WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding simulation solutions

  1. Artistic understanding as embodied simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Raymond W

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) correctly include historical perspectives into the scientific study of art appreciation. But artistic understanding always emerges from embodied simulation processes that incorporate the ongoing dynamics of brains, bodies, and world interactions. There may not be separate modes of artistic understanding, but a continuum of processes that provide imaginative simulations of the artworks we see or hear.

  2. Understanding molecular simulation from algorithms to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Daan

    2001-01-01

    Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the ""recipes"" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique for a given application. A wide variety of tools exist, so the choice of technique requires a good understanding of the basic principles. More importantly, such understanding may greatly improve the efficiency of a simulation program. The implementation of simulation methods is illustrated in pseudocodes and their practic

  3. Understanding molecular simulation: from algorithms to applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.; Smit, B.

    2002-01-01

    Second and revised edition Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the "recipes" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique

  4. Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties from Molecular Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Wedberg, R.; O’Connell, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties obtained in the Fluctuation Solution Theory are based on spatial integrals of molecular TCFs between component pairs in the mixture. Molecular simulation, via either MD or MC calculations, can yield these correlation functions for model inter- and intramolecular...

  5. Adaptive resolution simulation of salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevc, Staš; Praprotnik, Matej; Junghans, Christoph; Kremer, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of aqueous salt (NaCl) solutions at ambient conditions using the adaptive resolution scheme. Our multiscale approach concurrently couples the atomistic and coarse-grained models of the aqueous NaCl, where water molecules and ions change their resolution while moving from one resolution domain to the other. We employ standard extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and simple point charge (SPC) water models in combination with AMBER and GROMOS force fields for ion interactions in the atomistic domain. Electrostatics in our model are described by the generalized reaction field method. The effective interactions for water–water and water–ion interactions in the coarse-grained model are derived using structure-based coarse-graining approach while the Coulomb interactions between ions are appropriately screened. To ensure an even distribution of water molecules and ions across the simulation box we employ thermodynamic forces. We demonstrate that the equilibrium structural, e.g. radial distribution functions and density distributions of all the species, and dynamical properties are correctly reproduced by our adaptive resolution method. Our multiscale approach, which is general and can be used for any classical non-polarizable force-field and/or types of ions, will significantly speed up biomolecular simulation involving aqueous salt. (paper)

  6. Global solutions through simulation for better decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoto Di Suoccio, Ines; Testard, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Decommissioning is a new activity in sense that it only exists a limited experience. Moreover, each facility is different due to their own history and there is no rule about choosing a decommissioning strategy. There are three major decommissioning strategies. First, 'immediate dismantling', which means the action of decommissioning begins immediately after the transfer of waste and nuclear material. Second, 'deferred dismantling strategy', which means that the facility is maintained into a containment zone from thirty to one hundred years before being decommissioned. Finally, 'entombment', means the facility is placed into a reinforced containment until the radionuclides decay and reach a level allowing the site release. When a strategy is decided many factors have to be taken into account. Into a major project such as a reactor decommissioning, there are many smaller projects. The decommissioning strategy can be different among these smaller projects. For some reasons, some entry data are not perfectly known. For example, dosimetric activity has not been updated through time or after specific events. Indeed, because of uncertainties and/or hypothesis existing around projects and their high level of interdependency, global solutions are a good way to choose the best decommissioning strategy. Actually, each entry data has consequences on output results whether it is on costs, cumulated dose, waste or delays. These output data are interdependent and cannot be taken apart from each other. Whether the dose, delays or waste management, all have impact on costs. To obtain an optimal scenario into a special environment, it is necessary to deal with all these items together. This global solution can be implemented thanks to simulation in dedicated software which helps to define the global strategy, to optimize the scenario, and to prevent contingencies. As a complete scenario simulation can be done quickly and efficiently, many strategies can

  7. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique et Systèmes Complexes, ISMANS, 44 Av. Bartholdi, 72000 Le Mans (France); Balian, Roger [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M., E-mail: T.M.Nieuwenhuizen@uva.nl [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D{sup -hat} (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of

  8. Understanding the defect structure of solution grown zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, Laura-Lynn [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sankar, Gopinathan, E-mail: g.sankar@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Handoko, Albertus D. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Goh, Gregory K.L., E-mail: g-goh@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconducting oxide with many potential applications in various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and field effect transistors (FETs). Much effort has been made to understand the ZnO structure and its defects. However, one major issue in determining whether it is Zn or O deficiency that provides ZnO its unique properties remains. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an ideal, atom specific characterization technique that is able to probe defect structure in many materials, including ZnO. In this paper, comparative studies of bulk and aqueous solution grown ({<=}90 Degree-Sign C) ZnO powders using XAS and x-ray pair distribution function (XPDF) techniques are described. The XAS Zn-Zn correlation and XPDF results undoubtedly point out that the solution grown ZnO contains Zn deficiency, rather than the O deficiency that were commonly reported. This understanding of ZnO short range order and structure will be invaluable for further development of solid state lighting and other optoelectronic device applications. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO powders have been synthesized through an aqueous solution method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Defect structure studied using XAS and XPDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn-Zn correlations are less in the ZnO powders synthesized in solution than bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn vacancies are present in the powders synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EXAFS and XPDF, when used complementary, are useful characterization techniques.

  9. The science and art of simulation I exploring, understanding, knowing

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, Andreas; Gehring, Petra

    2017-01-01

    The new book series “The Science and Art of Simulation” (SAS) addresses computer simulations as a scientific activity and engineering artistry (in the sense of a technē). The first volume is devoted to three topics: 1. The Art of Exploring Computer Simulations Philosophy began devoting attention to computer simulations at a relatively early stage. Since then, the unquestioned point of view has been that computer simulation is a new scientific method; the philosophy of simulation is therefore part of the philosophy of science. The first section of this volume discusses this implicit, unchallenged assumption by addressing, from different perspectives, the question of how to explore (and how not to explore) research on computer simulations. Scientists discuss what is still lacking or considered problematic, while philosophers draft new directions for research, and both examine the art of exploring computer simulations. 2. The Art of Understanding Computer Simulations The results of computer simulations are ...

  10. Challenges and solutions for realistic room simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2002-05-01

    Virtual room acoustic simulation (auralization) techniques have traditionally focused on answering questions related to speech intelligibility or musical quality, typically in large volumetric spaces. More recently, auralization techniques have been found to be important for the externalization of headphone-reproduced virtual acoustic images. Although externalization can be accomplished using a minimal simulation, data indicate that realistic auralizations need to be responsive to head motion cues for accurate localization. Computational demands increase when providing for the simulation of coupled spaces, small rooms lacking meaningful reverberant decays, or reflective surfaces in outdoor environments. Auditory threshold data for both early reflections and late reverberant energy levels indicate that much of the information captured in acoustical measurements is inaudible, minimizing the intensive computational requirements of real-time auralization systems. Results are presented for early reflection thresholds as a function of azimuth angle, arrival time, and sound-source type, and reverberation thresholds as a function of reverberation time and level within 250-Hz-2-kHz octave bands. Good agreement is found between data obtained in virtual room simulations and those obtained in real rooms, allowing a strategy for minimizing computational requirements of real-time auralization systems.

  11. Understanding the ice nucleation characteristics of feldspars suspended in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Zobrist et al. (2008) Arizona test dust, silver iodide, nonadecanol and silicon dioxide suspensions in various solutes showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust particles at a microphysical scale. To improve our understanding how solute and mineral dust particle surface interaction, we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with microcline, sanidine, plagioclase, kaolinite and quartz particles suspended in pure water and solutions containing ammonia, ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium nitrate, potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid. Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (2 - 5 wt%) are prepared in water with varying solute concentrations (0 - 15 wt%). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich

  12. Enhancing Dental Students' Understanding of Poverty Through Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampiris, Lewis N; White, Alex; Sams, Lattice D; White, Tiffany; Weintraub, Jane A

    2017-09-01

    Dental students should develop an understanding of the barriers to and frustrations with accessing dental care and maintaining optimal oral health experienced by persons with limited resources rather than blaming the patient or caregiver. Developing this understanding may be aided by helping students learn about the lives of underserved and vulnerable patients they will encounter not only in extramural rotations, but throughout their careers. The aim of this study was to determine if dental students' understanding of daily challenges faced by families with low income changed as a result of a poverty simulation. In 2015 and 2016, an experiential poverty simulation was used to prepare third-year dental students at one U.S. dental school for their upcoming required community-based rotations. In 2015, United Way staff conducted the simulation using the Missouri Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS); in 2016, faculty members trained in CAPS conducted the simulation using a modified version of the tool. In the simulation, students were assigned to family units experiencing various types of hardship and were given specific identities for role-playing. A retrospective pretest and a posttest were used to assess change in levels of student understanding after the simulation. Students assessed their level of understanding in five domains: financial pressures, difficult choices, difficulties in improving one's situation, emotional stressors, and impact of community resources for those living in poverty. The survey response rates in 2015 and 2016 were 86% and 74%, respectively. For each of the five domains, students' understanding increased from 58% to 74% per domain. The majority reported that the exercise was very valuable or somewhat valuable (74% in 2015, 88% in 2016). This study found that a poverty simulation was effective in raising dental students' understanding of the challenges faced by low-income families. It also discovered that framing the issues in the

  13. Development of solute transport models in YMPYRÄ framework to simulate solute migration in military shooting and training areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsta, L.; Karvonen, T.

    2017-12-01

    There are currently 25 shooting and training areas in Finland managed by The Finnish Defence Forces (FDF), where military activities can cause contamination of open waters and groundwater reservoirs. In the YMPYRÄ project, a computer software framework is being developed that combines existing open environmental data and proprietary information collected by FDF with computational models to investigate current and prevent future environmental problems. A data centric philosophy is followed in the development of the system, i.e. the models are updated and extended to handle available data from different areas. The results generated by the models are summarized as easily understandable flow and risk maps that can be opened in GIS programs and used in environmental assessments by experts. Substances investigated with the system include explosives and metals such as lead, and both surface and groundwater dominated areas can be simulated. The YMPYRÄ framework is composed of a three dimensional soil and groundwater flow model, several solute transport models and an uncertainty assessment system. Solute transport models in the framework include particle based, stream tube and finite volume based approaches. The models can be used to simulate solute dissolution from source area, transport in the unsaturated layers to groundwater and finally migration in groundwater to water extraction wells and springs. The models can be used to simulate advection, dispersion, equilibrium adsorption on soil particles, solubility and dissolution from solute phase and dendritic solute decay chains. Correct numerical solutions were confirmed by comparing results to analytical 1D and 2D solutions and by comparing the numerical solutions to each other. The particle based and stream tube type solute transport models were useful as they could complement the traditional finite volume based approach which in certain circumstances produced numerical dispersion due to piecewise solution of the

  14. Polymer solution phase separation: Microgravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Lawrence C.; Sutter, James K.

    1989-01-01

    In many multicomponent systems, a transition from a single phase of uniform composition to a multiphase state with separated regions of different composition can be induced by changes in temperature and shear. The density difference between the phase and thermal and/or shear gradients within the system results in buoyancy driven convection. These differences affect kinetics of the phase separation if the system has a sufficiently low viscosity. This investigation presents more preliminary developments of a theoretical model in order to describe effects of the buoyancy driven convection in phase separation kinetics. Polymer solutions were employed as model systems because of the ease with which density differences can be systematically varied and because of the importance of phase separation in the processing and properties of polymeric materials. The results indicate that the kinetics of the phase separation can be performed viscometrically using laser light scattering as a principle means of following the process quantitatively. Isopycnic polymer solutions were used to determine the viscosity and density difference limits for polymer phase separation.

  15. Combining metadynamics simulation and experiments to characterize dendrimers in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavan, G.M.; Barducci, A.; Albertazzi, L.; Parrinello, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a combined theoretical-experimental approach to characterize dendrimers and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-dendrimer hybrids in solution. Well-tempered metadynamics simulation allows for an exhaustive sampling of the conformational fluctuations in solution. In contrast to classical molecular

  16. Salt Effect on Osmotic Pressure of Polyelectrolyte Solutions: Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Michael Y. Carrillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present results of the hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics simulations of the osmotic pressure of salt solutions of polyelectrolytes. In our simulations, we used a coarse-grained representation of polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions. During simulation runs, we alternate Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation steps. Monte Carlo steps were used to perform small ion exchange between simulation box containing salt ions (salt reservoir and simulation box with polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions (polyelectrolyte solution. This allowed us to model Donnan equilibrium and partitioning of salt and counterions across membrane impermeable to polyelectrolyte chains. Our simulations have shown that the main contribution to the system osmotic pressure is due to salt ions and osmotically active counterions. The fraction of the condensed (osmotically inactive counterions first increases with decreases in the solution ionic strength then it saturates. The reduced value of the system osmotic coefficient is a universal function of the ratio of the concentration of osmotically active counterions and salt concentration in salt reservoir. Simulation results are in a very good agreement with osmotic pressure measurements in sodium polystyrene sulfonate, DNA, polyacrylic acid, sodium polyanetholesulfonic acid, polyvinylbenzoic acid, and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride solutions.

  17. Intuitive Understanding of Solutions of Partially Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses diagrams that help the observer see how solutions of the wave equation and heat conduction equation are obtained. The analytical approach cannot necessarily show the mechanisms of the key to the solution without transforming the differential equation into a more convenient form by separation of variables. The visual clues based…

  18. Hydrogen/deuterium substitution methods: understanding water structure in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogen/deuterium substitution method has been used for different applications, such as the short range order between water molecules in a number of different environments (aqueous solutions of organic molecules), or to study the partial structure factors of water at high pressure and temperature. The absolute accuracy that can be obtained remains uncertain, but important qualitative information can be obtained on the local organization of water in aqueous solution. Some recent results with pure water, methanol and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) solutions are presented. It is shown that the short range water structure is not greatly affected by most solutes except at high concentrations and when the solute species has its own distinctive interaction with water (such as a dissolved small ion). 3 figs., 14 refs

  19. Pitfall in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulation of small solutes in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Liu, Haiyan

    2013-05-30

    Developments in computing hardware and algorithms have made direct molecular dynamics simulation with the combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods affordable for small solute molecules in solution, in which much improved accuracy can be obtained via the quantum mechanical treatment of the solute molecule and even sometimes water molecules in the first solvation shell. However, unlike the conventional molecular mechanical simulations of large molecules, e.g., proteins, in solutions, special care must be taken in the technical details of the simulation, including the thermostat of the solute/solvent system, so that the conformational space of the solute molecules can be properly sampled. We show here that the common setup for classical molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations, such as the Berendsen or single Nose-Hoover thermostat, and/or rigid water models could lead to pathological sampling of the solutes' conformation. In the extreme example of a methanol molecule in aqueous solution, improper and sluggish setups could generate two peaks in the distribution of the O-H bond length. We discuss the factors responsible for this somewhat unexpected result and evoke a simple and ancient technical fix-up to resolve this problem.

  20. Understanding Islamist political violence through computational social simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Jennifer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mackerrow, Edward P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patelli, Paolo G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eberhardt, Ariane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stradling, Seth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the process that enables political violence is of great value in reducing the future demand for and support of violent opposition groups. Methods are needed that allow alternative scenarios and counterfactuals to be scientifically researched. Computational social simulation shows promise in developing 'computer experiments' that would be unfeasible or unethical in the real world. Additionally, the process of modeling and simulation reveals and challenges assumptions that may not be noted in theories, exposes areas where data is not available, and provides a rigorous, repeatable, and transparent framework for analyzing the complex dynamics of political violence. This paper demonstrates the computational modeling process using two simulation techniques: system dynamics and agent-based modeling. The benefits and drawbacks of both techniques are discussed. In developing these social simulations, we discovered that the social science concepts and theories needed to accurately simulate the associated psychological and social phenomena were lacking.

  1. Understanding casing flow in Pelton turbines by numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, M.; Neuhauser, M.; Marongiu, J. C.; Parkinson, E.

    2016-11-01

    For rehabilitation projects of Pelton turbines, the flow in the casing may have an important influence on the overall performance of the machine. Water sheets returning on the jets or on the runner significantly reduce efficiency, and run-away speed depends on the flow in the casing. CFD simulations can provide a detailed insight into this type of flow, but these simulations are computationally intensive. As in general the volume of water in a Pelton turbine is small compared to the complete volume of the turbine housing, a single phase simulation greatly reduces the complexity of the simulation. In the present work a numerical tool based on the SPH-ALE meshless method is used to simulate the casing flow in a Pelton turbine. Using improved order schemes reduces the numerical viscosity. This is necessary to resolve the flow in the jet and on the casing wall, where the velocity differs by two orders of magnitude. The results are compared to flow visualizations and measurement in a hydraulic laboratory. Several rehabilitation projects proved the added value of understanding the flow in the Pelton casing. The flow simulation helps designing casing insert, not only to see their influence on the flow, but also to calculate the stress in the inserts. In some projects, the casing simulation leads to the understanding of unexpected behavior of the flow. One such example is presented where the backsplash of a deflector hit the runner, creating a reversed rotation of the runner.

  2. Understanding Emergency Care Delivery Through Computer Simulation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Lauren F; Torabi, Elham; France, Daniel J; Froehle, Craig M; Goldlust, Eric J; Hoot, Nathan R; Kasaie, Parastu; Lyons, Michael S; Barg-Walkow, Laura H; Ward, Michael J; Wears, Robert L

    2018-02-01

    In 2017, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference entitled, "Catalyzing System Change through Health Care Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes." This article, a product of the breakout session on "understanding complex interactions through systems modeling," explores the role that computer simulation modeling can and should play in research and development of emergency care delivery systems. This article discusses areas central to the use of computer simulation modeling in emergency care research. The four central approaches to computer simulation modeling are described (Monte Carlo simulation, system dynamics modeling, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based simulation), along with problems amenable to their use and relevant examples to emergency care. Also discussed is an introduction to available software modeling platforms and how to explore their use for research, along with a research agenda for computer simulation modeling. Through this article, our goal is to enhance adoption of computer simulation, a set of methods that hold great promise in addressing emergency care organization and design challenges. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  4. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies

  5. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  6. Solution of partial differential equations by agent-based simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Miklos N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this short note is to demonstrate that partial differential equations can be quickly solved by agent-based simulation with high accuracy. There is no need for the solution of large systems of algebraic equations. This method is especially useful for quick determination of potential distributions and demonstration purposes in teaching electromagnetism. (letters and comments)

  7. Issues and Solutions of International Understanding Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li

    2013-01-01

    School in China has actively implemented International Understanding Education to foster a cosmopolitan perspective. The educational principle is to respect people of various socio-cultural backgrounds through comparing China's culture with that of other countries. However, my survey revealed that such education in practice is limited to…

  8. Understanding Interfacial Alignment in Solution Coated Conjugated Polymer Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Ge; Zhao, Xikang; Newbloom, Gregory M.; Zhang, Fengjiao; Mohammadi, Erfan

    2017-01-01

    Domain alignment in conjugated polymer thin films can significantly enhance charge carrier mobility. However, the alignment mechanism during meniscus-guided solution coating remains unclear. Furthermore, interfacial alignment has been rarely studied despite its direct relevance and critical importance to charge transport. In this study, we uncover a significantly higher degree of alignment at the top interface of solution coated thin films, using a donor–acceptor conjugated polymer, poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-co-thiopheneco- thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-co-thiophene) (DPP2T-TT), as the model system. At the molecular level, we observe in-plane π–π stacking anisotropy of up to 4.8 near the top interface with the polymer backbone aligned parallel to the coating direction. The bulk of the film is only weakly aligned with the backbone oriented transverse to coating. At the mesoscale, we observe a well-defined fibril-like morphology at the top interface with the fibril long axis pointing toward the coating direction. Significantly smaller fibrils with poor orientational order are found on the bottom interface, weakly aligned orthogonal to the fibrils on the top interface. The high degree of alignment at the top interface leads to a charge transport anisotropy of up to 5.4 compared to an anisotropy close to 1 on the bottom interface. We attribute the formation of distinct interfacial morphology to the skin-layer formation associated with high Peclet number, which promotes crystallization on the top interface while suppressing it in the bulk. As a result, we further infer that the interfacial fibril alignment is driven by the extensional flow on the top interface arisen from increasing solvent evaporation rate closer to the meniscus front.

  9. Understanding Quantum Tunneling through Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Sergei V; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Jiang, Zhang; Boixo, Sergio; Neven, Hartmut; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-10-28

    The tunneling between the two ground states of an Ising ferromagnet is a typical example of many-body tunneling processes between two local minima, as they occur during quantum annealing. Performing quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations we find that the QMC tunneling rate displays the same scaling with system size, as the rate of incoherent tunneling. The scaling in both cases is O(Δ^{2}), where Δ is the tunneling splitting (or equivalently the minimum spectral gap). An important consequence is that QMC simulations can be used to predict the performance of a quantum annealer for tunneling through a barrier. Furthermore, by using open instead of periodic boundary conditions in imaginary time, equivalent to a projector QMC algorithm, we obtain a quadratic speedup for QMC simulations, and achieve linear scaling in Δ. We provide a physical understanding of these results and their range of applicability based on an instanton picture.

  10. Using computer simulations to facilitate conceptual understanding of electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Fen

    This study investigated the use of computer simulations to facilitate conceptual understanding in physics. The use of computer simulations in the present study was grounded in a conceptual framework drawn from findings related to the use of computer simulations in physics education. To achieve the goal of effective utilization of computers for physics education, I first reviewed studies pertaining to computer simulations in physics education categorized by three different learning frameworks and studies comparing the effects of different simulation environments. My intent was to identify the learning context and factors for successful use of computer simulations in past studies and to learn from the studies which did not obtain a significant result. Based on the analysis of reviewed literature, I proposed effective approaches to integrate computer simulations in physics education. These approaches are consistent with well established education principles such as those suggested by How People Learn (Bransford, Brown, Cocking, Donovan, & Pellegrino, 2000). The research based approaches to integrated computer simulations in physics education form a learning framework called Concept Learning with Computer Simulations (CLCS) in the current study. The second component of this study was to examine the CLCS learning framework empirically. The participants were recruited from a public high school in Beijing, China. All participating students were randomly assigned to two groups, the experimental (CLCS) group and the control (TRAD) group. Research based computer simulations developed by the physics education research group at University of Colorado at Boulder were used to tackle common conceptual difficulties in learning electromagnetic induction. While interacting with computer simulations, CLCS students were asked to answer reflective questions designed to stimulate qualitative reasoning and explanation. After receiving model reasoning online, students were asked to submit

  11. Understanding bulk behavior of particulate materials from particle scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoliang

    Particulate materials play an increasingly significant role in various industries, such as pharmaceutical manufacturing, food, mining, and civil engineering. The objective of this research is to better understand bulk behaviors of particulate materials from particle scale simulations. Packing properties of assembly of particles are investigated first, focusing on the effects of particle size, surface energy, and aspect ratio on the coordination number, porosity, and packing structures. The simulation results show that particle sizes, surface energy, and aspect ratio all influence the porosity of packing to various degrees. The heterogeneous force networks within particle assembly under external compressive loading are investigated as well. The results show that coarse-coarse contacts dominate the strong network and coarse-fine contacts dominate the total network. Next, DEM models are developed to simulate the particle dynamics inside a conical screen mill (comil) and magnetically assisted impaction mixer (MAIM), both are important particle processing devices. For comil, the mean residence time (MRT), spatial distribution of particles, along with the collision dynamics between particles as well as particle and vessel geometries are examined as a function of the various operating parameters such as impeller speed, screen hole size, open area, and feed rate. The simulation results can help better understand dry coating experimental results using comil. For MAIM system, the magnetic force is incorporated into the contact model, allowing to describe the interactions between magnets. The simulation results reveal the connections between homogeneity of mixture and particle scale variables such as size of magnets and surface energy of non-magnets. In particular, at the fixed mass ratio of magnets to non-magnets and surface energy the smaller magnets lead to better homogeneity of mixing, which is in good agreement with previously published experimental results. Last but not

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Caffeine Aggregation in Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Schnupf, Udo; Mason, Philip E.; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a system of eight independent caffeine molecules in a periodic box of water at 300 K, representing a solution near the solubility limit for caffeine at room temperature, using a newly-developed CHARMM-type force field for caffeine in water. Simulations were also conducted for single caffeine molecules in water using two different water models (TIP3P and TIP4P). Water was found to structure in a complex fashion around the planar caffeine molec...

  13. Experimental Simulations to Understand the Lunar and Martian Surficial Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. Y. S.; Li, X.; Tang, H.; Li, Y.; Zeng, X.; Chang, R.; Li, S.; Zhang, S.; Jin, H.; Mo, B.; Li, R.; Yu, W.; Wang, S.

    2016-12-01

    In support with China's Lunar and Mars exploration programs and beyond, our center is dedicated to understand the surficial processes and environments of planetary bodies. Over the latest several years, we design, build and optimize experimental simulation facilities and utilize them to test hypotheses and evaluate affecting mechanisms under controlled conditions particularly relevant to the Moon and Mars. Among the fundamental questions to address, we emphasize on five major areas: (1) Micrometeorites bombardment simulation to evaluate the formation mechanisms of np-Fe0 which was found in lunar samples and the possible sources of Fe. (2) Solar wind implantation simulation to evaluate the alteration/amorphization/OH or H2O formation on the surface of target minerals or rocks. (3) Dusts mobility characteristics on the Moon and other planetary bodies by excitation different types of dust particles and measuring their movements. (4) Mars basaltic soil simulant development (e.g., Jining Martian Soil Simulant (JMSS-1)) and applications for scientific/engineering experiments. (5) Halogens (Cl and Br) and life essential elements (C, H, O, N, P, and S) distribution and speciation on Mars during surficial processes such as sedimentary- and photochemical- related processes. Depending on the variables of interest, the simulation systems provide flexibility to vary source of energy, temperature, pressure, and ambient gas composition in the reaction chambers. Also, simulation products can be observed or analyzed in-situ by various analyzer components inside the chamber, without interrupting the experimental conditions. In addition, behavior of elements and isotopes during certain surficial processes (e.g., evaporation, dissolution, etc.) can be theoretically predicted by our theoretical geochemistry group with thermodynamics-kinetics calculation and modeling, which supports experiment design and result interpretation.

  14. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-06

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete.

  15. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete. PMID:25492932

  16. Understanding dynamics using sensitivity analysis: caveat and solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Parametric sensitivity analysis (PSA) has become one of the most commonly used tools in computational systems biology, in which the sensitivity coefficients are used to study the parametric dependence of biological models. As many of these models describe dynamical behaviour of biological systems, the PSA has subsequently been used to elucidate important cellular processes that regulate this dynamics. However, in this paper, we show that the PSA coefficients are not suitable in inferring the mechanisms by which dynamical behaviour arises and in fact it can even lead to incorrect conclusions. Results A careful interpretation of parametric perturbations used in the PSA is presented here to explain the issue of using this analysis in inferring dynamics. In short, the PSA coefficients quantify the integrated change in the system behaviour due to persistent parametric perturbations, and thus the dynamical information of when a parameter perturbation matters is lost. To get around this issue, we present a new sensitivity analysis based on impulse perturbations on system parameters, which is named impulse parametric sensitivity analysis (iPSA). The inability of PSA and the efficacy of iPSA in revealing mechanistic information of a dynamical system are illustrated using two examples involving switch activation. Conclusions The interpretation of the PSA coefficients of dynamical systems should take into account the persistent nature of parametric perturbations involved in the derivation of this analysis. The application of PSA to identify the controlling mechanism of dynamical behaviour can be misleading. By using impulse perturbations, introduced at different times, the iPSA provides the necessary information to understand how dynamics is achieved, i.e. which parameters are essential and when they become important. PMID:21406095

  17. Understanding quantum tunneling using diffusion Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inack, E. M.; Giudici, G.; Parolini, T.; Santoro, G.; Pilati, S.

    2018-03-01

    In simple ferromagnetic quantum Ising models characterized by an effective double-well energy landscape the characteristic tunneling time of path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations has been shown to scale as the incoherent quantum-tunneling time, i.e., as 1 /Δ2 , where Δ is the tunneling gap. Since incoherent quantum tunneling is employed by quantum annealers (QAs) to solve optimization problems, this result suggests that there is no quantum advantage in using QAs with respect to quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. A counterexample is the recently introduced shamrock model (Andriyash and Amin, arXiv:1703.09277), where topological obstructions cause an exponential slowdown of the PIMC tunneling dynamics with respect to incoherent quantum tunneling, leaving open the possibility for potential quantum speedup, even for stoquastic models. In this work we investigate the tunneling time of projective QMC simulations based on the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm without guiding functions, showing that it scales as 1 /Δ , i.e., even more favorably than the incoherent quantum-tunneling time, both in a simple ferromagnetic system and in the more challenging shamrock model. However, a careful comparison between the DMC ground-state energies and the exact solution available for the transverse-field Ising chain indicates an exponential scaling of the computational cost required to keep a fixed relative error as the system size increases.

  18. The Crucible simulation: Behavioral simulation improves clinical leadership skills and understanding of complex health policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Daniel; Vlaev, Ivo; McMahon, Laurie; Harvey, Sarah; Mitchell, Andy; Borovoi, Leah; Darzi, Ara

    2017-05-11

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 represents the most complex National Health Service reforms in history. High-quality clinical leadership is important for successful implementation of health service reform. However, little is known about the effectiveness of current leadership training. This study describes the use of a behavioral simulation to improve the knowledge and leadership of a cohort of medical doctors expected to take leadership roles in the National Health Service. A day-long behavioral simulation (The Crucible) was developed and run based on a fictitious but realistic health economy. Participants completed pre- and postsimulation questionnaires generating qualitative and quantitative data. Leadership skills, knowledge, and behavior change processes described by the "theory of planned behavior" were self-assessed pre- and postsimulation. Sixty-nine medical doctors attended. Participants deemed the simulation immersive and relevant. Significant improvements were shown in perceived knowledge, capability, attitudes, subjective norms, intentions, and leadership competency following the program. Nearly one third of participants reported that they had implemented knowledge and skills from the simulation into practice within 4 weeks. This study systematically demonstrates the effectiveness of behavioral simulation for clinical management training and understanding of health policy reform. Potential future uses and strategies for analysis are discussed. High-quality care requires understanding of health systems and strong leadership. Policymakers should consider the use of behavioral simulation to improve understanding of health service reform and development of leadership skills in clinicians, who readily adopt skills from simulation into everyday practice.

  19. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors

  20. Density of simulated americium/curium melter feed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1997-01-01

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to Oak Ridge National Laboratory and use in heavy isotope production programs. Prior to vitrification, a series of in-tank oxalate precipitation and nitric/oxalic acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Following nitric acid dissolution and oxalate destruction, the solution will be denitrated and evaporated to a dissolved solids concentration of approximately 100 g/l (on an oxide basis). During the Am/Cm vitrification, an airlift will be used to supply the concentrated feed solution to a constant head tank which drains through a filter and an in-line orifice to the melter. Since the delivery system is sensitive to the physical properties of the feed, a simulated solution was prepared and used to measure the density as a function of temperature between 20 to 70 degrees C. The measured density decreased linearly at a rate of 0.0007 g/cm3/degree C from an average value of 1.2326 g/cm 3 at 20 degrees C to an average value of 1.1973g/cm 3 at 70 degrees C

  1. Density of simulated americium/curium melter feed solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1997-09-22

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to Oak Ridge National Laboratory and use in heavy isotope production programs. Prior to vitrification, a series of in-tank oxalate precipitation and nitric/oxalic acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Following nitric acid dissolution and oxalate destruction, the solution will be denitrated and evaporated to a dissolved solids concentration of approximately 100 g/l (on an oxide basis). During the Am/Cm vitrification, an airlift will be used to supply the concentrated feed solution to a constant head tank which drains through a filter and an in-line orifice to the melter. Since the delivery system is sensitive to the physical properties of the feed, a simulated solution was prepared and used to measure the density as a function of temperature between 20 to 70{degrees} C. The measured density decreased linearly at a rate of 0.0007 g/cm3/{degree} C from an average value of 1.2326 g/cm{sup 3} at 20{degrees} C to an average value of 1.1973g/cm{sup 3} at 70{degrees} C.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of caffeine aggregation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Schnupf, Udo; Mason, Philip E; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W

    2011-09-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a system of eight independent caffeine molecules in a periodic box of water at 300 K, representing a solution near the solubility limit for caffeine at room temperature, using a newly developed CHARMM-type force field for caffeine in water. Simulations were also conducted for single caffeine molecules in water using two different water models (TIP3P and TIP4P). Water was found to structure in a complex fashion around the planar caffeine molecules, which was not sensitive to the water model used. As expected, extensive aggregation of the caffeine molecules was observed, with the molecules stacking their flat faces against one another like coins, with their methylene groups staggered to avoid steric clashes. A dynamic equilibrum was observed between large n-mers, including stacks with all eight solute molecules, and smaller clusters, with the calculated osmotic coefficient being in acceptable agreement with the experimental value. The insensitivity of the results to water model and the congruence with experimental thermodynamic data suggest that the observed stacking interactions are a realistic representation of the actual association mechanism in aqueous caffeine solutions.

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in simulated Purex Process solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.daC. de; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is presented, utilizing the Griess reagent for the formation of the coloured azocompound with an absorption maximum at 525 nm. Molar absortivity was 36,262 and the sensitivity of the method 10/sup -6/M for nitrite. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 2 to 30..mu..g NO/sup -//sub 2//25 ml in cells of 1 cm optical path. The method can be used in the presence of uranium up to limits of an U/NO/sup -//sub 2/ ratio of 150. Test solutions were prepared to simulate composition and concentrations as obtained by irradiating standard fuel with a neutro flux of 3.2 x 10/sup 13/ n.s/sup -1/.cm/sup -2/, with a burn-up value of 33,000 Mwd/T and cooling time of two years. Nitrite determinations in these solutions were accurate within limits of 5%.

  5. Simulation and understanding of atomic and molecular quantum crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-07-01

    Quantum crystals abound in the whole range of solid-state species. Below a certain threshold temperature the physical behavior of rare gases (He 4 and Ne), molecular solids (H2 and CH4 ), and some ionic (LiH), covalent (graphite), and metallic (Li) crystals can be explained only in terms of quantum nuclear effects (QNE). A detailed comprehension of the nature of quantum solids is critical for achieving progress in a number of fundamental and applied scientific fields such as planetary sciences, hydrogen storage, nuclear energy, quantum computing, and nanoelectronics. This review describes the current physical understanding of quantum crystals formed by atoms and small molecules, as well as the wide palette of simulation techniques that are used to investigate them. Relevant aspects in these materials such as phase transformations, structural properties, elasticity, crystalline defects, and the effects of reduced dimensionality are discussed thoroughly. An introduction to quantum Monte Carlo techniques, which in the present context are the simulation methods of choice, and other quantum simulation approaches (e.g., path-integral molecular dynamics and quantum thermal baths) is provided. The overarching objective of this article is twofold: first, to clarify in which crystals and physical situations the disregard of QNE may incur in important bias and erroneous interpretations. And second, to promote the study and appreciation of QNE, a topic that traditionally has been treated in the context of condensed matter physics, within the broad and interdisciplinary areas of materials science.

  6. Rippled shock front solutions for testing hydrodynamic stability simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The response of a shock front to arbitrary small perturbations can be calculated analytically. Such rippled shock front solutions are useful for determining the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulation codes such as LASNEX [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 51 (1977)], which are used to compute perturbation growth in inertial fusion targets. The LASNEX fractional errors are of order κ 2 L 2 , where κ is the transverse wavenumber of the perturbation, and L is the largest zone dimension. Numerical errors are about 25% for a calculation using 26 zones per transverse wavelength

  7. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes

  8. A Cross-Age Study on the Understanding of Chemical Solutions and Their Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were considered under three headings. The first was to elicit misconceptions that students had about the terms "solute", "solvent" and "solution." The second was to understand how students' prior learning affected their misconceptions. The third was to determine if students were able to make a…

  9. Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashmi, K.; Naga Sowjanya, T.; Maruthi Mohan, P.; Balaji, V.; Venkateswaran, G

    2004-07-26

    Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 {mu}M) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 {mu}M) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co]{sub initial} ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287 000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup.

  10. Bioremediation of 60Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashmi, K.; Naga Sowjanya, T.; Maruthi Mohan, P.; Balaji, V.; Venkateswaran, G.

    2004-01-01

    Bioremediation of 60 Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 μM) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 μM) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co] initial ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287 000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup

  11. The corrosion resistance of Nitinol alloy in simulated physiological solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milošev, Ingrid; Kapun, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Nitinol alloy containing nearly equi-atomic composition of nickel and titanium and its constituent metals (nickel and titanium) was investigated in simulated Hanks physiological solution (pH value 7.5) and pH modified simulated Hanks physiological solution (pH values 4.5 and 6.5) and by electrochemical method of anodic potentiodynamic polarization at 37 °C. In this chloride-rich medium the corrosion stability of Nitinol is limited by the susceptibility to localized corrosion and is in that sense more similar to nickel than to titanium. The corrosion stability of Nitinol is strongly dependent on the surface preparation—grinding, polishing or chemical etching. Whereas a ground surface is not resistant to localized corrosion, polished and chemically etched surfaces are resistant to this type of corrosion attack. The reasons for this behaviour were investigated through metallurgical, topographical and chemical properties of the surface as a function of surface preparation. For that purpose, scanning electron microscopy combined with chemical analysis, confocal microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used. The surface roughness decreased in the following order: chemically etched > ground > polished surface. Besides differences in topography, distinct differences in the chemical composition of the outermost surface are observed. Ground, rough surfaces comprised mainly titanium oxides and small amounts of nickel metal. Chemically etched and, especially, polished surfaces are composed of a mixture of titanium, nickel and titanium oxides, as studied by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results emphasize the importance of detailed investigation of the metal surface since small differences in surface preparation may induce large differences in corrosion stability of material when exposed to corrosive environments. - Highlights: ► The corrosion resistance of Nitinol is dependent on the surface preparation.

  12. Understanding Yield Anomalies in ICF Implosions via Fully Kinetic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitano, William

    2017-10-01

    In the quest towards ICF ignition, plasma kinetic effects are among prime candidates for explaining some significant discrepancies between experimental observations and rad-hydro simulations. To assess their importance, high-fidelity fully kinetic simulations of ICF capsule implosions are needed. Owing to the extremely multi-scale nature of the problem, kinetic codes have to overcome nontrivial numerical and algorithmic challenges, and very few options are currently available. Here, we present resolutions of some long-standing yield discrepancy conundrums using a novel, LANL-developed, 1D-2V Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code iFP. iFP possesses an unprecedented fidelity and features fully implicit time-stepping, exact mass, momentum, and energy conservation, and optimal grid adaptation in phase space, all of which are critically important for ensuring long-time numerical accuracy of the implosion simulations. Specifically, we concentrate on several anomalous yield degradation instances observed in Omega campaigns, with the so-called ``Rygg effect'', or an anomalous yield scaling with the fuel composition, being a prime example. Understanding the physical mechanisms responsible for such degradations in non-ignition-grade Omega experiments is of great interest, as such experiments are often used for platform and diagnostic development, which are then used in ignition-grade experiments on NIF. In the case of Rygg's experiments, effects of a kinetic stratification of fuel ions on the yield have been previously proposed as the anomaly explanation, studied with a kinetic code FPION, and found unimportant. We have revisited this issue with iFP and obtained excellent yield-over-clean agreement with the original Rygg results, and several subsequent experiments. This validates iFP and confirms that the kinetic fuel stratification is indeed at the root of the observed yield degradation. This work was sponsored by the Metropolis Postdoctoral Fellowship, LDRD office, Thermonuclear Burn

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbret, A. [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, 101 Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.affouard@univ-lille1.fr; Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique et de Physico-Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5624, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-18

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  14. Understand ATLAS NSW Thin Gap Chamber from Garfield Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J; Diehl, E; Feng, H; Guan, L; Mikenberg, G; Smakhtin, V; Yu, J M; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zhao, Z

    2014-01-01

    The LHC will be upgraded in several phases with the goal of obtaining an instantaneous lumi- nosity of 5-7 x 10^34 cm-2s-s at the center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In order to profit from the high luminosity and high energy runs of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration plans to upgrade the present endcap small wheel muon spectrometer to im- prove the muon triggering as well as precision tracking. The proposed New Small Wheel (nSW) will be composed of two four-layer Micromegas detectors (MM) detector sandwiched between two four-layer small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) quadruplets, where MM for precision tracking and sTGC for Level-1 triggering. In this paper, we focus on the Garfield [ 1 ] simulation of the sTGC detector to understand its timing performance and charge production. We also stud- ied the sTGC timing under different magnetic fields and high voltages. These studies provide important guide lines for the sTGC detector and electronics development.

  15. Spray drying test of simulated borated waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongxiang; Zhou Lianquan; Fan Zhiwen; Sun Qi; Lin Xiaolong

    2007-01-01

    Performance and the effecting factors of spray drying of simulated borated waste solutions is studied for three contaeting methods between the atomized beads and the heated air, in which boron concentration is around 21000 ppm. The contacting modes are centrifugal atomizing co-current flow, pneumatic atomizing co-current flow and mixed flow. The results show that a free-flowing product in all these tests when the temperature of the solutions is between 62 degree C and 64 degree C, the inlet temperature of the spray drying chamber is between 210 degree C and 220 degree C, the temperature of the outlet of the spray drying chamber is between 110 and 120 degree C, the flow rate of the pressure air is 8.0 m 3 /h, the rotational speed of the centrifugal atomizer is 73.0 m/s. The diameters of the powder product which account for 95% of the feed range from 0.356 mm to 0.061 mm. The production capacity and water content in the powder increase in the order of pneumatic atomizing co-current flow, mixed flow and centrifugal atomizing co-current flow. The volume reduction coeffecient of spray drying is in the ranged of 0.22 and 0.27. (authors)

  16. Corrosion of construction steel in pore simulated solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes, Matias; Vasquez, Marcela

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion of steel for reinforcing reinforced cement structures is a common problem particularly in structures that are exposed to a marine environment. Loosened masonry originating by the diametrical stress that iron oxides place on the cement is not unusual. These situations involve risk to people and goods and make it necessary to repair the structure to prolong its useful service life. Some preliminary results are presented from the reproduction of the corrosive process with the use of a solution that simulates the chemical surroundings in the concrete pores. These results will help to evaluate the incidence of contaminants (CO 2 , chloride ions), inhibitors and coatings, among others, in the following stages by conveniently adjusting the solution's composition. The composition of the chosen solution is: 0.01 mol NaOH - 0.002 mol/l Ca(OH) 2 . The effect was evaluated of a passive film generated on the surface of the steel of the reinforcements at 100 mV for 14 minutes and for 12 hours. This potential corresponds to the passive region, as determined by recording tests with cyclic volt amperometry and in accordance with the Pourbaix diagram for steel. The corrosion current was defined by recording the resistance to polarization using different electrochemical methods: potential sweep, potentiostatic jump and sweep electrochemical impedance. The results show that neither of the two times selected are enough to generate the metal's passive state and that the potential of 100 mV used to generate the passive film may be too low to produce a compact and long lasting layer, considering that the passive zone interval comes to 700 mV, according to the volt amperometry readings (CW)

  17. Analysis of Discharged Gas from Incinerator using Simulated Organic Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungil; Kim, Hyunki; Heo, Jun; Kang, Dukwon; Kim, Yunbok; Kwon, Youngbock

    2014-01-01

    Korea has no experience of treatment of RI organic waste and appropriate measures for treatment of organic waste did not suggested. RI organic wastes which are occurring in KOREA are stored at the RI waste storage building of KORAD. But they can't no more receive the RI organic waste because the storage facility for RI organic waste was saturated with these organic wastes. In case of Japan, they recognized the dangerousness of long-term storage for RI organic wastes. In case of Korea, the released concentration of gaseous pollutant from the incinerator is regulated by attached table No.1 of the Notification No. 2012-60 of Nuclear Safety Commission and attached table No.8 of Clean Air Conservation Act. And the dioxin from the incinerator is regulated by attached table No.3 of Persistent Organic Pollutants Control Act. This experiment was performed to examine whether the incinerator introduced from Japan is manufactured suitably for municipal law regulation and to confirm the compliance about the gaseous pollutant released from incinerator with the above-mentioned laws especially attached table No.1 of NSC using simulated organic waste solution. In this experiment, we examined whether the incinerator was manufactured suitably for municipal law regulation and confirmed the compliance about the gaseous pollutant released from incinerator with the above-mentioned laws using simulated organic waste solution. The design requirement of incinerator for RI organic waste in the municipal law regulation is proposed briefly but the requirements for more detail about the incinerator are proposed in regulation of Japan. The incinerator used in this experiment is satisfied with all clauses of the domestic as well as Japan. Multiple safety functions were installed in the incinerator such as air purge system to remove unburned inflammable gases in the furnace and earthquake detector. Also, perfect combustion of RI organic waste is achieved because the temperature in the furnace

  18. Analysis of Discharged Gas from Incinerator using Simulated Organic Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungil; Kim, Hyunki; Heo, Jun; Kang, Dukwon [HaJI Co., Ltd., Radiation Eng. Center, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yunbok; Kwon, Youngbock [KORAD, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Korea has no experience of treatment of RI organic waste and appropriate measures for treatment of organic waste did not suggested. RI organic wastes which are occurring in KOREA are stored at the RI waste storage building of KORAD. But they can't no more receive the RI organic waste because the storage facility for RI organic waste was saturated with these organic wastes. In case of Japan, they recognized the dangerousness of long-term storage for RI organic wastes. In case of Korea, the released concentration of gaseous pollutant from the incinerator is regulated by attached table No.1 of the Notification No. 2012-60 of Nuclear Safety Commission and attached table No.8 of Clean Air Conservation Act. And the dioxin from the incinerator is regulated by attached table No.3 of Persistent Organic Pollutants Control Act. This experiment was performed to examine whether the incinerator introduced from Japan is manufactured suitably for municipal law regulation and to confirm the compliance about the gaseous pollutant released from incinerator with the above-mentioned laws especially attached table No.1 of NSC using simulated organic waste solution. In this experiment, we examined whether the incinerator was manufactured suitably for municipal law regulation and confirmed the compliance about the gaseous pollutant released from incinerator with the above-mentioned laws using simulated organic waste solution. The design requirement of incinerator for RI organic waste in the municipal law regulation is proposed briefly but the requirements for more detail about the incinerator are proposed in regulation of Japan. The incinerator used in this experiment is satisfied with all clauses of the domestic as well as Japan. Multiple safety functions were installed in the incinerator such as air purge system to remove unburned inflammable gases in the furnace and earthquake detector. Also, perfect combustion of RI organic waste is achieved because the temperature in the furnace

  19. Correction of MHS Viscosimetric Constants upon Numerical Simulation of Temperature Induced Degradation Kinetic of Chitosan Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Maria De Benedictis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mark–Houwink–Sakurada (MHS equation allows for estimation of rheological properties, if the molecular weight is known along with good understanding of the polymer conformation. The intrinsic viscosity of a polymer solution is related to the polymer molecular weight according to the MHS equation, where the value of the constants is related to the specific solvent and its concentration. However, MHS constants do not account for other characteristics of the polymeric solutions, i.e., Deacetilation Degree (DD when the solute is chitosan. In this paper, the degradation of chitosan in different acidic environments by thermal treatment is addressed. In particular, two different solutions are investigated (used as solvent acetic or hydrochloric acid with different concentrations used for the preparation of chitosan solutions. The samples were treated at different temperatures (4, 30, and 80 °C and time points (3, 6 and 24 h. Rheological, Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Thermal Gravimetric Analyses (TGA were performed in order to assess the degradation rate of the polymer backbones. Measured values of molecular weight have been integrated in the simulation of the batch degradation of chitosan solutions for evaluating MHS coefficients to be compared with their corresponding experimental values. Evaluating the relationship between the different parameters used in the preparation of chitosan solutions (e.g., temperature, time, acid type and concentration, and their contribution to the degradation of chitosan backbone, it is important to have a mathematical frame that could account for phenomena involved in polymer degradation that go beyond the solvent-solute combination. Therefore, the goal of the present work is to propose an integration of MHS coefficients for chitosan solutions that contemplate a deacetylation degree for chitosan systems or a more

  20. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, S.G.; Saulnier, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used ground-water solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occuring in the aquifer. Model simulations of ground-water pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of ground-water movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in ground-water quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the ground-water quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the ground-water quality. (USGS)

  2. Development of Multi-physics (Multiphase CFD + MCNP) simulation for generic solution vessel power calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Jun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-17

    The current study aims to predict the steady state power of a generic solution vessel and to develop a corresponding heat transfer coefficient correlation for a Moly99 production facility by conducting a fully coupled multi-physics simulation. A prediction of steady state power for the current application is inherently interconnected between thermal hydraulic characteristics (i.e. Multiphase computational fluid dynamics solved by ANSYS-Fluent 17.2) and the corresponding neutronic behavior (i.e. particle transport solved by MCNP6.2) in the solution vessel. Thus, the development of a coupling methodology is vital to understand the system behavior at a variety of system design and postulated operating scenarios. In this study, we report on the k-effective (keff) calculation for the baseline solution vessel configuration with a selected solution concentration using MCNP K-code modeling. The associated correlation of thermal properties (e.g. density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat) at the selected solution concentration are developed based on existing experimental measurements in the open literature. The numerical coupling methodology between multiphase CFD and MCNP is successfully demonstrated, and the detailed coupling procedure is documented. In addition, improved coupling methods capturing realistic physics in the solution vessel thermal-neutronic dynamics are proposed and tested further (i.e. dynamic height adjustment, mull-cell approach). As a key outcome of the current study, a multi-physics coupling methodology between MCFD and MCNP is demonstrated and tested for four different operating conditions. Those different operating conditions are determined based on the neutron source strength at a fixed geometry condition. The steady state powers for the generic solution vessel at various operating conditions are reported, and a generalized correlation of the heat transfer coefficient for the current application is discussed. The assessment of multi

  3. Visualizing and Understanding Probability and Statistics: Graphical Simulations Using Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.; Gordon, Florence S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a collection of dynamic interactive simulations for teaching and learning most of the important ideas and techniques of introductory statistics and probability. The modules cover such topics as randomness, simulations of probability experiments such as coin flipping, dice rolling and general binomial experiments, a simulation…

  4. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  5. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Day, Christy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  6. Difficulty understanding speech in noise by the hearing impaired: underlying causes and technological solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eric W; Yoho, Sarah E

    2016-08-01

    A primary complaint of hearing-impaired individuals involves poor speech understanding when background noise is present. Hearing aids and cochlear implants often allow good speech understanding in quiet backgrounds. But hearing-impaired individuals are highly noise intolerant, and existing devices are not very effective at combating background noise. As a result, speech understanding in noise is often quite poor. In accord with the significance of the problem, considerable effort has been expended toward understanding and remedying this issue. Fortunately, our understanding of the underlying issues is reasonably good. In sharp contrast, effective solutions have remained elusive. One solution that seems promising involves a single-microphone machine-learning algorithm to extract speech from background noise. Data from our group indicate that the algorithm is capable of producing vast increases in speech understanding by hearing-impaired individuals. This paper will first provide an overview of the speech-in-noise problem and outline why hearing-impaired individuals are so noise intolerant. An overview of our approach to solving this problem will follow.

  7. CO2 capture in amine solutions: modelling and simulations with non-empirical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Wanda; Pietrucci, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Absorption in aqueous amine solutions is the most advanced technology for the capture of CO2, although suffering from drawbacks that do not allow exploitation on large scale. The search for optimum solvents has been pursued with empirical methods and has also motivated a number of computational approaches over the last decade. However, a deeper level of understanding of the relevant chemical reactions in solution is required so as to contribute to this effort. We present here a brief critical overview of the most recent applications of computer simulations using ab initio methods. Comparison of their outcome shows a strong dependence on the structural models employed to represent the molecular systems in solution and on the strategy used to simulate the reactions. In particular, the results of very recent ab initio molecular dynamics augmented with metadynamics are summarized, showing the crucial role of water, which has been so far strongly underestimated both in the calculations and in the interpretation of experimental data. Indications are given for advances in computational approaches that are necessary if meant to contribute to the rational design of new solvents.

  8. CO2 capture in amine solutions: modelling and simulations with non-empirical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, Wanda; Pietrucci, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Absorption in aqueous amine solutions is the most advanced technology for the capture of CO 2 , although suffering from drawbacks that do not allow exploitation on large scale. The search for optimum solvents has been pursued with empirical methods and has also motivated a number of computational approaches over the last decade. However, a deeper level of understanding of the relevant chemical reactions in solution is required so as to contribute to this effort. We present here a brief critical overview of the most recent applications of computer simulations using ab initio methods. Comparison of their outcome shows a strong dependence on the structural models employed to represent the molecular systems in solution and on the strategy used to simulate the reactions. In particular, the results of very recent ab initio molecular dynamics augmented with metadynamics are summarized, showing the crucial role of water, which has been so far strongly underestimated both in the calculations and in the interpretation of experimental data. Indications are given for advances in computational approaches that are necessary if meant to contribute to the rational design of new solvents. (topical review)

  9. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel, E-mail: teodor.chelaru@upb.ro [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest - Research Center for Aeronautics and Space, Str. Ghe Polizu, nr. 1, Bucharest, Sector 1 (Romania); Cristian, Barbu, E-mail: barbucr@mta.ro [Military Technical Academy, Romania, B-dul. George Coşbuc, nr. 81-83, Bucharest, Sector 5 (Romania); Chelaru, Adrian, E-mail: achelaru@incas.ro [INCAS -National Institute for Aerospace Research Elie Carafoli, B-dul Iuliu Maniu 220, 061126, Bucharest, Sector 6 (Romania)

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital

  10. Solid solution hardening in face centered binary alloys: Gliding statistics of a dislocation in random solid solution by atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patinet, S.

    2009-12-01

    The glide of edge and screw dislocation in solid solution is modeled through atomistic simulations in two model alloys of Ni(Al) and Al(Mg) described within the embedded atom method. Our approach is based on the study of the elementary interaction between dislocations and solutes to derive solid solution hardening of face centered cubic binary alloys. We identify the physical origins of the intensity and range of the interaction between a dislocation and a solute atom. The thermally activated crossing of a solute atom by a dislocation is studied at the atomistic scale. We show that hardening of edge and screw segments are similar. We develop a line tension model that reproduces quantitatively the atomistic calculations of the flow stress. We identify the universality class to which the dislocation depinning transition in solid solution belongs. (author)

  11. Simulation and similarity using models to understand the world

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the 1950s, John Reber convinced many Californians that the best way to solve the state's water shortage problem was to dam up the San Francisco Bay. Against massive political pressure, Reber's opponents persuaded lawmakers that doing so would lead to disaster. They did this not by empirical measurement alone, but also through the construction of a model. Simulation and Similarity explains why this was a good strategy while simultaneously providing an account of modeling and idealization in modern scientific practice. Michael Weisberg focuses on concrete, mathematical, and computational models in his consideration of the nature of models, the practice of modeling, and nature of the relationship between models and real-world phenomena. In addition to a careful analysis of physical, computational, and mathematical models, Simulation and Similarity offers a novel account of the model/world relationship. Breaking with the dominant tradition, which favors the analysis of this relation through logical notions suc...

