against vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yonghui; Qi, Fanghua; Song, Zhenhua; Zhang, Bo; Teng, Jialin

    2014-08-01

    Dysfunction of the endothelium is regarded as an important factor in the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus (DM). Unfortunately, prevention of the progression of vascular complications of DM remains pessimistic. Ferulic acid and astragaloside IV, isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Angelica sinensis and Radix astragali respectively, exhibit potential cardio-protective and anti-hyperglycemic properties. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanism of ferulic acid and astragaloside IV against vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats. After the diabetic rat model was established using streptozotocin, sixty rats were divided into 6 groups (control, model, ferulic acid, astragaloside IV, ferulic acid + astragaloside IV, and metformin) and treated for 10 weeks. Blood samples were collected to measure levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbAlc), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), low density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatinine (Cr), nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and abdominal aorta tissue samples were collected for observing histological morphology changes of endothelium and detecting gene and protein expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) P65, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). We found that ferulic acid combined with astragaloside IV was capable of improving the structure of the aortic endothelium wall, attenuating the increase of HbAlc, TG, TC, LDL-C and Ox-LDL, promoting the release of NO and eNOS, and inhibiting over-activation of MCP-1, TNF-α, and NF-κB P65, without damage to liver and kidney function. In conclusion, ferulic acid combined with astragaloside IV exhibited significant protective effects against vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats through the NF-κB pathway involving

  11. VASCULAR INJURIES IN TEHRAN: A REVIEW OF 123 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karbakhsh M. R. Zarei

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- Studies of the epidemiology of civilian vascular trauma in developing countries are rather few. This is a prospective study of our experience with vascular trauma in a referral university hospital in Tehran, Iran. The aim was to study the etiology, pattern of injuries and the mortality and morbidity rates due to vascular trauma in our population. In this cross-sectional study, all trauma patients suspicious of having vascular injuries who were admitted to Sina Hospital between March 2002 and May 2003 were included. Among 123 studied cases, there were 109 males and 14 females.Blunt injuries were more common than penetrating ones (56.1% vs. 43.9%. The most common anatomical site of vascular injuries had been knee and lower leg. In fact, cases with lower extremities vascular trauma were twice as common as those with vascular trauma in upper limbs (59.1% vs. 27.3%. The commonest injured vessels were popliteal artery followed by femoral artery. Arterial repair with graft interposition was done in 23 cases and bypass graft in 13 cases. Procedures on veins were performed in 24 cases. Five patients (4.06% died and in 3 cases the patients died because of non-vascular reasons. The present study allows an understanding of the epidemiology of vascular trauma in the one of the major trauma centers in the metropolitan city of Tehran. The majority of our cases were young males sustaining vascular injuries due to road traffic accidents or being stabbed with knives. It also has important implications for vascular injury prevention in our community.

  12. Vascular insulin response is preserved in non-diabetic patients with coronary artery disease, despite endothelial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Rask-Madsen, Christian; Køber, Lars

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) are often insulin resistant, a state that predisposes to increased atherosclerosis. Recently, it was suggested that a "vascular insulin resistance" could explain this association, causing endothelial dysfunction and hence atherosclerosis. We...... nitroprusside (SNP) elicited endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation and were repeated during intra-arterial insulin infusion. RESULTS--Patients were insulin resistant as determined by HOMA index. Insulin infusion resulted in high physiological levels of insulin in the forearm without systemic...... response is intact in non-diabetic CAD patients in spite of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction....

  13. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  14. Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B.; Scuteri, Angelo; Black, Sandra E.; DeCarli, Charles; Greenberg, Steven M.; Iadecola, Costantino; Launer, Lenore J.; Laurent, Stephane; Lopez, Oscar L.; Nyenhuis, David; Petersen, Ronald C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Tzourio, Christophe; Arnett, Donna K.; Bennett, David A.; Chui, Helena C.; Higashida, Randall T.; Lindquist, Ruth; Nilsson, Peter M.; Roman, Gustavo C.; Sellke, Frank W.; Seshadri, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose This scientific statement provides an overview of the evidence on vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia of later life are common. Definitions of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), neuropathology, basic science and pathophysiological aspects, role of neuroimaging and vascular and other associated risk factors, and potential opportunities for prevention and treatment are reviewed. This statement serves as an overall guide for practitioners to gain a better understanding of VCI and dementia, prevention, and treatment. Methods Writing group members were nominated by the writing group co-chairs on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and the Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writing group used systematic literature reviews (primarily covering publications from 1990 to May 1, 2010), previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and, when appropriate, formulate recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. After peer review by the American Heart Association, as well as review by the Stroke Council leadership, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention Council, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, the statement was approved by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results The construct of VCI has been introduced to capture the entire spectrum of cognitive disorders associated with all forms of cerebral vascular brain injury—not solely stroke—ranging from mild cognitive impairment through fully developed

  15. Akita spontaneously type 1 diabetic mice exhibit elevated vascular arginase and impaired vascular endothelial and nitrergic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, Haroldo A; Nunes, Kenia P; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhimin; Kondrikov, Dmitry; Su, Yunchao; Webb, R Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, R William

    2013-01-01

    Elevated arginase (Arg) activity is reported to be involved in diabetes-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. It can reduce L-arginine availability to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) and NO production. Akita mice, a genetic non-obese type 1 diabetes model, recapitulate human diabetes. We determined the role of Arg in a time-course of diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction in aorta and corpora cavernosa (CC) from Akita mice. Endothelium-dependent relaxation, Arg and NOS activity, and protein expression levels of Arg and constitutive NOS were assessed in aortas and CC from Akita and non-diabetic wild type (WT) mice at 4, 12 and 24 wks of age. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed by tail cuff. In aorta and CC, Akita mice exhibited a progressive impairment of vascular endothelial and nitrergic function increased Arg activity and expression (Arg1 in aorta and both Arg1 and Arg2 in CC) compared with that of age-matched WT mice. Treatment of aorta and CC from Akita mice with an Arg inhibitor (BEC or ABH) reduced diabetes-induced elevation of Arg activity and restored endothelial and nitrergic function. Reduced levels of phospho-eNOS at Ser(1177) (in aorta and CC) and nNOS expression (in CC) were observed in Akita mice at 12 and 24 wks. Akita mice also had decreased NOS activity in aorta and CC at 12 and 24 wks that was restored by BEC treatment. Further, Akita mice exhibited moderately increased SBP at 24 wks and increased sensitivity to PE-induced contractions in aorta and sympathetic nerve stimulation in CC at 12 and 24 wks. Over 24 wks of diabetes in Akita mice, both aortic and cavernosal tissues exhibited increased Arg activity/expression, contributing to impaired endothelial and nitrergic function and reduced NO production. Our findings demonstrate involvement of Arg activity in diabetes-induced impairment of vascular function in Akita mouse.

  16. Akita spontaneously type 1 diabetic mice exhibit elevated vascular arginase and impaired vascular endothelial and nitrergic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo A Toque

    Full Text Available Elevated arginase (Arg activity is reported to be involved in diabetes-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. It can reduce L-arginine availability to nitric oxide (NO synthase (NOS and NO production. Akita mice, a genetic non-obese type 1 diabetes model, recapitulate human diabetes. We determined the role of Arg in a time-course of diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction in aorta and corpora cavernosa (CC from Akita mice.Endothelium-dependent relaxation, Arg and NOS activity, and protein expression levels of Arg and constitutive NOS were assessed in aortas and CC from Akita and non-diabetic wild type (WT mice at 4, 12 and 24 wks of age. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was assessed by tail cuff. In aorta and CC, Akita mice exhibited a progressive impairment of vascular endothelial and nitrergic function increased Arg activity and expression (Arg1 in aorta and both Arg1 and Arg2 in CC compared with that of age-matched WT mice. Treatment of aorta and CC from Akita mice with an Arg inhibitor (BEC or ABH reduced diabetes-induced elevation of Arg activity and restored endothelial and nitrergic function. Reduced levels of phospho-eNOS at Ser(1177 (in aorta and CC and nNOS expression (in CC were observed in Akita mice at 12 and 24 wks. Akita mice also had decreased NOS activity in aorta and CC at 12 and 24 wks that was restored by BEC treatment. Further, Akita mice exhibited moderately increased SBP at 24 wks and increased sensitivity to PE-induced contractions in aorta and sympathetic nerve stimulation in CC at 12 and 24 wks.Over 24 wks of diabetes in Akita mice, both aortic and cavernosal tissues exhibited increased Arg activity/expression, contributing to impaired endothelial and nitrergic function and reduced NO production. Our findings demonstrate involvement of Arg activity in diabetes-induced impairment of vascular function in Akita mouse.

  17. Dietary sodium restriction reverses vascular endothelial dysfunction in middle-aged/older adults with moderately elevated systolic blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Kristen L.; Racine, Matthew L.; Geolfos, Candace J.; Gates, Phillip E.; Chonchol, Michel; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We determined the efficacy of dietary sodium restriction (DSR) for improving vascular endothelial dysfunction in middle-aged/older adults with moderately elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP; 130–159 mmHg) and the associated physiological mechanisms. Background Vascular endothelial dysfunction develops with advancing age and elevated SBP, contributing to increased cardiovascular risk. DSR lowers BP, but its effect on vascular endothelial function and mechanisms involved are unknown. Methods Seventeen subjects (11M/6F; 62±7 yrs, mean±S.D.) completed a randomized, crossover study of 4 weeks of both low and normal sodium intake. Vascular endothelial function (endothelium-dependent dilation; EDD), nitric oxide (NO)/tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) bioavailability and oxidative stress-associated mechanisms were assessed following each condition. Results Urinary sodium excretion was reduced by ~50% (to 70±30 mmol/day), and conduit (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMDBA]) and resistance (forearm blood flow responses to acetylcholine [FBFACh]) artery EDD were 68% and 42% (peak FBFACh) higher following the low sodium diet (psodium markedly enhanced NO- mediated EDD (greater ΔFBFACh with endothelial NO synthase [eNOS] inhibition) without changing eNOS expression/activation (Ser1177 phosphorylation), restored BH4 bioactivity (less ΔFMDBA with acute BH4), abolished tonic superoxide suppression of EDD (less ΔFMDBA and ΔFBFACh with ascorbic acid infusion), and increased circulating superoxide dismutase activity (p<0.05). These effects were independent of ΔSBP. Other subject characteristics/dietary factors and endothelium-independent dilation were unchanged. Conclusions DSR largely reverses both macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction by enhancing NO and BH4 bioavailability and reducing oxidative stress. Our findings support the emerging concept that DSR induces “vascular protection” beyond that attributable to its BP-lowering effects. PMID

  18. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Michael; Alcaide, Pilar; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; van Buul, Jaap D

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers.

  19. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schnoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers.

  20. A spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor attenuates the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyang‑Hee Seo

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation and migration after vascular injury promotes the development of occlusive vascular disease. Therefore, an effective chemical agent to suppress aberrant proliferation and migration of VSMCs can be a potential therapeutic modality for occlusive vascular disease such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. To find an anti-proliferative chemical agent for VSMCs, we screened an in-house small molecule library, and the selected small molecule was further validated for its anti-proliferative effect on VSMCs using multiple approaches, such as cell proliferation assays, wound healing assays, transwell migration assays, and ex vivo aortic ring assay. Results Among 43 initially screened small molecule inhibitors of kinases that have no known anti-proliferative effect on VSMCs, a spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitor (BAY61-3606 showed significant anti-proliferative effect on VSMCs. Further experiments indicated that BAY61 attenuated the VSMC proliferation in both concentration- and time-dependent manner, and it also significantly suppressed the migration of VSMCs as assessed by both wound healing assays and transwell assays. Additionally, BAY61 suppressed the sprouting of VSMCs from endothelium-removed aortic rings. Conclusion The present study identified a Syk kinase inhibitor as a potent VSMC proliferation and migration inhibitor and warrants further studies to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms, such as its primary target, and to validate its in vivo efficacy as a therapeutic agent for restenosis and atherosclerosis.

  1. Composite vascular grafts with high cell infiltration by co-electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhikai; Wang, Hongjie; Gao, Xiangkai; Liu, Tong; Tan, Yongjun

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for functional small-diameter vascular grafts (diameterElectrospinning has become a popular polymer processing technique for vascular tissue engineering, but the grafts fabricated by electrospinning often have relatively small pores and low porosity, which limit cell infiltration into scaffolds and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of grafts. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient method to prepare electrospun composite vascular grafts comprising natural and synthetic materials. We fabricated grafts made of polycaprolactone, gelatin, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by co-electrospinning, and the scaffolds were further functionalized by immobilizing heparin on them. The PVA fibers degraded rapidly in vivo and generated electrospun scaffolds with high porosity, which significantly enhanced cell proliferation and infiltration. The mechanical properties of the grafts are suitable for use in artery replacement. Heparin functionalization of the grafts yielded a good antithrombogenic effect, which was demonstrated in platelet adhesion tests. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that the heparin release from the grafts enhanced the growth of endothelial cells, which is important for the endothelium of implanted grafts. The results of this study indicate that our method is effective and controllable for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements for blood vessel transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitric oxide, cholesterol oxides and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in plasma of patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moriel

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to identify disturbances of nitric oxide radical (·NO metabolism and the formation of cholesterol oxidation products in human essential hypertension. The concentrations of·NO derivatives (nitrite, nitrate, S-nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine, water and lipid-soluble antioxidants and cholesterol oxides were measured in plasma of 11 patients with mild essential hypertension (H: 57.8 ± 9.7 years; blood pressure, 148.3 ± 24.8/90.8 ± 10.2 mmHg and in 11 healthy subjects (N: 48.4 ± 7.0 years; blood pressure, 119.4 ± 9.4/75.0 ± 8.0 mmHg.Nitrite, nitrate and S-nitrosothiols were measured by chemiluminescence and nitrotyrosine was determined by ELISA. Antioxidants were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and cholesterol oxides by gas chromatography. Hypertensive patients had reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to reactive hyperemia (H: 9.3 and N: 15.1% increase of diameter 90 s after hyperemia, and lower levels of ascorbate (H: 29.2 ± 26.0, N: 54.2 ± 24.9 µM, urate (H: 108.5 ± 18.9, N: 156.4 ± 26.3 µM, ß-carotene (H: 1.1 ± 0.8, N: 2.5 ± 1.2 nmol/mg cholesterol, and lycopene (H: 0.4 ± 0.2, N: 0.7 ± 0.2 nmol/mg cholesterol, in plasma, compared to normotensive subjects. The content of 7-ketocholesterol, 5alpha-cholestane-3ß,5,6ß-triol and 5,6alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholestan-3alpha-ol in LDL, and the concentration of endothelin-1 (H: 0.9 ± 0.2, N: 0.7 ± 0.1 ng/ml in plasma were increased in hypertensive patients. No differences were found for ·NO derivatives between groups. These data suggest that an increase in cholesterol oxidation is associated with endothelium dysfunction in essential hypertension and oxidative stress, although ·NO metabolite levels in plasma are not modified in the presence of elevated cholesterol oxides.

