WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding texts high

  1. Text understanding for computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenter, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    A long-standing challenge for computers communicating with humans is to pass the Turing test, i.e., to communicate in such a way that it is impossible for humans to determine whether they are talking to a computer or another human being. The field of natural language understanding — which studies

  2. HELPING STUDENTS UNDERSTAND THE TEXT THROUGH SCAFFOLDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deni Sapta Nugraha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reported the practice of helping adult students to comprehend the texts in Indonesian Civil Aviation Institute majoring at Air traffic controller programme, Curug - Tangerang. The article demonstrated of how teacher helped them to comprehend the text during 100 minutes reading class in three meetings. It was employed as their input session to acquire context, knowledge and specific vocabulary in aviation or what so called as phraseology. Students were asked to construct some questions dealing with the text both literal and inferential comprehension suggested by Barrett (in Eanes 1997. The result showed that students attained three main bonuses; they get used to build questions that impact to their grammatical awareness, they get used to communicate orally, and they are successful to comprehend the text thoroughly by acquiring new knowledge, vocabulary as well as context. Keywords: reading comprehension, text, scaffolding

  3. Helios: Understanding Solar Evolution Through Text Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzese, Lucien [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-02

    This proof-of-concept project focused on developing, testing, and validating a range of bibliometric, text analytic, and machine-learning based methods to explore the evolution of three photovoltaic (PV) technologies: Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Dye-Sensitized solar cells (DSSC), and Multi-junction solar cells. The analytical approach to the work was inspired by previous work by the same team to measure and predict the scientific prominence of terms and entities within specific research domains. The goal was to create tools that could assist domain-knowledgeable analysts in investigating the history and path of technological developments in general, with a focus on analyzing step-function changes in performance, or “breakthroughs,” in particular. The text-analytics platform developed during this project was dubbed Helios. The project relied on computational methods for analyzing large corpora of technical documents. For this project we ingested technical documents from the following sources into Helios: Thomson Scientific Web of Science (papers), the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (patents), the U.S. Department of Energy (technical documents), the U.S. National Science Foundation (project funding summaries), and a hand curated set of full-text documents from Thomson Scientific and other sources.

  4. [Psychophysiological analysis of the reading and text understanding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamminpiya, A M; Zaschirinskaia, O V; Shelepin, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    Presented cognitive studies aimed to identifying the individual properties of macro saccades, one of the most important oculomotor functions during text, the fairy tales reading. We measure, in the form of abstracts, the reduced analogue of the "school essays", the capabilities of our subjects, the students of liberal arts colleges, to understand the presented text (morality of tales). Evaluation of this abstracts was conducted by independent experts using school 6 point scales. The preparing of the abstract wasn't limited in time. We found that there is not any relationship between reading speed and the quality of the interpretation of the text. No relationship of understanding the hidden morality with the number of characters being picked for the fixation and the mean duration of the macro saccades. Correlation analysis showed an inverse relationship between the number of returns and the understanding of the text, more macro saccades returns--the worse was the understanding of the text. There is an inverse relationship between the number of exciting characters and a number of macro saccades. Number of fixations (capture) increases the reading of the text. This means that the bandwidth of visual channel per time unit is determined by the number of captured characters. Less number of captured during fixation of signs--more time reading and less bandwidth of the eyes per time unit.

  5. Understanding a reader's attraction to a literary short text

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    Darío Luis Banegas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to understand why a reader may feel attracted to a short stretch of fictional discourse. I analyse a short extract taken from Khaled Hosseini’s novel A Thousand Splendid Suns through the integration of different perspectives in discourse analysis. First, I analyse the text in terms of contexts of culture and situation including field, tenor, mode, participants’ social world, setting, channel, and key. In the second section I attempt to examine the text line by line following my interdisciplinary framework of reference. Secondly, I offer a line-by-line analysis through Grice’s maxims, topicality, deixis, coding time, types of utterances and verbal processes, and metaphors. Through my analysis I discovered that my reader’s attraction was based on the combination and integration of different textual devices and my personal interpretation of the pragmatics behind the text.

  6. Understanding Texts in English a Challenge for Future Professionals

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    López Medina Consuelo

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available This project was conducted in the Fundación Universitaria San Martín with night accounting students who were coursing sixth semester. They were taking 3rd level of English. The purpose of the study was to improve reading comprehension through the use of some reading strategies. A group of 6 students was chosen because of their low level and difficulties in understanding texts in English. Data collection was conducted using questionnaires, teacher’s observation and teacher’s diary. Results showed that students mostly liked to read topics related to their programs, despite their lack of vocabulary, and they improved reading comprehension through the use of adequate reading strategies, avoiding the overuse of translation.

  7. HPTA: High-Performance Text Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Vandierendonck, Hans; Murphy, Karen; Arif, Mahwish; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main targets of data analytics is unstructured data, which primarily involves textual data. High-performance processing of textual data is non-trivial. We present the HPTA library for high-performance text analytics. The library helps programmers to map textual data to a dense numeric representation, which can be handled more efficiently. HPTA encapsulates three performance optimizations: (i) efficient memory management for textual data, (ii) parallel computation on associative dat...

  8. The home concept in poetic texts: new ways of understanding

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    С А Радзиевская

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the analysis of the HOME concept in American poetic texts and on the description of the model of its content. Linguocognitive mechanisms of the formation of the images of home are revealed.

  9. Cognitive Pathways: Analysis of Students' Written Texts for Science Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Hand, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reconstruct writers' reasoning process as reflected in their written texts. The codes resulting from the text analysis were related to cognitive operations, ranging from simple to more sophisticated ones. The sequence of the cognitive operations as the text unfolded represents the writer's cognitive pathway at the…

  10. Creating the Virtual Work: Readers' Processes in Understanding Literary Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earthman, Elise Ann

    1992-01-01

    Studies the ways readers create meaning initially from literary texts. Analyzes the data collected via think-aloud protocols and interviews. Compares reading tactics of first-year college students and graduate students. (HB)

  11. Sparse Machine Learning Methods for Understanding Large Text Corpora

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sparse machine learning has recently emerged as powerful tool to obtain models of high-dimensional data with high degree of interpretability, at low computational...

  12. Comprehension de Texte et Actes de Parole (Understanding a Text and Speech Acts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menting, Jan P.

    Oral production (the speech act) and the comprehension of written and oral texts have long been treated as separate entities when they could be used in an integrated approach to teach a broader range of language skills. The receptive aspects of the speech act should be brought into language instruction and used to select materials for teaching…

  13. Using Semantic Linking to Understand Persons’ Networks Extracted from Text

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    Alessio Palmero Aprosio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe a methodology to interpret large persons’ networks extracted from text by classifying cliques using the DBpedia ontology. The approach relies on a combination of NLP, Semantic web technologies, and network analysis. The classification methodology that first starts from single nodes and then generalizes to cliques is effective in terms of performance and is able to deal also with nodes that are not linked to Wikipedia. The gold standard manually developed for evaluation shows that groups of co-occurring entities share in most of the cases a category that can be automatically assigned. This holds for both languages considered in this study. The outcome of this work may be of interest to enhance the readability of large networks and to provide an additional semantic layer on top of cliques. This would greatly help humanities scholars when dealing with large amounts of textual data that need to be interpreted or categorized. Furthermore, it represents an unsupervised approach to automatically extend DBpedia starting from a corpus.

  14. Improving middle and high school students' comprehension of science texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi E. JOHNSON

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the United States, many middle and high school students struggle to comprehend science texts for a variety of reasons. Science texts are frequently boring, focused on isolated facts, present too many new concepts at once, and lack the clarity and organization known to improve comprehension. Compounding the problem is that many adolescent readers do not possess effective comprehension strategies, particularly for difficult expository science texts. Some researchers have suggested changing the characteristics of science texts to better assist adolescent readers with understanding, while others have focused on changing the strategies of adolescent readers. In the current paper, we review the literature on selected strategy instruction programs used to improve science text comprehension in middle and high school students and suggest avenues for future research.

  15. Improving middle and high school students' comprehension of science texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi E. Johnson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the United States, many middle and high school students struggle to comprehend science texts for a variety of reasons. Science texts are frequently boring, focused on isolated facts, present too many new concepts at once, and lack the clarity and organization known to improve comprehension. Compounding the problem is that many adolescent readers do not possess effective comprehension strategies, particularly for difficult expository science texts. Some researchers have suggested changing the characteristics of science texts to better assist adolescent readers with understanding, while others have focused on changing the strategies of adolescent readers. In the current paper, we review the literature on selected strategy instruction programs used to improve science text comprehension in middle and high school students and suggest avenues for future research.

  16. UNDERSTANDING TENOR IN SPOKEN TEXTS IN YEAR XII ENGLISH TEXTBOOK TO IMPROVE THE APPROPRIACY OF THE TEXTS

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    Noeris Meristiani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The goal of English Language Teaching is communicative competence. To reach this goal students should be supplied with good model texts. These texts should consider the appropriacy of language use. By analyzing the context of situation which is focused on tenor the meanings constructed to build the relationships among the interactants in spoken texts can be unfolded. This study aims at investigating the interpersonal relations (tenor of the interactants in the conversation texts as well as the appropriacy of their realization in the given contexts. The study was conducted under discourse analysis by applying a descriptive qualitative method. There were eight conversation texts which function as examples in five chapters of a textbook. The data were analyzed by using lexicogrammatical analysis, described, and interpreted contextually. Then, the realization of the tenor of the texts was further analyzed in terms of appropriacy to suggest improvement. The results of the study show that the tenor indicates relationships between friend-friend, student-student, questioners-respondents, mother-son, and teacher-student; the power is equal and unequal; the social distances show frequent contact, relatively frequent contact, relatively low contact, high and low affective involvement, using informal, relatively informal, relatively formal, and formal language. There are also some indications of inappropriacy of tenor realization in all texts. It should be improved in the use of degree of formality, the realization of societal roles, status, and affective involvement. Keywords: context of situation, tenor, appropriacy.

  17. Promoting the Understanding of Photosynthesis among Elementary School Student Teachers through Text Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södervik, Ilona; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Vilppu, Henna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary school pre-service teachers' understanding of photosynthesis and to examine if a refutational text can support understanding of photosynthesis better than a non-refutational text. A total of 91 elementary school pre-service teachers read either a refutational or a non-refutational text…

  18. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  19. The Role of Regulation and Processing Strategies in Understanding Science Text among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilppu, Henna; Mikkila-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Ahopelto, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of regulation and processing strategies in understanding science text. A total of 91 student teachers answered open-ended questions concerning photosynthesis before and after reading either a traditional or a refutational science text. After this, they also answered parts of the Inventory of…

  20. Students’ Ability and Difficulties in Understanding English Text (A Study at English Program IAIN Padangsidimpuan

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    Eka Sustri Harida

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the ability of the students to understand English texts and types of their reading strategies. It is believed that reading strategies help students improve their reading comperehension.  Based on this theory, then, the qualitative research was carried out to describe students’ reading ability and types of strategy they used. Data were collected through questionnaires that have been distributed to 34 students.  They were also observed and tested.  It was found that the students’ ability in understanding text was still low. They had many problems in understanding English texts because they did not apply appropriate reading strategies in their reading activities. Their low reading comprehension was due to their lack of reading strategies. Copyright © 2014 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  1. Lexical Density Of English Reading Texts For Senior High School

    OpenAIRE

    Nesia, Bersyebah Herljimsi; Ginting, Siti Aisah

    2014-01-01

    This study deals with the lexical density especially the lexical items of English reading texts in the textbook for senior high school. The objectives of the study are to find out the lexical density especially the lexical items which formed in the reading texts of Look Ahead textbook and the type of genre which has the highest lexical density of the reading texts. This study was conducted by descriptive method with qualitative approach. The data of this research were the English reading text...

  2. Bilingual Text With or Without Pictograms Improves Elderly Singaporeans' Understanding of Prescription Medication Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rahul; Bautista, Mary Ann C; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Tang, Wern Ee; Tay, Sarah; Tan, Audrey Siok Ling; Pouliot, Annie; Saffari, Seyed Ehsan; Chei, Choy-Lye; Vaillancourt, Regis

    2017-11-19

    In Singapore, primarily English-language prescription medication labels challenge elderly Singaporeans, many of whom are unable to read English. We investigated whether bilingual text and pictograms can help them understand prescription medication labels. We randomized 1,414 elderly respondents of a national survey into four prescription medication labels: English-text; English-text-and-pictograms; Bilingual-text; and Bilingual-text-and-pictograms, which were similar except for the addition of another language and/or pictograms (International Pharmaceutical Federation, FIP). Respondents answered 16 label-related questions; an expert panel rated answers for correctness. Outcomes were (1) complete understanding (16 correct); (2) any understanding (≥1 correct); and (3) number of incorrect answers among those with any understanding. We evaluated associations of each prescription medication label (vs. English-text) with outcomes (1), (2), and (3) using logistic and negative binomial regression, respectively. The elderly respondents were similar across the four prescription medication labels (English-text, English-text-and-pictograms, Bilingual-text, Bilingual-text-and-pictograms), for which the proportions with outcomes (1) and (2) were (17.9%, 25.6%, 36.9%, 40.1%) and (50.4%, 62.6%, 75.9%, 76.5%), respectively. We observed statistically significant higher odds of outcomes (1) and (2) among those assigned the three labels (vs. English-text): English-text-and-pictograms, 1.96 and 2.51; Bilingual-text, 3.54 and 6.73; and Bilingual-text-and-pictograms, 4.51 and 7.93. Those assigned the three labels also had 0.94, 1.98, and 2.12 fewer outcome (3) on average (vs. English-text). Adding bilingual text with or without pictograms on prescription medication labels considerably improved elderly Singaporeans' understanding of the labels, strongly suggesting its application in practice. Other issues in prescription medication labels design and content, including adapting FIP

  3. Moderne Texte zum Hoeren und Verstehen im Deutschunterricht (Modern Texts for Hearing and Understanding in Teaching German)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzkamm, Wolfgang

    1977-01-01

    In Finland, German ranks third among foreign languages taught, and is declining. To encourage its study, one should avoid using long and uninteresting textbooks. As examples of good texts, W. Biermann's "Soldatenlied" and "Kleinstadtsonntag" are suggested. These portray facets of postwar Germany. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  4. Improving middle and high school students' comprehension of science texts

    OpenAIRE

    Brandi E. JOHNSON; Karen M. ZABRUCKY

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the United States, many middle and high school students struggle to comprehend science texts for a variety of reasons. Science texts are frequently boring, focused on isolated facts, present too many new concepts at once, and lack the clarity and organization known to improve comprehension. Compounding the problem is that many adolescent readers do not possess effective comprehension strategies, particularly for difficult expository science texts. Some researchers have ...

  5. Improving Middle and High School Students' Comprehension of Science Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brandi E.; Zabrucky, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the United States, many middle and high school students struggle to comprehend science texts for a variety of reasons. Science texts are frequently boring, focused on isolated facts, present too many new concepts at once, and lack the clarity and organization known to improve comprehension. Compounding the problem is that many…

  6. Embracing the Other in Gothic Texts: Cultivating Understanding in the Reading Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nero, Jennifer Renner

    2018-01-01

    This case study explores the understandings that seventh graders constructed with Gothic texts in a reading unit designed by the researcher. Gothic is a fictional genre defined by horror and mystery. The stories' protagonists are often marginalized individuals. The genre was selected due to its popularity with adolescents. Qualitative data were…

  7. The Pathology of structure of explanations in understanding of literary texts

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    Mahyar Alavi Moghaddam

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional and non-scientific classification shade to educational and research Persian literature and literary education and research haven't grown up. The aim of explanation of text is to rub off difficulties and to lead reader to deep understanding. In semantics studies of understanding and interpretation of text, to familiar with the place of meaning in literary tradition and new approaches of criticism, the acceptance of multi meaning in interpretation texts are necessary. The role of interpreter is very important, because he can relate between the world of text and the world of reader and so between semantic horizon of writer and poet and mental horizon.   We can step in analysing interpretation of Hafez' poem and pathology of this area, because of expanding of research about Hafez and his explanations. There are four difficulties in these explanations: structural, semantic, lexical and figural. In this article, we will pay attention to just structural difficulties. These structural difficulties are unversatility system, incomprehensiveness, nonalaystic of explanations, mistake methods in educating and to ignore relation between Hafez's Verses in semantic texture of Ghazal. Certainly, it is necessary to pay scientific, analytic criticism in Hafez's explanations as one of the areas in understanding of his poems.

  8. Processes Utilized by High School Students Reading Scientific Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinger, Alicia Farr

    2014-01-01

    In response to an increased emphasis on disciplinary literacy in the secondary science classroom, an investigation of the literacy processes utilized by high school students while reading scientific text was undertaken. A think-aloud protocol was implemented to collect data on the processes students used when not prompted while reading a magazine…

  9. The effect of background music and song texts on the emotional understanding of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, June

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of background music and song texts to teach emotional understanding to children with autism. Participants were 12 students (mean age 11.5 years) with a primary diagnosis of autism who were attending schools in Japan. Each participant was taught four emotions to decode and encode: happiness, sadness, anger, and fear by the counterbalanced treatment-order. The treatment consisted of the four conditions: (a) no contact control (NCC)--no purposeful teaching of the selected emotion, (b) contact control (CC)--teaching the selected emotion using verbal instructions alone, (c) background music (BM)--teaching the selected emotion by verbal instructions with background music representing the emotion, and singing songs (SS)--teaching the selected emotion by singing specially composed songs about the emotion. Participants were given a pretest and a posttest and received 8 individual sessions between these tests. The results indicated that all participants improved significantly in their understanding of the four selected emotions. Background music was significantly more effective than the other three conditions in improving participants' emotional understanding. The findings suggest that background music can be an effective tool to increase emotional understanding in children with autism, which is crucial to their social interactions.

  10. UNDERSTANDING AND PERCEPTION OF THE CHARACTER IMAGE BY PRIMARY SCHOOLCHILDREN IN THE PROCESS OF TEXT INTERPRETATION

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    Kateryna Hnatenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern literature research works practically assert that literature is a way of thinking in imagery, and the interpretation of art works is almost always the interpretation of imagery, in other words perfect reality. Psychologists confirm that educational process in primary school should be formed on the account of both present and potential abilities of the children. Literature is an important means of pupils’ development. Reading in grades 1 − 4 promotes the development of children’s positive moral and will-power qualitie. With its help children perceive the world, learn to understand and love beautiful things. The writer’s ideological content of a piece of literature can be revealed in images. The main objective of text interpretation in grades 1 − 4 is to promote pupils’ perception and comprehension. Nowadays the changes in educational sphere require more attention to the issue of literary perception. In 2011, primary school changed the training course of "Reading" into "Literary reading," which aims at the development of the following reader’s qualities: to be capable to independent reading,to perform different communicative and creative activities. However, the educational process observation showed the existence of problems in young learners’ perception and understanding of literary art, and especially the role of character and its images. Today, the methodology pays attention to the quality of the perception, its depth and awareness. The efficiency level of children’s literary work perception is set on the analysis of readers’ activity results. Difficulties in the determination of the literary work perception level lie in various interpretations, complexity of the perception process, necessity to reflect different sides and emotions of imagination and thinking. Many scientific works are devoted to the analysis of literary texts understanding, to the role of visual images and imagination in literary text understanding

  11. Understanding text-based persuasion and support tactics of concerned significant others

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    Katherine van Stolk-Cooke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of concerned significant others (CSOs can have a measurable impact on the health and wellness of individuals attempting to meet behavioral and health goals, and research is needed to better understand the attributes of text-based CSO language when encouraging target significant others (TSOs to achieve those goals. In an effort to inform the development of interventions for CSOs, this study examined the language content of brief text-based messages generated by CSOs to motivate TSOs to achieve a behavioral goal. CSOs generated brief text-based messages for TSOs for three scenarios: (1 to help TSOs achieve the goal, (2 in the event that the TSO is struggling to meet the goal, and (3 in the event that the TSO has given up on meeting the goal. Results indicate that there was a significant relationship between the tone and compassion of messages generated by CSOs, the CSOs’ perceptions of TSO motivation, and their expectation of a grateful or annoyed reaction by the TSO to their feedback or support. Results underscore the importance of attending to patterns in language when CSOs communicate with TSOs about goal achievement or failure, and how certain variables in the CSOs’ perceptions of their TSOs affect these characteristics.

  12. Understanding text-based persuasion and support tactics of concerned significant others

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stolk-Cooke, Katherine; Hayes, Marie; Baumel, Amit

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of concerned significant others (CSOs) can have a measurable impact on the health and wellness of individuals attempting to meet behavioral and health goals, and research is needed to better understand the attributes of text-based CSO language when encouraging target significant others (TSOs) to achieve those goals. In an effort to inform the development of interventions for CSOs, this study examined the language content of brief text-based messages generated by CSOs to motivate TSOs to achieve a behavioral goal. CSOs generated brief text-based messages for TSOs for three scenarios: (1) to help TSOs achieve the goal, (2) in the event that the TSO is struggling to meet the goal, and (3) in the event that the TSO has given up on meeting the goal. Results indicate that there was a significant relationship between the tone and compassion of messages generated by CSOs, the CSOs’ perceptions of TSO motivation, and their expectation of a grateful or annoyed reaction by the TSO to their feedback or support. Results underscore the importance of attending to patterns in language when CSOs communicate with TSOs about goal achievement or failure, and how certain variables in the CSOs’ perceptions of their TSOs affect these characteristics. PMID:26312172

  13. Measurement of the jet mass in highly boosted [Formula: see text] events from pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Dvornikov, O; Makarenko, V; Mossolov, V; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Zykunov, V; Shumeiko, N; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Skovpen, K; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; 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    2017-01-01

    The first measurement of the jet mass [Formula: see text] of top quark jets produced in [Formula: see text] events from pp collisions at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] is reported for the jet with the largest transverse momentum [Formula: see text] in highly boosted hadronic top quark decays. The data sample, collected with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurement is performed in the lepton+jets channel in which the products of the semileptonic decay [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is an electron or muon, are used to select [Formula: see text] events with large Lorentz boosts. The products of the fully hadronic decay [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text] are reconstructed using a single Cambridge-Aachen jet with distance parameter [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. The [Formula: see text] cross section as a function of [Formula: see text] is unfolded at the particle level and is used to test the modelling of highly boosted top quark production. The peak position of the [Formula: see text] distribution is sensitive to the top quark mass [Formula: see text], and the data are used to extract a value of [Formula: see text] to assess this sensitivity.

  14. Print versus digital texts: understanding the experimental research and challenging the dichotomies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella Ross

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a systematic critical review of interdisciplinary literature concerned with digital text (or e-text uses in education and proposes recommendations for how e-texts can be implemented for impactful learning. A variety of e-texts can be found in the repertoire of educational resources accessible to students, and in the constantly changing terrain of educational technologies, they are rapidly evolving, presenting new opportunities and affordances for student learning. We highlight some of the ways in which academic studies have examined e-texts as part of teaching and learning practices, placing a particular emphasis on aspects of learning such as recall, comprehension, retention of information and feedback. We also review diverse practices associated with uses of e-text tools such as note-taking, annotation, bookmarking, hypertexts and highlighting. We argue that evidence-based studies into e-texts are overwhelmingly structured around reinforcing the existing dichotomy pitting print-based (‘traditional’ texts against e-texts. In this article, we query this approach and instead propose to focus on factors such as students’ level of awareness of their options in accessing learning materials and whether they are instructed and trained in how to take full advantage of the capabilities of e-texts, both of which have been found to affect learning performance.

  15. Neglect of Biological Rhythms in High School Biology Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, Andrew; Nelson, Julie Ann

    1979-01-01

    This article developed from a survey of the five most popular biology texts which promote the theory of invariant homeostasis rather than biological rhythms. The popular fad of "birthdate biorhythms" is discussed in relation to providing education on biological rhythms and its legitimacy to the public. (SA)

  16. A Multi-Method Approach to Understanding Behavior Change. The Case of Texting and Driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. HOOD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Distracted driving, specifically texting and driving, has become a nationwide public health problem in the U.S. with negative, and potentially fatal consequences. In an effort to combat the growing problem, non-profit organizations, corporations, and the federal government have all stepped in to try to increase public awareness and persuade drivers to cease texting while driving. These efforts have not had the desired impact as texting and driving has continued to increase in recent years. This research investigates the potential that the messages used to curb texting and driving behavior might not be properly constructed. Specifically, we test the potential for message sponsor and self-relevance of the message to influence message outcomes. Our results suggest that messages sponsored by a combination of company and government that are self-relevant to viewers will have different outcomes than other messages. We identify practical and theoretical implications as well as future research directions.

  17. Understanding Homosexuality, Changing Schools: A Text for Teachers, Counselors, and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Arthur

    This book is designed to help teachers, counselors, and administrators understand the significance of gay and lesbian issues in education and to facilitate the integration of gay and lesbian families into the school community. It offers models for equity, inclusion, and school reform. The chapters are: (1) "Overview of the Problem"; (2)…

  18. Enhancing Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Solution Chemistry with Conceptual Change Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of a constructivist-based pedagogy to enhance understanding of some features of solution chemistry. Pre-service science teacher trainees' prior knowledge about the dissolution of salts and sugar in water were elicited by the use of a simple diagnostic tool. The test revealed widespread alternative conceptions. These…

  19. You and Technology, A High School Case Study Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaskos, Nickander J., Ed.; Smyth, Michael P., Ed.

    This second draft of a manuscript for a high school engineering and technology course uses case studies as its format. The principles associated with various engineering problems are presented along with their effects on daily life. Topics include the computer, the automotive power system, satellite communications, the petroleum industry, water…

  20. Training the intelligent eye: understanding illustrations in early modern astronomy texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Kathleen M; Barker, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Throughout the early modern period, the most widely read astronomical textbooks were Johannes de Sacrobosco's De sphaera and the Theorica planetarum, ultimately in the new form introduced by Georg Peurbach. This essay argues that the images in these texts were intended to develop an "intelligent eye." Students were trained to transform representations of specific heavenly phenomena into moving mental images of the structure of the cosmos. Only by learning the techniques of mental visualization and manipulation could the student "see" in the mind's eye the structure and motions of the cosmos. While anyone could look up at the heavens, only those who had acquired the intelligent eye could comprehend the divinely created order of the universe. Further, the essay demonstrates that the visual program of the Sphaera and Theorica texts played a significant and hitherto unrecognized role in later scientific work. Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler all utilized the same types of images in their own texts to explicate their ideas about the cosmos.

  1. Using Concept Mapping to Improve Poor Readers' Understanding of Expository Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfidi, Eleni; Mikropoulos, Anastasios; Rogdaki, Aspasia

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined whether the use of concept mapping is more effective in teaching expository material in comparison to a traditional, lecture only, approach. Its objective was threefold. First, to determine if multimedia concept mapping produces differential learning outcomes compared to digital text-based concept mapping. Secondly, to…

  2. Drawing Analogies between Logic Programming and Natural Language Argumentation Texts to Scaffold Learners' Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonis, Noa; Shilo, Gila

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical investigational study of the potential advantages that secondary school learners may gain from learning two different subjects, namely, logic programming within computer science studies and argumentation texts within linguistics studies. The study suggests drawing an analogy between the two subjects since they both…

  3. In the Age of Analytic Reading: Understanding Readers' Engagement with Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Teaching children to inquire, discuss ideas, and defend thinking about a literary text is a key aim of the common core state standards (CCSS). This article describes how four third-grade, male struggling readers successfully co-constructed meaning during a discussion based reading intervention rooted in philosophical inquiry. Three elements that…

  4. Geographical Text Analysis: A new approach to understanding nineteenth-century mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Catherine; Atkinson, Paul; Gregory, Ian

    2015-11-01

    This paper uses a combination of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and corpus linguistic analysis to extract and analyse disease related keywords from the Registrar-General's Decennial Supplements. Combined with known mortality figures, this provides, for the first time, a spatial picture of the relationship between the Registrar-General's discussion of disease and deaths in England and Wales in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Techniques such as collocation, density analysis, the Hierarchical Regional Settlement matrix and regression analysis are employed to extract and analyse the data resulting in new insight into the relationship between the Registrar-General's published texts and the changing mortality patterns during this time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wertigkeit und Frequenz in der Lexis hochspezialisierter medizinischer Texte (Value and Frequency in the Lexicon of Highly Specialized Medical Texts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Norbert

    1977-01-01

    A statistical study produced a list of 350 highly "learnworthy" words from the specialized medical vocabulary of German, for the benefit of English-, French-, and Spanish-speaking students. The words are ranked and listed according to frequency, range, and difficulty of learning. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  6. Multi-dimensional classification of biomedical text: toward automated, practical provision of high-utility text to diverse users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkay, Hagit; Pan, Fengxia; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Wilbur, W John

    2008-09-15

    Much current research in biomedical text mining is concerned with serving biologists by extracting certain information from scientific text. We note that there is no 'average biologist' client; different users have distinct needs. For instance, as noted in past evaluation efforts (BioCreative, TREC, KDD) database curators are often interested in sentences showing experimental evidence and methods. Conversely, lab scientists searching for known information about a protein may seek facts, typically stated with high confidence. Text-mining systems can target specific end-users and become more effective, if the system can first identify text regions rich in the type of scientific content that is of interest to the user, retrieve documents that have many such regions, and focus on fact extraction from these regions. Here, we study the ability to characterize and classify such text automatically. We have recently introduced a multi-dimensional categorization and annotation scheme, developed to be applicable to a wide variety of biomedical documents and scientific statements, while intended to support specific biomedical retrieval and extraction tasks. The annotation scheme was applied to a large corpus in a controlled effort by eight independent annotators, where three individual annotators independently tagged each sentence. We then trained and tested machine learning classifiers to automatically categorize sentence fragments based on the annotation. We discuss here the issues involved in this task, and present an overview of the results. The latter strongly suggest that automatic annotation along most of the dimensions is highly feasible, and that this new framework for scientific sentence categorization is applicable in practice.

  7. THE ANALYSIS OF THEMATIC ROLE IN NARRATIVE TEXTS OF SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ririn Marlina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzed narrative texts of Senior High School textbooks for X Grade, based on Jackendoff’s and Saeed’s theories of thematic role. This research employed a qualitative research design and the data were ten narrative texts taken from Developing English Competencies and Interlanguage for X Grade. The research Questions involve the ways of thematic role in constructing the sentence’s meaning in narrative texts and the thematic role that mostly employed. This research revealed that nine kinds of thematic role (Agent, Patient, Location, Beneficiary, Experiencer, Theme, Source, Goal, and Instrument are available in narrative texts and the role Theme was frequently employed (260 times of 782. Meanwhile, thematic role constructs the sentence’s meaning in narrative texts by observing the verb and the preposition used in the sentence. Thematic role is a way to describe the role of noun phrase in a sentence, so that thematic role is closely related with the grammatical function. It can be also said that the analysis of thematic role in narrative texts is beneficial for educational participants both teacher and student in order to recognize the sentence’s grammatical function. Therefore, thematic role helps them to understand the sentence’s meaning and finally they can grasp the message in a text.

  8. High Content Screening: Understanding Cellular Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Zaffar Ali Mohamed Amiroudine; Daryl Jesus Arapoc; Zainah Adam; Shafii Khamis

    2015-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) is the convergence between cell-based assays, high-resolution fluorescence imaging, phase-contrast imaging of fixed- or live-cell assays, tissues and small organisms. It has been widely adopted in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries for target identification and validation and as secondary screens to reveal potential toxicities or to elucidate a drugs mechanism of action. By using the ImageXpress® Micro XLS System HCS, the complex network of key players controlling proliferation and apoptosis can be reduced to several sentinel markers for analysis. Cell proliferation and apoptosis are two key areas in cell biology and drug discovery research. Understanding the signaling pathways in cell proliferation and apoptosis is important for new therapeutic discovery because the imbalance between these two events is predominant in the progression of many human diseases, including cancer. The DNA binding dye DAPI is used to determine the nuclear size and nuclear morphology as well as cell cycle phases by DNA content. Images together with MetaXpress® analysis results provide a convenient and easy to use solution to high volume image management. In particular, HCS platform is beginning to have an important impact on early drug discovery, basic research in systems cell biology, and is expected to play a role in personalized medicine or revealing off-target drug effects. (author)

  9. Exploring learners' beliefs about science reading and scientific epistemic beliefs, and their relations with science text understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Li-Ling; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore learners' beliefs about science reading and scientific epistemic beliefs, and how these beliefs were associating with their understanding of science texts. About 400 10th graders were involved in the development and validation of the Beliefs about Science Reading Inventory (BSRI). To find the effects of reader beliefs and epistemic beliefs, a new group of 65 10th grade students whose reader and epistemic beliefs were assessed by the newly developed BSRI and an existing SEB questionnaire were invited to take part in a science reading task. Students' text understanding in terms of concept gain and text interpretations was collected and analyzed. By the correlation analysis, it was found that when students had stronger beliefs about meaning construction based on personal goals and experiences (i.e. transaction beliefs), they produced more thematic and critical interpretations of the content of the test article. The regression analysis suggested that students SEBs could predict concept gain as a result of reading. Moreover, among all beliefs examined in the study, transaction beliefs stood out as the best predictor of overall science-text understanding.

  10. Availability of Japanese Government's supplemental texts on radiation reflecting the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident for elementary and secondary education from dental students' understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Midori; Honda, Eiichi; Dashpuntsag, Oyunbat; Maeda, Naoki; Hosoki, Hidehiko; Sakama, Minoru; Tada, Toshiko

    2016-05-01

    Following the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, the Japanese government created two supplemental texts about radiation reflecting the accident for elementary, middle school, and high school students. These texts were made to explain radiation and consequently to obtain public consent for the continuation of the nuclear program. The present study aimed to evaluate the appropriateness of the content of the texts and to collect the basic data on the level of understanding necessary to improve radiation education. Lectures on radiology including nuclear energy and the Fukushima accident were given to 44 fourth-year dental students in 2013. The questionnaire was administered in 2014 when these students were in their sixth-year. The survey was also administered to 40 first-year students and 41 fourth-year students who hadn't any radiology lectures. Students rated their level of understanding of 50 phrases used in the texts on a four-point scale (understanding = 3, a little knowledge = 2, having heard = 1, no knowledge = 0). Questions on taking an advanced physics course in high school and means of learning about radiation in daily life were also asked. The level of understanding of phrases in the supplemental text for middle and high school students was significantly higher among sixth-year students (mean = 1.43) than among first-year (mean = 1.12) or fourth-year (mean = 0.93) students (p radiation from television but four-year and six-year students learning about radiation from newspaper scored significantly higher (p radiation education should be improved by using visual material and preparing educators to teach the material for improving the public's understanding of radiation use-especially nuclear power generation because the phrases used in the supplementary texts are very difficult for students to understand. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction/discussion-based learning cycle versus conceptual change text: comparative effects on students' understanding of genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    khawaldeh, Salem A. Al

    2013-07-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the comparative effects of a prediction/discussion-based learning cycle (HPD-LC), conceptual change text (CCT) and traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of genetics concepts. Sample: Participants were 112 10th basic grade male students in three classes of the same school located in an urban area. The three classes taught by the same biology teacher were randomly assigned as a prediction/discussion-based learning cycle class (n = 39), conceptual change text class (n = 37) and traditional class (n = 36). Design and method: A quasi-experimental research design of pre-test-post-test non-equivalent control group was adopted. Participants completed the Genetics Concept Test as pre-test-post-test, to examine the effects of instructional strategies on their genetics understanding. Pre-test scores and Test of Logical Thinking scores were used as covariates. Results: The analysis of covariance showed a statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups in the favor of experimental groups after treatment. However, no statistically significant difference between the experimental groups (HPD-LC versus CCT instruction) was found. Conclusions: Overall, the findings of this study support the use of the prediction/discussion-based learning cycle and conceptual change text in both research and teaching. The findings may be useful for improving classroom practices in teaching science concepts and for the development of suitable materials promoting students' understanding of science.

  12. Upper High School Students' Understanding of Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Murat; Millar, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Although electromagnetism is an important component of upper secondary school physics syllabuses in many countries, there has been relatively little research on students' understanding of the topic. A written test consisting of 16 diagnostic questions was developed and used to survey the understanding of electromagnetism of upper secondary school…

  13. The association between states' texting regulations and the prevalence of texting while driving among U.S. high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudisill, Toni M; Zhu, Motao

    2015-12-01

    To determine which distracted driving laws were associated with decreased texting while driving among U.S. teenage drivers. Data from the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey were merged with states' distracted driving legislation. The prevalence of texting while driving was assessed for different laws using log-binomial regression. Approximately 39.0% of students reported texting while driving at least once in the 30 days before survey. Compared to states with universal texting bans along with young driver all cellphone bans, the adjusted ratio of texting while driving was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77-1.16) in states with no bans, 1.33 (95% CI, 1.11-1.58) for young driver bans only, 1.24 (95% CI, 1.00-1.52) in states with bans for young drivers but no young driver all cellphone bans, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.66-1.19) in states with universal texting bans. The prevalence of texting was 28% less in states with delays of full licensure for texting offenses (prevalence ratio = 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.88). Universal texting bans along with young driver all cellphone bans may be more effective in reducing texting while driving. Delays of full licensure may dissuade young drivers from texting and driving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding text as social practice: An exploration of the potential of systemic functional grammar to facilitate students' interpretation of media texts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Clarence-Fincham

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It has frequently been claimed that Halliday's Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG is apowerful linguistic tool which facilitates analytical and interpretative skills and provides aflexible, yet structured set of analytical tools with which to interpret texts. With this claim asa backdrop, this article asks whether SFG is, in fact an appropriate analytical approach forunder-graduate students and whether it can facilitate their ability to analyse texts. Its contextis a second level course, Analysing Media Texts, offered at Natal University. Broadly framedby critical discourse analysis, it traces the development of a thirteen week module and,using student analyses for illustrative purposes, identifies pedagogical challenges anddifficulties that need to be confronted before any strong claims can be made. It is concludedthat, on the evidence of students' responses to texts analysed during this course, it is not yetpossible to make strong claims about the benefits of SFG. There is enough positiveevidence, however, to pursue the possibility that with innovative curriculum development andthe careful scaffolding and integration of concepts, SFG will be clearly shown to have anextremely important role to play.Daar is dikwels beweer dat Halliday se Sistemies-Funksionele Grammatika (SFG 'n kragtige linguistiese middel is wat analitiese en interpreterende vaardighede bevorder en 'n plooibare, dog gestruktureere stel analitiese gereedskap verskaf waarmee tekste gei"nterpreteer kan word. Met die bewering as agtergrond vra hierdie artikel of SFG inderdaad 'n toepas like analitiese benadering vir voorgraadse studente is en of dit hulle vermoe om tekste te ontleed, bevorder. Die konteks is 'n tweedejaarskursus, Analysing Media Texts, wat aan die Universiteit van Natal aangebied word. Breedweg omraam deur kritiese diskoersanalise, speur die artikel die ontwikkeling van 'n module van dertien weke na, met gebruik van studenteontledings ter illustrasie en identifiseer

  15. High field superconductor development and understanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lee, Peter J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Tarantini, Chiara [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  16. Text mining analysis of public comments regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Akihide; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Yasunaga

    2005-01-01

    In order to narrow the risk perception gap as seen in social investigations between the general public and people who are involved in nuclear industry, public comments on high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal have been conducted to find the significant talking points with the general public for constructing an effective risk communication model of social risk information regarding HLW disposal. Text mining was introduced to examine public comments to identify the core public interest underlying the comments. The utilized test mining method is to cluster specific groups of words with negative meanings and then to analyze public understanding by employing text structural analysis to extract words from subjective expressions. Using these procedures, it was found that the public does not trust the nuclear fuel cycle promotion policy and shows signs of anxiety about the long-lasting technological reliability of waste storage. To develop effective social risk communication of HLW issues, these findings are expected to help experts in the nuclear industry to communicate with the general public more effectively to obtain their trust. (author)

  17. TOCUSO: Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2012-01-01

    Physics educators around the world often need reliable diagnostic materials to measure students' understanding of physics concept in high school. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new diagnostic tool on High School Optics concept. Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics (TOCUSO) consists of 25 conceptual items that measures…

  18. MODEL WRITTEN TEXTS IN THE RECOMMENDED SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Rukmini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article is based on the study on the model written texts provided in the Senior High School English textbooks. It is aimed at finding out whether those models are written by considering the English two contexts, cultural and situational, which encircle them. The data are all written texts provided in the six recommended English textbooks published by six different publishers. The results reveal that only eleven out of 115 model written texts tend to be incompatible with the two contexts encircling them, this implies that 104 of them (93.43% are likely to be compatible and can be used as model texts.

  19. The Relationship between Field Dependent-Independent Cognitive Style and Understanding of English Text Reading and Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozari, Ali Yazdanpanah; Siamian, Hasan

    2015-02-01

    The learning styles are the distinctive learners' strategies for information processing and discovering new concepts. One of the most important kinds of learning styles is the Witkin's theory of field dependence-independence cognitive style. This study seeks to find the relationship between field dependence -independence cognitive style and English text reading comprehension, learning English as a foreign language, academic achievement and the choice of academic courses. In this study, 305 students (both girls and boys) studying at the junior level at high school in Sari were randomly selected through multistage selection who responded to Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT). The data analysis was conducted by using regression analysis which showed that FDI cognitive styles determined the changes in dependant variables of reading comprehension score, learning English and the total average with the respective values of %8.8, %9.2 and %11.6 (p reading comprehension skills and learning English and the more academic achievement will result. The results of this study can help in selecting students' courses and also better directing the learners to improve their learning.

  20. Text-Message Abbreviations and Language Skills in High School and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonge, Sarah; Kemp, Nenagh

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the use of text-message abbreviations (textisms) in Australian adolescents and young adults, and relations between textism use and literacy abilities. Fifty-two high school students aged 13-15 years, and 53 undergraduates aged 18-24 years, all users of predictive texting, translated conventional English sentences into…

  1. “You should be reading, not texting”: Understanding classroom text messaging in the constant contact society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lohnes Watulak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones are the most ubiquitous communication device owned by young people today, and students’ text messaging during class is a common occurrence in many university classrooms. Analyzing data from a qualitative study involving 34 undergraduate students at a university in the Northeastern United States, this paper seeks to explore: Why do university students text message during class, and what does this tell us about text messaging as a new literacy practice within traditional classroom settings? Drawing on perspectives from new literacies and communication studies, I argue that texting was a meaningful practice for students as it afforded the opportunity for ongoing participation in social networks, and provided a means of exercising power within the controlled space of the classroom.

  2. Text Mining for Precision Medicine: Bringing Structure to EHRs and Biomedical Literature to Understand Genes and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Michael; Singhal, Ayush; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The key question of precision medicine is whether it is possible to find clinically actionable granularity in diagnosing disease and classifying patient risk. The advent of next-generation sequencing and the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have provided clinicians and researchers a wealth of data and made possible the precise characterization of individual patient genotypes and phenotypes. Unstructured text-found in biomedical publications and clinical notes-is an important component of genotype and phenotype knowledge. Publications in the biomedical literature provide essential information for interpreting genetic data. Likewise, clinical notes contain the richest source of phenotype information in EHRs. Text mining can render these texts computationally accessible and support information extraction and hypothesis generation. This chapter reviews the mechanics of text mining in precision medicine and discusses several specific use cases, including database curation for personalized cancer medicine, patient outcome prediction from EHR-derived cohorts, and pharmacogenomic research. Taken as a whole, these use cases demonstrate how text mining enables effective utilization of existing knowledge sources and thus promotes increased value for patients and healthcare systems. Text mining is an indispensable tool for translating genotype-phenotype data into effective clinical care that will undoubtedly play an important role in the eventual realization of precision medicine.