  12. Simulation of solution phase electron transfer in a compact donor-acceptor dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Wang, Lee-Ping; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2011-10-27

    Charge separation (CS) and charge recombination (CR) rates in photosynthetic architectures are difficult to control, yet their ratio can make or break photon-to-current conversion efficiencies. A rational design approach to the enhancement of CS over CR requires a mechanistic understanding of the underlying electron-transfer (ET) process, including the role of the environment. Toward this goal, we introduce a QM/MM protocol for ET simulations and use it to characterize CR in the formanilide-anthraquinone dyad (FAAQ). Our simulations predict fast recombination of the charge-transfer excited state, in agreement with recent experiments. The computed electronic couplings show an electronic state dependence and are weaker in solution than in the gas phase. We explore the role of cis-trans isomerization on the CR kinetics, and we find strong correlation between the vertical energy gaps of the full simulations and a collective solvent polarization coordinate. Our approach relies on constrained density functional theory to obtain accurate diabatic electronic states on the fly for molecular dynamics simulations, while orientational and electronic polarization of the solvent is captured by a polarizable force field based on a Drude oscillator model. The method offers a unified approach to the characterization of driving forces, reorganization energies, electronic couplings, and nonlinear solvent effects in light-harvesting systems.

  13. Practical Solutions for Reducing Container Ships’ Waiting Times at Ports Using Simulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdorreza Sheikholeslami; Gholamreza Ilati; Yones Eftekhari Yeganeh

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for container ports is the planning required for berthing container ships while docked in port. Growth of containerization is creating problems for ports and container terminals as they reach their capacity limits of various resources which increasingly leads to traffic and port congestion. Good planning and management of container terminal operations reduces waiting time for liner ships. Reducing the waiting time improves the terminal’s productivity and decreases the port difficulties. Two important keys to reducing waiting time with berth allocation are determining suitable access channel depths and increasing the number of berths which in this paper are studied and analyzed as practical solutions. Simulation based analysis is the only way to understand how various resources interact with each other and how they are affected in the berthing time of ships. We used the Enterprise Dynamics software to produce simulation models due to the complexity and nature of the problems. We further present case study for berth allocation simulation of the biggest container terminal in Iran and the optimum access channel depth and the number of berths are obtained from simulation results. The results show a significant reduction in the waiting time for container ships and can be useful for major functions in operations and development of container ship terminals.

  14. Overview: Understanding nucleation phenomena from simulations of lattice gas models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in Ising/lattice gas models are reviewed with an emphasis on the general insight gained on the mechanisms by which metastable states decay. Attention is paid to the proper distinction of particles that belong to a cluster (droplet), that may trigger a nucleation event, from particles in its environment, a problem crucial near the critical point. Well below the critical point, the lattice structure causes an anisotropy of the interface tension, and hence nonspherical droplet shapes result, making the treatment nontrivial even within the conventional classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. For temperatures below the roughening transition temperature facetted crystals rather than spherical droplets result. The possibility to find nucleation barriers from a thermodynamic analysis avoiding a cluster identification on the particle level is discussed, as well as the question of curvature corrections to the interfacial tension. For the interpretation of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls, knowledge of contact angles and line tensions is desirable, and methods to extract these quantities from simulations will be mentioned. Finally, also the problem of nucleation near the stability limit of metastable states and the significance of the spinodal curve will be discussed, in the light of simulations of Ising models with medium range interactions.

  15. Digital simulation of an enrichment process for solutions by means of an advection-diffusion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artucio, G.; Suarez, R.; Uruguay Catholic University)

    1995-01-01

    An ab-initio digital simulation of the space-time dynamics of the concentration field of a solute in an advection-diffusion chamber is done. Some questions related to the digital simulation of the concentration field using the analytical solution obtained in a previous paper are discussed

  16. Simulation-Based Performance Assessment: An Innovative Approach to Exploring Understanding of Physical Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Jessica; Wind, Stefanie; Koval, Jayma; Dagosta, Joseph; Ryan, Mike; Usselman, Marion

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of simulation-based performance assessment (PA) methodology in a recent study of eighth-grade students' understanding of physical science concepts. A set of four simulation-based PA tasks were iteratively developed to assess student understanding of an array of physical science concepts, including net force,…

  17. Understanding the mechanisms of amorphous creep through molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Penghui; Short, Michael P; Yip, Sidney

    2017-12-26

    Molecular processes of creep in metallic glass thin films are simulated at experimental timescales using a metadynamics-based atomistic method. Space-time evolutions of the atomic strains and nonaffine atom displacements are analyzed to reveal details of the atomic-level deformation and flow processes of amorphous creep in response to stress and thermal activations. From the simulation results, resolved spatially on the nanoscale and temporally over time increments of fractions of a second, we derive a mechanistic explanation of the well-known variation of creep rate with stress. We also construct a deformation map delineating the predominant regimes of diffusional creep at low stress and high temperature and deformational creep at high stress. Our findings validate the relevance of two original models of the mechanisms of amorphous plasticity: one focusing on atomic diffusion via free volume and the other focusing on stress-induced shear deformation. These processes are found to be nonlinearly coupled through dynamically heterogeneous fluctuations that characterize the slow dynamics of systems out of equilibrium.

  18. Understanding diffusion of intrinsically disordered proteins in polymer solutions: A disorder plus collapse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding diffusion of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs under crowded environments is of ubiquitous importance to modelling related dynamics in biological systems. In the present work, we proposed a theoretical framework to study the diffusion behavior of IDPs in polymer solutions. IDP is modeled as an ensemble of particles with a wide range of gyration radius subject to Flory-Fisk distribution, where the collapse effect which leads to the shrink of IDP due to polymer crowding is included. The diffusion coefficient of IDP is calculated as the average, denoted by 〈D〉, over the values of the particle samples. By properly incorporating the scaling relations for diffusion coefficient of nanoparticle (NP in polymer solutions, we are able to evaluate 〈D〉 straightforwardly and reveal the disorder and collapse effects on IDP’s diffusion in an explicit manner. Particular attentions are paid on comparison between the diffusion coefficient of an IDP and that of a NP. Results demonstrate that both disorder and collapse can enhance IDP diffusion rate. Our analysis shows that the crossover behavior reported by experiments can be actually a general phenomenon, namely, while a NP with smaller size than that of an IDP diffuses faster in simple solutions, the IDP may become the faster one under crowded conditions. We apply our theory to analyze the diffusion of several types of IDP in a few different polymer solutions. Good agreements between the theoretical results and the experimental data are obtained.

  19. An adaptive nonlinear solution scheme for reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, G.S. [Scientific Software - Intercomp, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Numerical reservoir simulation involves solving large, nonlinear systems of PDE with strongly discontinuous coefficients. Because of the large demands on computer memory and CPU, most users must perform simulations on very coarse grids. The average properties of the fluids and rocks must be estimated on these grids. These coarse grid {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} properties are costly to determine, and risky to use, since their optimal values depend on the fluid flow being simulated. Thus, they must be found by trial-and-error techniques, and the more coarse the grid, the poorer the results. This paper describes a numerical reservoir simulator which accepts fine scale properties and automatically generates multiple levels of coarse grid rock and fluid properties. The fine grid properties and the coarse grid simulation results are used to estimate discretization errors with multilevel error expansions. These expansions are local, and identify areas requiring local grid refinement. These refinements are added adoptively by the simulator, and the resulting composite grid equations are solved by a nonlinear Fast Adaptive Composite (FAC) Grid method, with a damped Newton algorithm being used on each local grid. The nonsymmetric linear system of equations resulting from Newton`s method are in turn solved by a preconditioned Conjugate Gradients-like algorithm. The scheme is demonstrated by performing fine and coarse grid simulations of several multiphase reservoirs from around the world.

  20. Understanding the tropical warm temperature bias simulated by climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brient, Florent; Schneider, Tapio

    2017-04-01

    The state-of-the-art coupled general circulation models have difficulties in representing the observed spatial pattern of surface tempertaure. A majority of them suffers a warm bias in the tropical subsiding regions located over the eastern parts of oceans. These regions are usually covered by low-level clouds scattered from stratus along the coasts to more vertically developed shallow cumulus farther from them. Models usually fail to represent accurately this transition. Here we investigate physical drivers of this warm bias in CMIP5 models through a near-surface energy budget perspective. We show that overestimated solar insolation due to a lack of stratocumulus mostly explains the warm bias. This bias also arises partly from inter-model differences in surface fluxes that could be traced to differences in near-surface relative humidity and air-sea temperature gradient. We investigate the role of the atmosphere in driving surface biases by comparing historical and atmopsheric (AMIP) experiments. We show that some differences in boundary-layer characteristics, mostly those related to cloud fraction and relative humidity, are already present in AMIP experiments and may be the drivers of coupled biases. This gives insights in how models can be improved for better simulations of the tropical climate.

  1. Using Transport Diagnostics to Understand Chemistry Climate Model Ozone Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Akiyoshi, H.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Butchart, N.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cugnet, D.; Dhomse, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of N2O and mean age in the tropical and midlatitude lower stratosphere (LS) can be used to identify realistic transport in models. The results are applied to 15 Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) participating in the 2010 WMO assessment. Comparison of the observed and simulated N2O/mean age relationship identifies models with fast or slow circulations and reveals details of model ascent and tropical isolation. The use of this process-oriented N2O/mean age diagnostic identifies models with compensating transport deficiencies that produce fortuitous agreement with mean age. We compare the diagnosed model transport behavior with a model's ability to produce realistic LS O3 profiles in the tropics and midlatitudes. Models with the greatest tropical transport problems show the poorest agreement with observations. Models with the most realistic LS transport agree more closely with LS observations and each other. We incorporate the results of the chemistry evaluations in the SPARC CCMVal Report (2010) to explain the range of CCM predictions for the return-to-1980 dates for global (60 S-60 N) and Antarctic column ozone. Later (earlier) Antarctic return dates are generally correlated to higher (lower) vortex Cl(sub y) levels in the LS, and vortex Cl(sub y) is generally correlated with the model's circulation although model Cl(sub y) chemistry or Cl(sub y) conservation can have a significant effect. In both regions, models that have good LS transport produce a smaller range of predictions for the return-to-1980 ozone values. This study suggests that the current range of predicted return dates is unnecessarily large due to identifiable model transport deficiencies.

  2. Phase field simulations of ice crystal growth in sugar solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, Van Der R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first model ever, that describes explicitly ice crystal growth in a sugar solution during freezing. This 2-D model uses the phase field method, supplemented with realistic, and predictive theories on the thermodynamics and (diffusion) kinetics of this food system. We have to make

  3. Brown & Smith Communication Solutions: A Staffing System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Erika E.; Doll, Jessica L.; Bergman, Shawn M.; Heggestad, Eric D.

    2018-01-01

    Developing students' practical skills in strategic staffing and selection within the classroom can be challenging. This article describes a staffing system simulation designed to engage students and develop applied skills in strategic recruiting, assessment, and evaluation of job applicants. Instructors looking for a multifaceted team project…

  4. HVAC system simulation: overview, issues and some solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trcka, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated performance simulation of buildings’ heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems can help in reducing energy consumption and increasing occupant comfort. Recognizing this fact, in the last forty years many tools have been developed to help achieving this goal. In this paper

  5. Open Source AV solution supporting In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Pociunas, Gintas; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    the software to meet our expectations for a portable AV system for VAD. The system would make use of “off the shelf” hardware components which are widely available and easily replaced or expanded. The developed AV software and coding is contracted to be available as Copyleft Open Source to ensure low cost...... a stable AV software that has be developed and implemented for an in situ simulation initiative. This version (1.3) is the first on released as Open Source (Copyleft) software (see QR tag). We have found that it is possible to deliver multi-camera video assisted debriefing in a mobile, in situ simulation...... environment using an AV system constructed from “off the shelf” components and Open Source software....

  6. Aggregation in concentrated protein solutions: Insights from rheology, neutron scattering and molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica

    Aggregation of therapeutic proteins is currently one of the major challenges in the bio-pharmaceutical industry, because aggregates could induce immunogenic responses and compromise the quality of the product. Current scientific efforts, both in industry and academia, are focused on developing rational approaches to screen different drug candidates and predict their stability under different conditions. Moreover, aggregation is promoted in highly concentrated protein solutions, which are typically required for subcutaneous injection. In order to gain further understanding about the mechanisms that lead to aggregation, an approach that combined rheology, neutron scattering, and molecular simulations was undertaken. Two model systems were studied in this work: Bovine Serum Albumin in surfactant-free Phosphate Buffered Saline at pH = 7.4 at concentrations from 11 mg/mL up to ˜519 mg/mL, and a monoclonal antibody in 20 mM Histidine/Histidine Hydrochloride at pH = 6.0 with 60 mg/mL trehalose and 0.2 mg/mL polysorbate-80 at concentrations from 53 mg/mL up to ˜220 mg/mL. The antibody used here has three mutations in the CH2 domain, which result in lower stability upon incubation at 40 °C with respect to the wild-type protein, based on size-exclusion chromatography assays. This temperature is below 49 °C, where unfolding of the least stable, CH2 domain occurs, according to differential scanning calorimetry. This dissertation focuses on identifying the role of aggregation on the viscosity of protein solutions. The protein solutions of this work show an increase in the low shear viscosity in the absence of surfactants, because proteins adsorb at the air/water interface forming a viscoelastic film that affects the measured rheology. Stable surfactant-laden protein solutions behave as simple Newtonian fluids. However, the surfactant-laden antibody solution also shows an increase in the low shear viscosity from bulk aggregation, after prolonged incubation at 40 °C. Small

  7. Discovering and understanding the vector field using simulation in android app

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, A.; Muliyati, D.

    2018-05-01

    An understanding of vector field’s concepts are fundamental parts of the electrodynamics course. In this paper, we use a simple simulation that can be used to show qualitative imaging results as a variation of the vector field. Android application packages the simulation with consideration of the efficiency of use during the lecture. In addition, this simulation also trying to cover the divergences and curl concepts from the same conditions that students have a complete understanding and can distinguish concepts that have been described only mathematically. This simulation is designed to show the relationship between the field magnitude and its potential. This application can show vector field simulations in various conditions that help to improve students’ understanding of vector field concepts and their relation to particle existence around the field vector.

  8. Evaluation of element migration from food plastic packagings into simulated solutions using radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Eufemia Paez; Saiki, Mitiko; Wiebeck, Helio

    2005-01-01

    In the present study a radiometric method was established to determine the migration of elements from food plastic packagings to a simulated acetic acid solution. This radiometric method consisted of irradiating plastic samples with neutrons at IEA-R1 nuclear reactor for a period of 16 hours under a neutron flux of 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 and, then to expose them to the element migration into a simulated solution. The radioactivity of the activated elements transferred to the solutions was measured to evaluate the migration. The experimental conditions were: time of exposure of 10 days at 40 deg C and 3% acetic acid solution was used as simulated solution, according to the procedure established by the National Agency of Sanitary Monitoring (ANVISA). The migration study was applied for plastic samples from soft drink and juice packagings. The results obtained indicated the migration of elements Co, Cr and Sb. The advantage of this methodology was no need to analyse the blank of simulantes, as well as the use of high purity simulated solutions. Besides, the method allows to evaluate the migration of the elements into the food content instead of simulated solution. The detention limits indicated high sensitivity of the radiometric method. (author)

  9. Tsunami Simulators in Physical Modelling - Concept to Practical Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Ian; Allsop, William; Robinson, David; Rossetto, Tiziana; McGovern, David; Todd, David

    2017-04-01

    Whilst many researchers have conducted simple 'tsunami impact' studies, few engineering tools are available to assess the onshore impacts of tsunami, with no agreed methods available to predict loadings on coastal defences, buildings or related infrastructure. Most previous impact studies have relied upon unrealistic waveforms (solitary or dam-break waves and bores) rather than full-duration tsunami waves, or have used simplified models of nearshore and over-land flows. Over the last 10+ years, pneumatic Tsunami Simulators for the hydraulic laboratory have been developed into an exciting and versatile technology, allowing the forces of real-world tsunami to be reproduced and measured in a laboratory environment for the first time. These devices have been used to model generic elevated and N-wave tsunamis up to and over simple shorelines, and at example coastal defences and infrastructure. They have also reproduced full-duration tsunamis including Mercator 2004 and Tohoku 2011, both at 1:50 scale. Engineering scale models of these tsunamis have measured wave run-up on simple slopes, forces on idealised sea defences, pressures / forces on buildings, and scour at idealised buildings. This presentation will describe how these Tsunami Simulators work, demonstrate how they have generated tsunami waves longer than the facilities within which they operate, and will present research results from three generations of Tsunami Simulators. Highlights of direct importance to natural hazard modellers and coastal engineers include measurements of wave run-up levels, forces on single and multiple buildings and comparison with previous theoretical predictions. Multiple buildings have two malign effects. The density of buildings to flow area (blockage ratio) increases water depths and flow velocities in the 'streets'. But the increased building densities themselves also increase the cost of flow per unit area (both personal and monetary). The most recent study with the Tsunami

  10. Development of virtual natural lighting solutions with a simplified view using lighting simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangkuto, R.A.; Aries, M.B.C.; Loenen, van E.J.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Computational building performance simulation can be employed to develop various future solutions. The development of Virtual Natural Lighting Solutions (VNLS), which are systems that artificially provide natural lighting and view comparable to those of real windows and skylights, is steered by

  11. Synergistic extraction behaviour of americium from simulated acidic waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, P.N.; Veeraraghavan, R.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of americium has been investigated with mixtures of 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone (PBI) and oxodonors viz. tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) and di-n-butyl octanamide (DBOA) using dodecane as the diluent from 1-6 M HNO 3 media. It is observed that D Am remains unaltered with PBI concentration (in the range 0.06-0.1 M) at 1.47 M TBP in the entire range of HNO 3 concentration. PBI and TBP in combination appears more promising compared to other synergistic systems. The possibility of using this mixture for americium removal from high level liquid waste solution has been explored. Extraction studies indicated that prior removal of uranium by 20% TBP in dodecane is helpful in the quantitative recovery of americium in three contacts. Effect of lanthanides on D Am is found to be marginal. (orig.)

  12. Simulations of water and solute movement in the buried waste repository at Vaalputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A previous series of simulations examined the movement of water through trench cap configurations of several types. The objectives of this series are i) to extent the simulations from the surface to the bottom of the repository, accounting for the placement of drums, ii) to examine the magnitude and direction of water fluxes throughout this depth and iii) to simulate the movement of solutes, using various assumptions regarding solute adsorption. Two models were used. The first was an adaptation of a solute transport model which incorporates the transient water flow model used in previous simulations. This was used primarily to estimate the likely water fluxes in the drum placement region. Since it requires large amounts of computer time this model was used to simulate periods of one or two years only. The second model was a very simple steady state solute transport model which was used to simulate Cs distribution after a 100 year period, using flux data obtained from the transient model simulations. The most important conclusion reached from this series of simulations is that the movement of Cs in the soil under the likely water regime is extremely slow. 'Worst case' situations were simulated. Some of these situations are unlikely in reality but provide a useful indication of the rates of movement of solute under various conditions. For this reason it was assumed that plants were absent in cases when maximum percolation was simulated and present when maximum upward flow was simulated. In no case was a 'wick' (a textural barrier to unsaturated water flow) assumed to be present

  13. Modeling for thermodynamic activities of components in simulated reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahira, Akira; Hoshikawa, Tadahiro; Kawamura, Fumio

    1992-01-01

    Analyses of chemical reactions have been widely carried out for soluble fission products encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. For detailed analyses of reactions, a prediction of the activity or activity coefficient for nitric acid, water, and several nitrates of fission products is needed. An idea for the predicted nitric acid activity was presented earlier. The model, designated the hydration model, does not predict the nitrate activity. It did, however, suggest that the activity of water would be a function of nitric acid activity but not the molar fraction of water. If the activities of nitric acid and water are accurately predicted, the activity of the last component, nitrate, can be calculated using the Gibbs-Duhem relation for chemical potentials. Therefore, in this study, the earlier hydration model was modified to evaluate the water activity more accurately. The modified model was experimentally examined in stimulated reprocessing solutions. It is concluded that the modified model was suitable for water activity, but further improvement was needed for the activity evaluation of nitric acid in order to calculate the nitrate activity

  14. Calculus Problem Solution And Simulation Using GUI Of Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaharuddin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop the project application in teaching and learning Calculus using Grapichal User Interface GUI of Matlab. The scope of the development result includes 1 PreCalculus 2 Function Limit 3 Derivative and its application and 4 Integral and its application. Every aspect of development is presented according to the standards of material competence learning achievement indicators and solutions or settlement steps on each issue presented. This project application can be used by lecturers and students in universities to improve motivation mastery of material and student learning outcomes in the Calculus course. Development of this project application is done through 4 stages called 4-D namely Define Design Development and Dissemination. Based on the data analysis the results obtained at the validation stage of expert validity level average of 3.575 which means quite valid. Then on a limited trial the average student gave a response of 92.00 which means very good. While in the first field trial the average student gave a response of 89.30 which means very good and in the second field trial the average student gave a responded of 90.15 which means very good. Besides that we also solve computational calculus problems in Edwin J. Purcell Dale Varbergs Book of Volume 1 of Edition 5 of 48 questions that are divided into 64 cases.

  15. Outlook of multiple time and spatial scale simulation for understanding self-organizing phenomena in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Sato, Tetsuya

    2003-01-01

    The importance of the methodology of computer simulation has been recognized in plasma physics since the early era of computer evolution. In particular, the goal of simulation in this research field has been characterized by attempts to treat phenomena in a self-consistent manner as much as possible. Owing to the astonishing progress in recent supercomputer technology, we are now standing on a doorway to open a new stage in the simulation research in this direction, that is, an execution of multi-layer model simulation to understand complex phenomena in plasmas. (author)

  16. Caffeine and Sugars Interact in Aqueous Solutions: A Simulation and NMR Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Engström, Olof; Schnupf, Udo; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Himmel, Michael; Widmalm, Göran; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on several systems of caffeine interacting with simple sugars. These included a single caffeine molecule in a 3 molal solution of α-D-glucopyranose, at a caffeine concentration of 0.083 molal; a single caffeine in a 3 molal solution of β-D-glucopyranose, and a single caffeine molecule in a 1.08 molal solution of sucrose (table sugar). Parallel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance titration experiments were carried out on the same solutions under similar c...

  17. A gradual update method for simulating the steady-state solution of stiff differential equations in metabolic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Emi; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2009-02-01

    Numerical simulation of differential equation systems plays a major role in the understanding of how metabolic network models generate particular cellular functions. On the other hand, the classical and technical problems for stiff differential equations still remain to be solved, while many elegant algorithms have been presented. To relax the stiffness problem, we propose new practical methods: the gradual update of differential-algebraic equations based on gradual application of the steady-state approximation to stiff differential equations, and the gradual update of the initial values in differential-algebraic equations. These empirical methods show a high efficiency for simulating the steady-state solutions for the stiff differential equations that existing solvers alone cannot solve. They are effective in extending the applicability of dynamic simulation to biochemical network models.

  18. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  19. Numerical simulation of solute trapping phenomena using phase-field solidification model for dilute binary alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Silva Furtado

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of solute trapping during solidification, using two phase-field model for dilute binary alloys developed by Kim et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 60, 7186 (1999] and Ramirez et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 69, 05167 (2004] is presented here. The simulations on dilute Cu-Ni alloy are in good agreement with one dimensional analytic solution of sharp interface model. Simulation conducted under small solidification velocity using solid-liquid interface thickness (2λ of 8 nanometers reproduced the solute (Cu equilibrium partition coefficient. The spurious numerical solute trapping in solid phase, due to the interface thickness was negligible. A parameter used in analytical solute trapping model was determined by isothermal phase-field simulation of Ni-Cu alloy. Its application to Si-As and Si-Bi alloys reproduced results that agree reasonably well with experimental data. A comparison between the three models of solute trapping (Aziz, Sobolev and Galenko [Phys. Rev. E, 76, 031606 (2007] was performed. It resulted in large differences in predicting the solidification velocity for partition-less solidification, indicating the necessity for new and more acute experimental data.

  20. Understanding the gastrointestinal tract of the elderly to develop dietary solutions that prevent malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, Didier; Shahar, Danit R.; Gille, Doreen; Pinto, Paula; Kachal, Josefa; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Walther, Barbara; Bordoni, Alessandra; Dupont, Didier; Tomás-Cobos, Lidia; Vergères, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Although the prevalence of malnutrition in the old age is increasing worldwide a synthetic understanding of the impact of aging on the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients is still lacking. This review article aims at filling the gap in knowledge between the functional decline of the aging gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and the consequences of malnutrition on the health status of elderly. Changes in the aging GIT include the mechanical disintegration of food, gastrointestinal motor function, food transit, chemical food digestion, and functionality of the intestinal wall. These alterations progressively decrease the ability of the GIT to provide the aging organism with adequate levels of nutrients, what contributes to the development of malnutrition. Malnutrition, in turn, increases the risks for the development of a range of pathologies associated with most organ systems, in particular the nervous-, muscoskeletal-, cardiovascular-, immune-, and skin systems. In addition to psychological, economics, and societal factors, dietary solutions preventing malnutrition should thus propose dietary guidelines and food products that integrate knowledge on the functionality of the aging GIT and the nutritional status of the elderly. Achieving this goal will request the identification, validation, and correlative analysis of biomarkers of food intake, nutrient bioavailability, and malnutrition. PMID:26091351

  1. Effect of soil compositions on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.M. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University (China); Luo, S.X. [Department of Chemistry, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi (China); Sun, C. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Wu, Y.H.

    2010-04-15

    In this study, effect of cations, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and anions, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} on electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated soil solution was investigated through potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that the Ca{sup 2+}and Mg{sup 2+} can decrease the corrosion current density of carbon steel in simulated soil solution, and K{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} can increase the corrosion density. All the above ions in the simulated soil solution can decrease its resistivity, but they have different effect on the charge transfer resistivity. This finding can be useful in evaluating the corrosivity of certain soil through chemical analysis, and provide data for construction engineers. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. North American water availability under stress and duress: building understanding from simulations, observations and data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Condon, L. E.; Atchley, A. L.; Hector, B.

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying the available freshwater for human use and ecological function depends on fluxes and stores that are hard to observe. Evapotranspiration (ET) is the largest terrestrial flux of water behind precipitation but is observed with low spatial density. Likewise, groundwater is the largest freshwater store, yet is equally uncertain. The ability to upscale observations of these variables is an additional complication; point measurements are made at scales orders of magnitude smaller than remote sensing data products. Integrated hydrologic models that simulate continental extents at fine spatial resolution are now becoming an additional tool to constrain fluxes and address interconnections. For example, recent work has shown connections between water table depth and transpiration partitioning, and demonstrated the ability to reconcile point observations and large-scale inferences. Here we explore the dynamics of large hydrologic systems experiencing change and stress across continental North America using integrated model simulations, observations and data products. Simulations of aquifer depletion due to pervasive groundwater pumping diagnose both stream depletion and changes in ET. Simulations of systematic increases in temperature are used to understand the relationship between snowpack dynamics, surface and groundwater flow, ET and a changing climate. Remotely sensed products including the GRACE estimates of total storage change are downscaled using model simulations to better understand human impacts to the hydrologic cycle. These example applications motivate a path forward to better use simulations to understand water availability.

  3. The simulation of solute transport: An approach free of numerical dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.; Melloni, G.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of most algorithms for simulation of solute transport is limited either by instability or by numerical dispersion, as seen by a review of existing methods. A new approach is proposed that is free of these two problems. The method is based on the mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation of the mass-transport problem, thus ensuring stability. Advection is simulated by a variation of reverse-particle tracking that avoids the accumulation of interpolation errors, thus preventing numerical dispersion. The algorithm has been implemented in a one-dimensional code. Excellent results are obtained, in comparison with an analytical solution. 36 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  4. Simulation of unsaturated flow and nonreactive solute transport in a heterogeneous soil at the field scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockhold, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    A field-scale, unsaturated flow and solute transport experiment at the Las Cruces trench site in New Mexico was simulated as part of a ''blind'' modeling exercise to demonstrate the ability or inability of uncalibrated models to predict unsaturated flow and solute transport in spatially variable porous media. Simulations were conducted using a recently developed multiphase flow and transport simulator. Uniform and heterogeneous soil models were tested, and data from a previous experiment at the site were used with an inverse procedure to estimate water retention parameters. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean observed and simulated flow and transport behavior. The results of this study suggest that defensible predictions of waste migration and fate at low-level waste sites will ultimately require site-specific data for model calibration

  5. Simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the Glen Canyon aquifer, East-Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freethey, Geoffrey W.; Stolp, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of methane from coal beds in the Ferron coal trend in central Utah started in the mid-1980s. Beginning in 1994, water from the extraction process was pressure injected into the Glen Canyon aquifer. The lateral extent of the aquifer that could be affected by injection is about 7,600 square miles. To address regional-scale effects of injection over a decadal time frame, a conceptual model of ground-water movement and transport of dissolved solids was formulated. A numerical model that incorporates aquifer concepts was then constructed and used to simulate injection.The Glen Canyon aquifer within the study area is conceptualized in two parts—an active area of ground-water flow and solute transport that exists between recharge areas in the San Rafael Swell and Desert, Waterpocket Fold, and Henry Mountains and discharge locations along the Muddy, Dirty Devil, San Rafael, and Green Rivers. An area of little or negligible ground-water flow exists north of Price, Utah, and beneath the Wasatch Plateau. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water occurs in this area where dissolved-solids concentrations can be more than 100,000 milligrams per liter. Injection has the potential to increase hydrologic interaction with the active flow area, where dissolved-solids concentrations are generally less than 3,000 milligrams per liter.Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water in 1994 initiated a net addition of flow and mass of solutes into the Glen Canyon aquifer. To better understand the regional scale hydrologic interaction between the two areas of the Glen Canyon aquifer, pressurized injection was numerically simulated. Data constraints precluded development of a fully calibrated simulation; instead, an uncalibrated model was constructed that is a plausible representation of the conceptual flow and solute-transport processes. The amount of injected water over the 36-year simulation period is about 25,000 acre-feet. As a result

  6. Thorium determination by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry in simulated thorex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, M.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence method for thorium determination in aqueous and organic (TBP-n-dodecane) solutions is described. The thin film-technique for sample preparation and a suitable internal standard have been used. Some parameters as analytical line, internal standard, filter paper, paper geometry, sample volume and measurement conditions were studied. Uranium, fission products, corrosion products and thorex reagent components were studied as interfering elements in the thorium analysis, as well as the matrix effect by using the thorex process simulated solutions the method to thorium determination in irradiated thorium solutions was applied. (M.J.C.) [pt

  7. Development of Three-Layer Simulation Model for Freezing Process of Food Solution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminishi, Koji; Araki, Tetsuya; Shirakashi, Ryo; Ueno, Shigeaki; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    A numerical model has been developed for simulating freezing phenomena of food solution systems. The cell model was simplified to apply to food solution systems, incorporating with the existence of 3 parts such as unfrozen, frozen and moving boundary layers. Moreover, the moving rate of freezing front model was also introduced and calculated by using the variable space network method proposed by Murray and Landis (1957). To demonstrate the validity of the model, it was applied to the freezing processes of coffee solutions. Since the model required the phase diagram of the material to be frozen, the initial freezing temperatures of 1-55 % coffee solutions were measured by the DSC method. The effective thermal conductivity for coffee solutions was determined as a function of temperature and solute concentration by using the Maxwell - Eucken model. One-dimensional freezing process of 10 % coffee solution was simulated based on its phase diagram and thermo-physical properties. The results were good agreement with the experimental data and then showed that the model could accurately describe the change in the location of the freezing front and the distributions of temperature as well as ice fraction during a freezing process.

  8. Effect of a Problem Based Simulation on the Conceptual Understanding of Undergraduate Science Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David Devraj; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    A study of the effect of science teaching with a multimedia simulation on water quality, the "River of Life," on the science conceptual understanding of students (N = 83) in an undergraduate science education (K-9) course is reported. Teaching reality-based meaningful science is strongly recommended by the National Science Education Standards…

  9. Understanding the concept of resolving power in the Fabry-Perot interferometer using a digital simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvells, I; Carnicer, A; Ferre-Borrull, J; MartIn-Badosa, E; Montes-Usategui, M

    2006-01-01

    The resolution concept in connection with the Fabry-Perot interferometer is difficult to understand for undergraduate students enrolled in physical optics courses. The resolution criterion proposed in textbooks for distinguishing equal intensity maxima and the deduction of the resolving power equation is formal and non-intuitive. In this paper, we study the practical meaning of the resolution criterion and resolution power using a computer simulation of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The light source in the program has two monochromatic components, the wavelength difference being tunable by the user. The student can also adjust other physical parameters so as to obtain different simulation results. By analysing the images and graphics of the simulation, the resolving power concept becomes intuitive and understandable

  10. Parallel shooting methods for finding steady state solutions to engine simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Parallel single- and multiple shooting methods were tested for finding periodic steady state solutions to a Stirling engine model. The model was used to illustrate features of the methods and possibilities for optimisations. Performance was measured using simulation of an experimental data set...

  11. Go with the Flow. Moving meshes and solution monitoring for compressible flow simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, A.

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of time-dependent physical problems, such as flows of some kind, places high demands on the domain discretization in order to obtain high accuracy of the numerical solution. We present a moving mesh method in which the mesh points automatically move towards regions where high spatial

  12. Biocorrosion properties of antibacterial Ti-10Cu sintered alloy in several simulated biological solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Zhang, Erlin

    2015-03-01

    Ti-10Cu sintered alloy has shown strong antibacterial properties against S. aureus and E. coli and good cell biocompatibility, which displays potential application in dental application. The corrosion behaviors of the alloy in five different simulated biological solutions have been investigated by electrochemical technology, surface observation, roughness measurement and immersion test. Five different simulated solutions were chosen to simulate oral condition, oral condition with F(-) ion, human body fluids with different pH values and blood system. It has been shown that Ti-10Cu alloy exhibits high corrosion rate in Saliva pH 3.5 solution and Saliva pH 6.8 + 0.2F solution but low corrosion rate in Hank's, Tyrode's and Saliva pH 6.8 solutions. The corrosion rate of Ti-10Cu alloy was in a order of Hank's, Tyrode's, Saliva pH 6.8, Saliva-pH 3.5 and Saliva pH 6.8 + 0.2F from slow to fast. All results indicated acid and F(-) containing conditions prompt the corrosion reaction of Ti-Cu alloy. It was suggested that the Cu ion release in the biological environments, especially in the acid and F(-) containing condition would lead to high antibacterial properties without any cell toxicity, displaying wide potential application of this alloy.

  13. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-10-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  14. VS2DRTI: Simulating Heat and Reactive Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W; Haile, Sosina S; Parkhurst, David L; Charlton, Scott R

    2018-01-29

    Variably saturated groundwater flow, heat transport, and solute transport are important processes in environmental phenomena, such as the natural evolution of water chemistry of aquifers and streams, the storage of radioactive waste in a geologic repository, the contamination of water resources from acid-rock drainage, and the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Up to now, our ability to simulate these processes simultaneously with fully coupled reactive transport models has been limited to complex and often difficult-to-use models. To address the need for a simple and easy-to-use model, the VS2DRTI software package has been developed for simulating water flow, heat transport, and reactive solute transport through variably saturated porous media. The underlying numerical model, VS2DRT, was created by coupling the flow and transport capabilities of the VS2DT and VS2DH models with the equilibrium and kinetic reaction capabilities of PhreeqcRM. Flow capabilities include two-dimensional, constant-density, variably saturated flow; transport capabilities include both heat and multicomponent solute transport; and the reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of geochemical reactions of PHREEQC. The graphical user interface includes a preprocessor for building simulations and a postprocessor for visual display of simulation results. To demonstrate the simulation of multiple processes, the model is applied to a hypothetical example of injection of heated waste water to an aquifer with temperature-dependent cation exchange. VS2DRTI is freely available public domain software. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  15. A new Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element simulator for solute transport in discrete fracture-matrix systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.; Karasaki, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1996-07-01

    Fracture network simulators have extensively been used in the past for obtaining a better understanding of flow and transport processes in fractured rock. However, most of these models do not account for fluid or solute exchange between the fractures and the porous matrix, although diffusion into the matrix pores can have a major impact on the spreading of contaminants. In the present paper a new finite element code TRIPOLY is introduced which combines a powerful fracture network simulator with an efficient method to account for the diffusive interaction between the fractures and the adjacent matrix blocks. The fracture network simulator used in TRIPOLY features a mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian solution scheme for the transport in fractures, combined with an adaptive gridding technique to account for sharp concentration fronts. The fracture-matrix interaction is calculated with an efficient method which has been successfully used in the past for dual-porosity models. Discrete fractures and matrix blocks are treated as two different systems, and the interaction is modeled by introducing sink/source terms in both systems. It is assumed that diffusive transport in the matrix can be approximated as a one-dimensional process, perpendicular to the adjacent fracture surfaces. A direct solution scheme is employed to solve the coupled fracture and matrix equations. The newly developed combination of the fracture network simulator and the fracture-matrix interaction module allows for detailed studies of spreading processes in fractured porous rock. The authors present a sample application which demonstrate the codes ability of handling large-scale fracture-matrix systems comprising individual fractures and matrix blocks of arbitrary size and shape.

  16. The Effect of Three-Dimensional Simulations on the Understanding of Chemical Structures and Their Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Nick, Sabine; Schanze, Sascha

    2009-08-01

    In a series of three experimental studies, the effectiveness of three-dimensional computer simulations to aid the understanding of chemical structures and their properties was investigated. Arguments for the usefulness of three-dimensional simulations were derived from Mayer’s generative theory of multimedia learning. Simulations might lead to a decrease in cognitive load and thus support active learning. In our studies, the learning effectiveness of three-dimensional simulations was compared to two-dimensional illustrations by use of different versions of a computer programme concerning the modifications of carbon. The first and third study with freshman students of chemistry and biochemistry show that no more knowledge was acquired when participants learnt with three-dimensional simulations than with two-dimensional figures. In the second study with 16-year old secondary school students, use of simulations facilitated the acquisition of conceptual knowledge. It was concluded that three-dimensional simulations are more effective for younger students who lack the experience of learning with different visual representation formats in chemistry. In all three studies, a significant relationship between spatial ability and conceptual knowledge about the modifications of carbon was detected.

  17. On the corrosion behaviour of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Gadadhar; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of three phosphoric irons P 1 (Fe-0.11P-0.028C), P 2 (Fe-0.32P-0.026C) and P 3 (Fe-0.49P-0.022C) has been studied in simulated concrete pore solution (saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution) containing different chloride concentration. This has been compared with that of two commercial concrete reinforcement steels, a low carbon steel TN (Fe-0.148C-0.542Mn-0.128Si) and a microalloyed corrosion resistant steel CS (Fe-0.151C-0.088P-0.197Si-0.149Cr-0.417Cu). The beneficial aspect of phosphoric irons was revealed from potentiodynamic polarization experiments. The pitting potentials and pitting nucleation resistances for phosphoric irons and CS were higher than that for TN. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies revealed thickening and growth of passive film as a function of time in case of phosphoric irons and CS in saturated Ca(OH) 2 pore solutions without chloride and in the same solution with 0.05% Cl - and 0.1% Cl - . In case of TN, breakdown of passive film resulted in active corrosion in simulated pore solution containing 0.1% Cl - . Linear polarization resistance measurements complemented EIS results. Visual observations indicated that phosphoric iron P 3 was immune to corrosion even after 125 days of immersion in saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution containing 5% NaCl. The good corrosion resistance of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution containing chloride ions has been related to the formation of phosphate, based on ultraviolet spectrophotometric analysis and Pourbaix diagram of phosphorus-water system

  18. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tolokh, Igor S. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Drozdetski, Aleksander [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Baker, Nathan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Onufriev, Alexey V. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however, the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively characterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight into understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  19. Enhancing Student’s Understanding in Entrepreneurship Through Business Plan Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzairy M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Business Plan is an important document for entrepreneurs to guide them managing their business. Business Plan also assist the entrepreneur to strategies their business and manage future growth. That is why Malaysian government has foster all Higher Education Provider to set entrepreneurship education as compulsory course. One of the entrepreneurship education learning outcome is the student can write effective business plan. This study focused on enhancing student’s understanding in entrepreneurship through business plan simulation. This study also considers which of the factor that most facilitate the business simulation that help the student to prepare effective business plan. The methodology of this study using quantitative approach with pre-and post-research design. 114 students take part as respondent in the business simulation and answer quantitative survey pre-question and post question. The crucial findings of this study are student characteristic factor after playing the simulation contribute much on facilitate business plan learning. The result has shown that the business plan simulation can enhance undergraduate student in understanding entrepreneurship by preparing effective business plan before opening new startup.

  20. Simulation of effects of redox and precipitation on diffusion of uranium solution species in backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-12-01

    This investigation addresses the problem of prediction of the rate of migration of redox-sensitive solution species within packing and backfill materials under conditions of variable oxidation potential. Effects of changes of oxidation potential and precipitation of stable uranium compounds during diffusion of uranium from a region of high oxidation potential into a region of low oxidation potential were simulated numerically. Questions of particular interest addressed in the investigation were the existence of a moving ''redox front'' and the influence of precipitation-dissolution processes on uranium migration. The simulations showed that no expanding redox fronts existed at any simulated time up to 3.2 x 10 5 years (10 13 s). In simulations where precipitation of stable solids was not allowed, variations of oxidation potential did not affect total uranium concentrations in solution. Concentration profiles could be predicted simply by diffusion of the (constant) source concentrations. In simulations where precipitation of stable solids was allowed, uraninite and calcium uranate accumulated at the source-transport domain interface, while coffinite penetrated further into the transport domain. Total uranium concentrations in regions of precipitation were determined by solubilities of the precipitated solids, and were six to seven orders of magnitude lower than those in the simulations without precipitation, throughout the domain of transport. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, V.H.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1983-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H + liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor) [pt

  2. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, V H; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H/sup +/ liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10/sup 13/n.cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/ and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor).

  3. Limit Theorems and Their Relation to Solute Transport in Simulated Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, D. M.; Benson, D. A.; Meerschaert, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    Solute particles that travel through fracture networks are subject to wide velocity variations along a restricted set of directions. This may result in super-Fickian dispersion along a few primary scaling directions. The fractional advection-dispersion equation (FADE), a modification of the original advection-dispersion equation in which a fractional derivative replaces the integer-order dispersion term, has the ability to model rapid, non-Gaussian solute transport. The FADE assumes that solute particle motions converge to either α -stable or operator stable densities, which are modeled by spatial fractional derivatives. In multiple dimensions, the multi-fractional dispersion derivative dictates the order and weight of differentiation in all directions, which correspond to the statistics of large particle motions in all directions. This study numerically investigates the presence of super- Fickian solute transport through simulated two-dimensional fracture networks. An ensemble of networks is gen

  4. Generalizing Source Geometry of Site Contamination by Simulating and Analyzing Analytical Solution of Three-Dimensional Solute Transport Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the uneven distribution of pollutions and blur edge of pollutant area, there will exist uncertainty of source term shape in advective-diffusion equation model of contaminant transport. How to generalize those irregular source terms and deal with those uncertainties is very critical but rarely studied in previous research. In this study, the fate and transport of contaminant from rectangular and elliptic source geometry were simulated based on a three-dimensional analytical solute transport model, and the source geometry generalization guideline was developed by comparing the migration of contaminant. The result indicated that the variation of source area size had no effect on pollution plume migration when the plume migrated as far as five times of source side length. The migration of pollution plume became slower with the increase of aquifer thickness. The contaminant concentration was decreasing with scale factor rising, and the differences among various scale factors became smaller with the distance to field increasing.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of Compressible Ising Models: Do We Understand Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, D. P.; Dünweg, B.; Laradji, M.; Tavazza, F.; Adler, J.; Cannavaccioulo, L.; Zhu, X.

    Extensive Monte Carlo simulations have begun to shed light on our understanding of phase transitions and universality classes for compressible Ising models. A comprehensive analysis of a Landau-Ginsburg-Wilson hamiltonian for systems with elastic degrees of freedom resulted in the prediction that there should be four distinct cases that would have different behavior, depending upon symmetries and thermodynamic constraints. We shall provide an account of the results of careful Monte Carlo simulations for a simple compressible Ising model that can be suitably modified so as to replicate all four cases.

  6. A simple and effective solution to the constrained QM/MM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Kambe, Hiroyuki; Morita, Akihiro

    2018-04-01

    It is a promising extension of the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to incorporate the solvent molecules surrounding the QM solute into the QM region to ensure the adequate description of the electronic polarization of the solute. However, the solvent molecules in the QM region inevitably diffuse into the MM bulk during the QM/MM simulation. In this article, we developed a simple and efficient method, referred to as the "boundary constraint with correction (BCC)," to prevent the diffusion of the solvent water molecules by means of a constraint potential. The point of the BCC method is to compensate the error in a statistical property due to the bias potential by adding a correction term obtained through a set of QM/MM simulations. The BCC method is designed so that the effect of the bias potential completely vanishes when the QM solvent is identical with the MM solvent. Furthermore, the desirable conditions, that is, the continuities of energy and force and the conservations of energy and momentum, are fulfilled in principle. We applied the QM/MM-BCC method to a hydronium ion(H3O+) in aqueous solution to construct the radial distribution function (RDF) of the solvent around the solute. It was demonstrated that the correction term fairly compensated the error and led the RDF in good agreement with the result given by an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation.

  7. Neptunium sorption and co-precipitation of strontium in simulated DWPF salt solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.F.; Orebaugh, E.G.; King, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Batch experiments performed using crushed slag saltstone (∼40 mesh) removed >80% of 237 Np from simulated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) salt solution. The concentration of 237 Np (110 pCi/ml) used was 1000x greater than levels in actual DWPF solutions. Neptunium-239 was used as a tracer and was formed by neutron activation of uranyl nitrate. Results showed that small amounts of crushed saltstone (as little as 0.05 grams), removed >80% of neptunium from 15 ml of simulated DWPF solution after several hours equilibration. The neptunium is sorbed on insoluble carbonates formed in and on the saltstone matrix. Further testing showed that addition of 0.01 and 0.10 ml of 1 molar Ca +2 (ie. Ca (NO 3 ) 2 , CaCl 2 ) into 15 ml of simulated DWPF solution yielded a white carbonate precipitate which also removed >80% of the neptunium after 1 hour equilibration. Further experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of this procedure to co-precipitate strontium

  8. Simulation of macromolecule self-assembly in solution: A multiscale approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavino, Alessio D., E-mail: alessiodomenico.lavino@studenti.polito.it; Barresi, Antonello A., E-mail: antonello.barresi@polito.it; Marchisio, Daniele L., E-mail: daniele.marchisio@polito.it [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Istituto di Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Pasquale, Nicodemo di, E-mail: nicodemo.dipasquale@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UnitedKingdom (United Kingdom); Carbone, Paola, E-mail: paola.carbone@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UnitedKingdom (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-17

    One of the most common processes to produce polymer nanoparticles is to induce self-assembly by using the solvent-displacement method, in which the polymer is dissolved in a “good” solvent and the solution is then mixed with an “anti-solvent”. The polymer ability to self-assemble in solution is therefore determined by its structural and transport properties in solutions of the pure solvents and at the intermediate compositions. In this work, we focus on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) which is a biocompatible polymer that finds widespread application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, performing simulation at three different scales using three different computational tools: full atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), population balance modeling (PBM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Simulations consider PCL chains of different molecular weight in solution of pure acetone (good solvent), of pure water (anti-solvent) and their mixtures, and mixing at different rates and initial concentrations in a confined impinging jets mixer (CIJM). Our MD simulations reveal that the nano-structuring of one of the solvents in the mixture leads to an unexpected identical polymer structure irrespectively of the concentration of the two solvents. In particular, although in pure solvents the behavior of the polymer is, as expected, very different, at intermediate compositions, the PCL chain shows properties very similar to those found in pure acetone as a result of the clustering of the acetone molecules in the vicinity of the polymer chain. We derive an analytical expression to predict the polymer structural properties in solution at different solvent compositions and use it to formulate an aggregation kernel to describe the self-assembly in the CIJM via PBM and CFD. Simulations are eventually validated against experiments.

  9. Pore solution chemistry of simulated low-level liquid waste incorporated in cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Expressed pore solutions from simulated low level liquid waste cement grouts cured at room temperature, 50 degree C and 90 degree C for various duration were analyzed by standard chemical methods and ion chromatography. The solid portions of the grouts were formulated with portland cement, fly ash, slag, and attapulgite clay in the ratios of 3:3:3:1. Two different solutions simulating off-gas condensates expected from vitrification of Hanford low level tank wastes were made. One is highly alkaline and contains the species Na + , P0 4 3- , N0 2 - , NO 3 - and OH - . The other is carbonated and contains the species, Na + , PO 4 3- , NO 2 - , NO 3 - , and CO 3 2- . In both cases phosphate rapidly disappeared from the pore solution, leaving behind sodium in the form of hydroxide. The carbonates were also removed from the pore solution to form calcium carbonate and possibly calcium monocarboaluminate. These reactions resulted in the increase of hydroxide ion concentration in the early period. Subsequently there was a significant reduction OH - and Na + ion concentrations. In contrast high concentration of N0 2 - and N0 3 - were retained in the pore solution indefinitely

  10. Understanding cellulose dissolution: energetics of interactions of ionic liquids and cellobiose revealed by solution microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Heitor Fernando Nunes; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2015-05-11

    In this report, the interactions between fifteen selected ionic liquids (ILs) and cellobiose (CB) are examined by high-precision solution microcalorimetry. The heat of mixing (Δmix H) of CB and ILs, or CB and IL/molecular solvent (MS) solutions, provides the first ever-published measure of the affinity of CB with ILs. Most importantly, we found that there is a very good correlation between the nature of the results found for Δmix H(CB) and the solubility behavior of cellulose. This correlation suggests that Δmix H(CB) offers a good estimate of the enthalpy of dissolution of cellulose even in solvents in which cellulose is insoluble. Therefore, the current findings open up new horizons for unravelling the intricacies of the thermodynamic factors accounting for the spontaneity of cellulose dissolution in ILs or IL/MS solutions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous solution of nitric oxide in different formal oxidation states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Mateus F.; Rocha, Willian R.

    2015-10-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the early chemical events involved in the dynamics of nitric oxide (NOrad), nitrosonium cation (NO+) and nitroxide anion (NO-) in aqueous solution. The NO+ ion is very reactive in aqueous solution having a lifetime of ∼4 × 10-13 s, which is shorter than the value of 3 × 10-10 s predicted experimentally. The NO+ reacts generating the nitrous acid as an intermediate and the NO2- ion as the final product. The dynamics of NOrad revealed the reversibly formation of a transient anion radical species HONOrad -.

  12. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  13. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eapen, Jacob [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Murty, Korukonda [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Burchell, Timothy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-06-02

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  14. Understanding Barriers and Solutions Affecting Preschool Attendance in Low-Income Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman-Stillman, Amy; Englund, Michelle M.; Storm, Karen J.; Bailey, Ann E.

    2018-01-01

    Preschool attendance problems negatively impact children's school readiness skills and future school attendance. Parents are critical to preschoolers' attendance. This study explored parental barriers and solutions to preschool attendance in low-income families. School-district administrative data from a racially/ethnically diverse sample of…

  15. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  16. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  17. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, Narcisse

    2015-06-15

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  18. Aggregation work at polydisperse micellization: ideal solution and "dressed micelle" models comparing to molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, S V; Shchekin, A K

    2010-12-28

    General thermodynamic relations for the work of polydisperse micelle formation in the model of ideal solution of molecular aggregates in nonionic surfactant solution and the model of "dressed micelles" in ionic solution have been considered. In particular, the dependence of the aggregation work on the total concentration of nonionic surfactant has been analyzed. The analogous dependence for the work of formation of ionic aggregates has been examined with regard to existence of two variables of a state of an ionic aggregate, the aggregation numbers of surface active ions and counterions. To verify the thermodynamic models, the molecular dynamics simulations of micellization in nonionic and ionic surfactant solutions at two total surfactant concentrations have been performed. It was shown that for nonionic surfactants, even at relatively high total surfactant concentrations, the shape and behavior of the work of polydisperse micelle formation found within the model of the ideal solution at different total surfactant concentrations agrees fairly well with the numerical experiment. For ionic surfactant solutions, the numerical results indicate a strong screening of ionic aggregates by the bound counterions. This fact as well as independence of the coefficient in the law of mass action for ionic aggregates on total surfactant concentration and predictable behavior of the "waterfall" lines of surfaces of the aggregation work upholds the model of "dressed" ionic aggregates.

  19. Thorium determination by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry in simulated thorex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, M.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1991-11-01

    The X-ray fluorescence method for thorium determination in aqueous and organic (TBP/n-dodecane) solutions is described. The thin film technique for sample preparation and a suitable internal standard had been used. The best conditions for Thorium determination had been established studying some parameters as analytical line, internal standard, filter paper, paper geometry, sample volume and measurement conditions. With the established conditions, thorium was concentration range of to 200 g Th/L and in organic solutions (2-63g Th/L) with 1,5% of precision. The accuracy of the proposed method was 3% in aqueous and organic phases. The detection limit was 1,2μg thorium for aqueous solutions and 1,4μg for organic solutions. Uranium, fission products, corrosion products and Thorex reagent components were studied as interfering elements in the thorium analysis. The matrix effect was also studied using the Thorex process simulated solutions. Finally, the method was applied to thorium determination in irradiated thorium solutions with satisfactory results. (author)

  20. Dynamic Beam Solutions for Real-Time Simulation and Control Development of Flexible Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weihua; King, Cecilia K.; Clark, Scott R.; Griffin, Edwin D.; Suhey, Jeffrey D.; Wolf, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, flexible rockets are structurally represented by linear beams. Both direct and indirect solutions of beam dynamic equations are sought to facilitate real-time simulation and control development for flexible rockets. The direct solution is completed by numerically integrate the beam structural dynamic equation using an explicit Newmark-based scheme, which allows for stable and fast transient solutions to the dynamics of flexile rockets. Furthermore, in the real-time operation, the bending strain of the beam is measured by fiber optical sensors (FOS) at intermittent locations along the span, while both angular velocity and translational acceleration are measured at a single point by the inertial measurement unit (IMU). Another study in this paper is to find the analytical and numerical solutions of the beam dynamics based on the limited measurement data to facilitate the real-time control development. Numerical studies demonstrate the accuracy of these real-time solutions to the beam dynamics. Such analytical and numerical solutions, when integrated with data processing and control algorithms and mechanisms, have the potential to increase launch availability by processing flight data into the flexible launch vehicle's control system.

