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Sample records for understanding organizational workload

  1. Understanding Organizational Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Linder, Stefan; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2015-01-01

    The attention-based view (ABV) of the firm highlights the role of decision makers’ attention in firm behavior. The ABV vastly improves our understanding of decision makers’ focus of attention; how that focus is situated in an organization’s procedural and communication channels; and how the distr......The attention-based view (ABV) of the firm highlights the role of decision makers’ attention in firm behavior. The ABV vastly improves our understanding of decision makers’ focus of attention; how that focus is situated in an organization’s procedural and communication channels; and how...... the distribution of the focus of attention among decision makers participating in those procedural and communication channels affects their understanding of a situation, their motivation to act, and, ultimately, their behavior. Significant progress has been made in recent years in refining and extending the ABV....... However, the role of individual differences in the capacity to read other people’s desires, intentions, knowledge, and beliefs that is, the theory of mind (ToM) has remained on the sidelines. The ToM is a natural complement to the ABV. In this study, we explore how the ToM allows for an understanding...

  2. Understanding I/O workload characteristics of a Peta-scale storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gunasekaran, Raghul [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Understanding workload characteristics is critical for optimizing and improving the performance of current systems and software, and architecting new storage systems based on observed workload patterns. In this paper, we characterize the I/O workloads of scientific applications of one of the world s fastest high performance computing (HPC) storage cluster, Spider, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). OLCF flagship petascale simulation platform, Titan, and other large HPC clusters, in total over 250 thousands compute cores, depend on Spider for their I/O needs. We characterize the system utilization, the demands of reads and writes, idle time, storage space utilization, and the distribution of read requests to write requests for the Peta-scale Storage Systems. From this study, we develop synthesized workloads, and we show that the read and write I/O bandwidth usage as well as the inter-arrival time of requests can be modeled as a Pareto distribution. We also study the I/O load imbalance problems using I/O performance data collected from the Spider storage system.

  3. Cognitive and affective components of mental workload: Understanding the effects of each on human decision making behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics researchers have recognized for some time the increasing importance of understanding the role of the construct of mental workload in flight research. Current models of mental workload suggest that it is a multidimensional and complex construct, but one that has proved difficult to measure. Because of this difficulty, emphasis has usually been placed on using direct reports through subjective measures such as rating scales to assess levels of mental workload. The NASA Task Load Index (NASA/TLX, Hart and Staveland) has been shown to be a highly reliable and sensitive measure of perceived mental workload. But a problem with measures like TLX is that there is still considerable disagreement as to what it is about mental workload that these subjective measures are actually measuring. The empirical use of subjective workload measures has largely been to provide estimates of the cognitive components of the actual mental workload required for a task. However, my research suggests that these measures may, in fact have greater potential in accurately assessing the affective components of workload. That is, for example, TLX may be more likely to assess the positive and negative feelings associated with varying workload levels, which in turn may potentially influence the decision making behavior that directly bears on performance and safety issues. Pilots, for example, are often called upon to complete many complex tasks that are high in mental workload, stress, and frustration, and that have significant dynamic decision making components -- often ones that involve risk as well.

  4. Understanding Organizational Culture and Communication through a Gyroscope Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Ryan S.; Messersmith, Amber S.; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01

    To fill a critical void in organizational culture pedagogy, the authors present an instructional system that employs the metaphor of a gyroscope to help students understand implicit assumptions in culture research. Working from Martin's nexus approach to organizational culture and Fairhurst and Putnam's tripartite theory of organizational…

  5. Understanding and managing organizational change: implications for public health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M

    2010-01-01

    Managing organizational change has become a significant responsibility of managers. Managing the change process within public health organizations is important because appropriately and systematically managing change is linked to improved organizational performance. However, change is difficult and the change process poses formidable challenges for managers. Managers themselves face increased pressure to respond to environmental influences and provide the necessary leadership to their organizations in the change process. In fact, managing organizational change has become a key competency for healthcare managers. This article addresses the important topic of organizational change in public health organizations. It provides a conceptual foundation for understanding organizational change and its relationship to healthcare organizational performance, and then discusses the types and nature of change, using some examples and evidence from those organizations that have successfully managed change. A framework for guiding public health managers in the change management process is provided. The article concludes with suggested management competencies to establish a change-oriented organization with the culture and capacity for change.

  6. Understanding the role of organizational legitimacy within the realm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    .doi.org/10.4314/mcd.v12i1.2. Understanding the role of organizational legitimacy within the realm of the community-based conservation approach. Armand RandrianasoloI, Arilova A. RandrianasoloII. Correspondence: Armand Randrianasolo.

  7. Using Porterian Activity Analysis to Understand Organizational Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheehan, Norman T.; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2017-01-01

    conceptualized by Porter’s writings on the activity-based view. Porterian activity analysis is becoming more accepted in the strategy literature, but no strategy scholar has explicitly used Porter’s activities, and particularly his concept of drivers, to understand and analyze organizational capabilities...

  8. Change in higher education: understanding and responding to individual and organizational resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F

    2007-01-01

    In many fields, the ability of educators and practitioners to cope with rapid change is essential to sustained success. In veterinary medical education, as in other scientific disciplines, meaningful change is challenging to achieve and subject to resistance from many individual and organizational norms. Individual concerns often relate to fears of instability or uncertainty, loss of current status, or effects on individual time and workload. Sources of organizational resistance may include a conservative culture, fierce protection of current practices, and prevalence of disciplinary or territorial viewpoints. In academia, especially in scientific or medical fields, individuals appear to be strongly independent and conservative in nature, and generally skeptical of educational change. In this environment, a highly participatory process, with regular communication strategies and demonstrations or evidence that supports proposed changes, can be useful in facilitating change. An understanding of the nature of complex change, as well as of the reasons underlying resistance to change, and some methods to overcome these barriers are highly valuable tools for educational leaders.

  9. Understanding the Relationship Between Organizational Networking and Network Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutu Raul Alexandru

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizational networking refers to firms‘ behaviours as activities, routines, practices which enable an organization to make sense of and capitalize on their networks of direct and indirect business relationships. The relationships are more important today when the business environment is more competitive. The firms can develop their organizational networking strategies by developing their network capability which refers to its ability to build, handle and exploit relationships. These capabilities are included in a complex configuration with other capabilities and competencies. The aim of this paper is to explore how network capabilities are structured and we tried to understand how they could be improved in order to obtain higher performance. Achieving a good network position that allows firms to make use of business opportunities is a main strategic aim of firms

  10. Understanding Organizational Agility: A Work-Design Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holsapple, Clyde W; Li, Xun

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a unified theoretical model of organizational agility and investigates the attributes of knowledge-intensive work-design systems, which contribute to achieving and sustaining organizational agility...