  3. Production of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mesons up to high transverse momentum in pp collisions at 2.76 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, S; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Rinella, G Aglieri; Agnello, M; Agrawal, N; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S U; Aiola, S; Akindinov, A; Alam, S N; Albuquerque, D S D; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alexandre, D; Molina, R Alfaro; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altsybeev, I; Prado, C Alves Garcia; An, M; Andrei, C; Andrews, H A; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Anwar, R; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arcelli, S; Arnaldi, R; Arnold, O W; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Audurier, B; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T; Azmi, M D; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Ball, M; Baral, R C; Barbano, A M; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barioglio, L; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartalini, P; Barth, K; Bartke, J; Bartsch, E; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Camejo, A Batista; Batyunya, B; Batzing, P C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Bedda, C; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Martinez, H Bello; Bellwied, R; Beltran, L G E; Belyaev, V; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bertens, R A; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhat, I R; Bhati, A K; Bhattacharjee, B; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Biro, G; Biswas, R; Biswas, S; Blair, J T; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boca, G; Bock, F; Bogdanov, A; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Bonomi, G; Bonora, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Borri, M; Botta, E; Bourjau, C; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Broker, T A; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brucken, E J; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Buhler, P; Buitron, S A I; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Butt, J B; Buxton, J T; Cabala, J; Caffarri, D; Caines, H; Caliva, A; Villar, E Calvo; Camerini, P; Capon, A A; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carnesecchi, F; Castellanos, J Castillo; Castro, A J; Casula, E A R; Sanchez, C Ceballos; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Chartier, M; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chauvin, A; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Barroso, V Chibante; Chinellato, D D; Cho, S; Chochula, P; Choi, K; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Collu, A; Colocci, M; Concas, M; Balbastre, G Conesa; Valle, Z Conesa Del; Connors, M E; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Morales, Y Corrales; Maldonado, I Cortés; Cortese, P; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Costanza, S; Crkovská, J; Crochet, P; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dahms, T; Dainese, A; Danisch, M C; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, I; Das, S; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Conti, C; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; De Souza, R D; Degenhardt, H F; Deisting, A; Deloff, A; Deplano, C; Dhankher, P; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Di Ruzza, B; Corchero, M A Diaz; Dietel, T; Dillenseger, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Gimenez, D Domenicis; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Drozhzhova, T; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Duggal, A K; Dupieux, P; Ehlers, R J; Elia, D; Endress, E; Engel, H; Epple, E; Erazmus, B; Erhardt, F; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eulisse, G; Eum, J; Evans, D; Evdokimov, S; Fabbietti, L; Faivre, J; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Feldkamp, L; Feliciello, A; Feofilov, G; Ferencei, J; Téllez, A Fernández; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Feuillard, V J G; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Francisco, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fronze, G G; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Furs, A; Girard, M Fusco; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A M; Gajdosova, K; Gallio, M; Galvan, C D; Ganoti, P; Gao, C; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garg, K; Garg, P; Gargiulo, C; Gasik, P; Gauger, E F; Ducati, M B Gay; Germain, M; Ghosh, P; Ghosh, S K; Gianotti, P; Giubellino, P; Giubilato, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Coral, D M Goméz; Ramirez, A Gomez; Gonzalez, A S; Gonzalez, V; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Görlich, L; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Graham, K L; Greiner, L; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grion, N; Gronefeld, J M; Grosa, F; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grosso, R; Gruber, L; Grull, F R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Guzman, I B; Haake, R; Hadjidakis, C; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hamon, J C; Harris, J W; Harton, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Heckel, S T; Hellbär, E; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Corral, G Herrera; Herrmann, F; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hillemanns, H; Hippolyte, B; Hladky, J; Hohlweger, B; Horak, D; Hornung, S; Hosokawa, R; Hristov, P; Hughes, C; Humanic, T J; Hussain, N; Hussain, T; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Ilkaev, R; Inaba, M; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Isakov, V; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Izucheev, V; Jacak, B; Jacazio, N; Jacobs, P M; Jadhav, M B; Jadlovska, S; Jadlovsky, J; Jaelani, S; Jahnke, C; Jakubowska, M J; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, C; Jena, S; Jercic, M; Bustamante, R T Jimenez; Jones, P G; Jusko, A; Kalinak, P; Kalweit, A; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Kar, S; Uysal, A Karasu; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karayan, L; Karpechev, E; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Keijdener, D L D; Keil, M; Ketzer, B; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Khatun, A; Khuntia, A; Kielbowicz, M M; Kileng, B; Kim, D; Kim, D W; Kim, D J; Kim, H; Kim, J S; Kim, J; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S; Kim, T; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Kiss, G; Klay, J L; Klein, C; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Klewin, S; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Kobdaj, C; Kofarago, M; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Kondratyuk, E; Konevskikh, A; Kopcik, M; Kour, M; Kouzinopoulos, C; Kovalenko, O; Kovalenko, V; Kowalski, M; Meethaleveedu, G Koyithatta; Králik, I; Kravčáková, A; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kubera, A M; Kučera, V; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kumar, A; Kumar, J; Kumar, L; Kumar, S; Kundu, S; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A B; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; La Pointe, S L; La Rocca, P; Fernandes, C Lagana; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; Lapidus, K; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; Lattuca, A; Laudi, E; Lavicka, R; Lazaridis, L; Lea, R; Leardini, L; Lee, S; Lehas, F; Lehner, S; Lehrbach, J; Lemmon, R C; Lenti, V; Leogrande, E; Monzón, I León; Lévai, P; Li, S; Li, X; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Litichevskyi, V; Ljunggren, H M; Llope, W J; Lodato, D F; Loenne, P I; Loginov, V; Loizides, C; Loncar, P; Lopez, X; Torres, E López; Lowe, A; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luparello, G; Lupi, M; Lutz, T H; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahajan, S; Mahmood, S M; Maire, A; Majka, R D; Malaev, M; Cervantes, I Maldonado; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Margutti, J; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martin, N A; Martinengo, P; Martinez, J A L; Martínez, M I; García, G Martínez; Pedreira, M Martinez; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Mastroserio, A; Mathis, A M; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzilli, M; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Melikyan, Y; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meninno, E; Pérez, J Mercado; Meres, M; Mhlanga, S; Miake, Y; Mieskolainen, M M; Mihaylov, D L; Mikhaylov, K; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitra, J; Mitu, C M; Mohammadi, N; Mohanty, B; Khan, M Mohisin; Montes, E; De Godoy, D A Moreira; Moreno, L A P; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Mühlheim, D; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Mulligan, J D; Munhoz, M G; Münning, K; Munzer, R H; Murakami, H; Murray, S; Musa, L; Musinsky, J; Myers, C J; Naik, B; Nair, R; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Narayan, A; Naru, M U; da Luz, H Natal; Nattrass, C; Navarro, S R; Nayak, K; Nayak, R; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; De Oliveira, R A Negrao; Nellen, L; Nesbo, S V; Ng, F; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Niedziela, J; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Noris, J C C; Norman, J; Nyanin, A; Nystrand, J; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Ohlson, A; Okubo, T; Olah, L; Oleniacz, J; Da Silva, A C Oliveira; Oliver, M H; Onderwaater, J; Oppedisano, C; Orava, R; Oravec, M; Velasquez, A Ortiz; Oskarsson, A; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pacik, V; Pagano, D; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Palni, P; Pan, J; Pandey, A K; Panebianco, S; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Pareek, P; Park, J; Park, W J; Parmar, S; Passfeld, A; Pathak, S P; Paticchio, V; Patra, R N; Paul, B; Pei, H; Peitzmann, T; Peng, X; Pereira, L G; Da Costa, H Pereira; Peresunko, D; Lezama, E Perez; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petrov, V; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Pezzi, R P; Piano, S; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pimentel, L O D L; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Piyarathna, D B; Oskoń, M Pł; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polichtchouk, B; Poljak, N; Poonsawat, W; Pop, A; Poppenborg, H; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Porter, J; Pospisil, J; Pozdniakov, V; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puccio, M; Puddu, G; Pujahari, P; Punin, V; Putschke, J; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Raha, S; Rajput, S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Rami, F; Rana, D B; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Ratza, V; Ravasenga, I; Read, K F; Redlich, K; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reidt, F; Ren, X; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Ristea, C; Cahuantzi, M Rodríguez; Røed, K; Rogochaya, E; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Rokita, P S; Ronchetti, F; Ronflette, L; Rosnet, P; Rossi, A; Rotondi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Roy, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Montero, A J Rubio; Rueda, O V; Rui, R; Russo, R; Rustamov, A; Ryabinkin, E; Ryabov, Y; Rybicki, A; Saarinen, S; Sadhu, S; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Saha, S K; Sahlmuller, B; Sahoo, B; Sahoo, P; Sahoo, R; Sahoo, S; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakai, S; Saleh, M A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sandoval, A; Sarkar, D; Sarkar, N; Sarma, P; Sas, M H P; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Scheid, H S; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schmidt, M O; Schmidt, M; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Šefčík, M; Seger, J E; Sekiguchi, Y; Sekihata, D; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senosi, K; Senyukov, S; Serradilla, E; Sett, P; Sevcenco, A; Shabanov, A; Shabetai, A; Shadura, O; Shahoyan, R; Shangaraev, A; Sharma, A; Sharma, A; Sharma, M; Sharma, M; Sharma, N; Sheikh, A I; Shigaki, K; Shou, Q; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siddhanta, S; Sielewicz, K M; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singhal, V; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Slupecki, M; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Snellman, T W; Song, J; Song, M; Soramel, F; Sorensen, S; Sozzi, F; Spiriti, E; Sputowska, I; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stankus, P; Stenlund, E; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Suleymanov, M; Suljic, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Sumowidagdo, S; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Szabo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szymanski, M; Tabassam, U; Takahashi, J; Tambave, G J; Tanaka, N; Tarhini, M; Tariq, M; Tarzila, M G; Tauro, A; Muñoz, G Tejeda; Telesca, A; Terasaki, K; Terrevoli, C; Teyssier, B; Thakur, D; Thakur, S; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Tikhonov, A; Timmins, A R; Toia, A; Tripathy, S; Trogolo, S; Trombetta, G; Trubnikov, V; Trzaska, W H; Trzeciak, B A; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ullaland, K; Umaka, E N; Uras, A; Usai, G L; Utrobicic, A; Vala, M; Van Der Maarel, J; Van Hoorne, J W; van Leeuwen, M; Vanat, T; Vyvre, P Vande; Varga, D; Vargas, A; Vargyas, M; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vauthier, A; Doce, O Vázquez; Vechernin, V; Veen, A M; Velure, A; Vercellin, E; Limón, S Vergara; Vernet, R; Vértesi, R; Vickovic, L; Vigolo, S; Viinikainen, J; Vilakazi, Z; Baillie, O Villalobos; Tello, A Villatoro; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Vislavicius, V; Vodopyanov, A; Völkl, M A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S A; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vorobyev, I; Voscek, D; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Wagner, B; Wagner, J; Wang, H; Wang, M; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, Y; Weber, M; Weber, S G; Weiser, D F; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Whitehead, A M; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilk, G; Wilkinson, J; Willems, G A; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Witt, W E; Yalcin, S; Yang, P; Yano, S; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J H; Yurchenko, V; Zaccolo, V; Zaman, A; Zampolli, C; Zanoli, H J C; Zardoshti, N; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zhigareva, N; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, Z; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zimmermann, M B; Zimmermann, S; Zinovjev, G; Zmeskal, J

    2017-01-01

    The invariant differential cross sections for inclusive [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mesons at midrapidity were measured in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV for transverse momenta [Formula: see text] GeV/ c and [Formula: see text] GeV/ c , respectively, using the ALICE detector. This large range in [Formula: see text] was achieved by combining various analysis techniques and different triggers involving the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). In particular, a new single-cluster, shower-shape based method was developed for the identification of high-[Formula: see text] neutral pions, which exploits that the showers originating from their decay photons overlap in the EMCal. Above 4 GeV/[Formula: see text], the measured cross sections are found to exhibit a similar power-law behavior with an exponent of about 6.3. Next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations differ from the measured cross sections by about 30% for the [Formula: see text], and between 30-50% for the [Formula: see text] meson, while generator-level simulations with PYTHIA 8.2 describe the data to better than 10-30%, except at [Formula: see text] GeV/[Formula: see text]. The new data can therefore be used to further improve the theoretical description of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] meson production.

  4. Understanding Prescriptive Texts: Rules and Logic as Elaborated by the Mīmāṃsā School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Freschi,

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mīmāṃsā school of Indian philosophy elaborated complex ways of interpreting the prescriptive portions of the Vedic sacred texts. The present article is the result of the collaboration of a group of scholars of logic, computer science, European philosophy and Indian philosophy and aims at the individuation and analysis of the deontic system which is applied but never explicitly discussed in Mīmāṃsā texts. The article outlines the basic distinction between three sorts of principles —hermeneutic, linguistic and deontic. It proposes a mathematical formalization of the deontic principles and uses it to discuss a well-known example of seemingly conflicting statements, namely the prescription to undertake the malefic Śyena sacrifice and the prohibition to perform any harm.

  5. Understanding and Evaluating L2 Personal Letter Writing: A Systemic Functional Linguistics Analysis of Student Texts in German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Cori

    2016-01-01

    Adopting a genre lens informed by Systemic Functional Linguistics (cf. Halliday & Matthiessen, [Halliday, M. A. K., 2004]; Martin & Rose, [Martin, J. R., 2008]), this paper explores the text-structural and lexico-grammatical choices that second language (L2) writers of German make in personal letter writing. Close analysis of two student…

  6. TEXT COMPLEXITY IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEXTBOOKS: A SYSTEMIC FUNCTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhani Aldila Putra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Textbooks have been considered to play a key role in the processes of education by researchers and educators, and the need to explore the language of textbooks has become increasingly recognized. However, although textbooks are an important learning tool, textbook language and composition have not been widely explored especially from textual perspectives. The purpose of the present study is to investigate text complexity progression in the reading texts of English textbooks published for senior high school students in Indonesia. The nature and rate of that progression are addressed within the framework of Systemic Functional Linguistics. Being largely qualitative, this study examines three consecutive textbooks issued by the Ministry of Education, which are available online for classroom use. Data were collected and sampled from the reading texts found in the textbooks and were analyzed with regard to lexical density, lexical variation and grammatical intricacy in order to find the complexity of the texts. The results of the analyses show that regardless of the inconsistent progression of text complexity within each textbook, there is a consistent pattern of text complexity progression across grade levels. In other words, the lexical density, lexical variation and grammatical intricacy across the textbooks were found to have consistent progression from one grade level to another of which the direction is positive. It could be concluded that in general the language used in the texts becomes increasingly sophisticated, especially at lexical level, in accordance with grade level progression to cater for students’ intellectual development.

  7. The Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts in Remediating High School Students' Alternative Conceptions Concerning Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of conceptual change texts in remediating high school students' alternative conceptions concerning chemical equilibrium. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. The subjects for this study consisted of a total 78 tenth-grade students, 38 of them in the experimental group and 40 of them in the…

  8. High School Students' Representations and Understandings of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Brizuela, Bárbara M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the representations and understandings of electric fields expressed by Chinese high school students 15 to 16 years old who have not received high school level physics instruction. The physics education research literature has reported students' conceptions of electric fields post-instruction as indicated by students'…

  9. Understanding How Domestic Violence Affects Behavior in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Malika

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader with an understanding of how domestic violence affects the behavior of high school students. The presentation is designed to provide the reader with a working definition of domestic violence, the rate of occurrence and its effects on high school students. Additionally the paper will summarize the negative effects…

  10. A high capacity text steganography scheme based on LZW compression and color coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Malik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, capacity and security issues of text steganography have been considered by employing LZW compression technique and color coding based approach. The proposed technique uses the forward mail platform to hide the secret data. This algorithm first compresses secret data and then hides the compressed secret data into the email addresses and also in the cover message of the email. The secret data bits are embedded in the message (or cover text by making it colored using a color coding table. Experimental results show that the proposed method not only produces a high embedding capacity but also reduces computational complexity. Moreover, the security of the proposed method is significantly improved by employing stego keys. The superiority of the proposed method has been experimentally verified by comparing with recently developed existing techniques.

  11. First results from the J-TEXT high-resolution three-wave polarimeter-interferometera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Z. J.; Gao, L.; Li, Q.; Chen, W.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2012-10-01

    A laser-based far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented on the J-TEXT tokamak. The polarimeter determines the Faraday effect by measuring the phase difference between two collinear, counter-rotating, circularly polarized laser beams. The first results of the polarimeter-interferometer designed for J-TEXT have been obtained in the most recent J-TEXT experimental campaign. Simultaneous polarimetric and interferometric measurement is achieved, with phase resolution up to 0.1°, at bandwidth of 50 kHz. The temporal resolution, which is dependent on the laser's frequency offset, is ˜1 μs. Continual spatial measurement covering 45 cm (80% of the plasma cross-section) is realized by utilizing 1D parabolic beam expansion optics. Three initial test chords are installed and future plans call for expansion up to 30 chords with 1.5 cm chord spacing, providing high spatial resolution for measurement of electron density and current density profiles. Reliability of both polarimetric and interferometric measurement is confirmed by comparison with computation and data from a hydrocyanic acid (HCN) interferometer. With the high temporal and phase resolution, perturbations associated with the sawtooth cycle and MHD activity have been observed.

  12. Language and Text-to-Speech Technologies for Highly Accessible Language & Culture Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Gelan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents the results of the “Speech technology integrated learning modules for Intercultural Dialogue” project. The project objective was to increase the availability and quality of e-learning opportunities for less widely-used and less taught European languages using a user-friendly and highly accessible learning environment. The integration of new Text-to-Speech developments into web-based authoring software for tutorial CALL had a double goal: on the one hand increase the accessibility of e-learning packages, also for learners having difficulty reading (e.g. dyslexic learners or preferring auditory learning; on the other hand exploiting some didactic possibilities of this technology.

  13. The baby and the bath water: improving metaphors and analogies in high school biology texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shors, Luke

    This dissertation is concerned with understanding how metaphors and analogies function in biology education and whether some of the philosophical critiques of the language used in the field of biology -- and in particular its accompanying metaphors and analogies, have a basis in the educational materials used to teach the subject. This inquiry was carried out through examining the pedagogical features and content of metaphors and analogies from three high school biology textbooks. After identifying over two hundred and twenty-five verbal and pictorial metaphors and analogies, these figures of speech were coded based on prior research that establishes effective characteristics for their use. In tandem with this quantitative analysis, a philosophical analysis considers how well the content of these metaphors and analogies aligns with current scientific understanding and what misunderstandings may be engendered through the use of these metaphors and analogies. The major findings of the analysis include: 1) Textbook authors are much more likely to utilize metaphors and analogies as well as signal their presence to students compared with past analyses; 2) A number of metaphors and analogies either contain errors in analogical mapping or use source analogues that are too antiquated to support today's students; 3) The content of many metaphors and analogies is frequently outdated in reference to current scientific understanding; and 4) Many metaphors and analogies tend to reinforce tacit elements of past scientific paradigms - these are termed 'reinforcing metaphors' in the dissertation and include nature as machine, nature as blueprint or information, nature as business and nature as war. The present work submits several implications for students learning biology as well as the manner in which students come to understand the natural world. The work suggests ways to reduce ineffective metaphors and analogies as well as reliance on reinforcing metaphors. It offers new

  14. Sentiment analysis methods for understanding large-scale texts: a case for using continuum-scored words and word shift graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Reagan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The emergence and global adoption of social media has rendered possible the real-time estimation of population-scale sentiment, an extraordinary capacity which has profound implications for our understanding of human behavior. Given the growing assortment of sentiment-measuring instruments, it is imperative to understand which aspects of sentiment dictionaries contribute to both their classification accuracy and their ability to provide richer understanding of texts. Here, we perform detailed, quantitative tests and qualitative assessments of 6 dictionary-based methods applied to 4 different corpora, and briefly examine a further 20 methods. We show that while inappropriate for sentences, dictionary-based methods are generally robust in their classification accuracy for longer texts. Most importantly they can aid understanding of texts with reliable and meaningful word shift graphs if (1 the dictionary covers a sufficiently large portion of a given text’s lexicon when weighted by word usage frequency; and (2 words are scored on a continuous scale.

  15. Mobile Phone Text Messages to Support Treatment Adherence in Adults With High Blood Pressure (SMS-Text Adherence Support [StAR]): A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew J; Springer, David; Shanyinde, Milensu; Yu, Ly-Mee; Brennan, Thomas; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Steyn, Krisela; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2016-02-09

    We assessed the effect of automated treatment adherence support delivered via mobile phone short message system (SMS) text messages on blood pressure. In this pragmatic, single-blind, 3-arm, randomized trial (SMS-Text Adherence Support [StAR]) undertaken in South Africa, patients treated for high blood pressure were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to information only, interactive SMS text messaging, or usual care. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 12 months from baseline measured with a validated oscillometric device. All trial staff were masked to treatment allocation. Analyses were intention to treat. Between June 26, 2012, and November 23, 2012, 1372 participants were randomized to receive information-only SMS text messages (n=457), interactive SMS text messages (n=458), or usual care (n=457). Primary outcome data were available for 1256 participants (92%). At 12 months, the mean adjusted change in systolic blood pressure compared with usual care was -2.2 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -4.4 to -0.04) with information-only SMS and -1.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -3.7 to 0.6) with interactive SMS. Odds ratios for the proportion of participants with a blood pressure high blood pressure, we found a small reduction in systolic blood pressure control compared with usual care at 12 months. There was no evidence that an interactive intervention increased this effect. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02019823. South African National Clinical Trials Register, number SANCTR DOH-27-1212-386; Pan Africa Trial Register, number PACTR201411000724141. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Availability of Japanese Government's supplemental texts on radiation reflecting the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident for elementary and secondary education from dental students' understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Midori; Honda, Eiichi; Dashpuntsag, Oyunbat; Maeda, Naoki; Hosoki, Hidehiko; Sakama, Minoru; Tada, Toshiko

    2016-01-01

    Following the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, the Japanese government created two supplemental texts about radiation reflecting the accident for elementary, middle school, and high school students. These texts were made to explain radiation and consequently to obtain public consent for the continuation of the nuclear program. The present study aimed to evaluate the appropriateness of the content of the texts and to collect the basic data on the level of understanding necessary to improve radiation education. Lectures on radiology including nuclear energy and the Fukushima accident were given to 44 fourth-year dental students in 2013. The questionnaire was administered in 2014 when these students were in their sixth-year. The survey was also administered to 40 first-year students and 41 fourth-year students who hadn't any radiology lectures. Students rated their level of understanding of 50 phrases used in the texts on a four-point scale (understanding = 3, a little knowledge = 2, having heard = 1, no knowledge = 0). Questions on taking an advanced physics course in high school and means of learning about radiation in daily life were also asked. The level of understanding of phrases in the supplemental text for middle and high school students was significantly higher among sixth-year students (mean = 1.43) than among first-year (mean = 1.12) or fourth-year (mean = 0.93) students (p < 0.05). Overall, the level of understanding was low, with scores indicating that most students knew only a little. First-year students learning about radiation from television but four-year and six-year students learning about radiation from newspaper scored significantly higher (p < 0.05). It was concluded that radiation education should be improved by using visual material and preparing educators to teach the material for improving the public's understanding of radiation use—especially nuclear power generation because the phrases used in the

  17. First results of the J-TEXT high-resolution 3-wave polarimeter-interferometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, G.; Chen, J.; Li, Q.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.

    2013-10-01

    A far-infrared laser polarimeter-interferometer system based on Three-wave technique has been established on the J-TEXT tokamak. The system determines Faraday angle by measuring phase difference between two collinear, counter-rotating, circularly polarized laser beams, and acquires line-integrated electron density simultaneously by phase comparison between the two beams and a third local oscilate (LO) beam. Three seperately pumped HCOOH lasers at 432 μm are adopted as sources, suppling more than 100 mW power output in sum. Parabolic mirrors are used to expand probe beams to 450 mm wide, covering ~ 80% of plasma cross section, which allows profile measurement with high spatial resolution. First experimental results of the polarimeter-interferometer have been obtained. 12 chords (3 cm chord spacing) simultaneous polarimetric and interferometric measurements are achieved, with phase resolution up to 0.1° at bandwidth of 50 kHz. With the high temporal and phase resolution, perturbations associated with the sawtooth cycle and MHD activity have been observed.

  18. High field superconductor development and understanding project, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.

    2009-07-15

    Over 25 years the Applied Superconductivity Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provided a vital technical resource to the High Energy Physics community covering development in superconducting strand for HEP accelerator magnet development. In particular the work of the group has been to develop the next generation of high field superconductors for high field application. Grad students Mike Naus, Chad Fischer, Arno Godeke and Matt Jewell improved our understanding of the microstructure and microchemistry of Nb3Sn and their impact on the physical and mechanical properties. The success of this work has led to the continued funding of this work at the ASC after it moved to the NHMFL and also to direct funding from BNL for some aspects of Nb3Sn cable evaluation.

  19. Adolescents’ Text Message Communication and Growth in Antisocial Behavior across the First Year of High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Samuel E.; Underwood, Marion K.; Ackerman, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether adolescents communicate about antisocial topics and behaviors via text messaging and how adolescents’ antisocial text message communication relates to growth in rule-breaking and aggression as reported by youth, parents, and teachers. Participants (n = 172; 82 girls) received BlackBerry devices configured to capture all text messages sent and received. Four days of text messages during the 9th grade year were coded for discussion of antisocial activities. The majority of participants engaged in at least some antisocial text message communication. Text messaging about antisocial activities significantly predicted increases in parent, teacher, and self-reports of adolescents’ rule-breaking behavior, as well as teacher and self-reports of adolescents’ aggressive behavior. Text message communication may provide instrumental information about how to engage in antisocial behavior and reinforce these behaviors as normative within the peer group. PMID:24014161

  20. Centrality dependence of low-$p_{_\\text{T}}$ and high-$p_{_\\text{T}}$ particle production in proton--lead collisions with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Shulga, Evgeny; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the centrality dependence of low-$p_{_\\text{T}}$ and high-$p_{_\\text{T}}$ particle production in proton-lead collisions at the LHC can provide unique insight into the dynamics of soft and hard scattering processes and the initial state of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Recent results have shown that both soft and hard processes may be significantly influenced by event-to-event fluctuations (variations) in the structure of the proton. In this talk, the latest measurements of the centrality dependence of charged particle, jet, and Z boson production with the ATLAS detector at the LHC will be used to explore these questions. In particular, the sensitivity of the charged particle pseudorapidity distribution in proton--lead collisions to the choice of centrality variable will be discussed. Separately, the strong centrality dependence of jet production in proton--lead collisions has raised questions about energy production at large rapidities in collisions involving a large proton-x. To addr...

  1. Understanding the Impact of an Apprenticeship-Based Scientific Research Program on High School Students' Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Baksa, Kristen; Skinner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of an apprenticeship program on high school students' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. Data related to seventeen students' understanding of science and scientific inquiry were collected through open-ended questionnaires. Findings suggest that although engagement in authentic…

  2. TEACHERS’ UNDERSTANDING OF LEARNER AUTONOMY IN INDONESIAN CONTEXTS: FINDINGS FROM HIGH SCHOOLS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Learner autonomy has become one of the main topics in the current research and conferences in Indonesia. This suggests that learner autonomy has received more attention in Indonesian contexts. However, there has been no space for discussions about the meaning of learner autonomy from high school teachers’ points of view. A multi-case study conducted by Agustina (2017 has found diverse understanding of autonomy as reported by Junior High School English teachers in Magelang Regency, Central Java, Indonesia. This paper discusses those teachers’ understanding in a more detailed way along with the implications when the concept is understood differently. This paper supports Agustina’s argument that the diversity in understanding and developing autonomy should be anticipated since teachers have different beliefs about autonomy. Referring to Agustina’s findings this paper proposes the need to consider the consequences of allowing the presence of various understanding of learner autonomy particularly when it is set as an educational goal.

  3. Low- and High-Text Books Facilitate the Same Amount and Quality of Extratextual Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhinyi, Amber; Hesketh, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Recent research suggests that caregiver-child extratextual talk during shared book reading facilitates the development of preschool children's oral language skills. This study investigated the effects of the amount of picturebook text on mother-child extratextual talk during shared book reading. Twenty-four mother-child dyads (children aged…

  4. High-Performance Annotation Tagging over Solr Full-text Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Manghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we focus on the problem of “annotation tagging” over Information Spaces of objects stored in a full-text index. In such a scenario, tags are assigned to objects by “data curator” users with the purpose of classification, while generic end-users will perceive tags as searchable and browsable object properties. To carry out their activities, data curators need “annotation tagging tools” which allow them to “bulk” tag or untag large sets of objects in temporary work sessions, where they can “virtually” and in “real-time” experiment the effect of their actions before making the changes visible to end-users. The implementation of these tools over full-text indexes is a challenge, since bulk object updates in this context are far from being real-time and in critical cases may slow down index performance. We devised TagTick, a tool which offers to data curators a fully functional annotation tagging environment over the full-text index Apache Solr, regarded as a “de-facto standard” in this area. TagTick consists of a TagTick Virtualizer module, which extends the APIs of Solr to support real-time, virtual, bulk-tagging operations, and a TagTick User Interface module, which offers end-user functionalities for annotation tagging. The tool scales optimally with the number and size of bulk tag operations, without compromising index performance.

  5. Promoting Acceleration of Comprehension and Content through Text in High School Social Studies Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Greg; Vaughn, Sharon; Kent, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Promoting Acceleration of Comprehension and Content Through Text intervention implemented with 11th-grade students enrolled in U.S. History classes. Using a within-teacher randomized design, the study was conducted in 41 classes (23 treatment classes) with 14 teachers providing the…

  6. Text mining of rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus to understand the mechanisms of Chinese medicine in different diseases with same treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Zheng, Guang; Li, Jian; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Lu, Cheng; Jiang, Miao; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Hong-Tao; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2018-01-09

    To identify the commonalities between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to understand the mechanisms of Chinese medicine (CM) in different diseases with the same treatment. A text mining approach was adopted to analyze the commonalities between RA and DM according to CM and biological elements. The major commonalities were subsequently verifified in RA and DM rat models, in which herbal formula for the treatment of both RA and DM identifified via text mining was used as the intervention. Similarities were identifified between RA and DM regarding the CM approach used for diagnosis and treatment, as well as the networks of biological activities affected by each disease, including the involvement of adhesion molecules, oxidative stress, cytokines, T-lymphocytes, apoptosis, and inflfl ammation. The Ramulus Cinnamomi-Radix Paeoniae Alba-Rhizoma Anemarrhenae is an herbal combination used to treat RA and DM. This formula demonstrated similar effects on oxidative stress and inflfl ammation in rats with collagen-induced arthritis, which supports the text mining results regarding the commonalities between RA and DM. Commonalities between the biological activities involved in RA and DM were identifified through text mining, and both RA and DM might be responsive to the same intervention at a specifific stage.

  7. A Full-Text-Based Search Engine for Finding Highly Matched Documents Across Multiple Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report demonstrates the full-text-based search engine that works on any Web-based mobile application. The engine has the capability to search databases across multiple categories based on a user's queries and identify the most relevant or similar. The search results presented here were found using an Android (Google Co.) mobile device; however, it is also compatible with other mobile phones.

  8. The Analysis of Learning Objectives in Iranian Junior High School English Text Books Based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Ayoub; Khoshnood, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the Iranian junior high school English text books according to learning objectives of Bloom's Revised Taxonomy (BRT) (2001) to find which learning levels of Bloom's Revised Taxonomy were more common in these text books. The primary data in this study came from the newly published English text book,…

  9. Refutations in science texts lead to hypercorrection of misconceptions held with high confidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loon, Mariëtte H.; Dunlosky, John; Van Gog, Tamara; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen J.g.; De Bruin, Anique B.h.

    2015-01-01

    Misconceptions about science are often not corrected during study when they are held with high confidence. However, when corrective feedback co-activates a misconception together with the correct conception, this feedback may surprise the learner and draw attention, especially when the

  10. "Bauchman v. West High School" Revisited: Religious Text and Context in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, William Michael

    2017-01-01

    In 1997 the Tenth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that school officials at West High School did not violate Rachel Bauchman's constitutional rights by including Christian religious music as part of its curriculum, or by staging school performances at religious sites. Three philosophical questions are investigated in this paper: whether the…

  11. Content analysis to detect high stress in oral interviews and text documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar (Inventor); Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system of interrogation to estimate whether a subject of interrogation is likely experiencing high stress, emotional volatility and/or internal conflict in the subject's responses to an interviewer's questions. The system applies one or more of four procedures, a first statistical analysis, a second statistical analysis, a third analysis and a heat map analysis, to identify one or more documents containing the subject's responses for which further examination is recommended. Words in the documents are characterized in terms of dimensions representing different classes of emotions and states of mind, in which the subject's responses that manifest high stress, emotional volatility and/or internal conflict are identified. A heat map visually displays the dimensions manifested by the subject's responses in different colors, textures, geometric shapes or other visually distinguishable indicia.

  12. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  13. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort

  14. High School Teachers' Understanding of Blackbody Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri

    2018-01-01

    This study is a detailed look at the level of understanding of fundamental ideas about blackbody radiation (BBR) among physics teachers. The aim is to explore associations and ideas that teachers have regarding blackbody radiation: a concept used routinely in physics and chemistry, which is necessary to understand fundamentals of quantum physics.…

  15. Understanding high magnitude flood risk: evidence from the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, N.

    2009-04-01

    The average length of gauged river flow records in the UK is ~25 years, which presents a problem in determining flood risk for high-magnitude flood events. Severe floods have been recorded in many UK catchments during the past 10 years, increasing the uncertainty in conventional flood risk estimates based on river flow records. Current uncertainty in flood risk has implications for society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and water resource managers (flood/drought risk). An alternative approach is required which can improve current understanding of the flood frequency/magnitude relationship. Historical documentary accounts are now recognised as a valuable resource when considering the flood frequency/magnitude relationship, but little consideration has been given to the temporal and spatial distribution of these records. Building on previous research based on British rivers (urban centre): Ouse (York), Trent (Nottingham), Tay (Perth), Severn (Shrewsbury), Dee (Chester), Great Ouse (Cambridge), Sussex Ouse (Lewes), Thames (Oxford), Tweed (Kelso) and Tyne (Hexham), this work considers the spatial and temporal distribution of historical flooding. The selected sites provide a network covering many of the largest river catchments in Britain, based on urban centres with long detailed documentary flood histories. The chronologies offer an opportunity to assess long-term patterns of flooding, indirectly determining periods of climatic variability and potentially increased geomorphic activity. This research represents the first coherent large scale analysis undertaken of historical multi-catchment flood chronologies, providing an unparalleled network of sites, permitting analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of historical flood patterns on a national scale.

  16. Development of Geography Text Books Used by Senior High School Teachers Case Study at East Java-Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwanto, Edy; Fatchan, Ach.; Purwanto; Soekamto, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the geography text book for: (1) identify and describe the errors in the organization of geography textbooks, and (2) identify and describe the content of the textbook standard errors of geography. The text book is currently being used by teachers of Senior High School in East Java. To analyze the contents of…

  17. The adjectival subordinate clause in the production of meaning in the text: the prospect of Portuguese textbooks in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliana Lopes Câmara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies how Portuguese textbooks of high school, approved by the Programa Nacional do Livro Didático-2015, approach the teaching of adjectival subordinate clause. Several researchers (Bagno, 2011; Neves, 2011; Travaglia, 2009, 2011 address the issue of grammar teaching, questioning the mechanistic and traditional teaching of identification and classification of linguistic units (morphological and syntactic. These authors argue the articulation of grammar with the teaching of reader and writer skills, so that linguistic resources are studied in mobilizing effects of meaning in the textual construction. The choice of textbooks corpus, therefore, was determined by the grammar teaching proposal explicitly stated in the manuals for the teacher (part attached to the textbook, under which linguistic resources are subsidiary to the reading and writing teaching. First we compare the proposal of manuals on the teaching of grammar and what was accomplished in the book of the student, more specifically on the proposals for the teaching of adjectival subordinate clause. Then, from the study on the functional description of the adjectival subordinate clause (Câmara, 2015, which is based on Functional Discourse Grammar (Hengeveld e Mackenzie, 2008, we studied how some descriptive aspects can be subsidiary for the teaching of the adjective clause, aiming at the development of reading and writing skills. The reason for the choice of this theoretical support is the fact that grammar is hierarchically structured in levels and layers of linguistic analysis, and the pragmatic units determine the semantic units, which in turn determine the morphosyntactic units which, in turn, determine the phonological units. The data show that remains, in the educational proposals of the relative clause in high school textbooks, a grammar teaching that focuses primarily in the nomenclature, metalanguage and in the normative grammar rules. There isn’t many

  18. Corpus of High School Academic Texts (COHAT): Data-Driven, Computer Assisted Discovery in Learning Academic English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohát, Róbert; Rödlingová, Beata; Horáková, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Corpus of High School Academic Texts (COHAT), currently of 150,000+ words, aims to make academic language instruction a more data-driven and student-centered discovery learning as a special type of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL), emphasizing students' critical thinking and metacognition. Since 2013, high school English as an additional…

  19. Aspects of Skill in Understanding High-Order Semantic Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-25

    adversative relation. ’p 2.2.4 Critical clause For presentation purposes, the passages were divided into clauses on the basis of two pragmatic criteria...Understanding anaphora . Rules used by readers in assigning , pronominal referents. Discourse Processes, 4, 323-347. Frederiksen J.R. and Warren, B.M

  20. Investigating High School Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the year 12 students' (N = 56) understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts after instruction using two conceptual tests, the "Chemical Equilibrium Conceptual Test 1" ("CECT-1") consisting of nine two-tier multiple-choice items and the "Chemical Equilibrium Conceptual Test 2"…

  1. Understanding the Implementation of Knowledge Management in High-Performance Schools in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmad Sukor Ab. Samad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to assess the implementation of policies in high-performance schools (HPS. One hundred fifty-two administrators in 52 HPS were selected using full sampling. Only two factors serve as contributors in knowledge management model for high-performing schools in Malaysia, which were school culture and school strategy. Whereas the correlation indicated that all 10 factors, namely, mission and vision, school strategy, school culture, intellectual modal, learning organization, leadership management, teamwork and learning community, knowledge sharing, new knowledge generation, and digital advancement, have significant relationships with the understanding of knowledge management, at different levels.

  2. From regular text to artistic writing and artworks: Fourier statistics of images with low and high aesthetic appeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmer, Tamara; Amirshahi, Seyed A.; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of letters and their influence on readability and letter identification have been intensely studied during the last decades. There have been few studies, however, on statistical image properties that reflect more global aspects of text, for example properties that may relate to its aesthetic appeal. It has been shown that natural scenes and a large variety of visual artworks possess a scale-invariant Fourier power spectrum that falls off linearly with increasing frequency in log-log plots. We asked whether images of text share this property. As expected, the Fourier spectrum of images of regular typed or handwritten text is highly anisotropic, i.e., the spectral image properties in vertical, horizontal, and oblique orientations differ. Moreover, the spatial frequency spectra of text images are not scale-invariant in any direction. The decline is shallower in the low-frequency part of the spectrum for text than for aesthetic artworks, whereas, in the high-frequency part, it is steeper. These results indicate that, in general, images of regular text contain less global structure (low spatial frequencies) relative to fine detail (high spatial frequencies) than images of aesthetics artworks. Moreover, we studied images of text with artistic claim (ornate print and calligraphy) and ornamental art. For some measures, these images assume average values intermediate between regular text and aesthetic artworks. Finally, to answer the question of whether the statistical properties measured by us are universal amongst humans or are subject to intercultural differences, we compared images from three different cultural backgrounds (Western, East Asian, and Arabic). Results for different categories (regular text, aesthetic writing, ornamental art, and fine art) were similar across cultures. PMID:23554592

  3. Understanding high-level radwaste disposal through the historical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.N.

    1993-01-01

    As an example of different needs in communication to persons other than physical scientists, a teacher needs an approach somewhere between just assigning to an advanced student the book Understanding Radioactive Waste to review and administering to a science class the several-week module open-quotes Science, Society and America's Nuclear Waste.close quotes When a nuclear professional reviews for the class the lengthy US research and development (R ampersand D) program, a broader approach is provided that can focus on geology or management aspects or can be made suitable for middle and elementary schools' earth or environmental science studies

  4. Understanding the Gap between High School and College Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Cheryl; Knight, Melinda A.

    2007-01-01

    A recent article in "The Chronicle of Higher Education" comparing perceptions of college preparedness in writing from the vantage point of high school teachers and college faculty shows that the two groups have dramatically different views. What accounts for these differences in perception? What types of writing assignments are high school…

  5. Supporting Critical Literacy in High School English by Using Systemic Functional Linguistics to Analyze Fantasy, Canonical, and Nonfiction Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    While important work has been done on assessing classroom texts and investigating classroom discourse, there is little research on teachers doing systemic functional linguistics (SFL) with students for critical ends, especially in the high school arena. This article discusses how instructional use of SFL analytic resources in subject English…

  6. High school students' understanding and problem solving in population genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, Patti D.

    This study is an investigation of student understanding of population genetics and how students developed, used and revised conceptual models to solve problems. The students in this study participated in three rounds of problem solving. The first round involved the use of a population genetics model to predict the number of carriers in a population. The second round required them to revise their model of simple dominance population genetics to make inferences about populations containing three phenotype variations. The third round of problem solving required the students to revise their model of population genetics to explain anomalous data where the proportions of males and females with a trait varied significantly. As the students solved problems, they were involved in basic scientific processes as they observed population phenomena, constructed explanatory models to explain the data they observed, and attempted to persuade their peers as to the adequacy of their models. In this study, the students produced new knowledge about the genetics of a trait in a population through the revision and use of explanatory population genetics models using reasoning that was similar to what scientists do. The students learned, used and revised a model of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium to generate and test hypotheses about the genetics of phenotypes given only population data. Students were also interviewed prior to and following instruction. This study suggests that a commonly held intuitive belief about the predominance of a dominant variation in populations is resistant to change, despite instruction and interferes with a student's ability to understand Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and microevolution.

  7. Text classification

    OpenAIRE

    Deveikis, Karolis

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of text classification. The task of text classification is to assign a piece of text to one of several categories based on its content. Text classification is one of the tasks of natural language processing. Like the others, it is often solved using machine learning algorithms. There are many algorithms suitable for text classification. As a result, a problem of choice arises. In an effort to solve this problem, this paper analyzes various feature extractio...

  8. Cognitive diffusion model with user-oriented context-to-text recognition for learning to promote high level cognitive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Yuin Hwang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a large number of studies on how to promote students’ cognitive processes and learning achievements through various learning activities supported by advanced learning technologies. However, not many of them focus on applying the knowledge that students learn in school to solve authentic daily life problems. This study aims to propose a cognitive diffusion model called User-oriented Context-to-Text Recognition for Learning (U-CTRL to facilitate and improve students’ learning and cognitive processes from lower levels (i.e., Remember and Understand to higher levels (i.e., Apply and above through an innovative approach, called User-Oriented Context-to-Text Recognition for Learning (U-CTRL. With U-CTRL, students participate in learning activities in which they capture the learning context that can be scanned and recognized by a computer application as text. Furthermore, this study proposes the use of an innovative model, called Cognitive Diffusion Model, to investigate the diffusion and transition of students’ cognitive processes in different learning stages including pre-schooling, after-schooling, crossing the chasm, and higher cognitive processing. Finally, two cases are presented to demonstrate how the U-CTRL approach can be used to facilitate student cognition in their learning of English and Natural science.

  9. Text Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybula, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the state of research in text mining, focusing on newer developments. The intent is to describe the disparate investigations currently included under the term text mining and provide a cohesive structure for these efforts. A summary of research identifies key organizations responsible for pushing the development of text mining. A section…

  10. The Importance of Understanding Hierarchical Relations between High Order Mental Functions in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetto Farina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art in studies on mentalization suggests that capacity to understand other minds (mindreading, self introspection and consciousness, mental time travel in the past and the present, linguistic communication, are different components of a hierarchical organization of several functions reflecting the evolutionary development of the specie and integrates increasingly complex, mutually coordinated brain levels. The understanding of the precise hierarchical relations between them, that reflect the phylo- and ontogenetic evolutionary pathway for adaptation to the complex interpersonal and socio-cultural environment, has an essential application in psychopathology and psychotherapy, in particular for those clinical conditions where the normal integration of high order mental functions is hampered by developmental relational trauma.

  11. Full text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IndexCopernicus Portal System

    language disabilities [147]. The various forms of traumatic injury therefore represent a ..... 6. Bone RC. Immunologic dissonance: a continuing evolution in our understanding of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the multiple.

  12. Fundamental understanding and rational design of high energy structural microbatteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuxing; Li, Qiuyan; Cartmell, Samuel; Li, Huidong; Mendoza, Sarah; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Xiao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Microbatteries play a critical role in determining the lifetime of downsized sensors, wearable devices and medical applications, etc. More often, structural batteries are required from the perspective of aesthetics and space utilization, which is however rarely explored. Herein, we discuss the fundamental issues associated with the rational design of practically usable high energy microbatteries. The tubular shape of the cell further allows the flexible integration of microelectronics. A functioning acoustic micro-transmitter continuously powered by this tubular battery has been successfully demonstrated. Multiple design features adopted to accommodate large mechanical stress during the rolling process are discussed providing new insights in designing the structural microbatteries for emerging technologies.

  13. Linguistic parameters of Russian texts by suicides and persons with a high risk of self-destructive behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litvinova Tatiana Aleksandrovna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of identifying the features of speech (both oral and written of persons in different mental states and constructing mathematical models for classifying texts depending on the author's mental state is one of the topical and actively developed problems of modern computer and psychiatric linguistics. Most of these studies are based on the material of the English language. The work presents a review of the research devoted to the analysis of written texts of persons who commit suicide as well as persons with a high risk of self-destructive behaviour, with special attention paid to work done on the material of the Russian language. Prospects for further research are also outlined.

  14. Design of the high voltage isolation transmission module with low delay for ECRH system on J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiyan, MA; Donghui, XIA; Zhijiang, WANG; Fangtai, CUI; Zhenxiong, YU; Yikun, JIN; Changhai, LIU

    2018-02-01

    As a flexible auxiliary heating method, the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has been widely used in many tokamaks and also will be applied for the J-TEXT tokamak. To meet requirements of protection and fault analysis for the ECRH system on J-TEXT, signals of gyrotrons such as the cathode voltage and current, the anode voltage and current, etc should be transmitted to the control and data acquisition system. Considering the high voltage environment of gyrotrons, isolation transmission module based on FPGA and optical fiber communication has been designed and tested. The test results indicate that the designed module has strong anti-noise ability, low error rate and high transmission speed. The delay of the module is no more than 5 μs which can fulfill the requirements.

  15. Controller adherence following hospital discharge in high risk children: A pilot randomized trial of text message reminders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chén C; Gruschow, Siobhan M; Quarshie, William O; Griffis, Heather; Leach, Michelle C; Zorc, Joseph J; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra C; Miller, Victoria A; Feudtner, Chris

    2018-02-13

    To assess the feasibility of a mobile health, inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) adherence reminder intervention and to characterize adherence trajectories immediately following severe asthma exacerbation in high-risk urban children with persistent asthma. Children aged 2-13 with persistent asthma were enrolled in this pilot randomized controlled trial during an asthma emergency department (ED) visit or hospitalization. Intervention arm participants received daily text message reminders for 30 days, and both arms received electronic sensors to measure ICS use. Primary outcomes were feasibility of sensor use and text message acceptability. Secondary outcomes included adherence to prescribed ICS regimen and 30-day adherence trajectories. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to examine adherence trajectories. Forty-one participants (mean age 5.9) were randomized to intervention (n = 21) or control (n = 20). Overall, 85% were Black, 88% had public insurance, and 51% of the caregivers had a high school education or less. Thirty-two participant families (78%) transmitted medication adherence data; of caregivers who completed the acceptability survey, 25 (96%) chose to receive daily reminders beyond that study interval. Secondary outcome analyses demonstrated similar average daily adherence between groups (intervention = 36%; control = 32%, P = 0.73). Three adherence trajectories were identified with none ever exceeding 80% adherence. Within a high-risk pediatric cohort, electronic monitoring of ICS use and adherence reminders delivered via text message were feasible for most participants, but there was no signal of effect. Adherence trajectories following severe exacerbation were suboptimal, demonstrating an important opportunity for asthma care improvement.

  16. Understanding a Text from the 1980s Unrest in South Africa: A Teacher-Led Reading of a Novel at a Rural School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiba, Maropeng; Stewart, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we draw on theories of teaching English as a second language (L2) to examine ways in which a teacher taught a novel to Grade 9 students whose home language is not English. How this second language English-speaker engaged with and spoke about her teaching highlighted her understanding of the challenges students seemed to experience…

  17. Understanding gastric forces calculated from high-resolution pill tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Bryan; Tripathi, Anubhav; Schlageter, Vincent; Kucera, Pavel; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2010-05-04

    Although other methods exist for monitoring gastrointestinal motility and contractility, this study exclusively provides direct and quantitative measurements of the forces experienced by an orally ingested pill. We report motive forces and torques calculated from real-time, in vivo measurements of the movement of a magnetic pill in the stomachs of fasted and fed humans. Three-dimensional net force and two-dimensional net torque vectors as a function of time data during gastric residence are evaluated using instantaneous translational and rotational position data. Additionally, the net force calculations described can be applied to high-resolution pill tracking acquired by any modality. The fraction of time pills experience ranges of forces and torques are analyzed and correlate with the physiological phases of gastric digestion. We also report the maximum forces and torques experienced in vivo by pills as a quantitative measure of the amount of force pills experience during the muscular contractions leading to gastric emptying. Results calculated from human data are compared with small and large animal models with a translational research focus. The reported magnitude and direction of gastric forces experienced by pills in healthy stomachs serves as a baseline for comparison with pathophysiological states. Of clinical significance, the directionality associated with force vector data may be useful in determining the muscle groups associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility. Additionally, the quantitative comparison between human and animal models improves insight into comparative gastric contractility that will aid rational pill design and provide a quantitative framework for interpreting gastroretentive oral formulation test results.

  18. Health impacts of Facebook usage and mobile texting among undergraduate dental students: it's time to understand the difference between usage and an excessive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y L; Verma, R K; Yadav, H; Barua, A

    2016-11-01

    Facebook and mobile texting are prevalent in the lives of almost every student. However, little is known about the relationship between Facebook usage or mobile texting and their impacts on health amongst undergraduate dental students. In this study, excessive Facebook use and excessive mobile texting were studied as they relate to impacts on health. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a private university in Malaysia. A total of 188 undergraduate dental students were interviewed using a pre-tested and self-rated questionnaire. Data collected from participants were analysed using SPSS version 18.0. Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to study the relationship between explanatory variables and excessive Facebook use and excessive mobile texting. The prevalence of excessive Facebook use and excessive mobile texting amongst undergraduate dental students was found to be 33.2% and 33.0%, respectively. According to a multivariate analysis, texting habits, such as the presence of daytime sleepiness after texting late at night (aOR = 2.682, 95% CI = 1.142-6.301) and the presence of anxious feelings if students failed to receive a timely response (aOR = 3.819, 95% CI = 1.580-9.230), were determined to be significant predictors of excessive mobile texting. Excessive Facebook use was found to be significantly related to three variables as follows: fewer numbers of close friends (aOR = 2.275, 95% CI = 1.057-4.898), the checking of updates on the Facebook walls of their friends (aOR = 2.582, 95% CI = 1.189-5.605) and the absence of active and vigorous feelings during Facebook use (aOR = 3.401, 95% CI = 1.233-9.434). Approximately one-third of undergraduate dental students in this study experienced excessive Facebook use and/or excessive mobile texting. Health education and promotion should be instituted to create awareness, whilst students should be advised to practise self-control with respect to

  19. NMR initiatives on understanding high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaoka, Y.; Mukuda, H.; Shimizu, S.; Abe, M.; Iyo, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Kito, H.; Tokiwa, K.; Watanabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We review a recent progress of NMR studies [H. Mukuda, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96 (2006) 087001; S. Shimizu, et al., submitted for publication.] on multi-layered cuprates. This work has shed new light to a generic phase diagram of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) which suggests a competition between antiferromagnetism (AFM) and superconductivity (SC). The multi-layered cuprates include two types of CuO 2 planes, an outer CuO 2 plane (OP) in a pyramidal coordination and an inner CuO 2 plane (IP) in a square one with no apical oxygen. Remarkable feature of the multi-layered systems is the presence of ideally flat CuO 2 planes that are homogeneously doped. Systematic Cu-NMR studies on the optimally-doped five-layered HgBa 2 Ca 4 Cu 5 O 12+δ (Hg-1245(OPT)) and slightly overdoped Tl-1245(OVD) have revealed the coexistent phase of SC and AFM in a unit cell [H. Kotegawa, et al., Phys. Rev. B 64 (2001) 064515; H. Kotegawa, et al., Phys. Rev. B 69 (2004) 014501.]. The optimally doped two OPs are predominantly superconducting with T c =108 and 100K, whereas the under-doped three IPs show the AFM order below T N =60 and 45K for Hg-1245(OPT) and Tl-1245(OVD), respectively. Recently exciting is the finding of the uniform mixing of AFM and HTSC in a single CuO 2 layer in the under-doped Hg-1245(UD) and the heavily underdoped four-layered Ba 2 Ca 3 Cu 4 O 8 F 2 (0234F(2.0)) that has fluorine ions (F 1- ) as apical ions [H. Mukuda, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96 (2006) 087001; S. Shimizu, et al., submitted for publication.]. In Hg-1245(UD) with T c =72K and T N =290K, the OPs exhibit the uniform mixing of AFM and HTSC with AFM moment of M AFM (OP)=0.1μ B , whereas the IPs are possibly AFM insulators with a small doping [H. Mukuda, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96 (2006) 087001.]. In 0234F(2.0) with T c =55K and T N =100K, the uniform mixing of AFM and HTSC is demonstrated to take place in electron (n)-doped IPs [S. Shimizu, et al., submitted for publication.], thanks to insight

  20. Effect of Précis Writing Instruction on the Creation of Cohesive Text by Iranian High School EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfollah Karimi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Being expert in establishing cohesion and coherence in writing is not an easy task. The EFL learners are to pass through very long, uneven paths such as précis exercise to achieve this skill. The present study was launched to explore the effect of précis writing on the creation of a compact text. To this end, a true-experimental method of research with the pretest-posttest control design was employed. Via double-stage sampling, 40 female students were selected at Fatemeh-al-Zahra High School in Kabutarahang, Hamedan, Iran. The control group was taught some grammatical structures such as active and passive voices, reduced adjective clauses, and different tenses in English during twelve sessions; while the experimental group received a lesson plan consisting of twelve sessions of précis writing. To analyze the data collected via pretest and posttest, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was run. The findings of the study indicated that the participants in the experimental group performed better in producing cohesive and qualified texts than those in the control group. The conclusion drawn was that teaching précis, as a basic skill, can improve the writing ability and provide the students with more opportunities to utilize the cohesive devices and consequently produce more cohesive pieces of text.