  3. Effect of lithium on endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum: role of nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-02-01

    Some studies have reported erectile dysfunction in patients receiving lithium through a mechanism that has not yet been defined. The aim of the present study was to verify the effect of acute lithium administration on the nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC)- and endothelium-mediated relaxation of rat isolated corpus cavernosum. The isolated rat corporeal strips were precontracted with phenylephrine hydrochloride (7.5 microM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) was applied at different frequencies (2, 5, 10, and 15 Hz) to obtain NANC-mediated relaxation or relaxed by adding cumulative doses of acetylcholine (10nM-1mM) to obtain endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence or absence of lithium (0.3, 0.5, 1, and 5mM). Also, effects of combining lithium (0.3mM) with 30 nM and 0.1 nM L-NAME (an NO synthase inhibitor) on NANC- and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was investigated, respectively. Moreover, effects of combining lithium (1mM) with 0.1mM and 10 microM L-arginine (a precursor of NO) on NANC- and endothelium-mediated relaxation was assessed, respectively. Also, the effect of lithium (1mM) on relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1nM-1mM), an NO donor, was investigated. The NANC-mediated relaxation was significantly (Pacetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of lithium (0.3mM) with 30 and 0.1 nM L-NAME, which separately had a minimum effect on NANC- and endothelium-mediated relaxation, significantly (Pacetylcholine and EFS, it improved the inhibition by lithium (1mM) of relaxant responses to acetylcholine and EFS, respectively. Also, SNP produced similar concentration-dependent relaxations from both groups. Our experiments indicated that lithium likely by interfering with NO pathway in both endothelium and nitrergic nerve can result in impairment of both the endothelium- and NANC-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum.

  4. Early changes in vascular reactivity in response to 56Fe irradiation in ApoE-/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. Roger; Yu, Tao; Gupta, Kiran; Babitz, Stephen K.; Black, Leland L.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have established that radiation from a number of terrestrial sources increases the risk of atherosclerosis. The accelerated heavy ions in the galacto-cosmic radiation (GCR) that astronauts will encounter on in space, however, interact very differently with tissues than most types of terrestrial radiation, so the health consequences of exposure on deep-space missions are not clear. We demonstrated earlier that 56Fe, an important component of cosmic radiation, accelerates atherosclerotic plaque development. In the present study, we examined an earlier, pro-atherogenic event that might be predictive of later atherosclerotic disease. Decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilation is a prominent manifestation of vascular dysfunction that is thought to predispose humans to the development of structural vascular changes that precede the development of atherosclerotic plaques. To test the effect of heavy-ion radiation on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we used the same ApoE-/- mouse model in which we previously demonstrated the pro-atherogenic effect of 56Fe on plaque development. Ten week old male ApoE mice (an age at which there is little atherosclerotic plaque in the descending aorta) were exposed to 2.6 Gy 56Fe. The mice were then fed a normal diet and housed under standard conditions. At 4-5 weeks post-irradiation, aortic rings were isolated and endothelial-dependent relaxation was measured. Relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in irradiated mice compared to age-matched, un-irradiated mice. This decrease in vascular reactivity following 56Fe irradiation occurred eight weeks prior to the development of statistically significant exacerbation of aortic plaque formation and may contribute to the formation of later atherosclerotic lesions.

  5. The role of endothelial activation in dengue hemorrhagic fever and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiropoulou, Christina F; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon

    2013-08-15

    The loss of the endothelium barrier and vascular leakage play a central role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhagic fever viruses. This can be caused either directly by the viral infection and damage of the vascular endothelium, or indirectly by a dysregulated immune response resulting in an excessive activation of the endothelium. This article briefly reviews our knowledge of the importance of the disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier in two severe disease syndromes, dengue hemorrhagic fever and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Both viruses cause changes in vascular permeability without damaging the endothelium. Here we focus on our understanding of the virus interaction with the endothelium, the role of the endothelium in the induced pathogenesis, and the possible mechanisms by which each virus causes vascular leakage. Understanding the dynamics between viral infection and the dysregulation of the endothelial cell barrier will help us to define potential therapeutic targets for reducing disease severity.

  6. Spinal vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, Timo [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany); Mull, Michael; Thron, Armin [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Gilsbach, Joachim M. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare diseases that consist of true inborn cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations (including perimedullary fistulae, glomerular and juvenile AVMs) and presumably acquired dural arteriovenous fistulae. This review article gives an overview of the imaging features both on MRI and angiography, the differential diagnoses, the clinical symptomatology and the potential therapeutic approaches to these diseases. It is concluded that MRI is the diagnostic modality of first choice in suspected spinal vascular malformation and should be complemented by selective spinal angiography. Treatment in symptomatic patients offers an improvement in the prognosis, but should be performed in specialized centers. Patients with spinal cord cavernomas and perimedullary fistulae type I are surgical candidates. Dural arteriovenous fistulae can either be operated upon or can be treated by an endovascular approach, the former being a simple, quick and secure approach to obliterate the fistula, while the latter is technically demanding. In spinal arteriovenous malformations, the endovascular approach is the method of first choice; in selected cases, a combined therapy might be sensible. (orig.)

  7. Fast Nondestructive Identification of Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli Using Visible/Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiao-Yan; Meng Yao-Yong; Zhang Hao; Ou Wen-Juan; Liu Song-Hao

    2011-01-01

    Vis/NIR spectroscopy, in combination with partial least square (PLS) analysis and a back-propagation neural network, is investigated to identify endothelium corneum gigeriae galli (ECGG). The spectral features of ECGGs and their counterfeits are reasonably differentiated in vis/NIR region, which provides enough qualitative information to establish the relationship between the spectra and samples for identification. After pretreatment of the spectral data, cross validation is implemented for extracting the best number of principal components. Then the calibration and validation set are performed well. The PLS and back propagation neural network (BPNN) model gives the BPNN to be 0.9941 and the root mean square residual (RMSR) to be 0.0775 for the calibration set, and the multiple correlation coefficient (MCC) to 0.9874 and the RMSE to 0.1134 for the validation set. Thus the PLS and BPNN model is reliable and practicable. Through testing, a recognition accuracy of 100% is achieved. The present study could offer a new approach for fast and nondestructive discrimination of ECGG and its counterfeit. (general)

  8. Glutaminolysis is Essential for Energy Production and Ion Transport in Human Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlin Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Corneal endothelium (CE is among the most metabolically active tissues in the body. This elevated metabolic rate helps the CE maintain corneal transparency by its ion and fluid transport properties, which when disrupted, leads to visual impairment. Here we demonstrate that glutamine catabolism (glutaminolysis through TCA cycle generates a large fraction of the ATP needed to maintain CE function, and this glutaminolysis is severely disrupted in cells deficient in NH3:H+ cotransporter Solute Carrier Family 4 Member 11 (SLC4A11. Considering SLC4A11 mutations leads to corneal endothelial dystrophy and sensorineural deafness, our results indicate that SLC4A11-associated developmental and degenerative disorders result from altered glutamine catabolism. Overall, our results describe an important metabolic mechanism that provides CE cells with the energy required to maintain high level transport activity, reveal a direct link between glutamine metabolism and developmental and degenerative neuronal diseases, and suggest an approach for protecting the CE during ophthalmic surgeries.

  9. Uptake of low density lipoproteins by the hamster lung. Interactions with capillary endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, A.; Simionescu, M.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism by which the circulating low density lipoproteins (LDL) contribute to the lung surfactant cholesterol was investigated by perfusing the hamster lung in situ with LDL either radiolabeled or coupled to gold, or both. Part of [ 125 I]-LDL and [ 3 H]-cholesterol LDL were taken up by a specific process which was time- and concentration-dependent and reached saturation within 20 to 30 min of perfusion. Competition experiments and removal of receptor-bound LDL by heparin suggested that about 50% of LDL uptake is receptor-independent. Experiments using double labeled LDL showed a preferential uptake of 3 H-cholesterol versus 125 I by the lung both in situ and in vivo. LDL-gold particles (LDL-Au), recirculated through the isolated lung, bound to the endothelial luminal plasma membrane and to features potentially involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (coated pits, coated vesicles, lysosomelike structures) and in transcytosis (plasmalemmal vesicles). The results suggest that LDL uptake by the lung takes place by both receptor-mediated and receptor-independent mechanisms. Cholesterol may be in part transferred to the lung without the apoprotein moiety; the alveolar capillary endothelium appears to be the first monitor of this complex process

  10. Endothelium-dependent control of cerebrovascular functions through age: exercise for healthy cerebrovascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Virginie; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Thorin, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive performances are tightly associated with the maximal aerobic exercise capacity, both of which decline with age. The benefits on mental health of regular exercise, which slows the age-dependent decline in maximal aerobic exercise capacity, have been established for centuries. In addition, the maintenance of an optimal cerebrovascular endothelial function through regular exercise, part of a healthy lifestyle, emerges as one of the key and primary elements of successful brain aging. Physical exercise requires the activation of specific brain areas that trigger a local increase in cerebral blood flow to match neuronal metabolic needs. In this review, we propose three ways by which exercise could maintain the cerebrovascular endothelial function, a premise to a healthy cerebrovascular function and an optimal regulation of cerebral blood flow. First, exercise increases blood flow locally and increases shear stress temporarily, a known stimulus for endothelial cell maintenance of Akt-dependent expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide generation, and the expression of antioxidant defenses. Second, the rise in circulating catecholamines during exercise not only facilitates adequate blood and nutrient delivery by stimulating heart function and mobilizing energy supplies but also enhances endothelial repair mechanisms and angiogenesis. Third, in the long term, regular exercise sustains a low resting heart rate that reduces the mechanical stress imposed to the endothelium of cerebral arteries by the cardiac cycle. Any chronic variation from a healthy environment will perturb metabolism and thus hasten endothelial damage, favoring hypoperfusion and neuronal stress.

  11. Effects of chronic oral consumption of nicotine on the rabbit aortic endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booyse, F M; Osikowicz, G; Quarfoot, A J

    1981-02-01

    New Zealand white rabbits (10) were administered daily doses of nicotine (2.4 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water for 25 weeks. Nicotine-treated rabbits were compared with control rabbits (10) in terms of blood serum biochemistry and lipid profiles, blood cells counts, changes in aortic endothelial cell morphologic characteristic and distribution, and vessel wall permeability (Evans blue dye uptake). Fasting serum levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were elevated in nicotine-treated rabbits. No significant differences (nicotine vs control) were seen in leukocyte, erythrocyte and platelet counts, or hematocrit and hemoglobin. Control and nicotine-treated rabbit aortas showed similar focal areas of increased Evans blue dye uptake; staining was localized primarily to aortic arch areas. Endothelial cells (luminal surface) from non-Evans blue and Evans blue arch areas were examined by a combination of Häutchen preparation (silver-stained vessels) and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Endothelial cells from nicotine-treated arch areas (Evans-blue-stained) showed extensive changes such as: increased cytoplasmic silver deposition, increased formation of microvilli, and numerous focal areas of "ruffled" endothelium (projections on cell surfaces). These data indicate that nicotine, administered orally to rabbits, has a demonstrable in vivo morphologic effect on endothelial cells in the aortic arch.

  12. Temporary vascular shunting in vascular trauma: A 10-year review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five patients with non-viable limbs had the vessel ligated. Conclusions. A TIVS in the damage control setting is both life- and limb-saving. These shunts can be inserted safely in a facility without access to a surgeon with vascular surgery experience if there is uncontrollable bleeding or the delay to definitive vascular surgery ...

  13. Additive Manufacturing of Vascular Grafts and Vascularized Tissue Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, Laura; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2017-10-01

    There is a great need for engineered vascular grafts among patients with cardiovascular diseases who are in need of bypass therapy and lack autologous healthy blood vessels. In addition, because of the severe worldwide shortage of organ donors, there is an increasing need for engineered vascularized tissue constructs as an alternative to organ transplants. Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great advantages and flexibility of fabrication of cell-laden, multimaterial, and anatomically shaped vascular grafts and vascularized tissue constructs. Various inkjet-, extrusion-, and photocrosslinking-based AM techniques have been applied to the fabrication of both self-standing vascular grafts and porous, vascularized tissue constructs. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research on the use of AM for vascular applications and the key criteria for biomaterials in the AM of both acellular and cellular constructs. We envision that new smart printing materials that can adapt to their environment and encourage rapid endothelialization and remodeling will be the key factor in the future for the successful AM of personalized and dynamic vascular tissue applications.

  14. Controlled release hydrogen sulfide delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles protects graft endothelium from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshuo; Sun, Xiaotian; Zhang, Huili; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Ye; Yang, Wuli; Guo, Changfa; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) functions as a protective gas transmitter in various physiological and pathological processes, but the lack of ideal donors severely hampers the clinical application of H2S. This study aims to construct a controlled release H2S donor and evaluate its protective effect on graft endothelium. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were synthesized using the sol-gel method and loaded with diallyl trisulfide (DATS), an H2S-releasing agent named DATS-MSN. In vitro experiments showed that DATS-MSN could alleviate endothelial cell inflammation and enhance endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the apoptosis of graft endothelium was mitigated in the presence of DATS-MSN. Our results indicated that DATS-MSN, releasing H2S in a controlled release fashion, could serve as an ideal H2S donor.

  15. Effects of hydrazine derivatives on vascular smooth muscle contractility, blood pressure and cGMP production in rats: comparison with hydralazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; Fernández, Gabriela; Medina, Martha; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Orallo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Hydralazine is a hydrazine derivative used clinically as a vasodilator and antihypertensive agent. Despite numerous studies with the drug, its mechanism of action has remained unknown; guanylate cyclase activation and release of endothelial relaxing factors are thought to be involved in its vasodilator effect. Other hydrazine derivatives are known to stimulate guanylate cyclase and could therefore share the vasodilator activity of hydralazine, although such possibility has not been assessed systematically. In the present study, hydralazine, hydrazine, phenylhydrazine, and isoniazid were evaluated for vascular smooth muscle relaxation in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium, as well as after incubation with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue. They were also tested for enhancement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production by cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and for hypotension in the anesthetized rat. All hydrazines relaxed aortic rings, an action unaffected by endothelium removal and, in all cases except hydralazine, antagonized by methylene blue. Only phenylhydrazine increased cGMP production and only hydralazine markedly lowered blood pressure. It was concluded that hydralazine vascular relaxation is independent of endothelium and is not related to guanylate cyclase activation. The other hydrazines studied also elicit endothelium-independent relaxation, but the effect is related to guanylate cyclase. The marked hypotensive effect of hydralazine contrasts with its modest relaxant activity and is not shared by the other hydrazines. The fact that hydrazine and isoniazid produce methylene blue-sensitive relaxation, yet do not enhance cGMP production suggests the need for activating factors present in aortic rings but not in isolated cells.