  11. Understanding the Influence of Organizational Culture and Group Dynamics on Organizational Change and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Colleen; Kline, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was used to examine cultural and group level factors that potentially influence groups' learning in the context of…

  12. Understanding the Organizational Context of Academic Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Jay R.; Heineman, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a conceptual model that academic leaders can use to navigate the complex, and often contentious, organizational terrain of academic program development. The model includes concepts related to the institution's external environment, as well as internal organizational structures, cultures, and politics. Drawing from the…

  13. Understanding Organizational Agility: A Work-Design Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holsapple, Clyde W; Li, Xun

    2008-01-01

    .... Here, we organize a review of existing definitions and conceptual models of organizational agility, and proceed to advance a relatively comprehensive model built from a work-design perspective...

  14. Polish adaptation of three self-report measures of job stressors: the Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, the Quantitative Workload Inventory and the Organizational Constraints Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, Łukasz; Bazińska, Róża

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the psychometric properties, reliability and validity of three job stressor measures, namely, the Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, the Organizational Constraints Scale and the Quantitative Workload Inventory. The study was conducted on two samples (N = 382 and 3368) representing a wide range of occupations. The estimation of internal consistency with Cronbach's α and the test-retest method as well as both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were the main statistical methods. The internal consistency of the scales proved satisfactory, ranging from 0.80 to 0.90 for Cronbach's α test and from 0.72 to 0.86 for the test-retest method. The one-dimensional structure of the three measurements was confirmed. The three scales have acceptable fit to the data. The one-factor structures and other psychometric properties of the Polish version of the scales seem to be similar to those found in the US version of the scales. It was also proved that the three job stressors are positively related to all the job strain measures. The Polish versions of the three analysed scales can be used to measure the job stressors in Polish conditions.

  15. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  16. Towards Diagram Understanding: A Pilot Study Measuring Cognitive Workload Through Eye-Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Baltsen, Nick; Christoffersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    measurements and subjective assessments; here, we also investigate behavioral indicators such as fixation and pupillary dilation. We use such indicators to explore diagram understanding- and reading strategies and how such strategies are impacted, e.g. by diagram type and expertise level. In the pilot eye......-tracking experiment run so far, we have only examined a small number of participants (n=4), so our results are preliminary in nature and do not afford far reaching conclusions. They do, however, corroborate findings from earlier experiments, for example, showing that layout quality indeed matters and improves...... understanding. Our results also give rise to a number of new hypotheses about diagram understanding strategies that we are investigating in an ongoing data acquisition campaign....

  17. Understanding the drivers on medical workloads: an analysis of spectators at the Australian Football League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitz, Kathryn; Haghighi, Pari Delir; Burstein, Frada; Williams, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The present study was designed to further understand the psychosocial drivers of crowds impacting on the demand for healthcare. This involved analysing different spectator crowds for medical usage at mass gatherings; more specifically, did different football team spectators (of the Australian Football League) generate different medical usage rates. In total, 317 games were analysed from 10 venues over 2 years. Data were analysed by the ANOVA and Pearson correlation tests. RESULTS; Spectators who supported different football teams generated statistically significant differences in patient presentation rates (PPR) (F15, 618=1.998, P=0.014). The present study confirmed previous findings that there is a positive correlation between the crowd size and PPR at mass gatherings but found a negative correlation between density and PPR (r = -0.206, n=317, Pfootball teams generated statistically significant differences in PPR. What is known about this topic? Understanding the drivers of emergency medical care is most important in the mass gathering setting. There has been minimal analysis of psychological 'crowd' variables. What does this paper add? This study explores the psychosocial impact of supporting a different team on the PPR of spectators at Australian Football League matches. The value of collecting and analysing these types of data sets is to support more balanced planning, better decision support and knowledge management, and more effective emergency medical demand management. What are the implications for practitioners? This information further expands the body of evidence being created to understand the drivers of emergency medical demand and usage. In addition, it supports the planning and management of emergency medical and health-related requirements by increasing our understanding of the effect of elements of 'crowd' that impact on medical usage and emergency healthcare.

  18. Understanding employee motivation and organizational performance: Arguments for a set-theoretic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Empirical evidence demonstrates that motivated employees mean better organizational performance. The objective of this conceptual paper is to articulate the progress that has been made in understanding employee motivation and organizational performance, and to suggest how the theory concerning employee motivation and organizational performance may be advanced. We acknowledge the existing limitations of theory development and suggest an alternative research approach. Current motivation theory development is based on conventional quantitative analysis (e.g., multiple regression analysis, structural equation modeling. Since researchers are interested in context and understanding of this social phenomena holistically, they think in terms of combinations and configurations of a set of pertinent variables. We suggest that researchers take a set-theoretic approach to complement existing conventional quantitative analysis. To advance current thinking, we propose a set-theoretic approach to leverage employee motivation for organizational performance.

  19. Applying the Skill-Rule-Knowledge Framework to Understanding Operators’ Behaviors and Workload in Advanced Main Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Shiang, Wei-Jung; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Liou, Jin-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Operator behaviors were analyzed according to Rasmussen's SRK classification. • Different job positions connote different abilities to perform the job successfully. • Rule-based behavior comprised the main behavior patterns of the operating crew. - Abstract: For the past years, a number of researches have focused on operators’ behaviors and workloads in advanced main control rooms (MCRs) in either the procedure-domain or knowledge-domain and in either workload-increased or workload-decreased conditions. Different job positions connote different responsibilities and abilities that are required to perform the job successfully. However, it may be inappropriate to apply a dichotomy in these issues. In this study, we clarified these controversial points through the analysis of the time, frequency, and workload of the behaviors based on Rasmussen's skill–rule–knowledge classification (SRK framework) according to the supervisor operator (SRO), reactor operator (RO), and assistant reactor operator (ARO). The results showed that, for the SRO, rule- and knowledge-based behaviors occurred more often than skill-based behavior in terms of time and frequency, and knowledge-based behavior was the main source of workload. For the RO, no significant differences were found among the three behavior types in terms of frequency and workload, but more time was spent on rule-based behaviors than on skill- and knowledge-based behaviors. The ARO spent more time performing skill-based behaviors than rule- and knowledge-based behaviors, but in terms of frequency and workload, rule-based behavior was the predominant type. Operators’ behaviors contribute to a plant's defense-in-depth approach to safety and serve a vital function in ensuring its safe operation. Research on behavioral taxonomies of advanced MCRs has many significant benefits in both scientific-theoretical and applied practical fields

  20. Understanding childbirth practices as an organizational cultural phenomenon: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behruzi, Roxana; Hatem, Marie; Goulet, Lise; Fraser, William; Misago, Chizuru

    2013-11-11

    Understanding the main values and beliefs that might promote humanized birth practices in the specialized hospitals requires articulating the theoretical knowledge of the social and cultural characteristics of the childbirth field and the relations between these and the institution. This paper aims to provide a conceptual framework allowing examination of childbirth practices through the lens of an organizational culture theory. A literature review performed to extrapolate the social and cultural factors contribute to birth practices and the factors likely overlap and mutually reinforce one another, instead of complying with the organizational culture of the birth place. The proposed conceptual framework in this paper examined childbirth patterns as an organizational cultural phenomenon in a highly specialized hospital, in Montreal, Canada. Allaire and Firsirotu's organizational culture theory served as a guide in the development of the framework. We discussed the application of our conceptual model in understanding the influences of organizational culture components in the humanization of birth practices in the highly specialized hospitals and explained how these components configure both the birth practice and women's choice in highly specialized hospitals. The proposed framework can be used as a tool for understanding the barriers and facilitating factors encountered birth practices in specialized hospitals.