  1. Upgraded high time-resolved x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy system for J-TEXT ohmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Li, Q. L.; Yan, W.; Luo, Y. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the upgraded x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) system on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) tokamak and the latest experimental results obtained in last campaign. With 500 Hz frame rate of the new Pilatus detector and 5 cm × 10 cm spherically bent crystal, the XICS system can provide core electron temperature (T e ), core ion temperature (T i ), and plasma toroidal rotation (V Φ ) with a maximum temporal resolution of 2 ms for J-TEXT pure ohmic plasmas. These parameters with high temporal resolution are very useful in tokamak plasma research, especially for rapidly changed physical processes. The experimental results from the upgraded XICS system are presented

  2. Development of hard X-ray spectrometer with high time resolution on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.K.; Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D.W.; Tong, R.H.; Yan, W.; Wang, S.Y.; Dai, A.J.; Wang, X.L.

    2017-06-01

    A hard X-ray (HXR) spectrometer has been developed to study the runaway electrons during the sawtooth activities and during the runaway current plateau phase on the J-TEXT tokamak. The spectrometer system contains four NaI scintillator detectors and a multi-channel analyzer (MCA) with 0.5 ms time resolution. The dedicated peak detection circuit embedded in the MCA provides a pulse height analysis at count rate up to 1.2 million counts per second (Mcps), which is the key to reach the high time resolution. The accuracy and reliability of the system have been verified by comparing with the hardware integrator of HXR flux. The temporal evolution of HXR flux in different energy ranges can be obtained with high time resolution by this dedicated HXR spectrometer. The response of runaway electron transport with different energy during the sawtooth activities can be studied. The energy evolution of runaway electrons during the plateau phase of runaway current can be obtained. - Highlights: • A HXR spectrometer with high time resolution has been developed on J-TEXT tokamak. • The response of REs transport during the sawtooth activities can be investigated. • The energy evolution of REs following the disruptions can be monitored.

  3. An Investigation of High School Social Studies Teachers' Understandings of Vocabulary Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Janis; Antuna, Marcos; Juarez, Lucinda; Wood, Karen D.; Vintinner, Jean

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on high school social studies teachers' understandings of and perspectives about vocabulary acquisition and instruction. The research questions were the following: (1) What do high school social studies teachers understand about vocabulary instruction? and (2) How do high school social studies teachers support…

  4. Text Maps: Helping Students Navigate Informational Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda H.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that a text map is an instructional approach designed to help students gain fluency in reading content area materials. Discusses how the goal is to teach students about the important features of the material and how the maps can be used to build new understandings. Presents the procedures for preparing and using a text map. (SG)

  5. Dificuldades de compreensão de textos em situação de vestibular = Difficulties relates to text understanding in vestibular examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair Vieira Gonçalves

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho é pautado na concepção de leitura como forma de interação sujeitos/texto/contexto e destina-se a discutir algumas perspectivas de leitura textual, bem como apresentar uma visão de alguns documentos oficiais e órgãos de pesquisa da educação. Na parte analítica, objetiva-se investigar uma questão da prova de Língua Portuguesa do vestibular de 2008 da Unicamp, articulando o comando da pergunta, a sugestão de resposta elaborada pela banca examinadora e seis respostas emitidas por candidatos. A fim de mapear as dificuldades de compreensão de alunos apresentadas nas respostas de uma questão envolvendo a leitura de um exemplar do gênero tirinha, a pesquisa pauta-se na no conceito de sistemas de conhecimentos da Linguística Textual: conhecimentos linguísticos, enciclopédicos e interacionais. A análise do corpus demonstra a relevância de uma leitura baseada na funcionalidade do gênero tirinha e no acionamento dos conhecimentos linguísticos, enciclopédicos e interacionais pressupostos não somente no texto da tira, mas também na textualidade do comando da questão do vestibular.This study is based on the concept of reading as a way of interaction among subjects/text/context. It aims at discussing some perspectives of textual reading as well as to present a view of some official documents and educational research institutions. In the analytical part, it aims at investigating one question from the Portuguese Test of 'Vestibular' from 2008 at Unicamp University, articulating the command of the question to the suggestion of answer elaborated by the examiners and six answers given by the candidates. In order to map the students difficulties of comprehension presented in the answersinvolving reading of an excerpt of Comic Strip genre, the research is based on the concept of knowledge systems of Textual Linguistics: linguistics knowledge, encyclopedic and interactional. Thus, the analysis demonstrates the relevance of

  6. Reorganized text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Reorganized Text: In the Original Investigation titled “Patterns of Hospital Utilization for Head and Neck Cancer Care: Changing Demographics” posted online in the January 29, 2015, issue of JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery (doi:10.1001 /jamaoto.2014.3603), information was copied within sections and text rearranged to accommodate Continuing Medical Education quiz formatting. The information from the topic statements of each paragraph in the Hypothesis Testing subsection of the Methods section was collected in a new first paragraph for that subsection, which reads as follows: “Several hypotheses regarding the causes of regionalization of HNCA care were tested using the NIS data: (1) increasing patient comorbidities over time, causing a shift in care to teaching institutions that would theoretically be better equipped to handle such increased comorbidities; (2) shifting of payer status; (3) increased proportion of prior radiation therapy; and (4) a higher fraction of more complex procedures being referred and performed at teaching institutions.” In addition, the phrase "As summarized in Table3," was added to the beginning of paragraph 6 of the Discussion section, and the call-out to Table 3 in the middle of that paragraph was deleted. Finally, paragraphs 6 and 7 of the Discussion section were combined.

  7. Harnessing Reddit to Understand the Written-Communication Challenges Experienced by Individuals With Mental Health Disorders: Analysis of Texts From Mental Health Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Albert; Conway, Mike

    2018-04-10

    online health communities. Our results also suggest that participating in these platforms has the potential to improve members' written communication. For example, members of all three mental health communities showed statistically significant improvement in both lexical diversity and readability compared with members of the OHC focusing on positive emotion. We provide new insights into the written communication challenges faced by individuals suffering from depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. A comparison with three other online health communities suggests that written communication in mental health communities is significantly more difficult to read, while also consisting of a significantly less diverse lexicon. We contribute practical suggestions for utilizing our findings in Web-based communication settings to enhance members' communicative experience. We consider these findings to be an important step toward understanding and addressing everyday written communication challenges among individuals suffering from mental disorders. ©Albert Park, Mike Conway. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 10.04.2018.

  8. The effectiveness of multi modal representation text books to improve student's scientific literacy of senior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakiya, Hanifah; Sinaga, Parlindungan; Hamidah, Ida

    2017-05-01

    The results of field studies showed the ability of science literacy of students was still low. One root of the problem lies in the books used in learning is not oriented toward science literacy component. This study focused on the effectiveness of the use of textbook-oriented provisioning capability science literacy by using multi modal representation. The text books development method used Design Representational Approach Learning to Write (DRALW). Textbook design which was applied to the topic of "Kinetic Theory of Gases" is implemented in XI grade students of high school learning. Effectiveness is determined by consideration of the effect and the normalized percentage gain value, while the hypothesis was tested using Independent T-test. The results showed that the textbooks which were developed using multi-mode representation science can improve the literacy skills of students. Based on the size of the effect size textbooks developed with representation multi modal was found effective in improving students' science literacy skills. The improvement was occurred in all the competence and knowledge of scientific literacy. The hypothesis testing showed that there was a significant difference on the ability of science literacy between class that uses textbooks with multi modal representation and the class that uses the regular textbook used in schools.

  9. Unified Theory of Inference for Text Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-25

    constitutes a very unusual event in the real world. In the domain of fairy tales, it is more common to have animals acting in a manner similar to human...FRUMP program was tested with stories taken directly off the UPI newswire, and was able to correctly summarize over half the news stories that referred...8217THEY’ refers to the FISH. because the FISH is not a SENTIENT -AGENT. FAUSTUS represents the word "they" as a group of unspecified nature. So markers are

  10. TACITUS: Text Understanding for Strategic Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    34 "Hummingbirds can fly," " Giraffes can’t fly," and so forth, we can say "One’s species determines whether or not one can fly," and allow cases to build up over...reached a significant size, we will ance, compatibility, modularity, and evolution of begin experimenting with more general solutions and man-machine

  11. A Parallel Neuromorphic Text Recognition System and Its Implementation on a Heterogeneous High-Performance Computing Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    book “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens . The text consists of 96,767 letters or 23,912 words. The text has not been read during the training process... Charles Dickens and the book “Lost World” by Arthur Conan Doyle. Neither of these books has been read during the training. We increase the percentage of

  12. Understanding the High Ionic Conductivity in Nanostructured Ytterbium Stabilized Zirconia Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Benítez-Rico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, high ionic conduction has been reported in nanostructured materials. This increase in conductivity can be important in technological applications, including micro-Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, so the understanding of this phenomenon is essential. In this work, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, EDS maps, and UV-Visible spectroscopy measurements are used to have an insight into the relationship between structural and electrical properties in nanostructured ytterbium stabilized zirconia (YbSZ thin films prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Raman measurements allowed the identification of a mixture of tetragonal and cubic phases at 4% of Yb doping, which cannot be detected by XRD, while the compositional maps suggest that Yb can be located preferentially in the grain boundaries. Changes in the activation energy values in bulk and grain boundaries are related to the small grain sizes (≤10 nm. UV measurements support the ionic nature of the charge transport. These results indicate that the high conductivity is a consequence of different physical parameters in the films such as stress in the materials, different crystalline phases, impurities diffusion to the grain boundaries, and the presence or absence of electronic conduction. A model that explains the increase of conductivity in nanostructured materials must include all these aspects.

  13. LINGUISTIC FEATURES OF THE RUSSIAN TEXTS OF PERSONS WHO COMMITTED SUICIDE AND PERSONS WITH A HIGH RISK OF AUTOAGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagorovskaya, O.V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising areas of modern research is speech analysis for the purpose of identifying the mental state and assessing the mental health of the speaker / writer. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in solving problems of this kind with the use of methods and tools for computer linguistics and data mining. A separate scientific problem far from its solution and, undoubtedly, requiring consolidation of the efforts of psychologists, linguists and experts in the intellectual analysis of data, is the problem of diagnosing a propensity for autoaggressive behavior (and suicide as an extreme form of it based on linguistic analysis of writing. This problem has not only theoretical, but also obvious practical significance. Using the methods of natural language processing, scientists analyze the texts (mostly English of suiciders and build models that classify the text as belonging or not belonging to the suicider, and reveal the characteristics of such texts. At the same time, if earlier mainly the fiction texts of suiciders were analyzed, then in the newest works scientists study Internet texts (blogs, tweets, Facebook posts etc. of persons who committed suicide or express their intention to commit it. The Russian language has long remained on the periphery of such studies. The article presents the results of studies aimed at identifying the linguistic features of Russian-language texts of persons who committed suicide, as well as persons prone to autoaggressive behavior. The studies used methods and techniques of corpus linguistics, computer linguistics, statistical analysis. Prospects for further research are indicated.

  14. Defending Interpretations of Literary Texts: The Effects of Topoi Instruction on the Literary Arguments of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William E.; Ferretti, Ralph P.

    2009-01-01

    The study of literature has many important benefits for students, but research shows that students often have difficulty interpreting literary texts, are unable to read critically, and are challenged to write interpretations that go beyond basic plot summary. This article provides a theoretical interpretation of the processes by which students…

  15. Understanding the Reading Attributes and Their Cognitive Relationships on a High-Stakes Biology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlusyk, Kevin James

    Test items used to assess learners' knowledge on high-stakes science examinations contain contextualized questions that unintentionally assess reading skill along with conceptual knowledge. Therefore, students who are not proficient readers are unable to comprehend the text within the test item to demonstrate effectively their level of science knowledge. The purpose of this quantitative study was to understand what reading attributes were required to successfully answer the Biology 30 Diploma Exam. Furthermore, the research sought to understand the cognitive relationships among the reading attributes through quantitative analysis structured by the Attribute Hierarchy Model (AHM). The research consisted of two phases: (1) Cognitive development, where the cognitive attributes of the Biology 30 Exam were specified and hierarchy structures were developed; and (2) Psychometric analysis, that statistically tested the attribute hierarchy using the Hierarchy Consistency Index (HCI), and calculate attribute probabilities. Phase one of the research used January 2011, Biology 30 Diploma Exam, while phase two accessed archival data for the 9985 examinees who took the assessment on January 24th, 2011. Phase one identified ten specific reading attributes, of which five were identified as unique subsets of vocabulary, two were identified as reading visual representations, and three corresponded to general reading skills. Four hierarchical cognitive model were proposed then analyzed using the HCI as a mechanism to explain the relationship among the attributes. Model A had the highest HCI value (0.337), indicating an overall poor data fit, yet for the top achieving examinees the model had an excellent model fit with an HCI value of 0.888, and for examinees that scored over 60% there was a moderate model fit (HCI = 0.592). Linear regressions of the attribute probability estimates suggest that there is a cognitive relationship among six of the ten reading attributes (R2 = 0.958 and 0

  16. Are we getting to the point of understanding high-temperature superconductivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, R.P.; Tsuei, C.C.; Newns, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    The model elaborated by van Hove allows a coherent explanation of various anomalies observed with the phenomenon of high-T c superconductivity, including the cause of T c reaching such a high value, or the materials behaving like marginal Fermi liquids. However, there remain other enigma to be solved before it will be possible to fully explain and understand high-T c superconductivity. (DG) [de

  17. Off the Radar and Ubiquitous: Text Messaging and Its Relationship to "Drama" and Cyberbullying in an Affluent, Academically Rigorous US High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kathleen P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study explores text messaging in a suburban US high school. Survey questions were answered by students (mean age 16.0; SD = 1.23) regarding the prevalence of bullying and victimization via text messaging. Students and staff members responded to a survey item regarding perceptions of hostile text messaging. Both students and…

  18. Text mining-based in silico drug discovery in oral mucositis caused by high-dose cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jon; Shah, Nirav; Noll, Braxton; Stevens, Craig B; Lawler, Marshall; Mougeot, Farah B; Mougeot, Jean-Luc C

    2018-02-23

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and radiation used in cancer treatment. Due to the complex nature of OM, currently available drug-based treatments are of limited efficacy. Our objectives were (i) to determine genes and molecular pathways associated with OM and wound healing using computational tools and publicly available data and (ii) to identify drugs formulated for topical use targeting the relevant OM molecular pathways. OM and wound healing-associated genes were determined by text mining, and the intersection of the two gene sets was selected for gene ontology analysis using the GeneCodis program. Protein interaction network analysis was performed using STRING-db. Enriched gene sets belonging to the identified pathways were queried against the Drug-Gene Interaction database to find drug candidates for topical use in OM. Our analysis identified 447 genes common to both the "OM" and "wound healing" text mining concepts. Gene enrichment analysis yielded 20 genes representing six pathways and targetable by a total of 32 drugs which could possibly be formulated for topical application. A manual search on ClinicalTrials.gov confirmed no relevant pathway/drug candidate had been overlooked. Twenty-five of the 32 drugs can directly affect the PTGS2 (COX-2) pathway, the pathway that has been targeted in previous clinical trials with limited success. Drug discovery using in silico text mining and pathway analysis tools can facilitate the identification of existing drugs that have the potential of topical administration to improve OM treatment.

  19. Perspectives for an integrated understanding of tropical and temperate high-mountain lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Catalan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High mountain lakes are extreme freshwater ecosystems and excellent sentinels of current global change. They are likely among the most comparable ecosystems across the world. The largest contrast occurs between lakes in temperate and tropical areas. The main difference arises from the seasonal patterns of heat exchange and the external loadings (carbon, phosphorus, metals. The consequence is a water column structure based on temperature, in temperate lakes, and oxygen, in tropical lakes. This essential difference implies that, in tropical lakes, one can expect a more sustained productivity throughout the year; a higher nutrient internal loading based on the mineralization of external organic matter; higher nitrification-denitrification potential related to the oxyclines; and a higher metal mobilization due to the permanently reduced bottom layer. Quantifying and linking these and other biogeochemical pathways to particular groups of organisms is in the current agenda of high-mountain limnology. The intrinsic difficulties of the taxonomic study of many of the organisms inhabiting these systems can be now overcome with the use of molecular techniques. These techniques will not only provide a much less ambiguous taxonomic knowledge of the microscopic world, but also will unveil new biogeochemical pathways that are difficult to measure chemically and will solve biogeographical puzzles of the distribution of some macroscopic organism, tracing the relationship with other areas. Daily variability and vertical gradients in the tropics are the main factors of phytoplankton species turnover in tropical lakes; whereas seasonality is the main driver in temperate communities. The study of phytoplankton in high-mountain lakes only makes sense in an integrated view of the microscopic ecosystem. A large part of the plankton biomass is in heterotrophic, and mixotrophic organisms and prokaryotes compete for dissolved resources with eukaryotic autotrophs. In fact

  20. Using text messaging to obtain weekly data on infant feeding in a Danish birth cohort resulted in high participation rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Signe; Wedderkopp, Niels; Mølgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    .1% exclusively. Complementary food was introduced at an average age of 20 weeks. Breastfeeding cessation was associated with maternal smoking, lower maternal age and supplementation with infant formula in the first days after birth (all pbreastfeeding, but only 1......AIM: Our aim was to use text message questions to obtain prospective, real-time data on exclusive and partial breastfeeding and introduction to complementary foods in a Danish birth cohort. We also wanted to identify factors influencing breastfeeding initiation and cessation. METHODS: This study...... formed part of the Odense Child Cohort and focused on mothers who gave birth to full-term singletons between April and October 2012. They received the same three to five questions, about breastfeeding, infant formula and introduction to complementary foods, three days after birth and then at weekly...

  1. ERRORS IN NARRATIVE TEXT COMMITTED BY STUDENTS IN GRADE XI OF VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL (SMK STATE 4 SURAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Mulyono -

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimes to identify the types of  errors in the students’ writing, to  know the frequencies of each type of errors, and to investigate the causes of errors. There are three types of errors occured in the students’ writing namely lexical error, syntactical error, and discourse error. The errors can be categorized into twenty four subcategories of errors: wrong spelling words (10,35%, wrong selection words (15,53%, omission verb (0,74%, omission v-ing after preposition for (0,55%, addition unnecessary verb (0,74%, using simple present tense refers to simple past (22,37%, use simple future instead of past future (2,40%, using irregular past verb tense after to infinitive (2,40%, addition final ed after to infinitive (1,85%, addition v-ing after to infinitive (1,11%, addition double marking verb (1,66%, omission to be (11,65%, addition to be (1,29%, omission s/es in the use of plural noun (2,40%, addition s in singular noun (1,29%, omission article (6,47%, addition unnecessary article (1,66%, wrong article (1,11%, wrong subject pronoun (2,03%, wrong object pronoun (0,55%, wrong possessive pronoun (2,03%, generic structure (2,96%, reference (2,03%, wrong selection conjunction (4,81%. The most dominant error is in syntactical error i.e. using simple present tense refers to simple past with the percentage 22,37%. Those errors are caused by four aspects, they are overgeneralization, incomplete application of rules, ignorance of rule restrictions, and false concept hypothesized.

  2. Zum Bildungspotenzial biblischer Texte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theis, Joachim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Biblical education as a holistic process goes far beyond biblical learning. It must be understood as a lifelong process, in which both biblical texts and their understanders operate appropriating their counterpart in a dialogical way. – Neither does the recipient’s horizon of understanding appear as an empty room, which had to be filled with the text only, nor is the latter a dead material one could only examine cognitively. The recipient discovers the meaning of the biblical text recomposing it by existential appropriation. So the text is brought to live in each individual reality. Both scientific insights and subjective structures as well as the understanders’ community must be included to avoid potential one-sidednesses. Unfortunately, a special negative association obscures the approach of the bible very often: Still biblical work as part of religious education appears in a cognitively oriented habit, which is neither regarding the vitality and sovereignty of the biblical texts nor the students’ desire for meaning. Moreover, the bible is getting misused for teaching moral terms or pontifications. Such downfalls can be disrupted by biblical didactics which are empowerment didactics. Regarding the sovereignty of biblical texts, these didactics assist the understander with his/her individuation by opening the texts with focus on the understander’s otherness. Thus each the text and the recipient become subjects in a dialogue. The approach of the Biblical-Enabling-Didactics leads the Bible to become always new a book of life. Understanding them from within their hermeneutics, empowerment didactics could be raised to the principle of biblical didactics in general and grow into an essential element of holistic education.

  3. High School Students' Proficiency and Confidence Levels in Displaying Their Understanding of Basic Electrolysis Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Ding Teng; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted with 330 Form 4 (grade 10) students (aged 15-16 years) who were involved in a course of instruction on electrolysis concepts. The main purposes of this study were (1) to assess high school chemistry students' understanding of 19 major principles of electrolysis using a recently developed 2-tier multiple-choice diagnostic…

  4. Reflective Voices: Understanding University Students' Experiences of Urban High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackman, Jeremy; Chepyator-Thomson, Jepkorir

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand first-year college students' reflections on past physical education (PE) experiences in urban high school settings. Method: Data collection included semi-structured, open-ended, qualitative interviews. Constant comparison method was used for data analysis. Results: Several findings emerged: (a)…

  5. Beyond "Is This OK?": High School Writers Building Understandings of Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Anne Elrod; Ridgeman, Michael; Masquelier, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Understandings about genre govern nearly all of the choices writers make. They make choices about form, persuasive moves, conventions, and even ideas through a sense, whether articulated or tacit, of the social situation from which a piece of writing is arising. In a semester-long high school writing course, the authors engaged students in a…

  6. The International Status of English for Intercultural Understanding in Taiwan's High School EFL Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya-Chen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate linguistic and cultural issues around the status of English as a lingua franca and intercultural understanding as presented in one set of Taiwan's (English as a Foreign Language (EFL) high school textbooks. The methodology centres on the analysis of textbook content as categorized in three central themes:…

  7. The Effect of Conceptual Change Model in the Senior High School Students’ Understanding and Character in Learning Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santyasa I Wayan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning physics for senior high school (SMA students is often coloured by misconceptions that hinder students in achieving deep understanding. So a relevant learning model is needed. This study aims to examine the effect of conceptual change model (CCM compared with direct instruction model (DIM on the students’ conceptual understanding and character in the subject area of motion and force. This quasi-experimental research using a non-equivalence pre-test post-test control groups design. The population is 20 classes (738 students of grade X consisted of 8 classes (272 students of SMA 1 Amlapura, 8 classes (256 students of SMA 2 Amlapura, and 6 classes (210 students of SMA 1 Manggis in Karangasem regency in Bali. The random assignment technique is used to assign 6 classes (202 students, or 26.5% of the population. In each school there are set 2 classes each as a CCM group and DIM groups. The data of students’ conceptual understanding is collected by tests, while the characters by questionnaires. To analyse the data a one way MANCOVA statistics was used. The result of the analysis showed that there was a significant difference of effect between CCM group and DIM group on the students’ conceptual understanding and character. The effect of the CCM group is higher than the DIM group on the students’ conceptual understanding and character in learning subject area of motion and force.

  8. Should We Be Afraid of Simple Messages? The Effects of Text Difficulty and Illustrations in People With Low or High Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meppelink, Corine S; Smit, Edith G; Buurman, Bianca M; van Weert, Julia C M

    2015-01-01

    It is often recommended that health information should be simplified for people with low health literacy. However, little is known about whether messages adapted to low health literacy audiences are also effective for people with high health literacy, or whether simple messages are counterproductive in this group. Using a two (illustrated vs. text-only) by two (nondifficult vs. difficult text) between-subjects design, we test whether older adults with low (n = 279) versus high health literacy (n = 280) respond differently to colorectal cancer screening messages. Results showed that both health literacy groups recalled information best when the text was nondifficult. Reduced text difficulty did not lead to negative attitudes or less intention to have screening among people with high health literacy. Benefits of illustrations, in terms of improved recall and attitudes, were only found in people with low health literacy who were exposed to difficult texts. This was not found for people with high health literacy. In terms of informed decisions, nondifficult and illustrated messages resulted in the best informed decisions in the low health literacy group, whereas the high health literacy group benefited from nondifficult text in general, regardless of illustrations. Our findings imply that materials adapted to lower health literacy groups can also be used for a more general audience, as they do not deter people with high health literacy.

  9. Understanding and Prevention of Transient Voltages and Dielectric Breakdown in High Voltage Battery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    From - To) 07/31/2017 Final 4/1/2016 - 5/31/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Understanding and Prevention of Transient Voltages and...and Prevention of Transient Voltages and Dielectric Breakdown in High Voltage Battery Systems Submitted to: Mr. Donald Hoffman donald.hoffman...the next hurdle was to begin to evaluate the suppression topologies ability to prevent transients. IV.a. TVS Diodes TVS diodes were evaluated from

  10. Reflective Writing for a Better Understanding of Scientific Concepts in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Helou, Joseph; Kalman, Calvin S.

    2018-02-01

    Science teachers can always benefit from efficient tools that help students to engage with the subject and understand it better without significantly adding to the teacher's workload nor requiring too much of class time to manage. Reflective writing is such a low-impact, high-return tool. What follows is an introduction to reflective writing, and more on its usefulness for teachers is given in the last part of this article.

  11. Family physicians understanding about Mantoux test: A survey from a high endemic TB country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Niloufer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a global health emergency and is a big challenge to diagnose and manage it. Family physicians being first contact health persons should be well competent to diagnose and manage the patients with tuberculosis. Aims This study was aimed to assess the level of understanding about Mantoux Test amongst Family Physicians in Karachi, Pakistan and to determine the difference of level of understanding by gender and number of tuberculosis patients seen in a month. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted among 200 Family Physicians working in Karachi; the largest city and economic hub of Pakistan. Family Physicians who attended Continuous Medical Education sessions were approached after taking consent. Pre-tested, self administered questionnaire was filled consisting of: basic demographic characteristics, questions regarding knowledge about Mantoux Test, its application and interpretation. Data of 159 questionnaires was analyzed for percentages, as rest were incomplete. Chi square test was used to calculate the difference of understanding levels between various groups. Results Almost two thirds of respondents were males and above 35 years of age. Majority of Family Physicians were private practitioners and seeing more than five tuberculosis patients per month. Overall, a big gap was identified about the knowledge of Mantoux Test among study participants. Only 18.8% of Family Physicians secured Excellent (≥ 80% correct responses. This poor level of understanding was almost equally distributed in all comparative groups (Male = 20.8% versus Female = 15.9%; p - 0.69 and (Seen Conclusion Our study revealed an overall major deficit in understanding and interpretation of Mantoux Test amongst Family Physicians which needs to be addressed. Continues Medical Education sessions for Family Physicians should be organized in regular basis for upgrading their knowledge in this regards.

  12. Fundamental understanding and development of low-cost, high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROHATGI,A.; NARASIMHA,S.; MOSCHER,J.; EBONG,A.; KAMRA,S.; KRYGOWSKI,T.; DOSHI,P.; RISTOW,A.; YELUNDUR,V.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

    2000-05-01

    The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  13. CSRNet: Dilated Convolutional Neural Networks for Understanding the Highly Congested Scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaofan; Chen, Deming

    2018-01-01

    We propose a network for Congested Scene Recognition called CSRNet to provide a data-driven and deep learning method that can understand highly congested scenes and perform accurate count estimation as well as present high-quality density maps. The proposed CSRNet is composed of two major components: a convolutional neural network (CNN) as the front-end for 2D feature extraction and a dilated CNN for the back-end, which uses dilated kernels to deliver larger reception fields and to replace po...

  14. Correlation of understanding of physics and psychological symptoms among high-school students in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggeliki, Anagnostopoulou; Miltiades, Kyprianou; Antigoni-Elisavet, Rota; Evangelia, Pavlatou; Loizos, Zaphiris

    2017-09-01

    Depression may essentially influence cognitive function contributing to poor school performance. The present study undertakes to determine the existence and strength of correlation between depressive symptomatology and other mental conditions with the acquired level of understanding of Newtonian physics taught in schools. The current study recruited 490 students (262 girls, 228 boys) attending the first semester of the Greek Second Grade of General Lyceum School. Force Concept Inventory (FCI) tested the depth of the students’ understanding of Newtonian Physics. Symptom Checklist-90-R assessed general mental status. The tests took place in the classroom during a 1 h session. Low FCI scores significantly correlated with mental conditions, with depression ranking first. Girls had higher scores in all nine symptoms scales of SCL-90 and lower FCI scores. Stepwise regression models proved that the gender effect on FCI could be effectively explained through the significant effect of depression. An understanding of Newtonian physics among high school students may be restricted by common problematic mental conditions, with depression being the greatest among all. Further research, using a more systematic approach to measure depression among adolescents with poor understanding of physics, would help to elucidate the nature of the effect.

  15. Western Australian High School Students' Understandings about the Socioscientific Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille

    2015-05-01

    Climate change is one of the most significant science issues facing humanity; yet, teaching students about climate change is challenging: not only is it multidisciplinary, but also it is contentious and debated in political, social and media forums. Students need to be equipped with an understanding of climate change science to be able to participate in this discourse. The purpose of this study was to examine Western Australian high school students' understanding of climate change and the greenhouse effect, in order to identify their alternative conceptions about climate change science and provide a baseline for more effective teaching. A questionnaire designed to elicit students' understanding and alternative conceptions was completed by 438 Year 10 students (14-15 years old). A further 20 students were interviewed. Results showed that students know different features of both climate change and the greenhouse effect, however not necessarily all of them and the relationships between. Five categories of alternative conceptions were identified. The categories were (1) the greenhouse effect and the ozone layer; (2) types of greenhouse gases; (3) types of radiation; (4) weather and climate and (5) air pollution. These findings provide science educators a basis upon which to develop strategies and curriculum resources to improve their students' understanding and decision-making skills about the socioscientific issue, climate change.

  16. Recent advances in understanding climate, glacier and river dynamics in high mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerzeel, W.

    2016-12-01

    The water cycle in the Himalaya is poorly understood because of its extreme topography that results in complex interactions between climate, water stored in snow and glaciers and the hydrological processes. Hydrological extremes in the greater Himalayas regularly cause great damage, while high mountain Asia also supplies water to over 25% of the global population. So, the stakes are high and an accurate understanding of the Himalayan water cycle is imperative. The hydrology of the greater Himalayas is only marginally resolved due to the intricacy of monsoon dynamics, the poorly quantified dependence on the cryosphere and the physical constraints of doing research in high-altitude and generally inaccessible terrain. However, in recent years significant scientific advances have been made in field monitoring, modelling and remote sensing and the latest progress and outstanding challenges will be presented for three related fields. First focus will be on recent learnings about high altitude climate dynamics and the interaction between the atmosphere and the extreme mountain topography. Secondly, recent advances in how climate controls key glacio-hydrological processes in high-altitude catchments will be discussed with a particular focus on debris covered glaciers. Thirdly, new developments in glacio-hydrological modelling and approaches to climate change impact assessments will be reviewed. Finally, the outstanding scientific challenges will be synthesized that need to be addressed to fully close the high mountain water cycle and to be able to reduce the uncertainty in future projections of water availability and the occurrence of extreme events in high mountain Asia.

  17. A high throughput platform for understanding the influence of excipients on physical and chemical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raijada, Dhara; Cornett, Claus; Rantanen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    selected. Binary physical mixtures of drug and excipient were transferred to a 96-well plate followed by addition of water to simulate aqueous granulation environment. The plate was subjected for XRPD measurements followed by drying and subsequent XRPD and HPLC measurements of the dried samples. Excipients...... for chemical degradation. The proposed high-throughput platform can be used during early drug development to simulate typical processing induced stress in a small scale and to understand possible phase transformation behaviour and influence of excipients on this....

  18. Developing high-performance cross-functional teams: Understanding motivations, functional loyalties, and teaming fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Teamwork is the key to the future of effective technology management. Today`s technologies and markets have become too complex for individuals to work alone. Global competition, limited resources, cost consciousness, and time pressures have forced organizations and project managers to encourage teamwork. Many of these teams will be cross-functional teams that can draw on a multitude of talents and knowledge. To develop high-performing cross-functional teams, managers must understand motivations, functional loyalties, and the different backgrounds of the individual team members. To develop a better understanding of these issues, managers can learn from experience and from literature on teams and teaming concepts. When studying the literature to learn about cross-functional teaming, managers will find many good theoretical concepts, but when put into practice, these concepts have varying effects. This issue of varying effectiveness is what drives the research for this paper. The teaming concepts were studied to confirm or modify current understanding. The literature was compared with a {open_quotes}ground truth{close_quotes}, a survey of the reality of teaming practices, to examine the teaming concepts that the literature finds to be critical to the success of teams. These results are compared to existing teams to determine if such techniques apply in real-world cases.

  19. Analysis of the effect of specific vocabulary instruction on high school chemistry students' knowledge and understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrosse, Peggy

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of specific vocabulary instruction on high school chemistry students' knowledge and understanding. Students might be able to formally recite a definition for a term without actually having understood the meaning of the term and its connection to other terms or to related concepts. Researchers (Cassels & Johnstone, 1983; Gabel, 1999; Johnstone, 1991) have been studying the difficulty students have in learning science, particularly chemistry. Gabel (1999) suggests that, "while research into misconceptions (also known as alternative conceptions) and problem-solving has dominated the field for the past 25 years, we are no closer to a solution that would improve the teaching and learning of chemistry" (P. 549). Gabel (1999) relates the difficulty in learning chemistry to use of language. She refers to student difficulty both with words that have more than one meaning in English and with words that are used to mean one idea in chemistry and another idea in every day language. The Frayer Model, a research-based teaching strategy, is a graphic organizer which students use to create meaningful definitions for terms in context (Frayer, Frederick, & Klausmeier, 1969). It was used as the treatment---the specific vocabulary instruction---in this research study. The researcher collected and analyzed data to answer three research questions that focused on the effect of using the Frayer model (a graphic organizer) on high school students' knowledge and understanding of academic language used in chemistry. The research took place in a New England high school. Four intact chemistry classes provided the student participants; two classes were assigned to the treatment group (TG) and two classes were assigned to the control group (CG). The TG received vocabulary instruction on 14 chosen terms using the Frayer Model. The CG received traditional vocabulary instruction with no special attention to the 14 terms selected for this study

  20. Vocabulary Constraint on Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sutarsyah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study was carried out in the English Education Department of State University of Malang. The aim of the study was to identify and describe the vocabulary in the reading text and to seek if the text is useful for reading skill development. A descriptive qualitative design was applied to obtain the data. For this purpose, some available computer programs were used to find the description of vocabulary in the texts. It was found that the 20 texts containing 7,945 words are dominated by low frequency words which account for 16.97% of the words in the texts. The high frequency words occurring in the texts were dominated by function words. In the case of word levels, it was found that the texts have very limited number of words from GSL (General Service List of English Words (West, 1953. The proportion of the first 1,000 words of GSL only accounts for 44.6%. The data also show that the texts contain too large proportion of words which are not in the three levels (the first 2,000 and UWL. These words account for 26.44% of the running words in the texts.  It is believed that the constraints are due to the selection of the texts which are made of a series of short-unrelated texts. This kind of text is subject to the accumulation of low frequency words especially those of content words and limited of words from GSL. It could also defeat the development of students' reading skills and vocabulary enrichment.

  1. Revelação ou entendimento: alguns apontamentos sobre a tradução de textos religiosos Revelation or understanding: some ideas about the translation of religious texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenita Maria Rimoli Esteves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho sugere que existem pelo menos duas estratégias bastante distintas para abordar a tradução de textos religiosos: a primeira busca dar acesso ao leitor em termos de entendimento, aproximando o texto religioso da cultura para a qual ele está sendo traduzido. A segunda estratégia é nutrida por uma ênfase na iluminação, na revelação, numa clarividência que não necessariamente passa pelo raciocínio, mas que pode ser proporcionada pela transmissão de características da língua que não pertencem ao campo dos sentidos e têm a ver com a materialidade da língua: ritmo, assonâncias, aliterações. As duas estratégias, numa primeira análise, parecem não só se opor diametralmente, mas também reforçar uma dicotomia talvez tão ou mais antiga que os próprios textos em estudo: aquela que opõe espírito (ou conteúdo a letra (forma. No entanto, como já poderíamos suspeitar, as coisas não são tão simples assim... O trabalho apresentará algumas manifestações dessas duas tendências ao longo da história, problematizando a dicotomia e buscando delimitar que éticas informaram cada esforço de tradução.This paper suggests the existence of at least two very different strategies in the translation of religious texts: one is based on understanding and aims at accommodating the religious text to the culture into which it is translated. The second strategy is nourished by an emphasis on illumination, on revelation, on an insight that does not necessarily demand reasoning, but rather the transmission of certain linguistic characteristics not belonging to the realm of meaning: rhythm, assonances, alliterations. At first sight, the two strategies are radically different, stressing a dichotomy that is perhaps even older than the texts being studied " that opposing spirit to letter (or content to form. However, as one might expect, things are not so simple. The work will present some manifestations of these two tendencies along

  2. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion crack

  3. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James; Gewirth, Andrew; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next–Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion – crack

  4. Understanding High-Resolution Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Groundwater Recharge Using Process Based Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, G.; Qiu, H.; Li, S. G.; Lusch, D.; Phanikumar, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the natural rates of groundwater recharge and identifying the location and timing of major recharge events are essential for maintaining sustainable water yields and for understanding contaminant transport mechanisms in groundwater systems. Using Ottawa County, Michigan as a case study in sustainable water resources management, this research is part of a larger project that examines the issues of declining water tables and increasing chloride concentrations within the county. A process-based hydrologic model (PAWS) is used to mechanistically evaluate the integrated hydrologic response of both the surface and subsurface systems to further compute daily fluxes due to evapotranspiration, surface runoff, recharge and groundwater-stream interactions. Both rain gauge (NCDC) and NEXRAD precipitation data are used as input for the model. The model is built based on three major watersheds at 300m spatial resolution and daily temporal resolution, covering all of Ottawa County and is calibrated using streamflow data from USGS gauging stations. In addition, synoptic and time-series baseflow data collected using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers and electromagnetic flow meters during the summer of 2015 are used to test the ability of the model to simulate baseflows and to quantify the uncertainty. The MODIS evapotranspiration product is used to evaluate model performance in simulating ET. The primary objectives of this study are to (1) understand the periods of high and low groundwater recharge in the county between the years 2009 and 2015; and (2) analyze the impacts of different types of land use, soil, elevation, and slope on groundwater recharge.

  5. Perspectives on understanding and verifying the safety terrain of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Donald E., E-mail: donald@carlsonperin.net [11221 Empire Lane, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Ball, Sydney J., E-mail: beckysyd@comcast.net [100 Greywood Place, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The passive safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving loss of forced cooling, coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity events. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, this paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs.

  6. Perspectives on Understanding and Verifying the Safety Terrain of Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity insertion. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, the paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs. (author)

  7. New Tools For Understanding Microbial Diversity Using High-throughput Sequence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Hamady, M.; Liu, Z.; Lozupone, C.

    2007-12-01

    High-throughput sequencing techniques such as 454 are straining the limits of tools traditionally used to build trees, choose OTUs, and perform other essential sequencing tasks. We have developed a workflow for phylogenetic analysis of large-scale sequence data sets that combines existing tools, such as the Arb phylogeny package and the NAST multiple sequence alignment tool, with new methods for choosing and clustering OTUs and for performing phylogenetic community analysis with UniFrac. This talk discusses the cyberinfrastructure we are developing to support the human microbiome project, and the application of these workflows to analyze very large data sets that contrast the gut microbiota with a range of physical environments. These tools will ultimately help to define core and peripheral microbiomes in a range of environments, and will allow us to understand the physical and biotic factors that contribute most to differences in microbial diversity.

  8. A Customizable Text Classifier for Text Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-liang Zhang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Text mining deals with complex and unstructured texts. Usually a particular collection of texts that is specified to one or more domains is necessary. We have developed a customizable text classifier for users to mine the collection automatically. It derives from the sentence category of the HNC theory and corresponding techniques. It can start with a few texts, and it can adjust automatically or be adjusted by user. The user can also control the number of domains chosen and decide the standard with which to choose the texts based on demand and abundance of materials. The performance of the classifier varies with the user's choice.

  9. Automatic Text Summarization for Indonesian Language Using TextTeaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, D.; Pasaribu, A.; Rahmat, R. F.; Budiarto, R.

    2017-04-01

    Text summarization is one of the solution for information overload. Reducing text without losing the meaning not only can save time to read, but also maintain the reader’s understanding. One of many algorithms to summarize text is TextTeaser. Originally, this algorithm is intended to be used for text in English. However, due to TextTeaser algorithm does not consider the meaning of the text, we implement this algorithm for text in Indonesian language. This algorithm calculates four elements, such as title feature, sentence length, sentence position and keyword frequency. We utilize TextRank, an unsupervised and language independent text summarization algorithm, to evaluate the summarized text yielded by TextTeaser. The result shows that the TextTeaser algorithm needs more improvement to obtain better accuracy.

  10. High-resolution modeling approaches to understanding changes in extreme precipitation projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, K. M.; Alexander, M. A.; Thompson, G.; Scott, J. D.; Barsugli, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    One of the challenges inherent to understanding the effect of global climate change on precipitation extremes is the mismatch of scale. Climate models simulate large-scale patterns of long-term change, while weather models generally diagnose small-scale weather phenomena such as extreme rainfall. Therefore, understanding the potential effects of global-scale changes on local-scale weather requires new research approaches to connect questions and processes across weather and climate scales. This study represents one such integrated approach by investigating projected changes in warm-season extreme precipitation events using a dynamical downscaling framework that sequentially interfaces climate- and weather-scale data. Focusing on the Colorado Front Range, global simulations are first downscaled to a medium/regional-scale resolution; the resulting simulations are then further downscaled using a high-resolution weather model. The high-resolution model is able to explicitly simulate intense thunderstorms using 1.3-km grid spacing, thus resolving the small-scale physical processes that generate extreme precipitation. Physical process explanations are sought for projected changes in rainfall amount, hail occurrence, and flood risk. Past and future extreme event simulations are compared with respect to environmental drivers such as low-level instability (e.g., CAPE), large-scale forcing, and vertical temperature and moisture profiles. The events are also examined for systematic differences in storm-scale processes such as updraft strength, hail production and hail melting, dry air entrainment, and downdraft formation. Qualitative and quantitative consistency (or the lack thereof) across global, regional, and local-scale simulations is also explored.

  11. High School Students' Understanding of Change over Time and System Complexity: A Focus on the Cryosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, K. S.; Libarkin, J.; Ledley, T. S.; Guthrie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Most students have difficulty articulating processes that are key for Earth’s changes and may have limited ability to understand Earth system science and think across spatial and temporal dimensions. The cryosphere, a complex and dynamic Earth system that exhibits change over time (e.g., seasonal, yearly, decadal, and millennial), can be difficult for students to reason about. The presented research assesses the effectiveness of the project developed on-line modules on high school students’ cryosphere content knowledge and skill development, including their: (1) conceptual understanding of ice, thermodynamics, climate, changes in ice cover over time, Earth system interactions, and complexity, and (2) use and interpretation of data and graphs about the cryosphere. Pre- and post- student assessments, classroom observations, and teacher interviews were collected from four high school classrooms in Texas to determine the effectiveness of the Earthlabs cryosphere modules in reaching the specified learning goals. Preliminary analysis of pre-and post-test data revealed a number of interesting changes where students displayed an increase in their awareness of the cryosphere, increase in confidence about cryosphere knowledge, and an increase in their ability to read and interpret graphs. Furthermore, classroom observations made for 25 minutes during a class period illustrated that for over 84% of the class period the students were engaged with the Earthlabs materials and spent the majority (>50%) of their time either discussing (31%) or working on the on-line Earthlabs cryosphere materials (29%). Finally, forty-five minute individual telephone interviews conducted with the four implementing cryosphere teachers revealed that teachers overwhelmingly reflected that the materials supported students’ ability to learn about the (i) nature and importance of the cryosphere, (ii) manipulation, analysis, interpretation of data, (iii) physical changes over multiple time scales

  12. Real-time high-level video understanding using data warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienard, Bruno; Desurmont, Xavier; Barrie, Bertrand; Delaigle, Jean-Francois

    2006-02-01

    High-level Video content analysis such as video-surveillance is often limited by computational aspects of automatic image understanding, i.e. it requires huge computing resources for reasoning processes like categorization and huge amount of data to represent knowledge of objects, scenarios and other models. This article explains how to design and develop a "near real-time adaptive image datamart", used, as a decisional support system for vision algorithms, and then as a mass storage system. Using RDF specification as storing format of vision algorithms meta-data, we can optimise the data warehouse concepts for video analysis, add some processes able to adapt the current model and pre-process data to speed-up queries. In this way, when new data is sent from a sensor to the data warehouse for long term storage, using remote procedure call embedded in object-oriented interfaces to simplified queries, they are processed and in memory data-model is updated. After some processing, possible interpretations of this data can be returned back to the sensor. To demonstrate this new approach, we will present typical scenarios applied to this architecture such as people tracking and events detection in a multi-camera network. Finally we will show how this system becomes a high-semantic data container for external data-mining.