  1. Students' understanding of teamwork and professional roles after interprofessional simulation-a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxelmark, Lena; Nordahl Amorøe, Torben; Carlzon, Liisa; Rystedt, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how interprofessional simulation-based education (IPSE) can contribute to a change in students' understanding of teamwork and professional roles. A series of 1-day training sessions was arranged involving undergraduate nursing and medical students. Scenarios were designed for practicing teamwork principles and interprofessional communication skills by endorsing active participation by all team members. Four focus groups occurred 2-4 weeks after the training. Thematic analysis of the transcribed focus groups was applied, guided by questions on what changes in students' understanding of teamwork and professional roles were identified and how such changes had been achieved. The first question, aiming to identify changes in students' understanding of teamwork, resulted in three categories: realizing and embracing teamwork fundamentals, reconsidering professional roles, and achieving increased confidence. The second question, regarding how participation in IPSE could support the transformation of students' understanding of teamwork and of professional roles, embraced another three categories: feeling confident in the learning environment, embodying experiences, and obtaining an outside perspective. This study showed the potential of IPSE to transform students' understanding of others' professional roles and responsibilities. Students displayed extensive knowledge on fundamental teamwork principles and what these meant in the midst of participating in the scenarios. A critical prerequisite for the development of these new insights was to feel confident in the learning environment. The significance of how the environment was set up calls for further research on the design of IPSE in influencing role understanding and communicative skills in significant ways.

  2. Comparative study of structural properties of trehalose water solutions by neutron diffraction, synchrotron radiation and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaro, A.; Magazu, V.; Migliardo, F.; Sussich, F.; Vadala, M

    2004-07-15

    Neutron diffraction measurements combined with H/D substitution have been performed on trehalose aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and concentration by using the SANDALS diffractometer at ISIS Facility (UK). The findings point out a high capability of trehalose to strongly affect the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network of water. The neutron diffraction results are also compared with simulation and experimental data obtained by synchrotron radiation on the phospholipid bilayer membranes (DPPC)/trehalose/H{sub 2}O ternary system.

  3. An Accelerating Solution for N-Body MOND Simulation with FPGA-SoC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a modified-gravity proposal to handle the dark matter problem on galactic scales, Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND has shown a great success. However, the N-body MOND simulation is quite challenged by its computation complexity, which appeals to acceleration of the simulation calculation. In this paper, we present a highly integrated accelerating solution for N-body MOND simulations. By using the FPGA-SoC, which integrates both FPGA and SoC (system on chip in one chip, our solution exhibits potentials for better performance, higher integration, and lower power consumption. To handle the calculation bottleneck of potential summation, on one hand, we develop a strategy to simplify the pipeline, in which the square calculation task is conducted by the DSP48E1 of Xilinx 7 series FPGAs, so as to reduce the logic resource utilization of each pipeline; on the other hand, advantages of particle-mesh scheme are taken to overcome the bottleneck on bandwidth. Our experiment results show that 2 more pipelines can be integrated in Zynq-7020 FPGA-SoC with the simplified pipeline, and the bandwidth requirement is reduced significantly. Furthermore, our accelerating solution has a full range of advantages over different processors. Compared with GPU, our work is about 10 times better in performance per watt and 50% better in performance per cost.

  4. Finding Solutions to Different Problems Simultaneously in a Multi-molecule Simulated Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaderick P. Pabico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available – In recent years, the chemical metaphor has emerged as a computational paradigm based on the observation of different researchers that the chemical systems of living organisms possess inherent computational properties. In this metaphor, artificial molecules are considered as data or solutions, while the interactions among molecules are defined by an algorithm. In recent studies, the chemical metaphor was used as a distributed stochastic algorithm that simulates an abstract reactor to solve the traveling salesperson problem (TSP. Here, the artificial molecules represent Hamiltonian cycles, while the reactor is governed by reactions that can re-order Hamiltonian cycles. In this paper, a multi-molecule reactor (MMR-n that simulates chemical catalysis is introduced. The MMR-n solves in parallel three NP-hard computational problems namely, the optimization of the genetic parameters of a plant growth simulation model, the solution to large instances of symmetric and asymmetric TSP, and the static aircraft landing scheduling problems (ALSP. The MMR-n was shown as a computational metaphor capable of optimizing the cultivar coefficients of CERES-Rice model, and at the same time, able to find solutions to TSP and ALSP. The MMR-n as a computational paradigm has a better computational wall clock time compared to when these three problems are solved individually by a single-molecule reactor (MMR-1.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dielectric properties of fructose aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Milton T; Dolores Elola, M; Skaf, Munir S

    2016-01-01

    The static dielectric permittivity and dielectric relaxation properties of fructose aqueous solutions of different concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 4.0 mol l −1 are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The contributions from intra- and interspecies molecular correlations were computed individually for both the static and frequency-dependent dielectric properties, and the results were compared with the available experimental data. Simulation results in the time- and frequency-domains were analyzed and indicate that the presence of fructose has little effect on the position of the fast, high-frequency (>500 cm −1 ) components of the dielectric response spectrum. The low-frequency (<0.1 cm −1 ) components, however, are markedly influenced by sugar concentration. Our analysis indicates that fructose–fructose and fructose–water interactions strongly affect the rotational-diffusion regime of molecular motions in the solutions. Increasing fructose concentration not only enhances sugar–sugar and sugar-water low frequency contributions to the dielectric loss spectrum but also slows down the reorientational dynamics of water molecules. These results are consistent with previous computer simulations carried out for other disaccharide aqueous solutions. (paper)

  6. A thermodynamic solution model for calcium carbonate: Towards an understanding of multi-equilibria precipitation pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Donnet, Marcel; Bowen, Paul; Lemaître, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Thermodynamic solubility calculations are normally only related to thermodynamic equilibria in solution. In this paper, we extend the use of such solubility calculations to help elucidate possible precipitation reaction pathways during the entire reaction. We also estimate the interfacial energy of particles using only solubility data by a modification of Mersmann’s approach. We have carried this out by considering precipitation reactions as a succession of small quasi-equilibrium states. Thu...

  7. Simulating Osmotic Equilibria: A New Tool for Calculating Activity Coefficients in Concentrated Aqueous Salt Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Michael; Duvail, Magali; Guilbaud, Philippe; Dufrêche, Jean-François

    2017-10-19

    Herein, a new theoretical method is presented for predicting osmotic equilibria and activities, where a bulk liquid and its corresponding vapor phase are simulated by means of molecular dynamics using explicit polarization. Calculated time-averaged number density profiles provide the amount of evaporated molecules present in the vapor phase and consequently the vapor-phase density. The activity of the solvent and the corresponding osmotic coefficient are determined by the vapor density at different solute concentrations with respect to the reference vapor density of the pure solvent. With the extended Debye-Hückel equation for the activity coefficient along with the corresponding Gibbs-Duhem relation, the activity coefficients of the solutes are calculated by fitting the osmotic coefficients. A simple model based on the combination of Poisson processes and Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distributions is introduced to interpret statistical phenomena observed during the simulations, which are related to evaporation and recondensation. This method is applied to aqueous dysprosium nitrate [Dy(NO 3 ) 3 ] solutions at different concentrations. The obtained densities of the liquid bulk and the osmotic and activity coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental results for concentrated and saturated solutions. Density profiles of the liquid-vapor interface at different concentrations provide detailed insight into the spatial distributions of all compounds.

  8. Caffeine and sugars interact in aqueous solutions: a simulation and NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Engström, Olof; Schnupf, Udo; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Himmel, Michael; Widmalm, Göran; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W

    2012-09-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on several systems of caffeine interacting with simple sugars. These included a single caffeine molecule in a 3 m solution of α-D-glucopyranose, at a caffeine concentration of 0.083 m, a single caffeine in a 3 m solution of β-D-glucopyranose, and a single caffeine molecule in a 1.08 m solution of sucrose (table sugar). Parallel nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments were carried out on the same solutions under similar conditions. Consistent with previous thermodynamic experiments, the sugars were found to have an affinity for the caffeine molecules in both the simulations and experiments, and the binding in these complexes occurs by face-to-face stacking of the hydrophobic triad of protons of the pyranose rings against the caffeine face, rather than by hydrogen bonding. For the disaccharide, the binding occurs via stacking of the glucose ring against the caffeine, with a lesser affinity for the fructose observed. These findings are consistent with the association being driven by hydrophobic hydration and are similar to the previously observed binding of glucose rings to various other planar molecules, including indole, serotonin, and phenol.

  9. Modeling the liquid-liquid interface and the transfer of a solute by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1990-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics method and Lennard-Jones potential functions have been employed to model Liquid-Liquid Interfaces. The variation of the miscibilities between the two liquids is obtained by changing the interaction between the two atomic species. The resulting interfaces have a thickness of about three atomic diameters and are stable on the time scale of the simulation. They have been characterized by the density and pressure profiles. The interfacial tension has also been computed and is of the order of magnitude of experimental values. The diffusion process is anisotropic in the interfacial region: the transverse diffusion coefficient (parallelly to the interface) is higher than the normal one. A qualitative explanation of this behaviour is suggested by considering the pressure tensor. The second part of this work, performed by Molecular Dynamics in the canonical ensemble, is devoted to the kinetic study of the transfer of a solute through the interface. A model of a symmetric interface with an atomic solute has been used. The interaction potential between the solute and the solvents has been built in order to obtain an activation barrier to the transfer. We have computed the mean force exerted by the solvent on the solute as a function of its distance to the interface. The resulting mean force potential corresponds to a free energy difference. The height of the energy barrier involved is about 4 kT. The potential energy and entropy profiles have also been calculated and discussed. The diffusion coefficient of the solute has been computed by equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods. We deduced the friction coefficient of the solvent, which is essential to determine the Kramers transmission coefficient. This coefficient is compared to the one obtained by simulation. Finally, the solute transfer rate constant has been calculated. (author) [fr

  10. Exploration of DGVM Parameter Solution Space Using Simulated Annealing: Implications for Forecast Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J. R.; Kim, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Parameters in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are thought to be weakly constrained and can be a significant source of errors and uncertainties. DGVMs use between 5 and 26 plant functional types (PFTs) to represent the average plant life form in each simulated plot, and each PFT typically has a dozen or more parameters that define the way it uses resource and responds to the simulated growing environment. Sensitivity analysis explores how varying parameters affects the output, but does not do a full exploration of the parameter solution space. The solution space for DGVM parameter values are thought to be complex and non-linear; and multiple sets of acceptable parameters may exist. In published studies, PFT parameters are estimated from published literature, and often a parameter value is estimated from a single published value. Further, the parameters are "tuned" using somewhat arbitrary, "trial-and-error" methods. BIOMAP is a new DGVM created by fusing MAPSS biogeography model with Biome-BGC. It represents the vegetation of North America using 26 PFTs. We are using simulated annealing, a global search method, to systematically and objectively explore the solution space for the BIOMAP PFTs and system parameters important for plant water use. We defined the boundaries of the solution space by obtaining maximum and minimum values from published literature, and where those were not available, using +/-20% of current values. We used stratified random sampling to select a set of grid cells representing the vegetation of the conterminous USA. Simulated annealing algorithm is applied to the parameters for spin-up and a transient run during the historical period 1961-1990. A set of parameter values is considered acceptable if the associated simulation run produces a modern potential vegetation distribution map that is as accurate as one produced by trial-and-error calibration. We expect to confirm that the solution space is non-linear and complex, and that

  11. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  12. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  13. From single Debye-Hückel chains to polyelectrolyte solutions: Simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kurt

    1996-03-01

    This lecture will present results from simulations of single weakly charged flexible chains, where the electrostatic part of the interaction is modeled by a Debye-Hückel potential,( with U. Micka, IFF, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany) as well as simulations of polyelectrolyte solutions, where the counterions are explicitly taken into account( with M. J. Stevens, Sandia Nat. Lab., Albuquerque, NM 87185-1111) ( M. J. Stevens, K. Kremer, JCP 103), 1669 (1995). The first set of the simulations is meant to clear a recent contoversy on the dependency of the persistence length LP on the screening length Γ. While the analytic theories give Lp ~ Γ^x with either x=1 or x=2, the simulations find for all experimentally accessible chain lengths a varying exponent, which is significantly smaller than 1. This causes serious doubts on the applicability of this model for weakly charged polyelectrolytes in general. The second part deals with strongly charged flexible polyelectrolytes in salt free solution. These simulations are performed for multichain systems. The full Coulomb interactions of the monomers and counterions are treated explicitly. Experimental measurements of the osmotic pressure and the structure factor are reproduced and extended. The simulations reveal a new picture of the chain structure based on calculations of the structure factor, persistence length, end-to-end distance, etc. Even at very low density, the chains show significant bending. Furthermore, the chains contract significantly before they start to overlap. We also show that counterion condensation dramatically alters the chain structure, even for a good solvent backbone.

  14. Understanding ice nucleation characteristics of selective mineral dusts suspended in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Introduction & Objectives Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Kaufmann (PhD Thesis 2015, ETHZ) with Hoggar Mountain dust suspensions in various solutes (ammonium sulfate, PEG, malonic acid and glucose) showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear of how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust samples. In view of these results we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with the following mineral dust particles suspended in pure water and ammonium sulfate solutions: Arizona Test Dust (ATD), microcline, and kaolinite (KGa-2, Clay Mineral Society). Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (ATD: 2 weight%, microcline: 5% weight, KGa-2: 5% weight) are prepared in pure water with varying solute concentrations (ammonium sulfate: 0 - 10% weight). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich Chemical) and 5 wt% lanolin (Fluka Chemical) is emulsified with a

  15. WATSFAR: numerical simulation of soil WATer and Solute fluxes using a FAst and Robust method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevoisier, David; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    To simulate the evolution of hydro- and agro-systems, numerous spatialised models are based on a multi-local approach and improvement of simulation accuracy by data-assimilation techniques are now used in many application field. The latest acquisition techniques provide a large amount of experimental data, which increase the efficiency of parameters estimation and inverse modelling approaches. In turn simulations are often run on large temporal and spatial domains which requires a large number of model runs. Eventually, despite the regular increase in computing capacities, the development of fast and robust methods describing the evolution of saturated-unsaturated soil water and solute fluxes is still a challenge. Ross (2003, Agron J; 95:1352-1361) proposed a method, solving 1D Richards' and convection-diffusion equation, that fulfil these characteristics. The method is based on a non iterative approach which reduces the numerical divergence risks and allows the use of coarser spatial and temporal discretisations, while assuring a satisfying accuracy of the results. Crevoisier et al. (2009, Adv Wat Res; 32:936-947) proposed some technical improvements and validated this method on a wider range of agro- pedo- climatic situations. In this poster, we present the simulation code WATSFAR which generalises the Ross method to other mathematical representations of soil water retention curve (i.e. standard and modified van Genuchten model) and includes a dual permeability context (preferential fluxes) for both water and solute transfers. The situations tested are those known to be the less favourable when using standard numerical methods: fine textured and extremely dry soils, intense rainfall and solute fluxes, soils near saturation, ... The results of WATSFAR have been compared with the standard finite element model Hydrus. The analysis of these comparisons highlights two main advantages for WATSFAR, i) robustness: even on fine textured soil or high water and solute

  16. Implementing Mobile Phone Solutions for Health in Resource Constrained Areas: Understanding the Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Tiwonge Davis; Herstad, Jo

    This paper presents results from a study on mobile phone use to connect two rural hospitals in Malawi with community health workers (CHWs), the hospitals work with. Mobile phone use at the hospitals has helped reduce the need for face-to-face communication to permit patient information exchange, meetings and appointments scheduling, as well as work coordination. On the other hand mobile phone use has proved paradoxical as it has introduced users to challenges, like recharging of phone batteries, they did not anticipate. The paper highlights use context-centric and solution based opportunities and challenges associated with mobile phone use in rural settings.

  17. Effects of Structural Transparency in System Dynamics Simulators on Performance and Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Kopainsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior exploration is an instructional strategy that has improved performance and understanding in system-dynamics-based simulators, but only to a limited degree. This study investigates whether model transparency, that is, showing users the internal structure of models, can extend the prior exploration strategy and improve learning even more. In an experimental study, participants in a web-based simulation learned about and managed a small developing nation. All participants were provided the prior exploration strategy but only half received prior exploration embedded in a structure-behavior diagram intended to make the underlying model’s structure more transparent. Participants provided with the more transparent strategy demonstrated better understanding of the underlying model. Their performance, however, was the equivalent to those in the less transparent condition. Combined with previous studies, our results suggest that while prior exploration is a beneficial strategy for both performance and understanding, making the model structure transparent with structure-behavior diagrams is more limited in its effect.

  18. Using Modeling and Simulation to Complement Testing for Increased Understanding of Weapon Subassembly Response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davidson, Megan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    As part of Sandia’s nuclear deterrence mission, the B61-12 Life Extension Program (LEP) aims to modernize the aging weapon system. Modernization requires requalification and Sandia is using high performance computing to perform advanced computational simulations to better understand, evaluate, and verify weapon system performance in conjunction with limited physical testing. The Nose Bomb Subassembly (NBSA) of the B61-12 is responsible for producing a fuzing signal upon ground impact. The fuzing signal is dependent upon electromechanical impact sensors producing valid electrical fuzing signals at impact. Computer generated models were used to assess the timing between the impact sensor’s response to the deceleration of impact and damage to major components and system subassemblies. The modeling and simulation team worked alongside the physical test team to design a large-scale reverse ballistic test to not only assess system performance, but to also validate their computational models. The reverse ballistic test conducted at Sandia’s sled test facility sent a rocket sled with a representative target into a stationary B61-12 (NBSA) to characterize the nose crush and functional response of NBSA components. Data obtained from data recorders and high-speed photometrics were integrated with previously generated computer models in order to refine and validate the model’s ability to reliably simulate real-world effects. Large-scale tests are impractical to conduct for every single impact scenario. By creating reliable computer models, we can perform simulations that identify trends and produce estimates of outcomes over the entire range of required impact conditions. Sandia’s HPCs enable geometric resolution that was unachievable before, allowing for more fidelity and detail, and creating simulations that can provide insight to support evaluation of requirements and performance margins. As computing resources continue to improve, researchers at Sandia are hoping

  19. Numerical Simulation of the Freeze-Thaw Behavior of Mortar Containing Deicing Salt Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, Hadi S; Farnam, Yaghoob; Bentz, Dale P; Zavattieri, Pablo D; Weiss, Jason

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional finite difference model that is developed to describe the freeze-thaw behavior of an air-entrained mortar containing deicing salt solution. A phenomenological model is used to predict the temperature and the heat flow for mortar specimens during cooling and heating. Phase transformations associated with the freezing/melting of water/ice or transition of the eutectic solution from liquid to solid are included in this phenomenological model. The lever rule is used to calculate the quantity of solution that undergoes the phase transformation, thereby simulating the energy released/absorbed during phase transformation. Undercooling and pore size effects are considered in the numerical model. To investigate the effect of pore size distribution, this distribution is considered using the Gibbs-Thomson equation in a saturated mortar specimen. For an air-entrained mortar, the impact of considering pore size (and curvature) on freezing was relatively insignificant; however the impact of pore size is much more significant during melting. The fluid inside pores smaller than 5 nm (i.e., gel pores) has a relatively small contribution in the macroscopic freeze-thaw behavior of mortar specimens within the temperature range used in this study (i.e., +24 °C to -35 °C), and can therefore be neglected for the macroscopic freeze-thaw simulations. A heat sink term is utilized to simulate the heat dissipation during phase transformations. Data from experiments performed using a low-temperature longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) on mortar specimens fully saturated with various concentration NaCl solutions or partially saturated with water is compared to the numerical results and a promising agreement is generally obtained.

  20. Understanding of electrochemical and structural changes of polypyrrole/polyethylene glycol composite films in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirvu, Cristian; Manole, Claudiu Constantin; Stoian, Andrei Bogdan; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Electrochemical monitoring of PPy and PPy-PEG films over immersion time. → Electrochemical and surface analysis showed that PEG improves the stability of PPy films. → Mott-Schottky analysis reveals p-type conductance for both films. → In situ AFM analysis sustains electrochemical behaviour. → A model of PPy and PPy-PEG films behaviour during immersion was elaborated. - Abstract: Electrochemical monitoring of electrical and structural changes of both PPy and PPy-PEG films electrochemical deposited, in order to highlight if the structural stability offered by PEG has an influence on electrical properties and stability in aqueous solution over immersion time was investigated. Electrochemical analysis suggests that PPy-PEG film inserts cations easier than PPy film for a short immersion time probably due to ability of PEG to form complexes with metal cations. The FTIR spectra showed that the PEG incorporation decreases the rate of PPy overoxidation probably by restraining the electron release and by rendering O 2 inaccessible to PPy. Mott-Schottky analysis based on capacitance measurement reveal p-type conductance for both films. The in situ AFM analysis sustains electrochemical behaviour and has permitted elaboration of a model of PPy and PPy-PEG films behaviour during immersion in testing solution.

  1. Understanding of electrochemical and structural changes of polypyrrole/polyethylene glycol composite films in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirvu, Cristian, E-mail: c_pirvu@chim.pub.ro [University Polytechnic of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1-7 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Manole, Claudiu Constantin; Stoian, Andrei Bogdan; Demetrescu, Ioana [University Polytechnic of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1-7 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > Electrochemical monitoring of PPy and PPy-PEG films over immersion time. > Electrochemical and surface analysis showed that PEG improves the stability of PPy films. > Mott-Schottky analysis reveals p-type conductance for both films. > In situ AFM analysis sustains electrochemical behaviour. > A model of PPy and PPy-PEG films behaviour during immersion was elaborated. - Abstract: Electrochemical monitoring of electrical and structural changes of both PPy and PPy-PEG films electrochemical deposited, in order to highlight if the structural stability offered by PEG has an influence on electrical properties and stability in aqueous solution over immersion time was investigated. Electrochemical analysis suggests that PPy-PEG film inserts cations easier than PPy film for a short immersion time probably due to ability of PEG to form complexes with metal cations. The FTIR spectra showed that the PEG incorporation decreases the rate of PPy overoxidation probably by restraining the electron release and by rendering O{sub 2} inaccessible to PPy. Mott-Schottky analysis based on capacitance measurement reveal p-type conductance for both films. The in situ AFM analysis sustains electrochemical behaviour and has permitted elaboration of a model of PPy and PPy-PEG films behaviour during immersion in testing solution.

  2. Modeling and simulation of storm surge on Staten Island to understand inundation mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Michael E.; Benimoff, Alan I.; Fritz, William J.; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Blanton, Brian O.; Dzedzits, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall on October 29, 2012, near Brigantine, New Jersey, and had a transformative impact on Staten Island and the New York Metropolitan area. Of the 43 New York City fatalities, 23 occurred on Staten Island. The borough, with a population of approximately 500,000, experienced some of the most devastating impacts of the storm. Since Hurricane Sandy, protective dunes have been constructed on the southeast shore of Staten Island. ADCIRC+SWAN model simulations run on The City University of New York's Cray XE6M, housed at the College of Staten Island, using updated topographic data show that the coast of Staten Island is still susceptible to tidal surge similar to those generated by Hurricane Sandy. Sandy hindcast simulations of storm surges focusing on Staten Island are in good agreement with observed storm tide measurements. Model results calculated from fine-scaled and coarse-scaled computational grids demonstrate that finer grids better resolve small differences in the topography of critical hydraulic control structures, which affect storm surge inundation levels. The storm surge simulations, based on post-storm topography obtained from high-resolution lidar, provide much-needed information to understand Staten Island's changing vulnerability to storm surge inundation. The results of fine-scale storm surge simulations can be used to inform efforts to improve resiliency to future storms. For example, protective barriers contain planned gaps in the dunes to provide for beach access that may inadvertently increase the vulnerability of the area.

  3. A Framework for Understanding and Generating Integrated Solutions for Residential Peak Energy Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  4. The challenges of understanding glycolipid functions: An open outlook based on molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manna, M.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    and molecular simulations can be used to shed light on the role of glycolipids in membrane structure and dynamics, receptor function, and other phenomena related to emergence of diseases such as Parkinson's. The cases we discuss highlight the challenge to understand how glycolipids function in cell membranes......, and the significant added value that one would gain by bridging molecular simulations with experiments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Glycolipids are the most complex lipid type in cell membranes, characterized by a great diversity of different structures and functions. The underlying atomistic/molecular interactions and mechanisms associated with these functions are not well understood. Here we discuss how atomistic...

  5. Multiphase flow experiments, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the water - gas - solute movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Ma, X.; Su, N.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water and solute into and through the vadose zone is, in essence, an issue of immiscible displacement in pore-space network of a soil. Therefore, multiphase flow and transport in porous media, referring to three medium: air, water, and the solute, pose one of the largest unresolved challenges for porous medium fluid seepage. However, this phenomenon has always been largely neglected. It is expected that a reliable analysis model of the multi-phase flow in soil can truly reflect the process of natural movement about the infiltration, which is impossible to be observed directly. In such cases, geophysical applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides the opportunity to measure the water movements into soils directly over a large scale from tiny pore to regional scale, accordingly enable it available both on the laboratory and on the field. In addition, the NMR provides useful information about the pore space properties. In this study, we proposed both laboratory and field experiments to measure the multi-phase flow parameters, together with optimize the model in computer programming based on the fractional partial differential equations (fPDE). In addition, we establish, for the first time, an infiltration model including solute flowing with water, which has huge influence on agriculture and soil environment pollution. Afterwards, with data collected from experiments, we simulate the model and analyze the spatial variability of parameters. Simulations are also conducted according to the model to evaluate the effects of airflow on water infiltration and other effects such as solute and absorption. It has significant meaning to oxygen irrigation aiming to higher crop yield, and shed more light into the dam slope stability. In summary, our framework is a first-time model added in solute to have a mathematic analysis with the fPDE and more instructive to agriculture activities.

  6. Understanding the nitrate coordination to Eu3+ ions in solution by potential of mean force calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvail, M.; Guilbaud, Ph.

    2011-01-01

    Coordination of nitrate anions with lanthanoid cations (Ln 3+ ) in water, methanol and octanol-1 has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization. Potential of mean force (PMF) profiles have been calculated for a mono-complex of lanthanoid nitrate (Ln(NO 3 ) 2+ ) in these solvents using umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics. In pure water, no difference in the nitrato coordination to lanthanoids (Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ and Dy 3+ ) is observed, i.e. the nitrate anion prefers the monodentate coordination, which promotes the salt dissociation. Then, the influence of the nature of the solvating molecules on the nitrato coordination to Eu 3+ has been investigated. PMF profiles point out that both monodentate and bidentate coordinations are stable in neat methanol, while in neat octanol, only the bidentate one is. MD simulations of Eu(NO 3 ) 3 in water-octanol mixtures with different concentrations of water have been then performed and confirm the importance of the water molecules' presence on the nitrate ion's coordination mode. (authors)

  7. Copy of Using Emulation and Simulation to Understand the Large-Scale Behavior of the Internet.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Armstrong, Robert C.; Chiang, Ken; Gentile, Ann C.; Lloyd, Levi; Minnich, Ronald G.; Vanderveen, Keith; Van Randwyk, Jamie A; Rudish, Don W.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the work done in the late-start LDRDUsing Emulation and Simulation toUnderstand the Large-Scale Behavior of the Internet. We describe the creation of a researchplatform that emulates many thousands of machines to be used for the study of large-scale inter-net behavior. We describe a proof-of-concept simple attack we performed in this environment.We describe the successful capture of a Storm bot and, from the study of the bot and furtherliterature search, establish large-scale aspects we seek to understand via emulation of Storm onour research platform in possible follow-on work. Finally, we discuss possible future work.3

  8. [Structure of crambin in solution, crystal and in the trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaturov, L V; Nosova, N G

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of the three-dimensional crambin structure alterations in the crystalline environments and in the trajectories of the molecular dynamics simulations in the vacuum and crystal surroundings have been analyzed. In the crystalline state and in the solution the partial regrouping of remote intramolecular packing contacts, involved in the formation and stabilization of the tertiary structure of the crambin molecule, occurs in NMR structures. In the crystalline state it is initiated by the formation of the intermolecular contacts, the conformational influence of its appearance is distributed over the structure. The changes of the conformations and positions of the residues of the loop segments, where the intermolecular contacts of the crystal surroundings are preferably concentrated, are most observable. Under the influence of these contacts the principal change of the regular secondary structure of crambin is taking place: extension of the two-strand beta structure to the three-strand structure with the participation of the single last residue N46 of the C-terminal loop. In comparison with the C-terminal loop the more profound changes are observed in the conformation and the atomic positions of the backbone atoms and in the solvent accessibility of the residues of the interhelical loop. In the solution of the ensemble of the 8 NMR structures relative accessibility to the solvent differs more noticeably also in the region of the loop segments and rather markedly in the interhelical loop. In the crambin cryogenic crystal structures the positions of the atoms of the backbone and/or side chain of 14-18 of 46 residues are discretely disordered. The disorganizations of at least 8 of 14 residues occur directly in the regions of the intermolecular contacts and another 5 residues are disordered indirectly through the intramolecular contacts with the residues of the intermolecular contacts. Upon the molecular dynamics simulation in the vacuum surrounding as in the

  9. Finite element simulation of moisture movement and solute transport in a large caisson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Jones, B.G.; Parker, J.C.; Wadsworth, T.D.; White, H.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the solute transport experiments performed on compacted, crushed Bandelier Tuff in caisson B of the experimental cluster described by DePoorter (1981) are simulated. Both one- and three-dimensional simulations of solute transport have been performed using two selected finite element codes. Results of bromide and iodide tracer experiments conducted during near-steady flow conditions have been analyzed for pulse additions made on December 6, 1984, and followed over a period of up to 60 days. In addition, a pulse addition of nonconservative strontium tracer on September 28, 1984, during questionably steady flow conditions has been analyzed over a period of 240 days. One-dimensional finite element flow and transport simulations were carried out assuming the porous medium to be homogeneous and the injection source uniformly distributed. To evaluate effects of the nonuniform source distribution and also to investigate effects of inhomogeneous porous medium properties, three dimensional finite element analyses of transport were carried out. Implications of the three-dimensional effects for the design and analysis of future tracer studies are discussed

  10. Understanding the central kinematics of globular clusters with simulated integrated-light IFU observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Paolo; Norris, Mark A.; van de Ven, Glenn; Schinnerer, Eva

    2015-10-01

    The detection of intermediate-mass black holes in the centres of globular clusters is highly controversial, as complementary observational methods often deliver significantly different results. In order to understand these discrepancies, we develop a procedure to simulate integral field unit (IFU) observations of globular clusters: Simulating IFU Star Cluster Observations (SISCO). The inputs of our software are realistic dynamical models of globular clusters that are then converted in a spectral data cube. We apply SISCO to Monte Carlo cluster simulations with a realistic number of stars and concentrations. Using independent realizations of a given simulation we are able to quantify the stochasticity intrinsic to the problem of observing a partially resolved stellar population with integrated-light spectroscopy. We show that the luminosity-weighted IFU observations can be strongly biased by the presence of a few bright stars that introduce a scatter in the velocity dispersion measurements up to ≃40 per cent around the expected value, preventing any sound assessment of the central kinematic and a sensible interpretation of the presence/absence of an intermediate-mass black hole. Moreover, we illustrate that, in our mock IFU observations, the average kinematic tracer has a mass of ≃0.75 M⊙, only slightly lower than the mass of the typical stars examined in studies of resolved line-of-sight velocities of giant stars. Finally, in order to recover unbiased kinematic measurements we test different masking techniques that allow us to remove the spaxels dominated by bright stars, bringing the scatter down to a level of only a few per cent. The application of SISCO will allow us to investigate state-of-the-art simulations as realistic observations.

  11. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.; Cook, Stuart N.; Scanlon, David O.; Fearn, Sarah; Cabana, Jordi; Greaves, Colin; Kilner, John A.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  12. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.

    2014-09-24

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  13. A thermodynamic solution model for calcium carbonate: Towards an understanding of multi-equilibria precipitation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnet, Marcel; Bowen, Paul; Lemaître, Jacques

    2009-12-15

    Thermodynamic solubility calculations are normally only related to thermodynamic equilibria in solution. In this paper, we extend the use of such solubility calculations to help elucidate possible precipitation reaction pathways during the entire reaction. We also estimate the interfacial energy of particles using only solubility data by a modification of Mersmann's approach. We have carried this out by considering precipitation reactions as a succession of small quasi-equilibrium states. Thus possible equilibrium precipitation pathways can be evaluated by calculating the evolution of surface charge, particle size and/or interfacial energy during the ongoing reaction. The approach includes the use of the Kelvin's law to express the influence of particle size on the solubility constant of precipitates, the use of Nernst's law to calculate surface potentials from solubility calculations and relate this to experimentally measured zeta potentials. Calcium carbonate precipitation and zeta potential measurements of well characterised high purity calcite have been used as a model system to validate the calculated values. The clarification of the change in zeta potential on titration illustrates the power of this approach as a tool for reaction pathway prediction and hence knowledge based tailoring of precipitation reactions.

  14. Simulated x-ray scattering of protein solutions using explicit-solvent models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanghyun; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Makowski, Lee; Roux, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    X-ray solution scattering shows new promise for the study of protein structures, complementing crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. In order to realize the full potential of solution scattering, it is necessary to not only improve experimental techniques but also develop accurate and efficient computational schemes to relate atomistic models to measurements. Previous computational methods, based on continuum models of water, have been unable to calculate scattering patterns accurately, especially in the wide-angle regime which contains most of the information on the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. Here we present a novel formulation based on the atomistic description of water, in which scattering patterns are calculated from atomic coordinates of protein and water. Without any empirical adjustments, this method produces scattering patterns of unprecedented accuracy in the length scale between 5 and 100 A, as we demonstrate by comparing simulated and observed scattering patterns for myoglobin and lysozyme.

  15. Reusable Object-Oriented Solutions for Numerical Simulation of PDEs in a High Performance Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Object-oriented platforms developed for the numerical solution of PDEs must combine flexibility and reusability, in order to ease the integration of new functionalities and algorithms. While designing similar frameworks, a built-in support for high performance should be provided and enforced transparently, especially in parallel simulations. The paper presents solutions developed to effectively tackle these and other more specific problems (data handling and storage, implementation of physical models and numerical methods that have arisen in the development of COOLFluiD, an environment for PDE solvers. Particular attention is devoted to describe a data storage facility, highly suitable for both serial and parallel computing, and to discuss the application of two design patterns, Perspective and Method-Command-Strategy, that support extensibility and run-time flexibility in the implementation of physical models and generic numerical algorithms respectively.

  16. VM-based infrastructure for simulating different cluster and storage solutions in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    KUTOUSKI, M; The ATLAS collaboration; PETROSYAN, A; KADOCHNIKOV, I; BELOV, S; KORENKOV, V

    2012-01-01

    The current ATLAS Tier3 infrastructure consists of a variety of sites of different sizes and with a mix of local resource management systems (LRMS) and mass storage system (MSS) implementations. The Tier3 monitoring suite, having been developed in order to satisfy the needs of Tier3 site administrators and to aggregate Tier3 monitoring information on the global VO level, needs to be validated for various combinations of LRMS and MSS solutions along with the corresponding Ganglia and/or Nagios plugins. For this purpose the Testbed infrastructure, which allows simulation of various computational cluster and storage solutions, had been set up at JINR (Dubna). This infrastructure provides the ability to run testbeds with various LRMS and MSS implementations, and with the capability to quickly redeploy particular testbeds or their components. Performance of specific components is not a critical issue for development and validation, whereas easy management and deployment are crucial. Therefore virtual machines were...

  17. Experimental simulation: using generative modelling and palaeoecological data to understand human-environment interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Perry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The amount of palaeoecological information available continues to grow rapidly, providing improved descriptions of the dynamics of past ecosystems and enabling them to be seen from new perspectives. At the same time, there has been concern over whether palaeoecological enquiry needs to move beyond descriptive inference to a more hypothesis-focussed or experimental approach; however, the extent to which conventional hypothesis-driven scientific frameworks can be applied to historical contexts (i.e., the past is the subject of ongoing debate. In other disciplines concerned with human-environment interactions, including physical geography and archaeology, there has been growing use of generative simulation models, typified by agent-based approaches. Generative modelling encourages counter-factual questioning (what if…?, a mode of argument that is particularly important in systems and time-periods, such as the Holocene and now the Anthropocene, where the effects of humans and other biophysical processes are deeply intertwined. However, palaeoecologically focused simulation of the dynamics of the ecosystems of the past either seems to be conducted to assess the applicability of some model to the future or treats humans simplistically as external forcing factors. In this review we consider how generative simulation-modelling approaches could contribute to our understanding of past human-environment interactions. We consider two key issues: the need for null models for understanding past dynamics and the need to be able learn more from pattern-based analysis. In this light, we argue that there is considerable scope for palaeocology to benefit from developments in generative models and their evaluation. We discuss the view that simulation is a form of experiment and, by using case studies, consider how the many patterns available to palaeoecologists can support model evaluation in a way that moves beyond simplistic pattern-matching and how such models

  18. Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this small-scale simulant mixing study was to identify the processes within the Hanford Site River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) that may generate precipitates and to identify the types of precipitates formed. This information can be used to identify where mixtures of various solutions will cause precipitation of solids, potentially causing operational problems such as fouling equipment or increasing the amount of High Level Waste glass produced. Having this information will help guide protocols for flushing or draining tanks, mixing internal recycle streams, and mixing waste tank supernates. This report contains the discussion and thermodynamic chemical speciation modeling of the raw data

  19. Ammonia and carbon dioxide regeneration from multicomponent solutions: II - Simulation and analysis of results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jotanović Milovan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the simulation of the technological process of NH3 and CO2 regeneration from the multicomponent solution NH3-CO2-NaCl-NH4Cl, based on a developed mathematical model of the process. All the parameters of the technological process were obtained from the simulation, and they represent the mass flow rates as well as the physical and chemical properties (pressure, temperature,.. of all the flows shown on the process flowsheet. The calculation of numerous variations of the process also enabled the analysis and establishment for a relation between the crucial process variables and the steam and liquid phase supply. These relations are important for the absorption-desorption process of synthesis, operating process analysis and process control.

  20. Towards an understanding of induced-charge electrokinetics at large applied voltages in concentrated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazant, Martin Z; Kilic, Mustafa Sabri; Storey, Brian D; Ajdari, Armand

    2009-11-30

    The venerable theory of electrokinetic phenomena rests on the hypothesis of a dilute solution of point-like ions in quasi-equilibrium with a weakly charged surface, whose potential relative to the bulk is of order the thermal voltage (kT/e approximately 25 mV at room temperature). In nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena, such as AC or induced-charge electro-osmosis (ACEO, ICEO) and induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP), several V approximately 100 kT/e are applied to polarizable surfaces in microscopic geometries, and the resulting electric fields and induced surface charges are large enough to violate the assumptions of the classical theory. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical literatures, highlight discrepancies between theory and experiment, introduce possible modifications of the theory, and analyze their consequences. We argue that, in response to a large applied voltage, the "compact layer" and "shear plane" effectively advance into the liquid, due to the crowding of counterions. Using simple continuum models, we predict two general trends at large voltages: (i) ionic crowding against a blocking surface expands the diffuse double layer and thus decreases its differential capacitance, and (ii) a charge-induced viscosity increase near the surface reduces the electro-osmotic mobility; each trend is enhanced by dielectric saturation. The first effect is able to predict high-frequency flow reversal in ACEO pumps, while the second may explain the decay of ICEO flow with increasing salt concentration. Through several colloidal examples, such as ICEP of an uncharged metal sphere in an asymmetric electrolyte, we show that nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena are generally ion-specific. Similar theoretical issues arise in nanofluidics (due to confinement) and ionic liquids (due to the lack of solvent), so the paper concludes with a general framework of modified electrokinetic equations for finite-sized ions.

  1. Reduced-Order Direct Numerical Simulation of Solute Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2017-11-01

    Pore-scale models are an important tool for analyzing fluid dynamics in porous materials (e.g., rocks, soils, fuel cells). Current direct numerical simulation (DNS) techniques, while very accurate, are computationally prohibitive for sample sizes that are statistically representative of the porous structure. Reduced-order approaches such as pore-network models (PNM) aim to approximate the pore-space geometry and physics to remedy this problem. Predictions from current techniques, however, have not always been successful. This work focuses on single-phase transport of a passive solute under advection-dominated regimes and delineates the minimum set of approximations that consistently produce accurate PNM predictions. Novel network extraction (discretization) and particle simulation techniques are developed and compared to high-fidelity DNS simulations for a wide range of micromodel heterogeneities and a single sphere pack. Moreover, common modeling assumptions in the literature are analyzed and shown that they can lead to first-order errors under advection-dominated regimes. This work has implications for optimizing material design and operations in manufactured (electrodes) and natural (rocks) porous media pertaining to energy systems. This work was supported by the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute for Reservoir Simulation (SUPRI-B).

  2. Understanding and Enhancing Soil Biological Health: The Solution for Reversing Soil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Michael Lehman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective is to provide an optimistic strategy for reversing soil degradation by increasing public and private research efforts to understand the role of soil biology, particularly microbiology, on the health of our world’s soils. We begin by defining soil quality/soil health (which we consider to be interchangeable terms, characterizing healthy soil resources, and relating the significance of soil health to agroecosystems and their functions. We examine how soil biology influences soil health and how biological properties and processes contribute to sustainability of agriculture and ecosystem services. We continue by examining what can be done to manipulate soil biology to: (i increase nutrient availability for production of high yielding, high quality crops; (ii protect crops from pests, pathogens, weeds; and (iii manage other factors limiting production, provision of ecosystem services, and resilience to stresses like droughts. Next we look to the future by asking what needs to be known about soil biology that is not currently recognized or fully understood and how these needs could be addressed using emerging research tools. We conclude, based on our perceptions of how new knowledge regarding soil biology will help make agriculture more sustainable and productive, by recommending research emphases that should receive first priority through enhanced public and private research in order to reverse the trajectory toward global soil degradation.

  3. Adaptive Planning: Understanding Organizational Workload to Capability/ Capacity through Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In August 2003, the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) established the Adaptive Planning (AP) initiative [1] with an objective of reducing the time necessary to develop and revise Combatant Commander (COCOM) contingency plans and increase SECDEF plan visibility. In addition to reducing the traditional plan development timeline from twenty-four months to less than twelve months (with a goal of six months)[2], AP increased plan visibility to Department of Defense (DoD) leadership through In-Progress Reviews (IPRs). The IPR process, as well as the increased number of campaign and contingency plans COCOMs had to develop, increased the workload while the number of planners remained fixed. Several efforts from collaborative planning tools to streamlined processes were initiated to compensate for the increased workload enabling COCOMS to better meet shorter planning timelines. This paper examines the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP) directed contingency planning and staffing requirements assigned to a combatant commander staff through the lens of modeling and simulation. The dynamics of developing a COCOM plan are captured with an ExtendSim [3] simulation. The resulting analysis provides a quantifiable means by which to measure a combatant commander staffs workload associated with development and staffing JSCP [4] directed contingency plans with COCOM capability/capacity. Modeling and simulation bring significant opportunities in measuring the sensitivity of key variables in the assessment of workload to capability/capacity analysis. Gaining an understanding of the relationship between plan complexity, number of plans, planning processes, and number of planners with time required for plan development provides valuable information to DoD leadership. Through modeling and simulation AP leadership can gain greater insight in making key decisions on knowing where to best allocate scarce resources in an effort to meet DoD planning objectives.

  4. Interpretation of Word Problems and The Effect of Web Based Educational Simulations on Their Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KARAL

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to make the students involve with the simulation environment with the developed practice and to develop their problem solving abilities by making easy their understanding of word problems. For this goal, a web based simulation environment which could be manipulated related to the defined movement and pool problems was designed in the light of the defined questions in the curriculum. The research was designed according to semi-experimental pattern which has equalized control group. It was applied in two different 8th grade classes on 44 students in total in the city center of Trabzon in 2008-2009 spring semester. In the research it was benefited from both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods, in the study as the data collection instrument to measure students’ cognitive achievements, it was benefited from word problems achievement test which had 20 items and its KR-20 coefficient was 0,86, observations and from the interviews which were made with the students. The study involved 19 students in experiment group and 25 students in the controlled group. It was used web based education in the experiment group, however, in controlled group, traditional education was used. For the analysis of the data collected in the research, t-test as used for the independent groups. At the end of the research, it was seen that in understanding and solving the word problems, the students in the experiment group who used web based education environment which included simulation environment was more successful than the controlled group who used the traditional method. After the interviews it was concluded that the students in the experiment group had positive thoughts about the web based simulations environment. It is defined that students are more motivated to the lesson and they have an increasing self-confident in problem solving in simulation environment

  5. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S.; Gow, J. P. D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. Aims: The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event selection logic, and maximizing event recovery to improve photon-collection efficiency in SCDs. Methods: Charge generation and transportation in the SCD at different layers related to channel stops, field zones, and field-free zones due to photon interaction were computed using standard drift and diffusion equations. Charge collected in the buried channel due to photon interaction in different volumes of the detector was computed by assuming a Gaussian radial profile of the charge cloud. The collected charge was processed further to simulate both diagonal clocking read-out, which is a novel design exclusive for SCDs, and event selection logic to construct the energy spectrum. Results: We compare simulation results of the SCD CCD54 with measurements obtained during the ground calibration of C1XS and clearly demonstrate that our model reproduces all the major spectral features seen in calibration data. We also describe our understanding of interactions at

  6. Simulation of 2D rarefied gas flows based on the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleshkin, Sergey O.; Malkov, Ewgenij A.; Kudryavtsev, Alexey N.; Shershnev, Anton A.; Bondar, Yevgeniy A.; Kohanchik, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    There are various methods for calculating rarefied gas flows, in particular, statistical methods and deterministic methods based on the finite-difference solutions of the Boltzmann nonlinear kinetic equation and on the solutions of model kinetic equations. There is no universal method; each has its disadvantages in terms of efficiency or accuracy. The choice of the method depends on the problem to be solved and on parameters of calculated flows. Qualitative theoretical arguments help to determine the range of parameters of effectively solved problems for each method; however, it is advisable to perform comparative tests of calculations of the classical problems performed by different methods and with different parameters to have quantitative confirmation of this reasoning. The paper provides the results of the calculations performed by the authors with the help of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method and finite-difference methods of solving the Boltzmann equation and model kinetic equations. Based on this comparison, conclusions are made on selecting a particular method for flow simulations in various ranges of flow parameters.

  7. Pareto Optimal Solutions for Network Defense Strategy Selection Simulator in Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Pareto optimization in Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning (MORL leads to better learning results for network defense games. This is particularly useful for network security agents, who must often balance several goals when choosing what action to take in defense of a network. If the defender knows his preferred reward distribution, the advantages of Pareto optimization can be retained by using a scalarization algorithm prior to the implementation of the MORL. In this paper, we simulate a network defense scenario by creating a multi-objective zero-sum game and using Pareto optimization and MORL to determine optimal solutions and compare those solutions to different scalarization approaches. We build a Pareto Defense Strategy Selection Simulator (PDSSS system for assisting network administrators on decision-making, specifically, on defense strategy selection, and the experiment results show that the Satisficing Trade-Off Method (STOM scalarization approach performs better than linear scalarization or GUESS method. The results of this paper can aid network security agents attempting to find an optimal defense policy for network security games.

  8. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hong, E-mail: luohong@hhu.edu.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Su, Huaizhi [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098,China (China); Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang [Institute of Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083,China (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The pH value play an important role on passive mechanism of stainless steel. • The relationship between Cr/Fe ratio within the passive film and pH is non-linear. • Better corrosion resistance due to high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions. - Abstract: In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  9. [Effect of simulated heavy metal leaching solution of electroplating sludge on the bioactivity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin-Yuan; Sun, Pei-De; Lou, Ju-Qing; Guo, Mao-Xin; Ma, Wang-Gang

    2013-01-01

    An Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain WZ-1 was isolated from the tannery sludge in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province in China. The cell of WZ-1 strain is Gram negative and rod-shaped, its 16S rDNA sequence is closely related to that of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC23270 with 99% similarity. These results reveal that WZ-1 is a strain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The effects of Ni2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and 5 kinds of simulated leaching solutions of electroplating sludge on the bioactivity of Fe2+ oxidation and apparent respiratory rate of WZ-1 were investigated. The results showed that Ni2+ and Cr3+ did not have any influence on the bioactivity of WZ-1 at concentrations of 5.0 g x L(-1) and 0.1 g x L(-1), respectively. WZ-1 showed tolerance to high levels of Ni2+, Zn2+ (about 30.0 g x L(-1)), but it had lower tolerance to Cr3+ and Cu2+ (0.1 g x L(-1) Cr3+ and 2.5 g x L(-1) Cu2+). Different kinds of simulated leaching solution of electroplating sludge had significant differences in terms of their effects on the bioactivity of WZ-1 with a sequence of Cu/Ni/Cr/Zn > Cu/Ni/Zn > Cu/Cr/Zn > Cu/Ni/Cr > Ni/Cr/Zn.

  10. [Effect of simulated inorganic anion leaching solution of electroplating sludge on the bioactivity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Fang; Xie, Xin-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    An Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain WZ-1 (GenBank sequence number: JQ968461) was used as the research object. The effects of Cl-, NO3-, F- and 4 kinds of simulated inorganic anions leaching solutions of electroplating sludge on the bioactivity of Fe2+ oxidation and apparent respiratory rate of WZ-1 were investigated. The results showed that Cl-, NO3(-)- didn't have any influence on the bioactivity of WZ-1 at concentrations of 5.0 g x L(-1), 1.0 g x L(-1), respectively. WZ-1 showed tolerance to high levels of Cl- and NO3- (about 10.0 g x L(-1), 5.0 g x L(-1), respectively), but it had lower tolerance to F- (25 mg x L(-1)). Different kinds of simulated inorganic anions leaching solutions of electroplating sludge had significant differences in terms of their effects on bioactivity of WZ-1 with a sequence of Cl-/NO3(-)/F(-) > or = NO3(-)/F(-) > Cl-/F(-) > Cl(-)/NO3(-).

  11. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The pH value play an important role on passive mechanism of stainless steel. • The relationship between Cr/Fe ratio within the passive film and pH is non-linear. • Better corrosion resistance due to high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions. - Abstract: In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  12. Kinetic modeling and simulation of PCE and TCE removal in aqueous solutions by electron-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickelsen, Michael G.; Cooper, William J.; Secker, David A.; Rosocha, Louis A.; Kurucz, Charles N.; Waite, Thomas D.

    2002-01-01

    The irradiation of aqueous solutions of TCE and PCE using a high-energy electron-beam results in the rapid decomposition of both chemicals. It is known that both TCE and PCE react with the aqueous electron and the hydroxyl radical with bimolecular rate constants greater than 10 9 M -1 s -1 for each reaction. The fact that high-energy electrons produce significant concentrations of both e aq - and ·OH radicals in water makes it an effective process for the removal of TCE and PCE from aqueous solution. We have employed steady state and computer-based chemical kinetic models to simulate and better understand the chemistry and kinetics of e-beam irradiation when applied to natural water systems. Model results were benchmarked to experimental data, allowing for the optimization of the reaction of DOC with the ·OH radical. Values for the associated second-order reaction rate constant were found to be 2.5x10 8 and 4.0x10 8 M -1 s -1 , consistent with reported values for k OH,DOC . The models were also used to investigate the possibility of incomplete irradiation during treatment and the presence of proposed chemical reactions of by-products. The reactions involve radicals and radical-adduct species formed by the reaction of TCE and PCE with the hydroxyl radical

  13. Pore-scale and Continuum Simulations of Solute Transport Micromodel Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Mehmani, Yashar; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Tang, Y.; Liu, H.; Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Joekar Niasar, Vahid; Balhoff, Matthew; Dewers, T.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Leist, Emily AE; Hess, Nancy J.; Perkins, William A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2016-08-01

    Four sets of micromodel nonreactive solute transport experiments were conducted with flow velocity, grain diameter, pore-aspect ratio, and flow focusing heterogeneity as the variables. The data sets were offered to pore-scale modeling groups to test their simulators. Each set consisted of two learning experiments, for which all results was made available, and a challenge experiment, for which only the experimental description and base input parameters were provided. The experimental results showed a nonlinear dependence of the dispersion coefficient on the Peclet number, a negligible effect of the pore-aspect ratio on transverse mixing, and considerably enhanced mixing due to flow focusing. Five pore-scale models and one continuum-scale model were used to simulate the experiments. Of the pore-scale models, two used a pore-network (PN) method, two others are based on a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) approach, and one employed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The learning experiments were used by the PN models to modify the standard perfect mixing approach in pore bodies into approaches to simulate the observed incomplete mixing. The LB and CFD models used these experiments to appropriately discretize the grid representations. The continuum model use published non-linear relations between transverse dispersion coefficients and Peclet numbers to compute the required dispersivity input values. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results for the four challenge experiments show that all pore-scale models were all able to satisfactorily simulate the experiments. The continuum model underestimated the required dispersivity values and, resulting in less dispersion. The PN models were able to complete the simulations in a few minutes, whereas the direct models needed up to several days on supercomputers to resolve the more complex problems.

  14. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Linares, Universidad de Jaén, 23700 Linares, Jaén (Spain); Adroher-Benítez, Irene [Grupo de Física de Fluidos y Biocoloides, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated.

  15. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  16. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto; Adroher-Benítez, Irene

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated

  17. Nitrate-cancrinite precipitation on quartz sand in simulated Hanford tank solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, B R; Nagy, K L; Young, J S; Drexler, J W

    2001-11-15

    Caustic NaNO3 solutions containing dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand at 89 degrees C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste and primary subsurface minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began to precipitate onto the quartz after 2-10 days, cementing the grains together. Estimates of the equilibrium constant for the precipitation reaction differ for solutions with 0.1 or 1.0 m OH- (log Keq = 30.4 +/- 0.8 and 36.2 +/- 0.6, respectively). The difference in solubility may be attributable to more perfect crystallinity (i.e., fewer stacking faults) in the higher-pH cancrinite structure. This is supported by electron micrographs of crystal morphology and measured rates of Na volatilization under an electron beam. Precipitate crystallinity may affect radionuclide mobility, because stacking faults in the cancrinite structure can diminish its zeolitic cation exchange properties. The precipitation rate near the onset of nucleation depends on the total Al and Si concentrations in solution. The evolution of experimental Si concentrations was modeled by considering the dependence of quartz dissolution rate on AI(OH)4- activity, cancrinite precipitation, and the reduction of reactive surface area of quartz due to coverage by cancrinite.

  18. Phase transitions of single polymer chains and of polymer solutions: insights from Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, K; Paul, W; Strauch, T; Rampf, F; Ivanov, V; Luettmer-Strathmann, J

    2008-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of flexible and semiflexible macromolecules is distinct from that of small molecule systems, since the thermodynamic limit can also be approached when the number of (effective) monomers of a single chain (realizable by a polymer solution in the dilute limit) is approaching infinity. One can introduce effective attractive interactions into a simulation model for a single chain such that a swollen coil contracts when the temperature is reduced, until excluded volume interactions are effectively canceled by attractive forces, and the chain conformation becomes almost Gaussian at the theta point. This state corresponds to a tricritical point, as the renormalization group theory shows. Below the theta temperature a fluid globule is predicted (at nonzero concentration then phase separation between dilute and semidilute solutions occurs), while at still lower temperature a transition to a solid phase (crystal or glass) occurs. Monte Carlo simulations have shown, however, that the fluid globule phase may become suppressed, when the range of the effective attractive forces becomes too short, with the result that a direct (ultimately first-order) transition from the swollen coil to the solid occurs. This behavior is analogous to the behavior of colloidal particles with a very short range of attractive forces, where liquid-vapor-type phase separation may be suppressed. Analogous first-order transitions from swollen coils to dense rodlike or toroidal structures occur for semiflexible polymers. Finally, the modifications of the behavior discussed when the polymers are adsorbed at surfaces are also mentioned, and possible relations to wetting behavior of polymer solutions are addressed.