  1. An Integrative Model for Understanding Team Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Its Antecedents and Consequences for Educational Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somech, Anit; Khotaba, Soha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use a model to broaden the understanding of the organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) phenomenon in educational teams and examines team OCB's mediating role in the relation of the contextual variables of team justice climate (distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice) to team…

  2. Assessing Resilience: How Plans, Strategies, and After Action Reports Can Improve Our Understanding of Organizational Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    indicator, but these documents are strategic in nature —a high-level approach ; therefore an absent roles and responsibilities indicator is not alarming...Continuity of Operations DHS Department of Homeland Security DPS Texas Department of Public Safety EMS Emergency Medical Services ESL English as a Second...no systemic way to holistically understand organizational resilience in public safety agencies. A methodical approach can provide an understanding

  3. A Process-Philosophical Understanding of Organizational Learning as "Wayfinding": Process, Practices and Sensitivity to Environmental Affordances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to articulate a practice-based, non-cognitivist approach to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: This paper explores the potential contribution of a process-based "practice turn" in social theory for understanding organizational learning. Findings: In complex, turbulent environments, robust…

  4. The Development of Danish OHS Regulation - Organizational Understanding and Program Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim, Rikke; Jensen, Per Langaa; Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on a major recent amendment of the Danish Working Environment regulation concerning the cooperation of health and safety between employees and employer. The amendment, which came into force in October 2010, consists of four elements: 1) change of terminology, 2) flexibility...... in organizing OHS, 3) link between the companies’ overall strategic management and OHS and 4) continuously competence development for the health and safety representatives. In this paper we present and analyze the individual elements of the legislative amendment. Subsequent we investigate the organizational...... understanding that underlies the amendment and we explore the program theory that the different elements of the reform subscribe to....

  5. Understanding Organizational Learning via Knowledge Management in Government-Link Companies in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Asleena; Ahmad, Zainal Ariffin; Hung, Daisy Kee Mui

    The knowledge management or KM discipline conjures a host of understanding and impact upon the global business community albeit commercially or socially. Regardless of the different approach to KM, it has inarguably brought about changes in viewing the knowledge capabilities and capacities of organizations. Peter Drucker (1998) argued that knowledge has become the key economic resource and the only source of competitive advantage. Hence organizational learning is an integral part of KM initiatives and has been widely practiced in many large organizations and across nations such as Europe, North America and Asia Pacific. Thus, this paper explores the KM initiatives of government link companies (GLCs) in Malaysia via synergizing knowledge strategy and capabilities in order to achieve competitive advantage.

  6. Towards a better understanding of the link between participation in decision-making and organizational citizenship behaviour : A multilevel analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, N.W.; van den Berg, A.E.; Willering, M.C

    In the present study, two models were tested that can improve understanding of the link between participation in decision-making and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB). In Model 1, it is assumed that perceived supervisory support mediates the link between participation in decision-making and

  7. A Case Study of Liberal Arts Colleges in the 21st Century: Understanding Organizational Change and Evolution in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Vicki L.; Baldwin, Roger G.

    2015-01-01

    We draw upon the evolutionary model of change in order to examine the organizational transformation of three liberal arts colleges (Albion College, Allegheny College, Kenyon College). Relying on our prior research (Baker, Baldwin, & Makker, 2012), we seek to continue our exploration and understanding of the evolution occurring in the important…

  8. Exploring the Usefulness of Two Conceptual Frameworks for Understanding How Organizational Factors Influence Innovation Implementation in Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Robin; Sargeant, Joan; Grunfeld, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Moving knowledge into practice and the implementation of innovations in health care remain significant challenges. Few researchers adequately address the influence of organizations on the implementation of innovations in health care. The aims of this article are to (1) present 2 conceptual frameworks for understanding the organizational factors…

  9. Organizational Justice as a Framework for Understanding Union-Management Relations in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Wendy L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I have conceptualized union-management relations using an organizational justice framework. I consider organizational justice theory, including distributive, procedural, interactional, and what I call relational justice perspectives. Utilizing examples from my experience and research, I illustrate and discuss various forms of…

  10. Understanding the Organizational Nature of Student Persistence: Empirically-based Recommendations for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.

    2002-01-01

    Builds on the assumption that colleges and universities are organizations and subsequently that the organizational perspective provides important insights for improving retention on campuses. A review of existing organizational studies of undergraduate persistence serves as the basis for ten empirically-based recommendations for practice that are…

  11. The workload of fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Helle; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    on Danish seiners had higher workload scores than fishermen in other vessel types. Conclusions: Despite improved work environment in the Danish fishing industry, fishermen still experience high levels of workload and suboptimal ergonomic conditions, which are known to cause pain and impair musculoskeletal...... health. To address the specific areas of fishing with the highest workload, future investments in assistive devices to ease the demanding work and reduce the workload, should particularly address deckhands and less mechanized vessels....

  12. Workload, Aspiration, and Fun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhr, Sara Louise; Pedersen, Michael; Alvesson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary working life highlights the challenge between exploitation and exploration both on a general and a more individual level. Here, we focus on the latter, and connect the critical debate regarding selfmanagement to March’s exploitation/exploration trade-off, as this forms a useful...... theoretical frame to understand how employees make sense of their self-management efforts. The employee is subjected to an individual responsibility to understand and manage an exploration of the self while handling the norms of self-exploitation that a self-management culture creates. Through an empirical...... study of a large group of management consultants, we explore how they perform and make sense of selfexploitation and self-exploration through three specific discourses: the discourse of workload, the discourse of aspiration, and the discourse of fun. Through these, the consultants try to identify...