  13. Toward an understanding of the building blocks: constructing programs for high processor count systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M H

    2008-01-01

    Technology and industry trends have clearly shown that the future of technical computing lies in exploitation of more processors in larger multiprocessor systems. Exploitation of high processor count architectures demands a more thorough understanding of the underlying system dynamics and an accounting for them in the design of high-performance applications. Currently these dynamics are incompletely described by the widely adopted benchmarks and kernel metrics. Systems are most often characterized to allow comparisons and ranking. Often the characterizations are in the form of a scalar measure of some aspect of system performance that is a 'not to exceed' number: the maximum possible level of performance that could be attained. While such comparisons typically drive both system design and procurement, more useful characterizations can be used to drive application development and design. This paper explores a few of these measures and presents a few simple examples of their application. The first set of metrics addresses individual processor performance, specifically performance related to memory references. The second set of metrics attempts to describe the behavior of the message-passing system under load and across a range of conditions

  14. High-resolution x-ray computed tomography to understand ruminant phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeur, Loic; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography has become a vital technique to study fossils down to the true micrometer level. Paleontological research requires the non-destructive analysis of internal structures of fossil specimens. We show how X-ray computed tomography enables us to visualize the inner ear of extinct and extant ruminants without skull destruction. The inner ear, a sensory organ for hearing and balance has a rather complex three-dimensional morphology and thus provides relevant phylogenetical information what has been to date essentially shown in primates. We made visible the inner ears of a set of living and fossil ruminants using the phoenix x-ray nanotom®m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH). Because of the high absorbing objects a tungsten target was used and the experiments were performed with maximum accelerating voltage of 180 kV and a beam current of 30 μA. Possible stem ruminants of the living families are known in the fossil record but extreme morphological convergences in external structures such as teeth is a strong limitation to our understanding of the evolutionary history of this economically important group of animals. We thus investigate the inner ear to assess its phylogenetical potential for ruminants and our first results show strong family-level morphological differences.

  15. High acceptability for cell phone text messages to improve communication of laboratory results with HIV-infected patients in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedner, Mark J; Haberer, Jessica E; Bwana, Mwebesa Bosco; Ware, Norma C; Bangsberg, David R

    2012-06-21

    Patient-provider communication is a major challenge in resource-limited settings with large catchment areas. Though mobile phone usership increased 20-fold in Africa over the past decade, little is known about acceptability of, perceptions about disclosure and confidentiality, and preferences for cell phone communication of health information in the region. We performed structured interviews of fifty patients at the Immune Suppression Syndrome clinic in Mbarara, Uganda to assess four domains of health-related communication: a) cell phone use practices and literacy, b) preferences for laboratory results communication, c) privacy and confidentiality, and d) acceptability of and preferences for text messaging to notify patients of abnormal test results. Participants had a median of 38 years, were 56% female, and were residents of a large catchment area throughout southwestern Uganda. All participants expressed interest in a service to receive information about laboratory results by cell phone text message, stating benefits of increased awareness of their health and decreased transportation costs. Ninety percent reported that they would not be concerned for unintended disclosure. A minority additionally expressed concerns about difficulty interpreting messages, discouragement upon learning bad news, and technical issues. Though all respondents expressed interest in password protection of messages, there was also a strong desire for direct messages to limit misinterpretation of information. Cell phone text messaging for communication of abnormal laboratory results is highly acceptable in this cohort of HIV-infected patients in rural Uganda. The feasibility of text messaging, including an optimal balance between privacy and comprehension, should be further studied.

  16. Understanding anode and cathode behaviour in high-pressure discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, P.; Neiger, M.

    2005-09-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps have widespread and modern areas of application including general lighting, video/movie projection (e.g. UHP lamp), street/industrial lighting, and automotive headlight lamps (D2/xenon lamp). Even though HID lamps have been known for several decades now, the important plasma-electrode interactions are still not well understood. Because HID lamps are usually operated on ac (electrodes switch alternately from anode to cathode phase), time-dependent simulations including realistic and verified anode and cathode models are essential. Therefore, a recently published investigation of external laser heating of an electrode during anode and cathode phase in an operating HID lamp [28] provided the basis for our present paper. These measurements revealed impressive influences of the external laser heating on electrode fall voltage and electrode temperature. Fortunately, the effects are very different during anode and cathode phase. Thus, by comparing the experimental findings with results from our numerical simulations we can learn much about the principles of electrode behaviour and explain in detail the differences between anode and cathode phase. Furthermore, we can verify our model (which includes plasma column, hot plasma spots in front of the electrodes, constriction zones and near-electrode non-local thermal equilibrium-plasma as well as anode and cathode) that accounts for all relevant physical processes concerning plasma, electrodes and interactions between them. Moreover, we investigate the influence of two different notions concerning ionization and recombination in the near electrode plasma on the numerical results. This improves our physical understanding of near-electrode plasma likewise and further increases the confidence in the model under consideration. These results are important for the understanding and the further development of HID lamps which, due to their small dimensions, are often experimentally inaccessible

  17. A multi-diagnostic approach to understanding high-latitude plasma transport during the Halloween 2003 storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available During the Halloween 2003 storm event, significant electron density enhancements at elevated F-layer altitudes were recorded by the EISCAT and ESR radars in northern Europe between 20:00 and 24:00 UT on 30 October. At the same time, a sequence of optical images from Qaanaaq in northern Greenland captured a series of eastward-propagating polar cap patches. In this paper, an advanced 4-D tomographic method based on the assimilation of global GPS data, coupled to a predictive Kalman filtering technique, has been used to reveal the linkage between these ionospheric structures. The combination of the various data sources has clearly established the time history of this extreme event, in which high-density plasma was uplifted in the dayside ionosphere and convected anti-sunward across the polar cap to European high latitudes at an elevated F-layer. Using this multi instrument approach, we can differentiate between those density structures observed at the ESR which occurred as a result of cross-polar transport and those more likely to have been produced by in-situ soft particle precipitation, a distinction which is supported by the ESR and EISCAT data. The multi-diagnostic approach reported here has the potential significantly to extend our current understanding of high latitude plasma transport and the origin of electron density enhancements.

  18. Understanding DOC Mobilization Dynamics Through High Frequency Measurements in a Headwater Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Musolff, A.; Lechtenfeld, O.; de Rooij, G. H.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports from headwater catchments impact the quality of downstream waters and pose challenges to water supply. The importance of riparian zones for DOC export from catchments in humid, temperate climates has generally been acknowledged, but the hydrological controls and biogeochemical factors that govern mobilization of DOC from riparian zones remain elusive. By analyzing high-frequency time series of UV-VIS based water quality we therefore aim at a better understanding on temporal dynamics of DOC mobilization and exports. In a first step a one year high frequency (15 minutes) data set from a headwater catchment in the Harz Mountains (Germany) was systematically analyzed for event-based patterns in DOC concentrations. Here, a simplistic linear model was generated to explain DOC concentration level and variability in the stream. Furthermore, spectral (e.g. slopes and SUVA254) and molecular (FT-ICR-MS) characterization of DOC was used to fingerprint in-stream DOC during events. Continuous DOC concentrations were best predicted (R², NSE = 0.53) by instantaneous discharge (Q) and antecede wetness conditions of the last 30 days (AWC30 = Precip.30/PET30) as well as mean air temperature (Tmean30) and mean discharge (Qmean30) of the preceding 30 days. Analyses of 36 events revealed seasonal trends for the slope, intercept and R² of linear log(DOC)-log(Q) regressions that can be best explained by the mean air temperature of the preceding 15 days. Continuously available optical DOC quality parameters SUVA254 and spectral slope (275 nm - 295 nm) systematically changed with shifts in discharge and in DOC concentration. This is underlined by selected FT-ICR-MS measurements indicating higher DOC aromaticity and oxygen content at high flow conditions. The change of DOC quality parameters during events indicate a shift in the activated source zones: DOC with a different quality was mobilized during high flow conditions when higher

  19. High acceptability for cell phone text messages to improve communication of laboratory results with HIV-infected patients in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siedner Mark J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient-provider communication is a major challenge in resource-limited settings with large catchment areas. Though mobile phone usership increased 20-fold in Africa over the past decade, little is known about acceptability of, perceptions about disclosure and confidentiality, and preferences for cell phone communication of health information in the region. Methods We performed structured interviews of fifty patients at the Immune Suppression Syndrome clinic in Mbarara, Uganda to assess four domains of health-related communication: a cell phone use practices and literacy, b preferences for laboratory results communication, c privacy and confidentiality, and d acceptability of and preferences for text messaging to notify patients of abnormal test results. Results Participants had a median of 38 years, were 56% female, and were residents of a large catchment area throughout southwestern Uganda. All participants expressed interest in a service to receive information about laboratory results by cell phone text message, stating benefits of increased awareness of their health and decreased transportation costs. Ninety percent reported that they would not be concerned for unintended disclosure. A minority additionally expressed concerns about difficulty interpreting messages, discouragement upon learning bad news, and technical issues. Though all respondents expressed interest in password protection of messages, there was also a strong desire for direct messages to limit misinterpretation of information. Conclusions Cell phone text messaging for communication of abnormal laboratory results is highly acceptable in this cohort of HIV-infected patients in rural Uganda. The feasibility of text messaging, including an optimal balance between privacy and comprehension, should be further studied.

  20. Characterising the Development of the Understanding of Human Body Systems in High-School Biology Students--A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapir, Zohar; Eberbach, Catherine; Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; Tripto, Jaklin

    2017-01-01

    Science education today has become increasingly focused on research into complex natural, social and technological systems. In this study, we examined the development of high-school biology students' systems understanding of the human body, in a three-year longitudinal study. The development of the students' system understanding was evaluated…

  1. Aphasia and text writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrns, Ingrid; Ahlsén, Elisabeth; Wengelin, Asa

    2010-01-01

    Good writing skills are needed in almost every aspect of life today, and there is a growing interest in research into acquired writing difficulties. Most of the findings reported so far, however, are based on words produced in isolation. The present study deals with the production of entire texts. The aim was to characterize written narratives produced by a group of participants with aphasia. Eight persons aged 28-63 years with aphasia took part in the study. They were compared with a reference group consisting of ten participants aged 21-30 years. All participants were asked to write a personal narrative titled 'I have never been so afraid' and to perform a picture-based story-generation task called the 'Frog Story'. The texts were written on a computer. The group could be divided into participants with low, moderate, and high general performance, respectively. The texts written by the participants in the group with moderate and high writing performance had comparatively good narrative structure despite indications of difficulties on other linguistic levels. Aphasia appeared to influence text writing on different linguistic levels. The impact on overall structure and coherence was in line with earlier findings from the analysis of spoken and written discourse and the implication of this is that the written modality should also be included in language rehabilitation. 2010 Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.

  2. Understanding the biological activity of high rate algae ponds through the calculation of oxygen balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Zouhayr; de Godos Crespo, Ignacio; Corona, Enrique Lara; Rogalla, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae culture in high rate algae ponds (HRAP) is an environmentally friendly technology for wastewater treatment. However, for the implementation of these systems, a better understanding of the oxygenation potential and the influence of climate conditions is required. In this work, the rates of oxygen production, consumption, and exchange with the atmosphere were calculated under varying conditions of solar irradiance and dilution rate during six months of operation in a real scale unit. This analysis allowed determining the biological response of these dynamic systems. The rates of oxygen consumption measured were considerably higher than the values calculated based on the organic loading rate. The response to light intensity in terms of oxygen production in the bioreactor was described with one of the models proposed for microalgae culture in dense concentrations. This model is based on the availability of light inside the culture and the specific response of microalgae to this parameter. The specific response to solar radiation intensity showed a reasonable stability in spite of the fluctuations due to meteorological conditions. The methodology developed is a useful tool for optimization and prediction of the performance of these systems.

  3. Examining the streams of a retention policy to understand the politics of high-stakes reform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Brown

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Using John Kingdon's (2003 multiple streams approach to agenda setting, I analyze how key actors within the state of Wisconsin understood the need to construct and implement the state's No Social Promotion statutes to improve students' academic performance. Policymakers within the state focused their standards-based reforms on the issue of improving students' academic performance through increasing accountability. In doing so, they did not see these high-stakes policies as a form of punishment for those who fail, but rather, as a tool to focus the education establishment on improving the academic skills and knowledge of all their students. Thus, the retained student is not the primary concern of the policymaker, but rather, the retained student demonstrates the state's system of accountability works. Raising the question as to whether those who support or oppose high-stakes policies such as these should focus their efforts on the agenda setting process rather than analyzing effects of such policies. I contend that while evaluating a policy's effects is important, education stakeholders must pay attention to all three streams of the agenda setting process as they promote particular reforms to improve students' academic performance.

  4. PROTEIN STRUCTURE: A OBSTACLE TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Menezes

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry underlays many subjects taught in high school but most teacherslack enough biochemical bases to explore them properly. To investigate their alternativeconceptions we have applied the distance course Biochemistry of Drugs to public schoolteachers, with class load of 30 hours and six modules: Statistics and basic concepts;Marijuana; Tobacco; Inhalants; Alcohol; Legalization vs Criminalization. The conceptionswere analyzed through the course records and the most important was the lack ofknowledge on the protein chemical structure, which impaired the comprehension ofproposed molecular mechanisms (involving receptors, neurotransmitters, enzymeinhibition, etc.. Several interventions promoted the overcoming of many misconceptionsas detected by written tests on chemical nature of involved compounds; neurotransmissionmechanism and the role of drugs in neurotransmission. Among 63 questions only 10 hadless than 50% correct answers. The teachers’ performances were impaired by readingdifficulties and poor scientific background that difficult their distinction of facts and scientificmodels from common sense or personal opinion. The teachers’ and the course staffevaluations were highly positive. Most of them declared that their knowledge was amplifiedand that they would recommend this course to colleagues. They also were favorablysurprised with the deep level of the topics, the demanded dedication and the fact that thecourse was addressed to themselves instead of to their students.

  5. High acceptability for cell phone text messages to improve communication of laboratory results with HIV-infected patients in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient-provider communication is a major challenge in resource-limited settings with large catchment areas. Though mobile phone usership increased 20-fold in Africa over the past decade, little is known about acceptability of, perceptions about disclosure and confidentiality, and preferences for cell phone communication of health information in the region. Methods We performed structured interviews of fifty patients at the Immune Suppression Syndrome clinic in Mbarara, Uganda to assess four domains of health-related communication: a) cell phone use practices and literacy, b) preferences for laboratory results communication, c) privacy and confidentiality, and d) acceptability of and preferences for text messaging to notify patients of abnormal test results. Results Participants had a median of 38 years, were 56% female, and were residents of a large catchment area throughout southwestern Uganda. All participants expressed interest in a service to receive information about laboratory results by cell phone text message, stating benefits of increased awareness of their health and decreased transportation costs. Ninety percent reported that they would not be concerned for unintended disclosure. A minority additionally expressed concerns about difficulty interpreting messages, discouragement upon learning bad news, and technical issues. Though all respondents expressed interest in password protection of messages, there was also a strong desire for direct messages to limit misinterpretation of information. Conclusions Cell phone text messaging for communication of abnormal laboratory results is highly acceptable in this cohort of HIV-infected patients in rural Uganda. The feasibility of text messaging, including an optimal balance between privacy and comprehension, should be further studied. PMID:22720901

  6. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo

  7. Fundamental Understanding of Rotor Aeromechanics at High Advance Ratio Through Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Benjamin

    The purpose of this research is to further the understanding of rotor aeromechanics at advance ratios (mu) beyond the maximum of 0.5 (ratio of forward airspeed to rotor tip speed) for conventional helicopters. High advance ratio rotors have applications in high speed compound helicopters. In addition to one or more conventional main rotors, these aircraft employ either thrust compounding (propellers), lift compounding (fixed-wings), or both. An articulated 4-bladed model rotor was constructed, instrumented, and tested up to a maximum advance ratio of mu=1.6 in the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel at the University of Maryland. The data set includes steady and unsteady rotor hub forces and moments, blade structural loads, blade flapping angles, swashplate control angles, and unsteady blade pressures. A collective-thrust control reversal--where increasing collective pitch results in lower rotor thrust--was observed and is a unique phenomenon to the high advance ratio flight regime. The thrust reversal is explained in a physical manner as well as through an analytical formulation. The requirements for the occurrence of the thrust reversal are enumerated. The effects of rotor geometry design on the thrust reversal onset are explored through the formulation and compared to the measured data. Reverse-flow dynamic stall was observed to extend the the lifting capability of the edgewise rotor well beyond the expected static stall behavior of the airfoil sections. Through embedded unsteady blade surface pressure transducers, the normal force, pitching moment, and shed dynamic stall vortex time histories at a blade section in strong reverse flow were analyzed. Favorable comparisons with published 2-D pitching airfoil reverse flow dynamic stall data indicate that the 3-D stall environment can likely be predicted using models developed from such 2-D experiments. Vibratory hub loads were observed to increase with advance ratio. Maximum amplitude was observed near mu=1, with a

  8. Introducing a Culture of Modeling to Enhance Conceptual Understanding in High School Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda D.; Head, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Both the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the new AP Chemistry curriculum focus on a deeper understanding of content, as well as application of concepts within science classes. A well accepted research-based method for improving student understanding and the ability to apply many of the abstract concepts presented in chemistry is…

  9. High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding Level and Misconceptions about Temperature and Factors Affecting It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Yavuz

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' understanding levels and misconceptions about temperature and factors affecting it. The concept of the study was chosen from Geography National Curriculum. In this study, a questionnaire was developed after a pilot study with an aim to ascertain the students' understanding levels of temperature and…

  10. Understanding the Supersensitive Anti-Drug Antibody Assay: Unexpected High Anti-Drug Antibody Incidence and Its Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numbers of biotherapeutic products in development have increased over past decade. Despite providing significant benefits to patients with unmet needs, almost all protein-based biotherapeutics could induce unwanted immunogenicity, which result in a loss of efficacy and/or increase the risk of adverse reactions, such as infusion reactions, anaphylaxis, and even life-threatening response to endogenous proteins. Recognizing these possibilities, regulatory agencies request that immunogenicity be assessed as part of the approval process for biotherapeutics. Great efforts have been made to reduce drug immunogenicity through protein engineering. Accordingly the immunogenicity incidence has been reduced from around 80% in murine derived products to 0–10% in fully human products. However, recent improvements in immunogenicity assays have led to unexpectedly high immunogenicity rates, even in fully human products, leading to new challenges in assessing immunogenicity and its clinical relevance. These new immunogenicity assays are becoming supersensitive and able to detect more of anti-drug antibodies (ADA than with earlier assays. This paper intends to review and discuss our understanding of the supersensitive ADA assay and the unexpected high ADA incidence and its potential clinical relevance.

  11. Les Textes aussi sont des images (Texts Are Also Pictures)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirand, Sophie

    1978-01-01

    A printed text can be considered a picture on which readers project their own image in order to understand its original meaning. This process is explained via several kinds of original documents. Implications for instruction in reading a foreign language are discussed and several examples are given. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  12. Interactive text visualization with Text Variation Explorer

    OpenAIRE

    Siirtola, Harri; Isokoski, Poika; Säily, Tanja; Nevalainen, Terttu

    2016-01-01

    Digitalization is changing how research is carried out in all areas of science. Humanities is no exception - materials that used to be hand-written or printed on paper are increasingly available in digital form. This development is changing how scholars are interacting with their material. We are addressing the problem of interactive text visualization in the context of sociolinguistic language study. When a scholar is reading and analyzing text from a computer screen instead of a paper, we c...

  13. Texte et Co-texte. Discours – Contexte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura POPOVICI - ADUMITROAIE

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article represents a travel inside, outside and surrounding the text, having the aim of finding the parallel configuration of a text in order to better understand the hallo effect of a text, to clearly see its shadows and to hear the echo of its forefront meaning. I will focus on the aspects regarding the co-text and context of a text, enabling to expose the text as a unit very similar to co-text and the discourse as superior unit resembling the context. All these issues will be treated in relation to the didactic communication, as a resourceful way of analyzing the dynamics of a text and the feed-back that arouses instructional and perceptive valences of communication.

  14. Morphological keys to advance the understanding of protostrongylid biodiversity in caribou (Rangifer spp. at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Kafle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Protostrongylidae is a diverse family of nematodes capable of causing significant respiratory and neuromuscular disease in their ungulate and lagomorph hosts. Establishing the species diversity and abundance of the protostrongylid fauna has been hindered because the first stage larvae, commonly referred as dorsal spined larvae (DSL, that are shed in the feces are morphologically very similar among several genera. We aimed to determine the protostrongylid diversity and distribution in caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus and R. t. pearyi in the central and high Canadian Arctic. We first developed, tested and validated a morphological diagnostic guide for the DSL of two important protostrongylids, Parelaphostrongylus andersoni and Varestrongylus eleguneniensis, and then applied this guide to determine the prevalence and intensity of infection of these parasites in fecal samples from 242 caribou. We found that DSL of V. eleguneniensis and P. andersoni can be differentiated morphologically based on the structural differences at the caudal extremity. The presentation and morphology of the dorsal spine, and caudoventral bulging at the start of the tail extension were identified as the key identifying features. The two species were found in caribou on the arctic mainland and southern Victoria Island in single and co-infections, but the prevalence and intensity of infection was low. No protostrongylids were detected in caribou from the high arctic islands. Through this study, we provide a simple, efficient, and robust method to distinguish the DSL of the two protostrongylids, and present the current status of infection in different herds of caribou of the central Canadian Arctic. We report new geographic and host records for P. andersoni infection in Dolphin and Union caribou herd. Keywords: Parelaphostrongylus andersoni, Varestrongylus eleguneniensis, Diagnostic parasitology, Morphological diagnosis, Dorsal spined larvae, Canadian Arctic

  15. Towards understanding the electrodynamics of the 3-dimensional high-latitude ionosphere: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, due to observational constraints, ionospheric modelling and data analysis techniques have been devised either in one dimension (e.g. along a single radar beam, or in two dimensions (e.g. over a network of magnetometers. With new upcoming missions like the Swarm ionospheric multi-satellite project, or the EISCAT 3-D project, the time has come to take into account variations in all three dimensions simultaneously, as they occur in the real ionosphere. The link between ionospheric electrodynamics and the neutral atmosphere circulation which has gained increasing interest in the recent years also intrinsically requires a truly 3-dimensional (3-D description. In this paper, we identify five major science questions that need to be addressed by 3-D ionospheric modelling and data analysis. We briefly review what proceedings in the young field of 3-D ionospheric electrodynamics have been made in the past to address these selected question, and we outline how these issues can be addressed in the future with additional observations and/or improved data analysis and simulation techniques. Throughout the paper, we limit the discussion to high-latitude and mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics, and to directly data-driven (not statistical data analysis.

  16. Understanding Values in a Large Health Care Organization through Work-Life Narratives of High-Performing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Karnieli-Miller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective— To understand high-performing frontline employees’ values as reflected in their narratives of day-to-day interactions in a large health care organization. Methods— A total of 150 employees representing various roles within the organization were interviewed and asked to share work-life narratives (WLNs about value-affirming situations (i.e. situations in which they believed their actions to be fully aligned with their values and value-challenging situations (i.e. when their actions or the actions of others were not consistent with their values, using methods based on appreciative inquiry. Results— The analysis revealed 10 broad values. Most of the value-affirming WLNs were about the story-teller and team providing care for the patient/family. Half of the value-challenging WLNs were about the story-teller or a patient and barriers created by the organization, supervisor, or physician. Almost half of these focused on “treating others with disrespect/respect”. Only 15% of the value-challenging WLNs contained a resolution reached by the participants, often leaving them describing unresolved and frequently negative feelings. Conclusions— Appreciative inquiry and thematic analysis methods were found to be an effective tool for understanding the important and sometimes competing role personal and institutional values play in day-to-day work. There is remarkable potential in using WLNs as a way to surface and reinforce shared values and, perhaps more importantly, respectfully to identify and discuss conflicting personal and professional values.

  17. Science as Interests but Not for Career: Understanding High School Students' Engagement in Science in Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Badri, Masood; Al-Mazroui, Karima; Al-Rashedi, Asma; Nai, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Understanding high school students' engagement in science is important for the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Drawing on data from the ROSE Survey conducted in Abu Dhabi schools in 2013, this paper used a multi-dimensional framework to explore associations between high school students' engagement in science and a range of student psychosocial and…

  18. Science as Interests but Not for Career: Understanding High School Students' Engagement in Science in Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Badri, Masood; Al-Mazroui, Karima; Al-Rashedi, Asma; Nai, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Understanding high school students' engagement in science is important for the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Drawing on data from the ROSE Survey conducted in Abu Dhabi schools in 2013, this paper used a multi-dimensional framework to explore associations between high school students' engagement in science and a range of student psychosocial and…

  19. The Effect of Recycling Education on High School Students' Conceptual Understanding about Ecology: A Study on Matter Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugulu, Ilker; Yorek, Nurettin; Baslar, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze and determine whether a developed recycling education program would lead to a positive change in the conceptual understanding of ecological concepts associated with matter cycles by high school students. The research was conducted on 68 high school 10th grade students (47 female and 21 male students). The…

  20. Understanding Students' Precollege Experiences with Racial Diversity: The High School as Microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie J.; Chang, Stephanie H.

    2015-01-01

    Few qualitative studies consider how high school experiences affect readiness for diversity engagement in college. Using data from an ethnographic case study, three central trends (student experiences within homogeneous high schools, racial divisions within diverse high schools, and students who attended diverse high schools but had little…

  1. Urban High School Students' Critical Science Agency: Conceptual Understandings and Environmental Actions around Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how the enactment of a climate change curriculum supports students' development of critical science agency, which includes students developing deep understandings of science concepts and the ability to take action at the individual and community levels. We examined the impact of a four to six week urban ecology curriculum…

  2. Real Experiments versus Phet Simulations for Better High-School Students' Understanding of Electrostatic Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajredini, Fadil; Izairi, Neset; Zajkov, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the influence of computer simulations (virtual experiments) on one hand and real experiments on the other hand on the conceptual understanding of electrical charging. The investigated sample consists of students in the second year (10th grade) of three gymnasiums in Macedonia. There were two experimental groups and one…

  3. Improving High School Students' Understanding of Potential Difference in Simple Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegeois, Laurent; Chasseigne, G'erard; Papin, Sophie; Mullet, Etienne

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports two studies into the understanding of the concept of potential difference in the current-potential difference-resistance context among 8th-12th graders (Study 1), and the efficiency of a learning device derived from Social Judgment Theory (Study 2). These two studies showed that: (a) when asked to infer potential difference from…

  4. Understanding Korean Transnational Girls in High School Science Classes: Beyond the Model Minority Stereotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    This study examines six Korean transnational girls enrolled in two advanced placement (AP) biology classes to understand their experiences in science classrooms at the intersection of race, language, and gender. Confronting the model minority stereotype for Asian students, which is particularly salient in science, technology, engineering, and…

  5. Process understanding on high shear granulated lactose agglomerates during and after drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwmeyer, F.J.S.

    2009-01-01

    In 2001 the FDA launched the Process Analytical Technology initiative as a response to the growing public and industrial awareness that there is a lack of process understanding required to have an optimal control of pharmaceutical manufacturing. The current research project was initiated based upon

  6. Correlation of Understanding of Physics and Psychological Symptoms among High-School Students in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggeliki, Anagnostopoulou; Miltiades, Kyprianou; Antigoni-Elisavet, Rota; Evangelia, Pavlatou; Loizos, Zaphiris

    2017-01-01

    Depression may essentially influence cognitive function contributing to poor school performance. The present study undertakes to determine the existence and strength of correlation between depressive symptomatology and other mental conditions with the acquired level of understanding of Newtonian physics taught in schools. The current study…

  7. Western Australian High School Students' Understandings about the Socioscientific Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most significant science issues facing humanity; yet, teaching students about climate change is challenging: not only is it multidisciplinary, but also it is contentious and debated in political, social and media forums. Students need to be equipped with an understanding of climate change science to be able to…

  8. High resolution polarimeter-interferometer system for fast equilibrium dynamics and MHD instability studies on Joint-TEXT tokamak (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Zhou, Y. N.; Jian, X.; Xiong, C. Y.; Wang, Z. J.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2014-11-01

    A high-performance Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system has been developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. This system has time response up to 1 μs, phase resolution perturbations associated with intrinsic Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) instabilities and external coil-induced Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMP). The 3-wave technique, in which the line-integrated Faraday angle and electron density are measured simultaneously by three laser beams with specific polarizations and frequency offsets, is used. In order to achieve optimum resolution, three frequency-stabilized HCOOH lasers (694 GHz, >35 mW per cavity) and sensitive Planar Schottky Diode mixers are used, providing stable intermediate-frequency signals (0.5-3 MHz) with S/N > 50. The collinear R- and L-wave probe beams, which propagate through the plasma poloidal cross section (a = 0.25-0.27 m) vertically, are expanded using parabolic mirrors to cover the entire plasma column. Sources of systematic errors, e.g., stemming from mechanical vibration, beam non-collinearity, and beam polarization distortion are individually examined and minimized to ensure measurement accuracy. Simultaneous density and Faraday measurements have been successfully achieved for 14 chords. Based on measurements, temporal evolution of safety factor profile, current density profile, and electron density profile are resolved. Core magnetic and density perturbations associated with MHD tearing instabilities are clearly detected. Effects of non-axisymmetric 3D RMP in ohmically heated plasmas are directly observed by polarimetry for the first time.

  9. Reading Authentic Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther

    2013-01-01

    Most research on cognates has focused on words presented in isolation that are easily defined as cognate between L1 and L2. In contrast, this study investigates what counts as cognate in authentic texts and how such cognates are read. Participants with L1 Danish read news articles in their highly...... proficient L2, English, while their eye-movements were monitored. The experiment shows a cognate advantage for morphologically simple words, but only when cognateness is defined relative to translation equivalents that are appropriate in the context. For morphologically complex words, a cognate disadvantage...... is observed which may be due to problems of integrating cognate with non-cognate morphemes. The results show that fast non-selective access to the bilingual lexicon is conditioned by the communicative context. Importantly, a range of variables are statistically controlled in the regression analyses, including...

  10. Understanding How Ontario High School Teacher-Coaches Learn to Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Geoff; Culver, Diane; Camiré, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are approximately 52,000 teacher-coaches coaching 750,000 high school student-athletes in Canada. Despite this large population, Canadian high school teacher-coaches remain relatively unstudied. High school coaches in Canada are often asked to coach sports with which they are unfamiliar, and because they are not required to…

  11. Understanding Resilience in Diverse, Talented Students in an Urban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Sally M.; Colbert, Robert D.; Hebert, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes findings from a 3-year study of 35 economically disadvantaged, ethnically diverse, academically talented high school students who either achieved or underachieved in their urban high school. In particular, the resilience of these two groups of high ability students is explored. Comparative case study and ethnographic…

  12. Understanding the variation of microbial community in heavy metals contaminated soil using high throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Honghong; Nasir, Mubasher; Lv, Jialong; Dai, Yunchao; Gao, Jiakai

    2017-10-01

    To improve the understanding of bacterial community in heavy metals contaminated soils, we studied the effects of environmental factors on the bacterial community structure in contaminated fields located in Shaanxi Province of China. Our results showed that microbial community structure varied among sites, and it was significantly affected by soil environmental factors such as pH, soil organic matter (SOM), Cd, Pb and Zn. In addition, Spearman's rank-order correlation indicated heavy metal sensitive (Ralstonia, Gemmatimona, Rhodanobacter and Mizugakiibacter) and tolerant (unidentified-Nitrospiraceae, Blastocatella and unidentified-Acidobacteria) microbial groups. Our findings are crucial to understanding microbial diversity in heavy metal polluted soils of China and can be used to evaluate microbial communities for scientific applications such as bioremediation projects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Design methodology for understanding the sympathetic detonation characteristics of insensitive high explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Dinesh.

    2005-01-01

    The understanding of sympathetic detonation of energetic materials is important from the stand point of safety, shelf life, storage requirements and handling. The objective of this thesis is to introduce a methodology to assess performance and sensitivity levels of insensitive munitions to sympathetic detonations. AUTODYN code was utilized to validate the shock sensitivity results for Composition B explosives. Upon code validation, simulations were conducted to evaluate small scale sympat...

  14. Progress in understanding of land surface/atmosphere exchanges at high latitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, R.J.; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Halldin, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the key results from two European field programmes, WINTEX and LAPP, undertaken in the Boreal/Arctic regions in 1996-98. Both programmes have illustrated the very important role that snow plays within these areas, not only in the determination of energy, water and ca...... programmes presented in this volume are an important contribution to this understanding and provide a useful foundation for future research....

  15. Search for new phenomena in different-flavour high-mass dilepton final states in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] Tev with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Pettersson, N E; Peyaud, A; Pezoa, R; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Pickering, M A; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pin, A W J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pires, S; Pirumov, H; Pitt, M; Plazak, L; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Plucinski, P; Pluth, D; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Polesello, G; Poley, A; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Pollard, C S; Polychronakos, V; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Poppleton, A; Pospisil, S; Potamianos, K; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Astigarraga, M E Pozo; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Puddu, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Raine, J A; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Ratti, M G; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Ravinovich, I; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Reale, M; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reed, R G; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reichert, J; Reiss, A; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rifki, O; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rimoldi, M; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Rizzi, C; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Rodina, Y; Perez, A Rodriguez; Rodriguez, D Rodriguez; Roe, S; Rogan, C S; Røhne, O; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Saez, S M Romano; Adam, E Romero; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosien, N-A; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, J H N; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; 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Serkin, L; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shaikh, N W; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shirabe, S; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Saadi, D Shoaleh; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shope, D R; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sickles, A M; Sidebo, P E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simon, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Slovak, R; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smiesko, J; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snyder, I M; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; 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    2016-01-01

    A search is performed for a heavy particle decaying into different flavour dilepton pairs ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text]), using 3.2 fb[Formula: see text] of proton-proton collision data at [Formula: see text] TeV collected in 2015 by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess over the Standard Model prediction is observed. Limits at the 95 % credibility level are set on the mass of a [Formula: see text] boson with lepton-flavour-violating couplings at 3.0, 2.7 and 2.6 TeV, and on the mass of a supersymmetric [Formula: see text] sneutrino with R -parity-violating couplings at 2.3, 2.2 and 1.9 TeV, for [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] final states, respectively. The results are also interpreted as limits on the threshold mass for quantum black hole production.

  16. Understanding physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cassidy, David; Rutherford, James

    2002-01-01

    Understanding Physics provides a thorough grounding in contemporary physics while placing physics into its social and historical context Based in large part on the highly respected Project Physics Course developed by two of the authors, it also integrates the results of recent pedagogical research The text thus - teaches about the basic phenomena in the physical world and the concepts developed to explain them - shows that science is a rational human endeavor with a long and continuing tradition, involving many different cultures and people - develops facility in critical thinking, reasoned argumentation, evaluation of evidence, mathematical modeling, and ethical values The treatment emphasizes not only what we know but also how we know it, why we believe it, and what effects that knowledge has - Why do we believe the Earth and planets revolve around the Sun? - Why do we believe that matter is made of atoms? - How do relativity theory and quantum mechanics alter our conception of Nature and in what ways do th...

  17. XML and Free Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Ken Roger

    2002-01-01

    Discusses problems with marking free text, text that is either natural language or semigrammatical but unstructured, that prevent well-formed XML from marking text for readily available meaning. Proposes a solution to mark meaning in free text that is consistent with the intended simplicity of XML versus SGML. (Author/LRW)

  18. Contextual Text Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Qiaozhu

    2009-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of text information, there is an increasing need for powerful text mining systems that can automatically discover useful knowledge from text. Text is generally associated with all kinds of contextual information. Those contexts can be explicit, such as the time and the location where a blog article is written, and the…

  19. The Only Safe SMS Texting Is No SMS Texting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Cheryl; Sacopulos, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians and practice staff use short messaging service (SMS) text messaging to communicate with patients. But SMS text messaging is unencrypted, insecure, and does not meet HIPAA requirements. In addition, the short and abbreviated nature of text messages creates opportunities for misinterpretation, and can negatively impact patient safety and care. Until recently, asking patients to sign a statement that they understand and accept these risks--as well as having policies, device encryption, and cyber insurance in place--would have been enough to mitigate the risk of using SMS text in a medical practice. But new trends and policies have made SMS text messaging unsafe under any circumstance. This article explains these trends and policies, as well as why only secure texting or secure messaging should be used for physician-patient communication.

  20. Hermeneutic reading of classic texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla A-L; Lindström, Unni Å

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to broaden the understandinfg of the hermeneutic reading of classic texts. The aim is to show how the choice of a specific scientific tradition in conjunction with a methodological approach creates the foundation that clarifies the actual realization of the reading. This hermeneutic reading of classic texts is inspired by Gadamer's notion that it is the researcher's own research tradition and a clearly formulated theoretical fundamental order that shape the researcher's attitude towards texts and create the starting point that guides all reading, uncovering and interpretation. The researcher's ethical position originates in a will to openness towards what is different in the text and which constantly sets the researcher's preunderstanding and research tradition in movement. It is the researcher's attitude towards the text that allows the text to address, touch and arouse wonder. Through a flexible, lingering and repeated reading of classic texts, what is different emerges with a timeless value. The reading of classic texts is an act that may rediscover and create understanding for essential dimensions and of human beings' reality on a deeper level. The hermeneutic reading of classic texts thus brings to light constantly new possibilities of uncovering for a new envisioning and interpretation for a new understanding of the essential concepts and phenomena within caring science. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. High school students' understanding of radiation and the environment: Can museums play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen K.; Jorde, Doris

    2001-03-01

    In connection with an exhibition on radiation1-related environmental issues at the Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, teaching units including pre- and post-visit activities were developed for visiting students. The units were centered on real-life stories concerning radiation issues that were used by the students as starting points for reflections around these issues. Using the teaching units as an evaluation instrument, students' written responses were analyzed with a dual purpose: 1) to gain insight into the understanding of and attitudes on radiation issues held by students in their final year of compulsory science instruction; and 2) to explore whether the exhibition medium may successfully convey scientific information that students find relevant and helpful in making personal judgments in environmental issues. In the present work, some prominent features of Norwegian 16-year-olds' understanding of radiation issues were identified, and it was noted that these were in many aspects similar to those described for students of other age groups and nationalities. Furthermore, it was found that a visit to the exhibition clearly provided science learning outcome for the majority of the students; however, for students who had strong alternative conceptions about the exhibition's issues, their preconceptions tended to inhibit their correct interpretation of new concepts introduced at the exhibition. We found few examples of students using scientific information from the exhibition in making personal judgments in matters concerning radiation and the environment, and we hypothesize that this may be due to a lack of practice in employing scientific understanding in this way. We believe that the use of museum exhibitions as part of a science education for scientific literacy is worth further exploration and might have increased success if new ways were found of improving the cooperation between museums and schools.

  2. Understanding the Gap between Students Exiting High School and College Readiness: A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donna Rena

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this Modified Delphi study was to discern the appropriate profile of an incoming freshman and the essential knowledge and skills freshmen need for academic success beyond high school. This study was conducted to examine the specific problem that the structure of public high school curriculum and the current college standards in the…

  3. One-to-One Mobile Technology in High School Physics Classrooms: Understanding Its Use and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaoming; Zhang, Meilan; Li, Min

    2018-01-01

    This study examined ways in which high school students used mobile devices in physics classrooms and after school, and the impact of in-class and after-school mobile technology use on their physics learning performance and interest. We collected data from 803 high school freshmen in China after they had used mobile devices for over five months. A…

  4. Fostering Political Understanding Using "The West Wing": Analyzing the Pedagogical Benefits of Film in High School Civics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journell, Wayne; Buchanan, Lisa Brown

    2013-01-01

    This study describes one high school civics teacher's use of film as a way to improve his students' understanding of politics. Using episodes of "The West Wing," an award-winning political drama, over the course of a semester, the teacher was able to create an authentic context for political instruction that allowed his students to practice…

  5. The Effects of Conceptual Understanding Procedures (CUPs) Towards Critical Thinking Skills of Senior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukaesih, S.; Sutrisno

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of the application of Conceptual Understanding Procedures (CUPs) learning to the students’ critical thinking skills in the matter of categorisaed in SMA Negeri 1 Larangan. This study was quasi-experimental design using nonequivalent control group design. The population in this study was entire class X. The samples that were taken by convenience sampling were class X MIA 1 and X MIA 2. Primary data in the study was the student’s critical thinking skills, which was supported by student activity, the level of adherence to the CUPs learning model, student opinion and teacher opinion. N-gain test results showed that the students’ critical thinking skills of experimental class increased by 89.32%, while the control group increased by 57.14%. Activity grade of experimental class with an average value of 72.37 was better than that of the control class with an average of only 22.69 student and teacher opinions to the learning were excellegoodnt. Based on this study concluded that the model of Conceptual Understanding Procedures (CUPs) had an effect on the student’s critical thinking skills in the matter of protest in SMA Negeri 1 Larangan.

  6. E-text

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2018-01-01

    text can be defined by taking as point of departure the digital format in which everything is represented in the binary alphabet. While the notion of text, in most cases, lends itself to be independent of medium and embodiment, it is also often tacitly assumed that it is, in fact, modeled around...... the print medium, rather than written text or speech. In late 20th century, the notion of text was subject to increasing criticism as in the question raised within literary text theory: is there a text in this class? At the same time, the notion was expanded by including extra linguistic sign modalities...

  7. Understanding the Elements of Operational Reliability: A Key for Achieving High Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safie, Fayssal M.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews operational reliability and its role in achieving high reliability through design and process reliability. The topics include: 1) Reliability Engineering Major Areas and interfaces; 2) Design Reliability; 3) Process Reliability; and 4) Reliability Applications.

  8. Application of high-throughput sequencing in understanding human oral microbiome related with health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hui; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome is one of most diversity habitat in the human body and they are closely related with oral health and disease. As the technique developing,, high throughput sequencing has become a popular approach applied for oral microbial analysis. Oral bacterial profiles have been studied to explore the relationship between microbial diversity and oral diseases such as caries and periodontal disease. This review describes the application of high-throughput sequencing for characterizati...

  9. Understanding Students' Transition to High School: Demographic Variation and the Role of Supportive Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Aprile D; Boyle, Alaina E; Bakhtiari, Farin

    2017-10-01

    The transition to high school is disruptive for many adolescents, yet little is known about the supportive relational processes that might attenuate the challenges students face as they move from middle to high school, particularly for students from more diverse backgrounds. Identifying potential buffers that protect youth across this critical educational transition is important for informing more effective support services for youth. In this study, we investigated how personal characteristics (gender, nativity, parent education level) and changes in support from family, friends, and school influenced changes in socioemotional adjustment and academic outcomes across the transition from middle to high school. The data were drawn from 252 students (50% females, 85% Latina/o). The results revealed declines in students' grades and increases in depressive symptoms and feelings of loneliness across the high school transition, with key variation by student nativity and gender. Additionally, stable/increasing friend support and school belonging were both linked to less socioemotional disruptions as students moved from middle to high school. Increasing/stable school belonging was also linked to increases in school engagement across the high school transition. These findings suggest that when high school transitions disrupt supportive relationships with important others in adolescents' lives, adolescents' socioemotional well-being and, to a lesser extent, their academic engagement are also compromised. Thus, in designing transition support activities, particularly for schools serving more low-income and race/ethnic minority youth, such efforts should strive to acclimate new high school students by providing inclusive, caring environments and positive connections with educators and peers.

  10. Towards the understanding of PETN initiation by a fast, high power arc source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, C D; Tang, V; Glascoe, E A; McCarrick, J F

    2010-03-05

    We present a thorough characterization of a capacitor driven arc source that can deliver up to 200 mJ of energy to the arc and high explosive in a well-controlled, repeatable manner on the hundreds of nanoseconds time-scale. Our ultimate purpose is to create a platform to study high explosive kinetics under extreme conditions of high-temperature. In the current paper, we characterize the behavior of our arc source by electrical discharge over a thin PETN film. Temperature and density are determined by time-resolved atomic emission spectroscopy on the nano- to microsecond time scale along with fast photographic imaging to capture time-resolved images of the expanding plasma. We also discuss preliminary simulations of arc plasma using a 1-D hydrodynamic model. Comparisons of these simulations with experimental data are presented. Ultimately our goal is to create a platform that will generate conditions of high temperature in order to study high explosive kinetics. We believe that our arc source platform can be further combined with a time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy (e.g. IR or Raman) to study chemical kinetics under extreme conditions. High temperature conditions may access novel reactive pathways that are different from either shock or slower thermal processes that are substantially lower in temperature.

  11. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, L D; Rivas, J; José-Yacamán, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS 2 will be discussed. MoS 2 -based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important

  12. Searching for text documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Blanken, Henk; de Vries, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L.

    2007-01-01

    Many documents contain, besides text, also images, tables, and so on. This chapter concentrates on the text part only. Traditionally, systems handling text documents are called information storage and retrieval systems. Before the World-Wide Web emerged, such systems were almost exclusively used by

  13. Understanding the Interaction between High-Stakes Graduation Tests and English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Julian Vasquez

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: The prevailing theory of action underlying No Child Left Behind's high-stakes testing and accountability ratings is that schools and students held accountable to these measures will automatically increase educational output as educators try harder, schools will adopt more effective methods, and students will learn more. In…

  14. Risky Business: An Integrated Institutional Theory for Understanding High-Risk Decision Making in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lauren A.; Angulo, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Lauren A. Turner and A. J. Angulo explore how institutional theory can be applied to explain variance in higher education organizational strategies. Given strong regulatory, normative, and cultural-cognitive pressures to conform, they ask, why do some colleges engage in high-risk decision making? To answer this, they bring together classic and…

  15. Do High School Chemistry Examinations Inhibit Deeper Level Understanding of Dynamic Reversible Chemical Reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, R.; Atkinson, R.; Dawes, A.; Levinson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Chemistry examinations can favour the deployment of algorithmic procedures like Le Chatelier's Principle (LCP) rather than reasoning using chemical principles. This study investigated the explanatory resources which high school students use to answer equilibrium problems and whether the marks given for examination answers…

  16. Understanding the Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications in the U.S. High School Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cynthia G.; Pontes, Nancy M.; Pontes, Manuel C. F.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine relationships between sleep insufficiency, depressive symptoms, demographic factors, and the nonmedical use of prescription medications (NMUPMs) in the U.S. high school students. Data from the 2013 Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System were used (n = 13,570) and analyzed using IBM SPSS 23™ (complex…

  17. Do they understand the benefits from education? Evidence on Dutch high school students' earnings expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazza, J.; Hartog, J.

    2008-01-01

    Using an internet collected dataset, we will provide some empirical evidence on the level of knowledge that Dutch high school students possess before their decision on tertiary education participation. We will assess the awareness of the risky nature of such an investment and if a compensation for

  18. Taiwan High School Biology Teachers' Acceptance and Understanding of Evolution and the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is the cornerstone of biological sciences, but anti-evolution teaching has become a global controversy since the introduction of evolutionary ideas into the United States high school science curricula in 1914. It is suggested that teachers' attitude toward and acceptance of the theory of evolution will influence their effect of teaching…

  19. Using Grounded Theory to Understand Resiliency in Pre-Teen Children of High-Conflict Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomrenke, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Using grounded theory, this study identified factors that contributed to children's ability to utilize their resilient attributes. Children between the ages of 9 and 12 from high-conflict separated or divorced families participated in a study that examined how family and community interactions promote resilient behaviour. Substantive-level theory…

  20. Building an Understanding of the Role of Media Literacy for Latino/a High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boske, Christa; McCormack, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Popular media is a social phenomenon, especially for young audiences. This qualitative study examined how eleven Latino/a high school students and a Latino teacher understood the impact of media messages in an animated children's film. Findings suggest participants identified negative cultural messages embedded throughout the film regarding…

  1. The Effectiveness of an Online Curriculum on High School Students' Understanding of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Robert B.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2015-01-01

    An online curriculum about biological evolution was designed to promote increased student content knowledge and evidentiary reasoning. A feasibility study was conducted with 77 rural high school biology students who learned with the online biological evolution unit. Data sources included the Biological Evolution Assessment Measure (BEAM), an…

  2. Understanding the dust cycle at high latitudes: integrating models and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Maggi, V.; Delmonte, B.; Winckler, G.; Potenza, M. A. C.; Baccolo, G.; Balkanski, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Changing climate conditions affect dust emissions and the global dust cycle, which in turn affects climate and biogeochemistry. Paleodust archives from land, ocean, and ice sheets preserve the history of dust deposition for a range of spatial scales from close to the major hemispheric sources to remote sinks such as the polar ice sheets. In each hemisphere common features on the glacial-interglacial time scale mark the baseline evolution of the dust cycle, and inspired the hypothesis that increased dust deposition to ocean stimulated the glacial biological pump contributing to the reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. On the other hand finer geographical and temporal scales features are superposed to these glacial-interglacial trends, providing the chance of a more sophisticated understanding of the dust cycle, for instance allowing distinctions in terms of source availability or transport patterns as recorded by different records. As such paleodust archives can prove invaluable sources of information, especially when characterized by a quantitative estimation of the mass accumulation rates, and interpreted in connection with climate models. We review our past work and present ongoing research showing how climate models can help in the interpretation of paleodust records, as well as the potential of the same observations for constraining the representation of the global dust cycle embedded in Earth System Models, both in terms of magnitude and physical parameters related to particle sizes and optical properties. Finally we show the impacts on climate, based on this kind of observationally constrained model simulations.