  19. Simulated jury and brain storm: Understanding the implementation of Belo Monte Hydroelectric dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Marques Formigosa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The physics teaching still finds many obstacles in basic education, mainly because of the strong resistance that we find within its methodologies, still centered in the didactic book and the memorization of formulas and laws. This manuscript aims to present the results of the strategies of Simulated Jury and Brain Storm developed in a Countryside Education Degree (emphasis in Natural Sciences, specifically at Fundamentals of Physics III in two classes of the 4th Period, in the countryside Of Paraense Amazon. In one class we used the strategy Cerebral Storm and another strategy was the Simulated Jury, the Electricity content. The analyzes were made based on the reports of the students in the class and notes made by the teacher/researcher. These developed strategies allowed the rupture of the stereotypes presented among the students about the methodologies used by their teachers in teaching Physics contents, which was based on traditional expository classes, and with the strategies used they realized that they can approach the contents of and, above all, led them to a critical reality understanding in which they are inserted.

  20. Accelerating Our Understanding of Supernova Explosion Mechanism via Simulations and Visualizations with GenASiS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budiardja, R. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cardall, Christian Y [ORNL; Endeve, Eirik [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most powerful explosions in the Universe, releasing about 1053 erg of energy on timescales of a few tens of seconds. These explosion events are also responsible for the production and dissemination of most of the heavy elements, making life as we know it possible. Yet exactly how they work is still unresolved. One reason for this is the sheer complexity and cost of a self-consistent, multi-physics, and multi-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulation, which is impractical, and often impossible, even on the largest supercomputers we have available today. To advance our understanding we instead must often use simplified models, teasing out the most important ingredients for successful explosions, while helping us to interpret results from higher fidelity multi-physics models. In this paper we investigate the role of instabilities in the core-collapse supernova environment. We present here simulation and visualization results produced by our code GenASiS.

  1. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Understand Mechanical Response of Thaumasite under Temperature and Strain Rate Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajilar, Shahin; Shafei, Behrouz; Cheng, Tao; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres

    2017-06-22

    Understanding the structural, thermal, and mechanical properties of thaumasite is of great interest to the cement industry, mainly because it is the phase responsible for the aging and deterioration of civil infrastructures made of cementitious materials attacked by external sources of sulfate. Despite the importance, effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical response of thaumasite had remained unexplored prior to the current study, in which the mechanical properties of thaumasite are fully characterized using the reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) method. With employing a first-principles based reactive force field, the RMD simulations enable the description of bond dissociation and formation under realistic conditions. From the stress-strain curves of thaumasite generated in the x, y, and z directions, the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and fracture strain are determined for the three orthogonal directions. During the course of each simulation, the chemical bonds undergoing tensile deformations are monitored to reveal the bonds responsible for the mechanical strength of thaumasite. The temperature increase is found to accelerate the bond breaking rate and consequently the degradation of mechanical properties of thaumasite, while the strain rate only leads to a slight enhancement of them for the ranges considered in this study.

  2. Understanding gas production mechanism and effectiveness of well stimulation in the Haynesville shale through reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.; Thompson, J.W.; Robinson, J.R. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The Haynesville Shale Basin is one of the large and most active shale gas plays in the United States, with 185 horizontal rigs currently in place. The Haynesville Shale is a very tight source rock and resource play. The gas resources are being converted into gas reserves with horizontal wells and hydraulic fracture treatments. A complex fracture network created during well stimulation is the main factor in generating superior early well performance in the area. The key to making better wells in all the gas shale plays is to understand how to create more surface area during hydraulic stimulation jobs and preserve the surface area for as long as possible. This paper presented a unique workflow and methodology that has enabled analysis of production data using reservoir simulation to explain the shale gas production mechanism and the effectiveness of stimulation treatments along laterals. Since 2008, this methodology has been used to analyze production data from more than 30 horizontal wells in the Haynesville Shale. Factors and parameters relating to short and long term well performance were investigated, including pore pressure, rock matrix quality, natural fractures, hydraulic fractures, and complex fracture networks. Operators can use the simulation results to determine where and how to spend resources to produce better wells and to reduce the uncertainties of developing these properties. 19 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  3. A Comparison of Students' Conceptual Understanding of Electric Circuits in Simulation Only and Simulation-Laboratory Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Tomi; Nurmi, Sami; Veermans, Koen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to compare learning outcomes of students using a simulation alone (simulation environment) with outcomes of those using a simulation in parallel with real circuits (combination environment) in the domain of electricity, and to explore how learning outcomes in these environments are mediated by implicit (only…

  4. The effect of biomolecules on the behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in various simulated physiological solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milošev, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The behaviour of CoCrMo alloy is investigated in four simulated physiological solutions. ► The effect of synovial fluid significantly differs from the effect of organic components hitherto studied. ► In the presence of organic components carbon and nitrogen containing species are formed. ► Composition, structure and thickness of surface layers were determined by XPS. - Abstract: CoCrMo orthopaedic alloy was oxidized potentiostatically in various simulated physiological solutions in order to reveal differences in the composition, thickness and structure of the surface layers formed as a function of solution composition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combined with angle-resolved measurements and depth profiling, was used for the purpose. The following simulated physiological solutions were used: (1) 0.9% NaCl, (2) simulated Hanks physiological solution containing various inorganic salts, (3) simulated Hanks physiological solution containing an aliquot of synovial fluid retrieved at a primary operation, and (4) minimum essential medium containing various inorganic salts, amino acids and vitamins. No significant differences between alloy treated in these solutions were observed after oxidation in the passive region; the oxide films are a few nanometres thick and, except in NaCl solution, contain a small amount of calcium phosphate. After oxidation at a potential in the transpassive range, however, the oxide thickness increases considerably due to incorporation of cobalt and molybdenum oxides. Further, the concentration of calcium phosphate increases. The layers formed in minimum essential medium and Hanks solution containing synovial fluid comprise nitrogen and carbon containing species. The addition of synovial fluid significantly affects the behaviour in Hanks solution.

  5. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at {approx}90{sup o}C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces

  6. The effect of functionalized polycarboxylate structures as corrosion inhibitors in a simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazayel, A. S.; Khorasani, M.; Sarabi, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylate derivatives with different comonomers and functional groups on the control or reduction of corrosion in steel specimens were evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic analysis. A highly alkaline contaminated concrete pore solution (CPS) containing chlorides was used to simulate the pitting corrosion, and according to the results, the mechanism of inhibitive action was determined. Both the inhibition efficiency and pitting corrosion inhibition of methacrylate-copolymers were in the order of poly methacrylate-co acrylamide > poly methacrylate-co-2-acrylamido-2 methylpropane sulfonic acid > poly methacrylate-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. In addition, the corrosion potential of steel specimens in all studied concentrations of NaCl with different concentrations of polymethacrylate-co acrylamide (as the best inhibitor in this study) in saturated Ca(OH)2 solution showed almost an identical trend. Polymethacrylic acid-co-acrylamide showed a 92.35% inhibitor efficiency in the saturated Ca(OH)2 solution containing 1.8 wt.% chlorides and could effectively reduce the corrosion rate. Even at 3.5 wt.% of NaCl, this inhibitor could remarkably reduce the destructive effect of chloride ion attacks on the steel surface and passive film. The inhibition effect of these polymeric inhibitors seemed to be due to the formation of a barrier layer on the metal surface, approved by the well-known adsorption mechanism of organic molecules at the metal/solution interface. The results of SEM, EDS and AFM investigations were also in agreement with the outcomes of electrochemical studies.

  7. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at ∼90 o C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces. The

  8. Using Sandia's Z Machine and Density Functional Theory Simulations to Understand Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2017-06-01

    The use of Z, NIF, and Omega have produced many breakthrough results in high pressure physics. One area that has greatly benefited from these facilities is the planetary sciences. The high pressure behavior of planetary materials has implications for numerous geophysical and planetary processes. The continuing discovery of exosolar super-Earths demonstrates the need for accurate equation of state data to better inform our models of their interior structures. Planetary collision processes, such as the moon-forming giant impact, require understanding planetary materials over a wide-range of pressures and temperatures. Using Z, we examined the shock compression response of some common planetary materials: MgO, Mg2SiO4, and Fe2O3 (hematite). We compare the experimental shock compression measurements with density functional theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. The combination of experiment and theory provides clearer understanding of planetary materials properties at extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Understanding the microscopic moisture migration in pore space using DEM simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of soil skeleton and migration of pore fluid are the major factors relevant to the triggering of and damages by liquefaction. The influence of pore fluid migration during earthquake has been demonstrated from recent model experiments and field case studies. Most of the current liquefaction assessment models are based on testing of isotropic liquefiable materials. However the recent New Zealand earthquake shows much severer damages than those predicted by existing models. A fundamental cause has been contributed to the embedded layers of low permeability silts. The existence of these silt layers inhibits water migration under seismic loads, which accelerated liquefaction and caused a much larger settlement than that predicted by existing theories. This study intends to understand the process of moisture migration in the pore space of sand using discrete element method (DEM simulation. Simulations were conducted on consolidated undrained triaxial testing of sand where a cylinder sample of sand was built and subjected to a constant confining pressure and axial loading. The porosity distribution was monitored during the axial loading process. The spatial distribution of porosity change was determined, which had a direct relationship with the distribution of excess pore water pressure. The non-uniform distribution of excess pore water pressure causes moisture migration. From this, the migration of pore water during the loading process can be estimated. The results of DEM simulation show a few important observations: (1 External forces are mainly carried and transmitted by the particle chains of the soil sample; (2 Porosity distribution during loading is not uniform due to non-homogeneous soil fabric (i.e. the initial particle arrangement and existence of particle chains; (3 Excess pore water pressure develops differently at different loading stages. At the early stage of loading, zones with a high initial porosity feature higher

  10. A simulation study of CS2 solutions in two related ionic liquids with dications and monocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynden-Bell, R. M.; Quitevis, E. L.

    2018-05-01

    Atomistic simulations of solutions of CS2 in an ionic liquid, [C8(C1im)2 ] [NTf2]2, with a divalent cation and in the corresponding ionic liquid with a monovalent cation, [C4C1im][NTf2], were carried out. The low-frequency librational density of states of the CS2 was of particular interest in view of recent optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (OHD-RIKES). Compared to the monocation ionic liquid, the maximum shifts to higher frequencies in the dication ionic liquid under ambient conditions, but was found to be significantly pressure-dependent. CS2 molecules lie above and below the plane of the imidazolium rings and found to be close to the butyl tails of the monocation. The diffusion rates and embedding energies of solvent ions and CS2 in the two ionic liquids were measured.

  11. Treatment of Simulated Soil Decontamination Waste Solution by Ferrocyanide-Anion Exchange Resin Beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Min Gil; Kim, Gye Nam; Jung, Chung Hun; Park, Jin Ho; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Preparation of ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin and adsorption test of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion were performed. Adsorption capability of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion in the simulated citric acid based soil decontamination waste solution was 4 times greater than that of the commercial cation exchange resin. Adsorption equilibrium of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion reached within 360 minutes. Adsorption capability on the Cs{sup -} ion became to decrease above the necessary Co{sup 2-} ion concentration in the experimental range. Recycling test of the spent ion exchange resin by the successive application of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine was also performed. It was found that desorption of Cs{sup -} ion from the resin occurred to satisfy the electroneutrality condition without any degradation of the resin.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 204Cu and AISI 304 stainless steels in simulated pore solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocijan, Aleksandra [Institute of Metals and Technology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-10-15

    The evolution of the passive films on AISI 204Cu and AISI 304 stainless steels in simulated pore solution for steel reinforcements in concrete, and with and without the addition of chloride, was studied using cyclic voltammetry and potentiodynamic measurements. The passive layers were studied at open-circuit potential by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passive films on both materials predominantly contained Cr-oxides, whereas the Fe-species were markedly depleted. Mn-enrichment was also observed. The addition of chloride ions did not have a significant influence on the composition of the passive layers. The surface morphology of the products formed on the surface of both investigated materials at open-circuit potential and at high over-potentials in the presence of chloride was studied using scanning electron microscopy. (orig.)

  13. Foam separation of Cu (II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions and simulated wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, K.; Beheir, Sh.G.; Aziz, M.

    2003-01-01

    Batch experiments on the removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions were performed through two foam separation techniques: precipitate flotation (PTF) an adsorbing colloid flotation (ACF). In ACF, Fe(III), oxyhydroxide was used as co precipitant and/or adsorbing colloid and sodium lauryl sulfate was used as a collector. ACF required a lower collector concentration than PTF. foreign ions were found to decrease the percent removal, the extent of decrease being higher by divalent ions than that by monovalent ones. However, the percent removal could be improved, even in presence of foreign ions, by addition of Al(II) as an activator. High removals could be attained for Cu(II) and Ni(II) from simulated wastewaters containing different concentrations of both metal ions. The addition of concentrations below the limits recommended by the egyptian regulations for environmental discharge

  14. Electrochemical behaviour of iron and AISI 304 stainless steel in simulated acid rain solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilic, Zora; Martinovic, Ivana [Mostar Univ. (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-10-15

    The growth mechanism and properties of the oxide films on iron and AISI 304 stainless steel were studied in simulated acid rain (pH 4.5) by means of electrochemical techniques and atomic absorption spectrometry. The layer-pore resistance model was applied to explain a potentiodynamic formation of surface oxides. It was found that the growth of the oxide film on iron takes place by the low-field migration mechanism, while that on the stainless steel takes place by the high-field mechanism. Kinetic parameters were determined. Impedance measurements revealed that Fe surface film has no protective properties at the open circuit potential, while the resistance of stainless steel oxide film is very high. The concentration of the metallic ions released into solution and measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy was in accordance with the results obtained from the electrochemical techniques.

  15. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  16. Simulating and understanding the gap outflow and oceanic response over the Gulf of Tehuantepec during GOTEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaodong; Peng, Melinda; Wang, Shouping; Wang, Qing

    2018-06-01

    Tehuantepecer is a strong mountain gap wind traveling through Chivela Pass into eastern Pacific coast in southern Mexico, most commonly between October and February and brings huge impacts on local and surrounding meteorology and oceanography. Gulf of Tehuantepec EXperiment (GOTEX) was conducted in February 2004 to enhance the understanding of the strong offshore gap wind, ocean cooling, vertical circulations and interactions among them. The gap wind event during GOTEX was simulated using the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®). The simulations are compared and validated with the observations retrieved from several satellites (GOES 10-12, MODIS/Aqua/Terra, TMI, and QuikSCAT) and Airborne EXpendable BathyThermograph (AXBT). The study shows that the gap wind outflow has a fanlike pattern expending from the coast and with a strong diurnal variability. The surface wind stress and cooling along the axis of the gap wind outflow caused intense upwelling and vertical mixing in the upper ocean; both contributed to the cooling of the ocean mixed layer under the gap wind. The cooling pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) also reflects temperature advection by the nearby ocean eddies to have a crescent shape. Two sensitivity experiments were conducted to understand the relative roles of the wind stress and heat flux on the ocean cooling. The control has more cooling right under the gap flow region than either the wind-stress-only or the heat-flux-only experiment. Overall, the wind stress has a slightly larger effect in bringing down the ocean temperature near the surface and plays a more important role in local ocean circulations beneath the mixed layer. The impact of surface heat flux on the ocean is more limited to the top 30 m within the mixed layer and is symmetric to the gap flow region by cooling the ocean under the gap flow region and reducing the warming on both sides. The effect of surface wind stress is to induce more cooling

  17. Passivation of duplex stainless steel in solutions simulating chloride-contaminated concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenouti, H.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Most studies published to date on the corrosion behaviour of stainless reinforcing steel are based on austenitic steel. The market presence of corrugated duplex steel is growing, however. The present study compared passivity in 2205 type duplex and 304 type austenitic stainless steel. Polarization tests in chloride-containing Ca(OH2 solutions confirmed the exceptional performance of duplex steels. X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS showed that the passive layer generated on duplex stainless steel in media simulating concrete pore solutions had a higher Cr content than the layer formed on steel in contact with the air. The XPS results also revealed that in duplex steel the form adopted by the passive layer Fe oxides was Fe3O4 in the solutions simulating concrete, rather than Fe2O3, as in duplex steel exposed to air. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS can be used to monitor the transformations taking place in the passive layer and analyze the factors involved.La mayoría de los estudios publicados hasta el momento sobre el comportamiento frente a la corrosión de armaduras de acero inoxidable se basan en aceros austeníticos. Sin embargo, la presencia en el mercado de aceros corrugados dúplex es cada vez más importante. En este trabajo se analiza la pasividad de un acero inoxidable dúplex tipo 2205 en comparación con la de un inoxidable austenítico tipo 304. Los ensayos de polarización en disoluciones de Ca(OH2 con cloruros confirman el excepcional comportamiento de los aceros dúplex. La espectroscopía fotoelectrónica de rayos X (XPS informa de que la capa pasiva generada en aceros inoxidables dúplex en medios que simulan la disolución de los poros del hormigón posee mayor contenido en óxidos de Cr que la formada en aire. También se puede deducir de los resultados de XPS que los óxidos de Fe de la capa pasiva de los aceros dúplex se encuentran en forma de Fe3O4 en las disoluciones que simulan el hormigón en vez de en

  18. Comparison of three-dimensional poisson solution methods for particle-based simulation and inhomogeneous dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Claudio; Gillespie, Dirk; Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Eisenberg, Robert S; Fiegna, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Particle-based simulation represents a powerful approach to modeling physical systems in electronics, molecular biology, and chemical physics. Accounting for the interactions occurring among charged particles requires an accurate and efficient solution of Poisson's equation. For a system of discrete charges with inhomogeneous dielectrics, i.e., a system with discontinuities in the permittivity, the boundary element method (BEM) is frequently adopted. It provides the solution of Poisson's equation, accounting for polarization effects due to the discontinuity in the permittivity by computing the induced charges at the dielectric boundaries. In this framework, the total electrostatic potential is then found by superimposing the elemental contributions from both source and induced charges. In this paper, we present a comparison between two BEMs to solve a boundary-integral formulation of Poisson's equation, with emphasis on the BEMs' suitability for particle-based simulations in terms of solution accuracy and computation speed. The two approaches are the collocation and qualocation methods. Collocation is implemented following the induced-charge computation method of D. Boda et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 034901 (2006)]. The qualocation method is described by J. Tausch et al. [IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems 20, 1398 (2001)]. These approaches are studied using both flat and curved surface elements to discretize the dielectric boundary, using two challenging test cases: a dielectric sphere embedded in a different dielectric medium and a toy model of an ion channel. Earlier comparisons of the two BEM approaches did not address curved surface elements or semiatomistic models of ion channels. Our results support the earlier findings that for flat-element calculations, qualocation is always significantly more accurate than collocation. On the other hand, when the dielectric boundary is discretized with curved surface elements, the

  19. Mass transfer simulation of nanofiltration membranes for electrolyte solutions through generalized Maxwell-Stefan approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshyargar, Vahid; Fadaei, Farzad; Ashrafizadeh, Seyed Nezameddin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed for simulation of ion transport through nanofiltration membranes. The model is based on the Maxwell-Stefan approach and takes into account steric, Donnan, and dielectric effects in the transport of mono and divalent ions. Theoretical ion rejection for multi-electrolyte mixtures was obtained by numerically solving the 'hindered transport' based on the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equation for the flux of ions. A computer simulation has been developed to predict the transport in the range of nanofiltration, a numerical procedure developed linearization and discretization form of the governing equations, and the finite volume method was employed for the numerical solution of equations. The developed numerical method is capable of solving equations for multicomponent systems of n species no matter to what extent the system shows stiffness. The model findings were compared and verified with the experimental data from literature for two systems of Na 2 SO 4 +NaCl and MgCl 2 +NaCl. Comparison showed great agreement for different concentrations. As such, the model is capable of predicting the rejection of different ions at various concentrations. The advantage of such a model is saving costs as a result of minimizing the number of required experiments, while it is closer to a realistic situation since the adsorption of ions has been taken into account. Using this model, the flux of permeates and rejections of multi-component liquid feeds can be calculated as a function of membrane properties. This simulation tool attempts to fill in the gap in methods used for predicting nanofiltration and optimization of the performance of charged nanofilters through generalized Maxwell-Stefan (GMS) approach. The application of the current model may weaken the latter gap, which has arisen due to the complexity of the fundamentals of ion transport processes via this approach, and may further facilitate the industrial development of

  20. Comparison of simulation and experimental results for a model aqueous tert-butanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, S. D.; Patey, G. N.

    2017-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the behavior of aqueous tert-butanol (TBA) solutions for a range of temperatures, using the CHARMM generalized force field (CGenFF) to model TBA and the TIP4P/2005 or TIP4P-Ew water model. Simulation results for the density, isothermal compressibility, constant pressure heat capacity, and self-diffusion coefficients are in good accord with experimental measurements. Agreement with the experiment is particularly good at low TBA concentration, where experiments have revealed anomalies in a number of thermodynamic properties. Importantly, the CGenFF model does not exhibit liquid-liquid demixing at temperatures between 290 and 320 K (for systems of 32 000 molecules), in contrast with the situation for several other common TBA models [R. Gupta and G. N. Patey, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034509 (2012)]. However, whereas real water and TBA are miscible at all temperatures where the liquid is stable, we observe some evidence of demixing at 340 K and above. To evaluate the structural properties at low concentrations, we compare with both neutron scattering and recent spectroscopic measurements. This reveals that while the CGenFF model is a definite improvement over other models that have been considered, the TBA molecules still exhibit a tendency to associate at low concentrations that is somewhat stronger than that indicated by experiments. Finally, we discuss the range and decay times of the long-range correlations, providing an indication of the system size and simulation times that are necessary in order to obtain reliable results for certain properties.

  1. Simulating adsorptive expansion of zeolites: application to biomass-derived solutions in contact with silicalite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Julian E; Tsapatsis, Michael; Auerbach, Scott M

    2013-04-16

    We have constructed and applied an algorithm to simulate the behavior of zeolite frameworks during liquid adsorption. We applied this approach to compute the adsorption isotherms of furfural-water and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF)-water mixtures adsorbing in silicalite zeolite at 300 K for comparison with experimental data. We modeled these adsorption processes under two different statistical mechanical ensembles: the grand canonical (V-Nz-μg-T or GC) ensemble keeping volume fixed, and the P-Nz-μg-T (osmotic) ensemble allowing volume to fluctuate. To optimize accuracy and efficiency, we compared pure Monte Carlo (MC) sampling to hybrid MC-molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For the external furfural-water and HMF-water phases, we assumed the ideal solution approximation and employed a combination of tabulated data and extended ensemble simulations for computing solvation free energies. We found that MC sampling in the V-Nz-μg-T ensemble (i.e., standard GCMC) does a poor job of reproducing both the Henry's law regime and the saturation loadings of these systems. Hybrid MC-MD sampling of the V-Nz-μg-T ensemble, which includes framework vibrations at fixed total volume, provides better results in the Henry's law region, but this approach still does not reproduce experimental saturation loadings. Pure MC sampling of the osmotic ensemble was found to approach experimental saturation loadings more closely, whereas hybrid MC-MD sampling of the osmotic ensemble quantitatively reproduces such loadings because the MC-MD approach naturally allows for locally anisotropic volume changes wherein some pores expand whereas others contract.

  2. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation, Monitoring, Solution and Cellular Toxicity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, William; Jeevarajan, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, many undesirable situations were encountered that must be mitigated prior to returning humans to the moon. Lunar dust (that part of the lunar regolith less than 20 microns in diameter) was found to produce several problems with mechanical equipment and could have conceivably produced harmful physiological effects for the astronauts. For instance, the abrasive nature of the dust was found to cause malfunctions of various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. Additionally, though efforts were made to exclude lunar dust from the cabin of the lunar module, a significant amount of material nonetheless found its way inside. With the loss of gravity correlated with ascent from the lunar surface, much of the finer fraction of this dust began to float and was inhaled by the astronauts. The short visits tothe Moon during Apollo lessened exposure to the dust, but the plan for future lunar stays of up to six months demands that methods be developed to minimize the risk of dust inhalation. The guidelines for what constitutes "safe" exposure will guide the development of engineering controls aimed at preventing the presence of dust in the lunar habitat. This work has shown the effects of grinding on the activation level of lunar dust, the changes in dissolution properties of lunar simulant, and the production of cytokines by cellular systems. Grinding of lunar dust leads to the production of radicals in solution and increased dissolution of lunar simulant in buffers of different pH. Additionally, ground lunar simulant has been shown to promote the production of IL-6 and IL-8, pro-inflammatory cytokines, by alveolar epithelial cells. These results provide evidence of the need for further studies on these materials prior to returning to the lunar surface.

  3. A Cost Effective Solution for Development Environment for Data Acquisition, Monitoring and Simulation of PLC Controlled Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bjelica

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to test and monitor the operation of Programmable Logic Controller (PLC in real time (online. Nowadays, conventional, but expensive monitoring systems for PLCs, such as Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA systems, software and hardware simulators (or debuggers, are widely used. This paper proposes a user friendly and cost-effective development environment for monitoring, data acquisition and online simulation of applications with PLC. The purpose of this solution is to simulate the process which is controlled by the PLC. The performances of the proposed development environment are presented on the examples of washing machine and dishwasher simulators.

  4. Simulation-based education: understanding the socio-cultural complexity of a surgical training 'boot camp'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Walker, Kenneth G; Gale, Michael; Nicol, Laura G

    2016-08-01

    The focus of simulation-based education (SBE) research has been limited to outcome and effectiveness studies. The effect of social and cultural influences on SBE is unclear and empirical work is lacking. Our objective in this study was to explore and understand the complexity of context and social factors at a surgical boot camp (BC). A rapid ethnographic study, employing the theoretical lenses of complexity and activity theory and Bourdieu's concept of 'capital', to better understand the socio-cultural influences acting upon, and during, two surgical BCs, and their implications for SBE. Over two 4-day BCs held in Scotland, UK, an observer and two preceptors conducted 81 hours of observations, 14 field interviews and 11 formal interviews with faculty members (n = 10, including the lead faculty member, session leaders and junior faculty members) and participants (n = 19 core surgical trainees and early-stage residents). Data collection and inductive analysis for emergent themes proceeded iteratively. This paper focuses on three analytical themes. First, the complexity of the surgical training system and wider health care education context, and how this influenced the development of the BC. Second, participants' views of the BC as a vehicle not just for learning skills but for gaining 'insider information' on how best to progress in surgical training. Finally, the explicit aim of faculty members to use the Scottish Surgical Bootcamp to welcome trainees and residents into the world of surgery, and how this occurred. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first empirical study of a surgical BC that takes a socio-cultural approach to exploring and understanding context, complexities, uncertainties and learning associated with one example of SBE. Our findings suggest that a BC is as much about social and cultural processes as it is about individual, cognitive and acquisitive learning. Acknowledging this explicitly will help those planning similar enterprises and

  5. The effect of Phet Simulation media for physics teacher candidate understanding on photoelectric effect concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supurwoko Supurwoko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian new Curriculum for senior high school students required student-centered learning. One of the curriculum implementation constraint was the difficulty of providing learning media. PhET simulations media is one of the options that can help implementation of new curriculum on learning. However, the use of this media in Indonesia still needs to be studied comprehensively. The learning was conducted on students of physics education Study Program in sebelas maret university in 2013. The sample consisted of 62 students that was taking quantum physics course. The method that was used in the research was descriptive qualitative.  The method that was used in learning was demonstration’s method that used PhET media and accompanied by a question and answer and groups discussion. The data was collected using multiple choice test and interview through email. We found that any students still did not understand about photoelectric effect concept. They were confused when asked about the thick material and cross section of the targets as related with the regardless of electrons in the photoelectric effect event. Other than that, the concept of the waves as a particle and its relation with the kinetic energy of the electrons was not understood by most students.

  6. Comparison of different soil water extraction systems for the prognoses of solute transport at the field scale using numerical simulations, field and lysimeter experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihermueller, L

    2005-07-01

    To date, the understanding of processes, factors, and interactions that influence the amount of extracted water and the solute composition sampled with suction cups is limited. But this information is required for process description of solute transport in natural soils. Improved system understanding can lead to a low cost and easy to install water sampling system which can help to predict solute transport in natural soils for the benefit of environmental protection. The main objectives of this work were to perform numerical simulations with different boundary conditions and to implement the findings in the interpretation of the lysimeter and field experiments. In a first part of this thesis, theoretical considerations on the processes affecting the spatial influence of a suction cup in soil and changes in solute transport initiated by the suction cups are presented, including testing and validation of available model and experimental approaches. In the second part, a detailed experimental study was conducted to obtain data for the comparison of the different soil water sampling systems. Finally, the numerical experiments of the suction cup influence were used for the interpretation of the experimental data. The main goals are summarized as follows: - Characterization of the suction cup activity domain (SCAD), suction cup extraction domain (SCED) and suction cup sampling area (SCSA) of active suction cups (definitions are given in Chapter 6). - Determination of the boundary conditions and soil properties [e.g. infiltration, applied suction, duration of water extraction, soil hydraulic properties and soil heterogeneity] affecting the activity domain, extraction domain and sampling area of a suction cup. - Identification of processes that change the travel time and travel time variance of solutes extracted by suction cups. - Validation of the numerically derived data with analytical and experimental data from literature. - Comparison of the experimental data obtained

  7. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  8. Media-fill simulation tests in manual and robotic aseptic preparation of injection solutions in syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Irene; Federici, Matteo; Kaiser, Vanessa; Thiesen, Judith

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contamination rate of media-fill products either prepared automated with a robotic system (APOTECAchemo™) or prepared manually at cytotoxic workbenches in the same cleanroom environment and by experienced operators. Media fills were completed by microbiological environmental control in the critical zones and used to validate the cleaning and disinfection procedures of the robotic system. The aseptic preparation of patient individual ready-to-use injection solutions was simulated by using double concentrated tryptic soy broth as growth medium, water for injection and plastic syringes as primary packaging materials. Media fills were either prepared automated (500 units) in the robot or manually (500 units) in cytotoxic workbenches in the same cleanroom over a period of 18 working days. The test solutions were incubated at room temperature (22℃) over 4 weeks. Products were visually inspected for turbidity after a 2-week and 4-week period. Following incubation, growth promotion tests were performed with Staphylococcus epidermidis. During the media-fill procedures, passive air monitoring was performed with settle plates and surface monitoring with contact plates on predefined locations as well as fingerprints. The plates got incubated for 5-7 days at room temperature, followed by 2-3 days at 30-35℃ and the colony forming units (cfu) counted after both periods. The robot was cleaned and disinfected according to the established standard operating procedure on two working days prior to the media-fill session, while on six other working days only six critical components were sanitized at the end of the media-fill sessions. Every day UV irradiation was operated for 4 h after finishing work. None of the 1000 media-fill products prepared in the two different settings showed turbidity after the incubation period thereby indicating no contamination with microorganisms. All products remained uniform, clear, and light

  9. On the solution self-assembly of nanocolloidal brushes: insights from simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striolo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of novel nanoparticles with exceptional properties continues to stimulate the search for advanced applications in fields as diverse as solar energy harvesting and polymer reinforcement. It is widely recognized that to practically exploit the promised benefits it is necessary to guide the assembly of the various nanoparticles into well-defined supra-molecular structures. Towards this goal, we report Monte Carlo simulation results for the self-assembly of spherical nanoparticles in implicit solvent. The nanoparticles interact solely via dispersive interactions, modeled as square-well potentials. To control the morphology of the self-assembled aggregates, side chains are grafted on specific locations on the nanoparticle surface (i.e., on the equator, on the tropics, on the entire tropical region, or uniformly on the nanoparticle surface). The results are discussed in terms of average cluster size, probability of observing aggregates of given size, and aggregate radius of gyration and asphericity as a function of the aggregate size. The parameters of interest are the solution conditions and the nanoparticle volume fraction (always in the dilute regime). As shown in previous reports (e.g., Striolo 2007 Small 3 628), the nanoparticles form insoluble agglomerates in the absence of the side chains. When the side chains are long and uniformly distributed on the nanoparticles, these remain individually dispersed in solution. More importantly, when the side chains are grafted on selected locations on the nanoparticles, these self-assemble, yielding structures composed of up to 7-10 nanoparticles. The number of grafted side chains is the parameter that predominantly determines the average aggregate size, while the aggregate morphology can be tuned by appropriately controlling the distribution and length of the grafted side chains.

  10. Investigating dislocation motion through a field of solutes with atomistic simulations and reaction rate theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroukhani, S.; Warner, D.H.

    2017-01-01

    The rate of thermally activated dislocation motion across a field of solutes is studied using traditional and modern atomistically informed rate theories. First, the accuracy of popular variants of the Harmonic Transition State Theory, as the most common approach, is examined by comparing predictions to direct MD simulations. It is shown that HTST predictions are grossly inaccurate due to the anharmonic effect of thermal softening. Next, the utility of the Transition Interface Sampling was examined as the method was recently shown to be effective for predicting the rate of dislocation-precipitate interactions. For dislocation-solute interactions studied here, TIS is found to be accurate only when the dislocation overcomes multiple obstacles at a time, i.e. jerky motion, and it is inaccurate in the unpinning regime where the energy barrier is of diffusive nature. It is then shown that the Partial Path TIS method - designed for diffusive barriers - provides accurate predictions in the unpinning regime. The two methods are then used to study the temperature and load dependence of the rate. It is shown that Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule prediction of the entropy barrier is not as accurate as it is in the case of dislocation-precipitate interactions. In response, an alternative model is proposed that provides an accurate prediction of the entropy barrier. This model can be combined with TST to offer an attractively simple rate prediction approach. Lastly, (PP)TIS is used to predict the Strain Rate Sensitivity (SRS) factor at experimental strain rates and the predictions are compared to experimental values.

  11. Effective interactions in lysozyme aqueous solutions: a small-angle neutron scattering and computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, M C; Caccamo, C; Costa, D; Pellicane, G; Ruberto, R; Wanderlingh, U

    2012-01-21

    We report protein-protein structure factors of aqueous lysozyme solutions at different pH and ionic strengths, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering experiments. The observed upturn of the structure factor at small wavevectors, as the pH increases, marks a crossover between two different regimes, one dominated by repulsive forces, and another one where attractive interactions become prominent, with the ensuing development of enhanced density fluctuations. In order to rationalize such experimental outcome from a microscopic viewpoint, we have carried out extensive simulations of different coarse-grained models. We have first studied a model in which macromolecules are described as soft spheres interacting through an attractive r(-6) potential, plus embedded pH-dependent discrete charges; we show that the uprise undergone by the structure factor is qualitatively predicted. We have then studied a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model, in which only central interactions are advocated; we demonstrate that this model leads to a protein-rich/protein-poor coexistence curve that agrees quite well with the experimental counterpart; experimental correlations are instead reproduced only at low pH and ionic strengths. We have finally investigated a third, "mixed" model in which the central attractive term of the DLVO potential is imported within the distributed-charge approach; it turns out that the different balance of interactions, with a much shorter-range attractive contribution, leads in this latter case to an improved agreement with the experimental crossover. We discuss the relationship between experimental correlations, phase coexistence, and features of effective interactions, as well as possible paths toward a quantitative prediction of structural properties of real lysozyme solutions. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  12. Accelerating Convergence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutes in Lipid Membranes by Conducting a Random Walk along the Bilayer Normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Chris; Madill, Chris; Rauscher, Sarah; Pomès, Régis

    2013-08-13

    All molecular dynamics simulations are susceptible to sampling errors, which degrade the accuracy and precision of observed values. The statistical convergence of simulations containing atomistic lipid bilayers is limited by the slow relaxation of the lipid phase, which can exceed hundreds of nanoseconds. These long conformational autocorrelation times are exacerbated in the presence of charged solutes, which can induce significant distortions of the bilayer structure. Such long relaxation times represent hidden barriers that induce systematic sampling errors in simulations of solute insertion. To identify optimal methods for enhancing sampling efficiency, we quantitatively evaluate convergence rates using generalized ensemble sampling algorithms in calculations of the potential of mean force for the insertion of the ionic side chain analog of arginine in a lipid bilayer. Umbrella sampling (US) is used to restrain solute insertion depth along the bilayer normal, the order parameter commonly used in simulations of molecular solutes in lipid bilayers. When US simulations are modified to conduct random walks along the bilayer normal using a Hamiltonian exchange algorithm, systematic sampling errors are eliminated more rapidly and the rate of statistical convergence of the standard free energy of binding of the solute to the lipid bilayer is increased 3-fold. We compute the ratio of the replica flux transmitted across a defined region of the order parameter to the replica flux that entered that region in Hamiltonian exchange simulations. We show that this quantity, the transmission factor, identifies sampling barriers in degrees of freedom orthogonal to the order parameter. The transmission factor is used to estimate the depth-dependent conformational autocorrelation times of the simulation system, some of which exceed the simulation time, and thereby identify solute insertion depths that are prone to systematic sampling errors and estimate the lower bound of the

  13. Understanding Crew Decision-Making in the Presence of Complexity: A Flight Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven D.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Evans, Emory; deHaag, Maarten Uijt; Duan, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Crew decision making and response have long been leading causal and contributing factors associated with aircraft accidents. Further, it is anticipated that future aircraft and operational environments will increase exposure to risks related to these factors if proactive steps are not taken to account for ever-increasing complexity. A flight simulation study was designed to collect data to help in understanding how complexity can, or may, be manifest. More specifically, an experimental apparatus was constructed that allowed for manipulation of information complexity and uncertainty, while also manipulating operational complexity and uncertainty. Through these manipulations, and the aid of experienced airline pilots, several issues have been discovered, related most prominently to the influence of information content, quality, and management. Flight crews were immersed in an environment that included new operational complexities suggested for the future air transportation system as well as new technological complexities (e.g. electronic flight bags, expanded data link services, synthetic and enhanced vision systems, and interval management automation). In addition, a set of off-nominal situations were emulated. These included, for example, adverse weather conditions, traffic deviations, equipment failures, poor data quality, communication errors, and unexpected clearances, or changes to flight plans. Each situation was based on one or more reference events from past accidents or incidents, or on a similar case that had been used in previous developmental tests or studies. Over the course of the study, 10 twopilot airline crews participated, completing over 230 flights. Each flight consisted of an approach beginning at 10,000 ft. Based on the recorded data and pilot and research observations, preliminary results are presented regarding decision-making issues in the presence of the operational and technological complexities encountered during the flights.

  14. Understanding the discrete element method simulation of non-spherical particles for granular and multi-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matuttis, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gives readers a more thorough understanding of DEM and equips researchers for independent work and an ability to judge methods related to simulation of polygonal particles Introduces DEM from the fundamental concepts (theoretical mechanics and solidstate physics), with 2D and 3D simulation methods for polygonal particlesProvides the fundamentals of coding discrete element method (DEM) requiring little advance knowledge of granular matter or numerical simulationHighlights the numerical tricks and pitfalls that are usually only realized after years of experience, with relevant simple experiment

  15. Challenges and Solutions for the Integration of Structural and Hydrogeological Understanding of Fracture Systems - Insights from the Olkiluoto Site, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, L. J.; Aaltonen, I.; Baxter, S. J.; Cottrell, M.; Fox, A. L.; Hoek, J.; Koskinen, L.; Mattila, J.; Mosley, K.; Selroos, J. O.; Suikkanen, J.; Vanhanarkaus, O.; Williams, T. R. N.

    2017-12-01

    A field site at Olkiluoto in SW Finland has undergone extensive investigations as a location for a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, which is expected to become operational in the early 2020s. Characterisation data comes from 58 deep cored drillholes, a wide variety of geophysical investigations, many outcrops, kilometres of underground mapping and testing in the ONKALO research facility, and groundwater pressure monitoring and sampling in both deep and shallow holes. A primary focus is on the properties of natural fractures and brittle fault zones in the low permeability crystalline rocks at Olkiluoto; an understanding of the flow and transport processes in these features are an essential part of assessing long-term safety of the repository. This presentation will illustrate how different types of source data and cross-disciplinary interpretations are integrated to develop conceptual and numerical models of the fracture system. A model of the brittle fault zones developed from geological and geophysical data provides the hydrostructural backbone controlling the most intense fracturing and dynamic conduits for fluids. Models of ductile deformation and lithology form a tectonic framework for the description of fracture heterogeneity in the background rock, revealing correlations between the intensity and orientation of fractures with geological and spatial properties. The sizes of brittle features are found to be best defined on two scales relating to individual fractures and zones. Inferred fracture-specific from flow logging are correlated with fracture geometric and mechanical properties along with in situ stress measurements to create a hydromechanical description of fracture hydraulic properties. The insights and understandings gained from these efforts help define a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for the Olkiluoto site, with hydrogeological characteristics consistent with monitoring data of hydraulic heads and their disturbances to

  16. Physico-chemical properties of aqueous drug solutions: From the basic thermodynamics to the advanced experimental and simulation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellich, Barbara; Gamini, Amelia; Brady, John W; Cesàro, Attilio

    2018-04-05

    The physical chemical properties of aqueous solutions of model compounds are illustrated in relation to hydration and solubility issues by using three perspectives: thermodynamic, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulations. The thermodynamic survey of the fundamental backgrounds of concentration dependence and experimental solubility results show some peculiar behavior of aqueous solutions with several types of similar solutes. Secondly, the use of a variety of experimental spectroscopic devices, operating under different experimental conditions of dimension and frequency, has produced a large amount of structural and dynamic data on aqueous solutions showing the richness of the information produced, depending on where and how the experiment is carried out. Finally, the use of molecular dynamics computational work is presented to highlight how the different types of solute functional groups and surface topologies organize adjacent water molecules differently. The highly valuable contribution of computer simulation studies in providing molecular explanations for experimental deductions, either of a thermodynamic or spectroscopic nature, is shown to have changed the current knowledge of many aqueous solution processes. While this paper is intended to provide a collective view on the latest literature results, still the presentation aims at a tutorial explanation of the potentials of the three methodologies in the field of aqueous solutions of pharmaceutical molecules. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Hydrogen bonding analysis of hydroxyl groups in glucose aqueous solutions by a molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cong; Li, Wei Zhong; Song, Yong Chen; Weng, Lin Dong; Zhang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate hydrogen bonding characteristics of hydroxyl groups in glucose aqueous solutions with different concentrations. The hydrogen bonding abilities and strength of different O and H atom types have been calculated and compared. The acceptor/donor efficiencies have been predicted and it has been found that: (1) O2-HO2 and O3-HO3 are more efficient intramolecular hydrogen bonding acceptors than donors; (2) O1-HO1, O4-HO4 and O6-HO6 are more efficient intramolecular hydrogen bonding donors than acceptors; (5) O1-HO1 and O6-HO6 are more efficient intermolecular hydrogen bonding acceptors than donors while hydroxyl groups O2-HO2 and O4-HO4 are more efficient intermolecular hydrogen bonding donors than acceptors. The hydrogen bonding abilities of hydroxyl groups revealed that: (1) the hydrogen bonding ability of OH2-H w is larger than that of hydroxyl groups in glucose; (2) among the hydroxyl groups in glucose, the hydrogen bonding ability of O6-HO6 is the largest and the hydrogen bonding ability of O4-HO4 is the smallest; (3) the intermolecular hydrogen bonding ability of O6-HO6 is the largest; (4) the order for intramolecular hydrogen bonding abilities (from large to small) is O2-HO2, O1-HO1, O3-HO3, O6-HO6 and O4-HO4

  18. The solution of target assignment problem in command and control decision-making behaviour simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ni; Huai, Wenqing; Wang, Shaodan

    2017-08-01

    C2 (command and control) has been understood to be a critical military component to meet an increasing demand for rapid information gathering and real-time decision-making in a dynamically changing battlefield environment. In this article, to improve a C2 behaviour model's reusability and interoperability, a behaviour modelling framework was proposed to specify a C2 model's internal modules and a set of interoperability interfaces based on the C-BML (coalition battle management language). WTA (weapon target assignment) is a typical C2 autonomous decision-making behaviour modelling problem. Different from most WTA problem descriptions, here sensors were considered to be available resources of detection and the relationship constraints between weapons and sensors were also taken into account, which brought it much closer to actual application. A modified differential evolution (MDE) algorithm was developed to solve this high-dimension optimisation problem and obtained an optimal assignment plan with high efficiency. In case study, we built a simulation system to validate the proposed C2 modelling framework and interoperability interface specification. Also, a new optimisation solution was used to solve the WTA problem efficiently and successfully.

  19. Pore-scale simulation of fluid flow and solute dispersion in three-dimensional porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-07-31

    In the present work fluid flow and solute transport through porous media are described by solving the governing equations at the pore scale with finite-volume discretization. Instead of solving the simplified Stokes equation (very often employed in this context) the full Navier-Stokes equation is used here. The realistic three-dimensional porous medium is created in this work by packing together, with standard ballistic physics, irregular and polydisperse objects. Emphasis is placed on numerical issues related to mesh generation and spatial discretization, which play an important role in determining the final accuracy of the finite-volume scheme and are often overlooked. The simulations performed are then analyzed in terms of velocity distributions and dispersion rates in a wider range of operating conditions, when compared with other works carried out by solving the Stokes equation. Results show that dispersion within the analyzed porous medium is adequately described by classical power laws obtained by analytic homogenization. Eventually the validity of Fickian diffusion to treat dispersion in porous media is also assessed. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  20. Degradation characteristics of irradiated poly-(caprolactonechitosan-hydroxyapatite) biomaterial in simulated body fluid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warastuti, Y.; Suryani, N.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation purpose was to study degradation characteristics of poly-(caprolactone -chitosan-hydroxyapatite) biomaterial in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. A composite membrane has been synthesized using blending and stirring method with acetic acid solvent and then molded into thin film. Electron beam radiation dose 0 - 30 kGy were done in order to evaluate radiation effects. SBF absorption with various immersing times and degradation for 0 -12 weeks were conducted. Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identification functional groups of composite and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was applied to analyse micro structural surface of membrane before and after immersion. The irradiation process indicate that SBF absorption decrease because NH 2 groups in chitosan which contributes to the hydrophilicity was broken. The composite III indicate maximum absorption (58,2% ± 2,22) due to its smallest concentration of polycaprolactone and highest concentration of chitosan that caused decrease of hydrophobicity. Optimum degradation of composite III (1,3% ± 0,98) was reached after 8 weeks of immersion time. FTIR spectrum indicate the unity of typical peaks of the constituent materials and specific spectrum of CO 3 2- of carbonated apatite which was formed because immersion of SBF. Microstructural analysis using SEM indicate the formation of needle like apatite layer or calcium phosphate precipitate over all surface membrane. All the results indicate that these composite meet the requirements to biomaterial. (author)

  1. Five-equation and robust three-equation methods for solution verification of large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rabijit; Xing, Tao

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluates the recently developed general framework for solution verification methods for large eddy simulation (LES) using implicitly filtered LES of periodic channel flows at friction Reynolds number of 395 on eight systematically refined grids. The seven-equation method shows that the coupling error based on Hypothesis I is much smaller as compared with the numerical and modeling errors and therefore can be neglected. The authors recommend five-equation method based on Hypothesis II, which shows a monotonic convergence behavior of the predicted numerical benchmark ( S C ), and provides realistic error estimates without the need of fixing the orders of accuracy for either numerical or modeling errors. Based on the results from seven-equation and five-equation methods, less expensive three and four-equation methods for practical LES applications were derived. It was found that the new three-equation method is robust as it can be applied to any convergence types and reasonably predict the error trends. It was also observed that the numerical and modeling errors usually have opposite signs, which suggests error cancellation play an essential role in LES. When Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based error estimation method is applied, it shows significant error in the prediction of S C on coarse meshes. However, it predicts reasonable S C when the grids resolve at least 80% of the total turbulent kinetic energy.

  2. Contribution to the understanding and to the simulation of processes occurring at the vicinity of a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotignon, L.

    2004-04-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activities between 1986 and 2004. These activities were focused on the observation, analysis and simulation of solid-solution interactions, with application to radioactive waste storage in deep geologic formations. More precisely, these works dealt with the evolution of rock porosity (dissolution-crystallization under stress), the aqueous corrosion of nuclear glasses, the redox transient (how and at which rate a disturbance related to dissolved oxygen intrusion will be resorbed), and the transport-chemistry simulation and natural analogues

  3. Making the Invisible Visible: Enhancing Students' Conceptual Understanding by Introducing Representations of Abstract Objects in a Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympiou, Georgios; Zacharias, Zacharia; deJong, Ton

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify if complementing representations of concrete objects with representations of abstract objects improves students' conceptual understanding as they use a simulation to experiment in the domain of "Light and Color". Moreover, we investigated whether students' prior knowledge is a factor that must be considered in deciding…

  4. Making the invisible visible: Enhancing students' conceptual understanding by introducing representations of abstract objects in a simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olympiou, G.; Zacharias, Z.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify if complementing representations of concrete objects with representations of abstract objects improves students’ conceptual understanding as they use a simulation to experiment in the domain of Light and Color. Moreover, we investigated whether students’ prior knowledge

  5. Understanding Public Policy Making through the Work of Committees: Utilizing a Student-Led Congressional Hearing Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinfret, Sara R.; Pautz, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to help students better understand the complexity of making environmental policy and the role of policy actors in this process, we developed a mock congressional hearing simulation. In this congressional hearing, students in two environmental policy courses take on the roles of members of Congress and various interest groups to…

  6. COMPUTER SIMULATION IN MECHANICS TEACHING AND LEARNING: A CASE STUDY ON STUDENTS’ UNDERSTANDING OF FORCE AND MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Permata Sari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to develop a force and motion simulation based on the open-source Easy Java Simulation. The process of computer simulation development was done following the ADDIE model. Based on the Analysis and Design phases, the Development phase used the open-source Easy Java Simulation (EJS to develop a computer simulation with physics content that was relevant to the subtopic. Computing and communication technology continue to make an increasing impact on all aspects of education. EJS is a powerful didactic resource that gives us the ability to focus our students’ attention on the principles of physics. Using EJS, a computer simulation was created through which the motion of a particle under the action of a specific force can be studied. The implementation phase is implemented the computer simulation in the teaching and learning process. To describe the improvements in the students’ understanding of the force and motion concepts, we used a t-test to evaluate each of the four phases. These results indicated that the use of the computer simulation could improve students’ force and motion conceptual competence regarding Newton's second law of motion.

  7. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  8. New Insight in Understanding the mechanical responses of polymer glasses using molecular dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yexin; Wang, Shi-Qing; Tsige, Mesfin

    The Kremer-Grest bead-spring model has been the standard model in molecular dynamics simulation of polymer glasses. However, due to current computational limitations in accessing relevant time scales in polymer glasses in a reasonable amount of CPU time, simulation of mechanical response of polymer glasses in molecular dynamic simulations requires a much higher quenching rate and deformation rate than used in experiments. Despite several orders of magnitude difference in time scale between simulation and experiment, previous studies have shown that simulations can produce meaningful results that can be directly compared with experimental results. In this work we show that by tuning the quenching rate and deformation rate relative to the segmental relaxation times, a reasonable mechanical response shows up in the glassy state. Specifically, we show a younger glass prepared with a faster quenching rate shows glassy responses only when the imposed deformation rate is proportionally higher. the National Science Foundation (DMR-1444859 and DMR-1609977).

  9. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobtorweihen, S.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Keil, F. J.; Smirnova, I.

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations.

  10. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobtorweihen, S.; Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Smirnova, I.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Keil, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations

  11. Simulation and modeling CO2 absorption in biogas with DEA promoted K2CO3 solution in packed column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkhamidah, Siti; Altway, Ali; Airlangga, Bramantyo; Emilia, Dwi Putri

    2017-05-01

    Absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) using potassium carbonate (K2CO3) is one of biogas purification method. However, K2CO3 have slow mass transfer in liquid phase. So it is necessary to eliminate the disadvantage of CO2 absorption using K2CO3 by adding promotor (activator). Diethanol amine (DEA) is one of promotor which can increase its reaction rate. Simulation and modeling research of the CO2 absorption from biogas with DEA promoted K2CO3 solution has not been conducted. Thus, the main goal of this research is create model and simulation for the CO2 absorption from biogas with DEA promoted K2CO3 solution, then observe the influence of promoter concentration. DEA concentration varies between 1-5 %wt. From the simulation, we concluded that the CO2 removal rise with the increasing of promoter concentration. The highest CO2 removal is 54.5318 % at 5 % wt DEA concentration.

  12. Non-dissipative kinetic simulation and analytical solution of three-mode equations of ion temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Sato, T.

    1999-12-01

    A non-dissipative drift kinetic simulation scheme, which rigorously satisfies the time-reversibility, is applied to the three-mode coupling problem of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability. It is found from the simulation that the three-mode ITG system repeats growth and decay with a period which shows a logarithmic divergence for infinitesimal initial perturbations. Accordingly, time average of the mode amplitude vanishes, as the initial amplitude approaches to zero. An exact solution is analytically given for a class of initial conditions. An excellent agreement is confirmed between the analytical solution and numerical results. The results obtained here provide a useful reference for basic benchmarking of theories and simulation of the ITG modes. (author)

  13. Interactive simulations for promoting transdisciplinary understanding: a case study of the Western Cape fisheries, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Proches

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulations have proven beneficial in enabling participants from various backgrounds to meaningfully engage in learning from experience. The aim of this paper is to investigate how interactive simulations can play a role in navigating the changes faced in a multi- stakeholder setting, characterised by users dependent on marine resources and an authorising institution. Relevant literature in the areas of simulation and gaming, change management, systems thinking, and complexity theory was examined. A qualitative research approach and purposive sampling were employed. Interviews were first conducted with diverse stakeholders in the Western Cape fisheries of South Africa to determine the issues. A simulation was thereafter designed. The main findings from this study indicate that simulation use illustrates how the various stakeholders in a system interact, and how their actions and decisions influence each other. The simulation may be used in other areas of natural resource management, as well as in other kinds of multi- stakeholder scenarios. Keywords: Simulation and gaming, Change management, Fisheries, Multi-stakeholder scenarios, Systems thinking, Complexity theory Disciplines: Conflict Resolution, Leadership Studies, Management Studies, Natural Resource Management

  14. Qualitative exploration of public and smoker understanding of, and reactions to, an endgame solution to the tobacco epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Richard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in ending the tobacco epidemic and in applying ‘endgame’ solutions to achieve that goal at national levels. We explored the understanding of, and reactions to, a tobacco-free vision and an endgame approach to tobacco control among New Zealand smokers and non-smokers. Methods We recruited participants in four focus groups held in June 2009: Māori (indigenous people smokers (n=7; non-Māori smokers (n=6; Māori non-smokers (n=7; and non-Māori non-smokers (n=4. Participants were from the city of Whanganui, New Zealand. We introduced to them the vision of a tobacco-free New Zealand and the concept of a semi-autonomous agency (Tobacco-Free Commission [TFC] that would control the tobacco market as part of an endgame approach. Results There was mostly strong support for the tobacco-free New Zealand vision among all groups of participants. The reason most commonly given for supporting the vision was to protect children from tobacco. Most participants stated that they understood the TFC concept and reacted positively to it. Nevertheless, rather than focusing on organisational or structural arrangements, participants tended to focus on supporting the specific measures which a future TFC might facilitate such as plain packaging of tobacco products. Various concerns were also raised around the TFC, particularly around the feasibility of its establishment. Conclusions We were able to successfully communicate a complex and novel supply-side focused tobacco control policy intervention to smokers and non-smokers. The findings add to the evidence from national surveys that there is public support, including from smokers, for achieving a tobacco-free vision and using regulatory and policy measures to achieve it. Support for such measures may be enhanced if they are clearly communicated and explained with a rationale which stresses protecting children and future generations from tobacco smoking.