  13. Acquiring organizational learning norms: a contingency approach for understanding deutero learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    'The Learning Organization' is a configuration of learning norms (called a learning prototype here), which is seldom related to varying levels of learning needs. This article assumes that organizational environmental complexity and dynamics define four learning needs levels. Consequently, four

  14. A New Trilogy to Understand the Relationship among Organizational Climate, Workplace Bullying and Employee Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Qureshi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Organizational Climate is a driving force in the organization behavior which provides foundations to many physical and psychological phenomena to the employees. Bullying is one of the major under considered phenomenon, usually caused by the organizational climate. The objective of the study is to examine the relationship between organizational climates, workplace bullying and workers’ health in selected higher education institutes of Pakistan. A proportionate random sample of 20 Universities comprising of 10 from public sector and 10 from private sector was selected for the study. The model of workplace bullying, organizational climate and worker's health was estimated by Structural Equation Modeling using AMOS software. The study found a negative relationship between organizational climate and bullying on one hand, while on the other hand, an increased workplace bullying effects employees’ health negatively due to affected sleeping hours. Drug abuse was treated as a moderator between health and affected sleeping hours. The study suggested that organizations should control workplace bullying which may cause physical and psychological effects on employee's health.

  15. Managing a new collaborative entity in business organizations: understanding organizational communities of practice effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Bradley L; Mathieu, John E; Cordery, John L; Rosen, Benson; Kukenberger, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Companies worldwide are turning to organizational communities of practice (OCoPs) as vehicles to generate learning and enhance organizational performance. OCoPs are defined as groups of employees who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic and who strengthen their knowledge and expertise by interacting on a consistent basis. To date, OCoP research has drawn almost exclusively from the community of practice (CoP) literature, even though the organizational form of CoPs shares attributes of traditional CoPs and of organizational teams. Drawing on Lave and Wenger's (1991) original theory of legitimate peripheral participation, we integrate theory and research from CoPs and organizational teams to develop and empirically examine a model of OCoP effectiveness that includes constructs such as leadership, empowerment, the structure of tasks, and OCoP relevance to organizational effectiveness. Using data from 32 OCoPs in a U.S.-based multinational mining and minerals processing firm, we found that external community leaders play an important role in enhancing OCoP empowerment, particularly to the extent that task interdependence is high. Empowerment, in turn, was positively related to OCoP effectiveness. We also found that OCoPs designated as "core" by the organization (e.g., working on critical issues) were more effective than those that were noncore. Task interdependence also was positively related to OCoP effectiveness. We provide scholars and practitioners with insights on how to effectively manage OCoPs in today's organizations. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Understanding the Dynamics of High Tech Knowledge Creation across Organizational Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Pernille; Ulhøi, John Parm

    . Existing literature, however, offers little in-depth insight into why and how such inter-organizational collaborations often encounter difficulties in crossing these boundaries and thus in accomplishing the expected joint knowledge creation and exchange. Departing from Carlile's (2004) integrated framework...... for managing knowledge across boundaries, in this paper we identify the knowledge boundaries present in a longitudinal R&D collaboration between six organizations. We analyzed how these boundaries were partially overcome, and present a fourth knowledge boundary, which causes major challenges in the inter-organizational...

  17. Understanding Alignment of Trust Behaviors and Their Effect on Organizational Trust at the Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command Life Cycle Management Command (TACOM LCMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    trust, organizational commitment and personal need non-fulfillment. Journal of Occupational Psychology , 53, 39-52. Covey, S. M. (2006). The speed...L., & Perles, G. S. M. (2011). Towards a more humanistic understanding of organizational trust. Journal of Management Development, 30(6), 605- 614

  18. The knowledge dynamics of organizational innovation : understanding the implementation of decision support for planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjarbaini, Vivyane Larissa Ratna Nirma

    2009-01-01

    This thesis argues that a knowledge perspective on organizational innovation provides essential insights. A cognitive-semiotic model on knowledge dynamics is presented and used to perform an empirical study. We seek an answer to the question: What happens to the knowledge of planners during an

  19. Organizational philosophy as a new perspective on understanding the learning of professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafheutle, Ellen I; Hassell, Karen; Ashcroft, Darren M; Harrison, Stephen

    2013-12-16

    To define the concept of "organizational philosophy" through identification of elements within undergraduate pharmacy curricula in the United Kingdom that contribute to students' learning of professionalism. A qualitative study using curriculum mapping was conducted to identify "intended," "taught," and "received" curriculum in 3 schools of pharmacy. The study involved review of course materials, interviews with teaching staff members, focus groups with final year students, and observation of classes. "Organizational philosophy" (totality of all contributors) played a vital part in students' professionalism learning. Key contributions were not restricted to the "taught" curriculum but extended to the wider academic environment. Setting of high standards appeared important; role models had particular significance. Importance of professionalism learning being grounded and longitudinal throughout the curriculum was highlighted. An "integrated" organizational philosophy appeared to be achieved where maximum overlap occurred between "intended," "taught," and "received" curricula. Professionalism learning goes beyond the "taught" curriculum in pharmacy schools. The concept of "organizational philosophy" acknowledges the importance of integration between "intended," "taught," and "received" curriculum in the context of overall organization.

  20. Organizational Assessment

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Because organizations are made up of people, many of their activities are designed within the limits of the organizational members. One of the ... Each organizational unit has its way of carrying out work based on its goals and understanding of the appropriate technology required to meet its goals. Over the past two decades ...

  1. Organizational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Helping principals understand the importance of organizational justice is the first step in enhancing learning outcomes for all learners, regardless of their social class, race, abilities, sex, or gender. In schools, organizational justice may be defined as teachers' perceptions of fairness, respect, and equity that relate to their interactions…

  2. Living systems theory as a paradigm for organizational behavior: understanding humans, organizations, and social processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancouver, J B

    1996-07-01

    Living systems theories have been used to model human, organization, and communication processes. This paper attempts to describe these models and to highlight the isomorphisms among the models. Particular emphasis is given to self-regulating properties of humans as a subsystem of social systems. Attention is given to the advantages of generalizing across levels and phenomena and integrating the middle-range theories that dominate the field of organizational behavior. Three broad recommendations for future research are discussed.

  3. Understanding the organizational integration of subcontracted tasks in inter-firm projects

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Scheuner

    2011-01-01

    Project management researchers have recently emphasized the prevalence of inter-firm projects, i.e. projects which are carried out by multiple partners and hence cut across the organizational boundaries of one firm, in today’s business world (Bakker, Knoben, de Vries, & Oerlemanns, in Press). Especially in projects concerned with the delivery of what Hobday (Hobday, 1998) named complex products and systems (CoPS), where a diverse set of technological competences and high project budgets often...