  3. Energy Concept Understanding of High School Students: A Cross-Grade Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoglu, Zeynep Baskan

    2018-01-01

    Energy is a difficult concept to be understood by students of all levels. Thus, the aim of the study is to determine how high school students at different levels perceive the energy and related concepts. In line with this purpose, 173 students in total of which 57 ones of the 9th grade, 94 ones of the 10th grade and 22 ones of the 11th grade…

  4. Molecular Level Understanding of Electrocatalysis in High pH Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-08

    carbon substrates as well as efficient removal of CO2 from the interface via improved diffusion flux to the electrode tip in the RRDE. (c) Conducting... electrochemical interface. Initial preliminary data proves this concept to be true and highly sensitive to the generation of surface plasmons and quantum...B1423 (2011). 2. ‘ Electrochemical Kinetics and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigation of Oxygen Reduction on Chalcogen-Modified Ru Catalysts

  5. Understanding the Money-Prices Relationship Under Low and High Inflation Regimes: Argentina 1970-2005

    OpenAIRE

    Emiliano Basco; Laura D´Amato; Lorena Garegnani

    2006-01-01

    Recent cross-country empirical evidence indicates that the money-prices relationship depends on the average rate of inflation. This relationship is strong in economies with high inflation, but weakens under low inflation. Based on these findings, we study the dependence of the money-prices relationship on the level of inflation in Argentina along the last 35 years. We use descriptive analysis as well as cointegration tests to study the long run relationship between money growth and inflation....

  6. Understanding the hepatitis C virus life cycle paves the way for highly effective therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Rice, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    . An exciting new era in HCV therapy dawned with the recent approval of two viral protease inhibitors, used in combination with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin; however, this is just the beginning. Multiple classes of antivirals with distinct targets promise highly efficient combinations, and interferon......, such as HCV diversity, viral resistance, the influence of host genetics, advanced liver disease and other co-morbidities....

  7. Refining Our Understanding of Value-Based Insurance Design and High Cost Sharing on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Randall P; Bachman, Sara S; Tan, Hui Ren

    2017-05-01

    There is significant concern about the financial burdens of new insurance plan designs on families, particularly families with children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). With value-based insurance design (VBID) plans growing in popularity, this study examined the implications of selected VBID cost-sharing features on children. We studied children's health care spending patterns in 2 data sets that include high deductible and narrow network plans among others. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2007 to 2013 on 22 392 children were used to study out-of-pocket (OOP) costs according to CYSHCN, family income, and spending. MarketScan large employer insurance claims data from 2007 to 2014 ( N = 4 263 452) were used to test for differences in mean total payments and OOP costs across various health plans. Across the data sets, we found that existing health plans place significant financial burdens on families, particularly lower income households and families with CYSHCN; individuals among the top 10% of OOP spending averaged more than $2000 per child. Although high deductible and consumer-driven plans impose substantial OOP costs on children, they do not significantly reduce spending, whereas health maintenance organizations that use network restrictions and tighter management do. Our results do not support the conclusion that high cost-sharing features that are common in VBID plans will significantly reduce health care spending on children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Instant Sublime Text starter

    CERN Document Server

    Haughee, Eric

    2013-01-01

    A starter which teaches the basic tasks to be performed with Sublime Text with the necessary practical examples and screenshots. This book requires only basic knowledge of the Internet and basic familiarity with any one of the three major operating systems, Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X. However, as Sublime Text 2 is primarily a text editor for writing software, many of the topics discussed will be specifically relevant to software development. That being said, the Sublime Text 2 Starter is also suitable for someone without a programming background who may be looking to learn one of the tools of

  9. The Vicissitudes of Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan CULLER

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of text, which has been central to literary studies, has undergone many mutations, as it has traveled from the work of classical philologists, for whom it was and is the object of a powerful disciplinary formation, to postmodern theorists of the text, for whom, the concept might be summed up by the title of a fine book by John Mowatt: Text: the Genealogy of an Antidisciplinary Object. Of course, the interesting thing about a travelling concept is not that it travels — travelers, t...

  10. The Effect of Supplementary Materials on Reading Comprehension Improvement of Iranian Female High School EFL Learners Based on Gaj and Khate Sefid Text Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Zahra; Azizifar, Akbar; Gowhary, Habib; Heidari, Mina

    2015-01-01

    The Impact of using Supplementary books alongside the national academic text book has received great attention of the curriculum and material developers. Since the beginning of language studies, Second & Foreign Language Acquisition (SLA & FLA) researchers have been searching for effective ways of improving learners' language skills. This…

  11. Deep Dive Topic: State of understanding of capsule modeling in context of high-foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The work is summarized from several perspectives: 1D simulation perspective: Post-shot models agree with yield data to within a factor of ~2 at low implosion velocities, but the models diverge from the data as the velocity and convergence ratio increase. 2D simulation perspective: Integrated hohlraum-capsule post-shot models agree with primary data for most implosions, but overpredict yield and DSR for a few of the highest velocity implosions. High-resolution 3D post-shot capsule-only modeling captures much of the delivered performance of the one shot currently simulated.

  12. The role of high frequency monitoring in understanding nutrient pollution processes to address catchment management issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Paul; Jonczyk, Jennine; Owen, Gareth; Barber, Nick; Adams, Russell; ODonnell, Greg; EdenDTC Team

    2015-04-01

    The process insights afforded to catchment scientists through the availability of high frequency time series of hydrological and nutrient pollution datasets are invaluable. However, the observations reveal both good and bad news for the WFD. Data for flow, N, P and sediment (taken at 30 min intervals) from the River Eden Demonstration Test Catchment and several other detailed UK studies, will be used to discuss nutrient fluxes in catchments between 1km2 and 10km2. Monitoring of the seasonal groundwater status and the forensic analysis of numerous storm events have identified dominant flow pathways and nutrient losses. Nonetheless, many of the management questions demanded by the WFD will not be resolved by collecting these datasets alone. Long term trends are unlikely to be determined from these data and even if trends are found they are unlikely to be accurately apportioned to the activities that have caused them. The impacts of where and when an action takes place will not be detected at the catchment scale and the cost effectiveness of any mitigation method is unlikely to be quantifiable. Even in small well instrumented catchments the natural variability in rainfall, antecedent patterns and the variability in farming practices will mask any identifiable catchment scale signal. This does not mean the cost of the data acquisition has been wasted, it just means that the knowledge and expertise gained from these data should be used in new novel ways. It will always be difficult to quantify the actual losses occurring at the farm or field scale, but the positive benefits of any mitigation may still be approximated. The evidence for the rate of nutrient removal from a local sediment trap, wetland and a pond can be shown with high resolution datasets. However, any quantifiable results are still highly localised and the transfer and upscaling of any findings must be done with care. Modelling these datasets is also possible and the nature of models have evolved in the

  13. Understanding charge transfer of Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from metal surfaces with high work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lin; Wu Wen-Bin; Liu Pin-Yang; Xiao Yun-Qing; Li Guo-Peng; Liu Yi-Ran; Jiang Hao-Yu; Guo Yan-Ling; Chen Xi-Meng

    2016-01-01

    For Li + and Na + ions scattered from high work function metal surfaces, efficient neutralization is observed, and it cannot be explained by the conventional free electron model. In order to explain these experimental data, we investigate the velocity-dependent neutral fraction with the modified Brako–Newns (BN) model. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data. We find that the parallel velocity effect plays an important role in neutralizing the Li + and Na + ions for large angle scattering. The nonmonotonic velocity behavior of neutral fraction is strongly related to the distance-dependent coupling strength between the atomic level and metal states. (paper)

  14. New understanding of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yange; Zhang, Tao; Shao, Yawei; Meng, Guozhe; Wang, Fuhui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Stress distributions of pits under different hydrostatic pressures are simulated. •Corrosion model of Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel under hydrostatic pressure is established. •A novel understanding of the effect of hydrostatic pressure is proposed. -- Abstract: Corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel at different hydrostatic pressures is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and finite element analysis (FEA). The results indicate that corrosion pits of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel originate from inclusions in the steel and high hydrostatic pressures accelerate pit growth rate parallel to steel and the coalescence rate of neighbouring pits, which lead to the fast formation of uniform corrosion. Corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel under high hydrostatic pressure is the interaction result between electrochemical corrosion and elastic stress

  15. Linguistics in Text Interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togeby, Ole

    2011-01-01

    A model for how text interpretation proceeds from what is pronounced, through what is said to what is comunicated, and definition of the concepts 'presupposition' and 'implicature'.......A model for how text interpretation proceeds from what is pronounced, through what is said to what is comunicated, and definition of the concepts 'presupposition' and 'implicature'....

  16. Systematic text condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies.......To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies....

  17. Composing Texts, Composing Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Sondra

    1994-01-01

    Using composition, reader response, critical, and feminist theories, a teacher demonstrates how adult students respond critically to literary texts and how teachers must critically analyze the texts of their teaching practice. Both students and teachers can use writing to bring their experiences to interpretation. (SK)

  18. Making Sense of Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Rebecca G.

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the triadic nature regarding meaning construction of texts. Grounded in Rosenblatt's (1995; 1998; 2004) Transactional Theory, research conducted in an undergraduate Language Arts curriculum course revealed that when presented with unfamiliar texts, students used prior experiences, social interactions, and literary strategies…

  19. Text File Comparator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    File Comparator program IFCOMP, is text file comparator for IBM OS/VScompatable systems. IFCOMP accepts as input two text files and produces listing of differences in pseudo-update form. IFCOMP is very useful in monitoring changes made to software at the source code level.

  20. SparkText: Biomedical Text Mining on Big Data Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Ye

    Full Text Available Many new biomedical research articles are published every day, accumulating rich information, such as genetic variants, genes, diseases, and treatments. Rapid yet accurate text mining on large-scale scientific literature can discover novel knowledge to better understand human diseases and to improve the quality of disease diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.In this study, we designed and developed an efficient text mining framework called SparkText on a Big Data infrastructure, which is composed of Apache Spark data streaming and machine learning methods, combined with a Cassandra NoSQL database. To demonstrate its performance for classifying cancer types, we extracted information (e.g., breast, prostate, and lung cancers from tens of thousands of articles downloaded from PubMed, and then employed Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine (SVM, and Logistic Regression to build prediction models to mine the articles. The accuracy of predicting a cancer type by SVM using the 29,437 full-text articles was 93.81%. While competing text-mining tools took more than 11 hours, SparkText mined the dataset in approximately 6 minutes.This study demonstrates the potential for mining large-scale scientific articles on a Big Data infrastructure, with real-time update from new articles published daily. SparkText can be extended to other areas of biomedical research.

  1. Dictionaries for text production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuertes-Olivera, Pedro; Bergenholtz, Henning

    2018-01-01

    and free online dictionaries. The Diccionario español para la producción de textos is an example of a general text production dictionary that makes use of internet technologies, is based on a lexicographic theory, contains all the lexicographic data that users need in a production situation, and aims......Dictionaries for Text Production are information tools that are designed and constructed for helping users to produce (i.e. encode) texts, both oral and written texts. These can be broadly divided into two groups: (a) specialized text production dictionaries, i.e., dictionaries that only offer...... a small amount of lexicographic data, most or all of which are typically used in a production situation, e.g. synonym dictionaries, grammar and spelling dictionaries, collocation dictionaries, concept dictionaries such as the Longman Language Activator, which is advertised as the World’s First Production...

  2. Understanding nonlinear vibration behaviours in high-power ultrasonic surgical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Andrew; Cardoni, Andrea; Cerisola, Niccolò; Lucas, Margaret

    2015-04-08

    Ultrasonic surgical devices are increasingly used in oral, craniofacial and maxillofacial surgery to cut mineralized tissue, offering the surgeon high accuracy with minimal risk to nerve and vessel tissue. Power ultrasonic devices operate in resonance, requiring their length to be a half-wavelength or multiple-half-wavelength. For bone surgery, devices based on a half-wavelength have seen considerable success, but longer multiple-half-wavelength endoscopic devices have recently been proposed to widen the range of surgeries. To provide context for these developments, some examples of surgical procedures and the associated designs of ultrasonic cutting tips are presented. However, multiple-half-wavelength components, typical of endoscopic devices, have greater potential to exhibit nonlinear dynamic behaviours that have a highly detrimental effect on device performance. Through experimental characterization of the dynamic behaviour of endoscopic devices, it is demonstrated how geometrical features influence nonlinear dynamic responses. Period doubling, a known route to chaotic behaviour, is shown to be significantly influenced by the cutting tip shape, whereas the cutting tip has only a limited effect on Duffing-like responses, particularly the shape of the hysteresis curve, which is important for device stability. These findings underpin design, aiming to pave the way for a new generation of ultrasonic endoscopic surgical devices.

  3. Understanding Psychosocial and High-Risk Sexual Behaviors Among Detained Juveniles: A Descriptive Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Madison L; Staples-Horne, Michelle; Cartier, Jeanne; Best, Candace; Walker, Veronica; Schwartz, David; Yoo, Wonsuk

    2015-12-30

    African American women are disproportionately impacted by sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as chlamydia and gonorrhea, which are known risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. STIs, particularly chlamydia and gonorrhea, are even more prevalent among young African American women with a juvenile detention history. The population with experiences with the criminal justice system has greater rates of STIs and is diagnosed more often with mental health issues, often related to sexual abuse or intimate partner violence, compared to peers who have not been detained by law enforcement. Psychosocial factors, especially those related to intimate relationships (ie, the imperativeness of being in a relationship and the power one has in their relationship), have emerged as important explanatory factors for acquiring STIs, including HIV, and a component of risk reduction interventions. To investigate more comprehensively the relationship between psychosocial risk factors and STIs, including HIV, as it relates to reduction and prevention of these diseases. The long-term goal is to improve the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions with a major focus on intimate relationship dynamics. This descriptive study surveys young women (ages 13-17) who have been detained (incarcerated) by a department of juvenile justice. In addition to being female and detained, eligibility criteria include being detained longer than 30 days and being free of cognitive impairments. This study will include young women from one juvenile detention center. The primary outcomes to be measured are STI knowledge, intimate relationship dynamics (ie, imperativeness and power), and high-risk sexual behaviors. High-risk sexual behaviors will be assessed using data extracted from health records. Preliminarily, we have received assent from 26 primarily young African American women. The majority of participants (81%) had inadequate knowledge about STIs, 52% perceived a lack of

  4. Understanding the physiological responses of a tropical crop (Capsicum chinense Jacq. at high temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Garruña-Hernández

    Full Text Available Temperature is one of the main environmental factors involved in global warming and has been found to have a direct effect on plants. However, few studies have investigated the effect of higher temperature on tropical crops. We therefore performed an experiment with a tropical crop of Habanero pepper (Capsicum Chinense Jacq.. Three growth chambers were used, each with 30 Habanero pepper plants. Chambers were maintained at a diurnal maximum air temperature (DMT of 30 (chamber 1, 35 (chamber 2 and 40°C (chamber 3. Each contained plants from seedling to fruiting stage. Physiological response to variation in DMT was evaluated for each stage over the course of five months. The results showed that both leaf area and dry mass of Habanero pepper plants did not exhibit significant differences in juvenile and flowering phenophases. However, in the fruiting stage, the leaf area and dry mass of plants grown at 40°C DMT were 51 and 58% lower than plants at 30°C DMT respectively. Meanwhile, an increase in diurnal air temperature raised both stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, causing an increase in temperature deficit (air temperature - leaf temperature. Thus, leaf temperature decreased by 5°C, allowing a higher CO2 assimilation rate in plants at diurnal maximum air temperature (40°C. However, in CO2 measurements when leaf temperature was set at 40°C, physiological parameters decreased due to an increase in stomatal limitation. We conclude that the thermal optimum range in a tropical crop such as Habanero pepper is between 30 and 35°C (leaf temperature, not air temperature. In this range, gas exchange through stomata is probably optimal. Also, the air temperature-leaf temperature relationship helps to explain how temperature keeps the major physiological processes of Habanero pepper healthy under experimental conditions.

  5. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  6. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  7. The Effectiveness of an Online Curriculum on High School Students' Understanding of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Robert B.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2015-12-01

    An online curriculum about biological evolution was designed to promote increased student content knowledge and evidentiary reasoning. A feasibility study was conducted with 77 rural high school biology students who learned with the online biological evolution unit. Data sources included the Biological Evolution Assessment Measure (BEAM), an analysis of discussion forum posts, and a post-implementation perceptions and attitudes questionnaire. BEAM posttest scores were significantly higher than the pretest scores. However, the findings revealed that the students required additional support to develop evidentiary reasoning. Many students perceived that the Web-based curriculum would have been enhanced by increased immediate interaction and feedback. Students required greater scaffolding to support complex, process-oriented tasks. Implications for designing Web-based science instruction with curriculum materials to support students' acquisition of content knowledge and science process skills in a Web-based setting are discussed.

  8. Toward a better understanding of the comparatively high prostate cancer incidence rates in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M; Hilton, Sterling C; Wiggins, Charles L; Sturgeon, Jared D

    2003-04-29

    This study assesses whether comparatively high prostate cancer incidence rates among white men in Utah represent higher rates among members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormons), who comprise about 70% of the state's male population, and considers the potential influence screening has on these rates. Analyses are based on 14,693 histologically confirmed invasive prostate cancer cases among men aged 50 years and older identified through the Utah Cancer Registry between 1985 and 1999. Cancer records were linked to LDS Church membership records to determine LDS status. Poisson regression was used to derive rate ratios of LDS to nonLDS prostate cancer incidence, adjusted for age, disease stage, calendar time, and incidental detection. LDS men had a 31% (95% confidence interval, 26%-36%) higher incidence rate of prostate cancer than nonLDS men during the study period. Rates were consistently higher among LDS men over time (118% in 1985-88, 20% in 1989-92, 15% in 1993-1996, and 13% in 1997-99); age (13% in ages 50-59, 48% in ages 60-69, 28% in ages 70-79, and 16% in ages 80 and older); and stage (36% in local/regional and 17% in unstaged). An age- and stage-shift was observed for both LDS and nonLDS men, although more pronounced among LDS men. Comparatively high prostate cancer incidence rates among LDS men in Utah are explained, at least in part, by more aggressive screening among these men.

  9. Understanding sleep habits and associated factors can help to improve sleep in high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinçaslan, Ayşe; Aydin, Neriman; Kul, Seval

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to describe the sleep profiles and associated factors of poor sleep in adolescents. We gave a sleep questionnaire and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to 3,441 high school adolescents (15-18 years) in Gaziantep, Turkey. Adolescents reported a requirement of 10.4 hours of sleep on average to feel their best during the day. However, total night sleep time (TNST) was 7.42 +/- 1.48 hours on school nights and 9.40 +/- 1.37 on non-school nights. TNST of > or =9 hours on both school nights and non-school nights was detected in 8.2%. Average bedtime and wake-up time were 23:16 and 06:41 on school nights. Bedtime was approximately 30 minutes later on non-school nights. The shift in wake-up time was nearly 2.5 hours. Statistical analysis by logistic regression model showed that TNST was most significantly correlated with school start time (morning versus afternoon) irrespective of school or non-school nights. TNST on school nights was negatively correlated with age, passive smoking at home, drinking tea/coffee, and conduct problem, whereas TNST on non-school nights was negatively correlated with the mother's education, male gender, body mass index, number of household members, and having a television in the bedroom. Daytime napping (21.3%) was associated with morning start time, age, female gender, and mother's education. Sleep-onset insomnia with sleep latency >30 minutes (21%) was not related to age or gender; however, it was associated with abnormal breathing during sleep. The findings revealed that inadequate sleep is quite prevalent among high school adolescents. Given the fact that most of the associated factors are modifiable, inadequate sleep is not inevitable for adolescents.

  10. Understanding physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Understanding Physics - Second edition is a comprehensive, yet compact, introductory physics textbook aimed at physics undergraduates and also at engineers and other scientists taking a general physics course. Written with today's students in mind, this text covers the core material required by an introductory course in a clear and refreshing way. A second colour is used throughout to enhance learning and understanding. Each topic is introduced from first principles so that the text is suitable for students without a prior background in physics. At the same time the book is designed to enable

  11. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  12. The Vicissitudes of Text

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan CULLER; Jonathan CULLER

    2003-01-01

    The concept of text, which has been central to literary studies, has undergone many mutations, as it has traveled from the work of classical philologists, for whom it was and is the object of a powerful disciplinary formation, to postmodern theorists of the text, for whom, the concept might be summed up by the title of a fine book by John Mowatt: Text: the Genealogy of an Antidisciplinary Object. Of course, the interesting thing about a travelling concept is not that it travels — travelers, t...

  13. Satisfaction with the decision to participate in cancer clinical trials is high, but understanding is a problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefford, M; Mileshkin, L; Matthews, J; Raunow, H; O'Kane, C; Cavicchiolo, T; Brasier, H; Anderson, M; Reynolds, J

    2011-03-01

    Partially presented in poster format at the 40th and 41st Annual Meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held in 2004 in New Orleans, Louisiana and in 2005 in Orlando, Florida. We aimed to: (a) assess patient knowledge about cancer clinical trials (CCT) and satisfaction with their decision to participate, (b) determine whether satisfaction correlates with objective understanding, or other factors, and (c) identify correlates of increased understanding. A convenience sample of 100 patients were recruited. Instruments assessed quality of informed consent (QuIC), quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), and preferences for information and involvement in decision making. Measures were completed within 2 weeks of clinical trial enrollment. One hundred two patients (68 male) with a median age of 58.4 years (29-85) were registered in 27 of the 33 therapeutic cancer clinical trials approved for the Consent Study. Mean QuIC objective knowledge (QuIC-A) was 77.6 (/100) (95% CI, 75.7-79.4) and perceived (subjective) understanding (QuIC-B) 91.5 (95% CI, 89.6-93.3). There was low but significant correlation between QuIC-A and B (R = 0.26, p = 0.008). Satisfaction was very high. Correlation between QuIC-B and satisfaction was moderate (0.430, p < 0.001). QuIC-B, but not QuIC-A was associated with QOL scores. Preferences regarding participation in decision making and whether these preferences were achieved did not impact upon knowledge, understanding or satisfaction. Patient knowledge regarding CCT is similar to published US data, and satisfaction is high. Satisfaction correlates with perceived but not objective understanding of CCT. Strategies to further improve the consent process need to be developed.

  14. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  15. Understanding charge transfer of Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from metal surfaces with high work function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Pin-Yang; Xiao, Yun-Qing; Li, Guo-Peng; Liu, Yi-Ran; Jiang, Hao-Yu; Guo, Yan-Ling; Chen, Xi-Meng

    2016-08-01

    For Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from high work function metal surfaces, efficient neutralization is observed, and it cannot be explained by the conventional free electron model. In order to explain these experimental data, we investigate the velocity-dependent neutral fraction with the modified Brako-Newns (BN) model. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data. We find that the parallel velocity effect plays an important role in neutralizing the Li+ and Na+ ions for large angle scattering. The nonmonotonic velocity behavior of neutral fraction is strongly related to the distance-dependent coupling strength between the atomic level and metal states. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11405078 and 11474140), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. lzujbky-2014-169 and lzujbky-2015-244), the Project sponsored by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, the State Education Ministry, and the National Students’ Innovation and Entrepreneurship Training Program (Grant Nos. 201410730069 and 201510730078).

  16. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  17. Advances in Understanding the Role of Frozen Precipitation in High Latitude Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N.; Smalley, M.; McIlhattan, E.; Kulie, M.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite-based millimeter wavelength radar observations provide a unique perspective on the global character of frozen precipitation that has been difficult to detect using conventional spaceborne precipitation sensors. This presentation will describe the methodology underpinning the ten-year CloudSat global snowfall product and discuss the results of a number of complementary approaches that have been adopted to quantify its uncertainties. These datasets are shedding new light on the distribution, character, and impacts of frozen precipitation on high latitude hydrology. Inferred regional snowfall accumulations, for example, provide valuable constraints on projected changes in precipitation and mass balance on the Antarctic ice sheet in climate models. When placed in the broader context of complementary observations from other A-Train sensors, instantaneous snowfall estimates also hint at the large-scale processes that influence snow formation including air-sea interactions associated with cold-air outbreaks, lake-effect snows, and orographic enhancement. Simultaneous CloudSat and CALIPSO observations further emphasize the important role snowfall plays in the lifetime of super-cooled liquid containing clouds in the Arctic and highlight a model deficiency with important implications for surface energy and mass balance on the Greenland ice sheet.

  18. Journalistic Text Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Rikke Hartmann

    JOURNALISTIC TEXT PRODUCTION: A CASE STUDY ON REVISIONS OF CONTENT AND FORM ABSTRACT • This paper provides insights into journalists’ revisions of content and linguistic form when producing newspaper articles. • By use of keystroke logging, participant observation and retrospective interviews...... different overall purposes: one in which the journalists produce (more) text for the newspaper article, and one in which they evaluate, and especially, reduce the length of the article. EXTENDED SUMMARY News products provide much of the foundation for what we know about the world we live in. However, we...... journalists make as regards content and linguistic form when composing news articles (NN 2016). More specifically, the study investigated revisions that were carried out by journalists during text production as these revisions yield insights into the progression of the text and thus contribute to our...

  19. Plagiarism in Academic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eugenia Rojas-Porras

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ethical and social responsibility of citing the sources in a scientific or artistic work is undeniable. This paper explores, in a preliminary way, academic plagiarism in its various forms. It includes findings based on a forensic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness on the importance of considering these details when writing and publishing a text. Hopefully, this analysis may put the issue under discussion.

  20. SparkText: Biomedical Text Mining on Big Data Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhan; Tafti, Ahmad P; He, Karen Y; Wang, Kai; He, Max M

    Many new biomedical research articles are published every day, accumulating rich information, such as genetic variants, genes, diseases, and treatments. Rapid yet accurate text mining on large-scale scientific literature can discover novel knowledge to better understand human diseases and to improve the quality of disease diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. In this study, we designed and developed an efficient text mining framework called SparkText on a Big Data infrastructure, which is composed of Apache Spark data streaming and machine learning methods, combined with a Cassandra NoSQL database. To demonstrate its performance for classifying cancer types, we extracted information (e.g., breast, prostate, and lung cancers) from tens of thousands of articles downloaded from PubMed, and then employed Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine (SVM), and Logistic Regression to build prediction models to mine the articles. The accuracy of predicting a cancer type by SVM using the 29,437 full-text articles was 93.81%. While competing text-mining tools took more than 11 hours, SparkText mined the dataset in approximately 6 minutes. This study demonstrates the potential for mining large-scale scientific articles on a Big Data infrastructure, with real-time update from new articles published daily. SparkText can be extended to other areas of biomedical research.

  1. Contributions to understanding the high speed machining effects on aeronautic part surface integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid

    To remain competitive, the aeronautic industry has increasing requirements for mechanical components and parts with high functional performance and longer in-service life. The improvement of the in-service life of components can be achieved by mastering and optimizing the surface integrity of the manufactured parts. Thus, the present study attempted to investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the tool/work material interactions on part surface integrity during the machining of aluminium alloys and hardened materials (low alloy steels) using orthogonal machining tests data. The studied materials are two aluminum alloys (6061-T6 and 7075-T651) and AISI 4340 steel. The AISI 4340 steel was machined after been induction heat treated to 58-60 HRC. These materials were selected in an attempt to provide a comprehensive study for the machining of metals with different behaviours (ductile and hard material). The proposed approach is built on three steps. First, we proposed a design of experiment (DOE) to analyse, experimentally, the chip formation and the resulting surface integrity during the high speed machining under dry condition. The orthogonal cutting mode, adopted in these experiments, allowed to explore, theoretically, the effects of technological (cutting speed and feed) and physical (cutting forces, temperature, shear angle, friction angle, and length Contact tool/chip) parameters on the chip formation mechanisms and the machined surface characteristics (residual stress, plastic deformation, phase transformation, etc.). The cutting conditions were chosen while maintaining a central composite design (CCD) with two factors (cutting speed and feed per revolution). For the aluminum 7075-T651, the results showed that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles are the main causes of the machined surface damage. The BUE formation increases with the cutting feed while the increase of the cutting speed

  2. A Comparison of Two Cognitive Reading Strategies on the Comprehension of Functional Expository Text by High School Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation report focuses on the results of an intervention study that examined the effectiveness of two cognitive-based reading strategies ("5 Ws and an H" and paragraph summarization) on the reading comprehension skills of 13 high school students with mild intellectual disabilities as well as the students' abilities to…

  3. Should we be afraid of simple messages? The effects of text difficulty and illustrations in people with low or high health literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, C.S.; Smit, E.G.; Buurman, B.M.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    It is often recommended that health information should be simplified for people with low health literacy. However, little is known about whether messages adapted to low health literacy audiences are also effective for people with high health literacy, or whether simple messages are counterproductive

  4. Should We Be Afraid of Simple Messages? The Effects of Text Difficulty and Illustrations in People With Low or High Health Literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, Corine S.; Smit, Edith G.; Buurman, Bianca M.; van Weert, Julia C. M.

    2015-01-01

    It is often recommended that health information should be simplified for people with low health literacy. However, little is known about whether messages adapted to low health literacy audiences are also effective for people with high health literacy, or whether simple messages are counterproductive

  5. New GOES High-Resolution Magnetic Measurements and their Contribution to Understanding Magnetospheric Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, R. J.; Loto'aniu, P. T. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Chi, P. J.; Singer, H. J.; Kress, B. T.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Abdelqader, A.; Tilton, M.

    2017-12-01

    The era of NOAA observations of the geomagnetic field started with SMS-1 in May 1974 and continues to this day with GOES-13-16 (on-orbit). We describe the development of a new 20+ year archive of science-quality, high-cadence geostationary measurements of the magnetic field from eight NOAA spacecraft (GOES-8 through GOES-15), the status of GOES-16 and new scientific results using these data. GOES magnetic observations provide an early warning of impending space weather, are the core geostationary data set used for the construction of magnetospheric magnetic models, and can be used to estimate electromagnetic wave power in frequency bands important for plasma processes. Many science grade improvements are being made across the GOES archive to unify the format and content from GOES-8 through the new GOES-R series (with the first of that series launched on November 19, 2016). A majority of the 2-Hz magnetic observations from GOES-8-12 have never before been publicly accessible due to processing constraints. Now, a NOAA Big Earth Data Initiative project is underway to process these measurements starting from original telemetry records. Overall the new archive will include vector measurements in geophysically relevant coordinates (EPN, GSM, and VDH), comprehensive documentation, highest temporal cadence, best calibration parameters, recomputed means, updated quality flagging, full spacecraft ephemeris information, a unified standard format and public access. We are also developing spectral characterization tools for estimating power in standard frequency bands (up to 1 Hz for G8-15), and detecting ULF waves related to field-line resonances. We present the project status and findings, including in-situ statistical and extreme ULF event properties, and case studies where the ULF oscillations along the same field line were observed simultaneously by GOES near the equator in the magnetosphere, the ST-5 satellites at low altitudes, and ground magnetometer stations. For event

  6. Understanding the Structure of High-K Gate Oxides - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Andre [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Hafnium Oxide (HfO2) amorphous thin films are being used as gate oxides in transistors because of their high dielectric constant (κ) over Silicon Dioxide. The present study looks to find the atomic structure of HfO2 thin films which hasn’t been done with the technique of this study. In this study, two HfO2 samples were studied. One sample was made with thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) on top of a Chromium and Gold layer on a silicon wafer. The second sample was made with plasma ALD on top of a Chromium and Gold layer on a Silicon wafer. Both films were deposited at a thickness of 50nm. To obtain atomic structure information, Grazing Incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was carried out on the HfO2 samples. Because of this, absorption, footprint, polarization, and dead time corrections were applied to the scattering intensity data collected. The scattering curves displayed a difference in structure between the ALD processes. The plasma ALD sample showed the broad peak characteristic of an amorphous structure whereas the thermal ALD sample showed an amorphous structure with characteristics of crystalline materials. This appears to suggest that the thermal process results in a mostly amorphous material with crystallites within. Further, the scattering intensity data was used to calculate a pair distribution function (PDF) to show more atomic structure. The PDF showed atom distances in the plasma ALD sample had structure up to 10 Å, while the thermal ALD sample showed the same structure below 10 Å. This structure that shows up below 10 Å matches the bond distances of HfO2 published in literature. The PDF for the thermal ALD sample also showed peaks up to 20 Å, suggesting repeating atomic spacing outside the HfO2 molecule in the sample. This appears to suggest that there is some crystalline structure within the thermal ALD sample.

  7. Locative inferences in medical texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, P S; Bailey, G H; Mayer, R J; Hillis, A; Dvoracek, J E

    1987-06-01

    Medical research relies on epidemiological studies conducted on a large set of clinical records that have been collected from physicians recording individual patient observations. These clinical records are recorded for the purpose of individual care of the patient with little consideration for their use by a biostatistician interested in studying a disease over a large population. Natural language processing of clinical records for epidemiological studies must deal with temporal, locative, and conceptual issues. This makes text understanding and data extraction of clinical records an excellent area for applied research. While much has been done in making temporal or conceptual inferences in medical texts, parallel work in locative inferences has not been done. This paper examines the locative inferences as well as the integration of temporal, locative, and conceptual issues in the clinical record understanding domain by presenting an application that utilizes two key concepts in its parsing strategy--a knowledge-based parsing strategy and a minimal lexicon.

  8. Faust: Flexible Acquistion and Understanding System for Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    projects that: extend the Google Guava libraries; provides utilities around String manipulation,Collections, Error,Math and Logging handling...blacklisted dependencies. Examples/Description Dependencies Sue dove and caught the frisbee. conj(dove, caught) If you wash , I’ll dry. advcl(dry, wash ...You wash ; I’ll dry. parataxis( wash , dry) He said that she was swimming. ccomp(said, swimming) Bonds bought by investors came due. partmod(bonds

  9. Understanding Practices in Mathematics Education: Structure and Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Candia

    2014-01-01

    The practices of mathematics education can be investigated at a wide variety of levels: from the actions of individual students or teachers through classroom interactions, school structures, curriculum specifications and materials, teacher development programmes and local, national or international systems of instruction and assessment. These…

  10. Big Medical Text Analytics: querying, searching and understanding clinical data

    OpenAIRE

    Costumero Moreno, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The increasing generation of data in different sectors thanks to digitalization has provoked a change in the techniques used to store, process and extract value and knowledge from different datasets. This change has also affected more traditional sectors like healthcare, which have been transformed in this process. The amount of medical data generated is increasing as the adoption of Electronic Health Records is becoming a standard in all the developed countries. The economic impact of th...

  11. Fostering High School Students' Conceptual Understandings About Seasons: The Design of a Technology-enhanced Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Shao; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand in what ways a technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environment supports learning about the causes of the seasons. The environment was designed to engage students in five cognitive phases: Contextualisation, Sense making, Exploration, Modeling, and Application. Seventy-five high school students participated in this study and multiple sources of data were collected to investigate students’ conceptual understandings and the interactions between the design of the environment and students’ alternative conceptions. The findings show that the number of alternative conceptions held by students were reduced except for the incorrect concepts of “the length of sunshine” and “the distance between the sun and the earth.” The percentage of partial explanations held by students was also reduced from 60.5 to 55.3% and the percentage of students holding complete scientific explanations after using Lesson Seasons rose from 2.6 to 15.8%. While some students succeeded in modeling their science concepts closely to the expert’s concepts, some failed to do so after the invention. The unsuccessful students could not remediate their alternative conceptions without explicit guidance and scaffolding. Future research can then be focused on understanding how to provide proper scaffoldings for removing some alternative concepts which are highly resistant to change.

  12. Understanding of emotional experience in autism: insights from the personal accounts of high-functioning children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losh, Molly; Capps, Lisa

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the authors investigate emotional understanding in autism through a discourse analytic framework to provide a window into children's strategies for interpreting emotional versus nonemotional encounters and consider the implications for the mechanisms underlying emotional understanding in typical development. Accounts were analyzed for thematic content and discourse structure. Whereas high-functioning children with autism were able to discuss contextually appropriate accounts of simple emotions, their strategies for interpreting all types of emotional (but not nonemotional) experiences differed from those used by typically developing children. High-functioning children with autism were less inclined to organize their emotional accounts in personalized causal-explanatory frameworks and displayed a tendency to describe visually salient elements of experiences seldom observed among comparison children. Findings suggest that children with autism possess less coherent representations of emotional experiences and use alternative strategies for interpreting emotionally evocative encounters. Discussion focuses on the significance of these findings for informing the nature of emotional dysfunction in autism as well as implications for theories of emotional understanding in typical development.

  13. TEXT Energy Storage System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, W.F.; Rylander, H.G.; Woodson, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) Enery Storage System, designed by the Center for Electromechanics (CEM), consists of four 50 MJ, 125 V homopolar generators and their auxiliaries and is designed to power the toroidal and poloidal field coils of TEXT on a two-minute duty cycle. The four 50 MJ generators connected in series were chosen because they represent the minimum cost configuration and also represent a minimal scale up from the successful 5.0 MJ homopolar generator designed, built, and operated by the CEM

  14. Strategy as Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obed Madsen, Søren

    of the strategy into four categories. Second, the managers produce new texts based on the original strategy document by using four different ways of translation models. The study’s findings contribute to three areas. Firstly, it shows that translation is more than a sociological process. It is also...... a craftsmanship that requires knowledge and skills, which unfortunately seems to be overlooked in both the literature and in practice. Secondly, it shows that even though a strategy text is in singular, the translation makes strategy plural. Thirdly, the article proposes a way to open up the black box of what...

  15. Text analysis in R

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welbers, K.; van Atteveldt, W.H.; Benoit, K.

    2017-01-01

    Computational text analysis has become an exciting research field with many applications in communication research. It can be a difficult method to apply, however, because it requires knowledge of various techniques, and the software required to perform most of these techniques is not readily

  16. Documents and legal texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This section treats of the following documents and legal texts: 1 - Belgium 29 June 2014 - Act amending the Act of 22 July 1985 on Third-Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy; 2 - Belgium, 7 December 2016. - Act amending the Act of 22 July 1985 on Third-Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy

  17. Texts in the landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Graham-Campbell

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The Institute's members of UCL's "Celtic Inscribed Stones" project describe, in collaboration with Wendy Davies, Mark Handley and Paul Kershaw (Department of History, a major interdisciplinary study of inscriptions of the early middle ages from the Celtic areas of northwest Europe.

  18. Summarizing Expository Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Carol; Culatta, Barbara; Lawrence, Barbara; Hall-Kenyon, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the literature on students' developing skills in summarizing expository texts and describes strategies for evaluating students' expository summaries. Evaluation outcomes are presented for a professional development project aimed at helping teachers develop new techniques for teaching summarization. Methods: Strategies…

  19. New mathematical cuneiform texts

    CERN Document Server

    Friberg, Jöran

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents in great detail a large number of both unpublished and previously published Babylonian mathematical texts in the cuneiform script. It is a continuation of the work A Remarkable Collection of Babylonian Mathematical Texts (Springer 2007) written by Jöran Friberg, the leading expert on Babylonian mathematics. Focussing on the big picture, Friberg explores in this book several Late Babylonian arithmetical and metro-mathematical table texts from the sites of Babylon, Uruk and Sippar, collections of mathematical exercises from four Old Babylonian sites, as well as a new text from Early Dynastic/Early Sargonic Umma, which is the oldest known collection of mathematical exercises. A table of reciprocals from the end of the third millennium BC, differing radically from well-documented but younger tables of reciprocals from the Neo-Sumerian and Old-Babylonian periods, as well as a fragment of a Neo-Sumerian clay tablet showing a new type of a labyrinth are also discussed. The material is presen...

  20. Text Induced Spelling Correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaert, M.W.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present TISC, a language-independent and context-sensitive spelling checking and correction system designed to facilitate the automatic removal of non-word spelling errors in large corpora. Its lexicon is derived from a very large corpus of raw text, without supervision, and contains word

  1. Texts and Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, Wolfgang

    1980-01-01

    Notes that, since fictional discourse need not reflect prevailing systems of meaning and norms or values, readers gain detachment from their own presuppositions; by constituting and formulating text-sense, readers are constituting and formulating their own cognition and becoming aware of the operations for doing so. (FL)

  2. The Emar Lexical Texts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gantzert, Merijn

    2011-01-01

    This four-part work provides a philological analysis and a theoretical interpretation of the cuneiform lexical texts found in the Late Bronze Age city of Emar, in present-day Syria. These word and sign lists, commonly dated to around 1100 BC, were almost all found in the archive of a single school.

  3. Texts On-Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Jacques

    1993-01-01

    Maintains that the study of signs is divided between those scholars who use the Saussurian binary sign (semiology) and those who prefer the Peirce tripartite sign (semiotics). Concludes that neither the Saussurian nor Peircian analysis methods can produce a semiotic interpretation based on a hierarchy of the text's various components. (CFR)

  4. download full text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a literary text, the stylistician is primarily concerned with the features that are stylistically significant in creating meanings. This study, which focuses mainly on .... Others sell such items to make money, thereby sabotaging the efforts of the government to meet the health needs of the people. For instance, Census, a theatre ...

  5. Contribution of thermodynamics in the understanding of the physico-chemical behaviour of fuels at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau, C.; Chatain, S.; Gosse, S.; Dumas, J.C.; Defoort, F.

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic approach for studying the physico-chemical behaviour of nuclear fuels at high temperature is presented. For instance is shown how the thermodynamic study of the uranium-oxygen-zirconium-iron system has contributed to improve the understanding of the scenario considered in studies on serious accidents for PWR reactors. Concerning the fuels of the future high temperature reactors, has been developed a thermodynamic data base 'fuelbase' (U-Pu-O-C-N-Si-Zr-Ti-Mo-Cr) using the Calphad method in parallel with experimental studies. In the framework of the studies on high temperature reactors, experimental works on the study of the interaction between the uranium dioxide and graphite are presented. This interaction leads to the formation of gaseous CO and CO 2 which can potentially be prejudicial to the thermomechanical resistance of the fuel in reactor. In this framework, the thermodynamic properties of the uranium-oxygen-carbon system are studied. (O.M.)

  6. Knowledge Representation in Travelling Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2014-01-01

    Today, information travels fast. Texts travel, too. In a corporate context, the question is how to manage which knowledge elements should travel to a new language area or market and in which form? The decision to let knowledge elements travel or not travel highly depends on the limitation...... and the purpose of the text in a new context as well as on predefined parameters for text travel. For texts used in marketing and in technology, the question is whether culture-bound knowledge representation should be domesticated or kept as foreign elements, or should be mirrored or moulded—or should not travel...... at all! When should semantic and pragmatic elements in a text be replaced and by which other elements? The empirical basis of our work is marketing and technical texts in English, which travel into the Latvian and Danish markets, respectively....

  7. ERRORS IN NARRATIVE TEXT COMMITTED BY STUDENTS OF GRADE XI OF VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL STATE 4 SURAKARTA ACADEMIC YEAR 2014/2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Mulyono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimes to identify the types of errors in the students' writing, to know the frequencies of each type of errors, and to investigate the causes of errors. There are three types of errors occured in the students' writing namely lexical error, syntactical error, and discourse error. The errors can be categorized into twenty four subcategories of errors: wrong spelling words (10,35%, wrong selection words (15,53%, omission verb (0,74%, omission v-ing after preposition for (0,55%, addition unnecessary verb (0,74%, using simple present tense refers to simple past (22,37%, use simple future instead of past future (2,40%, using irregular past verb tense after to infinitive (2,40%, addition final ed after to infinitive (1,85%, addition v-ing after to infinitive (1,11%, addition double marking verb (1,66%, omission to be (11,65%, addition to be (1,29%, omission s/es in the use of plural noun (2,40%, addition s in singular noun (1,29%, omission article (6,47%, addition unnecessary article (1,66%, wrong article (1,11%, wrong subject pronoun (2,03%, wrong object pronoun (0,55%, wrong possessive pronoun (2,03%, generic structure (2,96%, reference (2,03%, wrong selection conjunction (4,81%. The most dominant error is in syntactical error i.e. using simple present tense refers to simple past with the percentage 22,37%. Those errors are caused by four aspects, they are overgeneralization, incomplete application of rules, ignorance of rule restrictions, and false concept hypothesized.

  8. Communication dated 27 August 2007 from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency concerning the text of the 'Understandings of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the IAEA on the Modalities of Resolution of the Outstanding Issues'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a Note Verbale dated 27 August 2007 from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran, attaching the text of the 'Understandings of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the IAEA on the Modalities of Resolution of the Outstanding Issues'. The Note Verbale and, as requested therein, the attached document are herewith attached for information

  9. An Exploration of High School (12 17 Year Old) Students' Understandings of, and Attitudes Towards Biotechnology Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille

    2007-03-01

    The products of modern biotechnology processes such as genetic engineering, DNA testing and cloning will increasingly impact on society. It is essential that young people have a well-developed scientific understanding of biotechnology and associated processes so that they are able to contribute to public debate and make informed personal decisions. The aim of this study was to examine the development of understandings and attitudes about biotechnology processes as students progress through high school. In a cross-sectional case study, data was obtained from student interviews and written surveys of students aged 12 to 17 years. The results indicate that students' ability to provide a generally accepted definition and examples of biotechnology, cloning and genetically modified foods was relatively poor amongst 12 13 year old students but improved in older students. Most students approved of the use of biotechnology processes involving micro-organisms, plants and humans and disapproved of the use of animals. Overall, 12 13 year old students' attitudes were less favourable than older students regardless of the context. An awareness of the development and range of students' understandings and attitudes may lead to a more appropriate use of biotechnology curriculum materials and thus improved biotechnology education in schools.

  10. Weaving with text

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn-Rasmussen, Peter

    This paper explores how a school principal by means of practical authorship creates reservoirs of language that provide a possible context for collective sensemaking. The paper draws upon a field study in which a school principal, and his managerial team, was shadowed in a period of intensive cha...... changes. The paper explores how the manager weaves with text, extracted from stakeholders, administration, politicians, employees, public discourse etc., as a means of creating a new fabric, a texture, of diverse perspectives that aims for collective sensemaking....

  11. Note on the Text

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Since there is no complete modern edition of Shelley’s drama, I have used a variety of texts. For Prometheus Unbound, Tasso and The Cenci I have used The Poems of Shelley edited by Kelvin Everest and Geoffrey Matthews, but I have also noted the stage directions in BSMIX which comprises the intermediate fair copy of Prometheus Unbound which Shelley transcribed into three notebooks for safe-keeping. For Hellas I have used Shelley’s Poetry and Prose edited by Donald H. Reiman and Neil Fraistat (...

  12. Documents and legal texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This section treats of the following documents and legal texts: 1 - Brazil: Law No. 13,260 of 16 March 2016 (To regulate the provisions of item XLIII of Article 5 of the Federal Constitution on terrorism, dealing with investigative and procedural provisions and redefining the concept of a terrorist organisation; and amends Laws No. 7,960 of 21 December 1989 and No. 12,850 of 2 August 2013); 2 - India: The Atomic Energy (Amendment) Act, 2015; Department Of Atomic Energy Notification (Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage); 3 - Japan: Act on Subsidisation, etc. for Nuclear Damage Compensation Funds following the implementation of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage

  13. Weitere Texte physiognomischen Inhalts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böck, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article offers the edition of three cuneiform texts belonging to the Akkadian handbook of omens drawn from the physical appearance as well as the morals and behaviour of man. The book comprising up to 27 chapters with more than 100 omens each was entitled in antiquity Alamdimmû. The edition of the three cuneiform tablets completes, thus, the author's monographic study on the ancient Mesopotamian divinatory discipline of physiognomy (Die babylonisch-assyrische Morphoskopie (Wien 2000 [=AfO Beih. 27].