  16. Vascular dementia: Pharmacological treatment approaches and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Baskys

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrius Baskys1,3, Anthony C Hou21Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; 2Program in Geriatrics, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California; 3Memory Disorders Program, VA Health Care System Long Beach, Long Beach, California, USAAbstract: Vascular dementia is a common condition for which there are no effective approved pharmacological treatments available. Absence of effective treatments creates a difficult situation for those suffering from the disease, their caregivers, and healthcare providers. This review will address our current understanding of the mechanisms of nerve cell damage due to ischemia and summarize available clinical trial data on several commonly used compounds including memantine, donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, nimodipine, hydergine, nicergoline, CDPcholine, folic acid, as well as such nonpharmacological approaches as validation therapy.Keywords: vascular dementia, excitotoxicity, treatment, NMDA, memantine, donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, nimodipine, hydergine, nicergoline, CDP-choline, folic acid

  17. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Gerecht, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The ability to grow stem cells in the laboratory and to guide their maturation to functional cells allows us to study the underlying mechanisms that govern vasculature differentiation and assembly in health and disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that early stages of vascular growth are exquisitely tuned by biophysical cues from the microenvironment, yet the scientific understanding of such cellular environments is still in its infancy. Comprehending these processes sufficiently to manipulate them would pave the way to controlling blood vessel growth in therapeutic applications. This book assembles the works and views of experts from various disciplines to provide a unique perspective on how different aspects of its microenvironment regulate the differentiation and assembly of the vasculature. In particular, it describes recent efforts to exploit modern engineering techniques to study and manipulate various biophysical cues. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly provides an inter...

  18. Visfatin and cardio-cerebro-vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide from nicotinamide. This protein was originally cloned as a putative pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor and also found to be a visceral fat-derived adipokine (visfatin). As a multifunctional protein, visfatin plays an important role in immunity, metabolism, aging, inflammation, and responses to stress. Visfatin also participates in several pathophysiological processes contributing to cardio-cerebro-vascular diseases, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke. However, whether visfatin is a friend or a foe in these diseases remains uncertain. This brief review focuses on the current understanding of the complex role of visfatin in the cardio-cerebro-vascular system under normal and pathophysiological conditions.

  19. The role of beta 1 integrins in adhesion of two breast carcinoma cell lines to a model endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, R D; Kirby, J A; Browell, D A; Lennard, T W

    1995-05-01

    Interactions between tumour cells and the endothelium are vital to the formation of haematogenous metastases. Binding to model endothelium of one oestrogen receptor positive breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) and one receptor negative line (HS578T) was examined in vitro together with endothelial retraction induced by these tumour cells. Adhesion was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies specific for the VLA integrins and by peptides containing the RGD motif which is commonly recognised as a ligand by the VLA adhesion molecules. However, binding of the two tumour cell lines was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies specific for different VLA molecules; anti-alpha 6 beta 1 inhibited MCF-7 adhesion but anti-alpha 5 beta 1 inhibited Hs578T. These results were consistent with flow cytometric quantification of the expression of these VLA integrins on the surfaces of the two tumour cell lines. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) demonstrated that laminin was present on the endothelial cell surface but collagen IV was absent. ELISA failed to detect increased exposure of the subendothelial matrix during the first hour after addition of either cancer cell type. This was supported by assays which demonstrated maintenance of the endothelial permeability barrier during this period. Slight endothelial retraction was detected within 2 hours of the addition of tumour cells. It is concluded that binding between tumour cells and confluent endothelium is inhibited by the blockade of adhesion molecules which are normally associated with interactions between the cell and the subendothelial matrix. Tumour cell to matrix interactions rather than direct tumour to endothelial cell adhesion may be the limiting step in tumour cell binding to the endothelium.

  20. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Effect of Apocynum venetum Leaf Extract via Src/PI3K/Akt Signalling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Siang Lau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Botanical herbs are consumed globally not only as an essential diet but also as medicines or as functional/recreational food supplements. The extract of the Apocynum venetum leaves (AVLE, also known as Luobuma, exerts its antihypertensive effect via dilating the blood vessels in an endothelium- and concentration-dependent manner with optimal effect seen at as low as 10 µg/mL. A commercial Luoboma “antihypertensive tea” is available commercially in the western province of China. The present study seeks to investigate the underlying cellular mechanisms of the nitric oxide (NO-releasing property of AVLE in rat aortas and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by AVLE was assessed in organ chambers in the presence or absence of polyethyleneglycol catalase (PP2, 20 µM; inhibitor of Src kinase, wortmannin (30 nM and LY294002 (20 µM; PI3 (phosphatidylinositol3-Kinase inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine (L-NAME, 100 µM; endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (eNOS and ODQ (1 µM; soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Total nitrite and nitrate (NOx level and protein expression of p-Akt and p-eNOS were measured. AVLE-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002 and abolished by L-NAME and ODQ. AVLE significantly increased total NOx level in rat aortas and in HUVECs compared to control. It also instigated phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in cultured HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner and this was markedly suppressed by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002. AVLE also inhibited superoxide generated from both NADPH oxidase and xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Taken together, AVLE causes endothelium-dependent NO mediated relaxations of rat aortas through Src/PI3K/Akt dependent NO signalling pathway and possesses superoxide scavenging activity.

  1. Composite vascular grafts with high cell infiltration by co-electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zhikai, E-mail: tanzk@hnu.edu.cn; Wang, Hongjie; Gao, Xiangkai; Liu, Tong; Tan, Yongjun

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for functional small-diameter vascular grafts (diameter < 6 mm) to be used in clinical arterial replacement. An ideal vascular graft should have appropriate biomechanical properties and be biocompatible. Electrospinning has become a popular polymer processing technique for vascular tissue engineering, but the grafts fabricated by electrospinning often have relatively small pores and low porosity, which limit cell infiltration into scaffolds and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of grafts. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient method to prepare electrospun composite vascular grafts comprising natural and synthetic materials. We fabricated grafts made of polycaprolactone, gelatin, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by co-electrospinning, and the scaffolds were further functionalized by immobilizing heparin on them. The PVA fibers degraded rapidly in vivo and generated electrospun scaffolds with high porosity, which significantly enhanced cell proliferation and infiltration. The mechanical properties of the grafts are suitable for use in artery replacement. Heparin functionalization of the grafts yielded a good antithrombogenic effect, which was demonstrated in platelet adhesion tests. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that the heparin release from the grafts enhanced the growth of endothelial cells, which is important for the endothelium of implanted grafts. The results of this study indicate that our method is effective and controllable for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements for blood vessel transplantation. - Highlights: • This study indicate an effective method for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements. • Co-electrospinning were used to fabricate grafts made of polycaprolactone (PCL), gelatin (GT), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). • PVA was used to create large pores within the hybrid scaffolds, thereby enhancing cell infiltration

  2. Composite vascular grafts with high cell infiltration by co-electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Zhikai; Wang, Hongjie; Gao, Xiangkai; Liu, Tong; Tan, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for functional small-diameter vascular grafts (diameter < 6 mm) to be used in clinical arterial replacement. An ideal vascular graft should have appropriate biomechanical properties and be biocompatible. Electrospinning has become a popular polymer processing technique for vascular tissue engineering, but the grafts fabricated by electrospinning often have relatively small pores and low porosity, which limit cell infiltration into scaffolds and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of grafts. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient method to prepare electrospun composite vascular grafts comprising natural and synthetic materials. We fabricated grafts made of polycaprolactone, gelatin, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by co-electrospinning, and the scaffolds were further functionalized by immobilizing heparin on them. The PVA fibers degraded rapidly in vivo and generated electrospun scaffolds with high porosity, which significantly enhanced cell proliferation and infiltration. The mechanical properties of the grafts are suitable for use in artery replacement. Heparin functionalization of the grafts yielded a good antithrombogenic effect, which was demonstrated in platelet adhesion tests. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that the heparin release from the grafts enhanced the growth of endothelial cells, which is important for the endothelium of implanted grafts. The results of this study indicate that our method is effective and controllable for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements for blood vessel transplantation. - Highlights: • This study indicate an effective method for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements. • Co-electrospinning were used to fabricate grafts made of polycaprolactone (PCL), gelatin (GT), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). • PVA was used to create large pores within the hybrid scaffolds, thereby enhancing cell infiltration

  3. Hemorrhagic epithelioid and spindle cell hemangioma: a newly recognized, unique vascular tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, S B; Rosenberg, A E

    1999-05-01

    Epithelioid vascular tumors of bone are uncommon and include epithelioid hemangioma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, and epithelioid angiosarcoma. It is important to distinguish among them because they have significantly different biologic potential and require different forms of therapy. In the current study the authors describe six cases of a distinct benign epithelioid and spindle cell vascular tumor of bone that, because of their unusual morphology, were confused with aggressive vascular neoplasms. Cases were retrieved from the surgical pathology files of the Department of Pathology or from the consultation files of one of the authors. Hematoxylin and eosin stained slides were examined. Immunohistochemistry was performed on two cases and electron microscopy was performed on one case. The tumors arose in the small bones of the hands and feet and the tibia. Three patients had multifocal bone disease at the time of presentation. Histologically, all lesions were comprised of lobules of spindle cells that grew focally in a fascicular pattern and were associated with abundant hemorrhage. Plump epithelioid cells were intermixed and were present focally in the interlobular areas as well, in which they lined larger, more well developed vascular spaces, often protruding into the vascular lumen in a "tombstone" fashion. Immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally the neoplastic cells had features of endothelium. One case was treated by amputation, one by resection, three by curettage, and one by curettage plus radiation therapy. None of the lesions was locally aggressive nor did any metastasize. The authors believe that hemorrhagic epithelioid and spindle cell hemangioma of bone is a histologically benign bone tumor. It should be distinguished from malignant epithelioid vascular tumors of bone, which have metastatic potential and need to be treated more aggressively.

  4. Distinct endothelial pathways underlie sexual dimorphism in vascular auto-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Melissa V; Bubb, Kristen J; Noyce, Alastair; Villar, Inmaculada C; Duchene, Johan; Hobbs, Adrian J; Scotland, Ramona S; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pre-menopausal females have a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease compared with age-matched males, implying differences in the mechanisms and pathways regulating vasoactivity. In small arteries, myogenic tone (constriction in response to raised intraluminal pressure) is a major determinant of vascular resistance. Endothelium-derived dilators, particularly NO, tonically moderate myogenic tone and, because the endothelium is an important target for female sex hormones, we investigated whether NO-mediated moderation of myogenic tone differed between the sexes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Pressure–diameter or relaxation concentration–response curves to the NO donor spermine-NO or soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulation (BAY41-2272) were constructed before and following drug intervention in murine mesenteric resistance arteries. Hypotensive responses to activators of the NO-sGC pathway were determined. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used for expression analysis. KEY RESULTS NO synthase inhibition enhanced myogenic tone of arteries of both sexes while block of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) enhanced responses in arteries of females only. Spermine-NO concentration-dependently relaxed mesenteric arteries isolated from either sex. However, while inhibition of sGC activity attenuated responses of arteries from male mice only, endothelial denudation attenuated responses of arteries from females only. BAY41-2272 and spermine-NO-induced vasodilatation and hypotension were greater in males than in females. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS NO moderated myogenic tone in arteries of male mice by a sGC-dependent pathway while EDHF was the predominant endothelial regulator in arteries of females. This is a potentially important sexual dimorphism in NO-mediated reactivity and further implicates EDHF as the predominant endothelial vasodilator in female resistance arteries. PMID:22540539

  5. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Endothelium-Independent Hypoxic Contraction Is Prevented Specifically by Nitroglycerin via Inhibition of Akt Kinase in Porcine Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixia Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Hypoxia-induced sustained contraction of porcine coronary artery is endothelium-independent and mediated by PI3K/Akt/Rho kinase. Nitroglycerin (NTG is a vasodilator used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart failure. The present study was to determine the role of NTG in hypoxia-induced endothelium-independent contraction and the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. Organ chamber technique was used to measure the isometric vessel tension of isolated porcine coronary arteries. Protein levels of phosphorylated and total Akt were determined by western blot. A sustained contraction of porcine coronary arteries induced by hypoxia was significantly reduced by NTG but not by isoproterenol. This contraction was also inhibited by DETA NONOate, 8-Br-cGMP, which can be reversed by ODQ, and Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS. The restored contraction was blocked by LY294002. The reduction of Akt-p at Ser-473 by NTG, DETA NONOate, and 8-Br-cGMP was significantly inhibited by ODQ, PKG-I. The decrease in Akt-p level by NTG and 8-Br-cGMP was prevented by calyculin A but not by okadaic acid. Conclusions. These results demonstrated that the endothelium-independent sustained hypoxic vasoconstriction can be prevented by NTG and that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may be involved.

  7. Visual outcomes after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using donor corneas without removal of Descemet membrane and endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Moura Bastos Prazeres

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The optical quality of the interface after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK using the big-bubble technique has been shown to be excellent, leading to results comparable to penetrating keratoplasty. However, there is little in the literature with respect to the controversy surrounding the preparation of the donor cornea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate visual acuity (VA in patients with keratoconus who underwent DALK without removal of the donor graft endothelium. Methods: The records of 90 patients who underwent DALK without the removal of the Descemet membrane (DM and endothelium were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included uncorrected VA (UCVA and spectacle-corrected VA (SCVA at 7, 30, 180 days, and 1 year postoperatively. Contact lens-corrected visual acuity (CLVA was evaluated after 1 year of the procedure. Results: UCVA was significantly better than preoperative values at 7 days (p<0.001, 30 days (p<0.001, 180 days (p<0.001, and 1 year (p<0.001 after surgery. The 1-year postoperative mean SCVA and CLVA also improved when compared with preoperative SCVA (p<0.001 for both. Conclusions: DALK utilizing donor corneas with attached Descemet membrane and endothelium results in satisfactory VA in patients with keratoconus.

  8. Involvement of plasmalogens in post-natal retinal vascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Saab

    Full Text Available Proper development of retinal blood vessels is essential to ensure sufficient oxygen and nutrient supplies to the retina. It was shown that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs could modulate factors involved in tissue vascularization. A congenital deficiency in ether-phospholipids, also termed "plasmalogens", was shown to lead to abnormal ocular vascularization. Because plasmalogens are considered to be reservoirs of PUFAs, we wished to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which plasmalogens regulate retinal vascular development and whether the release of PUFAs by calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2 could be involved.By characterizing the cellular and molecular steps of retinal vascular development in a mouse model of plasmalogen deficiency, we demonstrated that plasmalogens modulate angiogenic processes during the early phases of retinal vascularization. They influence glial activity and primary astrocyte template formation, endothelial cell proliferation and retinal vessel outgrowth, and impact the expression of the genes involved in angiogenesis in the retina. These early defects led to a disorganized and dysfunctional retinal vascular network at adult age. By comparing these data to those obtained on a mouse model of retinal iPLA2 inhibition, we suggest that these processes may be mediated by PUFAs released from plasmalogens and further signalling through the angiopoietin/tie pathways.These data suggest that plasmalogens play a crucial role in retinal vascularization processes.