  4. Conflict: Organizational

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clegg, Stewart; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Sewell, Graham

    2015-01-01

    This article examines four contemporary treatments of the problem of organizational conflict: social psychological, anthropological, neo-Darwinian, and neo-Machiavellian. Social psychological treatments of organizational conflict focus on the dyadic relationship between individual disputants....... In contrast, anthropological treatments take a more socially and historically embedded approach to organizational conflict, focusing on how organizational actors establish negotiated orders of understanding. In a break with the social psychological and anthropological approaches, neo-Darwinians explain...... the characteristics of organizational conflict by appealing to the concept of natural selection: all forms of organizational behavior, including conflictual relations, stem from the effects of heritable traits associated with a universal human nature. Finally, this article proposes a neo-Machiavellian view...

  5. State of science: mental workload in ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark S; Brookhuis, Karel A; Wickens, Christopher D; Hancock, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Mental workload (MWL) is one of the most widely used concepts in ergonomics and human factors and represents a topic of increasing importance. Since modern technology in many working environments imposes ever more cognitive demands upon operators while physical demands diminish, understanding how MWL impinges on performance is increasingly critical. Yet, MWL is also one of the most nebulous concepts, with numerous definitions and dimensions associated with it. Moreover, MWL research has had a tendency to focus on complex, often safety-critical systems (e.g. transport, process control). Here we provide a general overview of the current state of affairs regarding the understanding, measurement and application of MWL in the design of complex systems over the last three decades. We conclude by discussing contemporary challenges for applied research, such as the interaction between cognitive workload and physical workload, and the quantification of workload 'redlines' which specify when operators are approaching or exceeding their performance tolerances.

  6. Hopper Workload Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, Brian; Butler, Tina; Gerber, Richard; Whitney, Cary; Wright, Nicholas; Yang, Woo-Sun; Zhao, Zhengji

    2014-05-02

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center is the primary computing facility for the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science. With over 5,000 users and over 600 different applications utilizing NERSC systems, it is critically important to examine the workload running on NERSCs large supercomputers in order to procure systems that perform well for a broad workload. In this paper we show the breakdown of the NERSC workload by science area, algorithm, memory, thread usage and more. We also describe the methods used to collect data from NERSCs Hopper (Cray XE6) system.

  7. Understanding Unintended Consequences and Health Information Technology:. Contribution from the IMIA Organizational and Social Issues Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, C E; Randell, R; Borycki, E M

    2016-11-10

    No framework exists to identify and study unintended consequences (UICs) with a focus on organizational and social issues (OSIs). To address this shortcoming, we conducted a literature review to develop a framework for considering UICs and health information technology (HIT) from the perspective of OSIs. A literature review was conducted for the period 2000- 2015 using the search terms "unintended consequences" and "health information technology". 67 papers were screened, of which 18 met inclusion criteria. Data extraction was focused on the types of technologies studied, types of UICs identified, and methods of data collection and analysis used. A thematic analysis was used to identify themes related to UICs. We identified two overarching themes. One was the definition and terminology of how people classify and discuss UICs. Second was OSIs and UICs. For the OSI theme, we also identified four sub-themes: process change and evolution, individual-collaborative interchange, context of use, and approaches to model, study, and understand UICs. While there is a wide body of research on UICs, there is a lack of overall consensus on how they should be classified and reported, limiting our ability to understand the implications of UICs and how to manage them. More mixed-methods research and better proactive identification of UICs remain priorities. Our findings and framework of OSI considerations for studying UICs and HIT extend existing work on HIT and UICs by focusing on organizational and social issues.

  8. Understanding and supporting emergent and temporary collaboration across and beyond community and organizational boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Amsha, Khuloud; Grönvall, Erik; Saad-Sulonen, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The way the Computer Supported Cooperative work (CSCW) community talks about, defines and investigates ‘work’ has changed since the early workplace studies. In the current literature, work has been described as being distributed, cross-organizational and multi-actor dependent, volunteer......-based, fleeting, opportunistic, inbetween and community-based. Collaborative work has also been examined in the formation of Publics, as Infrastructuring or as Knotworking. Work and collaborative work is indeed something that can be unforeseen by most or all of the involved actors. It can emerge and take place......, temporary communities of action, at the boundaries of established communities or organizations, to address issue that challenges current organization of work. The aim of the workshop is to open a space of reflection on relevant concepts, through the discussion of concrete examples and cases....

  9. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING, CULTURAL SELF-UNDERSTANDING, AND COMMUNITY SELF-STRENGTHENING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    The infant mental health field can amplify its effects when it extends its purview beyond the dyad to the larger contexts in which infants and adult caregivers interact and develop over time. Within health, mental health, education, and other human service organizations, the quality of relationships is a critical variable in the individual-level outcomes that such organizations seek. The goals of this work and the means for accomplishing them are highly dependent on human qualities and interactions that are shaped by organizational processes. In communities, too, processes that shape relationships also strongly influence child-, family-, and community-level outcomes. The Touchpoints approach to reflective practice can guide relational processes among professionals, parents, and infants in organizations and communities that influence these outcomes. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  10. DDM Workload Emulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, R.; Schikuta, E.; Garonne, V.; Stewart, G.; Barisits, M.; Beermann, T.; Lassnig, M.; Serfon, C.; Goossens, L.; Nairz, A.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Rucio is the successor of the current Don Quijote 2 (DQ2) system for the distributed data management (DDM) system of the ATLAS experiment. The reasons for replacing DQ2 are manifold, but besides high maintenance costs and architectural limitations, scalability concerns are on top of the list. Current expectations are that the amount of data will be three to four times as it is today by the end of 2014. Further is the availability of more powerful computing resources pushing additional pressure on the DDM system as it increases the demands on data provisioning. Although DQ2 is capable of handling the current workload, it is already at its limits. To ensure that Rucio will be up to the expected workload, a way to emulate it is needed. To do so, first the current workload, observed in DQ2, must be understood in order to scale it up to future expectations. The paper discusses how selected core concepts are applied to the workload of the experiment and how knowledge about the current workload is derived from various sources (e.g. analysing the central file catalogue logs). Finally a description of the implemented emulation framework, used for stress-testing Rucio, is given.

  11. DDM Workload Emulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vigne, R; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V; Stewart, G; Barisits, M; Beermann, T; Lassnig, M; Serfon, C; Goossens, L; Nairz, A

    2013-01-01

    Rucio is the successor of the current Don Quijote 2 (DQ2) system for the distributed data management (DDM) system of the ATLAS experiment. The reasons for replacing DQ2 are manifold, but besides high maintenance costs and architectural limitations, scalability concerns are on top of the list. Current expectations are that the amount of data will be three to four times as it is today by the end of 2014. Further is the availability of more powerful computing resources pushing additional pressure on the DDM system as it increases the demands on data provisioning. Although DQ2 is capable of handling the current workload, it is already at its limits. To ensure that Rucio will be up to the expected workload, a way to emulate it is needed. To do so, first the current workload, observed in DQ2, must be understood in order to scale it up to future expectations. The paper discusses how selected core concepts are applied to the workload of the experiment and how knowledge about the current workload is derived from vario...