  15. Selection of dissolution process for spent fuels and preparation of corrosion test solution simulated to dissolver (contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Terakado, Shogo; Koya, Toshio; Hamada, Shozo; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2001-03-01

    In order to evaluate the reliability of reprocessing equipment materials used in the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, we have proceeded a mock-up test and laboratory tests for getting corrosion parameters. In a dissolver made of zirconium, the simulation of test solutions to the practical solution which includes the high concentration of radioactive elements such as FP and TRU is one of the important issues with respect to the life prediction. On this experiment, the dissolution process of spent fuels and the preparation of test solution for evaluating the corrosion resistance of dissolver materials were selected. These processes were tested in the No.3 cell of WASTEF. The test solution for corrosion tests was prepared by adjusting the uranium and nitric acid concentrations. (author)

  16. Teaching Thermodynamics of Ideal Solutions: An Entropy-Based Approach to Help Students Better Understand and Appreciate the Subtleties of Solution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomba, J. Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic formalism of ideal solutions is developed in most of the textbooks postulating a form for the chemical potential of a generic component, which is adapted from the thermodynamics of ideal gas mixtures. From this basis, the rest of useful thermodynamic properties can be derived straightforwardly without further hypothesis. Although…

  17. Salt weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Nevin; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Hamed, Ayman; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica

    2013-04-01

    weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures Nevin Aly Mohamed (1), Miguel Gomez - Heras(2), Ayman Hamed Ahmed (1), and Monica Alvarez de Buergo(2). (1) Faculty of Pet. & Min. Engineering- Suez Canal University, Suez, Egypt, (2) Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM) Madrid. Spain. Limestone is one of the most frequent building stones in Egypt and is used since the time of ancient Egyptians and salt weathering is one of the main threats to its conservation. Most of the limestone used in historical monuments in Cairo is a biomicrite extracted from the Mid-Eocene Mokattam Group. During this work, cylindrical samples (2.4 cm diameter and approx. 4.8 cm length) were subjected, in a purpose-made simulation chamber, to simulated laboratory weathering tests with fixed salt concentration (10% weight NaCl solution), at different temperatures, which were kept constant throughout each test (10, 20, 30, 40 oC). During each test, salt solutions flowed continuously imbibing samples by capilarity. Humidity within the simulation chamber was reduced using silica gel to keep it low and constant to increase evaporation rate. Temperature, humidity inside the simulation chamber and samples weight were digitally monitored during each test. Results show the advantages of the proposed experimental methodology using a continuous flow of salt solutions and shed light on the effect of temperature on the dynamics of salt crystallization on and within samples. Research funded by mission sector of high education ministry, Egypt and Geomateriales S2009/MAT-1629.

  18. A Green's function method for simulation of time-dependent solute transport and reaction in realistic microvascular geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secomb, Timothy W

    2016-12-01

    A novel theoretical method is presented for simulating the spatially resolved convective and diffusive transport of reacting solutes between microvascular networks and the surrounding tissues. The method allows for efficient computational solution of problems involving convection and non-linear binding of solutes in blood flowing through microvascular networks with realistic 3D geometries, coupled with transvascular exchange and diffusion and reaction in the surrounding tissue space. The method is based on a Green's function approach, in which the solute concentration distribution in the tissue is expressed as a sum of fields generated by time-varying distributions of discrete sources and sinks. As an example of the application of the method, the washout of an inert diffusible tracer substance from a tissue region perfused by a network of microvessels is simulated, showing its dependence on the solute's transvascular permeability and tissue diffusivity. Exponential decay of the washout concentration is predicted, with rate constants that are about 10-30% lower than the rate constants for a tissue cylinder model with the same vessel length, vessel surface area and blood flow rate per tissue volume. © The authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  19. Theoretical investigation of interaction of sorbitol molecules with alcohol dehydrogenase in aqueous solution using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Zahedi, Mansour; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Azizian, Homa; Amanlou, Massoud

    2011-03-01

    The nature of protein-sorbitol-water interaction in solution at the molecular level, has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. In order to do this task, two molecular dynamics simulations of the protein ADH in solution at room temperature have been carried out, one in the presence (about 0.9 M) and another in the absence of sorbitol. The results show that the sorbitol molecules cluster and move toward the protein, and form hydrogen bonds with protein. Also, coating by sorbitol reduces the conformational fluctuations of the protein compared to the sorbitol-free system. Thus, it is concluded that at moderate concentration of sorbitol solution, sorbitol molecules interact with ADH via many H-bonds that prevent the protein folding. In fact, at more concentrated sorbitol solution, water and sorbitol molecules accumulate around the protein surface and form a continuous space-filling network to reduce the protein flexibility. Namely, in such solution, sorbitol molecules can stabilize a misfolded state of ADH, and prevent the protein from folding to its native structure.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation and equation of state for flexible charged hard-sphere chain fluids: Polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Adidharma, Hertanto

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic modeling of flexible charged hard-sphere chains representing polyampholyte or polyelectrolyte molecules in solution is considered. The excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyampholyte and the osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyelectrolytes are determined by performing canonical and isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations. A new equation of state based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory is also proposed for flexible charged hard-sphere chains. For the modeling of such chains, the use of solely the structure information of monomer fluid for calculating the chain contribution is found to be insufficient and more detailed structure information must therefore be considered. Two approaches, i.e., the dimer and dimer-monomer approaches, are explored to obtain the contribution of the chain formation to the Helmholtz energy. By comparing with the simulation results, the equation of state with either the dimer or dimer-monomer approach accurately predicts the excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions except at very low density. It also well captures the effect of temperature on the thermodynamic properties of these solutions

  1. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  2. A New Heuristic Providing an Effective Initial Solution for a Simulated Annealing approach to Energy Resource Scheduling in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, Tiago M; Morais, Hugo; Castro, R.

    2014-01-01

    scheduling problem. Therefore, the use of metaheuristics is required to obtain good solutions in a reasonable amount of time. This paper proposes two new heuristics, called naive electric vehicles charge and discharge allocation and generation tournament based on cost, developed to obtain an initial solution...... to be used in the energy resource scheduling methodology based on simulated annealing previously developed by the authors. The case study considers two scenarios with 1000 and 2000 electric vehicles connected in a distribution network. The proposed heuristics are compared with a deterministic approach...

  3. The Simulation and Animation of Virtual Humans to Better Understand Ergonomic Conditions at Manual Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Rossmann

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article extends an approach to simulate and control anthro- pomorphic kinematics as multiagent-systems. These "anthro- pomorphic multiagent-systems" have originally been developed to control coordinated multirobot systems in industrial applica- tions, as well as to simulate humanoid robots. Here, we apply the approach of the anthropomorphic multiagent-systems to propose a "Virtual Human" - a model of human kinematics - to analyze ergonomic conditions at manual workplaces. Ergonom- ics provide a wide range of methods to evaluate human postures and movements. By the simulation and animation of the Virtual Human we develop examples of how results from the field of ergonomics can help to consider the human factor during the design and optimization phases of production lines.

  4. Concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solution in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing: Insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2018-06-01

    To address a high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and study the thermodynamics, structure, and diffusion of concentrated aqueous salt solution in clay nanopores. The concentrated solution results from the dissolution of a cubic NaCl nanocrystal, immersed in an aqueous NaCl solution of varying salt concentration and confined in clay pores of a width comparable to the crystal size. The size of the nanocrystal equals to about 18 Å which is above a critical nucleus size. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of 365 K and 275 bar, and we represent the clay pores as pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) slits. We employ the Extended Simple Point Charge (SPC/E) model for water, Joung-Cheatham model for ions, and CLAYFF for the slit walls. We impose the pressure in the normal direction and the resulting slit width varies from about 20 to 25 Å when the salt concentration in the surrounding solution increased from zero to an oversaturated value. By varying the salt concentration, we observe two scenarios. First, the crystal dissolves and its dissolution time increases with increasing salt concentration. We describe the dissolution process in terms of the number of ions in the crystal, and the crystal size and shape. Second, when the salt concentration reaches a system solubility limit, the crystal grows and attains a new equilibrium size; the crystal comes into equilibrium with the surrounding saturated solution. After crystal dissolution, we carry out canonical MD simulations for the concentrated solution. We evaluate the hydration energy, density profiles, orientation distributions, hydrogen-bond network, radial distribution functions, and in-plane diffusion of water and ions to provide insight into the microscopic behaviour of the concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solution in interlayer galleries of the slightly hydrophobic pyrophyllite and hydrophilic Na-MMT pores.

  5. A closed-loop forward osmosis-nanofiltration hybrid system: Understanding process implications through full-scale simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Phuntsho, Sherub

    2016-12-30

    This study presents simulation of a closed-loop forward osmosis (FO)-nanofiltration (NF) hybrid system using fertiliser draw solution (DS) based on thermodynamic mass balance in a full-scale system neglecting the non-idealities such as finite membrane area that may exist in a real process. The simulation shows that the DS input parameters such as initial concentrations and its flow rates cannot be arbitrarily selected for a plant with defined volume output. For a fixed FO-NF plant capacity and feed concentration, the required initial DS flow rate varies inversely with the initial DS concentration or vice-versa. The net DS mass flow rate, a parameter constant for a fixed plant capacity but that increases linearly with the plant capacity and feed concentration, is the most important operational parameter of a closed-loop system. Increasing either of them or both increases the mass flow rate to the system directly affecting the final concentration of the diluted DS with direct energy implications to the NF process. Besides, the initial DS concentration and flow rates are also limited by the optimum recovery rates at which NF process can be operated which otherwise also have direct implications to the NF energy. This simulation also presents quantitative analysis of the reverse diffusion of fertiliser nutrients towards feed brine and the gradual accumulation of feed solutes within the closed system.

  6. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M.n.; Marrink, S.j.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MAR- TINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell

  7. Using multi-criteria analysis of simulation models to understand complex biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maureen C. Kennedy; E. David. Ford

    2011-01-01

    Scientists frequently use computer-simulation models to help solve complex biological problems. Typically, such models are highly integrated, they produce multiple outputs, and standard methods of model analysis are ill suited for evaluating them. We show how multi-criteria optimization with Pareto optimality allows for model outputs to be compared to multiple system...

  8. Understanding nucleon structure using lattice simulations. Recent progress on three different structural observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroers, W.

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on the discussion of three key results of nucleon structure calculations on the lattice. These three results are the quark contribution to the nucleon spin, J q , the nucleon-Δ transition form factors, and the nucleon axial coupling, g A . The importance for phenomenology and experiment is discussed and the requirements for future simulations are pointed out. (orig.)

  9. Comparing Student Success and Understanding in Introductory Statistics under Consensus and Simulation-Based Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hldreth, Laura A.; Robison-Cox, Jim; Schmidt, Jade

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the transferability of results from previous studies of simulation-based curriculum in introductory statistics using data from 3,500 students enrolled in an introductory statistics course at Montana State University from fall 2013 through spring 2016. During this time, four different curricula, a traditional curriculum and…

  10. Cross-Cultural Simulations in Teacher Education: Developing Empathy and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Barbara C.; Patterson, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Teacher training programs have recognized the importance of preparing future teachers for the unique opportunities and challenges that our multicultural societies and world provide. One method that is useful in sensitizing teachers to issues of diversity is cross-cultural simulations. By using kinesthetic and affective modes of learning,…

  11. Computationally efficient and quantitatively accurate multiscale simulation of solid-solution strengthening by ab initio calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Duancheng; Friák, Martin; Pezold, Johann von; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    We propose an approach for the computationally efficient and quantitatively accurate prediction of solid-solution strengthening. It combines the 2-D Peierls–Nabarro model and a recently developed solid-solution strengthening model. Solid-solution strengthening is examined with Al–Mg and Al–Li as representative alloy systems, demonstrating a good agreement between theory and experiments within the temperature range in which the dislocation motion is overdamped. Through a parametric study, two guideline maps of the misfit parameters against (i) the critical resolved shear stress, τ 0 , at 0 K and (ii) the energy barrier, ΔE b , against dislocation motion in a solid solution with randomly distributed solute atoms are created. With these two guideline maps, τ 0 at finite temperatures is predicted for other Al binary systems, and compared with available experiments, achieving good agreement

  12. On Fast Post-Processing of Global Positioning System Simulator Truth Data and Receiver Measurements and Solutions Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhner, Semion; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Post-Processing of data related to a Global Positioning System (GPS) simulation is an important activity in qualification of a GPS receiver for space flight. Because a GPS simulator is a critical resource it is desirable to move off the pertinent simulation data from the simulator as soon as a test is completed. The simulator data files are usually moved to a Personal Computer (PC), where the post-processing of the receiver logged measurements and solutions data and simulated data is performed. Typically post-processing is accomplished using PC-based commercial software languages and tools. Because of commercial software systems generality their general-purpose functions are notoriously slow and more than often are the bottleneck problem even for short duration experiments. For example, it may take 8 hours to post-process data from a 6-hour simulation. There is a need to do post-processing faster, especially in order to use the previous test results as feedback for a next simulation setup. This paper demonstrates that a fast software linear interpolation algorithm is applicable to a large class of engineering problems, like GPS simulation data post-processing, where computational time is a critical resource and is one of the most important considerations. An approach is developed that allows to speed-up post-processing by an order of magnitude. It is based on improving the post-processing bottleneck interpolation algorithm using apriori information that is specific to the GPS simulation application. The presented post-processing scheme was used in support of a few successful space flight missions carrying GPS receivers. A future approach to solving the post-processing performance problem using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology is described.

  13. Assimilation of ocean colour to improve the simulation and understanding of the North West European shelf-sea ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavatta, Stefano; Brewin, Robert; Skakala, Jozef; Sursham, David; Ford, David

    2017-04-01

    Shelf-seas and coastal zones provide essential goods and services to humankind, such as fisheries, aquaculture, tourism and climate regulation. The understanding and management of these regions can be enhanced by merging ocean-colour observations and marine ecosystem simulations through data assimilation, which provides (sub)optimal estimates of key biogeochemical variables. Here we present a range of applications of ocean-colour data assimilation in the North West European shelf-sea. A reanalysis application illustrates that assimilation of error-characterized chlorophyll concentrations could provide a map of the shelf sea vulnerability to oxygen deficiency, as well as estimates of the shelf sea uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in the last decade. The interannual variability of CO2 uptake and its uncertainty were related significantly to interannual fluctuations of the simulated primary production. However, the reanalysis also indicates that assimilation of total chlorophyll did not improve significantly the simulation of some other variables, e.g. nutrients. We show that the assimilation of alternative products derived from ocean colour (i.e. spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient and phytoplankton size classes) can overcome this limitation. In fact, these products can constrain a larger number of model variables, which define either the underwater light field or the structure of the lower trophic levels. Therefore, the assimilation of such ocean-colour products into marine ecosystem models is an advantageous novel approach to improve the understanding and simulation of shelf-sea environments.

  14. Understanding the Future Market for NovaSAR-S Flood Mapping Products Using Data Mining and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Samantha; Haria, Kajal; Cooksley, Geraint; Farman, Alex; Beaton, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to understand a future market for NovaSAR-S, with a particular focus on flood mapping, through developing a simple Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) simulator that can be used in advance of NovaSAR-S data becoming available.The return signal was determined from a combination of a terrain or elevation model, Envisat S-Band Radar Altimeter (RA)-2, Landsat and CORINE land cover information; allowing for a simulation of a SAR image that's influenced by both the geometry and surface type. The test sites correspond to data from the 2014 AirSAR campaign, and validation is performed by using AirSAR together with Envisat Advanced (ASAR) and Advanced Land Observing Satellite "Daichi" (ALOS) Phased Array type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data.It's envisaged that the resulting simulated data, and the simulator, will not only aid early understanding of NovaSAR-S, but will also aid the development of flood mapping applications.

  15. Multiphysics Simulation of Welding-Arc and Nozzle-Arc System: Mathematical-Model, Solution-Methodology and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sumedh; Sharma, Atul

    2018-01-01

    This work presents mathematical model and solution methodology for a multiphysics engineering problem on arc formation during welding and inside a nozzle. A general-purpose commercial CFD solver ANSYS FLUENT 13.0.0 is used in this work. Arc formation involves strongly coupled gas dynamics and electro-dynamics, simulated by solution of coupled Navier-Stoke equations, Maxwell's equations and radiation heat-transfer equation. Validation of the present numerical methodology is demonstrated with an excellent agreement with the published results. The developed mathematical model and the user defined functions (UDFs) are independent of the geometry and are applicable to any system that involves arc-formation, in 2D axisymmetric coordinates system. The high-pressure flow of SF6 gas in the nozzle-arc system resembles arc chamber of SF6 gas circuit breaker; thus, this methodology can be extended to simulate arcing phenomenon during current interruption.

  16. Simulation modeling to understand how selective foraging by beaver can drive the structure and function of a willow community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinetti, H.R.; Baker, B.W.; Coughenour, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Beaver-willow (Castor-Salix) communities are a unique and vital component of healthy wetlands throughout the Holarctic region. Beaver selectively forage willow to provide fresh food, stored winter food, and construction material. The effects of this complex foraging behavior on the structure and function of willow communities is poorly understood. Simulation modeling may help ecologists understand these complex interactions. In this study, a modified version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model was developed to better understand how beaver foraging affects the structure and function of a willow community in a simulated riparian ecosystem in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado (RMNP). The model represents willow in terms of plant and stem dynamics and beaver foraging in terms of the quantity and quality of stems cut to meet the energetic and life history requirements of beaver. Given a site where all stems were equally available, the model suggested a simulated beaver family of 2 adults, 2 yearlings, and 2 kits required a minimum of 4 ha of willow (containing about10 stems m-2) to persist in a steady-state condition. Beaver created a willow community where the annual net primary productivity (ANPP) was 2 times higher and plant architecture was more diverse than the willow community without beaver. Beaver foraging created a plant architecture dominated by medium size willow plants, which likely explains how beaver can increase ANPP. Long-term simulations suggested that woody biomass stabilized at similar values even though availability differed greatly at initial condition. Simulations also suggested that willow ANPP increased across a range of beaver densities until beaver became food limited. Thus, selective foraging by beaver increased productivity, decreased biomass, and increased structural heterogeneity in a simulated willow community.

  17. Open Source AV solution supporting In Situ Simulation and Clinical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Eivind Ortind; Pociunas, Gintas; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulation is simulation done in the actual clinical environment exceeding the simulation immersion compared to that of the embedded simulation centers and facilitating an increased realistic learning experience. Doing this without compromising (all) the educational principals used....... • Rapid or instant playback capability. • Lightweight and compact design. • Non-cabled AV recording. • Simple, reliable set up and operation. Summary of work Commercial products did not meet our requirements why a programmer was hired to design and program the software to meet our expectations...

  18. Atomistic simulation of solid solution hardening in Mg/Al alloys: Examination of composition scaling and thermo-mechanical relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Peng; Cammarata, Robert C.; Falk, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation mobility in a solid solution was studied using atomistic simulations of an Mg/Al system. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) for the dislocations on the basal plane was calculated at temperatures from 0 K to 500 K with solute concentrations from 0 to 7 at%, and with four different strain rates. Solute hardening of the CRSS is decomposed into two contributions: one scales with c 2/3 , where c is the solute concentration, and the other scales with c 1 . The former was consistent with the Labusch model for local solute obstacles, and the latter was related to the athermal plateau stress due to the long range solute effect. A thermo-mechanical model was then used to analyze the temperature and strain rate dependences of the CRSS, and it yielded self-consistent and realistic results. The scaling laws were confirmed and the thermo-mechanical model was successfully parameterized using experimental measurements of the CRSS for Mg/Al alloys under quasi-static conditions. The predicted strain rate sensitivity from the experimental measurements of the CRSS is in reasonable agreement with separate mechanical tests. The concentration scaling and the thermo-mechanical relationships provide a potential tool to analytically relate the structural and thermodynamic parameters on the microscopic level with the macroscopic mechanical properties arising from dislocation mediated deformation.

  19. Concentrated Aqueous Sodium Chloride Solution in Clays at Thermodynamic Conditions of Hydraulic Fracturing: Insight from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 22 (2018), č. článku 222806. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-25100S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 640979 - ShaleXenvironmenT Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : aqueous NaCl solutions * hydrogen bond networks * molecular dynamics simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2016

  20. Stock Simulation and Mutual Funds: A Pedagogical Tool for Faith-Based Investing and Interfaith Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly important to understand the fundamentals of investing and, for many, the ability to integrate faith and ethics with investing decisions. This is especially relevant for employees and students in Christian higher education. Most employees in Christian higher education are enrolled in retirement plans that obligate them to make…

  1. Cootie Genetics: Simulating Mendel's Experiments to Understand the Laws of Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Katelyn; Anderson, Nadja

    2014-01-01

    "Cootie Genetics" is a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that enables students to learn the Mendelian laws of inheritance and gain an understanding of genetics principles and terminology. The activity begins with two true-breeding Cooties of the same species that exhibit five observable trait differences. Students observe the retention or…

  2. Modelling and Simulating Electronics Knowledge: Conceptual Understanding and Learning through Active Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twissell, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    Abstract electronics concepts are difficult to develop because the phenomena of interest cannot be readily observed. Visualisation skills support learning about electronics and can be applied at different levels of representation and understanding (observable, symbolic and abstract). Providing learners with opportunities to make transitions…

  3. Understanding Reactions to Workplace Injustice through Process Theories of Motivation: A Teaching Module and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Mary D.; Rosse, Joseph G.

    2007-01-01

    Management and organizational behavior students are often overwhelmed by the plethora of motivation theories they must master at the undergraduate level. This article offers a teaching module geared toward helping students understand how two major process theories of motivation, equity and expectancy theories and theories of organizational…

  4. Videogame Construction by Engineering Students for Understanding Modelling Processes: The Case of Simulating Water Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretelín-Ricárdez, Angel; Sacristán, Ana Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present some results of an ongoing research project where university engineering students were asked to construct videogames involving the use of physical systems models. The objective is to help them identify and understand the elements and concepts involved in the modelling process. That is, we use game design as a constructionist approach…

  5. Evaluating simulant materials for understanding cranial backspatter from a ballistic projectile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raj; Collins, Alistair; Verma, Anurag; Fernandez, Justin; Taylor, Michael

    2015-05-01

    In cranial wounds resulting from a gunshot, the study of backspatter patterns can provide information about the actual incidents by linking material to surrounding objects. This study investigates the physics of backspatter from a high-speed projectile impact and evaluates a range of simulant materials using impact tests. Next, we evaluate a mesh-free method called smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the splashing mechanism during backspatter. The study has shown that a projectile impact causes fragmentation at the impact site, while transferring momentum to fragmented particles. The particles travel along the path of least resistance, leading to partial material movement in the reverse direction of the projectile motion causing backspatter. Medium-density fiberboard is a better simulant for a human skull than polycarbonate, and lorica leather is a better simulant for a human skin than natural rubber. SPH is an effective numerical method for modeling the high-speed impact fracture and fragmentations. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Can Simulation Credibility Be Improved Using Sensitivity Analysis to Understand Input Data Effects on Model Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Young, M.; Goodenow, Debra A.; Keenan, A.; Walton, M.; Boley, L.

    2015-01-01

    Model and simulation (MS) credibility is defined as, the quality to elicit belief or trust in MS results. NASA-STD-7009 [1] delineates eight components (Verification, Validation, Input Pedigree, Results Uncertainty, Results Robustness, Use History, MS Management, People Qualifications) that address quantifying model credibility, and provides guidance to the model developers, analysts, and end users for assessing the MS credibility. Of the eight characteristics, input pedigree, or the quality of the data used to develop model input parameters, governing functions, or initial conditions, can vary significantly. These data quality differences have varying consequences across the range of MS application. NASA-STD-7009 requires that the lowest input data quality be used to represent the entire set of input data when scoring the input pedigree credibility of the model. This requirement provides a conservative assessment of model inputs, and maximizes the communication of the potential level of risk of using model outputs. Unfortunately, in practice, this may result in overly pessimistic communication of the MS output, undermining the credibility of simulation predictions to decision makers. This presentation proposes an alternative assessment mechanism, utilizing results parameter robustness, also known as model input sensitivity, to improve the credibility scoring process for specific simulations.

  7. Analytical solution and numerical simulation of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Haibing; Xu, Liuxun; Yang, Yugui; Li, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Artificial liquid nitrogen freezing technology is widely used in urban underground engineering due to its technical advantages, such as simple freezing system, high freezing speed, low freezing temperature, high strength of frozen soil, and absence of pollution. However, technical difficulties such as undefined range of liquid nitrogen freezing and thickness of frozen wall gradually emerge during the application process. Thus, the analytical solution of the freezing-temperature field of a single pipe is established considering the freezing temperature of soil and the constant temperature of freezing pipe wall. This solution is then applied in a liquid nitrogen freezing project. Calculation results show that the radius of freezing front of liquid nitrogen is proportional to the square root of freezing time. The radius of the freezing front also decreases with decreased the freezing temperature, and the temperature gradient of soil decreases with increased distance from the freezing pipe. The radius of cooling zone in the unfrozen area is approximately four times the radius of the freezing front. Meanwhile, the numerical simulation of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe is conducted using the Abaqus finite-element program. Results show that the numerical simulation of soil temperature distribution law well agrees with the analytical solution, further verifies the reliability of the established analytical solution of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe.

  8. Short-Term Solutions to Prevent Simulator-Induced Motion Sickness: Report of a Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    important thing for the human’s stability of closed loop. The gains and 4 magnitudes can be grossly off and he can compensate for that almost subconsciously ...that problem without going into the expense of reprogramming simulators or designing simulators that would give you relatively higher frequencies, I

  9. A Proposed Engineering Process and Prototype Toolset for Developing C2-to-Simulation Interoperability Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautreau, B.; Khimeche, L.; Reus, N.M. de; Heffner, K.; Mevassvik, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) is an open standard being developed for the exchange of digitized military information among command and control (C2), simulation and autonomous systems by the Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO). As the first phase of the C-BML

  10. Docking of flexible ligands to flexible receptors in solution by molecular dynamics simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangoni, R; Roccatano, D; Di Nola, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a method of simulating the docking of small flexible ligands to flexible receptors in water is reported. The method is based on molecular dynamics simulations and is an extension of an algorithm previously reported by Di Nola et al, (Di Nola et al,, Proteins 1994;19:174-182), The

  11. Towards an understanding of the attributes of simulation that enable learning in undergraduate nurse education: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Andrew J; Tobbell, Jane

    2016-09-01

    Simulation has become an established feature of nurse education yet little is understood about the mechanisms that lead to learning. To explore the attributes of simulation-based education that enable student learning in undergraduate nurse education. Final year students drawn from one UK University (n=46) participated in a grounded theory study. First, nonparticipant observation and video recording of student activity was undertaken. Following initial analysis, recordings and observations were deconstructed during focus group interviews that enabled both the researcher and participants to unpack meaning. Lastly emergent findings were verified with final year students drawn from a second UK University (n=6). A staged approach to learning emerged from engagement in simulation. This began with initial hesitation as students moved through nonlinear stages to making connections and thinking like a nurse. Core findings suggest that simulation enables curiosity and intellect (main concern) through doing (core category) and interaction with others identified as social collaboration (category). This study offers a theoretical basis for understanding simulation-based education and integration of strategies that maximise the potential for learning. Additionally it offers direction for further research, particularly with regards to how the application of theory to practice is accelerated through learning by doing and working collaboratively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pore-scale simulation of fluid flow and solute dispersion in three-dimensional porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo; Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L.; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-01-01

    In the present work fluid flow and solute transport through porous media are described by solving the governing equations at the pore scale with finite-volume discretization. Instead of solving the simplified Stokes equation (very often employed

  13. Comparison between lighting performance of a virtual natural lighting solutions prototype and a real window based on computer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Mangkuto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the measurement and simulation of a first generation prototype of Virtual Natural Lighting Solutions (VNLS, which are systems that can artificially provide natural lighting as well as a realistic outside view, with properties comparable to those of real windows and skylights. Examples of employing Radiance as a simulation tool to predict the lighting performance of such solutions are shown, for a particular case study of a VNLS prototype displaying variations of a simplified view of overcast, clear, and partly cloudy skies. Measurement and simulation were conducted to evaluate the illuminance distribution on workplane level. The key point of this study is to show that simulations can be used to compare an actual VNLS prototype with a hypothetical real window under the same sky scenes, which was physically not possible, since the test room was not located at the building׳s façade. It is found that the investigated prototype yields a less rapidly drop illuminance distribution and a larger average illuminance than the corresponding real window, under the overcast (52 lx compared to 28 lx and partly cloudy (102 lx compared to 80 lx sky scenes. Under the clear sky scene, the real window yields a larger average illuminance (97 lx compared to the prototype (71 lx, due to the influence of direct sunlight.

  14. Evaluation of near-wall solution approaches for large-eddy simulations of flow in a centrifugal pump impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Feng Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump impeller is bounded by complex surfaces, including blades, a hub and a shroud. The primary challenge of the flow simulation arises from the generation of a boundary layer between the surface of the impeller and the moving fluid. The principal objective is to evaluate the near-wall solution approaches that are typically used to deal with the flow in the boundary layer for the large-eddy simulation (LES of a centrifugal pump impeller. Three near-wall solution approaches –the wall-function approach, the wall-resolved approach and the hybrid Reynolds averaged Navier–Stoke (RANS and LES approach – are tested. The simulation results are compared with experimental results conducted through particle imaging velocimetry (PIV and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV. It is found that the wall-function approach is more sparing of computational resources, while the other two approaches have the important advantage of providing highly accurate boundary layer flow prediction. The hybrid RANS/LES approach is suitable for predicting steady-flow features, such as time-averaged velocities and hydraulic losses. Despite the fact that the wall-resolved approach is expensive in terms of computing resources, it exhibits a strong ability to capture a small-scale vortex and predict instantaneous velocity in the near-wall region in the impeller. The wall-resolved approach is thus recommended for the transient simulation of flows in centrifugal pump impellers.

  15. Simulation and Experimental Study on the Steady Conduction Solution for Continuous Rheo-Casting for A356 Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, Do Minh; Hai, Nguyen Hong; Quang, Pham

    2017-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic modeling of a continuous rheo-casting technology was conducted, consistent with the manufacturing of 3 "m"m"-"t"h"i"n plates made of aluminum alloy A356. The A numerical simulation on of the stabilizing time of the material crystallization was carried out using the ANSYS FLUENT code. Solidification and melting models were simulated with heat transfer and solid-liquid phase transformation involving the latent heat of crystallization were simulated. The calculated temperature distribution and the evolution of cooling rate through the material were examined and used to clarify their influence on microstructure, and further investigated with hardness testing. The thickness of the mushy zone was determined for the steady conduction solution of the continuous rheo-casting process.

  16. Simulation and Experimental Study on the Steady Conduction Solution for Continuous Rheo-Casting for A356 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, Do Minh; Hai, Nguyen Hong; Quang, Pham [Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2017-03-15

    Computational fluid dynamic modeling of a continuous rheo-casting technology was conducted, consistent with the manufacturing of 3 {sup mm-thin} plates made of aluminum alloy A356. The A numerical simulation on of the stabilizing time of the material crystallization was carried out using the ANSYS FLUENT code. Solidification and melting models were simulated with heat transfer and solid-liquid phase transformation involving the latent heat of crystallization were simulated. The calculated temperature distribution and the evolution of cooling rate through the material were examined and used to clarify their influence on microstructure, and further investigated with hardness testing. The thickness of the mushy zone was determined for the steady conduction solution of the continuous rheo-casting process.

  17. Preliminary results from uranium/americium affinity studies under experimental conditions for cesium removal from NPP ''Kozloduy'' simulated wastes solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforova, A.; Kinova, L.; Peneva, C.; Taskaeva, I.; Petrova, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use the approach described by Westinghouse Savannah River Company using ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) to remove elevated concentrations of radioactive cesium to facilitate handling waste samples from NPP K ozloduy . Preliminary series of tests were carried out to determine the exact conditions for sufficient cesium removal from five simulated waste solutions with concentrations of compounds, whose complexing power complicates any subsequent processing. Simulated wastes solutions contain high concentrations of nitrates, borates, H 2 C 2 O 4 , ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and Citric acid, according to the composition of the real waste from the NPP. On this basis a laboratory treatment protocol was created. This experiment is a preparation for the analysis of real waste samples. In this sense the results are preliminary. Unwanted removal of non-cesium radioactive species from simulated waste solutions was studied with gamma spectrometry with the aim to find a compromise between on the one hand the AMP effectiveness and on the other hand unwanted affinity to AMP of Uranium and Americium. Success for the treatment protocol is defined by proving minimal uptake of U and Am, while at the same time demonstrating good removal effectiveness through the use of AMP. Uptake of U and Am were determined as influenced by oxidizing agents at nitric acid concentrations, proposed by Savannah River National laboratory. It was found that AMP does not significantly remove U and Am when concentration of oxidizing agents is more than 0.1M for simulated waste solutions and for contact times inherent in laboratory treatment protocol. Uranium and Americium affinity under experimental conditions for cesium removal were evaluated from gamma spectrometric data. Results are given for the model experiment and an approach for the real waste analysis is chosen. Under our experimental conditions simulated wastes solutions showed minimal affinity to AMP when U and Am are most probably in

  18. Enhancing Student’s Understanding in Entrepreneurship Through Business Plan Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Guzairy M.; Mohamad N.; Yunus A.R.

    2018-01-01

    Business Plan is an important document for entrepreneurs to guide them managing their business. Business Plan also assist the entrepreneur to strategies their business and manage future growth. That is why Malaysian government has foster all Higher Education Provider to set entrepreneurship education as compulsory course. One of the entrepreneurship education learning outcome is the student can write effective business plan. This study focused on enhancing student’s understanding in entrepren...

  19. Effect of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation Modeling on Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding of Homeostasis and Their Perceptions of Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien; Fateen, Rasheta; Mumba, Frackson; Ochs, Laura Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of an inquiry-based computer simulation modeling (ICoSM) instructional approach on pre-service science teachers' understanding of homeostasis and its related concepts, and their perceived design features of the ICoSM and simulation that enhanced their conceptual understanding of these concepts. Fifty pre-service…

  20. Understanding the core-halo relation of quantum wave dark matter from 3D simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Liao, Ming-Hsuan; Woo, Tak-Pong; Wong, Shing-Kwong; Chiueh, Tzihong; Broadhurst, Tom; Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2014-12-31

    We examine the nonlinear structure of gravitationally collapsed objects that form in our simulations of wavelike cold dark matter, described by the Schrödinger-Poisson (SP) equation with a particle mass ∼10(-22)  eV. A distinct gravitationally self-bound solitonic core is found at the center of every halo, with a profile quite different from cores modeled in the warm or self-interacting dark matter scenarios. Furthermore, we show that each solitonic core is surrounded by an extended halo composed of large fluctuating dark matter granules which modulate the halo density on a scale comparable to the diameter of the solitonic core. The scaling symmetry of the SP equation and the uncertainty principle tightly relate the core mass to the halo specific energy, which, in the context of cosmological structure formation, leads to a simple scaling between core mass (Mc) and halo mass (Mh), Mc∝a(-1/2)Mh(1/3), where a is the cosmic scale factor. We verify this scaling relation by (i) examining the internal structure of a statistical sample of virialized halos that form in our 3D cosmological simulations and by (ii) merging multiple solitons to create individual virialized objects. Sufficient simulation resolution is achieved by adaptive mesh refinement and graphic processing units acceleration. From this scaling relation, present dwarf satellite galaxies are predicted to have kiloparsec-sized cores and a minimum mass of ∼10(8)M⊙, capable of solving the small-scale controversies in the cold dark matter model. Moreover, galaxies of 2×10(12)M⊙ at z=8 should have massive solitonic cores of ∼2×10(9)M⊙ within ∼60  pc. Such cores can provide a favorable local environment for funneling the gas that leads to the prompt formation of early stellar spheroids and quasars.

  1. Temperature-assisted solute focusing with sequential trap/release zones in isocratic and gradient capillary liquid chromatography: Simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groskreutz, Stephen R.; Weber, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we characterize the development of a method to enhance temperature-assisted on-column solute focusing (TASF) called two-stage TASF. A new instrument was built to implement two-stage TASF consisting of a linear array of three independent, electronically controlled Peltier devices (thermoelectric coolers, TECs). Samples are loaded onto the chromatographic column with the first two TECs, TEC A and TEC B, cold. In the two-stage TASF approach TECs A and B are cooled during injection. TEC A is heated following sample loading. At some time following TEC A’s temperature rise, TEC B’s temperature is increased from the focusing temperature to a temperature matching that of TEC A. Injection bands are focused twice on-column, first on the initial TEC, e.g. single-stage TASF, then refocused on the second, cold TEC. Our goal is to understand the two-stage TASF approach in detail. We have developed a simple yet powerful digital simulation procedure to model the effect of changing temperature in the two focusing zones on retention, band shape and band spreading. The simulation can predict experimental chromatograms resulting from spatial and temporal temperature programs in combination with isocratic and solvent gradient elution. To assess the two-stage TASF method and the accuracy of the simulation well characterized solutes are needed. Thus, retention factors were measured at six temperatures (25–75 °C) at each of twelve mobile phases compositions (0.05–0.60 acetonitrile/water) for homologs of n-alkyl hydroxylbenzoate esters and n-alkyl p-hydroxyphenones. Simulations accurately reflect experimental results in showing that the two-stage approach improves separation quality. For example, two-stage TASF increased sensitivity for a low retention solute by a factor of 2.2 relative to single-stage TASF and 8.8 relative to isothermal conditions using isocratic elution. Gradient elution results for two-stage TASF were more encouraging. Application of two-stage TASF

  2. Investigating the impact of visuohaptic simulations for the conceptual understanding of electric field for distributed charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Uzma Abdul Sattar

    The present study assessed the benefits of a multisensory intervention on the conceptual understanding of electric field for distributed charges in engineering and technology undergraduate students. A novel visuohaptic intervention was proposed, which focused on exploring the forces around the different electric field configurations for distributed charges namely point, infinitely long line and uniformly charged ring. The before and after effects of the visuohaptic intervention are compared, wherein the intervention includes instructional scaffolding. Three single-group studies were conducted to investigate the effect among three different populations: (a) Undergraduate engineering students, (b) Undergraduate technology students and (c) Undergraduate engineering technology students from a different demographic setting. The findings from the three studies suggests that the haptic modality intervention provides beneficial effects by allowing students to improve their conceptual understanding of electric field for distributed charges, although students from groups (b) and (c) showed a statistically significant increase in the conceptual understanding. The findings also indicate a positive learning perception among all the three groups.

  3. Understanding price discovery in interconnected markets: Generalized Langevin process approach and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Natalya A.; Horvath, Philip A.; Sinha, Amit K.

    2018-02-01

    While the literature on price discovery process and information flow between dominant and satellite market is exhaustive, most studies have applied an approach that can be traced back to Hasbrouck (1995) or Gonzalo and Granger (1995). In this paper, however, we propose a Generalized Langevin process with asymmetric double-well potential function, with co-integrated time series and interconnected diffusion processes to model the information flow and price discovery process in two, a dominant and a satellite, interconnected markets. A simulated illustration of the model is also provided.

  4. Understanding Large-scale Structure in the SSA22 Protocluster Region Using Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Michael W.; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Naoz, Smadar; Primack, Joel R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the nature and evolution of large-scale structure within the SSA22 protocluster region at z = 3.09 using cosmological simulations. A redshift histogram constructed from current spectroscopic observations of the SSA22 protocluster reveals two separate peaks at z = 3.065 (blue) and z = 3.095 (red). Based on these data, we report updated overdensity and mass calculations for the SSA22 protocluster. We find {δ }b,{gal}=4.8+/- 1.8 and {δ }r,{gal}=9.5+/- 2.0 for the blue and red peaks, respectively, and {δ }t,{gal}=7.6+/- 1.4 for the entire region. These overdensities correspond to masses of {M}b=(0.76+/- 0.17)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ , {M}r=(2.15+/- 0.32)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ , and {M}t=(3.19+/- 0.40)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ for the red, blue, and total peaks, respectively. We use the Small MultiDark Planck (SMDPL) simulation to identify comparably massive z∼ 3 protoclusters, and uncover the underlying structure and ultimate fate of the SSA22 protocluster. For this analysis, we construct mock redshift histograms for each simulated z∼ 3 protocluster, quantitatively comparing them with the observed SSA22 data. We find that the observed double-peaked structure in the SSA22 redshift histogram corresponds not to a single coalescing cluster, but rather the proximity of a ∼ {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ protocluster and at least one > {10}14{h}-1 {M}ȯ cluster progenitor. Such associations in the SMDPL simulation are easily understood within the framework of hierarchical clustering of dark matter halos. We finally find that the opportunity to observe such a phenomenon is incredibly rare, with an occurrence rate of 7.4{h}3 {{{Gpc}}}-3. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Sunlight simulators-the key to understanding the physiological effects of the sun

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Singh, A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available simulator Slide 4 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za ۞ Benefits of natural sunlight ۞ Restrictions of lifestyles ۞ Common misconceptions ۞ Experimental setups Slide 5 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Cancer Males...,043 181,439 Lung 965,241 848,132 386,891 330,786 Melanoma of skin 79,043 21,952 81,134 18,829 Breast 1,151,298 410,712 Leukemia 171,037 125,142 129,485 97,364 All sites but skin 5,801,839 3,795,991 5,060,657 2...

  6. Understanding LTE with Matlab from mathematical modeling to simulation and prototyping

    CERN Document Server

    Zarrinkoub, Houman

    2014-01-01

    An introduction to technical details related to the Physical Layer of the LTE standard with MATLAB® The LTE (Long Term Evolution) and LTE-Advanced are among the latest mobile communications standards, designed to realize the dream of a truly global, fast, all-IP-based, secure broadband mobile access technology. This book examines the Physical Layer (PHY) of the LTE standards by incorporating three conceptual elements: an overview of the theory behind key enabling technologies; a concise discussion regarding standard specifications; and the MATLAB® algorithms needed to simulate the standard.

  7. The combined effect of food-simulating solutions, brushing and staining on color stability of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia Mara Da; Sales, Ana Luísa Leme Simões; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the effect of food-simulating media associated with brushing and coffee staining on color stability of different composite resins. Materials and methods: Eighty specimens were prepared for each composite: Grandio SO (Voco), Amaris (Voco), Filtek Z350XT (3M/ESPE), Filtek P90 (3M/ESPE). They were divided into four groups according to food-simulating media for 7 days: artificial saliva (control), heptane, citric acid and ethanol. The composite surface was submitted to 10,950 brushing cycles (200 g load) in an automatic toothbrushing machine. The specimens were darkened with coffee solution at 37 °C for 24 h. After each treatment, color measurements were assessed by spectrophotometry, using CIE L*a*b* system. The overall color change (ΔE) was determined for each specimen at baseline (C1) and after the treatments (food-simulating media immersion/C2, brushing/C3 and dye solution/C4). Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p composites (p = .001), time (p = .001) and chemical degradation (p = .002). The mean of ΔE for composites were: Z350XT (5.39)a, Amaris (3.89)b, Grandio (3.75)bc, P90 (3.36)c. According to food-simulating media: heptane (4.41)a, citric acid (4.24)a, ethanol (4.02)ab, artificial saliva (3.76)b. For the treatments: dye solution (4.53)a, brushing (4.26)a, after food-simulating media (3.52)b. Conclusions: The composite resin Filtek Z350XT showed significantly higher staining than all other composite resin tested. The immersion in heptane and citric acid produced the highest color alteration than other food-simulating media. The exposure of samples to brushing protocols and darkening in coffee solution resulted in significant color alteration of the composite resins. PMID:28642926

  8. Cyclic deformation-induced solute transport in tissue scaffolds with computer designed, interconnected, pore networks: experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Buijs, Jorn Op; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Ritman, Erik L

    2009-08-01

    Nutrient supply and waste removal in porous tissue engineering scaffolds decrease from the periphery to the center, leading to limited depth of ingrowth of new tissue into the scaffold. However, as many tissues experience cyclic physiological strains, this may provide a mechanism to enhance solute transport in vivo before vascularization of the scaffold. The hypothesis of this study was that pore cross-sectional geometry and interconnectivity are of major importance for the effectiveness of cyclic deformation-induced solute transport. Transparent elastic polyurethane scaffolds, with computer-programmed design of pore networks in the form of interconnected channels, were fabricated using a 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold pores were loaded with a colored tracer for optical contrast, cyclically compressed with deformations of 10 and 15% of the original undeformed height at 1.0 Hz. Digital imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the tracer concentration within the pores. Numerical simulations of a fluid-structure interaction model of deformation-induced solute transport were compared to the experimental data. The results of experiments and modeling agreed well and showed that pore interconnectivity heavily influences deformation-induced solute transport. Pore cross-sectional geometry appears to be of less relative importance in interconnected pore networks. Validated computer models of solute transport can be used to design optimal scaffold pore geometries that will enhance the convective transport of nutrients inside the scaffold and the removal of waste, thus improving the cell survivability deep inside the scaffold.

  9. Modeling and simulation in inquiry learning: Checking solutions and giving intelligent advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo, C.; van Joolingen, W.R.; de Jong, T.

    2006-01-01

    Inquiry learning is a didactic approach in which students acquire knowledge and skills through processes of theory building and experimentation. Computer modeling and simulation can play a prominent role within this approach. Students construct representations of physical systems using modeling.

  10. Understanding the Causal Path between Action, Learning, and Solutions: Maximizing the Power of Action Learning to Achieve Great Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, H. Skipton

    2015-01-01

    Clients and practitioners alike are often confused about the ultimate purpose of action learning (AL). Because of the title of the method, many believe the primary goal of AL is to generate learning. This article clarifies the relationship between action, learning, and solutions. It also provides historical evidence to support the conclusion that…

  11. Retro-Diels-Alder reaction in aqueous solution : Toward a better understanding of organic reactivity in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, J.W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    The retro-Diels-Alder (RDA) reaction of anthracenedione 1a proceeds considerably faster in aqueous solutions than in organic solvents. Addition of organic solvents to water retards the reaction, whereas glucose induces a modest acceleration. SDS micelles induce a considerable retardation, but even

  12. Analytical solutions and particle simulations of cross-field plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerver, M.J.; Parker, S.E.; Theilhaber, K.

    1989-01-01

    Particles simulations have been made of an infinite plasma slab, bounded by absorbing conducting walls, with a magnetic field parallel to the walls. The simulations have been either 1-D, or 2-D, with the magnetic field normal to the simulation plane. Initially, the plasma has a uniform density between the walls, and there is a uniform source of ions and electrons to replace particles lost to the walls. In the 1-D case, there is no diffusion of the particle guiding centers, and the plasma remains uniform in density and potential over most of the slab, with sheaths about a Debye length wide where the potential rises to the wall potential. In the 2-D case, the density profile becomes parabolic, going almost to zero at the walls, and there is a quasineutral presheath in the bulk of the plasma, in addition to sheaths near the walls. Analytic expressions are found for the density and potential profiles in both cases, including, in the 2-D case, the magnetic presheath due to finite ion Larmor radius, and the effects of the guiding center diffusion rate being either much less than or much grater than the energy diffusion rate. These analytic expressions are shown to agree with the simulations. A 1-D simulation with Monte Carlo guiding center diffusion included gives results that are good agreement with the much more expensive 2-D simulation. 17 refs., 10 figs

  13. Understanding the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles through multi-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Simon Hedegaard; Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how the chemical reactivity of gold nanoparticles depends on the cluster size and shape using a combination of simulation techniques at different length scales, enabling us to model at the atomic level the shapes of clusters in the size range relevant for catalysis. The detailed......-coordinated active sites is found, and their reactivities are extracted from models based on Density Functional Theory calculations. This enables us to determine the chemical activity of clusters in the same range of particle sizes that is accessible experimentally. The variation of reactivity with particle size...... is in excellent agreement with experiments, and we conclude that the experimentally observed trends are mostly explained by the high reactivity of under-coordinated corner atoms on the gold clusters. Other effects, such as the effect of the substrate, may influence the reactivities significantly, but the presence...

  14. Understanding the connection between epigenetic DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning from computer simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Portella

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation is one of the most important epigenetic marks that regulate the process of gene expression. Here, we have examined the effect of epigenetic DNA methylation on nucleosomal stability using molecular dynamics simulations and elastic deformation models. We found that methylation of CpG steps destabilizes nucleosomes, especially when these are placed in sites where the DNA minor groove faces the histone core. The larger stiffness of methylated CpG steps is a crucial factor behind the decrease in nucleosome stability. Methylation changes the positioning and phasing of the nucleosomal DNA, altering the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, and accordingly gene functionality. Our theoretical calculations highlight a simple physical-based explanation on the foundations of epigenetic signaling.

  15. Understanding the Pathophysiology of Portosystemic Shunt by Simulation Using an Electric Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonhwan; Lee, Keon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunt (PSS) without a definable cause is a rare condition, and most of the studies on this topic are small series or based on case reports. Moreover, no firm agreement has been reached on the definition and classification of various forms of PSS, which makes it difficult to compare and analyze the management. The blood flow can be seen very similar to an electric current, governed by Ohm's law. The simulation of PSS using an electric circuit, combined with the interpretation of reported management results, can provide intuitive insights into the underlying mechanism of PSS development. In this article, we have built a model of PSS using electric circuit symbols and explained clinical manifestations as well as the possible mechanisms underlying a PSS formation.

  16. Challenges in simulating the human gut for understanding the role of the microbiota in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, M; Venema, K

    2017-02-07

    There is an elevated incidence of cases of obesity worldwide. Therefore, the development of strategies to tackle this condition is of vital importance. This review focuses on the necessity of optimising in vitro systems to model human colonic fermentation in obese subjects. This may allow to increase the resolution and the physiological relevance of the information obtained from this type of studies when evaluating the potential role that the human gut microbiota plays in obesity. In light of the parameters that are currently used for the in vitro simulation of the human gut (which are mostly based on information derived from healthy subjects) and the possible difference with an obese condition, we propose to revise and improve specific standard operating procedures.

  17. Effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids on the acute lethality, accumulation, and enzyme activity of cadmium in Eisenia fetida in a simulated soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Long; Wang, Yu-Jun; Xuan, Liang; Dang, Fei; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the toxicity of cadmium (Cd) to Eisenia fetida were investigated in a simulated soil solution. The LMWOAs protected E. fetida from Cd toxicity, as indicated by the increased median lethal concentration (LC50) values and the increased activity of superoxide dismutase. In addition, Cd concentrations in E. fetida decreased dramatically in the presence of LMWOAs. These results were likely because of the complexation between Cd and LMWOAs, which decreased the bioavailability and consequential toxicity of Cd to E. fetida. Notably, LMWOAs reduced Cd toxicity in decreasing order (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid [EDTA] > citric acid > oxalic acid > malic acid > acetic acid), which was consistent with the decreasing complexation constants between LMWOAs and Cd. These results advance our understanding of the interactions between Cd and LMWOAs in soil. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1005-1011. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  18. Understanding the impact of simulated patients on health care learners' communication skills: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplonyi, Jessica; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Nestel, Debra; Kiegaldie, Debra; Maloney, Stephen; Haines, Terry; Williams, Cylie

    2017-12-01

    Effective communication skills are at the core of good health care. Simulated patients (SPs) are increasingly engaged as an interactive means of teaching, applying and practising communication skills with immediate feedback. There is a large body of research into the use of manikin-based simulation but a gap exists in the body of research on the effectiveness of SP-based education to teach communication skills that impact patient outcomes. The aim of this systematic review was to critically analyse the existing research, investigating whether SP-based communication skills training improves learner-patient communication, how communication skill improvement is measured, and who measures these improvements. The databases Medline, ProQuest (Health & Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source) and CINAHL (EBSCOhost) Education Resources Information Centre (ERIC) were searched for articles that investigated the effects of SP-based education on the communication skills of medical, nursing and allied health learners. There were 60 studies included in the review. Only two studies reported direct patient outcomes, one reporting some negative impact, and no studies included an economic analysis. Many studies reported statistically significant third-party ratings of improved communication effectiveness following SP-based education; however, studies were unable to be pooled for meta-analysis because of the outcome collection methods. There were a small number of studies comparing SP with no training at all and there were no differences between communication skills, contradicting the results from studies reporting benefits. Of the 60 studies included for analysis, 54 (90%) met the minimum quality score of 7/11, with four articles (7%) scoring 11/11. SP-based education is widely accepted as a valuable and effective means of teaching communication skills but there is limited evidence of how this translates to patient outcomes and no indication of economic benefit for this

  19. N-body simulations of planet formation: understanding exoplanet system architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gavin; Nelson, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Observations have demonstrated the existence of a significant population of compact systems comprised of super-Earths and Neptune-mass planets, and a population of gas giants that appear to occur primarily in either short-period (100 days) orbits. The broad diversity of system architectures raises the question of whether or not the same formation processes operating in standard disc models can explain these planets, or if different scenarios are required instead to explain the widely differing architectures. To explore this issue, we present the results from a comprehensive suite of N-body simulations of planetary system formation that include the following physical processes: gravitational interactions and collisions between planetary embryos and planetesimals; type I and II migration; gas accretion onto planetary cores; self-consistent viscous disc evolution and disc removal through photo-evaporation. Our results indicate that the formation and survival of compact systems of super-Earths and Neptune-mass planets occur commonly in disc models where a simple prescription for the disc viscosity is assumed, but such models never lead to the formation and survival of gas giant planets due to migration into the star. Inspired in part by the ALMA observations of HL Tau, and by MHD simulations that display the formation of long-lived zonal flows, we have explored the consequences of assuming that the disc viscosity varies in both time and space. We find that the radial structuring of the disc leads to conditions in which systems of giant planets are able to form and survive. Furthermore, these giants generally occupy those regions of the mass-period diagram that are densely populated by the observed gas giants, suggesting that the planet traps generated by radial structuring of protoplanetary discs may be a necessary ingredient for forming giant planets.