  9. Peripheral vascular injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Yavuz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine etiology and management in patients with peripheral vascular trauma.Materials and Methods: From 2005 to 2006 with a diagnosis of peripheral artery injury, 69 cases admitted to Diyarbakır State Hospital Department of Cardiovascular surgery.Results: These cases have been respectively reviewed. The causes of injuries were; penetrating injuries in 60 cases (87%, blunt trauma in seven cases (10% and gunshot injuries in two cases (3%. In 53 cases (74% upper extremity, in 15 cases (21% lower extremity was involved. As a surgical procedure, in 34 cases (47% end-to-end anastomosis, in 28 cases (39% lateral suture, in five cases (7% venous graft interposition, in five cases (7% ligation was performed.Conclusion: Early intervention, transfusion of fluid and blood, systemic anticoagulation, preoperative and postoperative detailed debridement decreased the morbidity and mortality rates.

  10. The vascular secret of Klotho

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, Ewa; Olgaard, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Klotho is an evolutionarily highly conserved protein related to longevity. Increasing evidence of a vascular protecting effect of the Klotho protein has emerged and might be important for future treatments of uremic vascular calcification. It is still disputed whether Klotho is locally expressed ...

  11. Dynamic adaption of vascular morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here ...

  12. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  13. Vascular inflammatory cells in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease.

  14. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Echeverri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial.

  16. Prognostic Factors Influencing the Patency of Hemodialysis Vascular Access: Literature Review and Novel Therapeutic Modality by Far Infrared Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ching Lin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In Taiwan, more than 85% of patients with end-stage renal disease undergo maintenance hemodialysis (HD. The native arteriovenous fistula (AVF accounts for a prevalence of more than 80% of the vascular access in our patients. Some mechanical factors may affect the patency of hemodialysis vascular access, such as surgical skill, puncture technique and shear stress on the vascular endothelium. Several medical factors have also been identified to be associated with vascular access prognosis in HD patients, including stasis, hypercoagulability, endothelial cell injury, medications, red cell mass and genotype polymorphisms of transforming growth factor-β1 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase. According to our previous study, AVF failure was associated with a longer dinucleotide (GTn repeat (n ≥ 30 in the promoter of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 gene. Our recent study also demonstrated that far-infrared therapy, a noninvasive and convenient therapeutic modality, can improve access flow, inflammatory status and survival of the AVF in HD patients through both its thermal and non-thermal (endothelial-improving, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, antioxidative effects by upregulating NF-E2-related factor-2-dependent HO-1 expression, leading to the inhibition of expression of E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

  17. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  18. The Protective Effect of Antioxidants Consumption on Diabetes and Vascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes is generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress, disequilibrium in the redox balance, implicated in the development and progression of complications such as micro- and macro-angiopathies. Disorders in the inner layer of blood vessels, the endothelium, play an early and critical role in the development of these complications. Blunted endothelium-dependent relaxation and/or contractions are quietly associated to oxidative stress. Thus, preserving endothelial function and oxidative stress seems to be an optimization strategy in the prevention of vascular complications associated with diabetes. Diet is a major lifestyle factor that can greatly influence the incidence and the progression of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications. The notion that foods not only provide basic nutrition but can also prevent diseases and ensure good health and longevity is now attained greater prominence. Some dietary and lifestyle modifications associated to antioxidative supply could be an effective prophylactic means to fight against oxidative stress in diabesity and complications. A significant benefit of phytochemicals (polyphenols in wine, grape, teas, vitamins (ascorbate, tocopherol, minerals (selenium, magnesium, and fruits and vegetables in foods is thought to be capable of scavenging free radicals, lowering the incidence of chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in diabetes and complications, highlight the endothelial dysfunction, and examine the impact of antioxidant foods, plants, fruits, and vegetables, currently used medication with antioxidant properties, in relation to the development and progression of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.

  19. Beneficial Effects of Apelin on Vascular Function in Patients With Central Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Francesca; Veneziani, Augusto; Mores, Nadia; Barini, Angela; Di Daniele, Nicola; Cardillo, Carmine; Tesauro, Manfredi

    2017-05-01

    Patients with central obesity have impaired insulin-stimulated vasodilation and increased ET-1 (endothelin 1) vasoconstriction, which may contribute to insulin resistance and vascular damage. Apelin enhances insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal but also acts as a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vasodilator and a counter-regulator of AT 1 (angiotensin [Ang] II type 1) receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We, therefore, examined the effects of exogenous (Pyr 1 )apelin on NO-mediated vasodilation and Ang II- or ET-1-dependent vasoconstrictor tone in obese patients. In the absence of hyperinsulinemia, forearm blood flow responses to graded doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not different during saline or apelin administration (both P >0.05). During intra-arterial infusion of regular insulin, however, apelin enhanced the vasodilation induced by both acetylcholine and nitroprusside (both P 0.05). In conclusion, in patients with central obesity, apelin has favorable effects not only to improve insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilator responses but also to blunt Ang II- and ET-1-dependent vasoconstriction by a mechanism not involving NO. Taken together, our results suggest that targeting the apelin system might favorably impact some hemodynamic abnormalities of insulin-resistant states like obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The Protective Effect of Antioxidants Consumption on Diabetes and Vascular Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal, Stéphanie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2016-07-11

    Obesity and diabetes is generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress, disequilibrium in the redox balance, implicated in the development and progression of complications such as micro- and macro-angiopathies. Disorders in the inner layer of blood vessels, the endothelium, play an early and critical role in the development of these complications. Blunted endothelium-dependent relaxation and/or contractions are quietly associated to oxidative stress. Thus, preserving endothelial function and oxidative stress seems to be an optimization strategy in the prevention of vascular complications associated with diabetes. Diet is a major lifestyle factor that can greatly influence the incidence and the progression of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications. The notion that foods not only provide basic nutrition but can also prevent diseases and ensure good health and longevity is now attained greater prominence. Some dietary and lifestyle modifications associated to antioxidative supply could be an effective prophylactic means to fight against oxidative stress in diabesity and complications. A significant benefit of phytochemicals (polyphenols in wine, grape, teas), vitamins (ascorbate, tocopherol), minerals (selenium, magnesium), and fruits and vegetables in foods is thought to be capable of scavenging free radicals, lowering the incidence of chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in diabetes and complications, highlight the endothelial dysfunction, and examine the impact of antioxidant foods, plants, fruits, and vegetables, currently used medication with antioxidant properties, in relation to the development and progression of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.

  1. Vascular-targeted therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscular dystrophy and an X-linked recessive, progressive muscle wasting disease caused by the absence of a functional dystrophin protein. Dystrophin has a structural role as a cytoskeletal stabilization protein and protects cells against contraction-induced damage. Dystrophin also serves a signaling role through mechanotransduction of forces and localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which produces nitric oxide (NO) to facilitate vasorelaxation. In DMD, the signaling defects produce inadequate tissue perfusion caused by functional ischemia due to a diminished ability to respond to shear stress induced endothelium-dependent dilation. Additionally, the structural defects seen in DMD render myocytes with an increased susceptibility to mechanical stress. The combination of both defects is necessary to generate myocyte damage, which induces successive rounds of myofiber degeneration and regeneration, loss of calcium homeostasis, chronic inflammatory response, fibrosis, and myonecrosis. In individuals with DMD, these processes inevitably cause loss of ambulation shortly after the first decade and an abbreviated life with death in the third or fourth decade due to cardio-respiratory anomalies. There is no known cure for DMD, and although the culpable gene has been identified for more than twenty years, research on treatments has produced few clinically relevant results. Several recent studies on novel DMD therapeutics are vascular targeted and focused on attenuating the inherent functional ischemia. One approach improves vasorelaxation capacity through pharmaceutical inhibition of either phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Another approach increases the density of the underlying vascular network by inducing angiogenesis, and this has been accomplished through either direct delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or by downregulating the VEGF decoy

  2. Subacute effects of a maximal exercise bout on endothelium-mediated vasodilation in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bousquet-Santos

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated vascular reactivity after a maximal exercise test in order to determine whether the effect of exercise on the circulation persists even after interruption of the exercise. Eleven healthy sedentary volunteers (six women, age 28 ± 5 years were evaluated before and after (10, 60, and 120 min a maximal exercise test on a treadmill. Forearm blood flow (FBF was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography before and during reactive hyperemia (RH. Baseline FBF, analyzed by the area under the curve, increased only at 10 min after exercise (P = 0.01. FBF in response to RH increased both at 10 and 60 min vs baseline (P = 0.004. Total excess flow for RH above baseline showed that vascular reactivity was increased up to 60 min after exercise (mean ± SEM, before: 526.4 ± 48.8; 10 min: 1053.0 ± 168.2; 60 min: 659.4 ± 44.1 ml 100 ml-1 min-1 . s; P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively, vs before exercise. The changes in FBF were due to increased vascular conductance since mean arterial blood pressure did not change. In a time control group (N = 5, 34 ± 3 years, three women that did not exercise, FBF and RH did not change significantly (P = 0.07 and 0.7, respectively. These results suggest that the increased vascular reactivity caused by chronic exercise may result, at least in part, from a summation of the subacute effects of successive exercise bouts.

  3. Protective effects of Xuebijing on endothelium in sepsis -induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the protective effect of Xuebijing on the endothelium and extracellular matrix in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI rats for providing a new clinical treatment strategy. Methods  The method of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP was used to duplicate severe sepsis model. Thirty healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: Sham group (n=10, NS group (normal saline 4ml/kg, n=10, Xuebijing group (Xuebijing 4ml/kg, n=10. 6h after CLP, the rats were sacrificed and their kidneys were resected and histopathological characteristic was observed by light microscopic and transmission electron microscopic techniques. The expressions of ET-1 mRNA, iNOS mRNA, MMP-9 mRNA, TIMP-1 mRNA in the renal tissues were measured semi-quantitatively by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results  The histopathological changes in renal tissue were observed by light microscope. The changes of renal glomerulus and renal tubuli in Xuebijing group were better than NS group. The ultrastructural changes in renal tissue were observed under electron microscope. Compared with NS group, ultrastructural changes of renal glomerulus and proximal convoluted tubule were smaller in Xuebijing group. The expressions of ET-1mRNA (0.631±0.169 vs 0.770±0.154, P<0.05, iNOS mRNA (0.507±0.071 vs 0.587±0.073, P<0.05, MMP-9mRNA (0.641±0.082 vs 0.742±0.116, P<0.05 and TIMP-1 mRNA (0.434±0.052 vs 0.520±0.049, P<0.01 were significantly lower in XBJ group renal tissues than in NS group. The expressions of ET-1 mRNA(0.770±0.154 vs 0.394±0.105, P<0.01, iNOS mRNA (0.587±0.073 vs 0.326±0.085, P<0.01, MMP-9 mRNA (0.742±0.116 vs 0.356±0.055, P<0.01 and TIMP-1 mRNA (0.520±0.049 vs 0.351±0.041, P<0.05 in renal tissues were more significantly increased in NS group compared with sham group. Conclusions  Xuebijing could reduce the levels of ET-1, iNOS, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 mRNA, protect the stability of endothelium and extracellular

  4. Podocytes, Signaling Pathways, and Vascular Factors in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Frank C.; Coward, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations and injury to glomerular podocytes play a key role in the initiation and early progression of diabetic kidney disease. Multiple factors in the diabetic milieu cause abnormalities in podocyte signaling that lead to podocyte foot process effacement, hypertrophy, detachment, loss and death. Alterations in insulin action and mTOR activation have been well documented to lead to pathology. For example, reduced insulin action directly leads to albuminuria, increased glomerular matrix accumulation, thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, podocyte apoptosis and glomerulosclerosis. In addition, the podocyte generates factors that alter signaling in other glomerular cells. Prominent among these is VEGF-A which plays a complex role in maintaining glomerular endothelium viability but causes endothelial cell pathology when generated at too high a level. Finally, circulating vascular factors, such as activated protein C have a profound effect on podocyte stability and survival. This cytoprotective factor is critical for podocyte health and its deficiency promotes podocyte injury and apoptosis. Thus, the podocyte sits in the center of a network of paracrine and hormonal signaling systems that in health keep the podocyte adaptable and viable, but in diabetes can lead to pathologic changes, detachment and death. This podocyte injury is a critical determinant of the progression of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:24780459

  5. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (ARTICO study will increase the knowledge of patient outcome after ischemic stroke and may help to improve our ability to detect patients at high risk of stroke recurrence or major cardiovascular events. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Vascular endothelial markers of the human thoracic duct and lacteal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnepp, D R

    1987-03-01

    Factor VIII-related antigen (F8) and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEL) are accepted markers for human blood vessel endothelium. However, disagreement exists as to whether lymphatic vessels stain for F8, and accordingly this study was undertaken to address this issue. Moreover, another vascular endothelial marker, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was also examined in lymphatics. Segments of human thoracic duct and portions of small bowel containing lacteals with post-mortem intervals of less than 15 hours, were removed at autopsy and fixed in B5 or formalin. The specimens were processed routinely and sections examined by indirect immunohistochemical techniques for F8 (Dako Corp.), ACE and for UEL (EY Lab). F8, UEL, and ACE positivity was uniformly found in thoracic ducts and lacteals; however, the staining intensity was less in lymphatic vessels with F8 and UEL than with comparable arteries or veins. ACE staining intensity, on the other hand, was similar in blood vessels and lymphatics. Both formalin and B5 fixation preserved antigenicity; however, background staining was greater with B5 fixation whereas tissue staining was slightly more intense with formalin fixation.