  12. DDM workload emulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigne, R; Schikuta, E; Garonne, V; Stewart, G; Barisits, M; Beermann, T; Lassnig, M; Serfon, C; Goossens, L; Nairz, A

    2014-01-01

    Rucio is the successor of the current Don Quijote 2 (DQ2) system for the distributed data management (DDM) system of the ATLAS experiment. The reasons for replacing DQ2 are manifold, but besides high maintenance costs and architectural limitations, scalability concerns are on top of the list. Current expectations are that the amount of data will be three to four times as it is today by the end of 2014. Further is the availability of more powerful computing resources pushing additional pressure on the DDM system as it increases the demands on data provisioning. Although DQ2 is capable of handling the current workload, it is already at its limits. To ensure that Rucio will be up to the expected workload, a way to emulate it is needed. To do so, first the current workload, observed in DQ2, must be understood in order to scale it up to future expectations. The paper discusses how selected core concepts are applied to the workload of the experiment and how knowledge about the current workload is derived from various sources (e.g. analysing the central file catalogue logs). Finally a description of the implemented emulation framework, used for stress-testing Rucio, is given.

  13. DDM Workload Emulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vigne, R; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V; Stewart, G; Barisits, M; Beermann, T; Serfon, C; Goossens, L; Nairz, A

    2014-01-01

    Rucio is the successor of the current Don Quijote 2 (DQ2) system for the distributed data management (DDM) system of the ATLAS experiment. The reasons for replacing DQ2 are manifold, but besides high maintenance costs and architectural limitations, scalability concerns are on top of the list. Current expectations are that the amount of data will be three to four times as it is today by the end of 2014. Further is the availability of more powerful computing resources pushing additional pressure on the DDM system as it increases the demands on data provisioning. Although DQ2 is capable of handling the current workload, it is already at its limits. To ensure that Rucio will be up to the expected workload, a way to emulate it is needed. To do so, first the current workload, observed in DQ2, must be understood in order to scale it up to future expectations. The paper discusses how selected core concepts are applied to the workload of the experiment and how knowledge about the current workload is derived from vario...

  14. Process, institutional and organizational approaches in sociological understanding of educational system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Klyov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article draws attention to the nature and characteristics of culture­centric, process, institutional and organizational approaches to form the essence of the educational process as a whole. The author examines the university not only as an educational and scientific center, but also as a spiritual center, forming a new type of professional identity. It is noted that as a social phenomenon, process and social institution, education makes social changes in society, and the transparent nature of social processes, the dominance of market relations in turn affect the educational institute. However, the institutional approach makes it possible to consider the educational processes on social, and personal levels. It is observed that the institutionalization of higher education as a particular social institution within the entire social institution of education occurred in the second half of the twentieth century, which allowed to talk about the leading role of universities in modern culture. The author stresses that the theory of higher education is the widely recognized thesis that has multiple arguments. They are governed by national law based on national finance, train specialists for the national economy. In fact, the emergence of new forms of relationships is a positive social process, but there are also negative effects. Their premise, according to some researchers, was globalization, the effect of «market forces» that contribute to the development of «a world without borders».

  15. Level of Workload and Its Relationship with Job Burnout among Administrative Staff

    OpenAIRE

    MANSOUR ZIAEI; HAMED YARMOHAMMADI; MEISAM MORADI; MOHAMMAD KHANDAN

    2015-01-01

    Burnout syndrome is a response to prolonged occupational stress. Workload is one of the organizational risk factors of burnout. With regards to the topic, there are no data on administrative employees’ burnout and workload in Iran. This study seeks to determine the levels of job burnout and their relationships with workload among administrative members of staff. Two hundred and forty two administrative staff from Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences [Iran] volunteered to participate in t...

  16. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-11-13

    Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of 'corporate culture' as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff's perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing homes in Norway with long-term care residents was included in the study. Data were collected by participant observation including informal conversation with the staff, and in-depth interviews with 15 residents using a narrative approach. The main findings were that organizational cultures could be seen as relatively stable corporate cultures described as 'personalities' with characteristics that were common for all nursing homes (conformity) and typical traits that were present in some nursing homes, but that they were also like no other nursing home (distinctiveness). Conformity ('Every nursing home is like all other nursing homes') meant that nursing home organizations formed their services according to a perception of what residents in general need and expect. Trait ('Every nursing home is like some other nursing homes') expressed typologies of nursing homes: residency, medical, safeguard or family orientation. The distinctness of each nursing home ('Every nursing home is like no other nursing home') was expressed in unique features of the nursing home; the characteristics of the nursing home involved certain patterns of structure, cultural assumptions and interactions that were unique in each nursing home. Nursing home residents experienced quality of care as 'The nursing home as my home' and 'Interpersonal care quality'. The resident group in the different types of nursing homes were unique, and the experience of quality of care seemed to depend on whether their unique needs and expectations

  17. Understanding a Successful Implementation of Organizational Social Media: A Multi-Site Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahman, Caroline D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the successful implementation of social media strategies in multiple organizations. Examining the factors an organization used to implement social media can provide the understanding of the benefits and risks associated with this technology. Some businesses are considered successful using social…

  18. Understanding Organizational Commitment and Satisfaction of TACOM Life Cycle Management Command Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Associates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 23 MAY 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Academic Thesis 3...they needed the following in their lives to continue being a self-actualized person (Boeree, 2006): Truth, rather than dishonesty UNDERSTANDING...Survey Academic Users Guide 2004. University of Western Ontario. Mowday, R. T., Porter, L. W., & Steers, R. M. (1981). Employee-Organization

  19. School Nurse Workload: A Scoping Review of Acute Care, Community Health, and Mental Health Nursing Workload Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as…

  20. DIRAC Workload Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Garonne, V; Stokes-Rees, I

    2005-01-01

    The Workload Management System is the core component of the DIRAC distributed MC production and analysis grid environment of the CERN LHCb experiment. This paper discusses the architecture, implementation and performance of this system. The WMS is a community scheduler, realizing a pull paradigm, particulary for the high troughput computing context. It has recently been used for an intensive physics simulation production involving more than 60 sites, 65 TB of data, and over 1000-GHz processor-years.

  1. DIRAC Workload Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Paterson, S

    2007-01-01

    DIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control) is the Workload and Data Management system (WMS) for the LHCb experiment. The DIRAC WMS offers a transparent way for LHCb users to submit jobs to the EGEE Grid as well as local clusters and individual PCs. This paper will describe workload management optimizations, which ensure high job efficiency and minimized job start times. The computing requirements of the LHCb experiment can only be fulfilled through the use of many distributed compute resources. DIRAC provides a robust platform to run data productions on all the resources available to LHCb including the EGEE Grid. More recently, user support was added to DIRAC that greatly simplifies the procedure of submitting, monitoring and retrieving output of Grid jobs for the LHCb user community. DIRAC submits Pilot Agents to the EGEE Grid via the gLite WMS as normal jobs. Pilot Agents then request jobs from the DIRAC Workload Management System after the local environment has been checked. Therefore DIR...