    En este artículo se presenta la editio princeps de tres textos cuneiformes conservados en el British Museum (Londres y el Vorderasiatisches Museum (Berlín, que pertenecen al libro asirio-babilonio de presagios fisiognómicos. Este libro, titulado originalmente Alamdimmû ('forma, figura', consta de 27 capítulos, cada uno con más de cien presagios escritos en lengua acadia. Los tres textos completan así el estudio monográfico de la autora sobre la disciplina adivinatoria de la fisiognomía en el antiguo Oriente (Die babylonisch-assyrische Morphoskopie (Wien 2000 [=AfO Beih. 27].

  14. download full text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIVERSITY OF BENIN

    This principle and practice places great importance on characterization in the short story, thus making it an element of high utility in the creative endeavour of the writer as well as a vital aspect of illustration of incident. .... I looked out of the window and saw a brand new Mercedes coupe, in a lovely wine colour. Dani was at ...

  15. Biomarker Identification Using Text Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular biomarkers has become one of the important tasks for scientists to assess the different phenotypic states of cells or organisms correlated to the genotypes of diseases from large-scale biological data. In this paper, we proposed a text-mining-based method to discover biomarkers from PubMed. First, we construct a database based on a dictionary, and then we used a finite state machine to identify the biomarkers. Our method of text mining provides a highly reliable approach to discover the biomarkers in the PubMed database.

  16. Documents and legal texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This section reprints a selection of recently published legislative texts and documents: - Russian Federation: Federal Law No.170 of 21 November 1995 on the use of atomic energy, Adopted by the State Duma on 20 October 1995; - Uruguay: Law No.19.056 On the Radiological Protection and Safety of Persons, Property and the Environment (4 January 2013); - Japan: Third Supplement to Interim Guidelines on Determination of the Scope of Nuclear Damage resulting from the Accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi and Daini Nuclear Power Plants (concerning Damages related to Rumour-Related Damage in the Agriculture, Forestry, Fishery and Food Industries), 30 January 2013; - France and the United States: Joint Statement on Liability for Nuclear Damage (Aug 2013); - Franco-Russian Nuclear Power Declaration (1 November 2013)

  17. Systematic characterizations of text similarity in full text biomedical publications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Sun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods have been used to find duplicate biomedical publications in MEDLINE. Full text articles are becoming increasingly available, yet the similarities among them have not been systematically studied. Here, we quantitatively investigated the full text similarity of biomedical publications in PubMed Central.72,011 full text articles from PubMed Central (PMC were parsed to generate three different datasets: full texts, sections, and paragraphs. Text similarity comparisons were performed on these datasets using the text similarity algorithm eTBLAST. We measured the frequency of similar text pairs and compared it among different datasets. We found that high abstract similarity can be used to predict high full text similarity with a specificity of 20.1% (95% CI [17.3%, 23.1%] and sensitivity of 99.999%. Abstract similarity and full text similarity have a moderate correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient: -0.423 when the similarity ratio is above 0.4. Among pairs of articles in PMC, method sections are found to be the most repetitive (frequency of similar pairs, methods: 0.029, introduction: 0.0076, results: 0.0043. In contrast, among a set of manually verified duplicate articles, results are the most repetitive sections (frequency of similar pairs, results: 0.94, methods: 0.89, introduction: 0.82. Repetition of introduction and methods sections is more likely to be committed by the same authors (odds of a highly similar pair having at least one shared author, introduction: 2.31, methods: 1.83, results: 1.03. There is also significantly more similarity in pairs of review articles than in pairs containing one review and one nonreview paper (frequency of similar pairs: 0.0167 and 0.0023, respectively.While quantifying abstract similarity is an effective approach for finding duplicate citations, a comprehensive full text analysis is necessary to uncover all potential duplicate citations in the scientific literature and is helpful when

  18. Interconnectedness und digitale Texte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlev Doherr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Zusammenfassung Die multimedialen Informationsdienste im Internet werden immer umfangreicher und umfassender, wobei auch die nur in gedruckter Form vorliegenden Dokumente von den Bibliotheken digitalisiert und ins Netz gestellt werden. Über Online-Dokumentenverwaltungen oder Suchmaschinen können diese Dokumente gefunden und dann in gängigen Formaten wie z.B. PDF bereitgestellt werden. Dieser Artikel beleuchtet die Funktionsweise der Humboldt Digital Library, die seit mehr als zehn Jahren Dokumente von Alexander von Humboldt in englischer Übersetzung im Web als HDL (Humboldt Digital Library kostenfrei zur Verfügung stellt. Anders als eine digitale Bibliothek werden dabei allerdings nicht nur digitalisierte Dokumente als Scan oder PDF bereitgestellt, sondern der Text als solcher und in vernetzter Form verfügbar gemacht. Das System gleicht damit eher einem Informationssystem als einer digitalen Bibliothek, was sich auch in den verfügbaren Funktionen zur Auffindung von Texten in unterschiedlichen Versionen und Übersetzungen, Vergleichen von Absätzen verschiedener Dokumente oder der Darstellung von Bilden in ihrem Kontext widerspiegelt. Die Entwicklung von dynamischen Hyperlinks auf der Basis der einzelnen Textabsätze der Humboldt‘schen Werke in Form von Media Assets ermöglicht eine Nutzung der Programmierschnittstelle von Google Maps zur geographischen wie auch textinhaltlichen Navigation. Über den Service einer digitalen Bibliothek hinausgehend, bietet die HDL den Prototypen eines mehrdimensionalen Informationssystems, das mit dynamischen Strukturen arbeitet und umfangreiche thematische Auswertungen und Vergleiche ermöglicht. Summary The multimedia information services on Internet are becoming more and more comprehensive, even the printed documents are digitized and republished as digital Web documents by the libraries. Those digital files can be found by search engines or management tools and provided as files in usual formats as

  19. Documents and legal texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This section treats of the following Documents and legal texts: 1 - Canada: Nuclear Liability and Compensation Act (An Act respecting civil liability and compensation for damage in case of a nuclear incident, repealing the Nuclear Liability Act and making consequential amendments to other acts); 2 - Japan: Act on Compensation for Nuclear Damage (The purpose of this act is to protect persons suffering from nuclear damage and to contribute to the sound development of the nuclear industry by establishing a basic system regarding compensation in case of nuclear damage caused by reactor operation etc.); Act on Indemnity Agreements for Compensation of Nuclear Damage; 3 - Slovak Republic: Act on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and on its Financial Coverage and on Changes and Amendments to Certain Laws (This Act regulates: a) The civil liability for nuclear damage incurred in the causation of a nuclear incident, b) The scope of powers of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (hereinafter only as the 'Authority') in relation to the application of this Act, c) The competence of the National Bank of Slovakia in relation to the supervised financial market entities in the financial coverage of liability for nuclear damage; and d) The penalties for violation of this Act)

  20. Documents and legal texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This section of the Bulletin presents the recently published documents and legal texts sorted by country: - Brazil: Resolution No. 169 of 30 April 2014. - Japan: Act Concerning Exceptions to Interruption of Prescription Pertaining to Use of Settlement Mediation Procedures by the Dispute Reconciliation Committee for Nuclear Damage Compensation in relation to Nuclear Damage Compensation Disputes Pertaining to the Great East Japan Earthquake (Act No. 32 of 5 June 2013); Act Concerning Measures to Achieve Prompt and Assured Compensation for Nuclear Damage Arising from the Nuclear Plant Accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Exceptions to the Extinctive Prescription, etc. of the Right to Claim Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Act No. 97 of 11 December 2013); Fourth Supplement to Interim Guidelines on Determination of the Scope of Nuclear Damage Resulting from the Accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi and Daini Nuclear Power Plants (Concerning Damages Associated with the Prolongation of Evacuation Orders, etc.); Outline of 'Fourth Supplement to Interim Guidelines (Concerning Damages Associated with the Prolongation of Evacuation Orders, etc.)'. - OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: Decision and Recommendation of the Steering Committee Concerning the Application of the Paris Convention to Nuclear Installations in the Process of Being Decommissioned; Joint Declaration on the Security of Supply of Medical Radioisotopes. - United Arab Emirates: Federal Decree No. (51) of 2014 Ratifying the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage; Ratification of the Federal Supreme Council of Federal Decree No. (51) of 2014 Ratifying the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage

  1. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  2. The pig gut microbial diversity: Understanding the pig gut microbial ecology through the next generation high throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeun Bum; Isaacson, Richard E

    2015-06-12

    The importance of the gut microbiota of animals is widely acknowledged because of its pivotal roles in the health and well being of animals. The genetic diversity of the gut microbiota contributes to the overall development and metabolic needs of the animal, and provides the host with many beneficial functions including production of volatile fatty acids, re-cycling of bile salts, production of vitamin K, cellulose digestion, and development of immune system. Thus the intestinal microbiota of animals has been the subject of study for many decades. Although most of the older studies have used culture dependent methods, the recent advent of high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes has facilitated in depth studies exploring microbial populations and their dynamics in the animal gut. These culture independent DNA based studies generate large amounts of data and as a result contribute to a more detailed understanding of the microbiota dynamics in the gut and the ecology of the microbial populations. Of equal importance, is being able to identify and quantify microbes that are difficult to grow or that have not been grown in the laboratory. Interpreting the data obtained from this type of study requires using basic principles of microbial diversity to understand importance of the composition of microbial populations. In this review, we summarize the literature on culture independent studies of the pig gut microbiota with an emphasis on its succession and alterations caused by diverse factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Combined use of stable isotopes and hydrologic modeling to better understand nutrient sources and cycling in highly altered systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Guerin, M.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Silva, S. R.; Harter, T.; Parker, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers provide the majority of freshwater for the San Francisco Bay Delta. Both rivers are important sources of drinking and irrigation water for California, and play critical roles in the health of California fisheries. Understanding the factors controlling water quality and primary productivity in these rivers and the Delta is essential for making sound economic and environmental water management decisions. However, these highly altered surface water systems present many challenges for water quality monitoring studies due to factors such as multiple potential nutrient and contaminant inputs, dynamic source water inputs, and changing flow regimes controlled by both natural and engineered conditions. The watersheds for both rivers contain areas of intensive agriculture along with many other land uses, and the Sacramento River receives significant amounts of treated wastewater from the large population around the City of Sacramento. We have used a multi-isotope approach combined with mass balance and hydrodynamic modeling in order to better understand the dominant nutrient sources for each of these rivers, and to track nutrient sources and cycling within the complex Delta region around the confluence of the rivers. High nitrate concentrations within the San Joaquin River fuel summer algal blooms, contributing to low dissolved oxygen conditions. High δ15N-NO3 values combined with the high nitrate concentrations suggest that animal manure is a significant source of nitrate to the San Joaquin River. In contrast, the Sacramento River has lower nitrate concentrations but elevated ammonium concentrations from wastewater discharge. Downstream nitrification of the ammonium can be clearly traced using δ15N-NH4. Flow conditions for these rivers and the Delta have strong seasonal and inter-annual variations, resulting in significant changes in nutrient delivery and cycling. Isotopic measurements and estimates of source water contributions

  4. English Metafunction Analysis in Chemistry Text: Characterization of Scientific Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Amin Dalimunte, M.Hum

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research are to identify what Metafunctions are applied in chemistry text and how they characterize a scientific text. It was conducted by applying content analysis. The data for this research was a twelve-paragraph chemistry text. The data were collected by applying a documentary technique. The document was read and analyzed to find out the Metafunction. The data were analyzed by some procedures: identifying the types of process, counting up the number of the processes, categorizing and counting up the cohesion devices, classifying the types of modulation and determining modality value, finally counting up the number of sentences and clauses, then scoring the grammatical intricacy index. The findings of the research show that Material process (71of 100 is mostly used, circumstance of spatial location (26 of 56 is more dominant than the others. Modality (5 is less used in order to avoid from subjectivity. Impersonality is implied through less use of reference either pronouns (7 or demonstrative (7, conjunctions (60 are applied to develop ideas, and the total number of the clauses are found much more dominant (109 than the total number of the sentences (40 which results high grammatical intricacy index. The Metafunction found indicate that the chemistry text has fulfilled the characteristics of scientific or academic text which truly reflects it as a natural science.

  5. Methods to improve and understand the sensitivity of high purity germanium detectors for searches of rare events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volynets, Oleksandr

    2012-07-27

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta-decay could answer fundamental questions on the nature of neutrinos. High purity germanium detectors are well suited to search for this rare process in germanium. Successful operation of such experiments requires a good understanding of the detectors and the sources of background. Possible background sources not considered before in the presently running GERDA high purity germanium detector experiment were studied. Pulse shape analysis using artificial neural networks was used to distinguish between signal-like and background-like events. Pulse shape simulation was used to investigate systematic effects influencing the efficiency of the method. Possibilities to localize the origin of unwanted radiation using Compton back-tracking in a granular detector system were examined. Systematic effects in high purity germanium detectors influencing their performance have been further investigated using segmented detectors. The behavior of the detector response at different operational temperatures was studied. The anisotropy effects due to the crystallographic structure of germanium were facilitated in a novel way to determine the orientation of the crystallographic axes.

  6. ontextualization in Science teaching: the voices of those involved in creating theoretical and methodological texts for the ENEM (Exame Nacional do Ensino Médio [National High-school Exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina dos Santos Fernandes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse understanding of the concept of contextualization in Science teaching implicit in questions for the ENEM, from the perspective of those involved in creating theoretical and methodological texts for this exam, and with the intention of drawing attention to support frameworks for teaching practice and pedagogical and curricular considerations in Science teaching and evaluative processes. To this end, five semi-structured interviews on the theme were conducted with educators connected with the field of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics and involved with the ENEM, and were analysed guided by the precepts of Text Discourse Analysis. Based on this analysis there appears to be a need to go beyond perspectives that reduce the context to a pretext of purely conceptual approaches and ideas that limit the context merely to aspects of the students’ environs. However, there are also possibilities that emerge for a contextualized approach connected to using historical perspectives and a multiplicity of contexts.

  7. Understanding in-stream temporal coupling of macronutrients based on high-frequency monitoring in groundwater dominated rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, M. Z.; Heathwaite, A. L.

    2012-04-01

    Developments in high-frequency water quality measurements enable capturing of fine structure of temporal variations in river biogeochemistry. Understanding of the temporal variation in the nutrient source and in-stream processes is critical in restoration of the good ecological and chemical status of river ecosystems. However, to date the in-stream temporal variability of macronutrients captured by high-frequency sampling is poorly understood (Scholefield et al., 2005; Milne et al., 2009; Harris and Heathwaite, 2011). Typically, river water quality monitoring is based on coarse sampling or storm event targeting strategies that miss the low flow water quality dynamics when in-stream processes and chemical-biological interactions may be of the greatest importance. This paper investigates the temporal dynamics and interdependencies between multiple high-frequency (hourly) nutrient and water quality time series collated for the River Leith, a tributary of the River Eden (Cumbria, UK). In-stream nutrients (total phosphorus TP, soluble reactive phosphorus SRP, nitrate nitrogen NO3N) and water quality parameters (turbidity, specific conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential) were measured by an automated remote mobile lab. A 54 km2 catchment of the River Leith is of mixed geology with Carboniferous limestone overlain by Penrith Sandstone and glacial till deposits. Permeable riverbed deposits create an active groundwater-surface water interface with hyporheic processes potentially exerting control over nutrient cycling. The temporal variation in in-stream nutrients and water quality variables was analysed. Diurnal patterns were observed during low flow conditions for both nutrients and water quality time series. Possible physical and biogeochemical controls on nutrients short-term dynamics were discussed. Antecedent and contemporaneous interdependencies between nutrients, water quality and hydrometric time series were explored in more detail using

  8. Retextualization as a didactic resource for text production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane de Paula Bouzada

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the conception of retextualization as a production of a new text from one or more base texts, we report in this article a writing activity in which public high school students retextualized the genre chronicle into other oral and written genres. The activity allowed students to work on linguistic, textual and discursive strategies from the base text and to project them into a new situation of interaction. The results suggest that it is a responsibility of formal education to create conditions for students to understand and take ownership of textual genres to become competent Portuguese Language users.

  9. Interactive highly realistic virtual reality as a tool for understanding the genesis and treatment of psychotic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zányi, Eva; Selmanovic, Elmedin; Broome, Matthew; Czanner, Silvester; Birchwood, Max; Chalmers, Alan; Singh, Swaran

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia can be a devastating lifelong psychotic disorder with a poor prognosis. National guidelines in the UK recommend the provision of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to all those suffering with psychotic disorders, but there is a lack of trained therapists in the UK able to provide such a treatment. Developing high quality automated technologies that can serve as an adjunct to conventional CBT should enhance the provision of this therapy, and increase the efficiency of the therapists in practice. The latter will occur by enabling alternate professionals to aid in the delivery of therapy, to enable behavioral experiments to be conducted in the clinic, and for sessions to be recorded and re-played such that the patient can deliver therapy to him or herself. As such the system will enable patients to become experts in, and providers of, their own treatment and decrease the number of sessions needed to be led by a trained CBT therapist. A key feature of any such system is the level of realism required to ensure a compelling session in which the user is not adversely affected by the system itself. This paper presents a high-fidelity virtual environment to help better understand the environmental triggers for psychosis.

  10. Advancing understanding of the fluvial export of organic matter through high-resolution profiling of dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, S.; Drew, S.; Gilvear, D.; Murray, H.; Heal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Quantifying the natural variation (complexity) of a system remains an enduring scientific challenge in better understanding controls on surface water quality. This characterisation is needed in order to reveal controlling processes, such as dilution, and also to identify unusual load profiles. In trying to capture that natural variation we still rely largely on concentration time series (and associated export budgets) generated from manual spot sampling, or from samples collected by autosamplers - approaches which are unlikely to provide the high temporal resolution of parameter concentration required. Now however, advances in sensor technology are helping us address this challenge. Here we present detailed dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export profiles from a small upland river (9.4 km sq.), generated since June 2011 by semi-continuous logging of UV-vis absorption (200-750 nm, every 2.5 nm) every 30 minutes. Observed increases in the concentration of the DOC, [DOC], in freshwaters have prompted significant research to understand the cause and consequences of increased export: higher levels of DOC require additional water purification of potable sources; increased aquatic export may represent a reduction in terrestrial C-soil sequestration; changes in light penetration can affect the heterotrophic / autotrophic balance in surface waters and this has consequences for the food web structure; increased aquatic export may also result in increased carbon dioxide evasion. Additionally, C export is often linked to nutrient export: we have observed statistically significant stoichiometric relationships between DOC and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations, thus understanding better this parameters offers insight into export of other nutrient and the source of material from which these dissolved compounds are produced; this may be particulate. Our Scottish study site is interesting because there are multiple processes that can contribute to DOC and other nutrient

  11. High-frequency HYDRO-geophysical observations for an advanced understanding of clayey landSLIDES: the HYDROSLIDE research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, Jean-Philippe; Supper, Robert; Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Gautier, Stéphanie; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    resistivity is difficult to identify. Therefore the extension of the concept of resistivity to Induced Polarization (IP) (both in the time and spectral domains) is proposed in order to better understand the relationships between physical and hydro(geo)logical properties of the slope material. To understand the landslide triggering mechanisms, surface and in-depth deformation have to be monitored. Up to now, most of the landslides monitoring sites are equipped with GNSS receivers and total station benchmarks at the surface or inclinometers at depths, which provide only point (1D) information and/or have limitations at high displacement rates. To solve interpretation ambiguities and to account for spatial changes, not only point information, but also horizontally and vertically (borehole) distributed displacement/strain observations are necessary. New approaches are suggested in the project, namely temperature and strain monitoring at high frequency with Fiber-Optic (FO) cables both at the surface and in boreholes, sensing of surface deformation with Ultra-High Resolution (UHR, 20 cm) optical images (time-lapse ground based cameras). The combined application of these methods for landslide monitoring is very rare and has not been tested rigorously. Further, the joint interpretation of electrical resistivity, soil temperature, hydrological and strain data need to be supported by coupled multi-physical modelling in order to quantitatively establish petrophysical relationships for several slope configurations, material properties and groundwater conditions. The applicability of the approach is discussed for landslide sites representative of different hydrological forcings: La Valette (South French Alps; Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) and Lodève (South Central Massif, Hérault).

  12. Text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this act is to safeguard against the dangers and harmful effects of radioactive waste and to contribute to public safety and environmental protection by laying down requirements for the safe and efficient management of radioactive waste. We will find definitions, interrelation with other legislation, responsibilities of the state and local governments, responsibilities of radioactive waste management companies and generators, formulation of the basic plan for the control of radioactive waste, radioactive waste management ( with public information, financing and part of spent fuel management), Korea radioactive waste management corporation ( business activities, budget), establishment of a radioactive waste fund in order to secure the financial resources required for radioactive waste management, and penalties in case of improper operation of radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  13. The TEXT upgrade vertical interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.A.; Gartman, M.L.; Li, W.; Chiang, K.; Shin, S.; Castles, R.L.; Chatterjee, R.; Rahman, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    A far-infrared interferometer has been installed on TEXT upgrade to obtain electron density profiles. The primary system views the plasma vertically through a set of large (60-cm radialx7.62-cm toroidal) diagnostic ports. A 1-cm channel spacing (59 channels total) and fast electronic time response is used, to provide high resolution for radial profiles and perturbation experiments. Initial operation of the vertical system was obtained late in 1991, with six operating channels

  14. Understanding Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya Dilip Gadgil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda′s power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  15. Understanding Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the ability to adapt successfully in the face of stress and adversity. Stressful life events, trauma and chronic adversity can have a substantial impact on brain function and structure, and can result in the development of PTSD, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, most individuals do not develop such illnesses after experiencing stressful life events, and are thus thought to be resilient. Resilience as successful adaptation relies on effective responses to environmental challenges and ultimate resistance to the deleterious effects of stress, therefore a greater understanding of the factors that promote such effects is of great relevance. This review focuses on recent findings regarding genetic, epigenetic, developmental, psychosocial and neurochemical factors that are considered essential contributors to the development of resilience. Neural circuits and pathways involved in mediating resilience are also discussed. The growing understanding of resilience factors will hopefully lead to the development of new pharmacological and psychological interventions for enhancing resilience and mitigating the untoward consequences.

  16. Analyse de textes ecrits et apprentissage "grammatical" (Analysis of Written Texts and Learning of Grammar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirand, Sophie

    1977-01-01

    Presents a method for teaching grammar through an understanding of the content of a written text, using a three-fold approach: sociolinguistic, linguistic, and logico-syntactical. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  17. Development and Application of a Two-Tier Multiple Choice Diagnostic Instrument To Assess High School Students' Understanding of Inorganic Chemistry Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Goh, Ngoh Khang; Chia, Lian Sai; Treagust, David F.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a two-tier multiple choice diagnostic instrument to assess high school students' understanding of inorganic chemistry qualitative analysis. Shows that the Grade 10 students had difficulty understanding the reactions involved in the identification of cations and anions, for example, double decomposition…

  18. Enhancing Understanding of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas from Solid Liner Implosions Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Hansen, David; Held, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Recent results from experiments and simulations of magnetically driven pulsed power liners have explored the role of early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the MRT (magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor) instability. Understanding the development of these instabilities can lead to potential stabilization mechanisms; thereby providing a significant role in the success of fusion concepts such as MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion). For MagLIF the MRT instability is the most detrimental instability toward achieving fusion energy production. Experiments of high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions have shown the requirement for more advanced physics modeling than that of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The overall focus of this project is on using a multi-fluid extended-MHD model with kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity. The extended-MHD model has been updated to include the SESAME equation-of-state tables and numerical benchmarks with this implementation will be presented. Simulations of MRT growth and evolution for MagLIF-relevant parameters will be presented using this extended-MHD model with the SESAME equation-of-state tables. This work is supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science under Grant Number DE-SC0016515.

  19. Proteomics approach to understand reduced clearance of mycobacteria and high viral titers during HIV-mycobacteria co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Rakesh; Dhali, Snigdha; Rizvi, Arshad; Sankati, Swetha; Vemula, Mani Harika; Mahajan, Gaurang; Rapole, Srikanth; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-03-01

    Environmental mycobacteria, highly prevalent in natural and artificial (including chlorinated municipal water) niches, are emerging as new threat to human health, especially to HIV-infected population. These seemingly harmless non-pathogenic mycobacteria, which are otherwise cleared, establish as opportunistic infections adding to HIV-associated complications. Although immune-evading strategies of pathogenic mycobacteria are known, the mechanisms underlying the early events by which opportunistic mycobacteria establish infection in macrophages and influencing HIV infection are unclear. Proteomics of phagosome-enriched fractions from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) mono-infected and HIV-M. bovis BCG co-infected THP-1 cells by LC-MALDI-MS/MS revealed differential distribution of 260 proteins. Validation of the proteomics data showed that HIV co-infection helped the survival of non-pathogenic mycobacteria by obstructing phagosome maturation, promoting lipid biogenesis and increasing intracellular ATP equivalents. In turn, mycobacterial co-infection up-regulated purinergic receptors in macrophages that are known to support HIV entry, explaining increased viral titers during co-infection. The mutualism was reconfirmed using clinically relevant opportunistic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium phlei that exhibited increased survival during co-infection, together with increase in HIV titers. Additionally, the catalogued proteins in the study provide new leads that will significantly add to the understanding of the biology of opportunistic mycobacteria and HIV coalition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Understanding high traffic injury risks for children in low socioeconomic areas: a qualitative study of parents' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, N; Ward, H; Kimberlee, R; Towner, E; Sleney, J

    2007-12-01

    To gain an in-depth qualitative understanding of parents' views about their children's exposure to road traffic injury risk in low socioeconomic areas. Focus groups facilitated by a moderator with content analysis of data. Focus groups were conducted in 10 low socioeconomic English districts that also have high rates of child pedestrian injury. Research was conducted in community venues within each area. Parents of children aged 9-14 years living in low socioeconomic areas. Parents believe that children play in their local streets for the following reasons: they like playing out with friends near home; there are few safe, secure, and well-maintained public spaces for children; children are excluded from affordable leisure venues because of their costs; insufficient parental responsibility. For children that play in the street, the key sources of risk identified by parents were: illegal riding and driving around estates and on the pavements; the speed and volume of traffic; illegal parking; drivers being poorly informed about where children play; children's risk-taking behavior. Intervention programs need to take into account multiple reasons why children in low socioeconomic areas become exposed to hazardous environments thereby increasing their risk of injury. Multi-agency partnerships involving the community are increasingly needed to implement traditional road safety approaches, such as education, engineering, and enforcement, and provide safe and accessible public space, affordable activities for children, and greater support for parents.

  1. Text Mining for Drug–Drug Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug–drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases. To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:24788261

  2. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  3. Understanding Technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Bendtsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We are facing radical changes in our ways of living in the nearest future. Not necessarily of our own choice, but because tchnological development is moving so fast, that it will have still greater impact on many aspects of our lives. We have seen the beginnings of that change within the latest 35 years or so, but according to newest research that change will speed up immensely in the nearest years to come. The impact of that change or these changes will affect our working life immensely as a consequence of automation. How these changes are brought about and which are their consequences in a broad sense is being attempted to be understood and guessed by researchers. No one knows for sure, but specific patterns are visible. This paper will not try to guess, what will come, but will rather try to understand the deepest ”nature” of technology in order to understand the driving factors in this development: the genesis of technology in a broad sense in order to contibute to the understanding of the basis for the expected development.

  4. Understanding analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This lively introductory text exposes the student to the rewards of a rigorous study of functions of a real variable. In each chapter, informal discussions of questions that give analysis its inherent fascination are followed by precise, but not overly formal, developments of the techniques needed to make sense of them. By focusing on the unifying themes of approximation and the resolution of paradoxes that arise in the transition from the finite to the infinite, the text turns what could be a daunting cascade of definitions and theorems into a coherent and engaging progression of ideas. Acutely aware of the need for rigor, the student is much better prepared to understand what constitutes a proper mathematical proof and how to write one. Fifteen years of classroom experience with the first edition of Understanding Analysis have solidified and refined the central narrative of the second edition. Roughly 150 new exercises join a selection of the best exercises from the first edition, and three more project-sty...

  5. Understanding ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Vaidya Dilip

    2010-01-01

    Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda's power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., ... find our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using ...

  7. Understanding Analysis Macroscopic, microscopic, and Acid-Base Titration Symbolic Student Class XI Science High School and Improvement Efforts Microscopy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Indrayani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Analisis Pemahaman Makroskopik, Mikroskopik, dan Simbolik Titrasi Asam-Basa Siswa Kelas XI IPA SMA serta Upaya Perbaikannya dengan Pendekatan Mikroskopik Abstract: This study aims to determine: (1 the level of understanding of the macroscopic, microscopic and symbolic students; (2 the error understanding of macroscopic, microscopic and symbolic students; (3 the effectiveness of the microscopic approach in an effort to improve students' ability to solve the problems macroscopic, symbolic and microscopic material acid-base titration. This research uses descriptive research design and quasi-experimental research design. Data research is the understanding of macroscopic, symbolic and microscopic students on the material acid-base titration. Student comprehension test measured with instruments that include: (1 macroscopic comprehension tests, (2 test the understanding of symbolic, and (3 understanding of the microscopic tests. Content validity was tested by a team of experts and the reliability of test questions macroscopic and microscopic calculated using the Spearman-Brown while reliability symbolic test item was calculated using Cronbach's Alpha. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis and statistical tests using Anacova. Results of the study are as follows. (1 The level of understanding of the macroscopic students is high, while the symbolic and microscopic levels of understanding of students is very low. (2 Errors identified macroscopic understanding is that students do not understand that the color shown by indicators related to the nature of the solution. Symbolic understanding of the identified errors are: (i the student can not write ionization reaction; and (ii students can not choose the formula used to calculate the pH of the solution. Errors identified microscopic understanding is that students can not provide a microscopic picture of a solution of a strong acid, strong base, weak acid, weak base, and salt solutions because they do

  8. Extension, sedimentation and diapirism: understanding evolution of diapiric structures in the Central High Atlas using analogue modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moragas, Mar; Vergés, Jaume; Nalpas, Thierry; Saura, Eduard; Diego Martín-Martín, Juan; Messager, Grégoire; Hunt, David William

    2017-04-01

    Analogue modelling has proven to be an essential tool for the study and analysis of the mechanisms involved in tectonic processes. Applied to salt tectonics, analogue modelling has been used to understand the mechanisms that trigger the onset of diapirs and the evolution of diapiric structures and minibasins. Analogue modelling has also been applied to analyse the impact of the progradation of sedimentary systems above a ductile layer, representing the source of diapirs. However, these models did not consider ongoing tectonic processes during progradation. To analyse how extension and sedimentary progradation influence on the formation of diapiric structures and their geometries, we present models composed of a mildly extension followed by post-extension period. Each model includes a particular sedimentary pattern: homogeneous sedimentation during extension and post-extension, homogeneous sedimentation during extension followed by prograding sedimentation during post-extension and prograding sedimentation during both extension and post-extension. Proximal high sedimentation rates enhance the mobilization of ductile material towards growing diapirs, resulting well-developed passive diapirs. Diapirs from distal domain of the model with post-extension progradation show silicone extrusions, that are caused by the decreased sedimentation rate associated to the progradation. By contrast, reduced sedimentation in the distal part of the model with syn- and post-extension progradation (3.5 times smaller than in the proximal domain) causes a limited migration of the silicone and hampers the transition from reactive diapirs to active and passive diapirs. These models show that the ratio between diapir growth and sedimentation rate, the time of the onset of the progradation and the relative thickness of the sedimentary cover beneath the prograding system have a clear impact on the final diapiric geometries. Additionally, we present two models with increasing amounts of

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using statistics that researchers have collected over many years about ...

  10. Analysis of high school students’ conceptual maps to investigate their understanding of DNA-RNA protein relation after accessing the GenBank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Teresinha Nascimento da Rosa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of conceptual maps elaborated by high school students during the application of a didactic unit (DU about synthesis of protein. One of the activities in this DU involved the supervised access to the GenBank, a database for genes and DNA sequences available, at the National Center Biotechnology Information (NCBI, website. The purpose of this study was to check the students’ understanding of DNA-RNA-protein relation through the elaboration of conceptual maps. These maps were developed at the end of the DU by six volunteer students from grade 10 at the Militar School (CMSM, in Santa Maria, RS, Brazil. This DU was developed, outside of regular, school activities time. For the analysis of the conceptual maps, a score table proposed by Novak and Gowin (1996 was used. The model conceptual map had 52 points; in our study, two students got score 41, others three got 26, 10, 2 points and only one had no score. In the quantitative and in the qualitative analyses it was possible to indentify a significant improvement in these students´ conceptual relations about protein synthesis. The data suggest that the access to the GenBank, used as a didactic strategy in the DU, has made this improvement possible.

  11. From Fundamental Understanding To Predicting New Nanomaterials For High Capacity Hydrogen/Methane Storage and Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Taner [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-03

    On-board hydrogen/methane storage in fuel cell-powered vehicles is a major component of the national need to achieve energy independence and protect the environment. The main obstacles in hydrogen storage are slow kinetics, poor reversibility and high dehydrogenation temperatures for the chemical hydrides; and very low desorption temperatures/energies for the physisorption materials (MOF’s, porous carbons). Similarly, the current methane storage technologies are mainly based on physisorption in porous materials but the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are below the target values. Finally, carbon capture, a critical component of the mitigation of CO2 emissions from industrial plants, also suffers from similar problems. The solid-absorbers such as MOFs are either not stable against real flue-gas conditions and/or do not have large enough CO2 capture capacity to be practical and cost effective. In this project, we addressed these challenges using a unique combination of computational, synthetic and experimental methods. The main scope of our research was to achieve fundamental understanding of the chemical and structural interactions governing the storage and release of hydrogen/methane and carbon capture in a wide spectrum of candidate materials. We studied the effect of scaffolding and doping of the candidate materials on their storage and dynamics properties. We reviewed current progress, challenges and prospect in closely related fields of hydrogen/methane storage and carbon capture.[1-5] For example, for physisorption based storage materials, we show that tap-densities or simply pressing MOFs into pellet forms reduce the uptake capacities by half and therefore packing MOFs is one of the most important challenges going forward. For room temperature hydrogen storage application of MOFs, we argue that MOFs are the most promising scaffold materials for Ammonia-Borane (AB) because of their unique interior active metal-centers for AB binding and well

  12. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Treffry-Goatley

    Full Text Available Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to

  13. Design and Development Computer-Based E-Learning Teaching Material for Improving Mathematical Understanding Ability and Spatial Sense of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjanah; Dahlan, J. A.; Wibisono, Y.

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to make a design and development computer-based e-learning teaching material for improving mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students. Furthermore, the particular aims are (1) getting teaching material design, evaluation model, and intrument to measure mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (2) conducting trials computer-based e-learning teaching material model, asessment, and instrument to develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (3) completing teaching material models of computer-based e-learning, assessment, and develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (4) resulting research product is teaching materials of computer-based e-learning. Furthermore, the product is an interactive learning disc. The research method is used of this study is developmental research which is conducted by thought experiment and instruction experiment. The result showed that teaching materials could be used very well. This is based on the validation of computer-based e-learning teaching materials, which is validated by 5 multimedia experts. The judgement result of face and content validity of 5 validator shows that the same judgement result to the face and content validity of each item test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense. The reliability test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense are 0,929 and 0,939. This reliability test is very high. While the validity of both tests have a high and very high criteria.

  14. Teaching Games for Understanding in American High-School Soccer: A Quantitative Data Analysis Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Stephen; Cushion, Christopher J.; Wegis, Heidi M.; Massa-Gonzalez, Ada N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous research examining the effectiveness of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) approach has been equivocal. This has been hampered by a dependence on a comparative (i.e., "which method is best?") theoretical framework. An alternative "practice-referenced" framework has the potential to examine the effectiveness of TGfU…

  15. "Toward High School Biology": Helping Middle School Students Understand Chemical Reactions and Conservation of Mass in Nonliving and Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Abell, Cari F.; Koppal, Mary; Roseman, Jo Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Modern biology has become increasingly molecular in nature, requiring students to understand basic chemical concepts. Studies show, however, that many students fail to grasp ideas about atom rearrangement and conservation during chemical reactions or the application of these ideas to biological systems. To help provide students with a better…

  16. Automatic segmentation of clinical texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolova, Emilia; Channin, David S; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Furst, Jacob; Lytinen, Steven; Raicu, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical narratives, such as radiology and pathology reports, are commonly available in electronic form. However, they are also commonly entered and stored as free text. Knowledge of the structure of clinical narratives is necessary for enhancing the productivity of healthcare departments and facilitating research. This study attempts to automatically segment medical reports into semantic sections. Our goal is to develop a robust and scalable medical report segmentation system requiring minimum user input for efficient retrieval and extraction of information from free-text clinical narratives. Hand-crafted rules were used to automatically identify a high-confidence training set. This automatically created training dataset was later used to develop metrics and an algorithm that determines the semantic structure of the medical reports. A word-vector cosine similarity metric combined with several heuristics was used to classify each report sentence into one of several pre-defined semantic sections. This baseline algorithm achieved 79% accuracy. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on additional formatting and contextual features was able to achieve 90% accuracy. Plans for future work include developing a configurable system that could accommodate various medical report formatting and content standards.

  17. Using Unlabeled Data to Improve Text Classification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nigam, Kamal P

    2001-01-01

    .... This dissertation demonstrates that supervised learning algorithms that use a small number of labeled examples and many inexpensive unlabeled examples can create high-accuracy text classifiers...

  18. Mining the Text: 34 Text Features that Can Ease or Obstruct Text Comprehension and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sheida

    2012-01-01

    This article presents 34 characteristics of texts and tasks ("text features") that can make continuous (prose), noncontinuous (document), and quantitative texts easier or more difficult for adolescents and adults to comprehend and use. The text features were identified by examining the assessment tasks and associated texts in the national…

  19. Addendum to ‘Understanding risks in the light of uncertainty: low-probability, high-impact coastal events in cities’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarraga, Ibon; Sainz de Murieta, Elisa; Markandya, Anil; María Abadie, Luis

    2018-02-01

    This addendum adds to the analysis presented in ‘Understanding risks in the light of uncertainty: low-probability, high-impact coastal events in cities’ Abadie et al (2017 Environ. Res. Lett. 12 014017). We propose to use the framework developed earlier to enhance communication and understanding of risks, with the aim of bridging the gap between highly technical risk management discussion to the public risk aversion debate. We also propose that the framework could be used for stress-testing resilience.

  20. L'ordre du texte (The Order of the Text)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slakta, Denis

    1975-01-01

    This article outlines a model of the two basic components of a text, namely, the system of formal linguistic rules, and the realization of these rules into concrete discourse, by means of particular transformations. (Text is in French.) (CLK)

  1. Understanding modern and past sedimentary processes in selected lakes from the High Arctic and the Mediterranean realm

    OpenAIRE

    Francke, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Lacustrine sediment sequences can provide valuable archives of past environmental and climatological variability in terrestrial realms. In order to unravel the history of a lake and of a lake’s catchment, a profound understanding of the sedimentary processes is required. This encompasses the supply of allochthonous organic matter, nutrients and clastic material to the lake, the subsequent redistribution within the lake as well as autochthonous organic matter and mineral deposition. These lake...

  2. High spoligotype diversity within a Mycobacterium bovis population: Clues to understanding the demography of the pathogen in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Sabrina; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; de Juan, Lucia; Alvarez, Julio; Castellanos, Elena; Moya, Nuria; Lozano, Francisco; Gonzalez, Sergio; Luis Saez-Llorente, Jose; Mateos, Ana; Dominguez, Lucas; Aranaz, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium bovis is the main causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. This zoonotic disease produces important economic losses and must be considered a threat to endangered animal species and public health. This study was performed (1) to assess the degree of diversity of the Spanish M. bovis isolates and its effect on the epidemiology of the infection, and (2) to understand the connection of M. bovis populations within a European context. In this report we resume the DV...

  3. Understanding the physics that causes hysteresis in carbon nanotube transistors, a key step toward high performance and energy-efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Rebecca

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration is a promising technology that achieves higher energy efficiency, higher performance, and smaller footprint than today's planar, 2D technology. In particular, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) enable monolithic 3D integration due to its low-temperature processing (digital systems, large hysteresis has long remained a challenge. Our approach to eliminating hysteresis is based on our understanding of the physics that lead to hysteresis: Understanding the sources of hysteresis: We develop a novel measurement technique called the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement (PTDM) which enables quantification of charged traps responsible for hysteresis. Leveraging a physics-based model, we study the mechanism of the charge trapping process. Eliminating hysteresis: After gaining a deeper understanding of the sources of hysteresis, we are able to develop a VLSI-compatible, solid-state fabrication method that mitigates the effect of traps. On average, we achieve hysteresis of less than 0.5% of the gate-source voltage sweep range.

  4. Metamorphoses d'un texte (Metamorphoses of a Text).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitinger, Guy Roger

    1993-01-01

    A variety of exercises based on manipulation of a single text are described. The activities involve replacing words or phrases in the text with synonyms or opposites, transposing gender, changing tenses, filling in blanks, and answering multiple-choice questions about linguistic forms. Three brief sample texts are offered. (MSE)

  5. Litterature: Retour au texte (Literature: Return to the Text).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Alfred

    1993-01-01

    Choice of texts for use in French language instruction is discussed. It is argued that the text's format (e.g., advertising, figurative poetry, journal article, play, prose, etc.) is instrumental in bringing attention to the language in it, and this has implications for the best uses of different text types. (MSE)

  6. Text mining from ontology learning to automated text processing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Biemann, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This book comprises a set of articles that specify the methodology of text mining, describe the creation of lexical resources in the framework of text mining and use text mining for various tasks in natural language processing (NLP). The analysis of large amounts of textual data is a prerequisite to build lexical resources such as dictionaries and ontologies and also has direct applications in automated text processing in fields such as history, healthcare and mobile applications, just to name a few. This volume gives an update in terms of the recent gains in text mining methods and reflects

  7. Working with text tools, techniques and approaches for text mining

    CERN Document Server

    Tourte, Gregory J L

    2016-01-01

    Text mining tools and technologies have long been a part of the repository world, where they have been applied to a variety of purposes, from pragmatic aims to support tools. Research areas as diverse as biology, chemistry, sociology and criminology have seen effective use made of text mining technologies. Working With Text collects a subset of the best contributions from the 'Working with text: Tools, techniques and approaches for text mining' workshop, alongside contributions from experts in the area. Text mining tools and technologies in support of academic research include supporting research on the basis of a large body of documents, facilitating access to and reuse of extant work, and bridging between the formal academic world and areas such as traditional and social media. Jisc have funded a number of projects, including NaCTem (the National Centre for Text Mining) and the ResDis programme. Contents are developed from workshop submissions and invited contributions, including: Legal considerations in te...

  8. Lectura y representación mental de textos expositivos en estudiantes de educación media Reading and Mental Representation of Expository Texts of High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geral Eduardo Mateus Ferro

    Full Text Available Resumen Este artículo da cuenta de los resultados de una prueba de lectura realizada con el fin de caracterizar la representación mental de estudiantes de educación media, con base en la teoría de los niveles de representación planteados por Kintsch y Van Dijk (1983. La prueba hace parte del proyecto de investigación Formulación de una estrategia didáctica para la cualificación de la representación mental de textos expositivos en estudiantes de educación media, FHU-294-11.Abstract This paper reports a finding from a reading test done in order to outline the mental representation of High School students, based on the theory of levels of representation proposed by Kintsch and Van Dijk (1983. The test is part of a research project, Developing a teaching strategy for the improvement of the mental representation of expository texts in High School students, FHU-294-11.

  9. Stereo-Optic High Definition Imaging: A New Technology to Understand Bird and Bat Avoidance of Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Evan; Goodale, Wing; Burns, Steve; Dorr, Chirs; Duron, Melissa; Gilbert, Andrew; Moratz, Reinhard; Robinson, Mark

    2017-07-21

    There is a critical need to develop monitoring tools to track aerofauna (birds and bats) in three dimensions around wind turbines. New monitoring systems will reduce permitting uncertainty by increasing the understanding of how birds and bats are interacting with wind turbines, which will improve the accuracy of impact predictions. Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI), The University of Maine Orono School of Computing and Information Science (UMaine SCIS), HiDef Aerial Surveying Limited (HiDef), and SunEdison, Inc. (formerly First Wind) responded to this need by using stereo-optic cameras with near-infrared (nIR) technology to investigate new methods for documenting aerofauna behavior around wind turbines. The stereo-optic camera system used two synchronized high-definition video cameras with fisheye lenses and processing software that detected moving objects, which could be identified in post-processing. The stereo- optic imaging system offered the ability to extract 3-D position information from pairs of images captured from different viewpoints. Fisheye lenses allowed for a greater field of view, but required more complex image rectification to contend with fisheye distortion. The ability to obtain 3-D positions provided crucial data on the trajectory (speed and direction) of a target, which, when the technology is fully developed, will provide data on how animals are responding to and interacting with wind turbines. This project was focused on testing the performance of the camera system, improving video review processing time, advancing the 3-D tracking technology, and moving the system from Technology Readiness Level 4 to 5. To achieve these objectives, we determined the size and distance at which aerofauna (particularly eagles) could be detected and identified, created efficient data management systems, improved the video post-processing viewer, and attempted refinement of 3-D modeling with respect to fisheye lenses. The 29-megapixel camera system

  10. Instructional Experiences That Align with Conceptual Understanding in the Transition from High School Mathematics to College Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Carol H.; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Hazari, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Using data from the first National study on high school preparation for college calculus success, the Factors Influencing College Success in Mathematics (FICSMath) project, this article connects student high school instructional experiences to college calculus performance. The findings reported here reveal that students were better prepared for…

  11. Using Solution Strategies to Examine and Promote High-School Students' Understanding of Exponential Functions: One Teacher's Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendefur, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Much research has been conducted on how elementary students develop mathematical understanding and subsequently how teachers might use this information. This article builds on this type of work by investigating how one high-school algebra teacher designs and conducts a lesson on exponential functions. Through a lesson study format she studies with…

  12. A Comparative Study of the Effects of a Concept Mapping Enhanced Laboratory Experience on Turkish High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The research reported here consists of the introduction of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities combined with concept mapping. The purpose of this intervention was to enhance student understanding of acid-base chemistry for tenth grade students' from two classes in a Turkish high school. An additional aim was to enhance…

  13. Toward High School Biology: Helping Middle School Students Understand Chemical Reactions and Conservation of Mass in Nonliving and Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Abell, Cari F.; Koppal, Mary; Roseman, Jo Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Modern biology has become increasingly molecular in nature, requiring students to understand basic chemical concepts. Studies show, however, that many students fail to grasp ideas about atom rearrangement and conservation during chemical reactions or the application of these ideas to biological systems. To help provide students with a better foundation, we used research-based design principles and collaborated in the development of a curricular intervention that applies chemistry ideas to living and nonliving contexts. Six eighth grade teachers and their students participated in a test of the unit during the Spring of 2013. Two of the teachers had used an earlier version of the unit the previous spring. The other four teachers were randomly assigned either to implement the unit or to continue teaching the same content using existing materials. Pre- and posttests were administered, and the data were analyzed using Rasch modeling and hierarchical linear modeling. The results showed that, when controlling for pretest score, gender, language, and ethnicity, students who used the curricular intervention performed better on the posttest than the students using existing materials. Additionally, students who participated in the intervention held fewer misconceptions. These results demonstrate the unit’s promise in improving students’ understanding of the targeted ideas. PMID:27909024

  14. Understanding fraction concepts of Indonesian junior high school students: A case of field independent and field dependent students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonto, K.; Juniati, D.; Siswono, T. Y. E.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to describe the students’ understanding of fraction concepts. This research is descriptive with the qualitative approach. The subjects consisted of 1 Field Independent (FI) and 1 Field Dependent (FD) students. Setting subjects based on Group Embedded Figure Test (GEFT) results and meeting equivalent mathematical ability. Data obtained techniques through Task-based interview. The results show that FI students were represented a complete fractional concept and express the meaning of fractional notation with its own words.The students use of fractional concept such as the idea of dividing equally, fractional equivalents, and the relative size of the fraction to classify fractions based on certain properties, giving fractional examples and non-fractional examples, and comparing fractions. However, FD students represented declarative farctional concepts, had difficulty in giving a good meaning notation, relation between components, classifying fractions and comparing them. FD students are fixated on fraction notation and the visualization of concrete objects. Overall, these results provide a detailed picture of the understanding of fractional concepts that, FI students tend to use coherent analysis, while FD students tended to be fixated on fractional notation and visualization of concrete objects.