  7. Real-time imaging reveals endothelium-mediated leukocyte retention in LPS-treated lung microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Sahu, Geetaram; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxemia, a major feature of sepsis, is a common cause of acute lung injury and initiates rapid accumulation of leukocytes in the lung vasculature. Endothelial mechanisms that underlie this accumulation remain unclear, as current experimental models of endotoxemia are less suitable for targeted activation of the endothelium. Toward elucidating this, we used the isolated blood-perfused rat lung preparation. With a microcatheter inserted through a left atrial cannula, we cleared blood cells from a small lung region and then infused lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into microvessels. After a Ringer’s wash to remove residual LPS, we infused fluorescently-labeled autologous leukocytes and imaged their transit through the treated microvessels. Image analysis revealed that leukocytes infused 90 min after LPS treatment, were retained more in treated venules and capillaries than untreated vessels. Further, pretreatment with either the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) mAb or polymyxin-B blunted LPS-induced leukocyte retention in both microvessel segments. In addition, retention of leukocytes treated ex vivo with LPS in LPS-treated microvessels was higher compared to retention of untreated leukocytes. In situ immunofluorescence experiments revealed that LPS significantly increased microvessel ICAM-1 expression at 90 min post treatment. Polymyxin pretreatment inhibited this increase. Taken together, the data suggest that LPS increased leukocyte retention in both venules and capillaries and this response was mediated by the increased expression of endothelial ICAM1. Thus, endothelial mechanisms may themselves play a major role in LPS-induced leukocyte retention in lung microvessels. Blunting the endothelial responses may mitigate endotoxin-induced morbidity. PMID:22342350

  8. Excess L-arginine restores endothelium-dependent relaxation impaired by monocrotaline pyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wei; Oike, Masahiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ohnaka, Keizo; Koyama, Tetsuya; Ito, Yushi

    2005-01-01

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid plant toxin monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP) causes pulmonary hypertension in experimental animals. The present study aimed to examine the effects of MCTP on the endothelium-dependent relaxation. We constructed an in vitro disease model of pulmonary hypertension by overlaying MCTP-treated bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs) onto pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell-embedded collagen gel lattice. Acetylcholine (Ach) induced a relaxation of the control CPAEs-overlaid gels that were pre-contracted with noradrenaline, and the relaxation was inhibited by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). In contrast, when MCTP-treated CPAEs were overlaid, the pre-contracted gels did not show a relaxation in response to Ach in the presence of 0.5 mM L-arginine. Expression of endothelial NOS protein, Ach-induced Ca 2+ transients and cellular uptake of L-[ 3 H]arginine were significantly smaller in MCTP-treated CPAEs than in control cells, indicating that these changes were responsible for the impaired NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. Since cellular uptake of L-[ 3 H]arginine linearly increased according to its extracellular concentration, we hypothesized that the excess concentration of extracellular L-arginine might restore NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. As expected, in the presence of 10 mM L-arginine, Ach showed a relaxation of the MCTP-treated CPAEs-overlaid gels. These results indicate that the impaired NO production in damaged endothelial cells can be reversed by supplying excess L-arginine

  9. Influence of applied corneal endothelium image segmentation techniques on the clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, Adam; Nurzynska, Karolina; Gronkowska-Serafin, Jolanta; Selig, Bettina; Boldak, Cezary; Reska, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The corneal endothelium state is verified on the basis of an in vivo specular microscope image from which the shape and density of cells are exploited for data description. Due to the relatively low image quality resulting from a high magnification of the living, non-stained tissue, both manual and automatic analysis of the data is a challenging task. Although, many automatic or semi-automatic solutions have already been introduced, all of them are prone to inaccuracy. This work presents a comparison of four methods (fully-automated or semi-automated) for endothelial cell segmentation, all of which represent a different approach to cell segmentation; fast robust stochastic watershed (FRSW), KH method, active contours solution (SNAKE), and TOPCON ImageNET. Moreover, an improvement framework is introduced which aims to unify precise cell border location in images pre-processed with differing techniques. Finally, the influence of the selected methods on clinical parameters is examined, both with and without the improvement framework application. The experiments revealed that although the image segmentation approaches differ, the measures calculated for clinical parameters are in high accordance when CV (coefficient of variation), and CVSL (coefficient of variation of cell sides length) are considered. Higher variation was noticed for the H (hexagonality) metric. Utilisation of the improvement framework assured better repeatability of precise endothelial cell border location between the methods while diminishing the dispersion of clinical parameter values calculated for such images. Finally, it was proven statistically that the image processing method applied for endothelial cell analysis does not influence the ability to differentiate between the images using medical parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems.

  11. Contemporary vascular smartphone medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Thomas; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R W

    2013-08-01

    Use of smartphones and medical mHealth applications (apps) within the clinical environment provides a potential means for delivering elements of vascular care. This article reviews the contemporary availability of apps specifically themed to major vascular diseases and the opportunities and concerns regarding their integration into practice. Smartphone apps relating to major vascular diseases were identified from the app stores for the 6 most popular smartphone platforms, including iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows, and Samsung. Search terms included peripheral artery (arterial) disease, varicose veins, aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, amputation, ulcers, hyperhydrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, vascular malformation, and lymphatic disorders. Forty-nine vascular-themed apps were identified. Sixteen (33%) were free of charge. Fifteen apps (31%) had customer satisfaction ratings, but only 3 (6%) had greater than 100. Only 13 apps (27%) had documented medical professional involvement in their design or content. The integration of apps into the delivery of care has the potential to benefit vascular health care workers and patients. However, high-quality apps designed by clinicians with vascular expertise are currently lacking and represent an area of concern in the mHealth market. Improvement in the quality and reliability of these apps will require the development of robust regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vascular disease in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachi, Keren; Mani, Venkatesh; Jeyachandran, Devi; Fayad, Zahi A; Goldstein, Rita Z; Alia-Klein, Nelly

    2017-07-01

    Cocaine, a powerful vasoconstrictor, induces immune responses including cytokine elevations. Chronic cocaine use is associated with functional brain impairments potentially mediated by vascular pathology. Although the Crack-Cocaine epidemic has declined, its vascular consequences are increasingly becoming evident among individuals with cocaine use disorder of that period, now aging. Paradoxically, during the period when prevention efforts could make a difference, this population receives psychosocial treatment at best. We review major postmortem and in vitro studies documenting cocaine-induced vascular toxicity. PubMed and Academic Search Complete were used with relevant terms. Findings consist of the major mechanisms of cocaine-induced vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, and accelerated atherosclerosis, emphasizing acute, chronic, and secondary effects of cocaine. The etiology underlying cocaine's acute and chronic vascular effects is multifactorial, spanning hypertension, impaired homeostasis and platelet function, thrombosis, thromboembolism, and alterations in blood flow. Early detection of vascular disease in cocaine addiction by multimodality imaging is discussed. Treatment may be similar to indications in patients with traditional risk-factors, with few exceptions such as enhanced supportive care and use of benzodiazepines and phentolamine for sedation, and avoiding β-blockers. Given the vascular toxicity cocaine induces, further compounded by smoking and alcohol comorbidity, and interacting with aging of the crack generation, there is a public health imperative to identify pre-symptomatic markers of vascular impairments in cocaine addiction and employ preventive treatment to reduce silent disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [The future of vascular medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. A microengineered vascularized bleeding model that integrates the principal components of hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yumiko; Hardy, Elaissa T; Ahn, Byungwook; Tran, Reginald; Fay, Meredith E; Ciciliano, Jordan C; Mannino, Robert G; Myers, David R; Qiu, Yongzhi; Carden, Marcus A; Baldwin, W Hunter; Meeks, Shannon L; Gilbert, Gary E; Jobe, Shawn M; Lam, Wilbur A

    2018-02-06

    Hemostasis encompasses an ensemble of interactions among platelets, coagulation factors, blood cells, endothelium, and hemodynamic forces, but current assays assess only isolated aspects of this complex process. Accordingly, here we develop a comprehensive in vitro mechanical injury bleeding model comprising an "endothelialized" microfluidic system coupled with a microengineered pneumatic valve that induces a vascular "injury". With perfusion of whole blood, hemostatic plug formation is visualized and "in vitro bleeding time" is measured. We investigate the interaction of different components of hemostasis, gaining insight into several unresolved hematologic issues. Specifically, we visualize and quantitatively demonstrate: the effect of anti-platelet agent on clot contraction and hemostatic plug formation, that von Willebrand factor is essential for hemostasis at high shear, that hemophilia A blood confers unstable hemostatic plug formation and altered fibrin architecture, and the importance of endothelial phosphatidylserine in hemostasis. These results establish the versatility and clinical utility of our microfluidic bleeding model.

  15. ADAM10 mediates vascular injury induced by Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael E; Kim, Hwan Keun; Wang, Yang; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2012-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia and sepsis. The interaction of S. aureus with the endothelium is central to bloodstream infection pathophysiology yet remains ill-understood. We show herein that staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin, is required for full virulence in a murine sepsis model. The α-hemolysin binding to its receptor A-disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) upregulates the receptor's metalloprotease activity on endothelial cells, causing vascular endothelial-cadherin cleavage and concomitant loss of endothelial barrier function. These cellular injuries and sepsis severity can be mitigated by ADAM10 inhibition. This study therefore provides mechanistic insight into toxin-mediated endothelial injury and suggests new therapeutic approaches for staphylococcal sepsis.

  16. [Aspects of vascular physiology in clinical and vascular surgical practice: basic principles of vascular mechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocke, H; Meyer, F; Lessmann, V

    2014-10-01

    To be able to evaluate properly a vascular problem, basic concepts of vascular physiology need to be considered, as they have been taught in physiology for a long time. This article deals with selected definitions and laws of passive vascular mechanics, subdivided into parameters of vascular filling and parameters of vascular flow. PARAMETERS OF VASCULAR FILLING: During vascular filling the transmural pressure distends the vascular wall until it is balanced by the wall tension. The extent of this distension up to the point of balance depends on the elasticity of the wall. Transmural pressure, wall tension and elasticity are defined, and their respective importance is described by clinical examples, e.g. aneurysm and varix. PARAMETERS OF VASCULAR FLOW: The vascular flow can be divided into stationary and pulsating components. Both components are relevant for the bloodstream. Since the blood flow is directed in the circuit, it can be understood in first approximation as stationary ("direct current").The direct current model uses only the average values of the pulsating variables. The great advantage of the direct current model is that it can be described with simple laws, which are not valid without reservation, but often allow a first theoretical approach to a vascular problem: Ohm's law, driving pressure, flow resistance, Hagen-Poiseuille law, wall shear stress, law of continuity, Bernoulli's equation and Reynold's number are described and associated with clinical examples.The heart is a pressure-suction pump and produces a pulsating flow, the pulse. The pulse runs with pulse wave velocity, which is much larger than the blood flow velocity, through the arterial vascular system. During propagation, the pulse has to overcome the wave resistance (impedance). Wherever the wave resistance changes, e.g., at vascular bifurcations and in the periphery, it comes to reflections. The incident (forward) and reflected (backward) waves are superimposed to yield the resulting

  17. Intravascular leukocyte migration through platelet thrombi: directing leukocytes to sites of vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Mehran; Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat

    2015-06-01

    Leukocytes recruitment to thrombi supports an intimate cellular interaction leading to the enhancement of pro-coagulant functions and pro-inflammatory responses at site of vascular injury. Recent observations of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation and its mutual reactions with platelet thrombi adds more clinical interest to the growing body of knowledge in the field of platelet-leukocyte cross-talk. However, having considered thrombus as a barrier between leukocytes and injured endothelium, the full inflammatory roles of these cells during thrombosis is still ill defined. The most recent observation of neutrophils migration into the thrombi is a phenomenon that highlights the inflammatory functions of leukocytes at the site of injury. It has been hypothesised that leukocytes migration might be associated with the conveyance of highly reactive pro-inflammatory and/or pro-coagulant mediators to sites of vascular injury. In addition, the evidence of neutrophils migration into arterial thrombi following traumatic and ischaemia-reperfusion injury highlights the already described role of these cells in atherosclerosis. Regardless of the mechanisms behind leukocyte migration, whether these migrated cells benefit normal homeostasis by their involvement in wound healing and vascular rebuilding or they increase unwilling inflammatory responses, could be of interest for future researches that provide new insight into biological importance of leukocyte recruitment to thrombi.

  18. Moringa oleifera Seeds Attenuate Vascular Oxidative and Nitrosative Stresses in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Iharinjaka Randriamboavonjy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera (MOI is a tree currently used in traditional medicine in tropical Africa, America, and Asia for therapeutic applications in several disorders including arterial hypertension. We previously described a cardiac protective role of a treatment with MOI seeds in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Here, we investigated the effects of this treatment on oxidative and nitrosative vascular stresses in SHR, with normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats used as controls. Oxidative and nitrosative stresses detected in SHR aortas using the fluorescent dye dihydroethidine and protein nitrotyrosine staining were reduced in MOI-treated SHR aortas. This was associated with a decrease of free 8-isoprostane circulating level, vascular p22phox and p47phox expressions, and SOD2 upregulation. Moreover, circulating nitrites and C-reactive protein, increased in SHR, were both reduced in SHR receiving MOI. This was associated to decrease iNOS and NF-κB protein expressions after MOI treatment. In functional studies, the endothelium-dependent carbachol-induced relaxation was improved in MOI-treated SHR resistance arteries. Oral administration of MOI seeds demonstrates vascular antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and endothelial protective effects in SHR. Our data support the use of MOI seeds in diet against cardiovascular disorders associated with oxidative stress and inflammation such as hypertension, scientifically validating the use of these seeds in Malagasy traditional medicine.

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle following glycogen-depleting exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper Degn; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is traditionally considered important for skeletal muscle angiogenesis. VEGF is released from vascular endothelium as well as the muscle cells in response to exercise. The mechanism and the physiological role of VEGF secreted from the muscle cells remain...... unclear. However, as VEGF is also considered very important for the regulation of vascular permeability, it is possible that metabolic stress may trigger muscle VEGF release. PURPOSE: To study the role of metabolic stress induced by glycogen-depleting exercise on muscle VEGF expression. METHODS: Fifteen...... males (age 27.0±0.8; VO2max 66.0±1.2 ml•kg-1•min-1) carried out 4h of cycling exercise supplied with H2O only followed by 4h of recovery with either carbohydrate (CHO) (n=8) or H2O (n=7) supplementation. Hereafter both groups received CHO. Muscle biopsies were collected pre and post as well as 4 and 24...

  20. Neural Vascular Mechanism for the Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation after Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the initial stages of hemorrhagic stroke, including intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, the reflex mechanisms are activated to protect cerebral perfusion, but secondary dysfunction of cerebral flow autoregulation will eventually reduce global cerebral blood flow and the delivery of metabolic substrates, leading to generalized cerebral ischemia, hypoxia, and ultimately, neuronal cell death. Cerebral blood flow is controlled by various regulatory mechanisms, including prevailing arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, arterial blood gases, neural activity, and metabolic demand. Evoked by the concept of vascular neural network, the unveiled neural vascular mechanism gains more and more attentions. Astrocyte, neuron, pericyte, endothelium, and so forth are formed as a communicate network to regulate with each other as well as the cerebral blood flow. However, the signaling molecules responsible for this communication between these new players and blood vessels are yet to be definitively confirmed. Recent evidence suggested the pivotal role of transcriptional mechanism, including but not limited to miRNA, lncRNA, exosome, and so forth, for the cerebral blood flow autoregulation. In the present review, we sought to summarize the hemodynamic changes and underline neural vascular mechanism for cerebral blood flow autoregulation in stroke-prone state and after hemorrhagic stroke and hopefully provide more systematic and innovative research interests for the pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies of hemorrhagic stroke.