  2. Electronic Health Record Alert-Related Workload as a Predictor of Burnout in Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Megan E; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-05

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been shown to increase physician workload. One EHR feature that contributes to increased workload is asynchronous alerts (also known as inbox notifications) related to test results, referral responses, medication refill requests, and messages from physicians and other health care professionals. This alert-related workload results in negative cognitive outcomes, but its effect on affective outcomes, such as burnout, has been understudied. To examine EHR alert-related workload (both objective and subjective) as a predictor of burnout in primary care providers (PCPs), in order to ultimately inform interventions aimed at reducing burnout due to alert workload. A cross-sectional questionnaire and focus group of 16 PCPs at a large medical center in the southern United States. Subjective, but not objective, alert workload was related to two of the three dimensions of burnout, including physical fatigue (p = 0.02) and cognitive weariness (p = 0.04), when controlling for organizational tenure. To reduce alert workload and subsequent burnout, participants indicated a desire to have protected time for alert management, fewer unnecessary alerts, and improvements to the EHR system. Burnout associated with alert workload may be in part due to subjective differences at an individual level, and not solely a function of the objective work environment. This suggests the need for both individual and organizational-level interventions to improve alert workload and subsequent burnout. Additional research should confirm these findings in larger, more representative samples.

  3. Organizational Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Schultz, Majken

    contributions from such diverse fields of study as sociology, psychology, management studies and cultural studies. The readings examine questions such as how organizations understand who they are, why organizations develop a sense of identity and belonging, where the boundaries of identity lie......This text presents the classic works on organizational identity alongside more current thinking on the issues. Ranging from theoretical contributions to empirical studies, the readings in this volume address the key issues of organizational identity, and show how these issues have developed through...... and the implications of postmodern and critical theories' challenges to the concept of identity as deeply-rooted and authentic....

  4. Organizational Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Schultz, Majken

    This text presents the classic works on organizational identity alongside more current thinking on the issues. Ranging from theoretical contributions to empirical studies, the readings in this volume address the key issues of organizational identity, and show how these issues have developed through...... contributions from such diverse fields of study as sociology, psychology, management studies and cultural studies. The readings examine questions such as how organizations understand who they are, why organizations develop a sense of identity and belonging, where the boundaries of identity lie...

  5. Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian HUDREA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of secondary cultures can provide the basis for change. Therefore, organizations need to understand the cultural environments and values.

  6. CMS workload management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiga, D.

    2007-01-01

    From september 2007 the LHC accelerator will start its activity and CMS, one of the four experiments, will begin to take data. The CMS computing model is based on the the Grid paradigm where data is deployed and accessed on a number of geographically distributed computing centers. In addition to real data events, a large number of simulated ones will be produced in a similar, distributed manner. Both real and simulated data will be analyzed by physicist, at an expected rate of 100000 jobs per day submitted to the Grid infrastructure. In order to reach these goals, CMS is developing two tools for the workload management (plus a set of services): ProdAgent and CRAB. The ProdAgent deals with MonteCarlo production system: it creates and configures jobs, interacts with the Framework, merges outputs to a reasonable filesize and publishes the simulated data back into CMS data bookkeeping and data location services. CRAB (Cms Remote Analysis Builder) is the tool deployed ad hoc by CMS to access those remote data. CRAB allows a generic user, without specific knowledge of the Grid infrastructure, to access data and perform its analysis as simply as in a local environment. CRAB takes care to interact with all Data Management services, from data discovery and location to output file management. An overview of the current implementation of the components of the CMS workload management is presented in this work

  7. WBDOC Weekly Workload Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Weekly reports of workloads processed in the Wilkes Barre Data Operation Center. Reports on quantities of work received, processed, pending and average processing...

  8. Quantitative assessment of workload and stressors in clinical radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Lukasz M; Mosaly, Prithima R; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D; Jones, Ellen L; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2012-08-01

    Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (Passociation between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045). Workload level and sources of stressors vary among professional subgroups. Understanding the factors that influence these findings can guide adjustments to the workflow procedures, physical layout, and/or communication protocols to enhance safety. Additional evaluations are needed in order to better understand if these findings are systemic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Operator Workload: Comprehensive Review and Evaluation of Operator Workload Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    WORKLOAD: COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF OPERATOR WORKLOAD METHODOLOG I ES Page CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ...and published with the approval of the Surgeoii General of the Army, from the Section of Pschology ol the Medica Department." In turn, reprinted from...505. Allport, D. A., Antonis, B., & Reynolds, P. (1972). On the divisioln of attention: A disproof of the single channel hypothesis. Quarterly Journal

  10. Workload and Stress in New Zealand Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Sally; Wylie, Cathy

    This study examined the workloads of academic, general, support, library, and technical staff of New Zealand universities. It focused on current levels of workload, changes in workload levels and content, connections between workload and stress, and staff attitudes towards the effects of workload changes and educational reforms on the quality of…

  11. A Model of Student Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Student workload is a contributing factor to students deciding to withdraw from their study before completion of the course, at significant cost to students, institutions and society. The aim of this paper is to create a basic workload model for a group of undergraduate students studying business law units at Curtin University in Western…

  12. Psychological workload and body weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Dorthe; Gyntelberg, Finn; Heitmann, Berit L

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to Karasek's Demand/Control Model, workload can be conceptualized as job strain, a combination of psychological job demands and control in the job. High job strain may result from high job demands combined with low job control. Aim To give an overview of the literature...... on the association between obesity and psychological workload. METHOD: We carried out a review of the associations between psychological workload and body weight in men and women. In total, 10 cross-sectional studies were identified. RESULTS: The review showed little evidence of a general association between...... psychological workload and body mass index. Only weak positive associations were found, and only between elements of psychological workload and overall body weight. For body fat distribution, two out of three studies showed a positive association in men, but the associations became insignificant after...