  15. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  16. Assessing Literary Reasoning: Text and Task Complexities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol D.; Goldman, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses 3 broad challenges of assessment in reading comprehension: (a) explicitly articulating the knowledge and skills students need to recognize and be able to use in comprehending complex texts; (b) understanding how knowledge and skills progress and successively deepen and develop over repeated opportunities to engage in tasks…

  17. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffry-Goatley, Astrid; Lessells, Richard; Sykes, Pam; Bärnighausen, Till; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moletsane, Relebohile; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to provide a sense of

  18. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  19. Complex dynamics of text analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yongqiang; Ma, Qinghua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the analysis of nonlinear text quality in Chinese language. Texts produced by university students in China were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and network dynamics were obtained. The method integrates the classical concepts of network feature representation and text quality series variation. The analytical and numerical scheme leads to a parameter space representation that constitutes a valid alternative to represent the network features. The results reveal that complex network features of different text qualities can be clearly revealed and applied to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  20. From Radio with Love: An Overview of the Role of Radio Observations in Understanding High-Energy Emission from Active Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Roopesh

    2012-01-01

    The gamma-ray satellite Fermi and the ground based TeV facilities MAGIC, VERITAS and HESS have ushered in a new era in the observation of high-energy emission from active galaxies. The energy budgets of these objects have a major contribution from gamma-rays and it is simply not possible to understand their physics without high-energy observations. Though the exact mechanisms for high-energy production in galaxies remains an open question, gamma-rays typically result from interactions between high-energy particles. Via different interactions these same particles can produce radio emission. Thus the non-thermal nature of gamma-ray emission practically guarantees that high-energy emitters are also radio loud. Aside from their obvious role as a component of multiwavelength analysis, radio observations provide two crucial elements essential to understanding the source structure and physical processes of high-energy emitters: very high timing resolution and very high spatial resolution. A brief overview of the unique role played by radio observations in unraveling the mysteries of the high energy Universe as presented here.

  1. TEXT DEIXIS IN NARRATIVE SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Rivera

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study looks at demonstrative descriptions, regarding them as text-deictic procedures which contribute to weave discourse reference. Text deixis is thought of as a metaphorical referential device which maps the ground of utterance onto the text itself. Demonstrative expressions with textual antecedent-triggers, considered as the most important text-deictic units, are identified in a narrative corpus consisting of J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and its translation into Catalan. Some linguistic and discourse variables related to DemNPs are analysed to characterise adequately text deixis. It is shown that this referential device is usually combined with abstract nouns, thus categorising and encapsulating (non-nominal complex discourse entities as nouns, while performing a referential cohesive function by means of the text deixis + general noun type of lexical cohesion.

  2. Toward High School Biology: Helping Middle School Students Understand Chemical Reactions and Conservation of Mass in Nonliving and Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Abell, Cari F; Koppal, Mary; Roseman, Jo Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Modern biology has become increasingly molecular in nature, requiring students to understand basic chemical concepts. Studies show, however, that many students fail to grasp ideas about atom rearrangement and conservation during chemical reactions or the application of these ideas to biological systems. To help provide students with a better foundation, we used research-based design principles and collaborated in the development of a curricular intervention that applies chemistry ideas to living and nonliving contexts. Six eighth grade teachers and their students participated in a test of the unit during the Spring of 2013. Two of the teachers had used an earlier version of the unit the previous spring. The other four teachers were randomly assigned either to implement the unit or to continue teaching the same content using existing materials. Pre- and posttests were administered, and the data were analyzed using Rasch modeling and hierarchical linear modeling. The results showed that, when controlling for pretest score, gender, language, and ethnicity, students who used the curricular intervention performed better on the posttest than the students using existing materials. Additionally, students who participated in the intervention held fewer misconceptions. These results demonstrate the unit's promise in improving students' understanding of the targeted ideas. © 2016 C. F. Herrmann-Abell et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Predicting and understanding Korean high school students' science-track choice: Testing the theory of reasoned action by structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeong, Jeon-Ok; Crawley, Frank E.

    The theory of reasoned action (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) was used to predict and understand Korean high school students' track choice for college entrance. First-year high school students (N = 665) from four representative regions of Korea participated in the study. The survey instruments were questionnaires developed according to the guidelines of the TRA. The target behavior of interest in this study was Korean students' choice of the science track when they completed the track application forms during the first year of high school. Predictors included TRA model and external variables. Multiple regression and the structural equation modeling with LISREL (Jöreskog & Sörbom, 1986) were used to analyze the data. The TRA was found to be applicable for understanding and predicting track choice, with minor modifications. Subjective norm was found to exert a direct influence on personal beliefs and the target behavior.

  4. The nuclear modification of charged particles in Pb-Pb at $\\sqrt{\\text{s}_\\text{NN}} = \\text{5.02}\\,\\text{TeV}$ measured with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Gronefeld, Julius

    2016-09-21

    The study of inclusive charged-particle production in heavy-ion collisions provides insights into the density of the medium and the energy-loss mechanisms. The observed suppression of high-$\\textit{p}_\\text{T}$ yield is generally attributed to energy loss of partons as they propagate through a deconfined state of quarks and gluons - Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) - predicted by QCD. Such measurements allow the characterization of the QGP by comparison with models. In these proceedings, results on high-$\\textit{p}_\\text{T}$ particle production measured by ALICE in Pb-Pb collisions at $ \\sqrt{\\text{s}_\\text{NN}}\\, = 5.02\\ \\rm{TeV}$ as well as well in pp at $\\sqrt{\\text{s}}\\,=5.02\\ \\rm{TeV}$ are presented for the first time. The nuclear modification factors ($\\text{R}_\\text{AA}$) in Pb-Pb collisions are presented and compared with model calculations.

  5. High-throughput development of amphiphile self-assembly materials: fast-tracking synthesis, characterization, formulation, application, and understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulet, Xavier; Conn, Charlotte E; Fong, Celesta; Kennedy, Danielle F; Moghaddam, Minoo J; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-07-16

    Amphiphile self-assembly materials, which contain both a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic domain, have great potential in high-throughput and combinatorial approaches to discovery and development. However, the materials chemistry community has not embraced these ideas to anywhere near the extent that the medicinal chemistry community has. While this situation is beginning to change, extracting the full potential of high-throughput approaches in the development of self-assembling materials will require further development in the synthesis, characterization, formulation, and application domains. One of the key factors that make small molecule amphiphiles prospective building blocks for next generation multifunctional materials is their ability to self-assemble into complex nanostructures through low-energy transformations. Scientists can potentially tune, control, and functionalize these structures, but only after establishing their inherent properties. Because both robotic materials handling and customized rapid characterization equipment are increasingly available, high-throughput solutions are now attainable. These address traditional development bottlenecks associated with self-assembling amphiphile materials, such as their structural characterization and the assessment of end-use functional performance. A high-throughput methodology can help streamline materials development workflows, in accord with existing high-throughput discovery pipelines such as those used by the pharmaceutical industry in drug discovery. Chemists have identified several areas that are amenable to a high-throughput approach for amphiphile self-assembly materials development. These allow an exploration of not only a large potential chemical, compositional, and structural space, but also material properties, formulation, and application variables. These areas of development include materials synthesis and preparation, formulation, characterization, and screening performance for the desired end

  6. Educators of Prospective Teachers Hesitate to Embrace Evolution Due to Deficient Understanding of Science/Evolution and High Religiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Acceptance of evolution by educators of prospective teachers remains superficially studied despite their role in having mentored schoolteachers whose weak support of evolution is known. Here, we contrast the views of New England educators of prospective teachers (n=62; 87% Ph. D./doctorate holders in 32 specializations) with those of the general faculty (n=244; 93% Ph.D./doctorate holders in 40 disciplines), both members of 35 colleges and universities, and with college students (n=827; subsample of the 35 institutions) who were polled on: (1) the controversy evolution vs. creationism vs. intelligent design (ID), (2) their understanding of how science/evolution works, and (3) their religiosity. The educators held intermediate positions in respect to the general faculty and the students: 94% of the general faculty, 75% of the educators, and 63% of the students said they accepted evolution openly; and 82% of the general faculty, 71% of the educators, and 58% of the students thought that evolution is definitely true. Only 3% of the general faculty in comparison to 19% of the educators and 24% of the students thought that evolution and creationism are in harmony. Although 93% of the general faculty, educators, and students knew that evolution relies on common ancestry, 26% of the general faculty, 45% of the educators, and 35% of the students did not know that humans are apes. Remarkably, 15% of the general faculty, 32% of the educators, and 35% of the students believed, incorrectly, that the origin of the human mind cannot be explained by evolution; and 30% of the general faculty, 59% of the educators, and 75% of the students were Lamarckian (=believed in inheritance of acquired traits). For science education: 96% of the general faculty, 86% of the educators, and 71% of the students supported the exclusive teaching of evolution, while 4% of the general faculty, 14% of the educators, and 29% of the students favored equal time to evolution, creationism and ID; note that

  7. Text Mining Applications and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Text Mining: Applications and Theory presents the state-of-the-art algorithms for text mining from both the academic and industrial perspectives.  The contributors span several countries and scientific domains: universities, industrial corporations, and government laboratories, and demonstrate the use of techniques from machine learning, knowledge discovery, natural language processing and information retrieval to design computational models for automated text analysis and mining. This volume demonstrates how advancements in the fields of applied mathematics, computer science, machine learning

  8. Theoretical simulation of CO2 capture by an \\text{A}{{\\text{l}}_{11}}\\text{Mg}_{3}^{-} cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Xuefang; Hamid, Ilyar; Chen, Chu; Duan, Haiming

    2017-04-01

    In order to have an impact on carbon emissions, new stable materials for carbon capture should be able to adsorb CO2 from a mixture of other gases efficiently. Based on density functional theory calculations, we showed that the \\text{A}{{\\text{l}}11}\\text{Mg}3- cluster has an excellent capture capacity of CO2 and high CO2 selectivity under ambient conditions. \\text{A}{{\\text{l}}11}\\text{Mg}3- has an O2-resist property because this cluster is similar to \\text{Al}13- which contains 40 electrons with a larger energy gap. The \\text{A}{{\\text{l}}11}\\text{Mg}3- cluster prefers to adsorb CO2 compared with CH4, H2 and N2, and the CO2 molecule can be chemically adsorbed on the cluster by overcoming a lower barrier, which originates from the introduction of the Mg atom. When seven CO2 molecules are chemically adsorbed on the cluster, the capture capacity of CO2 can reach up to 18.99 mol kg-1 this means that the \\text{A}{{\\text{l}}11}\\text{Mg}3- cluster can be viewed as a potential candidate material for CO2 capture.

  9. Understanding College-Student Roles: Perspectives of Participants in a High School/Community College Dual-Enrollment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lile, Joy R.; Ottusch, Timothy M.; Jones, Terese; Richards, Leslie N.

    2018-01-01

    Dual-enrollment programs have been proposed as a useful way to ease students' transition from high school to community college. Several studies have shown that dual enrollment produces positive effects for students, but less is known about the mechanisms these programs use to support student success. Symbolic interactionism suggests that clarity…

  10. High and low, fast or slow : the complementary contributions of altitude and latitude to understand life-history variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, B. Irene; Bradshaw, Corey

    H. Bears, K. Martin & G.C. White (2009) Breeding in high-elevation habitat results in shift to slower life-history strategy within a single species. Journal of Animal Ecology, 78, 365-375. Dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) from two elevations in the Rocky Mountains of Canada display different life

  11. Understanding cross-national trends in high-tech renewable power equipment exports to the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, Aparna; Kahn, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    We track US imports of advanced technology wind and solar power-generation equipment from a panel of countries during 1989–2010, and examine the determining factors including country size, sector-specific US FDI outflow, and domestic wind and solar power generation. Differentiating between the core high-tech and the balance of system equipment, we find US imports of both categories have grown at significantly higher rate from the relatively poorer countries, and particularly China and India. Larger countries are found to be exporting significantly more, and US FDI is found to play a significant positive role in the exports of high-tech equipment for the poor countries. For the core wind and solar high-tech equipment, we find domestic renewable power generation of the exporting countries also played a significant positive role. - Highlights: ► We track US imports of advanced technology wind and solar power-generation equipment. ► US imports of both categories have grown at significantly higher rate from China and India. ► US FDI is found to play a significant positive role in the exports of high-tech equipment.

  12. Comprehensive Understanding of High Polar Polyacrylonitrile as an Effective Binder for Li-Ion Battery Nano-Si Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lei; Xu, Yunlong; Zhang, Huang; Han, Xiaona; Dong, Hui; Xu, Xing; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Yang; Lin, Jiahao

    2016-03-01

    Well-defined polyacrylonitriles (PANs) with different molecular weights were synthesized through an activator regenerated by electron-transfer atom-transfer radical polymerization method and employed as binders in silicon negative electrode for lithium-ion batteries. Compared with poly(vinylidene fluoride) and carboxyl methyl cellulose as binders, the electrode performance of PANs is well-improved. Specifically, at 100 mA g(-1) from 0.01 to 1.5 V, the initial discharge capacity of PAN100-based electrode is 4147.8 mA h g(-1) and still remains about 1639.6 mA h g(-1) over 50 cycles. A comprehensive understanding on the improvement mechanism is preliminarily discussed. The results indicate that the superior performance largely depends on the higher lithium ion diffusion efficiency in PAN which results from the weak interaction between lithium ions and PAN polymer chain, and the hydrogen bonds among the nitrile group (C≡N) of PAN, Si nanoparticles, and the current collector, which will lead to an efficient coating of PAN with the Si particles and well-improved adhesion strength, synergistically depressing the structural deterioration of silicon electrodes.

  13. Texte et contre-texte en situation de diglossie

    OpenAIRE

    Carpanin Marimoutou, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Le texte en situation diglossique s'inscrit dans une relation dialogique conflictuelle indépassée qui produit le contre-texte et que le contre-texte reproduit en retour, déplaçant non pas le conflit, mais les pôles du conflit. Une vue d'ensemble de la littérature réunionnaise suffit à mettre en évidence ce jeu de miroir. Une étude des préfaces montre la conscience des producteurs de ce que le combat des textes cache d'enjeux et comment celui qui est posé comme Autre semble ne produire qu'une ...

  14. Zum Uebersetzen fachlicher Texte (On the Translation of Technical Texts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Wolf

    1975-01-01

    Reviews a 1974 East German publication on translation of scientific literature from Russian to German. Considers terminology, different standard levels of translation in East Germany, and other matters related to translation. (Text is in German.) (DH)

  15. Prior Knowledge, Reading Skill, and Text Cohesion in the Comprehension of Science Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuru, Yasuhiro; Dempsey, Kyle; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how text features (i.e., cohesion) and individual differences (i.e., reading skill and prior knowledge) contribute to biology text comprehension. College students with low and high levels of biology knowledge read two biology texts, one of which was high in cohesion and the other low in cohesion. The two groups were similar in…

  16. Understanding the differentiating impacts of the communication strategies of a high involvement service (investment advisory services) and a high involvement product (precious jewellery) on customer satisfaction and loyalty.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Gauri

    2009-01-01

    While marketing literature has largely focused on high and low involvement purchases and the positive relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty; the differentiating impacts of communication strategies for a high involvement service and a high involvement product on customer satisfaction and loyalty has received little academic attention. Consequently, this study examines the differentiating impacts of the communication strategies for investment advisory services and precious jewe...

  17. The Instructional Text like a Textual Genre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiane Fogali Marinello

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the instructional text as a textual genre and is part of the research called Reading and text production from the textual genre perspective, done at Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Campus Universitário da Região dos Vinhedos. Firstly, some theoretical assumptions about textual genre are presented, then, the instructional text is characterized. After that an instructional text is analyzed and, finally, some activities related to reading and writing of the mentioned genre directed to High School and University students are suggested.

  18. The Case for Multiple Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Sunday

    2017-01-01

    Reading just one text on any topic, Cummins argues, isn't enough if we expect students to learn at deep levels about the topic, synthesize various sources of information, and gain the knowledge they need to write and speak seriously about the topic. Reading a second or third text expands a reader's knowledge on any topic or story--and the why…

  19. Text Genres in Information Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahotko, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Text genres used by so-called information organizers in the processes of information organization in information systems were explored in this research. Method: The research employed text genre socio-functional analysis. Five genre groups in information organization were distinguished. Every genre group used in information…

  20. The Physics of High-Field Superconductors: New materials, used in lossless magnets at low temperatures, challenge scientific understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, C P; Schmitt, R W

    1963-04-05

    The recent burst of effort in the area of high-field superconductors has led to the construction of 70,000-oersted coils and the expectation that 100,000-oersted fields will be attained in the near future. The general theory suggests that fields above 300,000 oersteds are conceivable and that current densities of millions of amperes per square centimeter may be attained. Theory and experiment suggest that the upper critical field of materials such as Nb(3)Sn and Nb(.75)Zr(.25) is determined by their tendency to form a mixed state, and that a crucial question concerning their other properties is that of the interaction of this mixed state with imperfections. Lastly, it is possible to make a synthetic high-field superconductor by mechanically subdividing an ideal superconductor.

  1. Investigation of scientific literacy on understanding of ionizing radiations in elementary and junior high school students in Kagoshima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutoku, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Recently in Japan, many investigations to grasp the ways of thinking in the national layers for energy, environment and radiation applications have been carried out. In the investigations for radiation applications, there is a pointing out that the age which the knowledge on radiations and their related matters is formed is predominantly in elementary school years. Therefore, in order to find out the future way of proceeding with the education of nuclear power and radiations in the curriculums of elementary and junior high schools, the questionnaire survey on radiations and their related matters was carried out for the public elementary and junior high school students in Kagoshima prefecture. The results of the questionnaire survey are summarized in the present paper. (K. Kato)

  2. Linguistic Dating of Biblical Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    2003-01-01

    For two centuries, scholars have pointed to consistent differences in the Hebrew of certain biblical texts and interpreted these differences as reflecting the date of composition of the texts. Until the 1980s, this was quite uncontroversial as the linguistic findings largely confirmed...... the chronology of the texts established by other means: the Hebrew of Genesis-2 Kings was judged to be early and that of Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles to be late. In the current debate where revisionists have questioned the traditional dating, linguistic arguments in the dating of texts have...... come more into focus. The study critically examines some linguistic arguments adduced to support the traditional position, and reviewing the arguments it points to weaknesses in the linguistic dating of EBH texts to pre-exilic times. When viewing the linguistic evidence in isolation it will be clear...

  3. Text mining for systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, Juliane; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Scientific communication in biomedicine is, by and large, still text based. Text mining technologies for the automated extraction of useful biomedical information from unstructured text that can be directly used for systems biology modelling have been substantially improved over the past few years. In this review, we underline the importance of named entity recognition and relationship extraction as fundamental approaches that are relevant to systems biology. Furthermore, we emphasize the role of publicly organized scientific benchmarking challenges that reflect the current status of text-mining technology and are important in moving the entire field forward. Given further interdisciplinary development of systems biology-orientated ontologies and training corpora, we expect a steadily increasing impact of text-mining technology on systems biology in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Applying High Resolution Imagery to Understand the Role of Dynamics in the Diminishing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    describe contemporary ice pack thickness, MODIS , AVHRR, RadarSat-2 (satellite imagery) that describe ice pack deformation features on large scales, as well...enhance the seasonal marginal ice zone formation and albedo feedback in summer. WORK COMPLETED We have conducted an assessment of the declassified...observations collected by the NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) project, including high-resolution visible-band imagery (Onana et al., 2013), snow depth (Newman et

  5. Understanding the different rotational behaviors of $^{252}$No and $^{254}$No in terms of high-order deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, H L; Walker, P M

    2012-01-01

    Total Routhian surface calculations have been performed to investigate rapidly rotating transfermium nuclei, the heaviest nuclei accessible by detailed spectroscopy experiments. The observed fast alignment in $^{252}$No and slow alignment in $^{254}$No are well reproduced by the calculations incorporating high-order deformations. The different rotational behaviors of $^{252}$No and $^{254}$No can be understood for the first time in terms of $\\beta_6$ deformation that decreases the energies of the $\

  6. Understanding the physical metallurgy of the CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy: an atomistic simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Mi; Jo, Yong Hee; Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2018-01-01

    Although high-entropy alloys (HEAs) are attracting interest, the physical metallurgical mechanisms related to their properties have mostly not been clarified, and this limits wider industrial applications, in addition to the high alloy costs. We clarify the physical metallurgical reasons for the materials phenomena (sluggish diffusion and micro-twining at cryogenic temperatures) and investigate the effect of individual elements on solid solution hardening for the equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi HEA based on atomistic simulations (Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics and molecular statics). A significant number of stable vacant lattice sites with high migration energy barriers exists and is thought to cause the sluggish diffusion. We predict that the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure is more stable than the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure at 0 K, which we propose as the fundamental reason for the micro-twinning at cryogenic temperatures. The alloying effect on the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is well predicted by the atomistic simulation, used for a design of non-equiatomic fcc HEAs with improved strength, and is experimentally verified. This study demonstrates the applicability of the proposed atomistic approach combined with a thermodynamic calculation technique to a computational design of advanced HEAs.

  7. Understanding PISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen DOWNES

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding PISA Stephen DOWNESMoncton, CANADA ABSTRACT The headline was dramatic enough to cause a ripple in the reading public. "Students who use computers a lot at school have worse maths and reading performance," noted the BBC news article, citing a 2004 study by Ludger Woessmann and Thomas Fuchs (Fuchs and Woessman, 2004. It was not long before the blogosphere took notice. Taking the theme and running with it, Alice and Bill ask, "Computers Make School Kids Dumber?" They theorize, "If you track the admitted decline of education, you'll probably notice that it follows along with the increase of technology in the classroom." In a similar vein, James Bartholomew asks, "Do you think that the government will turn down the volume of its boasting about how it has spent billions introducing computers in schools (while keeping down the pay of teachers so much that there are shortages? Do you think it will stop sending governors of state schools glossy pamphlets about insisting that computers are used in their schools as much as possible?" In this study, therefore, PISA looks well beyond educational attainment, and also includes school demographics, such as whether it is a public or private school, has large or small classes, or has access or not to technological resources. Finally, it does measure student information-their family background, access to books and computers and parental support as well. The PISA survey departs from previous surveys in disregarding the stated curricula of the schools being measured. Therefore, the conclusion is not surprising, nor even wrong for him to consider independently of any parental or teacher support, considered without reference to the software running on it, considered without reference to student attitudes and interests, does not positively impact an education. Finally, he focus on missing the reporting of results

  8. Understanding the factors that influence high science achievers' academic choices and intent to pursue or opt out of the hard sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quihuis, Gisell

    Drawing on Eccles and her colleagues' Expectancy-Value model of academic behavior and choice, this dissertation study set out to serve three purposes: (1) to understand how high achieving high school students who aspire to science college degrees compare, in terms of motivational beliefs and social experiences, with other high achievers who do not aspire to science college degrees; (2) to understand why some high school students who excel in the hard sciences are unsure about pursuing a science degree in college; and (3) to examine whether gender differences in motivational beliefs and social experiences found in previous research on math (see Eccles 1984) exist for science among high achieving high school students. Survey and interview data showed that gender differences previously found in Eccles' research on math exist for science among a select group of high achieving high school students. Yet, these gender differences did not explain students' aspirations for science. Motivation, classroom perceptions, science engagement, as well as other science-related experiences at home and school, including parent and teacher influences, were also important factors associated with students' aspirations for science. Results and implications for this study are encouraging because they suggest that both parents and educators can help more high achievers become interested in science. Parents can expose their children, male and female alike, to science at home early on in their childhood and teachers can help students sustain and further develop an interest in science at school. In this manner, both parents and teachers can work together as a team to encourage more high achievers to aspire to science degrees in their future. Lastly, it is important to note that this study found Eccles' model of motivation and choice helpful in understanding not only gender differences in math and the hard sciences, but also aspiration differences that cut across gender among students

  9. Linguistic Dating of Biblical Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    2003-01-01

    For two centuries, scholars have pointed to consistent differences in the Hebrew of certain biblical texts and interpreted these differences as reflecting the date of composition of the texts. Until the 1980s, this was quite uncontroversial as the linguistic findings largely confirmed the chronol......For two centuries, scholars have pointed to consistent differences in the Hebrew of certain biblical texts and interpreted these differences as reflecting the date of composition of the texts. Until the 1980s, this was quite uncontroversial as the linguistic findings largely confirmed...... the chronology of the texts established by other means: the Hebrew of Genesis-2 Kings was judged to be early and that of Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles to be late. In the current debate where revisionists have questioned the traditional dating, linguistic arguments in the dating of texts have...... come more into focus. The study critically examines some linguistic arguments adduced to support the traditional position, and reviewing the arguments it points to weaknesses in the linguistic dating of EBH texts to pre-exilic times. When viewing the linguistic evidence in isolation it will be clear...

  10. Understanding the Effects of a High Surface Area Nanostructured Indium Tin Oxide Electrode on Organic Solar Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bing; He, Xiaoming; Sorge, Jason B; Lalany, Abeed; Ahadi, Kaveh; Afshar, Amir; Olsen, Brian C; Hauger, Tate C; Mobarok, Md Hosnay; Li, Peng; Cadien, Kenneth C; Brett, Michael J; Luber, Erik J; Buriak, Jillian M

    2017-11-08

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) are a complex assembly of disparate materials, each with a precise function within the device. Typically, the electrodes are flat, and the device is fabricated through a layering approach of the interfacial layers and photoactive materials. This work explores the integration of high surface area transparent electrodes to investigate the possible role(s) a three-dimensional electrode could take within an OSC, with a BHJ composed of a donor-acceptor combination with a high degree of electron and hole mobility mismatch. Nanotree indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were prepared via glancing angle deposition, structures that were previously demonstrated to be single-crystalline. A thin layer of zinc oxide was deposited on the ITO nanotrees via atomic layer deposition, followed by a self-assembled monolayer of C 60 -based molecules that was bound to the zinc oxide surface through a carboxylic acid group. Infiltration of these functionalized ITO nanotrees with the photoactive layer, the bulk heterojunction comprising PC 71 BM and a high hole mobility low band gap polymer (PDPPTT-T-TT), led to families of devices that were analyzed for the effect of nanotree height. When the height was varied from 0 to 50, 75, 100, and 120 nm, statistically significant differences in device performance were noted with the maximum device efficiencies observed with a nanotree height of 75 nm. From analysis of these results, it was found that the intrinsic mobility mismatch between the donor and acceptor phases could be compensated for when the electron collection length was reduced relative to the hole collection length, resulting in more balanced charge extraction and reduced recombination, leading to improved efficiencies. However, as the ITO nanotrees increased in height and branching, the decrease in electron collection length was offset by an increase in hole collection length and potential deleterious electric field redistribution effects, resulting in

  11. Outer Texts in Bilingual Dictionaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufus H. Gouws

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Dictionaries often display a central list bias with little or no attention to the use ofouter texts. This article focuses on dictionaries as text compounds and carriers of different texttypes. Utilising either a partial or a complete frame structure, a variety of outer text types can beused to enhance the data distribution structure of a dictionary and to ensure a better informationretrieval by the intended target user. A distinction is made between primary frame structures andsecondary frame structures and attention is drawn to the use of complex outer texts and the need ofan extended complex outer text with its own table of contents to guide the user to the relevant textsin the complex outer text. It is emphasised that outer texts need to be planned in a meticulous wayand that they should participate in the lexicographic functions of the specific dictionary, bothknowledge-orientated and communication-orientated functions, to ensure a transtextual functionalapproach.

    Keywords: BACK MATTER, CENTRAL LIST, COMMUNICATION-ORIENTATED FUNCTIONS,COMPLEX TEXT, CULTURAL DATA, EXTENDED COMPLEX TEXT, EXTENDED TEXTS,FRONT MATTER, FRAME STRUCTURE, KNOWLEDGE-ORIENTATED FUNCTIONS, LEXICOGRAPHICFUNCTIONS, OUTER TEXTS, PRIMARY FRAME, SECONDARY FRAME

    Opsomming: Buitetekste in tweetalige woordeboeke. Woordeboeke vertoondikwels 'n partydigheid ten gunste van die sentrale lys met min of geen aandag aan die buitetekstenie. Hierdie artikel fokus op woordeboeke as tekssamestellings en draers van verskillende tekssoorte.Met die benutting van óf 'n gedeeltelike óf 'n volledige raamstruktuur kan 'n verskeidenheidbuitetekste aangewend word om die dataverspreidingstruktuur van 'n woordeboek te verbeteren om 'n beter herwinning van inligting deur die teikengebruiker te verseker. 'n Onderskeidword gemaak tussen primêre en sekondêre raamstrukture en die aandag word gevestig op kompleksebuitetekste en die behoefte aan 'n uitgebreide komplekse

  12. Final state interactions in [Formula: see text] decays: [Formula: see text] rule vs. [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Andrzej J; Gérard, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Dispersive effects from strong [Formula: see text] rescattering in the final state interaction (FSI) of weak [Formula: see text] decays are revisited with the goal to have a global view on their relative importance for the [Formula: see text] rule and the ratio [Formula: see text] in the standard model (SM). We point out that this goal cannot be reached within a pure effective (meson) field approach like chiral perturbation theory in which the dominant current-current operators governing the [Formula: see text] rule and the dominant density-density (four-quark) operators governing [Formula: see text] cannot be disentangled from each other. But in the context of a dual QCD approach, which includes both long-distance dynamics and the UV completion, that is, QCD at short-distance scales, such a distinction is possible. We find then that beyond the strict large N limit, N being the number of colours, FSIs are likely to be important for the [Formula: see text] rule but much less relevant for [Formula: see text]. The latter finding diminishes significantly hopes that improved calculations of [Formula: see text] would bring its SM prediction to agree with the experimental data, opening thereby an arena for important new physics contributions to this ratio.

  13. Stemming Malay Text and Its Application in Automatic Text Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Michiko; Lim, Hui Tian; Yokoo, Hidetoshi

    In Malay language, there are no conjugations and declensions and affixes have important grammatical functions. In Malay, the same word may function as a noun, an adjective, an adverb, or, a verb, depending on its position in the sentence. Although extensively simple root words are used in informal conversations, it is essential to use the precise words in formal speech or written texts. In Malay, to make sentences clear, derivative words are used. Derivation is achieved mainly by the use of affixes. There are approximately a hundred possible derivative forms of a root word in written language of the educated Malay. Therefore, the composition of Malay words may be complicated. Although there are several types of stemming algorithms available for text processing in English and some other languages, they cannot be used to overcome the difficulties in Malay word stemming. Stemming is the process of reducing various words to their root forms in order to improve the effectiveness of text processing in information systems. It is essential to avoid both over-stemming and under-stemming errors. We have developed a new Malay stemmer (stemming algorithm) for removing inflectional and derivational affixes. Our stemmer uses a set of affix rules and two types of dictionaries: a root-word dictionary and a derivative-word dictionary. The use of set of rules is aimed at reducing the occurrence of under-stemming errors, while that of the dictionaries is believed to reduce the occurrence of over-stemming errors. We performed an experiment to evaluate the application of our stemmer in text mining software. For the experiment, text data used were actual web pages collected from the World Wide Web to demonstrate the effectiveness of our Malay stemming algorithm. The experimental results showed that our stemmer can effectively increase the precision of the extracted Boolean expressions for text categorization.

  14. Substance use: toward an understanding of its relation to nutrition-related attitudes and behavior among Israeli high school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isralowitz, R E; Trostler, N

    1996-09-01

    To study the distribution, prevalence, determinants, and association between substance use (e.g., cigarettes, alcohol, and illegal drugs) and eating attitudes and behavior of high school students in the Negev region of Israel in order to provide an improved basis for prevention and health services. An anonymous questionnaire regarding attitudes and behavior related to substance use and eating (e.g., breakfast before school, a snack or meal during school time, and three meals a day) was answered by 1,513 high school age youth. The study participants were at greater risk of poor eating behavior if they: (1) used cigarettes, alcohol, and/or illicit substances (p illicit substances were used or not used, more than 50% of the youth reported not eating breakfast and 30% indicated they did not eat three meals daily. There are many concerns about the use and abuse of both licit and illicit substances among adolescents. More attention, however, needs to be given to the relationship between substance use and the attitudes and behavior of young people toward their health, including proper eating habits. The results support the need to develop drug prevention and health programs that are more comprehensive in terms of addressing the broad range of factors associated with adolescent growth and development.

  15. Understanding the antecedents of Korean high school students' drinking refusal self-efficacy: parental influence, peer influence, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Ahn; Cho, Namauk; Yoo, Jina

    2011-12-29

    The current study examined the factors that influence Korean adolescents' drinking refusal self-efficacy, which is known to be associated with alcohol use and drinking intentions. Specifically, this study considered parental monitoring, parent-child communication satisfaction, peer influence, and prior alcohol use as possible antecedents of Korean high school students' drinking refusal self-efficacy. High school students (n = 538) in South Korea responded to the current study. The data revealed that parent-child communication satisfaction facilitated parental monitoring, and these factors indirectly predicted adolescents' drinking behavior through peer influence. We also found that prior drinking, parental monitoring, and peer influence were directly associated with drinking refusal self-efficacy, and the self-efficacy, in turn, was associated with drinking intentions. These results not only suggest that drinking refusal self-efficacy are related to drinking behavior and intentions, but they also provide a theoretical explanation for how parental and peer influences are associated with adolescents' drinking refusal self-efficacy.

  16. Biomedical text mining and its applications in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Patumcharoenpol, Preecha; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Yang; Chan, Jonathan; Meechai, Asawin; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Shen, Bairong

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is a malignant disease that has caused millions of human deaths. Its study has a long history of well over 100years. There have been an enormous number of publications on cancer research. This integrated but unstructured biomedical text is of great value for cancer diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. The immense body and rapid growth of biomedical text on cancer has led to the appearance of a large number of text mining techniques aimed at extracting novel knowledge from scientific text. Biomedical text mining on cancer research is computationally automatic and high-throughput in nature. However, it is error-prone due to the complexity of natural language processing. In this review, we introduce the basic concepts underlying text mining and examine some frequently used algorithms, tools, and data sets, as well as assessing how much these algorithms have been utilized. We then discuss the current state-of-the-art text mining applications in cancer research and we also provide some resources for cancer text mining. With the development of systems biology, researchers tend to understand complex biomedical systems from a systems biology viewpoint. Thus, the full utilization of text mining to facilitate cancer systems biology research is fast becoming a major concern. To address this issue, we describe the general workflow of text mining in cancer systems biology and each phase of the workflow. We hope that this review can (i) provide a useful overview of the current work of this field; (ii) help researchers to choose text mining tools and datasets; and (iii) highlight how to apply text mining to assist cancer systems biology research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anomaly Detection with Text Mining

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many existing complex space systems have a significant amount of historical maintenance and problem data bases that are stored in unstructured text forms. The...

  18. An Experimental Text-Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Joan

    1976-01-01

    An experimental text-commentary of selected passages from Sophocles'"Antigone" is described. The commentary is intended for students seeking more than a conventional translation who do not know enough Greek to use a standard commentary. (RM)

  19. Text segmentation with character-level text embeddings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrupała, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Learning word representations has recently seen much success in computational linguistics. However, assuming sequences of word tokens as input to linguistic analysis is often unjustified. For many languages word segmentation is a non-trivial task and naturally occurring text is sometimes a mixture

  20. Understanding classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subianto, M.

    2009-01-01

    In practical data analysis, the understandability of models plays an important role in their acceptance. In the data mining literature, however, understandability plays is hardly ever mentioned. If it is mentioned, it is interpreted as meaning that the models have to be simple. In this thesis we

  1. Embodied understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Western culture has inherited a view of understanding as an intellectual cognitive operation of grasping of concepts and their relations. However, cognitive science research has shown that this received intellectualist conception is substantially out of touch with how humans actually make and experience meaning. The view emerging from the mind sciences recognizes that understanding is profoundly embodied, insofar as our conceptualization and reasoning recruit sensory, motor, and affective patterns and processes to structure our understanding of, and engagement with, our world. A psychologically realistic account of understanding must begin with the patterns of ongoing interaction between an organism and its physical and cultural environments and must include both our emotional responses to changes in our body and environment, and also the actions by which we continuously transform our experience. Consequently, embodied understanding is not merely a conceptual/propositional activity of thought, but rather constitutes our most basic way of being in, and engaging with, our surroundings in a deep visceral manner.

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... side effects from the cancer treatments you received. Video Series This video series offers the perspectives of ... care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer ... Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer What Is ... Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding ... Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor to give you an accurate prognosis. Understanding the Difference Between Cure and Remission Cure means that ... about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this video on YouTube. Andrew wants ...

  8. Using theory to understand high school aged athletes' intentions to report sport-related concussion: implications for concussion education initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Linnan, Laura A; Marshall, Stephen W; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Mueller, Frederick O; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    To assess the influence of psychosocial determinants from the Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behaviour (TRA/TPB) on concussion-reporting intentions. The present study employed the TRA/TPB to develop a cross-sectional survey to examine contributors to intention to report concussion symptoms. High school athletes (n = 167, age = 15.7 ± 1.4) completed this survey. The TRA/TPB constructs of attitude (perceptions about concussion reporting), subjective norm (perception of important social referents beliefs about concussion reporting), perceived behavioural control (perceived control over concussion reporting) and intention to report concussion symptoms served as the independent variables. Linear regression models were used to predict intention to report concussion symptoms. Binomial regression models were used to predict concussion-reporting behaviours from intention. Direct attitude, subjective norm and direct perceived behavioural control were all associated with intention to report concussion. Intention was associated with decreased prevalence of participating in practices and games while symptomatic from concussion. Favourable attitudes toward reporting and social referents' beliefs have the greatest impact on intention to report concussion symptoms. Reporting intention may not always be an indicator of concussion-reporting behaviours. Concussion education initiatives should focus on improving attitudes and beliefs among athletes, coaches and parents to promote better care-seeking behaviours among young athletes.

  9. EARLY HEAD START FAMILIES' EXPERIENCES WITH STRESS: UNDERSTANDING VARIATIONS WITHIN A HIGH-RISK, LOW-INCOME SAMPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustedt, Jason T; Vu, Jennifer A; Bargreen, Kaitlin N; Hallam, Rena A; Han, Myae

    2017-09-01

    The federal Early Head Start program provides a relevant context to examine families' experiences with stress since participants qualify on the basis of poverty and risk. Building on previous research that has shown variations in demographic and economic risks even among qualifying families, we examined possible variations in families' perceptions of stress. Family, parent, and child data were collected to measure stressors and risk across a variety of domains in families' everyday lives, primarily from self-report measures, but also including assay results from child cortisol samples. A cluster analysis was employed to examine potential differences among groups of Early Head Start families. Results showed that there were three distinct subgroups of families, with some families perceiving that they experienced very high levels of stress while others perceived much lower levels of stress despite also experiencing poverty and heightened risk. These findings have important implications in that they provide an initial step toward distinguishing differences in low-income families' experiences with stress, thereby informing interventions focused on promoting responsive caregiving as a possible mechanism to buffer the effects of family and social stressors on young children. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  10. High-resolution genetic map for understanding the effect of genome-wide recombination rate on nucleotide diversity in watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Umesh K; Nimmakayala, Padma; Levi, Amnon; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Tomason, Yan R; Vajja, Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Abburi, Lavanya; Wehner, Todd C; Ronin, Yefim; Karol, Abraham

    2014-09-15

    We used genotyping by sequencing to identify a set of 10,480 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for constructing a high-resolution genetic map of 1096 cM for watermelon. We assessed the genome-wide variation in recombination rate (GWRR) across the map and found an association between GWRR and genome-wide nucleotide diversity. Collinearity between the map and the genome-wide reference sequence for watermelon was studied to identify inconsistency and chromosome rearrangements. We assessed genome-wide nucleotide diversity, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and selective sweep for wild, semi-wild, and domesticated accessions of Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus to track signals of domestication. Principal component analysis combined with chromosome-wide phylogenetic study based on 1563 SNPs obtained after LD pruning with minor allele frequency of 0.05 resolved the differences between semi-wild and wild accessions as well as relationships among worldwide sweet watermelon. Population structure analysis revealed predominant ancestries for wild, semi-wild, and domesticated watermelons as well as admixture of various ancestries that were important for domestication. Sliding window analysis of Tajima's D across various chromosomes was used to resolve selective sweep. LD decay was estimated for various chromosomes. We identified a strong selective sweep on chromosome 3 consisting of important genes that might have had a role in sweet watermelon domestication. Copyright © 2014 Reddy et al.

  11. Fundamental understanding of oxygen reduction and reaction behavior and developing high performance and stable hetero-structured cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-11-14

    New unique hetero-structured cathode has been developed in this project. La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as a surface catalyst with interstitial oxygen defects was introduced onto the state-of-the-art (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode to enhance the surface-limited ORR kinetics on SOFC cathode. Furthermore, the hetero-structured cathode surface maintains high activity under electrode polarization with much less negative effects from surface cation segregation of Sr, which is known to cause degradation issues for conventional LSCF and LSC cathodes, thus improving the cathode long-term stability. The interface chemistry distribution and oxygen transport properties have been studied to prove the enhancement of power out and stability of LNO-infiltrated LSCF cathode. The further investigation demonstrates that CeO2 & La2-xNiO4+δ (x=0-0.2) co-infiltration is a simple and cost-effective method to improve both performance and stability of LSCF cathode by limiting nano-particles growth/delamination and further improve the surface stability. For the first time, a physical model is proposed to illustrate how unique interstitial species on hetero-structured cathode surface work to regulate the exchange rate of the incorporation reaction. Meanwhile, fundamental investigation of the surface oxygen exchange and bulk oxygen transport properties under over-potential conditions across cathode materials have been carried out in this project, which were discussed and compared to the Nernst equation that is generally applied to treat any oxide electrodes under equilibrium.

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a ... for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three ...

  13. Implementation of cooperative learning model type STAD with RME approach to understanding of mathematical concept student state junior high school in Pekanbaru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Dian Mita; Hartono

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine whether there is a difference in the ability of understanding the concept of mathematics between students who use cooperative learning model Student Teams Achievement Division type with Realistic Mathematic Education approach and students who use regular learning in seventh grade SMPN 35 Pekanbaru. This study was quasi experiments with Posttest-only Control Design. The populations in this research were all the seventh grade students in one of state junior high school in Pekanbaru. The samples were a class that is used as the experimental class and one other as the control class. The process of sampling is using purposive sampling technique. Retrieval of data in this study using the documentation, observation sheets, and test. The test use t-test formula to determine whether there is a difference in student's understanding of mathematical concepts. Before the t-test, should be used to test the homogeneity and normality. Based in the analysis of these data with t0 = 2.9 there is a difference in student's understanding of mathematical concepts between experimental and control class. Percentage of students experimental class with score more than 65 was 76.9% and 56.4% of students control class. Thus be concluded, the ability of understanding mathematical concepts students who use the cooperative learning model type STAD with RME approach better than students using the regular learning. So that cooperative learning model type STAD with RME approach is well used in learning process.

  14. A Guide Text or Many Texts? "That is the Question”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado de Valencia Sonia

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of supplementary materials in the classroom has always been an essential part of the teaching and learning process. To restrict our teaching to the scope of one single textbook means to stand behind the advances of knowledge, in any area and context. Young learners appreciate any new and varied support that expands their knowledge of the world: diaries, letters, panels, free texts, magazines, short stories, poems or literary excerpts, and articles taken from Internet are materials that will allow learnersto share more and work more collaboratively. In this article we are going to deal with some of these materials, with the criteria to select, adapt, and create them that may be of interest to the learner and that may promote reading and writing processes. Since no text can entirely satisfy the needs of students and teachers, the creativity of both parties will be necessary to improve the quality of teaching through the adequate use and adaptation of supplementary materials.

  15. Cluster Based Text Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    We propose a cluster based classification model for suspicious email detection and other text classification tasks. The text classification tasks comprise many training examples that require a complex classification model. Using clusters for classification makes the model simpler and increases......, the classifier is trained on each cluster having reduced dimensionality and less number of examples. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the existing classification models for the task of suspicious email detection and topic categorization on the Reuters-21578 and 20 Newsgroups...... datasets. Our model also outperforms A Decision Cluster Classification (ADCC) and the Decision Cluster Forest Classification (DCFC) models on the Reuters-21578 dataset....

  16. Identifying issue frames in text.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Sagi

    Full Text Available Framing, the effect of context on cognitive processes, is a prominent topic of research in psychology and public opinion research. Research on framing has traditionally relied on controlled experiments and manually annotated document collections. In this paper we present a method that allows for quantifying the relative strengths of competing linguistic frames based on corpus analysis. This method requires little human intervention and can therefore be efficiently applied to large bodies of text. We demonstrate its effectiveness by tracking changes in the framing of terror over time and comparing the framing of abortion by Democrats and Republicans in the U.S.

  17. Analyzing high resolution topography for advancing the understanding of mass and energy transfer through landscapes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaiacquaa, Paola; Belmont, Patrick; Staley, Dennis M.; Simley, Jeffery; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Bode, Collin A.; Crosby, Christopher; DeLong, Stephen; Glenn, Nancy; Kelly, Sara; Lague, Dimitri; Sangireddy, Harish; Schaffrath, Keelin; Tarboton, David; Wasklewicz, Thad; Wheaton, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The study of mass and energy transfer across landscapes has recently evolved to comprehensive considerations acknowledging the role of biota and humans as geomorphic agents, as well as the importance of small-scale landscape features. A contributing and supporting factor to this evolution is the emergence over the last two decades of technologies able to acquire high resolution topography (HRT) (meter and sub-meter resolution) data. Landscape features can now be captured at an appropriately fine spatial resolution at which surface processes operate; this has revolutionized the way we study Earth-surface processes. The wealth of information contained in HRT also presents considerable challenges. For example, selection of the most appropriate type of HRT data for a given application is not trivial. No definitive approach exists for identifying and filtering erroneous or unwanted data, yet inappropriate filtering can create artifacts or eliminate/distort critical features. Estimates of errors and uncertainty are often poorly defined and typically fail to represent the spatial heterogeneity of the dataset, which may introduce bias or error for many analyses. For ease of use, gridded products are typically preferred rather than the more information-rich point cloud representations. Thus many users take advantage of only a fraction of the available data, which has furthermore been subjected to a series of operations often not known or investigated by the user. Lastly, standard HRT analysis work-flows are yet to be established for many popular HRT operations, which has contributed to the limited use of point cloud data.In this review, we identify key research questions relevant to the Earth-surface processes community within the theme of mass and energy transfer across landscapes and offer guidance on how to identify the most appropriate topographic data type for the analysis of interest. We describe the operations commonly performed from raw data to raster products and

  18. Intention understanding in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boria

    Full Text Available When we observe a motor act (e.g. grasping a cup done by another individual, we extract, according to how the motor act is performed and its context, two types of information: the goal (grasping and the intention underlying it (e.g. grasping for drinking. Here we examined whether children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD are able to understand these two aspects of motor acts. Two experiments were carried out. In the first, one group of high-functioning children with ASD and one of typically developing (TD children were presented with pictures showing hand-object interactions and asked what the individual was doing and why. In half of the "why" trials the observed grip was congruent with the function of the object ("why-use" trials, in the other half it corresponded to the grip typically used to move that object ("why-place" trials. The results showed that children with ASD have no difficulties in reporting the goals of individual motor acts. In contrast they made several errors in the why task with all errors occurring in the "why-place" trials. In the second experiment the same two groups of children saw pictures showing a hand-grip congruent with the object use, but within a context suggesting either the use of the object or its placement into a container. Here children with ASD performed as TD children, correctly indicating the agent's intention. In conclusion, our data show that understanding others' intentions can occur in two ways: by relying on motor information derived from the hand-object interaction, and by using functional information derived from the object's standard use. Children with ASD have no deficit in the second type of understanding, while they have difficulties in understanding others' intentions when they have to rely exclusively on motor cues.