  1. Pulmonary vascular abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing lung transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Victor I; Gómez, Federico P; Barberà, Joan Albert; Roman, Antonio; Angels Montero, M; Ramírez, Josep; Roca, Josep; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the structure and function relationships of pulmonary vessels in the most severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) spectrum. We investigated morphometric, cellular, and physiologic characteristics of pulmonary arteries from COPD patients undergoing bilateral lung transplant. Seventeen patients with very severe COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 24% ± 7%) were assessed using inert gas exchange and pulmonary hemodynamics while breathing ambient air and 100% oxygen. Morphometry, in vitro reactivity to hypoxia, and inflammatory cell counts of pulmonary arteries were measured in explanted lungs. Patients had moderate ventilation-perfusion imbalance along with mild release of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Mild pulmonary hypertension was observed in 7 patients. Explanted lungs had predominant emphysema with mild small airway involvement. In vitro reactivity was modestly altered, with relatively preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation, and vascular remodelling was discrete, with intense CD8+ T lymphocytes infiltrate. In vitro reactivity correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance (on ambient air) and oxygen-induced pulmonary artery pressure changes. Patients with pulmonary hypertension had more severe morphologic and physiologic emphysema. In end-stage COPD patients undergoing lung transplant, pulmonary vascular involvement is unexpectedly modest, with low-grade endothelial dysfunction. In this sub-set of COPD patients, pulmonary emphysema may constitute the major determinant of the presence of pulmonary hypertension. © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Published by International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation All rights reserved.

  2. Role of preoperative vascular ultrasonography in hemodialysis vascular access operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siribumrungwong, Boonying; Tomtitchong, Prakitpunthu; Kanpirom, Kitti

    2010-12-01

    Preoperative vascular mapping increase rate of successful hemodialysis vascular access operation. Several studies recommend using this procedure routinely. But some studies recommend using this procedure in selected patients. So this study aims to determine the impacts of preoperative vascular mapping in unfavorable-examined patients. 55 patients were studied retrospectively from August 2006 to October 2009. Before April 2008, the operative plans were based on physical examination (group 1). After April 2008, the surgeon did preoperative vascular mapping prior to the operation in unfavorable-examined patients (group 2). The results were compared. There were high maturation rates in favorable-examined patients. In unfavorable-examined patients, preoperative vascular mapping can identified nonpalpable favorable vein which successful maturation of 18.75%. Complementary duplex scan decrease rate of unsuccessful operation significantly (p = 0.037) but does not increase maturation rate. Careful physical examination is important part before operation. Preoperative vascular mapping has benefit only in patients with unfavorable-examined patients. It finds some nonpalpable favorable vein and decrease unsuccessful exploration.

  3. Trauma vascular, visión del cirujano vascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D. Cristián Salas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El 3% de todas las lesiones en trauma tiene un componente vascular. Con los conflictos armados del siglo pasado se lograron grandes avances en este campo. A partir de la Guerra de Vietnam gracias a las mejoras en el manejo prehospitalario, traslado de pacientes, y avances en técnica quirúrgica se lograron tasas de sobrevida y de amputaciones que se han mantenido estables hasta la fecha. El diagnóstico de lesiones vasculares en extremidades se realiza con el examen físico, sin embargo las lesiones de vasos torácicos y abdominales requieren de imágenes de apoyo, siempre que el paciente se encuentre estabilizado, generalmente tomografía axial computada. La mayoría de las lesiones vasculares son por trauma penetrante, comprometiendo principalmente las extremidades. Con el desarrollo de los procedimientos invasivos vasculares en los últimos años se ha observado un aumento de lesiones vasculares iatrogénicas. Hoy en día muchos pacientes con trauma vascular son manejados por vía endovascular.

  4. Vascular injuries during gynecological laparoscopy: the vascular surgeon's advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Barbosa Barros

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Iatrogenic vascular problems due to laparoscopy are a well recognized problem and lead to significant repercussions. In this context, a ten-year review of cases topic is presented, based on experience gained while heading two important vascular surgery services. CASES: Five patients with vascular injuries during elective laparoscopy are described. These patients presented with seven lesions of iliac vessels. All cases were evaluated immediately and required laparotomy, provisional hemostasis and urgent attendance by a vascular surgeon. Direct suturing was performed in three cases. One aortoiliac bypass and one ilioiliac reversed venous graft were made. Venous lesions were sutured. One case of a point-like perforation of the small bowel was found. There were no deaths and no complications during the postoperative period. DISCUSSION: Important points on this subject are made, and advice is given. There needs to be immediate recognition of the vascular injury, and expert repair by a vascular surgeon is recommended, in order to significantly reduce the degree of complications.

  5. Quantifying the evolution of vascular barrier disruption in advanced atherosclerosis with semipermeant nanoparticle contrast agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Acute atherothrombotic occlusion in heart attack and stroke implies disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier that exposes a highly procoagulant intimal milieu. However, the evolution, severity, and pathophysiological consequences of vascular barrier damage in atherosclerotic plaque remain unknown, in part because quantifiable methods and experimental models are lacking for its in vivo assessment.To develop quantitative nondestructive methodologies and models for detecting vascular barrier disruption in advanced plaques.Sustained hypercholesterolemia in New Zealand White (NZW rabbits for >7-14 months engendered endothelial barrier disruption that was evident from massive and rapid passive penetration and intimal trapping of perfluorocarbon-core nanoparticles (PFC-NP: ∼250 nm diameter after in vivo circulation for as little as 1 hour. Only older plaques (>7 mo, but not younger plaques (<3 mo demonstrated the marked enhancement of endothelial permeability to these particles. Electron microscopy revealed a complex of subintimal spongiform channels associated with endothelial apoptosis, superficial erosions, and surface-penetrating cholesterol crystals. Fluorine ((19F magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS enabled absolute quantification (in nanoMolar of the passive permeation of PFC-NP into the disrupted vascular lesions by sensing the unique spectral signatures from the fluorine core of plaque-bound PFC-NP.The application of semipermeant nanoparticles reveals the presence of profound barrier disruption in later stage plaques and focuses attention on the disrupted endothelium as a potential contributor to plaque vulnerability. The response to sustained high cholesterol levels yields a progressive deterioration of the vascular barrier that can be quantified with fluorine MRI/MRS of passively permeable nanostructures. The possibility of plaque classification based on the metric of endothelial permeability to nanoparticles is

  6. Endothelial and Perivascular Adipose Tissue Abnormalities in Obesity-Related Vascular Dysfunction: Novel Targets for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2017-06-01

    The heavy impact of obesity on the development and progression of cardiovascular disease has sparked sustained efforts to uncover the mechanisms linking excess adiposity to vascular dysfunction. In addition to its well-established role in maintaining vascular homeostasis, the endothelium has been increasingly recognized as a key player in modulating healthy adipose tissue expansion in response to excess calories by providing adipocyte precursors and driving angiogenesis. When this increased storage need is unmet, excessive deposition of fat occurs at ectopic locations, including perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). PVAT is in intimate contact with the vessel wall, hence affecting vascular function and structure. In lean individuals, PVAT exerts anticontractile and anti-inflammatory activities to protect the vasculature. In obesity, instead, these beneficial properties are lost and PVAT releases inflammatory mediators, promotes oxidative stress, and contributes to vascular dysfunction. The underlying mechanisms elicited by these outside-in signals include resistance to the vasodilator actions of insulin and activation of endothelin (ET)-1-mediated vasoconstriction. A number of adipokines and gut hormones, which are important modulators of food intake, energy balance, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation, have also positive vascular actions. This feature makes them promising tools for targeting both the metabolic and cardiovascular complications of obesity, a view supported by recent large-scale clinical trials indicating that novel drugs for type 2 diabetes with cardiovascular potential may translate into clinically significant benefits. There is, therefore, real hope that unleashing the power of fat- and gut-derived substances might provide effective dual-action therapies for obesity and its complications.

  7. Angiogenic T cell expansion correlates with severity of peripheral vascular damage in systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Manetti

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying endothelial cell injury and defective vascular repair in systemic sclerosis (SSc remain unclear. Since the recently discovered angiogenic T cells (Tang may have an important role in the repair of damaged endothelium, this study aimed to analyze the Tang population in relation to disease-related peripheral vascular features in SSc patients. Tang (CD3+CD31+CXCR4+ were quantified by flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 39 SSc patients and 18 healthy controls (HC. Circulating levels of the CXCR4 ligand stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1α and proangiogenic factors were assessed in paired serum samples by immunoassay. Serial skin sections from SSc patients and HC were subjected to CD3/CD31 and CD3/CXCR4 double immunofluorescence. Circulating Tang were significantly increased in SSc patients with digital ulcers (DU compared either with SSc patients without DU or with HC. Tang levels were significantly higher in SSc patients with late nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC pattern than in those with early/active NVC patterns and in HC. No difference in circulating Tang was found when comparing either SSc patients without DU or patients with early/active NVC patterns and HC. In SSc peripheral blood, Tang percentage was inversely correlated to levels of SDF-1α and CD34+CD133+VEGFR-2+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPC, and positively correlated to levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Tang were frequently detected in SSc dermal perivascular inflammatory infiltrates. In summary, our findings demonstrate for the first time that Tang cells are selectively expanded in the circulation of SSc patients displaying severe peripheral vascular complications like DU. In SSc, Tang may represent a potentially useful biomarker reflecting peripheral vascular damage severity. Tang expansion may be an ineffective attempt to compensate the need for increased angiogenesis and EPC function. Further

  8. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induces vascular dysfunction in obese OLETF rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Penghao [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Xie, Qihai [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiading District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Wei, Tong [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yichen [Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@shsmu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: wlshen@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-04

    Objective: Obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is related to chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. Recent studies indicate that NLRP3, a multiprotein complex formed by NOD-like receptor (NLR) family members, is a key component mediating internal sterile inflammation, but the role in obesity-related vascular dysfunction is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigate whether NLRP3 activation is involved in vascular inflammation in obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats (OLETF). Methods and results: Male OLETF with their control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats (LETO) were studied at 3 and 12 months of age. Aortic relaxation in response to acetylcholine decreased gradually with age in both strains, with early and persistent endothelium dysfunction in obese OLETF compared with age-matched LETO controls. These changes are associated with parallel changes of aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) content, macrophage accumulation and intimal thickening. NLRP3 increased in OLETF rats compared to LETO. Consistent with inflammasome activation, the conversion of procaspase-1 to cleaved and activated forms as well as IL-1β markedly increased in OLETF rats. Additionally, we observed increased expression of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion-relative protein optic atropy-1(OPA1). Altered mitochondrial dynamics was associated with elevated oxidative stress level in OLETF aortas. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that obesity seems to accelerate endothelial dysfunction in OLETFs via the activation of NLRP3 and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced vascular dysfunction. • Impaired mitochondrial dynamics may have been linked to mitochondrial defect and inflammasome activation. • Obesity seems to accelerate vascular dysfunction via NLRP3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induces vascular dysfunction in obese OLETF rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Penghao; Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Chen, Yichen; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is related to chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. Recent studies indicate that NLRP3, a multiprotein complex formed by NOD-like receptor (NLR) family members, is a key component mediating internal sterile inflammation, but the role in obesity-related vascular dysfunction is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigate whether NLRP3 activation is involved in vascular inflammation in obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats (OLETF). Methods and results: Male OLETF with their control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats (LETO) were studied at 3 and 12 months of age. Aortic relaxation in response to acetylcholine decreased gradually with age in both strains, with early and persistent endothelium dysfunction in obese OLETF compared with age-matched LETO controls. These changes are associated with parallel changes of aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) content, macrophage accumulation and intimal thickening. NLRP3 increased in OLETF rats compared to LETO. Consistent with inflammasome activation, the conversion of procaspase-1 to cleaved and activated forms as well as IL-1β markedly increased in OLETF rats. Additionally, we observed increased expression of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion-relative protein optic atropy-1(OPA1). Altered mitochondrial dynamics was associated with elevated oxidative stress level in OLETF aortas. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that obesity seems to accelerate endothelial dysfunction in OLETFs via the activation of NLRP3 and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced vascular dysfunction. • Impaired mitochondrial dynamics may have been linked to mitochondrial defect and inflammasome activation. • Obesity seems to accelerate vascular dysfunction via NLRP3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronco, Ana Maria; Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel; Saez, Daniel; Hirsch, Sandra; Zepeda, Ramiro; Llanos, Miguel N.

    2011-01-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-κB expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  11. Acute effects of tea on fasting and postprandial vascular function and blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Burke, Valerie; Puddey, Ian B

    2005-01-01

    Effects of regular exposure to polyphenolic compounds found in tea, leading to improved endothelial function and blood pressure, may reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Controlled trials in humans have found that ingestion of tea can improve endothelial function, but also cause a rapid onset acute increase in blood pressure. To examine the acute effects of tea consumption on fasting and postprandial vascular function and blood pressure. Endothelium-dependent dilatation of the brachial artery, assessed using ultrasound and blood pressure were measured in 20 participants with a history of coronary artery disease. Measurements were performed at baseline and at 3.5 h (blood pressure) and 4 h (endothelial function) after drinking three cups of black tea or hot water (consumed at time = 0, 1.5 and 3 h) with and without a high-fat (50 g) meal: a total of four treatments administered in random order. The high-fat meal did not impair endothelial function. In comparison to water alone, endothelium-dependent dilatation was increased by the meal with tea (1.7 (0.4, 3.0)%, P = 0.02), but was not significantly altered by the tea alone (0.7 (-0.6, 2.0)%, P = 0.32). Systolic blood pressure was significantly increased by tea alone in comparison to each of the other three groups: water alone (9.3 (4.5, 14.1) mmHg, P = 0.0003), meal with water (9.8 (5.0, 14.6) mmHg, P = 0.0001) and meal with tea (7.2 (2.4,12.0) mmHg, P = 0.004). Consumption of a meal negated the acute increase in systolic blood pressure found with tea in the fasting state. Consumption of food may alter the acute effects of tea on vascular function and blood pressure.

  12. ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq ) vascular wilt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effet de la jachére sur l'expérimentation de la fusariose vasculaire du palmier à huile ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq ) : Effects of the fallow in the expression of oil-palm ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq ) vascular wilt.