  20. The use of a virtual reality simulator to explore and understand the impact of Linac mis-calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Andrew W.; Ward, James W.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: In recent years there has been interest in using Computer Simulation within Medical training. The VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) system is a Flight Simulator for Radiation Oncology professionals, wherein fundamental concepts, techniques and problematic scenarios can be safely investigated. Methods: The system provides detailed simulations of several Linacs and the ability to display DICOM treatment plans. Patients can be mis-positioned with 'set-up errors' which can be explored visually, dosimetrically and using IGRT. Similarly, a variety of Linac calibration and configuration parameters can be altered manually or randomly via controlled errors in the simulated 3D Linac and its component parts. The implication of these can be investigated by following through a treatment scenario or using QC devices available within a Physics software module. Results: One resultant exercise is a systematic mis-calibration of 'lateral laser height' by 2mm. The offset in patient alignment is easily identified using IGRT and once corrected by reference to the 'in-room monitor'. The dosimetric implication is demonstrated to be 0.4% by setting a dosimetry phantom by the lasers (and ignoring TSD information). Finally, the need for recalibration can be shown by the Laser Alignment Phantom or by reference to the front pointer. Conclusions: The VERT system provides a realistic environment for training and enhancing understanding of radiotherapy concepts and techniques. Linac error conditions can be explored in this context and valuable experience gained in a controlled manner in a compressed period of time.

  1. Development and applications of the channel network model for simulations of flow and solute transport in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gylling, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Channel Network model and its computer implementation, the code CHAN3D, for simulations of fluid flow and transport of solutes have been developed. The tool may be used for performance and safety assessments of deep lying repositories in fractured rocks for nuclear and other hazardous wastes, e.g. chemical wastes. It may also be used to simulate and interpret field experiments of flow and transport in large or small scale. Fluid flow and solute transport in fractured media are of interest in the performance assessment of a repository for hazardous waste, located at depth in crystalline rock, with potential release of solutes. Fluid flow in fractured rock is found to be very unevenly distributed due to the heterogeneity of the medium. The water will seek the easiest path, channels, under a prevailing pressure gradient. Solutes in the flowing water may be transported through preferential paths and migrate from the water in the fractures into the stagnant water in the rock matrix. There, sorbing solutes may be sorbed on the micro surfaces within the matrix. The diffusion into the matrix and the sorption process may significantly retard the transport of species and increase the time available for radionuclide decay. Channelling and matrix diffusion contribute to the dispersion of solutes in the water. Important for performance assessment is that channeling may cause a portion of the solutes to arrive much faster than the rest of the solutes. Simulations of field experiments at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory using the Channel Network model have been performed. The application of the model to the site and the simulation results of the pumping and tracer tests are presented. The results show that the model is capable of describing the hydraulic gradient and of predicting flow rates and tracer transport obtained in the experiments. The data requirements for the Channel Network model have been investigated to determine which data are the most important for predictions

  2. MO-E-18C-04: Advanced Computer Simulation and Visualization Tools for Enhanced Understanding of Core Medical Physics Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Most medical physics programs emphasize proficiency in routine clinical calculations and QA. The formulaic aspect of these calculations and prescriptive nature of measurement protocols obviate the need to frequently apply basic physical principles, which, therefore, gradually decay away from memory. E.g. few students appreciate the role of electron transport in photon dose, making it difficult to understand key concepts such as dose buildup, electronic disequilibrium effects and Bragg-Gray theory. These conceptual deficiencies manifest when the physicist encounters a new system, requiring knowledge beyond routine activities. Methods: Two interactive computer simulation tools are developed to facilitate deeper learning of physical principles. One is a Monte Carlo code written with a strong educational aspect. The code can “label” regions and interactions to highlight specific aspects of the physics, e.g., certain regions can be designated as “starters” or “crossers,” and any interaction type can be turned on and off. Full 3D tracks with specific portions highlighted further enhance the visualization of radiation transport problems. The second code calculates and displays trajectories of a collection electrons under arbitrary space/time dependent Lorentz force using relativistic kinematics. Results: Using the Monte Carlo code, the student can interactively study photon and electron transport through visualization of dose components, particle tracks, and interaction types. The code can, for instance, be used to study kerma-dose relationship, explore electronic disequilibrium near interfaces, or visualize kernels by using interaction forcing. The electromagnetic simulator enables the student to explore accelerating mechanisms and particle optics in devices such as cyclotrons and linacs. Conclusion: The proposed tools are designed to enhance understanding of abstract concepts by highlighting various aspects of the physics. The simulations serve as

  3. MO-E-18C-04: Advanced Computer Simulation and Visualization Tools for Enhanced Understanding of Core Medical Physics Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S [Saint Agnes Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Most medical physics programs emphasize proficiency in routine clinical calculations and QA. The formulaic aspect of these calculations and prescriptive nature of measurement protocols obviate the need to frequently apply basic physical principles, which, therefore, gradually decay away from memory. E.g. few students appreciate the role of electron transport in photon dose, making it difficult to understand key concepts such as dose buildup, electronic disequilibrium effects and Bragg-Gray theory. These conceptual deficiencies manifest when the physicist encounters a new system, requiring knowledge beyond routine activities. Methods: Two interactive computer simulation tools are developed to facilitate deeper learning of physical principles. One is a Monte Carlo code written with a strong educational aspect. The code can “label” regions and interactions to highlight specific aspects of the physics, e.g., certain regions can be designated as “starters” or “crossers,” and any interaction type can be turned on and off. Full 3D tracks with specific portions highlighted further enhance the visualization of radiation transport problems. The second code calculates and displays trajectories of a collection electrons under arbitrary space/time dependent Lorentz force using relativistic kinematics. Results: Using the Monte Carlo code, the student can interactively study photon and electron transport through visualization of dose components, particle tracks, and interaction types. The code can, for instance, be used to study kerma-dose relationship, explore electronic disequilibrium near interfaces, or visualize kernels by using interaction forcing. The electromagnetic simulator enables the student to explore accelerating mechanisms and particle optics in devices such as cyclotrons and linacs. Conclusion: The proposed tools are designed to enhance understanding of abstract concepts by highlighting various aspects of the physics. The simulations serve as

  4. Computationally efficient and quantitatively accurate multiscale simulation of solid-solution strengthening by ab initio calculation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ma, D.; Friák, Martin; von Pezold, J.; Raabe, D.; Neugebauer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 85, FEB (2015), s. 53-66 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Solid-solution strengthening * DFT * Peierls–Nabarro model * Ab initio * Al alloys Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.058, year: 2015

  5. Study of source term evaluation from fuel solution under simulated nuclear criticality accident in TRACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Tashiro, Shinsuke; Nagai, Hitoshi; Koike, Tadao; Okagawa, Seigo; Murata, Mikio

    1999-01-01

    In a accident at the dissolver in a reprocessing plant, various fission products and radiolysis gases will be produced in the fuel solution and volatile radioactive nuclides and radiolysis gases and nitrogen oxide will be released into vent-gas spontaneously. Moreover other on-volatile nuclide will be releases as radioactive aerosol (mist) with bursting bubbles at surface of the solution. Therefore quantitative estimation of release and transport behavior of the radioactive material from solution as source term is very important. TRACY is a transient criticality experimental facility for studying the transient criticality characteristics of low enriched uranium. In this paper, experiment methods and results about the release behavior of the hydrogen, radioactive aerosol and iodine species from the fuel solutions are reported. As the results of the experiments, release patterns of H 2 , 140 Ba and 131 I could be grasped. Concentrations of H 2 in the vent-gas and 140 Ba in the gas phase in the core tank attained to the peak just after the transient criticality and decreased exponentially with time. On the other hand, concentrations of 131 I in the gas phase of the tank began to increase with a time lag of several minutes from the transient criticality and attained approximately constant values. (J.P.N.)

  6. Fuel solution criticality accident studies with the SILENE reactor: phenomenology, consequences and simulated intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbry, F.

    1984-01-01

    After defining the content and the objectives of criticality accident studies, the SILENE reactor, a means of studying fuel solution criticality accidents, is presented. Information obtained from the CRAC and SILENE experimental programs are then presented; they concern power excursion phenomenology, radiological consequences, and finally guide-lines for current and future programs

  7. Understanding and simulating vibrations of plain bridge cables under varying meteorological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, Giulia

    amplitude peak to peak amplitudes, occurred. This latter behaviour was likely to be associated to dry inclined galloping. Passive dynamic wind tunnel tests were finally undertaken in presence of rain, using the same cable model as adopted in the dry state. The tests served to improve the current......The dissertation investigates the phenomenon of wind induced vibration of bridge cables under varying meteorological conditions. A twin research approach is adopted, where wind tunnel investigation of full-scale bridge cable section models is paralleled with theoretical modelling. A literature......-scale monitoring, wind tunnel testing and theoretical modelling. An extensive wind tunnel test campaign was then undertaken in order to further understand the onset conditions and characteristics of instability in the different climatic conditions described in the literature. Tests were separated into two...

  8. Towards understanding the impact of assimilating along-track SLA data on simulated eddy characteristics in the Agulhas System

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Vos, M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available understanding the impact of assimilating along-track SLA data on simulated eddy characteristics in the Agulhas System Marc de Vos1, 3, Björn Backeberg2, 3, 4 and François Counillon4 Marine Research Unit, South African Weather Service, South Africa1 Coastal... and 1 Tel: +27 21 935 5764; Email: marc.devos@weathersa.co.za dipoles reach the Agulhas Current frequently and on occasion propagate all the way to the retroflection, influencing its position and modulating ring shedding events there (Schouten et al...

  9. A SAS-based solution to evaluate study design efficiency of phase I pediatric oncology trials via discrete event simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Patel, Dimple; Skolnik, Jeffrey M

    2008-06-01

    Previous exploration of oncology study design efficiency has focused on Markov processes alone (probability-based events) without consideration for time dependencies. Barriers to study completion include time delays associated with patient accrual, inevaluability (IE), time to dose limiting toxicities (DLT) and administrative and review time. Discrete event simulation (DES) can incorporate probability-based assignment of DLT and IE frequency, correlated with cohort in the case of DLT, with time-based events defined by stochastic relationships. A SAS-based solution to examine study efficiency metrics and evaluate design modifications that would improve study efficiency is presented. Virtual patients are simulated with attributes defined from prior distributions of relevant patient characteristics. Study population datasets are read into SAS macros which select patients and enroll them into a study based on the specific design criteria if the study is open to enrollment. Waiting times, arrival times and time to study events are also sampled from prior distributions; post-processing of study simulations is provided within the decision macros and compared across designs in a separate post-processing algorithm. This solution is examined via comparison of the standard 3+3 decision rule relative to the "rolling 6" design, a newly proposed enrollment strategy for the phase I pediatric oncology setting.

  10. VM-based infrastructure for simulating different cluster and storage solutions used on ATLAS Tier-3 sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, S; Kadochnikov, I; Korenkov, V; Kutouski, M; Oleynik, D; Petrosyan, A

    2012-01-01

    The current ATLAS Tier-3 infrastructure consists of a variety of sites of different sizes and with a mix of local resource management systems (LRMS) and mass storage system (MSS) implementations. The Tier-3 monitoring suite, having been developed in order to satisfy the needs of Tier-3 site administrators and to aggregate Tier-3 monitoring information on the global VO level, needs to be validated for various combinations of LRMS and MSS solutions along with the corresponding Ganglia plugins. For this purpose the testbed infrastructure, which allows simulation of various computational cluster and storage solutions, had been set up at JINR (Dubna, Russia). This infrastructure provides the ability to run testbeds with various LRMS and MSS implementations, and with the capability to quickly redeploy particular testbeds or their components. Performance of specific components is not a critical issue for development and validation, whereas easy management and deployment are crucial. Therefore virtual machines were chosen for implementation of the validation infrastructure which, though initially developed for Tier-3 monitoring project, can be exploited for other purposes. Load generators for simulation of the computing activities at the farm were developed as a part of this task. The paper will cover concrete implementation, including deployment scenarios, hypervisor details and load simulators.

  11. Atomistic simulations of nanocrystalline U0.5Th0.5O2 solid solution under uniaxial tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Xiao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the uniaxial tensile properties of nanocrystalline U0.5Th0.5O2 solid solution with the Born–Mayer–Huggins potential. The results indicated that the elastic modulus increased linearly with the density relative to a single crystal, but decreased with increasing temperature. The simulated nanocrystalline U0.5Th0.5O2 exhibited a breakdown in the Hall–Petch relation with mean grain size varying from 3.0 nm to 18.0 nm. Moreover, the elastic modulus of U1-yThyO2 solid solutions with different content of thorium at 300 K was also studied and the results accorded well with the experimental data available in the literature. In addition, the fracture mode of nanocrystalline U0.5Th0.5O2 was inclined to be ductile because the fracture behavior was preceded by some moderate amount of plastic deformation, which is different from what has been seen earlier in simulations of pure UO2.

  12. Effect of minimal/mild hearing loss on children's speech understanding in a simulated classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Dawna E; Valente, Daniel L; Spalding, Jody L

    2015-01-01

    While classroom acoustics can affect educational performance for all students, the impact for children with minimal/mild hearing loss (MMHL) may be greater than for children with normal hearing (NH). The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of MMHL on children's speech recognition comprehension and looking behavior in a simulated classroom environment. It was hypothesized that children with MMHL would perform similarly to their peers with NH on the speech recognition task but would perform more poorly on the comprehension task. Children with MMHL also were expected to look toward talkers more often than children with NH. Eighteen children with MMHL and 18 age-matched children with NH participated. In a simulated classroom environment, children listened to lines from an elementary-age-appropriate play read by a teacher and four students reproduced over LCD monitors and loudspeakers located around the listener. A gyroscopic headtracking device was used to monitor looking behavior during the task. At the end of the play, comprehension was assessed by asking a series of 18 factual questions. Children also were asked to repeat 50 meaningful sentences with three key words each presented audio-only by a single talker either from the loudspeaker at 0 degree azimuth or randomly from the five loudspeakers. Both children with NH and those with MMHL performed at or near ceiling on the sentence recognition task. For the comprehension task, children with MMHL performed more poorly than those with NH. Assessment of looking behavior indicated that both groups of children looked at talkers while they were speaking less than 50% of the time. In addition, the pattern of overall looking behaviors suggested that, compared with older children with NH, a larger portion of older children with MMHL may demonstrate looking behaviors similar to younger children with or without MMHL. The results of this study demonstrate that, under realistic acoustic conditions, it is difficult to

  13. Solution of AntiSeepage for Mengxi River Based on Numerical Simulation of Unsaturated Seepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Youjun; Zhang, Linzhi; Yue, Jiannan

    2014-01-01

    Lessening the leakage of surface water can reduce the waste of water resources and ground water pollution. To solve the problem that Mengxi River could not store water enduringly, geology investigation, theoretical analysis, experiment research, and numerical simulation analysis were carried out. Firstly, the seepage mathematical model was established based on unsaturated seepage theory; secondly, the experimental equipment for testing hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soil was developed to obtain the curve of two-phase flow. The numerical simulation of leakage in natural conditions proves the previous inference and leakage mechanism of river. At last, the seepage control capacities of different impervious materials were compared by numerical simulations. According to the engineering actuality, the impervious material was selected. The impervious measure in this paper has been proved to be effectible by hydrogeological research today. PMID:24707199

  14. Protocol for classical molecular dynamics simulations of nano-junctions in solution

    KAUST Repository

    Gkionis, Konstantinos; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of nanoscale electronic devices in water requires the evaluation of the transport properties averaged over the possible configurations of the solvent. They can be obtained from classical molecular dynamics for water confined in the device. A series of classical molecular dynamics simulations is performed to establish a methodology for estimating the average number of water molecules N confined between two static and semi-infinite goldelectrodes. Variations in key parameters of the simulations, as well as simulations with non-static infinite goldsurfaces of constant area and with anisotropically fluctuating cell dimensions lead to less than 1% discrepancies in the calculated N. Our approach is then applied to a carbon nanotube placed between the goldelectrodes. The atomic density profile along the axis separating the slabs shows the typical pattern of confined liquids, irrespective of the presence of the nanotube, while parallel to the slabs the nanotube perturbs the obtained profile.

  15. Solution of AntiSeepage for Mengxi River Based on Numerical Simulation of Unsaturated Seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lessening the leakage of surface water can reduce the waste of water resources and ground water pollution. To solve the problem that Mengxi River could not store water enduringly, geology investigation, theoretical analysis, experiment research, and numerical simulation analysis were carried out. Firstly, the seepage mathematical model was established based on unsaturated seepage theory; secondly, the experimental equipment for testing hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soil was developed to obtain the curve of two-phase flow. The numerical simulation of leakage in natural conditions proves the previous inference and leakage mechanism of river. At last, the seepage control capacities of different impervious materials were compared by numerical simulations. According to the engineering actuality, the impervious material was selected. The impervious measure in this paper has been proved to be effectible by hydrogeological research today.

  16. Protocol for classical molecular dynamics simulations of nano-junctions in solution

    KAUST Repository

    Gkionis, Konstantinos

    2012-10-19

    Modeling of nanoscale electronic devices in water requires the evaluation of the transport properties averaged over the possible configurations of the solvent. They can be obtained from classical molecular dynamics for water confined in the device. A series of classical molecular dynamics simulations is performed to establish a methodology for estimating the average number of water molecules N confined between two static and semi-infinite goldelectrodes. Variations in key parameters of the simulations, as well as simulations with non-static infinite goldsurfaces of constant area and with anisotropically fluctuating cell dimensions lead to less than 1% discrepancies in the calculated N. Our approach is then applied to a carbon nanotube placed between the goldelectrodes. The atomic density profile along the axis separating the slabs shows the typical pattern of confined liquids, irrespective of the presence of the nanotube, while parallel to the slabs the nanotube perturbs the obtained profile.

  17. Desorption of metals from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. Lichen using solutions simulating acid rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Ana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption of metals K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu and Sr from Cetraria islandica (L. with solutions whose composition was similar to that of acid rain, was investigated. Desorption of metals from the lichen was performed by five successive desorption processes. Solution mixtures containing H2SO4, HNO3 and H2SO4-HNO3 were used for desorption. Each solution had three different pH values: 4.61, 5.15 and 5.75, so that the desorptions were performed with nine different solutions successively five times, always using the same solution volume. The investigated metals can be divided into two groups. One group was comprised of K, Ca and Mg, which were desorbed in each of the five desorption processes at all pH values used. The second group included Al, Fe, Zn, Ba, Mn and Sr; these were not desorbed in each individual desorption and not at all pH values, whereas Cu was not desorbed at all under any circumstances. Using the logarithmic dependence of the metal content as a function of the desorption number, it was found that potassium builds two types of links and is connected with weaker links in lichen. Potassium is completely desorbed, 80% in the first desorption, and then gradually in the following desorptions. Other metals are linked with one weaker link (desorption 1-38% and with one very strong link (desorption below the metal detection limit. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009 i br. ON 172019

  18. SQUEEZE-E: The Optimal Solution for Molecular Simulations with Periodic Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; de Vries, Sjoerd; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Bekker, Henk

    2012-10-09

    In molecular simulations of macromolecules, it is desirable to limit the amount of solvent in the system to avoid spending computational resources on uninteresting solvent-solvent interactions. As a consequence, periodic boundary conditions are commonly used, with a simulation box chosen as small as possible, for a given minimal distance between images. Here, we describe how such a simulation cell can be set up for ensembles, taking into account a priori available or estimable information regarding conformational flexibility. Doing so ensures that any conformation present in the input ensemble will satisfy the distance criterion during the simulation. This helps avoid periodicity artifacts due to conformational changes. The method introduces three new approaches in computational geometry: (1) The first is the derivation of an optimal packing of ensembles, for which the mathematical framework is described. (2) A new method for approximating the α-hull and the contact body for single bodies and ensembles is presented, which is orders of magnitude faster than existing routines, allowing the calculation of packings of large ensembles and/or large bodies. 3. A routine is described for searching a combination of three vectors on a discretized contact body forming a reduced base for a lattice with minimal cell volume. The new algorithms reduce the time required to calculate packings of single bodies from minutes or hours to seconds. The use and efficacy of the method is demonstrated for ensembles obtained from NMR, MD simulations, and elastic network modeling. An implementation of the method has been made available online at http://haddock.chem.uu.nl/services/SQUEEZE/ and has been made available as an option for running simulations through the weNMR GRID MD server at http://haddock.science.uu.nl/enmr/services/GROMACS/main.php .

  19. Analytical vs. Simulation Solution Techniques for Pulse Problems in Non-linear Stochastic Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwankiewicz, R.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    Advantages and disadvantages of available analytical and simulation techniques for pulse problems in non-linear stochastic dynamics are discussed. First, random pulse problems, both those which do and do not lead to Markov theory, are presented. Next, the analytical and analytically-numerical tec......Advantages and disadvantages of available analytical and simulation techniques for pulse problems in non-linear stochastic dynamics are discussed. First, random pulse problems, both those which do and do not lead to Markov theory, are presented. Next, the analytical and analytically...

  20. Understanding and revisiting the most complex perovskite system via atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Xu, Bin; Xu, Changsong; Ren, Wei; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2018-05-01

    A first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian is developed and used, along with direct ab initio techniques, to investigate finite-temperature properties of the system commonly coined the most complex perovskite, that is NaNbO3. Such simulations successfully reproduce the existence of seven different phases in its phase diagram. The decomposition of the total energy of this effective Hamiltonian into different terms, altogether with the values of the parameters associated with these terms, also allow us to shed some light into puzzling features of such a compound. Examples include revealing the microscopic reasons of why R 3 c is its ground state and why it solely adopts in-phase tiltings at high temperatures versus complex nanotwins for intermediate temperatures. The results of the computations also call for a revisiting of the so-called P ,R , and S states, in the sense that an unexpected and previously overlooked inhomogeneous electrical polarization is numerically found in the P state while complex tiltings associated with the simultaneous condensation of several k points are predicted for the controversial R and S phases.

  1. Understanding for convergence monitoring for probabilistic risk assessment based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Jang, Han Ki; Jang, Sol Ah; Park, Tae Jin

    2014-01-01

    There is a question that the simulation actually leads to draws from its target distribution and the most basic one is whether such Markov chains can always be constructed and all chain values sampled from them. The problem to be solved is the determination of how large this iteration should be to achieve the target distribution. This problem can be answered as convergence monitoring. In this paper, two widely used methods, such as autocorrelation and potential scale reduction factor (PSRF) in MCMC are characterized. There is no general agreement on the subject of the convergence. Although it is generally agreed that running n parallel chains in practice is computationally inefficient and unnecessary, running multiple parallel chains is generally applied for the convergence monitoring due to easy implementation. The main debate is the number of parallel chains needed. If the convergence properties of the chain are well understood then clearly a single chain suffices. Therefore, autocorrelation using single chain and multiple parallel ones are tried and their results then compared with each other in this study. And, the following question is answered from the two convergence results: Have the Markov chain realizations for achieved the target distribution?

  2. Understanding road surface pollutant wash-off and underlying physical processes using simulated rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2008-01-01

    Pollutant wash-off is one of the key pollutant processes that detailed knowledge is required in order to develop successful treatment design strategies for urban stormwater. Unfortunately, current knowledge relating to pollutant wash-off is limited. This paper presents the outcomes of a detailed investigation into pollutant wash-off on residential road surfaces. The investigations consisted of research methodologies formulated to overcome the physical constraints due to the heterogeneity of urban paved surfaces and the dependency on naturally occurring rainfall. This entailed the use of small road surface plots and artificially simulated rainfall. Road surfaces were selected due to its critical importance as an urban stormwater pollutant source. The study results showed that the influence of initially available pollutants on the wash-off process was limited. Furthermore, pollutant wash-off from road surfaces can be replicated using an exponential equation. However, the typical version of the exponential wash-off equation needs to be modified by introducing a non dimensional factor referred to as 'capacity factor' CF. Three rainfall intensity ranges were identified where the variation of CF can be defined. Furthermore, it was found that particulate density rather than size is the critical parameter that influences the process of pollutant wash-off. (c) IWA Publishing 2008.

  3. Experimental and simulated displacement of oil in sand berea cores using aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Hernandez, F.; Hernandez, H.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a mathematical algorithm to simulate the displacement of a resident fluid using a displacing one in a saturated anisotropic porous media is shown in this work. The algorithm was included in the simulator developed by the present authors in previous works to represent the anisotropic distribution of the porous media properties and the fluid injection [Ramirez A et al. Mathematical simulation of oil reservoir properties. Chaos, solitons and Fractals 2008;38:778-88, Ramirez A et al. Simulation of uncompressible fluid flow through a porous media. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2009;39:1753-63] in a nested loop to analyze the participant nodes in the transport process and calculate the volumes of the resident and new fluids. The new routine developed takes in count the mobility of both fluids. Additionally experimental fluid displacement tests were done using heavy oil from Mexican reservoirs as a resident fluid in sand berea cores. The injection of new fluids in natural oil reservoirs is a part of the Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods used to improve the oil displacement and increase production after the primary stage of the oil recovery has been finished. Water is an available and economical resource to be used as a displacing fluid due to many of the producers (off-shores) of the oil industries are placed in the sea near the coast.

  4. A new astrophysical solution to the Too Big To Fail problem. Insights from the moria simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeke, R.; Papastergis, E.; Ponomareva, A. A.; Rathi, S.; De Rijcke, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We test whether or not realistic analysis techniques of advanced hydrodynamical simulations can alleviate the Too Big To Fail problem (TBTF) for late-type galaxies. TBTF states that isolated dwarf galaxy kinematics imply that dwarfs live in halos with lower mass than is expected in a Λ cold

  5. Planar air-bearing microgravity simulators: Review of applications, existing solutions and design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybus, Tomasz; Seweryn, Karol

    2016-03-01

    All devices designed to be used in space must be thoroughly tested in relevant conditions. For several classes of devices the reduced gravity conditions are the key factor. In early stages of development and later due to financial reasons, the tests need to be done on Earth. However, in Earth conditions it is impossible to obtain a different gravity field independent on all linear and rotational spatial coordinates. Therefore, various test-bed systems are used, with their design driven by the device's specific needs. One of such test-beds are planar air-bearing microgravity simulators. In such an approach, the tested objects (e.g., manipulators intended for on-orbit operations or vehicles simulating satellites in a close formation flight) are mounted on planar air-bearings that allow almost frictionless motion on a flat surface, thus simulating microgravity conditions in two dimensions. In this paper we present a comprehensive review of research activities related to planar air-bearing microgravity simulators, demonstrating achievements of the most active research groups and describing newest trends and ideas, such as tests of landing gears for low-g bodies. Major design parameters of air-bearing test-beds are also reviewed and a list of notable existing test-beds is presented.

  6. Solution and implementation of project ''Simulator of WWER-440 nuclear power plant''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukal, V.

    1985-01-01

    The time data are given of the development and construction of the simulator of a WWER-440 nuclear power plant unit. The individual tasks are summed up which are related to the project implementation, and cooperating institutions and enterprises are listed. (J.C.)

  7. Analysis of noise radiation mechanisms in hot subsonic jet from a validated large eddy simulation solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorteau, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.lorteau@onera.fr; Cléro, Franck, E-mail: franck.clero@onera.fr; Vuillot, François, E-mail: francois.vuillot@onera.fr [Onera–The French Aerospace Lab, F-92322 Châtillon (France)

    2015-07-15

    In the framework of jet noise computation, a numerical simulation of a subsonic turbulent hot jet is performed using large-eddy simulation. A geometrical tripping is used in order to trigger the turbulence at the nozzle exit. In a first part, the validity of the simulation is assessed by comparison with experimental measurements. The mean and rms velocity fields show good agreement, so do the azimuthal composition of the near pressure field and the far field spectra. Discrepancies remain close to the nozzle exit which lead to a limited overestimation of the pressure levels in both near and far fields, especially near the 90{sup ∘} angular sector. Two point correlation analyses are then applied to the data obtained from the simulation. These enable to link the downstream acoustic radiation, which is the main direction of radiation, to pressure waves developing in the shear layer and propagating toward the potential core end. The intermittency of the downstream acoustic radiation is evidenced and related to the coherent structures developing in the shear layer.

  8. Visualizing Network Traffic to Understand the Performance of Massively Parallel Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Landge, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    The performance of massively parallel applications is often heavily impacted by the cost of communication among compute nodes. However, determining how to best use the network is a formidable task, made challenging by the ever increasing size and complexity of modern supercomputers. This paper applies visualization techniques to aid parallel application developers in understanding the network activity by enabling a detailed exploration of the flow of packets through the hardware interconnect. In order to visualize this large and complex data, we employ two linked views of the hardware network. The first is a 2D view, that represents the network structure as one of several simplified planar projections. This view is designed to allow a user to easily identify trends and patterns in the network traffic. The second is a 3D view that augments the 2D view by preserving the physical network topology and providing a context that is familiar to the application developers. Using the massively parallel multi-physics code pF3D as a case study, we demonstrate that our tool provides valuable insight that we use to explain and optimize pF3D-s performance on an IBM Blue Gene/P system. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  9. Mathematical simulation and calculation of continuous countercurrent process of ion-exchange extraction of strontium from strongly mineralized solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikashina, V.A.; Venitsianov, E.V.; Ivanov, V.A.; Gur'yanova, L.N.; Nikolaev, N.P.; Baturova, L.L.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow

    1993-01-01

    A program 'Countercurrent' is developed for the simulation of a continuous ion-exchange extraction of strontium from the strongly mineralized solutions containing NaCl and CaCl 2 using carboxylic cation exchanger KB-4 in countercurrent columns. The use of the program allows one to calculate the consitions of Ca and Sr separation depending on the modes of operation at the stage of sorption as well as regeneration, to calculate a residual Sr content on an overloaded sorbent and Sr separation on an incompletely regenerated KB-4, and to find the optimal separation conditions

  10. Mathematical simulation and calculation of the continuous countercurrent process of ion-exchange extraction of strontium from strongly mineralized solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikashina, V.A.; Guryanova, L.N.; Baturova, L.L.; Venetsianov, E.V.; Ivanov, V.A.; Nikolaev, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    The program open-quotes Countercurrentclose quotes is developed for the simulation of a continuous ion-exchange extraction of strontium from strongly mineralized NaCl and CaCl 2 solutions using a KB-4 carboxylic cation-exchanger in the countercurrent columns. The program allows one to Calculate the conditions of Ca and Sr separation depending on the mode of operation at the sorption and regeneration stages, the residual Sr content on the overloaded sorbent, and the Sr separation on incompletely regenerated KB-4. It also makes it possible to find the optimal separation conditions. The program open-quotes Countercurrentclose quotes can be also used to simulate other ion-exchange processes

  11. Understanding the impact of recent advances in isoprene photooxidation on simulations of regional air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Xie

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality us model in combination with observations for INTEX-NA/ICARTT (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment–North America/International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation 2004 are used to evaluate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry and provide constraints on isoprene nitrate yields, isoprene nitrate lifetimes, and NOx recycling rates. We incorporate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry into the SAPRC-07 chemical mechanism within the US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency CMAQ model. The results show improved model performance for a range of species compared against aircraft observations from the INTEX-NA/ICARTT 2004 field campaign. We further investigate the key processes in isoprene nitrate chemistry and evaluate the impact of uncertainties in the isoprene nitrate yield, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2 recycling efficiency, dry deposition velocity, and RO2 + HO2 reaction rates. We focus our examination on the southeastern United States, which is impacted by both abundant isoprene emissions and high levels of anthropogenic pollutants. We find that NOx concentrations increase by 4–9% as a result of reduced removal by isoprene nitrate chemistry. O3 increases by 2 ppbv as a result of changes in NOx. OH concentrations increase by 30%, which can be primarily attributed to greater HOx production. We find that the model can capture observed total alkyl and multifunctional nitrates (∑ANs and their relationship with O3 by assuming either an isoprene nitrate yield of 6% and daytime lifetime of 6 hours or a yield of 12% and lifetime of 4 h. Uncertainties in the isoprene nitrates can impact ozone production by 10% and OH concentrations by 6%. The uncertainties in NOx recycling efficiency appear to have larger effects than uncertainties in isoprene nitrate yield and dry deposition velocity. Further progress depends on improved understanding of

  12. Pilot study: evaluation of the use of the convergent interview technique in understanding the perception of surgical design and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Heather; Wolfaardt, Johan; Boulanger, Pierre; Hodgetts, Bill; Seikaly, Hadi

    2013-06-19

    It is important to understand the perceived value of surgical design and simulation (SDS) amongst surgeons, as this will influence its implementation in clinical settings. The purpose of the present study was to examine the application of the convergent interview technique in the field of surgical design and simulation and evaluate whether the technique would uncover new perceptions of virtual surgical planning (VSP) and medical models not discovered by other qualitative case-based techniques. Five surgeons were asked to participate in the study. Each participant was interviewed following the convergent interview technique. After each interview, the interviewer interpreted the information by seeking agreements and disagreements among the interviewees in order to understand the key concepts in the field of SDS. Fifteen important issues were extracted from the convergent interviews. In general, the convergent interview was an effective technique in collecting information about the perception of clinicians. The study identified three areas where the technique could be improved upon for future studies in the SDS field.

  13. UNDERSTANDING BLACK HOLE MASS ASSEMBLY VIA ACCRETION AND MERGERS AT LATE TIMES IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulier, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Lackner, Claire N.; Cen, Renyue; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2015-01-01

    Accretion is thought to primarily contribute to the mass accumulation history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) throughout cosmic time. While this may be true at high redshifts, at lower redshifts and for the most massive black holes (BHs) mergers themselves might add significantly to the mass budget. We explore this in two disparate environments—a massive cluster and a void region. We evolve SMBHs from 4 > z > 0 using merger trees derived from hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of these two regions, scaled to the observed value of the stellar mass fraction to account for overcooling. Mass gains from gas accretion proportional to bulge growth and BH-BH mergers are tracked, as are BHs that remain ''orbiting'' due to insufficient dynamical friction in a merger remnant, as well as those that are ejected due to gravitational recoil. We find that gas accretion remains the dominant source of mass accumulation in almost all SMBHs; mergers contribute 2.5% ± 0.1% for all SMBHs in the cluster and 1.0% ± 0.1% in the void since z = 4. However, mergers are significant for massive SMBHs. The fraction of mass accumulated from mergers for central BHs generally increases for larger values of the host bulge mass: in the void, the fraction is 2% at M *, bul = 10 10 M ☉ , increasing to 4% at M *, bul ≳ 10 11 M ☉ , and in the cluster it is 4% at M *, bul = 10 10 M ☉ and 23% at 10 12 M ☉ . We also find that the total mass in orbiting SMBHs is negligible in the void, but significant in the cluster, in which a potentially detectable 40% of SMBHs and ≈8% of the total SMBH mass (where the total includes central, orbiting, and ejected SMBHs) is found orbiting at z = 0. The existence of orbiting and ejected SMBHs requires modification of the Soltan argument. We estimate this correction to the integrated accreted mass density of SMBHs to be in the range 6%-21%, with a mean value of 11% ± 3%. Quantifying the growth due to mergers at these late times

  14. New tendencies in wildland fire simulation for understanding fire phenomena: An overview of the WFDS system capabilities in Mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, E.; Tarragó, D.; Planas, E.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfire theoretical modeling endeavors predicting fire behavior characteristics, such as the rate of spread, the flames geometry and the energy released by the fire front by applying the physics and the chemistry laws that govern fire phenomena. Its ultimate aim is to help fire managers to improve fire prevention and suppression and hence reducing damage to population and protecting ecosystems. WFDS is a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a fire-driven flow. It is particularly appropriate for predicting the fire behaviour burning through the wildland-urban interface, since it is able to predict the fire behaviour in the intermix of vegetative and structural fuels that comprise the wildland urban interface. This model is not suitable for operational fire management yet due to computational costs constrains, but given the fact that it is open-source and that it has a detailed description of the fuels and of the combustion and heat transfer mechanisms it is currently a suitable system for research purposes. In this paper we present the most important characteristics of the WFDS simulation tool in terms of the models implemented, the input information required and the outputs that the simulator gives useful for understanding fire phenomena. We briefly discuss its advantages and opportunities through some simulation exercises of Mediterranean ecosystems.

  15. Formulation and make-up of simulated concentrated water, high ionic content aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    This procedure describes the formulation and make-up of Simulated Concentrated Water (SCW), a high-ionic-content water to be used for Activity E-20-50 Long-Term Corrosion Studies. This water has an ionic content which is nominally a factor of a thousand higher than that of representative waters at or near Yucca Mountain. Representative waters were chosen as J-13 well water [Harrar, 1990] and perched water at Yucca Mountain [Glassley, 1996]. J-13 well water is obtained from ground water that is in contact with the Topopah Spring tuff, which is the repository horizon rock. The perched water is located in the Topopah Spring tuff, but below the repository horizon and above the water table. A nominal thousand times higher ionic content was chosen to simulate the water that would result from the wetting of salts which have been previously deposited on a container surface

  16. Formulation and make-up of simulate dilute water, low ionic content aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    This procedure describes the formulation and make-up of Simulated Dilute Water (SOW), a low-ionic-content water to be used for Activity E-20-50, Long-Term Corrosion Studies. This water has an ionic content which is nominally a factor of ten higher than that of representative waters at or near Yucca Mountain. Representative waters were chosen as J-13 well water [Harrar, 1990] and perched water at Yucca Mountain [Glassley, 1996]. J-13 well water is obtained from ground water that is in contact with the Topopah Spring tuff, which is the repository horizon rock. The perched water is located in the Topopah Spring tuff, but below the repository horizon and above the water table. A nominal times ten higher ionic content was chosen to simulate the effect of ionic concentrating due to elevated temperature water flowing through fractures where salts and minerals have been deposited due to evaporation and boiling

  17. Mathematical simulation of the drying of suspensions and colloidal solutions by their depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkov, V. A.; Levashko, E. I.; Safin, R. G.

    2006-05-01

    The heat and mass transfer in the process of drying of high-humidity materials by their depressurization has been investigated. The results of experimental investigation and mathematical simulation of the indicated process are presented. They allow one to determine the regularities of this process and predict the quality of the finished product. A technological scheme and an engineering procedure for calculating the drying of the liquid base of a soap are presented.

  18. Simulations of water, heat, and solute transport in partially frozen soils

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Mousong; Jansson, Per-Erik; Tan, Xiao; Huang, Jiesheng; Wu, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Experiments for soil freezing/thawing were conducted in two seasonally frozen agricultural fields in northern China during 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 wintertime, respectively. Mass balance was checked based on measured data at various depths. Simulation work was conducted by combining CoupModel with Monte-Carlo sampling method to achieve parameter sets with equally good performance. Uncertainties existed in both measurements and model due to complexity in freezing/thawing processes as well as in...

  19. Research and Analysis of Possible Solutions for Navy-Simulated Training Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Army Memo dated 09 September 2009. The laser is 55 considered safe for use without laser protective eyewear (unintentional eye exposure) and is not...from its main application in the entertainment industry . Industries implementing the use of MOCAP include medical, sports, biomechanics, and the...Hueneme/Cubic Form Fit on HSMST. Trip Report, Corona: NAVSEA. Joshi, Elena M. 1999. “Introduction to Simulation.” In Discover Industrial Engineering

  20. NMR solution structures and MD-simulation of procyanidin B1, B2, and C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procyanidins are polyphenols associated with a variety of benefits to the health of both plants and animals. Procyanidins provide increased defense against microbes, act as strong antioxidants, and may decrease the incidence of cancer. Key to understanding how procyanidins function requires understa...

  1. Carbon black selection from simulated broth solution for ADU gel spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jeong Kyung; Ho, Eom Sung; Kim, Yeon Ku; Cho, Moon Seoung

    2012-01-01

    The VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor) is one of the reactor concepts in the Gen IV International Collaboration. The nuclear fuel of a VHTR in the US is based on microspheres containing a mixture of UO 2 and UC 2 coated with multi carbon layers and a SiC layer. This mixture is called a 'UCO (uranium oxi carbide)' kernel. The fabrication process of this kernel was based on the sol-gel method between an ADUN and HMTA and urea, a process referred to as internal gelation. UCO kernel microspheres were first prepared at ORNL in the late 1970s. CB(Carbon Black) as a carbon source in the final UCO kernel is added during the broth solution preparation, in the processing of UCO kernel fabrication. The preparation of a good quality UCO kernel is very difficult due to the homogeneous distribution of carbon in a UCO kernel. The key requirement to obtain a good quality kernel is a uniform distribution of carbon in the ADU gel sphere forming process before the thermal treatment, i.e., during the gel formation step. The internal gelation concept was adapted in ADU gel sphere fabrication in the ORNL process of the US. Generally, UO 2 kernel microspheres are prepared by an internal gelation method (USA, India) or external gelation method (Germany, China, Japan). The UCO kernel microspheres prepared only in the US, use an internal gelation method. A material flow chart on the preparation of the microsphere kernel is simply shown in Fig. 1. The broth solution preparation, the raw material, additives, and thermal steps such as calcining and sintering processes were different to compared with the external gelation and internal gelation methods. In this study, we first carried out the matching CB selection experiments among the various kinds of CBs in a broth solution, for UCO kernel preparation using an external gelation method.

  2. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-01-01

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated

  3. Development of a new simulation code for evaluation of criticality transients involving fissile solution boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basoglu, Benan; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi

    1998-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a new computer code named TRACE for predicting the excursion characteristics of criticality excursions involving fissile solutions. TRACE employs point neutronics coupled with simple thermal-hydraulics. The temperature, the radiolytic gas effects, and the boiling phenomena are estimated using the transient heat conduction equation, a lumped-parameter energy model, and a simple boiling model, respectively. To evaluate the model, we compared our results with the results of CRAC experiments. The agreement in these comparisons is quite satisfactory. (author)

  4. The use of a virtual reality simulator to explore and understand the impact of Linac mis-calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavis, Andrew W; Ward, James W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In recent years there has been interest in using Computer Simulation within Medical training. The VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) system is a Flight Simulator for Radiation Oncology professionals, wherein fundamental concepts, techniques and problematic scenarios can be safely investigated. Methods: The system provides detailed simulations of several Linacs and the ability to display DICOM treatment plans. Patients can be mis-positioned with 'set-up errors' which can be explored visually, dosimetrically and using IGRT. Similarly, a variety of Linac calibration and configuration parameters can be altered manually or randomly via controlled errors in the simulated 3D Linac and its component parts. The implication of these can be investigated by following through a treatment scenario or using QC devices available within a Physics software module. Results: One resultant exercise is a systematic mis-calibration of 'lateral laser height' by 2mm. The offset in patient alignment is easily identified using IGRT and once corrected by reference to the 'in-room monitor'. The dosimetric implication is demonstrated to be 0.4% by setting a dosimetry phantom by the lasers (and ignoring TSD information). Finally, the need for recalibration can be shown by the Laser Alignment Phantom or by reference to the front pointer. Conclusions: The VERT system provides a realistic environment for training and enhancing understanding of radiotherapy concepts and techniques. Linac error conditions can be explored in this context and valuable experience gained in a controlled manner in a compressed period of time.

  5. Solution adaptive triangular meshes with application to the simulation of plasma equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlebacher, G.

    1984-01-01

    A new discrete Laplace operator is constructed on a local mesh molecule, second order accurate on symmetric cell regions, based on local Taylor series expansions. This discrete Laplacian is then compared to the one commonly used in the literature. A truncation error analysis of gradient and Laplace operators calculated at triangle centroids reveals that the maximum bounds of their truncation errors are minimized on equilateral triangles, for a fixed triangle perimeter. A new adaptive strategy on arbitrary triangular grids is developed in which a uniform grid is defined with respect to the solution surface, as opposed to the x,y plane. Departures from mesh uniformity arises from a spacially dependent mean-curvature of the solution surface. The power of this new adaptive technique is applied to the problem of finding free-boundary plasma equilibria within the context of MHD. The geometry is toroidal, and axisymmetry in the toroidal direction is assumed. We are led to conclude that the grid should move, not towards regions of high curvature of magnetic flux, but rather towards regions of greater toroidal current density. This has a direct bearing on the accuracy with which the Grad-Shafranov equation is being approximated

  6. Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations for Simulating Biomolecular Diffusion-Reaction Processes I: Finite Element Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Holst, Michael J; McCammon, J Andrew; Zhou, Y C

    2010-09-20

    In this paper we developed accurate finite element methods for solving 3-D Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations with singular permanent charges for electrodiffusion in solvated biomolecular systems. The electrostatic Poisson equation was defined in the biomolecules and in the solvent, while the Nernst-Planck equation was defined only in the solvent. We applied a stable regularization scheme to remove the singular component of the electrostatic potential induced by the permanent charges inside biomolecules, and formulated regular, well-posed PNP equations. An inexact-Newton method was used to solve the coupled nonlinear elliptic equations for the steady problems; while an Adams-Bashforth-Crank-Nicolson method was devised for time integration for the unsteady electrodiffusion. We numerically investigated the conditioning of the stiffness matrices for the finite element approximations of the two formulations of the Nernst-Planck equation, and theoretically proved that the transformed formulation is always associated with an ill-conditioned stiffness matrix. We also studied the electroneutrality of the solution and its relation with the boundary conditions on the molecular surface, and concluded that a large net charge concentration is always present near the molecular surface due to the presence of multiple species of charged particles in the solution. The numerical methods are shown to be accurate and stable by various test problems, and are applicable to real large-scale biophysical electrodiffusion problems.

  7. Electrolyte pore/solution partitioning by expanded grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moucka, Filip [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23221 (United States); Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Bratko, Dusan, E-mail: dbratko@vcu.edu; Luzar, Alenka, E-mail: aluzar@vcu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23221 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    Using a newly developed grand canonical Monte Carlo approach based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules, we studied equilibrium partitioning of both components between laterally extended apolar confinements and surrounding electrolyte solution. Accurate calculations of the Hamiltonian and tensorial pressure components at anisotropic conditions in the pore required the development of a novel algorithm for a self-consistent correction of nonelectrostatic cut-off effects. At pore widths above the kinetic threshold to capillary evaporation, the molality of the salt inside the confinement grows in parallel with that of the bulk phase, but presents a nonuniform width-dependence, being depleted at some and elevated at other separations. The presence of the salt enhances the layered structure in the slit and lengthens the range of inter-wall pressure exerted by the metastable liquid. Solvation pressure becomes increasingly repulsive with growing salt molality in the surrounding bath. Depending on the sign of the excess molality in the pore, the wetting free energy of pore walls is either increased or decreased by the presence of the salt. Because of simultaneous rise in the solution surface tension, which increases the free-energy cost of vapor nucleation, the rise in the apparent hydrophobicity of the walls has not been shown to enhance the volatility of the metastable liquid in the pores.

  8. Electrolyte pore/solution partitioning by expanded grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moucka, Filip; Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    Using a newly developed grand canonical Monte Carlo approach based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules, we studied equilibrium partitioning of both components between laterally extended apolar confinements and surrounding electrolyte solution. Accurate calculations of the Hamiltonian and tensorial pressure components at anisotropic conditions in the pore required the development of a novel algorithm for a self-consistent correction of nonelectrostatic cut-off effects. At pore widths above the kinetic threshold to capillary evaporation, the molality of the salt inside the confinement grows in parallel with that of the bulk phase, but presents a nonuniform width-dependence, being depleted at some and elevated at other separations. The presence of the salt enhances the layered structure in the slit and lengthens the range of inter-wall pressure exerted by the metastable liquid. Solvation pressure becomes increasingly repulsive with growing salt molality in the surrounding bath. Depending on the sign of the excess molality in the pore, the wetting free energy of pore walls is either increased or decreased by the presence of the salt. Because of simultaneous rise in the solution surface tension, which increases the free-energy cost of vapor nucleation, the rise in the apparent hydrophobicity of the walls has not been shown to enhance the volatility of the metastable liquid in the pores

  9. A study of elemental migration from poly(ethylene terephthalate) of food packagings to simulated solutions by radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Eufemia Paez; Saki, Mitiko; Silva, Leonardo G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Brazilian plastic production for food packagings, in recent years, has grown in the same proportion as food consumption. Considering that the plastic manufacturing involves catalytic processes and the use of additives, when the foods are in direct contact with these materials, the components present in plastics may migrate to the food. The Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has established boundary-values of migrants as well as procedures to evaluate migration of elements and substances from plastic packaging to food. In this study elemental composition of poly (ethylene terephthalate) - PET - packaging and results of elemental migration were obtained. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine elemental concentrations in PET packagings and the radiometric method was applied for elemental migration determination. This radiometric method consisted of irradiating the PET samples with neutrons, followed by migration exposition and radioactivity measurement in food-simulated solution. Experimental conditions used for migration were 10 days exposure period at 40 deg C. Migration was evaluated for soft drink, juice and water PET packaging. The analytical results indicated that PET packagings contain Co and Sb and those elements are transferred to the simulated solutions. However, these migration results were lower than the maximum tolerance values established by ANVISA. The migration detection limits also indicated high sensitivity of the radiometric method. (author)

  10. Flexible polyelectrolyte chain in a strong electrolyte solution: Insight into equilibrium properties and force-extension behavior from mesoscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh Moghani, Mahdy; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecules with ionizable groups are ubiquitous in biological and synthetic systems. Due to the complex interaction between chain and electrostatic decorrelation lengths, both equilibrium properties and micro-mechanical response of dilute solutions of polyelectrolytes (PEs) are more complex than their neutral counterparts. In this work, the bead-rod micromechanical description of a chain is used to perform hi-fidelity Brownian dynamics simulation of dilute PE solutions to ascertain the self-similar equilibrium behavior of PE chains with various linear charge densities, scaling of the Kuhn step length (lE) with salt concentration cs and the force-extension behavior of the PE chain. In accord with earlier theoretical predictions, our results indicate that for a chain with n Kuhn segments, lE ˜ cs-0.5 as linear charge density approaches 1/n. Moreover, the constant force ensemble simulation results accurately predict the initial non-linear force-extension region of PE chain recently measured via single chain experiments. Finally, inspired by Cohen's extraction of Warner's force law from the inverse Langevin force law, a novel numerical scheme is developed to extract a new elastic force law for real chains from our discrete set of force-extension data similar to Padè expansion, which accurately depicts the initial non-linear region where the total Kuhn length is less than the thermal screening length.

  11. Detection of localized and general corrosion of mild steel in simulated defense nuclear waste solutions using electrochemical noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C.; Bell, G.E.C.; Wilson, D.F.

    1995-12-01

    Underground waste tanks fabricated from mild steel store more than 60 million gallons of radioactive waste from 50 years of weapons production. Leaks are suspected in a significant number of tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported to be localized corrosion (e.g. nitrate stress corrosion cracking and pitting). The use of electrochemical noise (EN) for the monitoring and detection of localized corrosion processes has received considerable attention and application over the last several years. Proof of principle laboratory tests were conducted to verify the capability of EN evaluation to detect localized corrosion and to compare the predictions of general corrosion obtained from EN with those derived from other sources. Simple, pre-fabricated flat and U-bend specimens of steel alloys A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) and A537-CL 1 (UNS K02400) were immersed in temperature controlled simulated waste solutions. The simulated waste solution was either 5M NaNO 3 with 0.3M NaOH at 90 C or 11M NaNO 3 with 0.15M NaOH at 95 C. The electrochemical noise activity from the specimens was monitored and recorded for periods ranging between 140 and 240 hours. At the end of each test period, the specimens were metallographically examined to correlated EN data with corrosion damage

  12. Parallel processing for a 1-D time-dependent solution to impurity rate equations for fusion plasma simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1990-01-01

    In fusion plasmas impurities such as carbon, oxygen or nickel can contaminate the plasma and cause degradation of the performance of a fusion device through radiation. However, impurities can also be used as diagnostics to obtain information about a plasma through spectroscopic experiments which can then be used in plasma modeling and simulations. In the past, serial algorithms have been described for either the time dependent or steady state problem. In this paper, we describe a parallel procedure adopted to solve the time-dependent problem. It can be shown that for the steady state problem a parallel procedure would not be a useful application of parallelization because a few seconds of the Central Processing Unit time on a CRAY-XMP or IBM 3090/600S would suffice to obtain the solution, while this is not the case for the time-dependent problem. In order to study the effects of low Z and high Z impurities on the final state of a plasma, time-dependent solutions are necessary. For purposes of diagnostics and comparisons with experiments, a fast turn around time of the simulations would be advantageous. We have implemented a parallel algorithm on and IBM 3090/600S and tested its performance for a typical set of fusion plasma parameters. 4 refs., 1 tab

  13. A new astrophysical solution to the Too Big To Fail problem. Insights from the moria simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, R.; Papastergis, E.; Ponomareva, A. A.; Rathi, S.; De Rijcke, S.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We test whether or not realistic analysis techniques of advanced hydrodynamical simulations can alleviate the Too Big To Fail problem (TBTF) for late-type galaxies. TBTF states that isolated dwarf galaxy kinematics imply that dwarfs live in halos with lower mass than is expected in a Λ cold dark matter universe. Furthermore, we want to identify the physical mechanisms that are responsible for this observed tension between theory and observations. Methods: We use the moria suite of dwarf galaxy simulations to investigate whether observational effects are involved in TBTF for late-type field dwarf galaxies. To this end, we create synthetic radio data cubes of the simulated moria galaxies and analyse their H I kinematics as if they were real, observed galaxies. Results: We find that for low-mass galaxies, the circular velocity profile inferred from spatially resolved H I kinematics often underestimates the true circular velocity profile, as derived directly from the enclosed mass. Fitting the H I kinematics of moria dwarfs with a theoretical halo profile results in a systematic underestimate of the mass of their host halos. We attribute this effect to the fact that the interstellar medium of a low-mass late-type dwarf is continuously stirred by supernova explosions into a vertically puffed-up, turbulent state to the extent that the rotation velocity of the gas is simply no longer a good tracer of the underlying gravitational force field. If this holds true for real dwarf galaxies as well, it implies that they inhabit more massive dark matter halos than would be inferred from their kinematics, solving TBTF for late-type field dwarf galaxies.

  14. Self-assembly of micelles in organic solutions of lecithin and bile salt: Mesoscale computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markina, A.; Ivanov, V.; Komarov, P.; Khokhlov, A.; Tung, S.-H.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a coarse-grained model for studying the effects of adding bile salt to lecithin organosols by means of computer simulation. This model allows us to reveal the mechanisms of experimentally observed increasing of viscosity upon increasing the bile salt concentration. We show that increasing the bile salt to lecithin molar ratio induces the growth of elongated micelles of ellipsoidal and cylindrical shape due to incorporation of disklike bile salt molecules. These wormlike micelles can entangle into transient network displaying perceptible viscoelastic properties.

  15. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment

  16. FELIX - a computer code for simulation of criticality excursions in liquid fissile solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmal, B.; Weber, J.

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of characteristic parameters like evolved power fission yield during an accidental excursion is of essential importance to estimate possible radiological consequences and resulting safety hazards. The computer code 'FELIX' simulates excursion characteristics of aqueous critical assemblies: Starting out from given initial conditions the space-dependent neutron kinetic equations are solved in one-dimensional geometry. Power, fission yield, reactivity and temperature are calculated as a function of time. Reactivity-feedback includes density effects and radiolytic gas voids. Results from calculations are compared with CRAC-experiments. (orig.)