  19. Application of LSP texts in translator training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Ilynska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents discussion of the results of extensive empirical research into efficient methods of educating and training translators of LSP (language for special purposes texts. The methodology is based on using popular LSP texts in the respective fields as one of the main media for translator training. The aim of the paper is to investigate the efficiency of this methodology in developing thematic, linguistic and cultural competences of the students, following Bloom’s revised taxonomy and European Master in Translation Network (EMT translator training competences. The methodology has been tested on the students of a professional Master study programme called Technical Translation implemented by the Institute of Applied Linguistics, Riga Technical University, Latvia. The group of students included representatives of different nationalities, translating from English into Latvian, Russian and French. Analysis of popular LSP texts provides an opportunity to structure student background knowledge and expand it to account for linguistic innovation. Application of popular LSP texts instead of purely technical or scientific texts characterised by neutral style and rigid genre conventions provides an opportunity for student translators to develop advanced text processing and decoding skills, to develop awareness of expressive resources of the source and target languages and to develop understanding of socio-pragmatic language use.

  20. Emotional Abilities in Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Impairments in Perspective-Taking and Understanding Mixed Emotions are Associated with High Callous-Unemotional Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kearney, Richard; Salmon, Karen; Liwag, Maria; Fortune, Clare-Ann; Dawel, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Most studies of emotion abilities in disruptive children focus on emotion expression recognition. This study compared 74 children aged 4-8 years with ODD to 45 comparison children (33 healthy; 12 with an anxiety disorder) on behaviourally assessed measures of emotion perception, emotion perspective-taking, knowledge of emotions causes and understanding ambivalent emotions and on parent-reported cognitive and affective empathy. Adjusting for child's sex, age and expressive language ODD children showed a paucity in attributing causes to emotions but no other deficits relative to the comparison groups. ODD boys with high levels of callous-unemotional traits (CU) (n = 22) showed deficits relative to low CU ODD boys (n = 25) in emotion perspective-taking and in understanding ambivalent emotions. Low CU ODD boys did not differ from the healthy typically developing boys (n = 12). Impairments in emotion perceptive-taking and understanding mixed emotions in ODD boys are associated with the presence of a high level of CU.

  1. Text linguistics: memory and representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Lopes Fávero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Text Linguistics originates in Brazil in the 80s of the twentieth century. The first work that we know of is from 1981, authored by Prof. Ignacio Antonio Neiss, entitled Por uma gramática textua, which was followed by two other in 1983: Linguística textual: o que é e como se faz, by Prof. Luiz Antônio Marcuschi and Linguística textual: introdução by Leonor Lopes Favero and Ingedore Villaça Koch. Professor Neiss shows how initial attempts to textual linguistics, were generally related to structural and generative grammars. The work of Prof. Marcuschi focuses on the analysis of some text definitions and on the study of theoretical aspects in relation to their applicability. Leonor Lopes Favero and Ingedore V. Koch aim to provide the Brazilian reader with an overview of text linguistics in Europe, a recent branch of language science then. This work is part of the History of Linguistic Ideas, part of the Cultural History, which seeks to identify how at different times , a social reality is constructed, designed, and enlightened (Chartier, 1990.

  2. Multilingual text induced spelling correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaert, M.W.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present TISC, a multilingual, language-independent and context-sensitive spelling checking and correction system designed to facilitate the automatic removal of non-word spelling errors in large corpora. Its lexicon is derived from raw text corpora, without supervision, and contains word unigrams

  3. Text as an Autopoietic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Maria Skou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research article is to discuss the possibilities and limitations in addressing text as an autopoietic system. The theory of autopoiesis originated in the field of biology in order to explain the dynamic processes entailed in sustaining living organisms at cellular level...

  4. Understanding semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Understanding natural language is a cognitive, information-driven process. Discussing some of the consequences of this fact, the paper offers a novel look at the semantic effect of lexical nouns and the identification of reference types....

  5. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  6. Understanding homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on understanding homelessness. It criticizes approaches that ignore, distort or diminish the humanity of homeless people, or else, add little to our understanding of that humanity. In particular, it rejects what it calls “epidemiological” approaches, which deny the possibility of agency for homeless people, insofar as those approaches view the situation of those people largely as a “social fact”, to be explained in terms of causal variables or “risk factors” ...

  7. Answering Questions from Oceanography Texts: Learner, Task and Text Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-15

    12IMaERIN KESTISUS FMS OCEUWUNRPIW TOMTS: LEME / TW M TEXT aWAC.. (U) CLIFSWII IWly bdwTNUU S Rt ULIU ET L 15 SEP 8? CMSITIVE SCIENCI -Th471,8 wL07...indicate that the learner ought to read on for the complete answer: "The first item (time) could be read from your seismograph, but there is no direct ...terribly "-" direct but instead of resuming a search process, she retreated back to the same answer she had originally retrieved from memory and the

  8. AHP 45: REVIEW: TIBETAN LITERARY GENRES, TEXTS, AND TEXT TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Tribur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the quantitative tradition of sociolinguistic research pioneered by such scholars as William Labov, Walt Wolfram, and Penelope Eckert, Reynolds presents a detailed, coherent analysis of the social parameters behind a specific on-going sound change, the merger of syllable final bilabial nasal (m with aveolar coronal nasal (n, in one small farming community in Qinghai Province. His is certainly not the first such study on Tibetan sound change. It is also not the first study to investigate the merger of (m into (n, which is a prominent feature of so-called "farmer" dialects of Amdo Tibetan (Hua 2005. ...

  9. Adaptive Text Entry for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proschowsky, Morten Smidt

    The reduced size of many mobile devices makes it difficult to enter text with them. The text entry methods are often slow or complicated to use. This affects the performance and user experience of all applications and services on the device. This work introduces new easy-to-use text entry methods...... for mobile devices and a framework for adaptive context-aware language models. Based on analysis of current text entry methods, the requirements to the new text entry methods are established. Transparent User guided Prediction (TUP) is a text entry method for devices with one dimensional touch input. It can...... be touch sensitive wheels, sliders or similar input devices. The interaction design of TUP is done with a combination of high level task models and low level models of human motor behaviour. Three prototypes of TUP are designed and evaluated by more than 30 users. Observations from the evaluations are used...

  10. The Impact of Texting on Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal K. M. Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the effects of texting on English language comprehension. The authors believe that English used in texting causes a lack of comprehension for English speakers, learners, and texters. Wei, Xian-hai and Jiang (2008:3 declare “In Netspeak, there are some newly-created vocabularies, which people cannot comprehend them either from their partial pronunciation or from their figures.” Crystal (2007:23 claims; “variation causes problems of comprehension and acceptability. If you speak or write differently from the way I do, we may fail to understand each other.”  In this paper, the authors conducted a questionnaire at Aligarh Muslim University to ninety respondents from five different Faculties and four different levels. To measure respondents’ comprehension of English texting, the authors gave the respondents abbreviations used by texters and asked them to write the full forms of the abbreviations. The authors found that many abbreviations were not understood, which suggested that most of the respondents did not understand and did not use these abbreviations.

  11. Quality Inspection of Printed Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Ballisager; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Inspecting the quality of printed texts has its own importance in many industrial applications. To do so, this paper proposes a grading system which evaluates the performance of the printing task using some quality measures for each character and symbols. The purpose of these grading system is two......-folded: for costumers of the printing and verification system, the overall grade used to verify if the text is of sufficient quality, while for printer's manufacturer, the detailed character/symbols grades and quality measurements are used for the improvement and optimization of the printing task. The proposed system...... has been tested on images from a real industrial environment and the obtained results are promising....

  12. Multilingual access to full text databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluhr, C.; Radwan, K.

    1990-05-01

    Many full text databases are available in only one language, or more, they may contain documents in different languages. Even if the user is able to understand the language of the documents in the database, it could be easier for him to express his need in his own language. For the case of databases containing documents in different languages, it is more simple to formulate the query in one language only and to retrieve documents in different languages. This paper present the developments and the first experiments of multilingual search, applied to french-english pair, for text data in nuclear field, based on the system SPIRIT. After reminding the general problems of full text databases search by queries formulated in natural language, we present the methods used to reformulate the queries and show how they can be expanded for multilingual search. The first results on data in nuclear field are presented (AFCEN norms and INIS abstracts). 4 refs

  13. [On two antique medical texts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria Carlota

    2005-01-01

    The two texts presented here--Regimento proueytoso contra ha pestenença [literally, "useful regime against pestilence"] and Modus curandi cum balsamo ["curing method using balm"]--represent the extent of Portugal's known medical library until circa 1530, produced in gothic letters by foreign printers: Germany's Valentim Fernandes, perhaps the era's most important printer, who worked in Lisbon between 1495 and 1518, and Germdo Galharde, a Frenchman who practiced his trade in Lisbon and Coimbra between 1519 and 1560. Modus curandi, which came to light in 1974 thanks to bibliophile José de Pina Martins, is anonymous. Johannes Jacobi is believed to be the author of Regimento proueytoso, which was translated into Latin (Regimen contra pestilentiam), French, and English. Both texts are presented here in facsimile and in modern Portuguese, while the first has also been reproduced in archaic Portuguese using modern typographical characters. This philological venture into sixteenth-century medicine is supplemented by a scholarly glossary which serves as a valuable tool in interpreting not only Regimento proueytoso but also other texts from the era. Two articles place these documents in historical perspective.

  14. Understanding Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Maple is a powerful symbolic computation system that is widely used in universities around the world. This short introduction gives readers an insight into the rules that control how the system works, and how to understand, fix, and avoid common problems. Topics covered include algebra, calculus, linear algebra, graphics, programming, and procedures. Each chapter contains numerous illustrative examples, using mathematics that does not extend beyond first-year undergraduate material. Maple worksheets containing these examples are available for download from the author's personal website. The book is suitable for new users, but where advanced topics are central to understanding Maple they are tackled head-on. Many concepts which are absent from introductory books and manuals are described in detail. With this book, students, teachers and researchers will gain a solid understanding of Maple and how to use it to solve complex mathematical problems in a simple and efficient way.

  15. Influence of text cohesion on the persuasive power of expository text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Johanna K; Salonen, Jonna; Venäläinen, Paula; Hyönä, Jukka

    2011-06-01

    The present study examined how global text cohesion affects persuasion and memory for message arguments presented in expository text. Sixty-nine participants who held a neutral prior attitude towards NATO read a persuasive text about NATO that was either high or low in global cohesion. After reading, participants voted whether Finland should seek NATO membership and filled in an attitude questionnaire. After a 1-week delay they returned for a surprise recall task. The results showed that the high cohesion text was more persuasive than the low cohesion text. Moreover, attitude after reading but not text cohesion predicted later recall of the message arguments. The results show that global text cohesion increases text's persuasive power and that readers who form a positive attitude have better memory of the persuasive arguments after a delay than readers who are less persuaded. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2011 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  16. The Balinese Unicode Text Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Habibi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In principal, the computer only recognizes numbers as the representation of a character. Therefore, there are many encoding systems to allocate these numbers although not all characters are covered. In Europe, every single language even needs more than one encoding system. Hence, a new encoding system known as Unicode has been established to overcome this problem. Unicode provides unique id for each different characters which does not depend on platform, program, and language. Unicode standard has been applied in a number of industries, such as Apple, HP, IBM, JustSystem, Microsoft, Oracle, SAP, Sun, Sybase, and Unisys. In addition, language standards and modern information exchanges such as XML, Java, ECMA Script (JavaScript, LDAP, CORBA 3.0, and WML make use of Unicode as an official tool for implementing ISO/IEC 10646. There are four things to do according to Balinese script: the algorithm of transliteration, searching, sorting, and word boundary analysis (spell checking. To verify the truth of algorithm, some applications are made. These applications can run on Linux/Windows OS platform using J2SDK 1.5 and J2ME WTK2 library. The input and output of the algorithm/application are character sequence that is obtained from keyboard punch and external file. This research produces a module or a library which is able to process the Balinese text based on Unicode standard. The output of this research is the ability, skill, and mastering of 1. Unicode standard (21-bit as a substitution to ASCII (7-bit and ISO8859-1 (8-bit as the former default character set in many applications. 2. The Balinese Unicode text processing algorithm. 3. An experience of working with and learning from an international team that consists of the foremost experts in the area: Michael Everson (Ireland, Peter Constable (Microsoft US, I Made Suatjana, and Ida Bagus Adi Sudewa.

  17. Text Mining for Protein Docking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha D Badal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly growing amount of publicly available information from biomedical research is readily accessible on the Internet, providing a powerful resource for predictive biomolecular modeling. The accumulated data on experimentally determined structures transformed structure prediction of proteins and protein complexes. Instead of exploring the enormous search space, predictive tools can simply proceed to the solution based on similarity to the existing, previously determined structures. A similar major paradigm shift is emerging due to the rapidly expanding amount of information, other than experimentally determined structures, which still can be used as constraints in biomolecular structure prediction. Automated text mining has been widely used in recreating protein interaction networks, as well as in detecting small ligand binding sites on protein structures. Combining and expanding these two well-developed areas of research, we applied the text mining to structural modeling of protein-protein complexes (protein docking. Protein docking can be significantly improved when constraints on the docking mode are available. We developed a procedure that retrieves published abstracts on a specific protein-protein interaction and extracts information relevant to docking. The procedure was assessed on protein complexes from Dockground (http://dockground.compbio.ku.edu. The results show that correct information on binding residues can be extracted for about half of the complexes. The amount of irrelevant information was reduced by conceptual analysis of a subset of the retrieved abstracts, based on the bag-of-words (features approach. Support Vector Machine models were trained and validated on the subset. The remaining abstracts were filtered by the best-performing models, which decreased the irrelevant information for ~ 25% complexes in the dataset. The extracted constraints were incorporated in the docking protocol and tested on the Dockground unbound

  18. Biased limiter experiments on text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, P.E.; Wootton, A.J.; Rowan, W.L.; Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Bengtson, R.D.; Hodge, W.L.; Durst, R.D.; McCool, S.C.; Richards, B.; Gentle, K.W.; Schoch, P.; Forster, J.C.; Hickok, R.L.; Evans, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments using an electrically biased limiter have been performed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). A small movable limiter is inserted past the main poloidal ring limiter (which is electrically connected to the vacuum vessel) and biased at V Lim with respect to it. The floating potential, plasma potential and shear layer position can be controlled. With vertical strokeV Lim vertical stroke ≥ 50 V the plasma density increases. For V Lim Lim > 0 the results obtained are inconclusive. Variation of V Lim changes the electrostatic turbulence which may explain the observed total flux changes. (orig.)

  19. Text mining by Tsallis entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaati, Maryam; Mehri, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Long-range correlations between the elements of natural languages enable them to convey very complex information. Complex structure of human language, as a manifestation of natural languages, motivates us to apply nonextensive statistical mechanics in text mining. Tsallis entropy appropriately ranks the terms' relevance to document subject, taking advantage of their spatial correlation length. We apply this statistical concept as a new powerful word ranking metric in order to extract keywords of a single document. We carry out an experimental evaluation, which shows capability of the presented method in keyword extraction. We find that, Tsallis entropy has reliable word ranking performance, at the same level of the best previous ranking methods.

  20. Understanding the emission impacts of high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) to high-occupancy toll (HOT) lane conversions: Experience from Atlanta, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanzhi Ann; Liu, Haobing; Rodgers, Michael O; Guin, Angshuman; Hunter, Michael; Sheikh, Adnan; Guensler, Randall

    2017-08-01

    Converting a congested high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane into a high-occupancy toll (HOT) lane is a viable option for improving travel time reliability for carpools and buses that use the managed lane. However, the emission impacts of HOV-to-HOT conversions are not well understood. The lack of emission impact quantification for HOT conversions creates a policy challenge for agencies making transportation funding choices. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the case study of before-and-after changes in vehicle emissions for the Atlanta, Georgia, I-85 HOV/HOT lane conversion project, implemented in October 2011. The analyses employed the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) for project-level analysis with monitored changes in vehicle activity data collected by Georgia Tech researchers for the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT). During the quarterly field data collection from 2010 to 2012, more than 1.5 million license plates were observed and matched to vehicle class and age information using the vehicle registration database. The study also utilized the 20-sec, lane-specific traffic operations data from the Georgia NaviGAtor intelligent transportation system, as well as a direct feed of HOT lane usage data from the State Road and Tollway Authority (SRTA) managed lane system. As such, the analyses in this paper simultaneously assessed the impacts associated with changes in traffic volumes, on-road operating conditions, and fleet composition before and after the conversion. Both greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants were examined. A straight before-after analysis showed about 5% decrease in air pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). However, when the before-after calendar year of analysis was held constant (to account for the effect of 1 yr of fleet turnover), mass emissions at the analysis site during peak hours increased by as much as 17%, with little change in CO 2 . Further investigation revealed that a large percentage decrease in criteria

  1. DeTEXT: A Database for Evaluating Text Extraction from Biomedical Literature Figures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Cheng Yin

    Full Text Available Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. Since text is a rich source of information in figures, automatically extracting such text may assist in the task of mining figure information. A high-quality ground truth standard can greatly facilitate the development of an automated system. This article describes DeTEXT: A database for evaluating text extraction from biomedical literature figures. It is the first publicly available, human-annotated, high quality, and large-scale figure-text dataset with 288 full-text articles, 500 biomedical figures, and 9308 text regions. This article describes how figures were selected from open-access full-text biomedical articles and how annotation guidelines and annotation tools were developed. We also discuss the inter-annotator agreement and the reliability of the annotations. We summarize the statistics of the DeTEXT data and make available evaluation protocols for DeTEXT. Finally we lay out challenges we observed in the automated detection and recognition of figure text and discuss research directions in this area. DeTEXT is publicly available for downloading at http://prir.ustb.edu.cn/DeTEXT/.

  2. Snakes and Eels and Dogs! Oh, My! Evaluating High School Students' Tree-Thinking Skills: An Entry Point to Understanding Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catley, Kefyn M.; Phillips, Brenda C.; Novick, Laura R.

    2013-12-01

    The biological community is currently undertaking one its greatest scientific endeavours, that of constructing the Tree of Life, a phylogeny intended to be an evidenced-based, predictive road map of evolutionary relationships among Earth's biota. Unfortunately, we know very little about how such diagrams are understood, interpreted, or used as inferential tools by students—collectively referred to as tree thinking. The present study provides the first in-depth look at US high school students' competence at tree thinking and reports how they engage cognitively with tree representations as a precursor to developing curricula that will provide an entry point into macroevolution. Sixty tenth graders completed a 12-question instrument that assessed five basic tree-thinking skills. We present data that show patterns of misunderstandings are largely congruent between tenth graders and undergraduates and identify competences that are pivotal to address during instruction. Two general principles that emerge from this study are: (a) Students need to be taught that cladograms are an authoritative source of evidence that should be weighted more than other superficial or ecological similarities; (b) students need to understand the vital importance and critical difference between most recent common ancestry and common ancestry. Further, we show how the objectives of this study are closely aligned with US and International Standards and argue that scientifically-literate citizens need at least a basic understanding of the science behind the Tree of Life to understand and engage in twenty-first century societal issues such as human health, agriculture, and biotechnology.

  3. Texte aus der Presse im Fortgeschrittenenunterricht (Texts from the Press in Teaching Adults)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidmann, Gertrud

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of German at advanced levels in English universities. Material from the serious press is used, including news articles, editorials and discussions. Reasons given include increasing vocabulary and deepening the students' understanding of German-speaking countries, their societies, economics and culture. (Text is in German.)…

  4. Sequences in language and text

    CERN Document Server

    Mikros, George K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to present the diverse but highly interesting area of the quantitative analysis of the sequence of various linguistic structures. The collected articles present a wide spectrum of quantitative analyses of linguistic syntagmatic structures and explore novel sequential linguistic entities. This volume will be interesting to all researchers studying linguistics using quantitative methods.

  5. Characterizing the development of students' understandings regarding the second law of thermodynamics: Using learning progressions to illuminate thinking in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin D.

    As demonstrated by their emphasis in the new, national, science education standards, learning progressions (LPs) have become a valuable means of informing teaching and learning. LPs serve this role by isolating the key components of central skills and understandings, and by describing how those abilities and concepts tend to develop over time among students in a particular context. Some LPs also identify common challenges students experience in learning specific content and suggest methods of instruction and assessment, particularly ways in which difficulties can be identified and addressed. LPs are research-based and created through the integration of content analyses and interpretations of student performances with respect to the skills and understandings in question. The present research produced two LPs portraying the development of understandings associated with the second law of thermodynamics as evidenced by the evolving explanations for the spontaneity and irreversibility of diffusion and the cooling of a hot object constructed periodically by twenty students over two consecutive years in high school chemistry. While the curriculum they experienced did not emphasize the processes of diffusion and cooling or the second law and its applications, these students received prolonged instruction regarding key aspects of the particulate nature of matter. Working in small groups and as individuals, they were also taught and regularly expected to create, test, and revise particulate-based, conceptual models to account for the properties and behavior of a wide variety of common phenomena. Although some students quickly exhibited dramatic improvements in explaining and understanding the phenomena of interest, conceptual development for most was evolutionary rather than revolutionary, and success in explaining one phenomenon did not generally translate into successes in explaining related but different phenomena. Few students reached the uppermost learning goals of

  6. Understanding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  7. Transfer Learning beyond Text Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang

    Transfer learning is a new machine learning and data mining framework that allows the training and test data to come from different distributions or feature spaces. We can find many novel applications of machine learning and data mining where transfer learning is necessary. While much has been done in transfer learning in text classification and reinforcement learning, there has been a lack of documented success stories of novel applications of transfer learning in other areas. In this invited article, I will argue that transfer learning is in fact quite ubiquitous in many real world applications. In this article, I will illustrate this point through an overview of a broad spectrum of applications of transfer learning that range from collaborative filtering to sensor based location estimation and logical action model learning for AI planning. I will also discuss some potential future directions of transfer learning.

  8. DeTEXT: A Database for Evaluating Text Extraction from Biomedical Literature Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xu-Cheng; Yang, Chun; Pei, Wei-Yi; Man, Haixia; Zhang, Jun; Learned-Miller, Erik; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. Since text is a rich source of information in figures, automatically extracting such text may assist in the task of mining figure information. A high-quality ground truth standard can greatly facilitate the development of an automated system. This article describes DeTEXT: A database for evaluating text extraction from biomedical literature figures. It is the first publicly available, human-annotated, high quality, and large-scale figure-text dataset with 288 full-text articles, 500 biomedical figures, and 9308 text regions. This article describes how figures were selected from open-access full-text biomedical articles and how annotation guidelines and annotation tools were developed. We also discuss the inter-annotator agreement and the reliability of the annotations. We summarize the statistics of the DeTEXT data and make available evaluation protocols for DeTEXT. Finally we lay out challenges we observed in the automated detection and recognition of figure text and discuss research directions in this area. DeTEXT is publicly available for downloading at http://prir.ustb.edu.cn/DeTEXT/.

  9. Text mining for the biocuration workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Lynette; Burns, Gully A P C; Krallinger, Martin; Arighi, Cecilia; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Valencia, Alfonso; Wu, Cathy H; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Dowell, Karen G; Huala, Eva; Lourenço, Anália; Nash, Robert; Veuthey, Anne-Lise; Wiegers, Thomas; Winter, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    Molecular biology has become heavily dependent on biological knowledge encoded in expert curated biological databases. As the volume of biological literature increases, biocurators need help in keeping up with the literature; (semi-) automated aids for biocuration would seem to be an ideal application for natural language processing and text mining. However, to date, there have been few documented successes for improving biocuration throughput using text mining. Our initial investigations took place for the workshop on 'Text Mining for the BioCuration Workflow' at the third International Biocuration Conference (Berlin, 2009). We interviewed biocurators to obtain workflows from eight biological databases. This initial study revealed high-level commonalities, including (i) selection of documents for curation; (ii) indexing of documents with biologically relevant entities (e.g. genes); and (iii) detailed curation of specific relations (e.g. interactions); however, the detailed workflows also showed many variabilities. Following the workshop, we conducted a survey of biocurators. The survey identified biocurator priorities, including the handling of full text indexed with biological entities and support for the identification and prioritization of documents for curation. It also indicated that two-thirds of the biocuration teams had experimented with text mining and almost half were using text mining at that time. Analysis of our interviews and survey provide a set of requirements for the integration of text mining into the biocuration workflow. These can guide the identification of common needs across curated databases and encourage joint experimentation involving biocurators, text mining developers and the larger biomedical research community.

  10. Audio Steganography with Embedded Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teck Jian, Chua; Chai Wen, Chuah; Rahman, Nurul Hidayah Binti Ab.; Hamid, Isredza Rahmi Binti A.

    2017-08-01

    Audio steganography is about hiding the secret message into the audio. It is a technique uses to secure the transmission of secret information or hide their existence. It also may provide confidentiality to secret message if the message is encrypted. To date most of the steganography software such as Mp3Stego and DeepSound use block cipher such as Advanced Encryption Standard or Data Encryption Standard to encrypt the secret message. It is a good practice for security. However, the encrypted message may become too long to embed in audio and cause distortion of cover audio if the secret message is too long. Hence, there is a need to encrypt the message with stream cipher before embedding the message into the audio. This is because stream cipher provides bit by bit encryption meanwhile block cipher provide a fixed length of bits encryption which result a longer output compare to stream cipher. Hence, an audio steganography with embedding text with Rivest Cipher 4 encryption cipher is design, develop and test in this project.

  11. A programmed text in statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, J

    1975-01-01

    Exercises for Section 2 42 Physical sciences and engineering 42 43 Biological sciences 45 Social sciences Solutions to Exercises, Section 1 47 Physical sciences and engineering 47 49 Biological sciences 49 Social sciences Solutions to Exercises, Section 2 51 51 PhYSical sciences and engineering 55 Biological sciences 58 Social sciences 62 Tables 2 62 x - tests involving variances 2 63,64 x - one tailed tests 2 65 x - two tailed tests F-distribution 66-69 Preface This project started some years ago when the Nuffield Foundation kindly gave a grant for writing a pro­ grammed text to use with service courses in statistics. The work carried out by Mrs. Joan Hine and Professor G. B. Wetherill at Bath University, together with some other help from time to time by colleagues at Bath University and elsewhere. Testing was done at various colleges and universities, and some helpful comments were received, but we particularly mention King Edwards School, Bath, who provided some sixth formers as 'guinea pigs' for the fir...

  12. Understanding translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  13. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  14. Understanding unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Rocheteau

    2006-01-01

    Modern economists have built models of the labor market, which isolate the market’s key drivers and describe the way these interact to produce particular levels of unemployment. One of the most popular models used by macroeconomists today is the search-matching model of equilibrium unemployment. We explain this model, and show how it can be applied to understand the way various policies, such as unemployment benefits, taxes, or technological changes, can affect the unemployment rate.

  15. Female high school biology students' biofilm-focused learning: The contributions of three instructional strategies to patterns in understanding and motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ales, Jo Dale Hill

    2000-12-01

    This exploratory study examined three instructional strategies used with female high school biology students. The relative contributions of the strategies to student understanding of microbiology and motivation in science were analyzed. The science education community targeted underachievement in science by implementing changes in content and practices (NRC, 1996). Research suggested that teachers facilitate learnirig environments based on human constructivism (Mintzes, Wandersee, & Novak, 1997) that is rooted in meaningful learning theory (Ausubel, Novak & Hanesian, 1978). Teachers were advised to use both visual and verbal instructional strategies (Paivio, 1983) and encourage students to construct understandings by connecting new experiences to prior knowledge. The American Society for Microbiology supports the study of microorganisms because of their prominence in the biosphere (ASK 1997). In this study, two participating teachers taught selected microbiology concepts while focused on the cutting edge science of biofilms. Biology students accessed digitized biofilm images on an ASM web page and adapted them into products, communicated with biofilm researchers, and adapted a professional-quality instructional video for cross-age teaching. The study revealed improvements in understanding as evidenced on a written test; however, differences in learnirig outcomes were not significant. Other data, including student journal reflections, observations of student interactions, and student clinical interviews indicate that students were engaged in cutting edge science and adapted biofilm images in ways that increased understanding of microbiology (with respect to both science content and as a way of knowing) and motivation. An ASM CD-ROM of the images did not effectively enhance learning and this study provides insights into what could make it more successful. It also identifies why, in most cases, students' E-mail communication with biofilm researchers was unsuccessful

  16. Basic philosophical texts in Medieval Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosavljević Boris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Medieval Serbian philosophy took shape mostly through the process of translating Byzantine texts and revising the Slavic translations. Apart from the Aristotelian terminological tradition, introduced via the translation of Damascene’s Dialectic, there also was, under the influence of the Corpus Areopagiticum and ascetic literature, notably of John Climacus’ Ladder, another strain of thought originating from Christian Platonism. Damascene’s philosophical chapters, or Dialectic, translated into medieval Serbian in the third quarter of the fourteenth century, not only shows the high standards of translation technique developed in Serbian monastic scriptoria, but testifies to a highly educated readership interested in such a complex theologico-philosophical text with its nuanced terminology. A new theological debate about the impossibility of knowing God led to Gregory Palamas’ complex text, The Exposition of the Orthodox Faith. Philosophical texts were frequently copied and much worked on in medieval Serbia, but it is difficult to infer about the actual scope of their influence on the formation and articulation of the worldview of medieval society. As a result of their demanding theoretical complexity, the study of philosophy was restricted to quite narrow monastic, court and urban circles. However, the strongest aspect of the influence of Byzantine thought on medieval society was the liturgy as the central social event of the community. It was through the liturgy that the wording of the translated texts influenced the life of medieval Serbian society.

  17. Project Physics Text 4, Light and Electromagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Optical and electromagnetic fundamentals are presented in this fourth unit of the Project Physics text for use by senior high students. Development of the wave theory in the first half of the 19th Century is described to deal with optical problems at the early stage. Following explanations of electric charges and forces, field concepts are…

  18. Modeling statistical properties of written text.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Angeles Serrano

    Full Text Available Written text is one of the fundamental manifestations of human language, and the study of its universal regularities can give clues about how our brains process information and how we, as a society, organize and share it. Among these regularities, only Zipf's law has been explored in depth. Other basic properties, such as the existence of bursts of rare words in specific documents, have only been studied independently of each other and mainly by descriptive models. As a consequence, there is a lack of understanding of linguistic processes as complex emergent phenomena. Beyond Zipf's law for word frequencies, here we focus on burstiness, Heaps' law describing the sublinear growth of vocabulary size with the length of a document, and the topicality of document collections, which encode correlations within and across documents absent in random null models. We introduce and validate a generative model that explains the simultaneous emergence of all these patterns from simple rules. As a result, we find a connection between the bursty nature of rare words and the topical organization of texts and identify dynamic word ranking and memory across documents as key mechanisms explaining the non trivial organization of written text. Our research can have broad implications and practical applications in computer science, cognitive science and linguistics.

  19. Exploring Academic Voice in Multimodal Quantitative Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Prince

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on students’ academic literacies practices has tended to focus on the written mode in order to understand the academic conventions necessary to access Higher Education. However, the representation of quantitative information can be a challenge to many students. Quantitative information can be represented through a range of modes (such as writing, visuals and numbers and different information graphics (such as tables, charts, graphs. This paper focuses on the semiotic aspects of graphic representation in academic work, using student and published data from the Health Science, and an information graphic from the social domain as a counterpoint to explore aspects about agency and choice in academic voice in multimodal texts. It explores voice in terms of three aspects which work across modes, namely authorial engagement, citation and modality. The work of different modes and their inter-relations in quantitative texts is established, as is the use of sources in citation. We also look at the ways in which credibility and validity are established through modality. This exploration reveals that there is a complex interplay of modes in the construction of academic voice, which are largely tacit. This has implications for the way we think about and teach writing and text-making in quantitative disciplines in Higher Education.

  20. INNER DIALOGICITY OF MEDICAL SCIENTIFIC TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova Nataliya Vladimirovna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author studies inner dialogicity as an integral property of a scientist's thinking activity, a way of a scientific idea development, one of the cognitive and discursive mechanisms of new knowledge formation, its crystallization and dementalisation in a text, as a way of search for truth. Such approach to dialogicity in the study of a scientific text makes it possible to analyze the cogitative processes proceeding in human consciousness and cognitive activity, allows to fully understand the stated scientific concept, to define pragmatic strategies of the author, to plunge into his reflexive world. On the material of medical scientific texts of N.M. Amosov and F. G. Uglov, famous scientists in the field of cardio surgery, it is established that traces of internal dialogicity manifestation in the textual space of scientists actualize the origin of new knowledge, the change of author's semantic positions, his ability to reflect, compare, analyze his own thoughts and actions, to estimate oneself and the features of thinking process which are realized in logic of a statement of the scientific concept, an explanation of concepts, terms at judgment of the points of view of contemporaries and predecessors, adherents and scientist's opponents, and also orientation to the addressee's presupposition, activization of his cogitative activity. Linguistic, discursive, verbal analysis singles out the impact on the addressee, his mental activity.

  1. Understanding Family Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, G

    2012-01-01

    This essential text will help students and those already working with children to understand both theoretically and practically, what may constitute a ‘family’. It explores how to build relationships with a child’s family to ensure early years settings and schools are working in partnership with children’s home environments, thereby supporting the best possible learning outcomes for children. It will help the reader to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding of their professional pr...

  2. Glucose and Fructose to Platform Chemicals: Understanding the Thermodynamic Landscapes of Acid-Catalysed Reactions Using High-Level ab Initio Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Kim, Taijin; Low, John; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-12-28

    Molecular level understanding of acid-catalysed conversion of sugar molecules to platform chemicals such as hydroxy-methyl furfural (HMF), furfuryl alcohol (FAL), and levulinic acid (LA) is essential for efficient biomass conversion. In this paper, the high-level G4MP2 method along with the SMD solvation model is employed to understand detailed reaction energetics of the acid-catalysed decomposition of glucose and fructose to HMF. Based on protonation free energies of various hydroxyl groups of the sugar molecule, the relative reactivity of gluco-pyranose, fructo-pyranose and fructo-furanose are predicted. Calculations suggest that, in addition to the protonated intermediates, a solvent assisted dehydration of one of the fructo-furanosyl intermediates is a competing mechanism, indicating the possibility of multiple reaction pathways for fructose to HMF conversion in aqueous acidic medium. Two reaction pathways were explored to understand the thermodynamics of glucose to HMF; the first one is initiated by the protonation of a C2–OH group and the second one through an enolate intermediate involving acyclic intermediates. Additionally, a pathway is proposed for the formation of furfuryl alcohol from glucose initiated by the protonation of a C2–OH position, which includes a C–C bond cleavage, and the formation of formic acid. The detailed free energy landscapes predicted in this study can be used as benchmarks for further exploring the sugar decomposition reactions, prediction of possible intermediates, and finally designing improved catalysts for biomass conversion chemistry in the future.

  3. The effects of conducting authentic field-geology research on high school students' understanding of the nature of science, and their views of themselves as research scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millette, Patricia M.

    Authentic field geology research is a inquiry method that encourages students to interact more with their local environment, and by solving genuine puzzles, begin to increase their intuitive understanding of the nature and processes of science. The goal of the current study was to determine if conducting authentic field research and giving high school students the opportunity to present findings to adult audiences outside of the school setting 1) enhances students' understanding of the nature of science, and 2) affects students views of themselves as researchers. To accomplish this, ninth-grade students from a public school in northern New England engaged in a community-initiated glacial geology problem, completed a field research investigation, and presented their findings at several professional conferences. Following the completion of this student-centered field research, I investigated its effects by using a mixed methods approach consisting of qualitative and quantitative data from two sources. These included selected questions from an open-response survey (VNOS-c), and interviews that were conducted with fifteen of the students of different ages and genders. Findings show that conducting original field research seems to have a positive influence on these students' understanding of the NOS as well as the processes of science. Many of the students reported feelings of accomplishment, acceptance of responsibility for the investigation, a sense of their authentic contribution to the body of scientific knowledge in the world, and becoming scientists. This type of authentic field investigation is significant because recent reforms in earth-science education stress the importance of students learning about the nature and processes of scientific knowledge along with science content.

  4. Understanding uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Lindley, Dennis V

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition ""...a reference for everyone who is interested in knowing and handling uncertainty.""-Journal of Applied Statistics The critically acclaimed First Edition of Understanding Uncertainty provided a study of uncertainty addressed to scholars in all fields, showing that uncertainty could be measured by probability, and that probability obeyed three basic rules that enabled uncertainty to be handled sensibly in everyday life. These ideas were extended to embrace the scientific method and to show how decisions, containing an uncertain element, could be rationally made.

  5. Understanding delusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Kiran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Delusion has always been a central topic for psychiatric research with regard to etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and forensic relevance. The various theories and explanations for delusion formation are reviewed. The etiology, classification and management of delusions are briefly discussed. Recent advances in the field are reviewed.

  6. The interactive effects of prior knowledge and text structure on memory for cognitive psychology texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Judith; McGuinness, Carol

    2004-12-01

    Interest in the interactive effects of prior knowledge and text structure on learning from text is increasing but experimental manipulations of knowledge and structure variables often produce findings that do not help teachers to select expository texts for students. We aimed to extend the ecological validity of previous findings by asking students with a high or low level of discipline-relevant knowledge to read texts characteristic of those they would normally encounter. A compensation effect was hypothesized, where high prior knowledge would compensate for a lack of text structure and text structure would compensate for a lack of prior knowledge. One hundred and ninety-five undergraduate psychology students (144 Year 1 students and 51 Year 3 students) were allocated to a high knowledge (HiPK) or low knowledge (LoPK) group on the basis of their performance on a word association test. Participants were randomly assigned to one of five text structure groups (compare/contrast, sequence, classification, enumeration, generalization) and asked to study two cognitive psychology passages before recalling the main points of the text immediately afterwards and after a delay of 2 weeks. The five text structures were placed on an 'organizational continuum' according to the degree of structure/organization in the 10 passages. A compensation effect did not emerge. Recall was high when texts were well structured and readers had prior knowledge, but recall was poor when texts were less structured, regardless of the level of prior knowledge. Readers benefit most from texts that challenge pre-existing mental representations.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in water at high temperature: contribution to a phenomenological approach to the understanding of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Pascale

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking of an alloy 600 in water at high temperature. More precisely, it aimed at determining, by using quantitative data characterizing cracking phenomenology, which mechanism(s) is (are) able to explain crack initiation and crack growth. These data concern quantitative characterization of crack initiation, of crack growth and of the influence of two cracking parameters (strain rate, medium hydrogen content). They have been obtained by quantifying cracking through the application of a morphological model. More precisely, these data are: evolution of crack density during a tensile test at slow rate, value of initial crack width with respect to grain boundary length, and relationship between crack density and medium hydrogen content. It appears that hydrogen absorption seems to be involved in the crack initiation mechanism. Crack growth mechanisms and crack growth rates are also discussed [fr

  8. Database citation in full text biomedical articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay Kafkas

    Full Text Available Molecular biology and literature databases represent essential infrastructure for life science research. Effective integration of these data resources requires that there are structured cross-references at the level of individual articles and biological records. Here, we describe the current patterns of how database entries are cited in research articles, based on analysis of the full text Open Access articles available from Europe PMC. Focusing on citation of entries in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA, UniProt and Protein Data Bank, Europe (PDBe, we demonstrate that text mining doubles the number of structured annotations of database record citations supplied in journal articles by publishers. Many thousands of new literature-database relationships are found by text mining, since these relationships are also not present in the set of articles cited by database records. We recommend that structured annotation of database records in articles is extended to other databases, such as ArrayExpress and Pfam, entries from which are also cited widely in the literature. The very high precision and high-throughput of this text-mining pipeline makes this activity possible both accurately and at low cost, which will allow the development of new integrated data services.

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor ... Quick Meal Ideas Snacks Nutrient Content Claims Understanding Carbohydrates Types of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate Counting Make Your Carbs ...

  10. Learning from Scientific Texts: Personalizing the Text Increases Transfer Performance and Task Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutke, Stephan; Grefe, Anna Christina; Leopold, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    In an experiment with 65 high-school students, we tested the hypothesis that personalizing learning materials would increase students' learning performance and motivation to study the learning materials. Students studied either a 915-word standard text on the anatomy and functionality of the human eye or a personalized version of the same text in…

  11. PISA - A procedure for analyzing the structure of explanatory texts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, T.J.M.; van Wijk, C.

    1996-01-01

    Linguistic analyses of text corpora have contributed to the understanding of natural language processing in both reading and writing. However, the impact of text analysis in psycho-linguistic research has been limited, mainly because the analyses hardly ever concern text structure. Existing models

  12. An Examination of Text Complexity as Characterized by Readability and Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Deborah K.; Kershaw-Herrera, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To better understand dimensions of text complexity and their effect on the comprehension of adolescents, 103 high school seniors were randomly assigned to 4 groups. Each group read versions of the same 2 informational passages and answered comprehension test items targeting factual recall and inferences of causal content. Group A passages had a…

  13. Uniting the Spheres: Modern Feminist Theory and Classic Texts in AP English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Simao J. A.; Bosnic, Brenda G.

    2008-01-01

    High school teachers Simao J. A. Drew and Brenda G. Bosnic help familiarize students with gender role analysis and feminist theory. Students examine classic literature and contemporary texts, considering characters' historical, literary, and social contexts while expanding their understanding of how patterns of identity and gender norms exist and…

  14. Ergonomic recommendations when texting on mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report was to give ergonomic recommendations in order to prevent musculoskeletal symptoms/disorders among young people due to intensive texting on mobile phones. In a study of 56 Swedish young adults (19-25 years, 41 with musculoskeletal symptoms in neck and/or upper extremities and 15 without symptoms) registration of thumb movements with electrogoniometry, muscle activity with electromyography and observation of texting technique were conducted during texting on mobile phones. The results showed differences in physical load between the group with musculoskeletal symptoms and the group without symptoms. There were also found differences in muscle activity and kinematics between different texting techniques. These differences could not be explained by the asymptomatic group having symptoms but may be a possible contribution to their symptoms. According to these results it can be recommended to support the forearms, to use both thumbs, to avoid sitting with the head bent forward and to avoid texting with high velocity in order to prevent musculoskeletal disorders when using mobile phones for texting.

  15. Regional Geography Texts on Latin America: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynden S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides an evaluation of regional texts on Latin America by means of analyzing opinions of 45 Latin Americanist geographers. Findings are presented in three categories--highly rated texts, intermediately rated texts, and others. (DB)

  16. Text mining for the biocuration workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Lynette; Burns, Gully A. P. C; Krallinger, Martin; Arighi, Cecilia; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Valencia, Alfonso; Wu, Cathy H.; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Dowell, Karen G.; Huala, Eva; Lourenço, Anália; Nash, Robert; Veuthey, Anne-Lise; Wiegers, Thomas; Winter, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular biology has become heavily dependent on biological knowledge encoded in expert curated biological databases. As the volume of biological literature increases, biocurators need help in keeping up with the literature; (semi-) automated aids for biocuration would seem to be an ideal application for natural language processing and text mining. However, to date, there have been few documented successes for improving biocuration throughput using text mining. Our initial investigations took place for the workshop on ‘Text Mining for the BioCuration Workflow’ at the third International Biocuration Conference (Berlin, 2009). We interviewed biocurators to obtain workflows from eight biological databases. This initial study revealed high-level commonalities, including (i) selection of documents for curation; (ii) indexing of documents with biologically relevant entities (e.g. genes); and (iii) detailed curation of specific relations (e.g. interactions); however, the detailed workflows also showed many variabilities. Following the workshop, we conducted a survey of biocurators. The survey identified biocurator priorities, including the handling of full text indexed with biological entities and support for the identification and prioritization of documents for curation. It also indicated that two-thirds of the biocuration teams had experimented with text mining and almost half were using text mining at that time. Analysis of our interviews and survey provide a set of requirements for the integration of text mining into the biocuration workflow. These can guide the identification of common needs across curated databases and encourage joint experimentation involving biocurators, text mining developers and the larger biomedical research community. PMID:22513129

  17. Improving text comprehension: scaffolding adolescents into strategic reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukrainetz, Teresa A

    2015-02-01

    Understanding and learning from academic texts involves purposeful, strategic reading. Adolescent readers, particularly poor readers, benefit from explicit instruction in text comprehension strategies, such as text preview, summarization, and comprehension monitoring, as part of a comprehensive reading program. However, strategies are difficult to teach within subject area lessons where content instruction must take primacy. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have the expertise and service delivery options to support middle and high school students in learning to use comprehension strategies in their academic reading and learning. This article presents the research evidence on what strategies to teach and how best to teach them, including the use of explicit instruction, spoken interactions around text, cognitive modeling, peer learning, classroom connections, and disciplinary literacy. The article focuses on how to move comprehension strategies from being teaching tools of the SLP to becoming learning tools of the student. SLPs can provide the instruction and support needed for students to learn and apply of this important component of academic reading. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. The Power Behind the Controversy: Understanding Local Policy Elites' Perceptions on the Benefits and Risks Associated with High Voltage Power Line Installation in the State of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Rachael M.

    Following a proposal for the installation of high voltage power lines in northwest Arkansas, a controversial policy debate emerged. Proponents of the transmission line argue that such an installation is inevitable and necessary to efficiently and reliably support the identified electric load in the region. Opponents claim that the lines will degrade the natural environment and hamper the tourism-based local economy in affected regions, notably in Ozark Mountain areas. This study seeks to understand how local policy elites perceive the benefits and risks associated with proposed transmission lines, which is a critical step in comprehending the formation and changes of related government policies. First, based upon the dual process theory of judgment, this study systematically investigates the triadic relationships between (a) more profound personal value predispositions, (b) affects and feelings, and (c) perceived benefits and risks related to the proposed installation of high voltage power lines among local policy elites in the state of Arkansas. Next, this study focuses more specifically on the role of value predispositions, specific emotional dimensions of affect heuristics, and perceptions pertaining to high voltage power line risks and benefits. Using original data collected from a statewide Internet survey of 420 local leaders and key policymakers about their opinions on the related issues, other factors claimed by previous literature, including trust, knowledge level, and demographic characteristics are considered. Analytical results suggest that grid-group cultural predispositions, as deeply held core values within local policy elites' individual belief systems, both directly and indirectly -- through affective feelings -- shape perceived utility associated with the installation of high voltage power lines. Recognizing that risk perceptions factor into policy decisions, some practical considerations for better designing policy addressing controversial issues

  19. Risk Behaviors Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in Bangkok: A Qualitative Study to Understand and Contextualize High HIV Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemnasiri, Tareerat; Beane, Chelsey R; Varangrat, Anchalee; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Chitwarakorn, Anupong; Van Griensven, Frits; Holtz, Timothy H

    2018-01-08

    The Bangkok Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) Cohort Study has shown high HIV incidence (8-12/100 person-years) among 18-21-year-old MSM. These data led to a further study using qualitative methods among young (18-24 years old) MSM in order to understand the factors driving the HIV epidemic among YMSM. We conducted eight focus group discussions and 10 key informant interviews among YMSM in Bangkok, Thailand. Sociodemographic and behavioral data were collected using a questionnaire. We audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitative and questionnaire data using computer software. The categories relating to risk behavior were (1) the use of social networks for seeking sexual partners and the marketing promotions of MSM entertainment venues, (2) social influence by peers and older MSM, (3) easy access to high parties and group sex, (4) easy access to club drugs, (5) conceptions related to HIV risk, and (6) sexual preferences of YMSM. Increased HIV testing, same-sex education, and YMSM-specific HIV prevention efforts are urgently needed for YMSM in Bangkok.

  20. Database citation in full text biomedical articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafkas, Şenay; Kim, Jee-Hyub; McEntyre, Johanna R

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biology and literature databases represent essential infrastructure for life science research. Effective integration of these data resources requires that there are structured cross-references at the level of individual articles and biological records. Here, we describe the current patterns of how database entries are cited in research articles, based on analysis of the full text Open Access articles available from Europe PMC. Focusing on citation of entries in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), UniProt and Protein Data Bank, Europe (PDBe), we demonstrate that text mining doubles the number of structured annotations of database record citations supplied in journal articles by publishers. Many thousands of new literature-database relationships are found by text mining, since these relationships are also not present in the set of articles cited by database records. We recommend that structured annotation of database records in articles is extended to other databases, such as ArrayExpress and Pfam, entries from which are also cited widely in the literature. The very high precision and high-throughput of this text-mining pipeline makes this activity possible both accurately and at low cost, which will allow the development of new integrated data services.