  13. Vascular lesions of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drape, Jean-Luc [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, APHP, Universite Paris, 27 rue du Fbg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris (France)]. E-mail: jean-luc.drape@cch.ap-hop-paris.fr; Feydy, Antoine [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, APHP, Universite Paris, 27 rue du Fbg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris (France); Guerini, Henri [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, APHP, Universite Paris, 27 rue du Fbg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris (France); Desmarais, Eric [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, APHP, Universite Paris, 27 rue du Fbg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris (France); Godefroy, Didier [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, APHP, Universite Paris, 27 rue du Fbg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris (France); Viet, Dominique Le [Institut de la main, Paris (France); Chevrot, Alain [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, APHP, Universite Paris, 27 rue du Fbg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris (France)

    2005-12-15

    The vascular malformations are not uncommon on the hand and offer diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Enjolras and Mulliken's classification is exposed. Their depiction and pretreatment assessment may benefit from non-invasive imaging as color-Doppler ultrasound and MRI combined with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Some chronic traumatic vascular injuries as the hypothenar hammer syndrome may also take advantage of these imaging modalities.

  14. Hemimegalencephaly, hemihypertrophy and vascular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristaldi, A; Vigevano, F; Antoniazzi, G; di Capua, M; Andreuzzi, A; Morselli, G; Iorio, F; Fariello, G; Trasimeni, G; Gualdi, G F

    1995-02-01

    We report on two children with hemihypertrophy and ipsilateral hemimegalencephaly. Vascular lesions in one were consistent with a diagnosis of the Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber Syndrome. MRI performed in the first days of life and at 1 month of age revealed the presence of the neuronal anomaly. The occurrence of hemimegalencephaly in our patients indicates that hemihypertrophy and vascular dysplasia are pathogenetically related phenomena of a continuous spectrum in which this brain disorder may appear.

  15. Facial vascular malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelle, F.O.; Lallemand, D.; Chaumont, P.; Teillac, D.; Manach, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present their experience with conventional and digital angiography of vascular malformations of the head and neck in children. 22 hemangioendotheliomas, 8 venous angiomas, and 3 arteriovenous fistula were studied. 22 patients were embolised. DSA offers many advantages during the diagnostic as well as during the therapeutic phase of angiography. Embolization appears to have a major role in treatment of such vascular malformations. (orig.)

  16. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs, the reti...... vasculature may affect the retinal response to potential vascular disease in later life....

  17. Molecular mechanisms for vascular development and secondary cell wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and secondary cell wall biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and secondary cell wall formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses.

  18. New Insights into Dialysis Vascular Access: Molecular Targets in Arteriovenous Fistula and Arteriovenous Graft Failure and Their Potential to Improve Vascular Access Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timmy; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-08-08

    Vascular access dysfunction remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. At present there are few effective therapies for this clinical problem. The poor understanding of the pathobiology that leads to arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and graft (AVG) dysfunction remains a critical barrier to development of novel and effective therapies. However, in recent years we have made substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of vascular access dysfunction. This article presents recent advances and new insights into the pathobiology of AVF and AVG dysfunction and highlights potential therapeutic targets to improve vascular access outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgo, M.V.; Claudio, E.R.G.; Silva, F.B.; Romero, W.G.; Gouvea, S.A.; Moysés, M.R.; Santos, R.L.; Almeida, S.A.; Podratz, P.L.; Graceli, J.B.; Abreu, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    Drospirenone (DRSP) is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2) and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX) spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87) at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham), OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2), and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP) groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women

  20. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Borgo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drospirenone (DRSP is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2 and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87 at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham, OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2, and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women.

  1. The endothelin B receptor plays a crucial role in the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Bérengère; Nivoit, Pierre; El Nemer, Wassim; Lenoir, Olivia; Hermand, Patricia; Pereira, Catia; Brousse, Valentine; Guyonnet, Léa; Ghinatti, Giulia; Benkerrou, Malika; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-07-01

    Although the primary origin of sickle cell disease is a hemoglobin disorder, many types of cells contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of the disease. The adhesion of neutrophils to activated endothelium is critical in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and targeting neutrophils and their interactions with endothelium represents an important opportunity for the development of new therapeutics. We focused on endothelin-1, a mediator involved in neutrophil activation and recruitment in tissues, and investigated the involvement of the endothelin receptors in the interaction of neutrophils with endothelial cells. We used fluorescence intravital microscopy analyses of the microcirculation in sickle mice and quantitative microfluidic fluorescence microscopy of human blood. Both experiments on the mouse model and patients indicate that blocking endothelin receptors, particularly ET B receptor, strongly influences neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions in sickle cell disease. We show that human neutrophils have functional ET B receptors with calcium signaling capability, leading to increased adhesion to the endothelium through effects on both endothelial cells and neutrophils. Intact ET B function was found to be required for tumor necrosis factor α-dependent upregulation of CD11b on neutrophils. Furthermore, we confirmed that human neutrophils synthesize endothelin-1, which may be involved in autocrine and paracrine pathophysiological actions. Thus, the endothelin-ET B axis should be considered as a cytokine-like potent pro-inflammatory pathway in sickle cell disease. Blockade of endothelin receptors, including ET B , may provide major benefits for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell patients. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Platelets are required for enhanced activation of the endothelium and fibrinogen in a mouse thrombosis model of APS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulle, Valerie; Furie, Richard A; Merrill-Skoloff, Glenn; Furie, Barbara C; Furie, Bruce

    2014-07-24

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by thrombosis, fetal loss, and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, including anti-β2-glycoprotein-1 autoantibodies (anti-β2GP1) that have a direct role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis in vivo. The cellular targets of the anti-β2GP1 autoantibody/β2GP1 complex in vivo were studied using a laser-induced thrombosis model of APS in a live mouse and human anti-β2GP1 autoantibodies affinity-purified from APS patients. Cell binding of fluorescently labeled β2GP1 and anti-β2GP1 autoantibodies revealed their colocalization on the platelet thrombus but not the endothelium. Anti-β2GP1 autoantibodies enhanced platelet activation, monitored by calcium mobilization, and endothelial activation, monitored by intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. When eptifibatide was infused to block platelet thrombus formation, enhanced fibrin generation and endothelial cell activation were eliminated. Thus, the anti-β2GP1 autoantibody/β2GP1 complex binds to the thrombus, enhancing platelet activation, and platelet secretion leads to enhanced endothelium activation and fibrin generation. These results lead to a paradigm shift away from the concept that binding of the anti-β2GP1 autoantibody/β2GP1 complex activates both endothelial cells and platelets toward one in which activation of platelets in response to anti-β2GP1 autoantibody/β2GP1 complex binding leads to subsequent enhanced endothelium activation and fibrin generation. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Inflammatory cytokine TNF-α promotes corneal endothelium apoptosis via upregulating TIPE2 transcription during corneal graft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Wei, Chao; Ma, Li; Wang, Xin; Li, Lin; Zhou, Qingjun; Shi, Weiyun

    2018-02-26

    Endothelial dysfunction accounts for 50% of total corneal transplantation failures, suggesting that corneal endothelial damage is the leading cause of graft failure. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is known to contribute to the negative regulation of corneal transplantation, but how it does so remains unclear. Here, we report a regulatory loop involving TNF-α, TNF-α-induced protein 8 like 2 (TNFAIP8L2 or TIPE2), and apoptosis during corneal graft rejection. We established mice models of penetrating keratoplasty to verify whether the quantification of TNF-α in allogeneic corneas is enhanced through ELISA assay and immunofluorescence staining. In cornea tissues, we obtained corneal endothelium and measured apoptosis of the removed cells. Meanwhile, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of TIPE2. In human corneal endothelial cells, we verified the conclusions through some experiments. By specifically knocking down TIPE2, we detected the importance of TIPE2 in TNF-α-triggered apoptosis. In mice models, TNF-α was higher in the cornea and aqueous humor in allograft group and TNF-α elevation increased the apoptosis of the corneal endothelium. In addition, high levels of TIPE2 were found in allograft rejection models following TNF-α elevation. In human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), TNF-α clearly augments TIPE2 expression and promotes cell apoptosis through upregulating TIPE2 transcription. Knocking down markedly decreased cell apoptosis. Our study identifies the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of TNF-α, TIPE2, and apoptosis during allograft rejection, and it suggests that both TNF-α and TIPE2 might be potential targets for the successfully grafted corneal endothelium.

  4. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgo, M.V.; Claudio, E.R.G.; Silva, F.B.; Romero, W.G.; Gouvea, S.A.; Moysés, M.R.; Santos, R.L.; Almeida, S.A. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Podratz, P.L.; Graceli, J.B. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Abreu, G.R. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2015-11-17

    Drospirenone (DRSP) is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2) and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX) spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87) at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham), OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2), and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP) groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women.

  5. Amiodarona causa vasodilatação dependente do endotélio em artérias coronárias caninas Amiodarone causes endothelium-dependent vasodilation in canine coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo José Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos vasodilatadores da amiodarona em artérias coronárias caninas empregando soluções de amiodarona dissolvida em polisorbato 80 ou em água. MÉTODOS: Anéis de artéria coronária, com e sem o endotélio íntegro, foram imersos em solução de krebs e conectadas a um transdutor para aferição de força isométrica promovida por contração vascular. As artérias foram expostas a concentrações crescentes de polisorbato 80, amiodarona dissolvida em água, amiodarona dissolvida em polisorbato 80 e uma apresentação comercial da amiodarona (Cordarone®. Os experimentos foram conduzidos na presença e na ausência dos seguintes bloqueadores enzimáticos: apenas indometacina, Nômega-nitro-L-arginina associada à indometacina e apenas Nômega-nitro-L-arginina. RESULTADOS: O polisorbato 80 causou pequeno relaxamento não dependente do endotélio. O Cordarone®, a amiodarona dissolvida em água e em polisorbato 80 promoveram relaxamento dependente do endotélio, que foi de maior magnitude para a amiodarona dissolvida em polisorbato e para o Cordarone®. Apenas a associação de indometacina com a Nômega-nitro-L-arginina foi capaz de abolir o relaxamento dependente do endotélio provocado pela amiodarona dissolvida em polisorbato 80. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados obtidos indicam que a vasodilatação promovida pela amiodarona em artérias coronárias caninas é causada principalmente pela estimulação da liberação de óxido nítrico e fatores endoteliais relaxantes dependentes das ciclo-oxigenases.OBJECTIVE: To assess the vasodilating effects of amiodarone on canine coronary arteries by using solutions of amiodarone dissolved in polysorbate 80 or water. METHODS: Rings of coronary arteries, with or without intact endothelium, were immersed in Krebs solution and connected to a transducer for measuring the isometric force promoted by a vascular contraction. The arteries were exposed to increasing concentrations of

  6. Effect of topical 0.05% cyclosporine A on corneal endothelium in patients with dry eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rico, Consuelo; Germain, Francisco; Castro-Rebollo, María; Moreno-Salgueiro, Agustín; Teus, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To determine the effect of topical 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA) on corneal endothelium in patients with dry eye disease.METHODS: Observational, prospective, case series study. Fifty-five eyes of 29 consecutive patients (9 males and 20 females; median age:66.8 years, interquartile range:61-73.2 years) with moderate-severe dry eye disease were evaluated. All patients were treated with topical 0.05% CsA ophthalmic emulsion twice a day in addition to lubricant eyedrops 5 times a day. The follow...

  7. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by L-carnitine in isolated aorta from normotensive and hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera González, María Dolores; Bueno, Rosario; Álvarez de Sotomayor Paz, María; Pérez Guerrero, María Concepción; Vázquez, Carmen M.; Marhuenda Requena, Elisa

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism of the vasodilatory effect induced by L- carnitine. Relaxation produced by L-carnitine was studied in rat aortic rings with and without functional endothelium, pre-contracted with phenylephrine by adding cumulative doses of L- carnitine (10-7 to 10-3 M). The relaxation evoked by L-carnitine reached higher values in aortic rings from spontaneously hypertensive rats than those obtained in arteries from normotensive rats; no relaxation was pr...

  8. Favorable Vascular Actions of Angiotensin-(1-7) in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Veneziani, Augusto; Mores, Nadia; Di Daniele, Nicola; Cardillo, Carmine

    2018-01-01

    Obese patients have vascular dysfunction related to impaired insulin-stimulated vasodilation and increased endothelin-1-mediated vasoconstriction. In contrast to the harmful vascular actions of angiotensin (Ang) II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 product Ang-(1-7) has shown to exert cardiovascular and metabolic benefits in experimental models through stimulation of the Mas receptor. We, therefore, examined the effects of exogenous Ang-(1-7) on vasodilator tone and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstriction in obese patients. Intra-arterial infusion of Ang-(1-7) (10 nmol/min) resulted in significant increase in unstimulated forearm flow ( P =0.03), an effect that was not affected by the Mas receptor antagonist A779 (10 nmol/min; P >0.05). In the absence of hyperinsulinemia, however, forearm flow responses to graded doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not different during Ang-(1-7) administration compared with saline (both P >0.05). During infusion of regular insulin (0.15 mU/kg per minute), by contrast, endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced by Ang-(1-7) ( P =0.04 versus saline), whereas endothelium-independent response to sodium nitroprusside was not modified ( P =0.91). Finally, Ang-(1-7) decreased the vasodilator response to endothelin A receptor blockade (BQ-123; 10 nmol/min) compared with saline (6±1% versus 93±17%; P <0.001); nitric oxide inhibition by l- N -monomethylarginine (4 µmol/min) during concurrent endothelin A antagonism resulted in similar vasoconstriction in the absence or presence of Ang-(1-7 Ang-(1-7) ( P =0.69). Our findings indicate that in obese patients Ang-(1-7) has favorable effects not only to improve insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation but also to blunt endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor tone. These findings provide support for targeting Ang-(1-7) to counteract the hemodynamic abnormalities of human obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Evolving mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction highlight key targets in vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwei; Khalil, Raouf A

    2018-02-13

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) plays an important role in the regulation of vascular function. Identifying the mechanisms of VSM contraction has been a major research goal in order to determine the causes of vascular dysfunction and exaggerated vasoconstriction in vascular disease. Major discoveries over several decades have helped to better understand the mechanisms of VSM contraction. Ca 2+ has been established as a major regulator of VSM contraction, and its sources, cytosolic levels, homeostatic mechanisms and subcellular distribution have been defined. Biochemical studies have also suggested that stimulation of Gq protein-coupled membrane receptors activates phospholipase C and promotes the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids into inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ) and diacylglycerol (DAG). IP 3 stimulates initial Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and is buttressed by Ca 2+ influx through voltage-dependent, receptor-operated, transient receptor potential and store-operated channels. In order to prevent large increases in cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] c ), Ca 2+ removal mechanisms promote Ca 2+ extrusion via the plasmalemmal Ca 2+ pump and Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger, and Ca 2+ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and the coordinated activities of these Ca 2+ handling mechanisms help to create subplasmalemmal Ca 2+ domains. Threshold increases in [Ca 2+ ] c form a Ca 2+ -calmodulin complex, which activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase, and causes MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction, and VSM contraction. Dissociations in the relationships between [Ca 2+ ] c , MLC phosphorylation, and force have suggested additional Ca 2+ sensitization mechanisms. DAG activates protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, which directly or indirectly via mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylate the actin-binding proteins calponin and caldesmon and thereby enhance the myofilaments force sensitivity to Ca 2+ . PKC-mediated phosphorylation

  10. Endothelium and NOTCH specify and amplify aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Brandon K; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Poulos, Michael G; Moon, Randall T; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin; Bernstein, Irwin D

    2015-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) first emerge during embryonic development within vessels such as the dorsal aorta of the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, suggesting that signals from the vascular microenvironment are critical for HSC development. Here, we demonstrated that AGM-derived endothelial cells (ECs) engineered to constitutively express AKT (AGM AKT-ECs) can provide an in vitro niche that recapitulates embryonic HSC specification and amplification. Specifically, nonengrafting embryonic precursors, including the VE-cadherin-expressing population that lacks hematopoietic surface markers, cocultured with AGM AKT-ECs specified into long-term, adult-engrafting HSCs, establishing that a vascular niche is sufficient to induce the endothelial-to-HSC transition in vitro. Subsequent to hematopoietic induction, coculture with AGM AKT-ECs also substantially increased the numbers of HSCs derived from VE-cadherin⁺CD45⁺ AGM hematopoietic cells, consistent with a role in supporting further HSC maturation and self-renewal. We also identified conditions that included NOTCH activation with an immobilized NOTCH ligand that were sufficient to amplify AGM-derived HSCs following their specification in the absence of AGM AKT-ECs. Together, these studies begin to define the critical niche components and resident signals required for HSC induction and self-renewal ex vivo, and thus provide insight for development of defined in vitro systems targeted toward HSC generation for therapeutic applications.