  17. Transient difference solutions of the inhomogeneous wave equation - Simulation of the Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent finite difference formulation to the inhomogeneous wave equation is derived for plane wave propagation with harmonic noise sources. The difference equation and boundary conditions are developed along with the techniques to simulate the Dirac delta function associated with a concentrated noise source. Example calculations are presented for the Green's function and distributed noise sources. For the example considered, the desired Fourier transformed acoustic pressures are determined from the transient pressures by use of a ramping function and an integration technique, both of which eliminates the nonharmonic pressure associated with the initial transient.

  18. Transient difference solutions of the inhomogeneous wave equation: Simulation of the Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeiste, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent finite difference formulation to the inhomogeneous wave equation is derived for plane wave propagation with harmonic noise sources. The difference equation and boundary conditions are developed along with the techniques to simulate the Dirac delta function associated with a concentrated noise source. Example calculations are presented for the Green's function and distributed noise sources. For the example considered, the desired Fourier transformed acoustic pressures are determined from the transient pressures by use of a ramping function and an integration technique, both of which eliminates the nonharmonic pressure associated with the initial transient.

  19. Mass and heat transfer between evaporation and condensation surfaces: Atomistic simulation and solution of Boltzmann kinetic equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Kryukov, Alexei P; Levashov, Vladimir Yu; Shishkova, Irina N; Anisimov, Sergey I

    2018-04-16

    Boundary conditions required for numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation (BKE) for mass/heat transfer between evaporation and condensation surfaces are analyzed by comparison of BKE results with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Lennard-Jones potential with parameters corresponding to solid argon is used to simulate evaporation from the hot side, nonequilibrium vapor flow with a Knudsen number of about 0.02, and condensation on the cold side of the condensed phase. The equilibrium density of vapor obtained in MD simulation of phase coexistence is used in BKE calculations for consistency of BKE results with MD data. The collision cross-section is also adjusted to provide a thermal flux in vapor identical to that in MD. Our MD simulations of evaporation toward a nonreflective absorbing boundary show that the velocity distribution function (VDF) of evaporated atoms has the nearly semi-Maxwellian shape because the binding energy of atoms evaporated from the interphase layer between bulk phase and vapor is much smaller than the cohesive energy in the condensed phase. Indeed, the calculated temperature and density profiles within the interphase layer indicate that the averaged kinetic energy of atoms remains near-constant with decreasing density almost until the interphase edge. Using consistent BKE and MD methods, the profiles of gas density, mass velocity, and temperatures together with VDFs in a gap of many mean free paths between the evaporation and condensation surfaces are obtained and compared. We demonstrate that the best fit of BKE results with MD simulations can be achieved with the evaporation and condensation coefficients both close to unity.

  20. Simulation of unsaturated flow and solute transport at the Las Cruces trench site using the PORFLO-3 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockhold, M.L.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this work was to test the ability of the PORFLO-3 computer code to simulate water infiltration and solute transport in dry soils. Data from a field-scale unsaturated zone flow and transport experiment, conducted near Las Cruces, New Mexico, were used for model validation. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean simulated and observed flow behavior. The scope of this work was limited to two-dimensional simulations of the second experiment at the Las Cruces trench site. Three simulation cases are presented. The first case represents a uniform soil profile, with homogeneous, isotropic hydraulic and transport properties. The second and third cases represent single stochastic realizations of randomly heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields, generated from the cumulative probability distribution of the measured data. Two-dimensional simulations produced water content changes that matched the observed data reasonably well. Models that explicitly incorporated heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields reproduced the characteristics of the observed data somewhat better than a uniform, homogeneous model. Improved predictions of water content changes at specific spatial locations were obtained by adjusting the soil hydraulic properties. The results of this study should only be considered a qualitative validation of the PORFLO-3 code. However, the results of this study demonstrate the importance of site-specific data for model calibration. Applications of the code for waste management and remediation activities will require site-specific data for model calibration before defensible predictions of unsaturated flow and containment transport can be made. 23 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  1. A green process for recovery of 1-propanol/2-propanol from their aqueous solutions: Experimental and MD simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Bhupender S.; Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A green conceptual design for separating propanols from their aqueous solutions is proposed. • TRIS is biocompatible and non-volatile and can be used as an auxiliary agent for the separation. • Isobaric VLE data for 1-propanol/2-propanol + water + TRIS were measured at 101.3 kPa. • The azeotropic compositions are significantly shifted in the presence of TRIS. • Intermolecular interactions were studied with fluorescence, COSMO-RS, and MD simulation. - Abstract: In the present study, we have found that a common and relatively inexpensive biological buffer tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) is potentially applicable to shift the azeotrope compositions of aqueous solutions of 1-propanol and 2-propanol. By taking the advantage of our findings, we are proposing a green process for the recovery of these organics from their respective aqueous solutions. In order to confirm the effect of TRIS buffer on vapor–liquid equilibrium behavior of the aqueous propanol systems, we measured the isobaric vapor–liquid equilibrium (VLE) data at 101.3 kPa for the 1-proponol + water + TRIS and 2-propanol + water + TRIS systems over the azeotropic range with various concentrations of TRIS (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 in mole fraction). The binary interaction parameters were obtained for TRIS with water, TRIS with 1-propanol, and TRIS with 2-propanol by correlating the new VLE data with the NRTL model. The isobaric VLE properties for the investigated propanol + water mixtures in the presence of various concentrations of TRIS were also predicted with the conductor-like screening model COSMO-RS. Based on the predicted excess molar enthalpies (H E m ) from the COSMO-RS, the interactions between all constituent pairs of molecules were estimated. To explore the mechanism of TRIS-based separation of 1-propanol/2-propanol from their aqueous solutions, the interactions between different pairs of molecules were also investigated by using fluorescence analysis and

  2. Factors responsible for the aggregation behavior of hydrophobic polyelectrolyte PEA in aqueous solution studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappidi, Praveenkumar; Natarajan, Upendra

    2017-08-01

    Self-association (i.e. interchain aggregation) behavior of atactic poly(ethacrylic acid) PEA in dilute aqueous solution as function of degree-of-neutralization by Na + counter-ions (i.e. charge fraction f) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Aggregation is found to occur in the range 0≤f≤0.7 in agreement with experimental results compared at specified polymer concentration C p =0.36mol/l in dilute solution. The macromolecular solution was characterized and analysed for radius-of-gyration, torsion angle distribution, inter and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, radial distribution functions of intermolecular and inter-atomic pairs, inter-chain contacts and solvation enthalpy. The PEA chains form aggregate through attractive inter-chain interaction via hydrogen bonding, in the range fenthalpy. The PEA solvation enthalpy becomes increasingly favorable with increase in f. The transition enthalpy change, in going from uncharged (acid) state to fully charged state (f=1) is unfavorable towards aggregate formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and solute/colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.S.; Pruess, K.

    1998-04-01

    EOS9nT is a new TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and transport of an arbitrary number n of tracers (solutes and/or colloids) in the subsurface. The module first solves the flow-related equations, which are comprised of (a) the Richards equation and, depending on conditions, may also include (b) the flow equation of a dense brine or aqueous suspension and/or (c) the heat equation. A second set of transport equations, corresponding to the n tracers, are then solved sequentially. The low concentrations of the n tracers are considered to have no effect on the liquid phase, thus making possible the decoupling of their equations. The first set of equations in EOS9nT provides the flow regime and account for fluid density variations due to thermal and/or solute concentration effects. The n tracer transport equations account for sorption, radioactive decay, advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, molecular diffusion, as well as filtration (for colloids only). EOS9nT can handle gridblocks or irregular geometry in three-dimensional domains. Preliminary results from four 1-D verification problems show an excellent agreement between the numerical predictions and the known analytical solutions

  4. Analysis of corrosion data for carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    Carbon steel is currently the leading candidate material for fabrication of a container for isolation of high level nuclear waste in a salt repository. Since brine entrapped in the bedded salt can migrate to the container by several transport processes, corrosion is an important consideration in the long-term performance of the waste package. A detailed literature search was performed to compile relevant corrosion data for carbon steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions, and simulated salt repository brines at temperatures between ∼ 20 and 400 0 C. The hydrolysis of Mg 2+ ions in simulated repository brines containing high magnesium concentrations causes acidification at temperatures above 25 0 C, which, in turn, influences the protective nature of the magnetite corrosion product layer on carbon steel. The corrosion data for the steels were analyzed, and an analytical model for general corrosion was developed to calculate the amount of penetration (i.e., wall thinning) as a function of time, temperature, and the pressure of corrosion product hydrogen than can build up during exposure in a closed system (e.g., a sealed capsule). Both the temperature and pressure dependence of the corrosion rate of steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions indicate that the rate-controlling partial reaction is the cathodic reduction of water to form hydrogen. Variations in the composition and microstructure of the steels or the concentration of the ionic species in the chloride solutions (provided that they do not change the pH significantly) do not appear to strongly influence the corrosion rate

  5. A computational model for simulating solute transport and oxygen consumption along the nephrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate water and solute transport, with a focus on sodium transport (TNa) and metabolism along individual nephron segments under differing physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To accomplish this goal, we developed a computational model of solute transport and oxygen consumption (QO2) along different nephron populations of a rat kidney. The model represents detailed epithelial and paracellular transport processes along both the superficial and juxtamedullary nephrons, with the loop of Henle of each model nephron extending to differing depths of the inner medulla. We used the model to assess how changes in TNa may alter QO2 in different nephron segments and how shifting the TNa sites alters overall kidney QO2. Under baseline conditions, the model predicted a whole kidney TNa/QO2, which denotes the number of moles of Na+ reabsorbed per moles of O2 consumed, of ∼15, with TNa efficiency predicted to be significantly greater in cortical nephron segments than in medullary segments. The TNa/QO2 ratio was generally similar among the superficial and juxtamedullary nephron segments, except for the proximal tubule, where TNa/QO2 was ∼20% higher in superficial nephrons, due to the larger luminal flow along the juxtamedullary proximal tubules and the resulting higher, flow-induced transcellular transport. Moreover, the model predicted that an increase in single-nephron glomerular filtration rate does not significantly affect TNa/QO2 in the proximal tubules but generally increases TNa/QO2 along downstream segments. The latter result can be attributed to the generally higher luminal [Na+], which raises paracellular TNa. Consequently, vulnerable medullary segments, such as the S3 segment and medullary thick ascending limb, may be relatively protected from flow-induced increases in QO2 under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27707705

  6. Thermal and Physical Property Determinations for Ionsiv IE-911 Crystalline Silicotitanate and Savannah River Site Waste Simulant Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, D.T.; Steele, W.V.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes physical and thermophysical property determinations that were made in order to resolve questions associated with the decontamination of Savannah River Site (SRS) waste streams using ion exchange on crystalline silicotitanate (CST). The research will aid in the understanding of potential issues associated with cooling of feed streams within SRS waste treatment processes. Toward this end, the thermophysical properties of engineered CST, manufactured under the trade name, Ionsivereg s ign IE-911 by UOP, Mobile, AL, were determined. The heating profiles of CST samples from several manufacturers' production runs were observed using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) measurements. DSC data were obtained over the region of 10 to 215 C to check for the possibility of a phase transition or any other enthalpic event in that temperature region. Finally, the heat capacity, thermal conductivity, density, viscosity, and salting-out point were determined for SRS waste simulants designated as Average, High NO 3 - and High OH - simulants

  7. HALO EXPANSION IN COSMOLOGICAL HYDRO SIMULATIONS: TOWARD A BARYONIC SOLUTION OF THE CUSP/CORE PROBLEM IN MASSIVE SPIRALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccio, A. V.; Stinson, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brook, C. B.; Gibson, B. K. [University of Central Lancashire, Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Shen, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Quinn, T., E-mail: maccio@mpia.de, E-mail: stinson@mpia.de [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    A clear prediction of the cold dark matter (CDM) model is the existence of cuspy dark matter halo density profiles on all mass scales. This is not in agreement with the observed rotation curves of spiral galaxies, challenging on small scales the otherwise successful CDM paradigm. In this work we employ high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the effects of dissipative processes on the inner distribution of dark matter in Milky Way like objects (M Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }). Our simulations include supernova feedback, and the effects of the radiation pressure of massive stars before they explode as supernovae. The increased stellar feedback results in the expansion of the dark matter halo instead of contraction with respect to N-body simulations. Baryons are able to erase the dark matter cuspy distribution, creating a flat, cored, dark matter density profile in the central several kiloparsecs of a massive Milky-Way-like halo. The profile is well fit by a Burkert profile, with fitting parameters consistent with the observations. In addition, we obtain flat rotation curves as well as extended, exponential stellar disk profiles. While the stellar disk we obtain is still partially too thick to resemble the Milky Way thin disk, this pilot study shows that there is enough energy available in the baryonic component to alter the dark matter distribution even in massive disk galaxies, providing a possible solution to the long-standing problem of cusps versus cores.

  8. Derivation Method for the Foundation Boundaries of Hydraulic Numerical Simulation Models Based on the Elastic Boussinesq Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The foundation boundaries of numerical simulation models of hydraulic structures dominated by a vertical load are investigated. The method used is based on the stress formula for fundamental solutions to semi-infinite space body elastic mechanics under a vertical concentrated force. The limit method is introduced into the original formula, which is then partitioned and analyzed according to the direction of the depth extension of the foundation. The point load will be changed to a linear load with a length of 2a. Inverse proportion function assumptions are proposed at parameter a and depth l of the calculation points to solve the singularity questions of elastic stress in a semi-infinite space near the ground. Compared with the original formula, changing the point load to a linear load with a length of 2a is more reasonable. Finally, the boundary depth criterion of a hydraulic numerical simulation model is derived and applied to determine the depth boundary formula for gravity dam numerical simulations.

  9. Simulating the reactions of CO2 in aqueous monoethanolamine solution by reaction ensemble Monte Carlo using the continuous fractional component method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balaji, S.P.; Gangarapu, S.; Ramdin, M.; Torres-Knoop, A.; Zuilhof, H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Dubbeldam, D.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular simulations were used to compute the equilibrium concentrations of the different species in CO2/monoethanolamine solutions for different CO2 loadings. Simulations were performed in the Reaction Ensemble using the continuous fractional component Monte Carlo method at temperatures of 293,

  10. A Collaborative Proposal: Simulating and Understanding Abrupt Climate-Ecosystem Changes During Holocene with NCAR-CCSM3.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengyu Liu, Bette Otto-Bliesner

    2013-02-01

    We have made significant progress in our proposed work in the last 4 years (3 years plus 1 year of no cost extension). In anticipation of the next phase of study, we have spent time on the abrupt changes since the last glacial maximum. First, we have performed further model-data comparison based on our baseline TRACE-21 simulation and made important progress towards the understanding of several major climate transitions. Second, we have made a significant effort in processing the model output of TRACE-21 and have put this output on a website for access by the community. Third, we have completed many additional sensitivity experiments. In addition, we have organized synthesis workshops to facilitate and promote transient model-data comparison for the international community. Finally, we have identified new areas of interest for Holocene climate changes.

  11. Simulating the control of molecular reactions via modulated light fields: from gas phase to solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Keefer, Daniel; Rott, Florian; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2017-04-01

    Over the past few years quantum control has proven to be very successful in steering molecular processes. By combining theory with experiment, even highly complex control aims were realized in the gas phase. In this topical review, we illustrate the past achievements on several examples in the molecular context. The next step for the quantum control of chemical processes is to translate the fruitful interplay between theory and experiment to the condensed phase and thus to the regime where chemical synthesis can be supported. On the theory side, increased efforts to include solvent effects in quantum control simulations were made recently. We discuss two major concepts, namely an implicit description of the environment via the density matrix algorithm and an explicit inclusion of solvent molecules. By application to chemical reactions, both concepts conclude that despite environmental perturbations leading to more complex control tasks, efficient quantum control in the condensed phase is still feasible.

  12. Hybrid method based on embedded coupled simulation of vortex particles in grid based solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, Nikolai

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents a novel hybrid approach developed to improve the resolution of concentrated vortices in computational fluid mechanics. The method is based on combination of a grid based and the grid free computational vortex (CVM) methods. The large scale flow structures are simulated on the grid whereas the concentrated structures are modeled using CVM. Due to this combination the advantages of both methods are strengthened whereas the disadvantages are diminished. The procedure of the separation of small concentrated vortices from the large scale ones is based on LES filtering idea. The flow dynamics is governed by two coupled transport equations taking two-way interaction between large and fine structures into account. The fine structures are mapped back to the grid if their size grows due to diffusion. Algorithmic aspects of the hybrid method are discussed. Advantages of the new approach are illustrated on some simple two dimensional canonical flows containing concentrated vortices.

  13. Complexation of Polyelectrolytes with Hydrophobic Drug Molecules in Salt-Free Solution: Theory and Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qun-Li; Hadinoto, Kunn; Ni, Ran

    2017-04-18

    The delivery and dissolution of poorly soluble drugs is challenging in the pharmaceutical industry. One way to significantly improve the delivery efficiency is to incorporate these hydrophobic small molecules into a colloidal polyelectrolyes(PE)-drug complex in their ionized states. Despite its huge application value, the general mechanism of PE collapse and complex formation in this system has not been well understood. In this work, by combining a mean-field theory with extensive molecular simulations, we unveil the phase behaviors of the system under dilute and salt-free conditions. We find that the complexation is a first-order-like phase transition triggered by the hydrophobic attraction between the drug molecules. Importantly, the valence ratio between the drug molecule and PE monomer plays a crucial role in determining the stability and morphology of the complex. Moreover, the sign of the zeta potential and the net charge of the complex are found to be inverted as the hydrophobicity of the drug molecules increases. Both theory and simulation indicate that the complexation point and complex morphology and the electrostatic properties of the complex have a weak dependence on chain length. Finally, the dynamics aspect of PE-drug complexation is also explored, and it is found that the complex can be trapped into a nonequilibrium glasslike state when the hydropobicity of the drug molecule is too strong. Our work gives a clear physical picture behind the PE-drug complexation phenomenon and provides guidelines to fabricate the colloidal PE-drug complex with the desired physical characteristics.

  14. Simulating the long-term chemistry of an upland UK catchment: Major solutes and acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipping, E. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Lancaster), Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk; Lawlor, A.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Lancaster), Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Lancaster), Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    CHUM-AM was used to investigate changes in soil and water chemical variables in four moorland sub-catchments in Cumbria UK, to which non-marine S deposition has declined by 65% since the 1970s. The principal processes represented in the model comprise N and S uptake and release, water movements, the binding of cations by soil organic matter, chemical interactions in solution, and chemical weathering. CHUM-AM reproduced reasonably well the current soil pH and pools of N and S, and changes in streamwater chemistry over the period 1970-2000, notably decreases in the concentrations of alkaline earth cations and sulphate, and increases in pH. The model also predicts streamwater pH-Al relationships in agreement with observations. Predictive calculations suggest that constant atmospheric deposition of N at present rates will lead to N saturation and re-acidification, whereas a 50% reduction in N would stabilise soil and streamwater pH at about the present levels. - CHUM-AM accounts for recovery from acidification due to sulphur deposition, but predicts re-acidification if nitrogen deposition is not reduced.

  15. Atomistic simulations of dislocations in a model BCC multicomponent concentrated solid solution alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.I.; Varvenne, C.; Woodward, C.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Miracle, D.; Senkov, O.N.; Curtin, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulations are presented for the structure and glide motion of a/2〈111〉 dislocations in a randomly-distributed model-BCC Co 16.67 Fe 36.67 Ni 16.67 Ti 30 alloy. Core structure variations along an individual dislocation line are found for a/2〈111〉 screw and edge dislocations. One reason for the core structure variations is the local variation in composition along the dislocation line. Calculated unstable stacking fault energies on the (110) plane as a function of composition vary significantly, consistent with this assessment. Molecular dynamics simulations of the critical glide stress as a function of temperature show significant strengthening, and much shallower temperature dependence of the strengthening, as compared to pure BCC Fe as well as a reference mean-field BCC alloy material of the same overall composition, lattice and elastic constants as the target alloy. Interpretation of the strength versus temperature in terms of an effective kink-pair activation model shows the random alloy to have a much larger activation energy than the mean-field alloy or BCC Fe. This is interpreted as due to the core structure variations along the dislocation line that are often unfavorable for glide in the direction of the load. The configuration of the gliding dislocation is wavy, and significant debris is left behind, demonstrating the role of local composition and core structure in creating kink pinning (super jogs) and/or deflection of the glide plane of the dislocation. - Graphical abstract: Measured critical resolved shear stress scaled by the (111) shear modulus (39 GPa) necessary to achieve on-going glide as a function of temperature, for the a/2[111] screw dislocation in the model BCC Co 16.67 Fe 36.67 Ni 16.67 Ti 30 alloy. The upper and lower bounds of the critical resolved shear stress is shown in the plot. Also shown in is the measured strength for the mean-field A-atom material and BCC Fe as a function of

  16. Passive and transpassive behaviour of CoCrMo in simulated biological solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, A.W.E.; Kurz, S.; Virtanen, S.; Fervel, V.; Olsson, C.-O.A.; Mischler, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the behaviour of a CoCrMo alloy under simulated body conditions was investigated. More specifically, the electrochemical properties of the alloy and the relevant mechanisms in the passive and transpassive states were studied in detail. Electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarisation, cyclic voltammetry, rotating disc electrode and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed. Further, ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the passive films was carried out. A good correlation between the results obtained from all the experimental techniques was achieved. Overall, it was found that the passive film on CoCrMo changed in composition and thickness with both potential and time. The passive behaviour of the CrCrMo alloy is due to a formation an oxide film highly enriched with Cr (∼90% Cr oxides) on the alloy surface. The passive and transpassive behaviour of the alloy is hence dominated by the alloying element Cr. In the transpassive region, strong thickening of the oxide film takes place, combined with a change in the composition of the film, and strongly increased dissolution rate. In the transpassive region, all alloying elements dissolve according to the composition of the alloy. The metal ion release is also very strongly enhanced by cyclic variation of the potential between reducing and oxidizing conditions. In this case, during activation/repassivation cycles, cobalt dissolution is greater than expected from the composition of the alloy. Therefore, active dissolution behaviour is mainly dominated by the alloying element Co

  17. Experimental control versus realism: methodological solutions for simulator studies in complex operating environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skraaning, Gyrd Jr.

    2004-03-15

    This report is a reprint of a dr.philos. thesis written by Gyrd Skraaning Jr. The text was submitted and accepted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in 2003 (ISBN 82-471-5237-1). The thesis suggests a nonlinear model of the theoretical relationship between experimental control and realism, claiming that high degrees of realism and experimental control can be obtained simultaneously if the experimental methods are utilized strategically and developed further. This is in opposition to the conventional opinion that realism and experimental control are mutually excluding objectives. The thesis debates the impact of the operating task on human performance during simulator studies in HAMMLAB, and suggests how task variation can be experimentally controlled. In a within subject design, every subject is tested under all experimental conditions, and the presentation order of the conditions is counterbalanced to compensate for order effects. In realistic settings, it is essential that the experimental design imposes few artificial constrains on the research environment. At the same time, the design should be able to uncover experimental effects in situations where the number of participants is low. Within-subject design represents a reasonable compromise between these aspirations. In this respect, an alternative counterbalancing method is proposed (dis-ORDER). A theoretical analysis of the human performance concept and a discussion about performance measurement in complex operating environments, are followed by a debate on the shortcomings of traditional performance indicators. Two specialized operator performance assessment techniques are then presented and evaluated (OPAS and ORT). (Author)

  18. Experimental control versus realism: methodological solutions for simulator studies in complex operating environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skraaning, Gyrd Jr.

    2004-03-01

    This report is a reprint of a dr.philos. thesis written by Gyrd Skraaning Jr. The text was submitted and accepted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in 2003 (ISBN 82-471-5237-1). The thesis suggests a nonlinear model of the theoretical relationship between experimental control and realism, claiming that high degrees of realism and experimental control can be obtained simultaneously if the experimental methods are utilized strategically and developed further. This is in opposition to the conventional opinion that realism and experimental control are mutually excluding objectives. The thesis debates the impact of the operating task on human performance during simulator studies in HAMMLAB, and suggests how task variation can be experimentally controlled. In a within subject design, every subject is tested under all experimental conditions, and the presentation order of the conditions is counterbalanced to compensate for order effects. In realistic settings, it is essential that the experimental design imposes few artificial constrains on the research environment. At the same time, the design should be able to uncover experimental effects in situations where the number of participants is low. Within-subject design represents a reasonable compromise between these aspirations. In this respect, an alternative counterbalancing method is proposed (dis-ORDER). A theoretical analysis of the human performance concept and a discussion about performance measurement in complex operating environments, are followed by a debate on the shortcomings of traditional performance indicators. Two specialized operator performance assessment techniques are then presented and evaluated (OPAS and ORT). (Author)

  19. Cesium release from ceramic waste form materials in simulated canister corrosion product containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittorio, Luca; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Chronis, Harriet; Griffith, Christopher S

    2004-07-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that immobilization of Cs{sup +} and/or Sr{sup 2+} sorbed on hexagonal tungsten oxide bronze (HTB) adsorbent materials can be achieved by heating the materials in air at temperatures in the range 500 - 1300 deg C. Highly crystalline powdered HTB materials formed by heating at 800 deg C show leach characteristics comparable to Cs-containing hot-pressed hollandites in the pH range from 0 to 12. As a very harsh leaching test, and also to model in a basic manner, leaching in the presence of canister corrosion products in oxidising environments, leaching of the bronzoid phases has been undertaken in Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions of increasing concentration. This is done in comparison with Cs -hollandite materials in order to compare the leaching characteristics of these two materials under such conditions. Both the Cs-loaded bronze and hollandite materials leach severely in Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} losing virtually all of the immobilized Cs in a period of four days at 150 deg C. Total release of Cs and conversion of hollandite to titanium and iron titanium oxides begins to be observed at relatively low concentrations and is virtually complete after four days reaction in 0.5 mol/L Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. In the case of the bronze, all of the Cs is also extracted but the HTB structure is preserved. The reaction presumably involves an ion-exchange mechanism and iron oxide with a spinel structure is also observed at high Fe concentrations. (authors)

  20. Cesium release from ceramic waste form materials in simulated canister corrosion product containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittorio, Luca; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Chronis, Harriet; Griffith, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that immobilization of Cs + and/or Sr 2+ sorbed on hexagonal tungsten oxide bronze (HTB) adsorbent materials can be achieved by heating the materials in air at temperatures in the range 500 - 1300 deg C. Highly crystalline powdered HTB materials formed by heating at 800 deg C show leach characteristics comparable to Cs-containing hot-pressed hollandites in the pH range from 0 to 12. As a very harsh leaching test, and also to model in a basic manner, leaching in the presence of canister corrosion products in oxidising environments, leaching of the bronzoid phases has been undertaken in Fe(NO 3 ) 3 solutions of increasing concentration. This is done in comparison with Cs -hollandite materials in order to compare the leaching characteristics of these two materials under such conditions. Both the Cs-loaded bronze and hollandite materials leach severely in Fe(NO 3 ) 3 losing virtually all of the immobilized Cs in a period of four days at 150 deg C. Total release of Cs and conversion of hollandite to titanium and iron titanium oxides begins to be observed at relatively low concentrations and is virtually complete after four days reaction in 0.5 mol/L Fe(NO 3 ) 3 . In the case of the bronze, all of the Cs is also extracted but the HTB structure is preserved. The reaction presumably involves an ion-exchange mechanism and iron oxide with a spinel structure is also observed at high Fe concentrations. (authors)

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the calcite/solution interface as a means to explore surface modifications induced by nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Sascha; Schmidt, Moritz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Spijker, P. [Aalto Univ., Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Applied Physics; Voitchovsky, K. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Physics Dept.

    2016-07-01

    The reactivity of calcite, one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust, is determined by the molecular details of its interface with the contacting solution. Recently, it has been found that trace concentrations of NaNO{sub 3} severely affect calcite's (104) surface and its reactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal density profiles of different ions near calcite's surface, with NO{sub 3}{sup -} able to reach closer to the surface than CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and in higher concentrations. Additionally, incorporation of NO{sub 3}{sup -} into the surface significantly disturbs the water structure at the interface.

  2. Simulation and prediction of the thuringiensin abiotic degradation processes in aqueous solution by a radius basis function neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingwen; Xu, Zhenghong; Chen, Shouwen

    2013-04-01

    The thuringiensin abiotic degradation processes in aqueous solution under different conditions, with a pH range of 5.0-9.0 and a temperature range of 10-40°C, were systematically investigated by an exponential decay model and a radius basis function (RBF) neural network model, respectively. The half-lives of thuringiensin calculated by the exponential decay model ranged from 2.72 d to 16.19 d under the different conditions mentioned above. Furthermore, an RBF model with accuracy of 0.1 and SPREAD value 5 was employed to model the degradation processes. The results showed that the model could simulate and predict the degradation processes well. Both the half-lives and the prediction data showed that thuringiensin was an easily degradable antibiotic, which could be an important factor in the evaluation of its safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical simulation of flow and mass transfer for large KDP crystal growth via solution-jet method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huawei; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Zhiwei

    2018-06-01

    A novel technique of growing large crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) named solution-jet method is proposed. The aim is to increase supersaturation on the pyramidal face, especially for crystal surface regions close to the rotation axis. The fluid flow and surface supersaturation distribution of crystals grown under different conditions were computed using the finite-volume method. Results indicate that the time-averaged supersaturation of the pyramidal face in the proposed method significantly increases and the supersaturation difference from the crystal center to edge clearly decreases compared with the rotating-crystal method. With increased jet velocity, supersaturation on the pyramidal face steadily increases. Rotation rate considerably affects the magnitude and distribution of the prismatic surface supersaturation. With increased crystal size, the mean value of surface supersaturation averaged over the pyramid gradually decreases; conversely, standard deviation increases, which is detrimental to crystal growth. Moreover, the significant roles played by natural and forced convection in the process of mass transport are discussed. Results show that further increased jet velocity to 0.6 m/s renders negligible the effects of natural convection around the pyramid. The simulation for step propagation indicates that solution-jet method can promote a steady step migration and enhance surface morphology stability, which can improve the crystal quality.

  4. Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D.

    1995-04-01

    Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO 3 , quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite

  5. Glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal–organic framework MIL-101: a molecular simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishna M.; Zhang, Kang; Jiang, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    A molecular simulation study is reported on glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101. The F atom of MIL-101 is identified to be the most favorable adsorption site. Among three MIL-101-X (X = H, NH2 or CH3), the parent MIL-101 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity and recovery efficacy. Upon functionalization by -NH2 or -CH3 group, the steric hindrance in MIL-101 increases; consequently, the interactions between glucose and framework become less attractive, thus reducing the capacity and mobility of glucose. The presence of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate, as an impurity reduces the strength of hydrogen-bonding between glucose and MIL-101, and leads to lower capacity and mobility. Upon adding anti-solvent (ethanol or acetone), a similar adverse effect is observed. The simulation study provides useful structural and dynamic properties of glucose in MIL-101, and it suggests that MIL-101 might be a potential candidate for glucose recovery. PMID:26242874

  6. Glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishna M; Zhang, Kang; Jiang, Jianwen

    2015-08-05

    A molecular simulation study is reported on glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101. The F atom of MIL-101 is identified to be the most favorable adsorption site. Among three MIL-101-X (X = H, NH2 or CH3), the parent MIL-101 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity and recovery efficacy. Upon functionalization by -NH2 or -CH3 group, the steric hindrance in MIL-101 increases; consequently, the interactions between glucose and framework become less attractive, thus reducing the capacity and mobility of glucose. The presence of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate, as an impurity reduces the strength of hydrogen-bonding between glucose and MIL-101, and leads to lower capacity and mobility. Upon adding anti-solvent (ethanol or acetone), a similar adverse effect is observed. The simulation study provides useful structural and dynamic properties of glucose in MIL-101, and it suggests that MIL-101 might be a potential candidate for glucose recovery.

  7. Recognition of RNA by amide modified backbone nucleic acids: molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-RNA hybrids in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Mafalda; Fonné-Pfister, Raymonde; Beaudegnies, Renaud; Chekatt, Habiba; Jung, Pierre M J; Murphy-Kessabi, Fiona; De Mesmaeker, Alain; Wendeborn, Sebastian

    2005-04-27

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a chemically modified DNA-RNA hybrid in which a phosphodiester linkage is replaced by a neutral amide-3 linkage (3'-CH(2)-CONH-5') were investigated using UV melting experiments, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, and continuum solvent models. van't Hoff analysis of the experimental UV melting curves suggests that the significant increase of the thermodynamic stability of a 15-mer DNA-RNA with seven alternated amide-3 modifications (+11 degrees C) is mainly due to an increased binding enthalpy. To further evaluate the origin in the observed affinities differences, the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy was calculated by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation numerically. The nonelectrostatic contribution was estimated as the product of a hydrophobic surface tension coefficient and the surface area that is buried upon double strand formation. Structures were taken from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations computed in a consistent fashion using explicit solvent, counterions, and the particle-mesh Ewald procedure. The present preliminary thermodynamic study suggests that the favorable binding free energy of the amide-3 DNA single strand to the complementary RNA is equally driven by electrostatic and nonpolar contributions to the binding compared to their natural analogues. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water were performed on an amide-3 DNA single strand and the corresponding natural DNA. Results from the conformations cluster analysis of the simulated amide-3 DNA single strand ensembles suggest that the 25% of the population sampled within 10 ns has a pre-organized conformation where the sugar C3' endo pucker is favored at the 3'-flanking nucleotides. These structural and thermodynamic features contribute to the understanding of the observed increased affinities of the amide-3 DNA-RNA hybrids at the microscopic level.

  8. Neutron Scattering of Residual Hydrogen in 1,4-Dioxane-D8 Liquid. Understanding Measurements with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Hongjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herwig, Kenneth W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kidder, Michelle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-25

    That incoherent scattering from protiated molecular liquids adds a constant background to the measured scattering intensity is well known, but less appreciated is the fact that coherent scattering is also induced by the presence of hydrogen in a deuterated liquid. In fact, the scattering intensity can be very sensitive, in the small-q region, with respect to the amounts and distribution of residual H in the system. We used 1,4-dioxane liquid to demonstrate that the partial structure factors of the HD and DD atom pairs contribute significantly to inter-molecular scattering and that uncertainty in the extent of deuteration account for discrepancies between simulations and measurements. Both contributions to uncertainty have similar magnitudes: scattering interference of the hydrogen-deuterium pair, and complementary interference from the deuterium-deuterium pair by virtue of chemical inhomogeneity. This situation arises in practice since deuteration of liquids is often 99% or less. A combined experimental and extensive computational study of static thermal neutron scattering of 1,4-dioxane demonstrates the foregoing. We show, through simulations, that the reason for the differences is the content of protiated dioxane (vendors quote 1%). We estimate that up to 5% (at 298K and at 343K) protiated mole fraction may be involved in generating the scattering differences. Finally, we find that the particular distribution of hydrogen in the protiated molecules affects the results significantly; here we considered molecules to be either fully protiated or fully deuterated. This scenario best reconciles the computational and experimental results, and leads us to speculate that the deuteration synthesis process tends to leave a molecule either fully deuterated or fully protiated. Although we have used 1,4-dioxane as a model liquid, the effects described in this study extend to similar liquids and similar systematic experimental/computational studies can be performed to either

  9. DOE Final Report: A Unified Understanding of Residual Stress in Thin Films: Kinetic Models, Experiments and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Thin films are critical for a wide range of advanced technologies. However, the deposited films often have high levels of residual stress that can limit their performance or lead to failure. The stress is known to depend on many variables, including the processing conditions, type of material, deposition technique and the film’s microstructure. The goal of this DOE program was to develop a fundamental understanding of how the different processes that control thin film growth under different conditions can be related to the development of stress. In the program, systematic experiments were performed or analyzed that related the stress to the processing conditions that were used. Measurements of stress were obtained for films that were grown at different rates, different solutions (for electrodeposition), different particle energies (for sputter deposition) and different microstructures. Based on this data, models were developed to explain the observed dependence on the different parameters. The models were based on considering the balance among different stress-inducing mechanism occurring as the film grows (for both non-energetic and energetic deposition). Comparison of the model predictions with the experiments enabled the kinetic parameters to be determined for different materials. The resulting model equations provide a comprehensive picture of how stress changes with the processing conditions that can be used to optimize the growth of thin films.

  10. A new unconditionally stable and consistent quasi-analytical in-stream water quality solution scheme for CSTR-based water quality simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldegiorgis, Befekadu Taddesse; van Griensven, Ann; Pereira, Fernando; Bauwens, Willy

    2017-06-01

    Most common numerical solutions used in CSTR-based in-stream water quality simulators are susceptible to instabilities and/or solution inconsistencies. Usually, they cope with instability problems by adopting computationally expensive small time steps. However, some simulators use fixed computation time steps and hence do not have the flexibility to do so. This paper presents a novel quasi-analytical solution for CSTR-based water quality simulators of an unsteady system. The robustness of the new method is compared with the commonly used fourth-order Runge-Kutta methods, the Euler method and three versions of the SWAT model (SWAT2012, SWAT-TCEQ, and ESWAT). The performance of each method is tested for different hypothetical experiments. Besides the hypothetical data, a real case study is used for comparison. The growth factors we derived as stability measures for the different methods and the R-factor—considered as a consistency measure—turned out to be very useful for determining the most robust method. The new method outperformed all the numerical methods used in the hypothetical comparisons. The application for the Zenne River (Belgium) shows that the new method provides stable and consistent BOD simulations whereas the SWAT2012 model is shown to be unstable for the standard daily computation time step. The new method unconditionally simulates robust solutions. Therefore, it is a reliable scheme for CSTR-based water quality simulators that use first-order reaction formulations.

  11. Large-eddy-simulation approach in understanding flow structures of 2D turbulent density currents over sloping surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayamatullah, M.; Rao Pillalamarri, Narasimha; Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2018-04-01

    A numerical investigation was performed to understand the flow dynamics of 2D density currents over sloping surfaces. Large eddy simulation was conducted for lock-exchange (L-E) release currents and overflows. 2D Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the Boussinesq approximation. The effects of the lock aspect-ratio (height/length of lock), slope, and Reynolds number on the flow structures and turbulence mixing have been analyzed. Results have confirmed buoyancy within the head of the two-dimensional currents is not conserved which contradicts the classical thermal theory. The lock aspect-ratio dictates the fraction of initial buoyancy which is carried by the head of the current at the beginning of the slumping (horizontal) and accelerating phase (over a slope), which has important implications on turbulence kinetic energy production, and hence mixing in the current. For L-E flows over a slope, increasing slope angle enhances the turbulence production. Increasing slope results in shear reversal within the density current resulting in shear-instabilities. Differences in turbulence production mechanisms and flow structures exist between the L-E and constant-flux release currents resulting in significant differences in the flow characteristics between different releases.

  12. Parallelizing ATLAS Reconstruction and Simulation: Issues and Optimization Solutions for Scaling on Multi- and Many-CPU Platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, C; Jackson, K; Tatarkhanov, M; Yao, Y; Binet, S; Levinthal, D

    2011-01-01

    Thermal limitations have forced CPU manufacturers to shift from simply increasing clock speeds to improve processor performance, to producing chip designs with multi- and many-core architectures. Further the cores themselves can run multiple threads as a zero overhead context switch allowing low level resource sharing (Intel Hyperthreading). To maximize bandwidth and minimize memory latency, memory access has become non uniform (NUMA). As manufacturers add more cores to each chip, a careful understanding of the underlying architecture is required in order to fully utilize the available resources. We present AthenaMP and the Atlas event loop manager, the driver of the simulation and reconstruction engines, which have been rewritten to make use of multiple cores, by means of event based parallelism, and final stage I/O synchronization. However, initial studies on 8 andl6 core Intel architectures have shown marked non-linearities as parallel process counts increase, with as much as 30% reductions in event throughput in some scenarios. Since the Intel Nehalem architecture (both Gainestown and Westmere) will be the most common choice for the next round of hardware procurements, an understanding of these scaling issues is essential. Using hardware based event counters and Intel's Performance Tuning Utility, we have studied the performance bottlenecks at the hardware level, and discovered optimization schemes to maximize processor throughput. We have also produced optimization mechanisms, common to all large experiments, that address the extreme nature of today's HEP code, which due to it's size, places huge burdens on the memory infrastructure of today's processors.

  13. [Patient-centered approaches to understanding, transformation and solution of team conflicts in the psychiatric clinic within the scope of the Balint group concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, A

    1987-08-01

    The working climate and therapeutic possibilities in a hospital are determined, among other factors, by emotional processes in everyday ward routine. Team conflicts and their solution are not infrequently reflections of the open-mindedness of a hospital towards the complexity of these processes. However, the complex interlocking of transference processes with rôle-specific and personality-conditioned behaviour patterns makes it more difficult to understand and make use of these emotional processes within the team. We present a specific attempt to working up emotional conflicts in a patient-centred approach via focussing on self-rating of the team workers in respect of mood, feeling tone and imagination. Specific internal Balint groups are the fulcrum. To distinguish this method from the theory of object-directed transference of emotions and constructions of relations, the theoretical basis of this group method is seen in the systemic paradigm with which patient-focussed solution functions are obtained in respect of process orientation and instrumental part functions of the team workers. In this connection it was explored to what extent the following factors can be interpreted as patient-induced phenomena: therapeutic and rôle behaviour, hospital structures and administrative squabbles, internal and external walls of a mental hospital.

  14. The development of high performance numerical simulation code for transient groundwater flow and reactive solute transport problems based on local discontinuous Galerkin method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Motoshima, Takayuki; Naemura, Yumi; Kubo, Shin; Kanie, Shunji

    2009-01-01

    The authors develop a numerical code based on Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for transient groundwater flow and reactive solute transport problems in order to make it possible to do three dimensional performance assessment on radioactive waste repositories at the earliest stage possible. Local discontinuous Galerkin Method is one of mixed finite element methods which are more accurate ones than standard finite element methods. In this paper, the developed numerical code is applied to several problems which are provided analytical solutions in order to examine its accuracy and flexibility. The results of the simulations show the new code gives highly accurate numeric solutions. (author)

  15. Anticorrosion performance of chromized coating prepared by pack cementation in simulated solution with H2S and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Behnamian, Yashar; Luo, Hong; Wang, Xian-Zong; Leitch, Michael; Zeng, Hongbo; Luo, Jing-Li

    2017-10-01

    A hash service environment containing H2S and CO2 in oil industry usually causes corrosion of carbon steel. In this study, the chromized coatings with different deposited time were prepared on the surface of carbon steel by the method of pack cementation to enhance its corrosion resistance. Then the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance as well as the semiconductor behavior of coatings in the simulated solution with saturated H2S and CO2 were investigated. The results show that the content of Cr in coating was increased by prolonging deposited time, and both chromium carbides and chromium nitrides were formed. Furthermore, coatings display higher polarization resistance, Rp, than that of the substrate, indicating a higher resistance to charge transfer on coating surface. The corrosion rates of coatings with different deposited time were significantly lower than that of substrate. Chemical analysis showed the formation of heavy sulfides on the surface of substrates after corrosion, while the least corrosion products were detected on the surface of coating with deposited time of 12 h. Mott-Schottky results indicated that coating of 12 h displayed less defects than the other two coatings with deposited time of 4 h and 8 h, which will be beneficial to improve corrosion resistance. The investigation showed that chromized coatings exhibited high corrosion resistance and owned a potential application in oil industry for corrosion prevention.

  16. MD simulation of organics adsorption from aqueous solution in carbon slit-like pores. Foundations of the pore blocking effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Zieliński, Wojciech; Włoch, Jerzy; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The results of systematic studies of organics adsorption from aqueous solutions (at the neutral pH level) in a system of slit-like carbon pores having different sizes and oxygen groups located at the pore mouth are reported. Using molecular dynamics simulations (GROMACS package) the properties of adsorbent–adsorbate (benzene, phenol or paracetamol) as well as adsorbent–water systems are discussed. After the introduction of surface oxygen functionalities, adsorption of organic compounds decreases (in accordance with experimental data) and this is caused by the accumulation of water molecules at pore entrances. The pore blocking effect decreases with the diameter of slits and practically vanishes for widths larger than approx. 0.68 nm. We observed the increase in phenol adsorption with the rise in temperature. Moreover, adsorbed molecules occupy the external surface of the slit pores (the entrances) in the case of oxidized adsorbents. Among the studied molecules benzene, phenol and paracetamol prefer an almost flat orientation and with the rise in the pore width the number of molecules oriented in parallel decreases. The decrease or increase in temperature (with respect to 298 K) leads to insignificant changes of angular orientation of adsorbed molecules. (paper)

  17. The problem of complex eigensystems in the semianalytical solution for advancement of time in solute transport simulations: a new method using real arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, Amjad M.J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    In the numerical modeling of groundwater solute transport, explicit solutions may be obtained for the concentration field at any future time without computing concentrations at intermediate times. The spatial variables are discretized and time is left continuous in the governing differential equation. These semianalytical solutions have been presented in the literature and involve the eigensystem of a coefficient matrix. This eigensystem may be complex (i.e., have imaginary components) due to the asymmetry created by the advection term in the governing advection-dispersion equation. Previous investigators have either used complex arithmetic to represent a complex eigensystem or chosen large dispersivity values for which the imaginary components of the complex eigenvalues may be ignored without significant error. It is shown here that the error due to ignoring the imaginary components of complex eigenvalues is large for small dispersivity values. A new algorithm that represents the complex eigensystem by converting it to a real eigensystem is presented. The method requires only real arithmetic.

  18. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  19. Simulations and analysis of the Raman scattering and differential Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids, peptides and proteins in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids and small peptides in aqueous solution have been simulated by density functional theory and restricted Hartree/Fock methods. The treatment of the aqueous environment in treated in two ways. The water molecules in the first hydratio...

  20. Self-consistent field theoretic simulations of amphiphilic triblock copolymer solutions: Polymer concentration and chain length effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-G. Han

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the self-consistent field lattice model, polymer concentration φP and chain length N (keeping the length ratio of hydrophobic to hydrophilic blocks constant the effects on temperature-dependent behavior of micelles are studied, in amphiphilic symmetric ABA triblock copolymer solutions. When chain length is increased, at fixed φP, micelles occur at higher temperature. The variations of average volume fraction of stickers φcos and the lattice site numbers Ncols at the micellar cores with temperature are dependent on N and φP, which demonstrates that the aggregation of micelles depends on N and φP. Moreover, when φP is increased, firstly a peak appears on the curve of specific heat CV for unimer-micelle transition, and then in addition a primary peak, the secondary peak, which results from the remicellization, is observed on the curve of CV. For a long chain, in intermediate and high concentration regimes, the shape of specific heat peak markedly changes, and the peak tends to be a more broad peak. Finally, the aggregation behavior of micelles is explained by the aggregation way of amphiphilic triblock copolymer. The obtained results are helpful in understanding the micellar aggregation process.

  1. Implementing Data Acquisition Systems DAS1 and DAS2 at Cernavoda Full-Scope Simulator Main Control Room based on the SIEN2007 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Ana Maria; Tutuianu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Teodor

    2009-01-01

    Modern personnel training, re-training and licensing is a guarantee of NPP's safe reliable operation. Cernavoda NPP personnel training system is the main objective of its specialized department built up as Training Center (TC), directly supervised by Administration of the National Nuclearelectrica Society (SNN) and National Regulatory Body for Nuclear Activities (CNCAN). It was implemented to ensure the abilities, skills and knowledge required by the safe reliable operation of the nuclear reactor by the Main Control Room (MCR) operators. This objective was reached through training lessons taught and tested on the Full Scope Simulator (FSS), the TC's main training tool, a replica of the MCR of the real plant. Its description is the subject of this paper. The TC's FSS includes a computer network equipped with a software connected to the specialized program DATAPATH supplied for Cernavoda FSS by the FSS provider, delivered by L-3/ MAPPS. An alternative to DATAPATH Communication of the L 3/MAPPS Simulation System, developed by Cernavoda Full Scope Simulator Staff, was presented in the previous edition of the symposium (see the SIEN 2007 paper). This original solution is now already applied in order to connect to simulation process Data Acquisition Systems DAS1 and DAS2, two new systems already installed in the real MCR but not included by the Cernavoda FSS initial design. Communication between simulation software and DAS1 and DAS2, considered to be simple receivers of simulated data both as much alike as the two DASs from real plant, is performed in parallel with DATAPATH in a safe mode and without affecting simulation process. This paperwork presents the above mentioned application of this communication solution, developed by the Cernavoda NPP Full Scope Simulator Staff with details about the hardware/software solutions and their performance, training impact, cost and benefits. (authors)

  2. Scenario Based Education as a Framework for Understanding Students Engagement and Learning in a Project Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I describe how students use a project management simulation game based on an attack-defense mechanism where two teams of players compete by challenging each other's projects. The project management simulation game is intended to be played by pre-service construction workers and engineers. The gameplay has two parts: a planning part,…

  3. Scenario Based Education as a Framework for Understanding Students Engagement and Learning in a Project Management Simulation Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I describe s how students use a project management simulation game based on an attack‑defense mechanism where two teams of players compete by challenging each other⠒s projects. The project management simulation game is intended to be playe d by pre‑service construction workers and e...

  4. Using rainfall simulations to understand the relationship between precipitation, soil crust and infiltration in four agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Alastrué, Juan; Moret-Fernández, David; Beguería, Santiago; López, Mariví; Navas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall simulation experiments were carried out in order to study soil crust formation and its relation with soil infiltration parameters—sorptivity (S) and hydraulic conductivity (K)—on four common agricultural soils with contrasted properties; namely, Cambisol, Gypsisol, Solonchak, and Solonetz. Three different rainfall simulations, replicated three times each of them, were performed over the soils. Prior to rainfall simulations all soils were mechanically tilled with a rototiller to create similar soil surface conditions and homogeneous soils. Rainfall simulation parameters were monitored in real time by a Thies Laser Precipitation Monitor, allowing a complete characterization of simulated rainfall microphysics (drop size and velocity distributions) and integrated variables (accumulated rainfall, intensity and kinetic energy). Once soils dried after the simulations, soil penetration resistance was measured and soil hydraulic parameters, S and K, were estimated using the disc infiltrometry technique. There was little variation in rainfall parameters among simulations. Mean intensity and mean median diameter (D50) varied in simulations 1 ( 0.5 bar), 2 ( 0.8 bar) and 3 ( 1.2 bar) from 26.5 mm h-1 and 0.43 mm (s1) to 40.5 mm h-1 and 0.54 mm (s2) and 41.1 mm h-1 and 0.56 mm for (s3), respectively. Crust formation by soil was explained by D50 and subsequently by the total precipitation amount and the percentage of silt and clay in soil, being Cambisol and Gypsisol the soils that showed more increase in penetration resistance by simulation. All soils showed similar S values by simulations which were explained by rainfall intensity. Different patterns of K were shown by the four soils, which were explained by the combined effect of D50 and intensity, together with soil physico-chemical properties. This study highlights the importance of monitoring all precipitation parameters to determine their effect on different soil processes.

  5. Degree of Response to Homeopathic Potencies Correlates with Dipole Moment Size in Molecular Detectors: Implications for Understanding the Fundamental Nature of Serially Diluted and Succussed Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2018-02-01

     The use of solvatochromic dyes to investigate homeopathic potencies holds out the promise of understanding the nature of serially succussed and diluted solutions at a fundamental physicochemical level. Recent studies have shown that a range of different dyes interact with potencies and, moreover, the nature of the interaction is beginning to allow certain specific characteristics of potencies to be delineated.  The study reported in this article takes previous investigations further and aims to understand more about the nature of the interaction between potencies and solvatochromic dyes. To this end, the UV-visible spectra of a wide range of potential detectors of potencies have been examined using methodologies previously described.  Results presented demonstrate that solvatochromic dyes are a sub-group of a larger class of compounds capable of demonstrating interactions with potencies. In particular, amino acids containing an aromatic bridge also show marked optical changes in the presence of potencies. Several specific features of molecular detectors can now be shown to be necessary for significant interactions with homeopathic potencies. These include systems with a large dipole moment, electron delocalisation, polarizability and molecular rigidity.  Analysis of the optical changes occurring on interaction with potencies suggests that in all cases potencies increase the polarity of molecular detectors to a degree that correlates with the size of the compound's permanent or ground dipole moment. These results can be explained by inferring that potencies themselves have polarity. Possible candidates for the identity of potencies, based on these and previously reported results, are discussed. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  6. Image understanding systems based on the unifying representation of perceptual and conceptual information and the solution of mid-level and high-level vision problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvychko, Igor

    2001-10-01

    Vision is a part of a larger information system that converts visual information into knowledge structures. These structures drive vision process, resolving ambiguity and uncertainty via feedback, and provide image understanding, that is an interpretation of visual information in terms of such knowledge models. A computer vision system based on such principles requires unifying representation of perceptual and conceptual information. Computer simulation models are built on the basis of graphs/networks. The ability of human brain to emulate similar graph/networks models is found. That means a very important shift of paradigm in our knowledge about brain from neural networks to the cortical software. Starting from the primary visual areas, brain analyzes an image as a graph-type spatial structure. Primary areas provide active fusion of image features on a spatial grid-like structure, where nodes are cortical columns. The spatial combination of different neighbor features cannot be described as a statistical/integral characteristic of the analyzed region, but uniquely characterizes such region itself. Spatial logic and topology naturally present in such structures. Mid-level vision processes like clustering, perceptual grouping, multilevel hierarchical compression, separation of figure from ground, etc. are special kinds of graph/network transformations. They convert low-level image structure into the set of more abstract ones, which represent objects and visual scene, making them easy for analysis by higher-level knowledge structures. Higher-level vision phenomena like shape from shading, occlusion, etc. are results of such analysis. Such approach gives opportunity not only to explain frequently unexplainable results of the cognitive science, but also to create intelligent computer vision systems that simulate perceptional processes in both what and where visual pathways. Such systems can open new horizons for robotic and computer vision industries.

  7. Numerical Solution and Simulation of Second-Order Parabolic PDEs with Sinc-Galerkin Method Using Maple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Secer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient solution algorithm for sinc-Galerkin method has been presented for obtaining numerical solution of PDEs with Dirichlet-type boundary conditions by using Maple Computer Algebra System. The method is based on Whittaker cardinal function and uses approximating basis functions and their appropriate derivatives. In this work, PDEs have been converted to algebraic equation systems with new accurate explicit approximations of inner products without the need to calculate any numeric integrals. The solution of this system of algebraic equations has been reduced to the solution of a matrix equation system via Maple. The accuracy of the solutions has been compared with the exact solutions of the test problem. Computational results indicate that the technique presented in this study is valid for linear partial differential equations with various types of boundary conditions.