  11. Data on the effects of losartan on protein expression, vascular reactivity and antioxidant capacity in the aorta of ethanol-treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S. Ceron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe the effects of losartan, a selective AT1 receptor antagonist on the alterations induced by treatment with ethanol in the rat aorta. The data shown here are related to the article entitled “Angiotensin type 1 receptor mediates chronic ethanol consumption-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress” (P. Passaglia, C.S. Ceron, A.S. Mecawi, J. Antunes-Rodrigues, E.B. Coelho, C.R. Tirapelli, 2015 [1]. Here we include new data on the protective effect of losartan against ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Male Wistar rats treated for 2 weeks with ethanol (20%, vol./vol. exhibited increased aortic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and losartan (10 mg/kg/day; p.o. gavage prevented this response. Ethanol did not alter the expression of eNOS in the rat aorta. Losartan prevented ethanol-induced increase in the aortic expression of nNOS. Neither ethanol nor losartan affected superoxide dismutase (SOD or catalase (CAT activities in the rat aorta. Treatment with ethanol increased the contraction induced by phenylephrine in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortas and these responses were prevented by losartan. Conversely, neither ethanol nor losartan affected the endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine.

  12. Data on the effects of losartan on protein expression, vascular reactivity and antioxidant capacity in the aorta of ethanol-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceron, Carla S; do Vale, Gabriel T; Simplicio, Janaina A; Passaglia, Patrícia; Ricci, Sthefany T; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2017-04-01

    We describe the effects of losartan, a selective AT 1 receptor antagonist on the alterations induced by treatment with ethanol in the rat aorta. The data shown here are related to the article entitled "Angiotensin type 1 receptor mediates chronic ethanol consumption-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress" (P. Passaglia, C.S. Ceron, A.S. Mecawi, J. Antunes-Rodrigues, E.B. Coelho, C.R. Tirapelli, 2015) [1]. Here we include new data on the protective effect of losartan against ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Male Wistar rats treated for 2 weeks with ethanol (20%, vol./vol.) exhibited increased aortic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and losartan (10 mg/kg/day; p.o. gavage) prevented this response. Ethanol did not alter the expression of eNOS in the rat aorta. Losartan prevented ethanol-induced increase in the aortic expression of nNOS. Neither ethanol nor losartan affected superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase (CAT) activities in the rat aorta. Treatment with ethanol increased the contraction induced by phenylephrine in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortas and these responses were prevented by losartan. Conversely, neither ethanol nor losartan affected the endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine.

  13. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  14. Inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma: vascular reconstruction is not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) of inferior vena cava is a rare and aggressive tumor, arising from the smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. A large complete surgical resection is the essential treatment. The need of vascular reconstruction is not always mandatory. It's above all to understand the place of the reconstruction with ...

  15. Peroxynitrite formed during a transient episode of brain ischaemia increases endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type dilations in thromboxane/prostaglandin receptor-stimulated rat cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onetti, Y; Dantas, A P; Pérez, B; McNeish, A J; Vila, E; Jiménez-Altayó, F

    2017-05-01

    Increased thromboxane A 2 and peroxynitrite are hallmarks of cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R). Stimulation of thromboxane/prostaglandin receptors (TP) attenuates endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). We investigated whether EDH-type middle cerebral artery (MCA) relaxations following TP stimulation are altered after I/R and the influence of peroxynitrite. Vascular function was determined by wire myography after TP stimulation with the thromboxane A 2 mimetic 9,11-dideoxy-9α, 11α -methano-epoxy prostaglandin F2α (U46619) in MCA of Sprague Dawley rats subjected to MCA occlusion (90 min)/reperfusion (24 h) or sham operation, and in non-operated (control) rats. Some rats were treated with saline or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato iron (III) (20 mg kg -1 ). Protein expression was evaluated in MCA and in human microvascular endothelial cells submitted to hypoxia (overnight)/reoxygenation (24 h) (H/R) using immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In U46619-pre-constricted MCA, EDH-type relaxation by the proteinase-activated receptor 2 agonist serine-leucine-isoleucine-glycine-arginine-leucine-NH 2 (SLIGRL) was greater in I/R than sham rats due to an increased contribution of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK C a ), which was confirmed by the enlarged relaxation to the SK C a activator N-cyclohexyl-N-2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinamine. I/R and H/R induced endothelial protein tyrosine nitration and filamentous-actin disruption. In control MCA, either cytochalasin D or peroxynitrite disrupted endothelial filamentous-actin and augmented EDH-type relaxation. Furthermore, peroxynitrite decomposition during I/R prevented the increase in EDH-type responses. Following TP stimulation in MCA, EDH-type relaxation to SLIGRL is greater after I/R due to endothelial filamentous-actin disruption by peroxynitrite, which prevents TP-induced block of SK C a input to EDH

  16. Insight into 144 patients with ocular vascular events during VEGF antagonist injections

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    Shami M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour1, Maha Shahin2, Peter K Kofoed3, Maurizio B Parodi4, Michel Shami5, Stephen G Schwartz6, Collaborative Anti-VEGF Ocular Vascular Complications GroupDepartment of Ophthalmology, 1American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Mansoura University, Mansoura City, Egypt; 3Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, National Eye Clinic, Kennedy Center, Glostrup, Denmark; 4University Vita-Salute, Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; 5Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, USA; 6Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Naples and Miami, FL, USAAim: To record ocular vascular events following injections of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF antagonists.Methods: Collaborative multicenter case series (48 cases, literature reviews (32 cases, and reports to the FDA (64 cases of patients that had vascular occlusions during anti-VEGF therapy were collected and analyzed.Results: A total of 144 cases of ocular vascular events were identified, with these diagnosed a median of 15 days after anti-VEGF injection. The majority of patients had pre-existing risk factors for cardiovascular events and nine patients had a prior history of glaucoma. Mean visual acuity dropped by 6.4 lines with severe visual loss after injection to NLP (five eyes, LP (six eyes, and HM (two eyes. The overall risk of ocular vascular events following a VEGF antagonist injection was 0.108% in the general population and 2.61% in the diabetic population. Mean retinal arterial constriction after intravitreal bevacizumab in 13 eyes was 21% (standard deviation = 27%, and mean retinal venous constriction was 8% (standard deviation = 30%.Conclusion: Ocular vascular events are rare during anti-VEGF therapy, but can lead to severe visual loss and may be caused by a number of factors including the vasoconstrictor effect of the drug, a post-injection rise

  17. Vascular effects of ketamine in isolated rabbit aortic Smooth muscle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    following precontractions by phenylephrine and high-K+ were 76.8 ± 2.3 and 71.2 ± 8.0 (p > 0.05). Ach-induced relaxation was observed only in rings with intact endothelium whereas ketamine-induced relaxation was observed in intact as well as endothelium-denuded rings; this suggests that ketamineinduced relaxation of ...

  18. Vascular effects of 3-carbomethoxypyridine on rabbit aortic smooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ach-induced relaxation was observed only in rings with intact endothelium. Also 3-CMP-induced relaxation responses were significantly attenuated in endothelium-denuded rings. Conclusion: The results suggest that 3-CMP elicits relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle activated by depolarization- dependent (high-K+) or ...

  19. NF1 Signal Transduction and Vascular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    malformations, aneurysms, and hypertension . Consequently there is a markedly elevated risk of cerbrovascular accidents(Friedman et al., 2002). NF1...the endothelium seems to trigger a rapid leukemic crisis . This observation is quite unexpected but consistent with the notion that the endothelial

  20. Sarpogrelate hydrochloride, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) antagonist, augments autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell implantation-induced improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yukihito; Miyazaki, Masanori; Goto, Chikara; Sanada, Hiroaki; Sueda, Taijiro; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) implantation and sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist, on endothelial function in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We evaluated the leg blood flow (LBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside before and after BM-MNC implantation in 16 patients with CLI. We divided patients with CLI into 2 groups: those cotreated with sarpogrelate orally for 12 weeks (sarpogrelate group, n = 8) and those who remained on conventional therapy (control group, n = 8). LBF was measured by strain gauge plethysmography. BM-MNC implantation improved ankle brachial pressure index, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and pain-free walking time. There was no significant difference in these parameters between the 2 groups. Before BM-MNC implantation, LBF responses to ACh were similar in the sarpogrelate group and control group. Twelve weeks of BM-MNC implantation enhanced LBF responses to ACh in the sarpogrelate and control groups. After 12 weeks of BM-MNC implantation, LBF response to ACh was significantly greater in the sarpogrelate group than in the control group. BM-MNC implantation did not alter the LBF responses to sodium nitroprusside in either group. These findings suggest that BM-MNC implantation improved not only limb ischemic symptoms but also endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with CLI. A combination of BM-MNC implantation and sarpogrelate had a more beneficial effect on vascular function in these patients.

  1. Systemic vascular function, measured with forearm flow mediated dilatation, in acute and stable cerebrovascular disease: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blacker David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute ischaemic stroke is associated with alteration in systemic markers of vascular function. We measured forearm vascular function (using forearm flow mediated dilatation to clarify whether recent acute ischaemic stroke/TIA is associated with impaired systemic vascular function. Methods Prospective case control study enrolling 17 patients with recent acute ischaemic stroke/TIA and 17 sex matched controls with stroke more than two years previously. Forearm vascular function was measured using flow medicated dilatation (FMD. Results Flow mediated dilatation was 6.0 ± 1.1% in acute stroke/TIA patients and 4.7 ± 1.0% among control subjects (p = 0.18. The mean paired difference in FMD between subjects with recent acute stroke and controls was 1.25% (95% CI -0.65, 3.14; p = 0.18. Endothelium independent dilatation was measured in six pairs of participants and was similar in acute stroke/TIA patients (22.6 ± 4.3% and control subjects (19.1 ± 2.6%; p = 0.43. Conclusions Despite the small size of this study, these data indicate that recent acute stroke is not necessarily associated with a clinically important reduction in FMD.

  2. Obesity in Indian subjects with Vascular Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Mina; Anand, Kuljeet Singh Anand

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity is considered a public health challenge in South Asia. Obesity is an independent risk factor in vascular dementia. It also contributes to other risk factors of vascular dementia like hypertension, coronary artery disease, dyslipidaemia and diabetes. As the rate of obesity in Indian subjects with vascular dementia is not known, we decided to assess obesity in subjects with vascular dementia. Methods: Subjects with vascular dementia presenting to Mem...

  3. Taurine Supplementation Lowers Blood Pressure and Improves Vascular Function in Prehypertension: Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Bin; Li, Yingsha; Sun, Fang; Li, Peng; Xia, Weijie; Zhou, Xunmei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Jing; Zeng, Xiangru; Zhao, Zhigang; He, Hongbo; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-03-01

    Taurine, the most abundant, semiessential, sulfur-containing amino acid, is well known to lower blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive animal models. However, no rigorous clinical trial has validated whether this beneficial effect of taurine occurs in human hypertension or prehypertension, a key stage in the development of hypertension. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we assessed the effects of taurine intervention on BP and vascular function in prehypertension. We randomly assigned 120 eligible prehypertensive individuals to receive either taurine supplementation (1.6 g per day) or a placebo for 12 weeks. Taurine supplementation significantly decreased the clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs, especially in those with high-normal BP. Mean clinic systolic BP reduction for taurine/placebo was 7.2/2.6 mm Hg, and diastolic BP was 4.7/1.3 mm Hg. Mean ambulatory systolic BP reduction for taurine/placebo was 3.8/0.3 mm Hg, and diastolic BP was 3.5/0.6 mm Hg. In addition, taurine supplementation significantly improved endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation and increased plasma H2S and taurine concentrations. Furthermore, changes in BP were negatively correlated with both the plasma H2S and taurine levels in taurine-treated prehypertensive individuals. To further elucidate the hypotensive mechanism, experimental studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that taurine treatment upregulated the expression of hydrogen sulfide-synthesizing enzymes and reduced agonist-induced vascular reactivity through the inhibition of transient receptor potential channel subtype 3-mediated calcium influx in human and mouse mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, the antihypertensive effect of chronic taurine supplementation shows promise in the treatment of prehypertension through improvement of vascular function. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide protects against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis via vascular endothelial cells in mice : ANP for pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Atsuko; Nojiri, Takashi; Konishi, Kazuhisa; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Hino, Jun; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kyomoto, Yohkoh; Asai, Kazuhisa; Hirata, Kazuto; Kangawa, Kenji

    2017-01-03

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a life-threatening disease characterized by progressive dyspnea and worsening pulmonary function. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a heart-derived secretory peptide used clinically in Japan for the treatment of acute heart failure, exerts a wide range of protective effects on various organs, including the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, and lungs. Its therapeutic properties are characterized by anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities mediated by the guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor. We hypothesized that ANP would have anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: normal control, BLM with vehicle, and BLM with ANP. ANP (0.5 μg/kg/min via osmotic-pump, subcutaneously) or vehicle administration was started before BLM administration (1 mg/kg) and continued until the mice were sacrificed. At 7 or 21 days after BLM administration, fibrotic changes and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs were assessed based on histological findings and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, fibrosis and inflammation induced by BLM were evaluated in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A overexpressed mice. Finally, attenuation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling by ANP was studied using immortalized mouse endothelial cells stably expressing GC-A receptor. ANP significantly decreased lung fibrotic area and infiltration of inflammatory cells in l