  8. Modelling of bentonite-granite solutes transfer from an in situ full-scale experiment to simulate a deep geological repository (Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil, B.; Gomez, P.; Pena, J.; Garralon, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Escribano, A.; Sanchez, L.; Duran, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The FEBEX experiment is a 1:1 simulation of a high level waste disposal facility in crystalline rock according to the Spanish radwaste disposal concept. → Solute transfer processes occurrs at the bentonite-granite interface. → An increase of Cl and Na is observed in granitic water of the surrounding of the experiment. → Solute transfer does not affect the sealing and thermo-hydromechanical properties of the engineered barriers. → A diffusive transport of Cl and Na simulated by 1D transport modeling with an effective diffusion coefficient of D e ≅ 5.0 E-11 m 2 /s. - Abstract: The FEBEX experiment is a 1:1 simulation of a high level waste disposal facility in crystalline rock according to the Spanish radwaste disposal concept. This experiment has been performed in a gallery drilled in the underground laboratory Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland). Two boreholes parallel to the FEBEX drift were drilled 20 and 60 cm away from the granite-bentonite interface to provide data on potential bentonite-granite solutes transfer. Periodic sampling and analysis of the major ions showed: (a) the existence of solutes transfer from the bentonite porewater towards the granite groundwater, explaining the Cl - and Na + contents of the latter; (b) that the concentration of the natural tracers coming into the granite groundwater from the bentonite porewater increased over time. This bentonite-granite solutes transfer was modelled in order to predict the increase in the Cl - and Na + concentrations of the granite groundwater. The modelled results seem to confirm that the mechanism of solute migration in this scenario is that of diffusive transport. An effective diffusion coefficient of D e = 5 x 10 -11 m 2 /s was that which best fitted the data obtained.

  9. Diffusion of aqueous solutions of ionic, zwitterionic, and polar solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xiaojing; Huang, Qi; Dharmawardhana, Chamila Chathuranga; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2018-06-01

    The properties of aqueous solutions of ionic, zwitterionic, and polar solutes are of interest to many fields. For instance, one of the many anomalous properties of aqueous solutions is the behavior of water diffusion in different monovalent salt solutions. In addition, solutes can affect the stabilities of macromolecules such as proteins in aqueous solution. Here, the diffusivities of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, tri-methylamine oxide (TMAO), urea, and TMAO-urea are examined in molecular dynamics simulations. The decrease in the diffusivity of water with the concentration of simple ions and urea can be described by a simple model in which the water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solutes are considered to diffuse at the same rate as the solutes, while the remainder of the water molecules are considered to be bulk and diffuse at almost the same rate as pure water. On the other hand, the decrease in the diffusivity of water with the concentration of TMAO is apparently affected by a decrease in the diffusion rate of the bulk water molecules in addition to the decrease due to the water molecules hydrogen bonded to TMAO. In other words, TMAO enhances the viscosity of water, while urea barely affects it. Overall, this separation of water molecules into those that are hydrogen bonded to solute and those that are bulk can provide a useful means of understanding the short- and long-range effects of solutes on water.

  10. Exact solutions and numerical simulation of longitudinal vibration of the Rayleigh-Love rods with variable cross-sections

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Exact solutions of equations of longitudinal vibration of conical and exponential rod are analyzed for the Rayleigh-Love model. These solutions are used as reference results for checking accuracy of the method of lines. It is shown that the method...

  11. Understanding the role of moisture transport on the dry bias in indian monsoon simulations by CFSv2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahana, A. S.; Pathak, Amey; Roxy, M. K.; Ghosh, Subimal

    2018-02-01

    We analyse the bias present in the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR), as simulated by Climate Forecast System Model 2 (CFSv2), the operational model used for monsoon forecasts in India. In the simulations, the precipitation intensity is redistributed within the ITCZ band with southward shifts of precipitation maxima. We observe weakening of maximum intensity of precipitation over the region between 20°N and 14°N. In the simulations by CFSv2, there exists two rain bands: the northern one located slightly southward compared to reanalysis dataset and the southern one over the equator with intensified precipitation. This results in dry bias over land and wet bias over the ocean. We use a Dynamic Recycling Model, based on Lagrangian approach, to investigate the role of various moisture sources in generating these biases. We find that, the dry bias during June exists due to the delayed monsoon onset and reduced moisture flow from the Arabian Sea. As the monsoon progresses, deficiency in the simulated contributions from South Indian Ocean becomes the key source of bias. The reduced supply of moisture from oceanic sources is primarily attributed to the weaker northward transport of moisture flux from the Southern Ocean, associated with a weaker southward energy flux. Inefficiency of the model in simulating the heating in Tibetan plateau during the pre-monsoon period leads to this reduced cross equatorial energy flow. We also find that, towards the end of monsoon season, moisture contributions from land sources namely, Ganga Basin and North-Eastern forests become significant and underestimations of the same in the simulations by CFSv2 result into biases over Central and Eastern India.

  12. Solution des systemes de controle de grandes dimensions basee sur les boucles de retroaction dans la simulation des reseaux electriques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugombozi, Chuma Francis

    2. The GFBI method may offer some advantages in this case. A last analysis axis prompted further work in initialization. It is shown that GFBI method may modifies the convergence properties of iterations of the Newton method. The Newton- Kantorovich theorem, using bounds on the norms of the Jacobian, has been applied to the proposed GFBI and classic full representation of control equations. The expressions of the Jacobian norms have been established for generic cases using Coates graph. It appears from the analysis of a simple case, for the same initial conditions, the behaviour of the Newton- Kantorovich theorem differs in both cases. These differences may also be more pronounced in the non-linear case. Further work would be useful to investigate this aspect and, eventually, pave the way to new initialization approaches. Despite these limitations, not to mention areas for improvement in further work, one notes the contribution of this thesis to improve the gain of time on simulation for the solution of control systems. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. A closed-loop forward osmosis-nanofiltration hybrid system: Understanding process implications through full-scale simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Phuntsho, Sherub; Kim, Jung Eun; Hong, Seungkwan; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Leiknes, TorOve; Choi, Joon Yong; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2016-01-01

    membrane area that may exist in a real process. The simulation shows that the DS input parameters such as initial concentrations and its flow rates cannot be arbitrarily selected for a plant with defined volume output. For a fixed FO-NF plant capacity

  14. Using numerical model simulations to improve the understanding of micro-plastic distribution and pathways in the marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardesty, Britta D.; Harari, Joseph; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Lebreton, Laurent; Maximenko, Nikolai; Potemra, Jim; van Sebille, Erik; Vethaak, A.Dick; Wilcox, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modeling is one of the key tools with which we can gain insight into the distribution of marine litter, especially micro-plastics. Over the past decade, a series of numerical simulations have been constructed that specifically target floating marine litter, based on ocean models of various

  15. A New Method Based on Simulation-Optimization Approach to Find Optimal Solution in Dynamic Job-shop Scheduling Problem with Breakdown and Rework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Amirkhani

    2017-03-01

    The proposed method is implemented on classical job-shop problems with objective of makespan and results are compared with mixed integer programming model. Moreover, the appropriate dispatching priorities are achieved for dynamic job-shop problem minimizing a multi-objective criteria. The results show that simulation-based optimization are highly capable to capture the main characteristics of the shop and produce optimal/near-optimal solutions with highly credibility degree.

  16. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated

  17. Testing Understanding and Understanding Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jean; Ross, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Provides examples in which graphs are used in the statements of problems or in their solutions as a means of testing understanding of mathematical concepts. Examples (appropriate for a beginning course in calculus and analytic geometry) include slopes of lines and curves, quadratic formula, properties of the definite integral, and others. (JN)

  18. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremin, Roman A., E-mail: era@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); International University “Dubna”, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 03022 (Ukraine); Rosta, László [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Grigoryeva, Natalia A. [Faculty of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • The model of the scattering particle for a reliable SANS analysis is proposed. • The structural parameters of saturated mono-carboxylic acids in solutions are obtained. • The differences in nematic transitions correlate to solvation peculiarities. - Abstract: The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute–solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  19. Electrodriven selective transport of Cs+ using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide in polymer inclusion membrane: a novel approach for cesium removal from simulated nuclear waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Goswami, Asok

    2014-11-04

    The work describes a novel and cleaner approach of electrodriven selective transport of Cs from simulated nuclear waste solutions through cellulose tri acetate (CTA)/poly vinyl chloride (PVC) based polymer inclusion membrane. The electrodriven cation transport together with the use of highly Cs+ selective hexachlorinated derivative of cobalt bis dicarbollide, allows to achieve selective separation of Cs+ from high concentration of Na+ and other fission products in nuclear waste solutions. The transport selectivity has been studied using radiotracer technique as well as atomic emission spectroscopic technique. Transport studies using CTA based membrane have been carried out from neutral solution as well as 0.4 M HNO3, while that with PVC based membrane has been carried out from 3 M HNO3. High decontamination factor for Cs+ over Na+ has been obtained in all the cases. Experiment with simulated high level waste solution shows selective transport of Cs+ from most of other fission products also. Significantly fast Cs+ transport rate along with high selectivity is an interesting feature observed in this membrane. The current efficiency for Cs+ transport has been found to be ∼100%. The promising results show the possibility of using this kind of electrodriven membrane transport methods for nuclear waste treatment.

  20. High-Order Ca(II)-Chloro Complexes in Mixed CaCl2-LiCl Aqueous Solution: Insights from Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Ying; Yi, Hai-Bo

    2016-07-21

    In this study, the structural characteristics of high-coordinated Ca-Cl complexes present in mixed CaCl2-LiCl aqueous solution were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The DFT results show that [CaClx](2-x) (x = 4-6) clusters are quite unstable in the gas phase, but these clusters become metastable when hydration is considered. The MD simulations show that high-coordinated Ca-chloro complexes are possible transient species that exist for up to nanoseconds in concentrated (11.10 mol·kg(-1)) Cl(-) solution at 273 and 298 K. As the temperature increases to 423 K, these high-coordinated structures tend to disassociate and convert into smaller clusters and single free ions. The presence of high-order Ca-Cl species in concentrated LiCl solution can be attributed to their enhanced hydration shell and the inadequate hydration of ions. The probability of the [CaClx](2-x)aq (x = 4-6) species being present in concentrated LiCl solution decreases greatly with increasing temperature, which also indicates that the formation of the high-coordinated Ca-Cl structure is related to its hydration characteristics.

  1. State conditions transferability of vapor-liquid equilibria via fluctuation solution theory with correlation function integrals from molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    on isobaric–isothermal molecular dynamics (NPT-MD) simulations, using force field parameters published in the literature and fitted CHARMM force field parameters. Systems studied previously [S. Christensen, G.H. Peters, F.Y. Hansen, J.P. O’Connell, J. Abildskov, Molecular Simulation 33 (2007) 449...

  2. Experimental comparative study and fracture resistance simulation with irrigation solution of 0.2% chitosan, 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernani Ernani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preparation in endodontic need irrigation materials as root canal debridement and disinfectant. However, irrigation materials is one of the factors that influence the tendency of fracture. Purpose: This study was aimed to see the resistance and fracture distribution if teeth irrigated with high molecular horseshoe crab chitosan at 0.2% concentration, 2.5% NaOCl solution and 17% EDTA solution in endodontic treatment with finite element method (FEM simulation study and experimental studies. Method: Endodontic treatment performed on 28 maxillary premolars with group A: irrigation solution of 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl solution; group B: 2.5% NaOCl irrigation solution; group C: 2.5% NaOCl irrigation solution and 0.2% chitosan solution; group D: 0.2% chitosan solution irrigation. Final restoration was done using prefabricated glass fiber post. Cementation of post using resin cement then restored with direct composite resin restorations. Pressure test was performed with a Universal Testing Machine with a speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. A three dimensional finite element analysis was performed for total deformation, equivalent (von-mises stress, and equivalent elastic strains. Result: Anova test showed significant differences in fracture resistance (p0.05. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (p>0.05 between the results of experiment and FEM analysis results using the t-test. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that there was effect of the use of high molecular 0.2% chitosan as a combined irrigation with NaOCl, but did not affect the fracture pattern distribution of endodontically treated teeth both experimentally and FEM analysis test.

  3. Computer simulation of strain-induced ordering in interstitial solutions based on the b.c.c. Ta lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanter, M.S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation is made of strain-induced ordering of interstitial atoms within octahedral interstices in the Ta host lattice. The calculation technique allows to take into account infinite-range strain-induced interaction. Computer simulation of ordering process enables to model the sequence of structure changes which occur during the ordering process and to find the equilibrium structure of the stable interstitial superstructures. The structures of high-temperature ordering phases obtained by the method of static concentration waves coincide with those obtained by means of computer simulation. However computer simulation enables to predict the structures of low-temperature ordered phases which cannot be obtained by the method of concentration waves. Comparison of computer simulation results and structures of observed ordered phases demonstrates good agreement. (author)

  4. Understanding the Impacts of Soil, Climate, and Farming Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: A Simulation Study in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godde, Cécile M; Thorburn, Peter J; Biggs, Jody S; Meier, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has the capacity to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to improve soil biological, physical, and chemical properties. The review of literature pertaining to soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics within Australian grain farming systems does not enable us to conclude on the best farming practices to increase or maintain SOC for a specific combination of soil and climate. This study aimed to further explore the complex interactions of soil, climate, and farming practices on SOC. We undertook a modeling study with the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator modeling framework, by combining contrasting Australian soils, climates, and farming practices (crop rotations, and management within rotations, such as fertilization, tillage, and residue management) in a factorial design. This design resulted in the transposition of contrasting soils and climates in our simulations, giving soil-climate combinations that do not occur in the study area to help provide insights into the importance of the climate constraints on SOC. We statistically analyzed the model's outputs to determinate the relative contributions of soil parameters, climate, and farming practices on SOC. The initial SOC content had the largest impact on the value of SOC, followed by the climate and the fertilization practices. These factors explained 66, 18, and 15% of SOC variations, respectively, after 80 years of constant farming practices in the simulation. Tillage and stubble management had the lowest impacts on SOC. This study highlighted the possible negative impact on SOC of a chickpea phase in a wheat-chickpea rotation and the potential positive impact of a cover crop in a sub-tropical climate (QLD, Australia) on SOC. It also showed the complexities in managing to achieve increased SOC, while simultaneously aiming to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate leaching in farming systems. The transposition of contrasting soils and climates in

  5. Understanding the Impacts of Soil, Climate and Farming Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: a Simulation Study in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Marie Godde

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has the capacity to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to improve soil biological, physical and chemical properties. The review of literature pertaining to soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics within Australian grain farming systems does not enable us to conclude on the best farming practices to increase or maintain SOC for a specific combination of soil and climate. This study aimed to further explore the complex interactions of soil, climate and farming practices on SOC. We undertook a modeling study with the APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator modeling framework, by combining contrasting Australian soils, climates and farming practices (crop rotations, and management within rotations, such as fertilization, tillage and residue management in a factorial design. This design resulted in the transposition of contrasting soils and climates in our simulations, giving soil-climate combinations that do not occur in the study area to help provide insights into the importance of the climate constraints on SOC. We statistically analyzed the model’s outputs to determinate the relative contributions of soil parameters, climate and farming practices on SOC. The initial SOC content had the largest impact on the value of SOC, followed by the climate and the fertilization practices. These factors explained 66%, 18% and 15% of SOC variations, respectively, after 80 years of constant farming practices in the simulation. Tillage and stubble management had the lowest impacts on SOC. This study highlighted the possible negative impact on SOC of a chickpea phase in a wheat-chickpea rotation and the potential positive impact of a cover crop in a sub-tropical climate (Queensland on SOC. It also showed the complexities in managing to achieve increased SOC, while simultaneously aiming to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O emissions and nitrate leaching in farming systems. The transposition of contrasting soils

  6. Understanding Dry Bias in the Simulations of Indian Monsoon by CFSv2 Through Analysis of Moisture Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheer, Sahana; Pathak, Amey; Mathew, Roxy; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-04-01

    Simulations of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) with its seasonal and subseasonal characteristics is highly crucial for predictions/ projections towards sustainable agricultural planning and water resources management. The Climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2), the state of the art coupled climate model developed by National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), is evaluated here for the simulations of ISM. Even though CFSv2 is a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model with advanced physics, increased resolution and refined initialization, its ISM simulations/ predictions/ projections, in terms of seasonal mean and variability are not satisfactory. Numerous works have been done for verifying the CFSv2 forecasts in terms of the seasonal mean, its mean and variability, active and break spells, and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-monsoon interactions. Underestimation of JJAS precipitation over the Indian land mass is one of the major drawbacks of CFSv2. ISM gets the moisture required to maintain the precipitation from different oceanic and land sources. In this work, we find the fraction of moisture supplied by different sources in the CFSv2 simulations and the findings are compared with observed fractions. We also investigate the possible variations in the moisture contributions from these different sources. We suspect that the deviation in the relative moisture contribution from different sources to various sinks over the monsoon region has resulted in the observed dry bias. We also find that over the Arabian Sea region, which is the key moisture source of ISM, there is a premature built up of specific humidity during the month of May and a decline during the later months of JJAS. This is also one of the reasons for the underestimation of JJAS mean precipitation.

  7. Evaluating the effects of a new qualitative simulation software (DynaLearn) on learning behavior, factual and causal understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitek, A.; Poppe, M.; Stelzhammer, M.; Muhar, S.; Bredeweg, B.; Biswas, G.; Bull, S.; Kay, J.; Mitrovic, A.

    2011-01-01

    The DynaLearn software, a new intelligent learning environment aimed at supporting a better conceptual and causal understanding of environmental sciences was evaluated. The main goals of these pilot evaluations were to provide information on (1) usability of the software and problems learners

  8. 3D Simulations of NIF Wetted Foam Experiments to Understand the Transition from 2D to 3D Implosion Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Brian; Olson, Richard; Yi, Austin; Zylstra, Alex; Peterson, Robert; Bradley, Paul; Shah, Rahul; Wilson, Doug; Kline, John; Leeper, Ramon; Batha, Steve

    2017-10-01

    The high convergence ratio (CR) of layered Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule implosions contribute to high performance in 1D simulations yet make them more susceptible to hydrodynamic instabilities, contributing to the development of 3D flows. The wetted foam platform is an approach to hot spot ignition to achieve low-to-moderate convergence ratios in layered implosions on the NIF unobtainable using an ice layer. Detailed high-resolution modeling of these experiments in 2D and 3D, including all known asymmetries, demonstrates that 2D hydrodynamics explain capsule performance at CR 12 but become less suitable as the CR increases. Mechanisms for this behavior and detailed comparisons of simulations to experiments on NIF will be presented. To evaluate the tradeoff between increased instability and improved 1D performance, we present a full-scale wetted foam capsule design with 17 Simulations predict that, given currently achievable levels of asymmetry, their effects negate all advantages of increased CR.

  9. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used....

  10. Understanding coupled natural and human systems on fire prone landscapes: integrating wildfire simulation into an agent based planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Ana; Ager, Alan; Preisler, Haiganoush; Day, Michelle; Spies, Tom; Bolte, John

    2015-04-01

    Agent-based models (ABM) allow users to examine the long-term effects of agent decisions in complex systems where multiple agents and processes interact. This framework has potential application to study the dynamics of coupled natural and human systems where multiple stimuli determine trajectories over both space and time. We used Envision, a landscape based ABM, to analyze long-term wildfire dynamics in a heterogeneous, multi-owner landscape in Oregon, USA. Landscape dynamics are affected by land management policies, actors decisions, and autonomous processes such as vegetation succession, wildfire, or at a broader scale, climate change. Key questions include: 1) How are landscape dynamics influenced by policies and institutions, and 2) How do land management policies and actor decisions interact to produce intended and unintended consequences with respect to wildfire on fire-prone landscapes. Applying Envision to address these questions required the development of a wildfire module that could accurately simulate wildfires on the heterogeneous landscapes within the study area in terms of replicating historical fire size distribution, spatial distribution and fire intensity. In this paper we describe the development and testing of a mechanistic fire simulation system within Envision and application of the model on a 3.2 million fire prone landscape in central Oregon USA. The core fire spread equations use the Minimum Travel Time algorithm developed by M Finney. The model operates on a daily time step and uses a fire prediction system based on the relationship between energy release component and historical fires. Specifically, daily wildfire probabilities and sizes are generated from statistical analyses of historical fires in relation to daily ERC values. The MTT was coupled with the vegetation dynamics module in Envision to allow communication between the respective subsystem and effectively model fire effects and vegetation dynamics after a wildfire. Canopy and

  11. Structure and thermodynamics of nonideal solutions of colloidal particles. Investigation of salt-free solutions of human serum albumin by using small-angle neutron scattering and Monte Carlo simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, B.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    Carlo simulation, to study salt-free solutions of human serum albumin (HSA) in the concentration range up to 0.26 g ml(-1). The model calculations of the theoretical SANS intensities are quite general, thus avoiding the approximation that the relative positions and orientations of the particles......-shaped potential which is spherically oriented around the particles. The combination of SANS and statistical thermodynamics also allows a determination of the nonideal part of the chemical potential and the activity coefficient of HSA. As expected the activity coefficient deviates strongly from the value one...

  12. Simulations of free-solution electrophoresis of polyelectrolytes with a finite Debye length using the Debye-Hückel approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Owen A; Shendruk, Tyler N; Harden, James L; Slater, Gary W

    2012-08-31

    We introduce a mesoscale simulation method based on multiparticle collision dynamics (MPCD) for the electrohydrodynamics of polyelectrolytes with finite Debye lengths. By applying the Debye-Hückel approximation to assign an effective charge to MPCD particles near charged monomers, our simulations are able to reproduce the rapid rise in the electrophoretic mobility with respect to the degree of polymerization for the shortest polymer lengths followed by a small decrease for longer polymers due to charge condensation. Moreover, these simulations demonstrate the importance of a finite Debye length in accurately determining the mobility of uniformly charged polyelectrolytes and net neutral polyampholytes.

  13. Distributions of 14 elements on 63 absorbers from three simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge, acidified supernate, and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-08-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 63 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste (HLW). These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with three solutions prepared to simulate acid-dissolved sludge (pH 0.6), acidified supernate (pH 3.5), and alkaline supernate (pH 13.9) from underground storage tank 102-SY at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. To these simulants we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U, Pu, and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr). For each of more than 2500 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. Because we measured the sorption of many different elements, the tabulated results indicate those elements most likely to interfere with the sorption of elements of greater interest. On the basis of nearly 7500 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of these absorbers appear suitable for processing HLW. This study supersedes the previous version of LA-12654, in which results attributed to a solution identified as an alkaline supernate simulant were misleading because that solution contained insufficient hydroxide

  14. Understanding Demographic and Behavioral Mechanisms that Guide Responses of Neotropical Migratory Birds to Urbanization: a Simulation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Shustack

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Although studies often report that densities of many forest birds are negatively related to urbanization, the mechanisms guiding this pattern are poorly understood. Our objective was to use a population simulation to examine the relative influence of six demographic and behavioral processes on patterns of avian abundance in urbanizing landscapes. We constructed an individual-based population simulation model representing the annual cycle of a Neotropical migratory songbird. Each simulation was performed under two landscape scenarios. The first scenario had similar proportions of high- and low-quality habitat across the urban to rural gradient. Under the first scenario, avian density was negatively related to urbanization only when rural habitats were perceived to be of higher quality than they actually were. The second landscape scenario had declining proportions of high-quality habitat as urbanization increased. Under the second scenario, each mechanism generated a negative relationship between density and urbanization. The strongest effect on density resulted when birds preferentially selected habitats in landscapes from which they fledged or were constrained from dispersing. The next strongest patterns occurred when birds directly evaluated habitat quality and accurately selected the highest-quality available territories. When birds selected habitats based on the presence of conspecifics, the density-urbanization relationship was only one-third the strength of other habitat selection mechanisms and only occurred under certain levels of population survival. Although differences in adult or nest survival in the face of random habitat selection still elicited reduced densities in urban landscapes, the relationships between urbanization and density were weaker than those produced by the conspecific attraction mechanism. Results from our study identify key predictions and areas for future research, including assessing habitat quality in urban and

  15. A comprehensive solution for simulating ultra-shallow junctions: From high dose/low energy implant to diffusion annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucard, F.; Roger, F.; Chakarov, I.; Zhuk, V.; Temkin, M.; Montagner, X.; Guichard, E.; Mathiot, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a global approach permitting accurate simulation of the process of ultra-shallow junctions. Physically based models of dopant implantation (BCA) and diffusion (including point and extended defects coupling) are integrated within a unique simulation tool. A useful set of the relevant parameters has been obtained through an original calibration methodology. It is shown that this approach provides an efficient tool for process modelling

  16. A comprehensive solution for simulating ultra-shallow junctions: From high dose/low energy implant to diffusion annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucard, F. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France)]. E-mail: Frederic.Boucard@silvaco.com; Roger, F. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Chakarov, I. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Zhuk, V. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Temkin, M. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Montagner, X. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Guichard, E. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Mathiot, D. [InESS, CNRS and Universite Louis Pasteur, 23 Rue du Loess, F67037 Strasbourg (France)]. E-mail: Daniel.Mathiot@iness.c-strasbourg.fr

    2005-12-05

    This paper presents a global approach permitting accurate simulation of the process of ultra-shallow junctions. Physically based models of dopant implantation (BCA) and diffusion (including point and extended defects coupling) are integrated within a unique simulation tool. A useful set of the relevant parameters has been obtained through an original calibration methodology. It is shown that this approach provides an efficient tool for process modelling.

  17. Solvation of magnesium dication: molecular dynamics simulation and vibrational spectroscopic study of magnesium chloride in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Karen M; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Roeselová, Martina; Allen, Heather C; Tobias, Douglas J

    2010-04-22

    Magnesium dication plays many significant roles in biochemistry. While it is available to the environment from both ocean waters and mineral salts on land, its roles in environmental and atmospheric chemistry are still relatively unknown. Several pieces of experimental evidence suggest that contact ion pairing may not exist at ambient conditions in solutions of magnesium chloride up to saturation concentrations. This is not typical of most ions. There has been disagreement in the molecular dynamics literature concerning the existence of ion pairing in magnesium chloride solutions. Using a force field developed during this study, we show that contact ion pairing is not energetically favorable. Additionally, we present a concentration-dependent Raman spectroscopic study of the Mg-O(water) hexaaquo stretch that clearly supports the absence of ion pairing in MgCl(2) solutions, although a transition occurring in the spectrum between 0.06x and 0.09x suggests a change in solution structure. Finally, we compare experimental and calculated observables to validate our force field as well as two other commonly used magnesium force fields, and in the process show that ion pairing of magnesium clearly is not observed at higher concentrations in aqueous solutions of magnesium chloride, independent of the choice of magnesium force field, although some force fields give better agreement to experimental results than others.

  18. An Investigation of Two Finite Element Modeling Solutions for Biomechanical Simulation Using a Case Study of a Mandibular Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Feng; Fan, Ying-Ying; Dong, Hui-Yue; Zhang, Jian-Xing

    2017-12-01

    The method used in biomechanical modeling for finite element method (FEM) analysis needs to deliver accurate results. There are currently two solutions used in FEM modeling for biomedical model of human bone from computerized tomography (CT) images: one is based on a triangular mesh and the other is based on the parametric surface model and is more popular in practice. The outline and modeling procedures for the two solutions are compared and analyzed. Using a mandibular bone as an example, several key modeling steps are then discussed in detail, and the FEM calculation was conducted. Numerical calculation results based on the models derived from the two methods, including stress, strain, and displacement, are compared and evaluated in relation to accuracy and validity. Moreover, a comprehensive comparison of the two solutions is listed. The parametric surface based method is more helpful when using powerful design tools in computer-aided design (CAD) software, but the triangular mesh based method is more robust and efficient.

  19. Atomic scale simulation of H2O2 permeation through aquaporin: toward the understanding of plasma cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, Maksudbek; Yan, Dayun; Cordeiro, Rodrigo M.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2018-03-01

    Experiments have demonstrated the potential selective anticancer capacity of cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using computer simulations, we try to shed light on the mechanism of selectivity, based on aquaporins (AQPs), i.e. transmembrane protein channels transferring external H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species, created e.g. by CAPs, to the cell interior. Specifically, we perform molecular dynamics simulations for the permeation of H2O2 through AQP1 (one of the members of the AQP family) and the palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayer (PLB). The free energy barrier of H2O2 across AQP1 is lower than for the POPC PLB, while the permeability coefficient, calculated using the free energy and diffusion rate profiles, is two orders of magnitude higher. This indicates that the delivery of H2O2 into the cell interior should be through AQP. Our study gives a better insight into the role of AQPs in the selectivity of CAPs for treating cancer cells.

  20. Development of simulated and ovine models of extracorporeal life support to improve understanding of circuit-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, Kiran; Fung, Yoke L; Diab, Sara; Mullany, Daniel V; McDonald, Charles I; Dunster, Kimble R; Fisquet, Stephanie; Platts, David G; Stewart, David; Wallis, Steven C; Smith, Maree T; Roberts, Jason A; Fraser, John F

    2012-06-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a lifesaving technology that is being increasingly used in patients with severe cardiorespiratory failure. However, ECLS is not without risks. The biosynthetic interface between the patient and the circuit can significantly alter inflammation, coagulation, pharmacokinetics and disposition of trace elements. The relative contributions of the pump, disease and patient in propagating these alterations are difficult to quantify in critically ill patients with multiple organ failure. To design a model where the relevance of individual components could be assessed, in isolation and in combination. Four ECLS models were developed and tested - an in-vitro simulated ECLS circuit; and ECLS in healthy sheep, sheep with acute lung injury (ALI), and sheep with ALI together with transfusion of old or new blood. Successful design of in-vitro and in-vivo models. We successfully conducted multiple experiments in the simulated circuits and ECLS runs in healthy and ALI sheep. We obtained preliminary data on inflammation, coagulation, histology, pharmacokinetics and trace element disposition during ECLS. The establishment of in-vitro and in-vivo models provides a powerful means for enhancing knowledge of the pathophysiology associated with ECLS and identification of key factors likely to influence patient outcomes. A clearer description of the contribution of disease and therapeutic interventions may allow improved design of equipment, membranes, medicines and physiological goals for improved patient care.

  1. Understanding the lid movements of LolA in Escherichia coli using molecular dynamics simulation and in silico point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahari, Priyadarshini; Anishetty, Sharmila; Pennathur, Gautam

    2013-12-01

    The Lol system in Escherichia coli is involved in localization of lipoproteins and hence is essential for growth of the organism. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that binds to outer-membrane specific lipoproteins and transports them from inner membrane to outer membrane through LolB. The hydrophobic lipid-binding cavity of LolA consists of α-helices which act as a lid in regulating the transfer of lipoproteins from LolA to LolB. The current study aims to investigate the structural changes observed in LolA during the transition from open to closed conformation in the absence of lipoprotein. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for two LolA crystal structures; LolA(R43L), and in silico mutated MsL43R for a simulation time of 50 ns in water environment. We have performed an in silico point mutation of leucine to arginine in MsL43R to evaluate the importance of arginine to induce structural changes and impact the stability of protein structure. A complete dynamic analysis of open to closed conformation reveals the existence of two distinct levels; closing of lid and closing of entrance of hydrophobic cavity. Our analysis reveals that the structural flexibility of LolA is an important factor for its role as a periplasmic chaperone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The understanding of strategy in a business simulation by students of business administration [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2017014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uajará Pessoa Araújo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The business simulation is an interesting tool for active experimental learning used in business courses in order to bring together theory and practice, comprising the knowledge of strategy. In this case study, we analyze this capability into a constructivist perspective, distinguishing our work from others that focus on the effectiveness of these business games. Once established the coherence between the study’s purpose and its epistemological approach of learning, taken as a mental effort that is at the same time social and personal, this paper attempted to reveal which concepts of strategy the students internalize after a business game course. We carried out a content analysis of the texts written by the students in their final exam. The results, while showing the possibilities of agency problems in the course, led the research team to conclude that students set partial dimensions of strategy, conceived as: mutual construction, management of errors, course of action, intention, path dependence and learned lessons, which were put together as a possible collective discourse built from individual fragments. Keywords Education in management; Teaching strategy; Business simulation.

  3. Investigation on the Effect of Addition of Fe3+ Ion into the Colloidal AgNPs in PVA Solution and Understanding Its Reaction Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roto Roto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Fe3+ ion present in aqueous solutions is always of interests. Recently, this ion has been analyzed by colorimetric methods using colloid of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs in capping agents of polymers. The reaction mechanism between AgNPs and Fe3+ is still subject to the further investigation. In this work, 1,10-phenanthroline was used to probe the reaction mechanism between AgNPs and Fe3+ ion in the solution. The colloids of AgNPs were prepared in the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA solution and reacted with Fe3+. The colloid surface plasmon absorbance decreases linearly along with the increase in Fe3+ concentration. The addition of 1,10-phenanthroline to mixture changes the solution to red, indicating that the reaction produces Fe2+. This suggests that the reduction of the AgNPs absorbance is the result of oxidation of the Ag nanoparticles along with the reduction of Fe3+.

  4. Hydration and Ion Pairing in Aqueous Mg2+ and Zn2+ Solutions: Force-Field Description Aided by Neutron Scattering Experiments and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Mason, Philip E; Fischer, Henry E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2018-04-05

    Magnesium and zinc dications possess the same charge and have an almost identical size, yet they behave very differently in aqueous solutions and play distinct biological roles. It is thus crucial to identify the origins of such different behaviors and to assess to what extent they can be captured by force-field molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we combine neutron scattering experiments in a specific mixture of H 2 O and D 2 O (the so-called null water) with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to probe the difference in the hydration structure and ion-pairing properties of chloride solutions of the two cations. The obtained data are used as a benchmark to develop a scaled-charge force field for Mg 2+ that includes electronic polarization in a mean field way. We show that using this electronic continuum correction we can describe aqueous magnesium chloride solutions well. However, in aqueous zinc chloride specific interaction terms between the ions need to be introduced to capture ion pairing quantitatively.

  5. Simulation of vibrational energy transfer in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I and amide II modes in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, Robbert; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Jansen, Thomas La Cour; Knoester, Jasper

    2008-01-01

    Population transfer between vibrational eigenstates is important for many phenomena in chemistry. In solution, this transfer is induced by fluctuations in molecular conformation as well as in the surrounding solvent. We develop a joint electrostatic density functional theory map that allows us to

  6. Validation of CFD simulation for ammonia emissions from an aqueous solution Submitted to Computers and Electronics in Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Elhadidi, B; Khalifa, H E

    2011-01-01

    In order to model and predict ammonia emissions from animal houses, it is important to determine the concentration on the emission surface correctly. In the current literature, Henry’s law is usually used to model the mass transfer through the gas–liquid surface (e.g. manure or aqueous solution)....

  7. Compaction creep of simulated anhydrite fault gouge by pressure solution: theory v. experiments and implications for fault sealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluymakers, A. M. H; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The sealing and healing behaviour of faults filled with anhydrite gouge, by processes such as pressure solution, is of interest in relation both to the integrity of faults cutting geological storage systems sealed by anhydrite caprocks and to seismic events that may nucleate in anhydrite-bearing

  8. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-01-01

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists

  9. INTEGRATING STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES IN A SYSTEMS APPROACH TO EXPLORING SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS: TRIPLE VALUE SIMULATION (3VS) MODELS IN COASTAL WATERSHEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decision makers often need assistance in understanding the dynamic interactions and linkages among economic, environmental and social systems in coastal watersheds. They also need scientific input to better evaluate the potential costs and benefits of intervention options. The US...

  10. An easy-to-build, low-budget point-of-care ultrasound simulator: from Linux to a web-based solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanovic, Domagoj; Goebel, Ulrich; Fischer, Benedikt; Huth, Martin; Breger, Hartmut; Buerkle, Hartmut; Schmutz, Axel

    2017-12-01

    Hands-on training in point-of-care ultrasound (POC-US) should ideally comprise bedside teaching, as well as simulated clinical scenarios. High-fidelity phantoms and portable ultrasound simulation systems are commercially available, however, at considerable costs. This limits their suitability for medical schools. A Linux-based software for Emergency Department Ultrasound Simulation (edus2TM) was developed by Kulyk and Olszynski in 2011. Its feasibility for POC-US education has been well-documented, and shows good acceptance. An important limitation to an even more widespread use of edus2, however, may be due to the need for a virtual machine for WINDOWS ® systems. Our aim was to adapt the original software toward an HTML-based solution, thus making it affordable and applicable in any simulation setting. We created an HTML browser-based ultrasound simulation application, which reads the input of different sensors, triggering an ultrasound video to be displayed on a respective device. RFID tags, NFC tags, and QR Codes™ have been integrated into training phantoms or were attached to standardized patients. The RFID antenna was hidden in a mock ultrasound probe. The application is independent from the respective device. Our application was used successfully with different trigger/scanner combinations and mounted readily into simulated training scenarios. The application runs independently from operating systems or electronic devices. This low-cost, browser-based ultrasound simulator is easy-to-build, very adaptive, and independent from operating systems. It has the potential to facilitate POC-US training throughout the world, especially in resource-limited areas.

  11. NMR characterization of simulated Hanford low-activity waste glasses and its use in understanding waste form chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; McGrail, B.P.

    1999-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structural and chemical environments of B, Al, and Si in model Hanford low-activity waste glasses. The average 29 Si NMR peak position was found to systematically change with changing glass composition and structure. From an understanding of the structural roles of Al and B obtained from MAS-NMR experiments, the authors first developed a model that reliably predicts the distribution of structural units and the average 29 Si chemical shift value, δ, based purely on glass composition. A product consistency test (PCT) was used to determine the normalized elemental release (NL) from the prepared glasses. Comparison of the NMR and PCT data obtained from sodium boro-aluminosilicate glasses indicates that a rudimentary exponential relationship exists between the 29 Si chemical shift value, and the boron NL value

  12. A nonequilibrium simulation method for calculating tracer diffusion coefficients of small solutes in n-alkane liquids and polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Briels, Willem J.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    The tracer diffusion coefficients of methane in n-alkane liquids of increasing chain length were calculated by measuring the friction from short time nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The frictional constant was calculated from the exponentially decaying distance between two methane

  13. Osmotic Pressure of Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions via Molecular Simulations of Chemical Potentials: Application to NaCl.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 407, Sl (2016), s. 76-83 ISSN 0378-3812 Grant - others:NSERC(CA) OGP1041 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : osmotic pressure * chemical potential * molecular simulation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.473, year: 2016

  14. Irrigation of an established vineyard with winery cleaning agent solution (simulated winery wastewater): vine growth, berry quality, and soil chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to use winery wastewater (WW) for irrigation purposes could be a beneficial to the wine industry. A major difficulty in studying WW use is its inconsistent availability and composition. As such, we applied four simulated WWs composed of salts from two main industrial cleaning agents, and...

  15. Corrosion behavior of 316 L stainless steel simulated by studying the influence of the species produced in the radiolysis in tritiated aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1991-10-01

    The corrosion of 316 L stainless steel in tritiated aqueous solutions was simulated by studying the influence of species produced or present in the radiolysis in these solutions. The species studied were nitrates, fluorides, nitrites, hydrogen peroxide and components of the steel, as well as the pH. The method used was voltammetry. The corroded or passivated surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the corrosion rates were determined by measuring the electrochemical impedance. The depletion of the component elements of the stainless steel at the surface was observed by X-ray fluorescence. From our results we propose methods to limit the corrosion in an industrial tritiated water installation by controlling the pH, the oxidation-reduction potential of the water and the voltage of the installation [fr

  16. Understanding the Effect of Gas Dynamics in Plasma Gun Performance for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Will; Underwood, Thomas; Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed coaxial plasma accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on both the properties of the plasma flow and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Specific emphasis is placed on quantifying the variation in these properties using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume as the gun volume is progressively filled with more neutral gas. These results are mapped to the operational dynamics of the gun via a time-resolved Schlieren cinematic visualization of the density gradient within the flow. Resulting videos indicate the existence of two distinct modes with vastly different characteristic timescales, spatial evolution, and plasma properties. Time resolved quantification of the associated plasma heat flux for both modes, including a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 10 GW m-2, is presented using both a fast thermocouple gauge and an IR camera. Both diagnostics in conjunction with a heat transfer model provide an accurate description of the energy transfer dynamics and operational characteristics of plasma guns. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program.

  17. Towards understanding of magnetization reversal in Nd-Fe-B nanocomposites: analysis by high-throughput micromagnetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Sergey; Berkov, Dmitry; Ito, Masaaki; Kato, Akira; Yano, Masao; Michels, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate how micromagnetic simulations can be employed in order to characterize and analyze the magnetic microstructure of nanocomposites. For the example of nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B, which is a potential material for future permanent-magnet applications, we have compared three different models for the micromagnetic analysis of this material class: (i) a description of the nanocomposite microstructure in terms of Stoner-Wohlfarth particles with and without the magnetodipolar interaction; (ii) a model based on the core-shell representation of the nanograins; (iii) the latter model including a contribution of superparamagnetic clusters. The relevant parameter spaces have been systematically scanned with the aim to establish which micromagnetic approach can most adequately describe experimental data for this material. According to our results, only the last, most sophisticated model is able to provide an excellent agreement with the measured hysteresis loop. The presented methodology is generally applicable to multiphase magnetic nanocomposites and it highligths the complex interrelationship between the microstructure, magnetic interactions, and the macroscopic magnetic properties.

  18. Simulated rain events on an urban roadway to understand the dynamics of mercury mobilization in stormwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckley, Chris S; Branfireun, Brian

    2009-08-01

    This research focuses on mercury (Hg) mobilization in stormwater runoff from an urban roadway. The objectives were to determine: how the transport of surface-derived Hg changes during an event hydrograph; the influence of antecedent dry days on the runoff Hg load; the relationship between total suspended sediments (TSS) and Hg transport, and; the fate of new Hg input in rain and its relative importance to the runoff Hg load. Simulated rain events were used to control variables to elucidate transport processes and a Hg stable isotope was used to trace the fate of Hg inputs in rain. The results showed that Hg concentrations were highest at the beginning of the hydrograph and were predominantly particulate bound (HgP). On average, almost 50% of the total Hg load was transported during the first minutes of runoff, underscoring the importance of the initial runoff on load calculations. Hg accumulated on the road surface during dry periods resulting in the Hg runoff load increasing with antecedent dry days. The Hg concentrations in runoff were significantly correlated with TSS concentrations (mean r(2)=0.94+/-0.09). The results from the isotope experiments showed that the new Hg inputs quickly become associated with the surface particles and that the majority of Hg in runoff is derived from non-event surface-derived sources.

  19. Electrochemical Evaluation of Hydroxyapatite/ZrN Coated Magnesium Biodegradable Alloy in Ringer Solution as a Simulated Body Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Rahim Kiahosseini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys as biodegradable materials can be used in body as an implant materials but since they have poor corrosion resistance, it is required to decrease their corrosion rate by biocompatible coatings. In this study, hydroxyapatite (HA coatings in the presence of an intermediate layer of ZrN as a biocompatible material, deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy by ion beam sputtering method at 300 °C temperature and at different times 180, 240, 300, 360 and 420 min. Then changes in corrosion resistance of samples in Ringer's solution as a solution similar to the human body was evaluated in two ways, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. To investigate the causes of the destruction of the samples, the surface of samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that because of porous coatings created, the corrosion potential of the samples was about +55mV higher than the uncoated substrate that by changing the deposition time, was not observed the significant change But with increasing deposition time to 360 min, corrosion current decreased which represents an increase of corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy in body solution. However, a further increase in deposition time to 420 min, due to increase thickness and stress in the layer, the corrosion resistance of the samples was reduced. The results of the EIS confirm the corrosion behavior of the polarization method, too.   

  20. Evaluation of the matrix exponential for use in ground-water-flow and solute-transport simulations; theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, A.M.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is possible to obtain analytic solutions to the groundwater flow and solute transport equations if space variables are discretized but time is left continuous. From these solutions, hydraulic head and concentration fields for any future time can be obtained without ' marching ' through intermediate time steps. This analytical approach involves matrix exponentiation and is referred to as the Matrix Exponential Time Advancement (META) method. Two algorithms are presented for the META method, one for symmetric and the other for non-symmetric exponent matrices. A numerical accuracy indicator, referred to as the matrix condition number, was defined and used to determine the maximum number of significant figures that may be lost in the META method computations. The relative computational and storage requirements of the META method with respect to the time marching method increase with the number of nodes in the discretized problem. The potential greater accuracy of the META method and the associated greater reliability through use of the matrix condition number have to be weighed against this increased relative computational and storage requirements of this approach as the number of nodes becomes large. For a particular number of nodes, the META method may be computationally more efficient than the time-marching method, depending on the size of time steps used in the latter. A numerical example illustrates application of the META method to a sample ground-water-flow problem. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Mathematical simulation of the behaviour of the spent organic extractive solution near the injection well area in the case of underground disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istomin, A.D.; Noskov, M.D.; Balakhonov, V.G.; Zubkov, A.A.; Egorov, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented of the processes in the collector seam under combined disposal of organic and radioactive wastes in porous geological strata of deep bedding. The model describes filtration, mass transfer, sorption and desorption of radionuclides, radioactive decay, decomposition of organic components and heat transfer. The computer software is developed. The results of simulating the thermal field dynamics, behaviour of the components of the spent organic extractive solution and water radioactive wastes in the collector seam of deep bedding are presented [ru

  2. Network Simulation solution of free convective flow from a vertical cone with combined effect of non- uniform surface heat flux and heat generation or absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immanuel, Y.; Pullepu, Bapuji; Sambath, P.

    2018-04-01

    A two dimensional mathematical model is formulated for the transitive laminar free convective, incompressible viscous fluid flow over vertical cone with variable surface heat flux combined with the effects of heat generation and absorption is considered . using a powerful computational method based on thermoelectric analogy called Network Simulation Method (NSM0, the solutions of governing nondimensionl coupled, unsteady and nonlinear partial differential conservation equations of the flow that are obtained. The numerical technique is always stable and convergent which establish high efficiency and accuracy by employing network simulator computer code Pspice. The effects of velocity and temperature profiles have been analyzed for various factors, namely Prandtl number Pr, heat flux power law exponent n and heat generation/absorption parameter Δ are analyzed graphically.

  3. Extraction of Am, Pu and U by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6/1-octanol from HNO3 solution and simulated HLLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinghai; Wang Jianchen; Liu Xiuqin; Song Chongli

    1999-01-01

    The extraction of americium, plutonium and uranium by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6)/1-octanol from HNO 3 solution and simulated HLLW are studied. The influences of acidity and dilution factor of simulated HLLW are studied. At low HNO 3 concentration and dilution factor above 2, 0.1 mol/L DCH18C6/1-octanol extracts very little americium, plutonium and uranium. the distribution ratios of Am, Pu and U increase with the increase of HNO 3 concentration in aqueous phase, and decrease with increasing of dilution factor of HLLW. The distribution ratio of extraction of Pu(IV) increases with the increase of extractant concentration

  4. Investigation of the main chemical properties of water-magnesium chloride solutions. Application to the understanding of stress corrosion phenomena in 17.12 Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasni, Abdellatif

    1988-01-01

    This research thesis reports the investigation of the main chemical properties of concentrated aqueous solutions of MgCl 2 and of their influence of stress corrosion of 17Cr-12Ni-2Mo stainless steel. It shows that the most important chemical properties are the equilibrium pH and the acidity range of MgCl 2 aqueous solutions, and that they strongly depend on solution temperature and concentration. The medium pH is governed by the increased acidity of water in presence of Mg ++ ions, while the acidity range is determined by a hydrolysis reaction of these ions which results in a precipitation of magnesium hydroxyl-chlorides. The investigation of stress corrosion behaviour of the steel in MgCl 2 solutions with varying temperature and concentration shows that this behaviour comes down to a prevailing pH effect which results from the variation of these both parameters, with a not negligible but less important effect of temperature. A study of cracking surfaces indicates that it is possible to pass from a transgranular to an intergranular mode by a variation of either media aggressiveness (pH, temperature, voltage) or strain rate. These results are explained by a concept of kinetic factor which limits stress corrosion [fr

  5. Improving Students' Understanding of the Connections between the Concepts of Real-Gas Mixtures, Gas Ideal-Solutions, and Perfect-Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Romain; Jaubert, Jean-Noël; Moine, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    In many textbooks of chemical-engineering thermodynamics, a gas mixture obeying the fundamental law pV[subscript m] = RT is most often called ideal-gas mixture (in some rare cases, the term perfect-gas mixture can be found). These textbooks also define the fundamental concept of ideal solution which in theory, can be applied indifferently to…

  6. A simulation to study the feasibility of improving the temporal resolution of LAGEOS geodynamic solutions by using a sequential process noise filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Brian Davis

    1995-01-01

    A key drawback to estimating geodetic and geodynamic parameters over time based on satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations is the inability to accurately model all the forces acting on the satellite. Errors associated with the observations and the measurement model can detract from the estimates as well. These 'model errors' corrupt the solutions obtained from the satellite orbit determination process. Dynamical models for satellite motion utilize known geophysical parameters to mathematically detail the forces acting on the satellite. However, these parameters, while estimated as constants, vary over time. These temporal variations must be accounted for in some fashion to maintain meaningful solutions. The primary goal of this study is to analyze the feasibility of using a sequential process noise filter for estimating geodynamic parameters over time from the Laser Geodynamics Satellite (LAGEOS) SLR data. This evaluation is achieved by first simulating a sequence of realistic LAGEOS laser ranging observations. These observations are generated using models with known temporal variations in several geodynamic parameters (along track drag and the J(sub 2), J(sub 3), J(sub 4), and J(sub 5) geopotential coefficients). A standard (non-stochastic) filter and a stochastic process noise filter are then utilized to estimate the model parameters from the simulated observations. The standard non-stochastic filter estimates these parameters as constants over consecutive fixed time intervals. Thus, the resulting solutions contain constant estimates of parameters that vary in time which limits the temporal resolution and accuracy of the solution. The stochastic process noise filter estimates these parameters as correlated process noise variables. As a result, the stochastic process noise filter has the potential to estimate the temporal variations more accurately since the constraint of estimating the parameters as constants is eliminated. A comparison of the temporal

  7. Model Simulations of a Field Experiment on Cation Exchange-affected Multicomponent Solute Transport in a Sandy Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ammentorp, Hans Christian; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1993-01-01

    A large-scale and long-term field experiment on cation exchange in a sandy aquifer has been modelled by a three-dimensional geochemical transport model. The geochemical model includes cation-exchange processes using a Gaines-Thomas expression, the closed carbonate system and the effects of ionic...... by batch experiments and by the composition of the cations on the exchange complex. Potassium showed a non-ideal exchange behaviour with K&z.sbnd;Ca selectivity coefficients indicating dependency on equivalent fraction and K+ concentration in the aqueous phase. The model simulations over a distance of 35 m...... and a period of 250 days described accurately the observed attenuation of Na and the expelled amounts of Ca and Mg. Also, model predictions of plateau zones, formed by interaction with the background groundwater, in general agreed satisfactorily with the observations. Transport of K was simulated over a period...

  8. Linking soils and streams: Response of soil solution chemistry to simulated hurricane disturbance mirrors stream chemistry following a severe hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McDowell; Daniel Liptzin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of forest ecosystem response to major disturbance events is an important topic in forest ecology and ecosystem management. Because of the multiple elements included in most major disturbances such as hurricanes, fires, or landslides, it is often difficult to ascribe a specific driver to the observed response. This is particularly true for the...

  9. Simulating the multi-disciplinary care team approach: Enhancing student understanding of anatomy through an ultrasound-anchored interprofessional session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetmer, Marianne T; Cloud, Beth A; Youdas, James W; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2018-01-01

    Quality of healthcare delivery is dependent on collaboration between professional disciplines. Integrating opportunities for interprofessional learning in health science education programs prepares future clinicians to function as effective members of a multi-disciplinary care team. This study aimed to create a modified team-based learning (TBL) environment utilizing ultrasound technology during an interprofessional learning activity to enhance musculoskeletal anatomy knowledge of first year medical (MD) and physical therapy (PT) students. An ultrasound demonstration of structures of the upper limb was incorporated into the gross anatomy courses for first-year MD (n = 53) and PT (n = 28) students. Immediately before the learning experience, all students took an individual readiness assurance test (iRAT) based on clinical concepts regarding the assigned study material. Students observed while a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician demonstrated the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic and procedural tool for the shoulder and elbow. Following the demonstration, students worked within interprofessional teams (n = 14 teams, 5-6 students per team) to review the related anatomy on dissected specimens. At the end of the session, students worked within interprofessional teams to complete a collaborative clinical case-based multiple choice post-test. Team scores were compared to the mean individual score within each team with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Students scored higher on the collaborative post-test (95.2 ±10.2%) than on the iRAT (66.1 ± 13.9% for MD students and 76.2 ±14.2% for PT students, P team activity facilitated an improved understanding and clinical application of anatomy. Anat Sci Educ 11: 94-99. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 x 3.0 x 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models

  11. Designing Solutions by a Student Centred Approach: Integration of Chemical Process Simulation with Statistical Tools to Improve Distillation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Joao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Projects thematically focused on simulation and statistical techniques for designing and optimizing chemical processes can be helpful in chemical engineering education in order to meet the needs of engineers. We argue for the relevance of the projects to improve a student centred approach and boost higher order thinking skills. This paper addresses the use of Aspen HYSYS by Portuguese chemical engineering master students to model distillation systems together with statistical experimental design techniques in order to optimize the systems highlighting the value of applying problem specific knowledge, simulation tools and sound statistical techniques. The paper summarizes the work developed by the students in order to model steady-state processes, dynamic processes and optimize the distillation systems emphasizing the benefits of the simulation tools and statistical techniques in helping the students learn how to learn. Students strengthened their domain specific knowledge and became motivated to rethink and improve chemical processes in their future chemical engineering profession. We discuss the main advantages of the methodology from the students’ and teachers perspective

  12. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  13. Understanding interdisciplinary health care teams: using simulation design processes from the Air Carrier Advanced Qualification Program to identify and train critical teamwork skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamman, William R; Beaudin-Seiler, Beth M; Beaubien, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    In the report "Five Years After 'To Err is Human' ", it was noted that "the combination of complexity, professional fragmentation, and a tradition of individualism, enhanced by a well-entrenched hierarchical authority structure and diffuse accountability, forms a daunting barrier to creating the habits and beliefs of common purpose, teamwork, and individual accountability for successful interdependence that a safe culture requires". Training physicians, nurses, and other professionals to work in teams is a concept that has been promoted by many patient safety experts. However the model of teamwork in healthcare is diffusely defined, no clear performance metrics have been established, and the use of simulation to train teams has been suboptimal. This paper reports on the first three years of work performed in the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) Tri-Corridor life science grant to apply concepts and processes of simulation design that were developed in the air carrier industry to understand and train healthcare teams. This work has been monitored by the American Academy for the Advancement of Science (AAA) and is based on concepts designed in the Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) from the air carrier industry, which trains and assesses teamwork skills in the same manner as technical skills. This grant has formed the foundation for the Center of Excellence for Simulation Education and Research (CESR).

  14. Interactive case vignettes utilizing simulated pathologist-clinician encounters with whole slide imaging