  13. Understanding the Role of Culture and Communication in Implementing Planned Organizational Change: The Case of Compstat in Police Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of planned change efforts, the failure rates of implementation are as high as 50 to 70 percent (Lewis & Seibold, 1998). While these efforts are affected by technical issues, the organizations' approach to change, structure, technological capabilities, and organizational culture and communication practices are…

  14. A Framework for Understanding Community Colleges' Organizational Capacity for Data Use: A Convergent Parallel Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Monica Reid

    2014-01-01

    This convergent parallel design mixed methods case study of four community colleges explores the relationship between organizational capacity and implementation of data-driven decision making (DDDM). The article also illustrates purposive sampling using replication logic for cross-case analysis and the strengths and weaknesses of quantitizing…

  15. The Strategic Fitness Process: A Collaborative Action Research Method for Developing and Understanding Organizational Prototypes and Dynamic Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Organizations underperform and sometimes fail because their leaders are unable to learn the unvarnished truth from relevant stakeholders about how the design and behavior of the organization is misaligned with its goals and strategy. The Strategic Fitness Process (SFP was designed to enable leaders to overcome organizational silence about the misalignment with the environment and chosen strategy. By enabling an honest, organization-wide and public conversation, senior management teams, working collaboratively with scholar-consultants and organizational members, have access to valid data (the unvarnished truth, can conduct a valid diagnosis, and can develop a valid plan to change the structure, processes, and behavior of an organization while at the same time developing commitment that ensures execution. SFP is also a research method. By applying SFP iteratively to new and challenging situations, scholar-consultants can invent new organizational prototypes as well as learn if a standardized and institutionalized organizational learning process like SFP can enhance dynamic capabilities. The SFP model is illustrated with an application to Hewlett-Packard’s Santa Rosa Systems Division.

  16. Crew workload-management strategies - A critical factor in system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the philosophy and goals of the NASA/USAF Strategic Behavior/Workload Management Program. The philosophical foundation of the program is based on the assumption that an improved understanding of pilot strategies will clarify the complex and inconsistent relationships observed among objective task demands and measures of system performance and pilot workload. The goals are to: (1) develop operationally relevant figures of merit for performance, (2) quantify the effects of strategic behaviors on system performance and pilot workload, (3) identify evaluation criteria for workload measures, and (4) develop methods of improving pilots' abilities to manage workload extremes.

  17. Organizational Theory and Leadership Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazer, S. David; Kruse, Sharon D.; Conley, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Teaching organizational theory in a way that bridges to leadership practice is vital to preparing deft educational leaders who understand the organizational behavior of schools and districts. Organizational theory guides understanding of the complexities of schools and districts and can be a basis for collaborative and effective decision making.…

  18. Organizational governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Klein, Peter G.

    This chapter reviews and discusses rational-choice approaches to organizational governance. These approaches are found primarily in organizational economics (virtually no rational-choice organizational sociology exists), particularly in transaction cost economics, principal-agent theory, and the ......This chapter reviews and discusses rational-choice approaches to organizational governance. These approaches are found primarily in organizational economics (virtually no rational-choice organizational sociology exists), particularly in transaction cost economics, principal-agent theory...

  19. Organizational Learning? Look Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the growth in research on conditions for successful learning by organizations and the introduction of expanding practices and approaches, a progressive and shared understanding of the link between organizational learning and governance is currently missing. This paper aims to take a closer look at organizational learning from a…

  20. Managing Organizational Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watwood, Britt; And Others

    Based on studies comparing leadership in two rural community colleges undergoing change and examining the management of change at Maryland's Allegany College, this paper presents a conceptual framework and model for managing organizational change. First, a framework for understanding the community college chair's role in organizational change is…

  1. Workload analyse of assembling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Workload and Stressors in Clinical Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Lukasz M.; Mosaly, Prithima R.; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X.; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-01-01

    ). Conclusions: Workload level and sources of stressors vary among professional subgroups. Understanding the factors that influence these findings can guide adjustments to the workflow procedures, physical layout, and/or communication protocols to enhance safety. Additional evaluations are needed in order to better understand if these findings are systemic.

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Workload and Stressors in Clinical Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Lukasz M., E-mail: lukasz_mazur@ncsu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Mosaly, Prithima R. [Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X.; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Hoyle, Lesley [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Xu, Jing [Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ). Conclusions: Workload level and sources of stressors vary among professional subgroups. Understanding the factors that influence these findings can guide adjustments to the workflow procedures, physical layout, and/or communication protocols to enhance safety. Additional evaluations are needed in order to better understand if these findings are systemic.

  4. Single-Pilot Workload Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Hackworth, Carla; Burian, Barbara; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Drechsler, Gena; Silverman, Evan; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Integrated glass cockpit systems place a heavy cognitive load on pilots (Burian Dismukes, 2007). Researchers from the NASA Ames Flight Cognition Lab and the FAA Flight Deck Human Factors Lab examined task and workload management by single pilots. This poster describes pilot performance regarding programming a reroute while at cruise and meeting a waypoint crossing restriction on the initial descent.

  5. Curriculum Change Management and Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Aishah

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Saudi teachers have responded or are responding to the challenges posed by a new curriculum. It also deals with issues relating to workload demands which affect teachers' performance when they apply a new curriculum in a Saudi Arabian secondary school. In addition, problems such as scheduling and sharing space…

  6. Monday Morning Workload Reports (FY15 - 17)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monday Morning Workload Report (MMWR) displays a snapshot of the Veterans Benefits Administration’s (VBA) workload as of a specified date, typically the previous...

  7. Organizational Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grande, Bård; Sørensen, Ole Henning

    1998-01-01

    The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept of organizational network are identified and critically discussed. Special focus is placed on how information and communication technologies as communication mediators and cognitive pictures influence...... the organizational forms discussed in the paper. It is asserted that the underlying organizational phenomena are not changing but that the manifestations and representations are shifting due to technological developments....

  8. Cultural Synergy and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig; Vogt, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores informal codes and rhythms of social behavior at work and their relation to organizational change and wellbeing. After a merger within a public service organization we organized 8 focus groups of 2-3 clerical or academic employees within a head office and a division office (N...... = 21). Word counts of ‘I’ and ‘we’ revealed that people sharing pre-merger organizational background (homogeneous groups) used ‘we’ more often than heterogeneous groups. Head office employees were concerned with workload and social code, whereas division office employees mainly discussed meetings......, commitment, and office space. Organizational background rather than office cultures guided these differences. We found that in a merged organization cultural synergies are possible to create if practical and social values for employees are offered. Thus, interesting new ways to transform problems...

  9. Research organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Organizational processes at nuclear power plants should be sufficient to prevent accidents and to protect public health and safety upon the occurrence of an accident. The role of regulatory research is to confirm that agency assessments of organization processes are on a firm technical basis and provide for improvements in the NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] programs. A firm technical basis is achieved by reducing uncertainties associated with methods and measures used to assess organization processes. The general objective for regulatory research is to confirm that the agency has a coherent understanding of the organizational processes that are individually necessary and are collectively sufficient for safe operations, methods are available to reliably characterize organizational processes, and measures exist to monitor changes in the key organizational processes. The first specific objective was to develop a method to translate organizational processes into PRAs. The discussion provides feedback and insights from experience with the past and the ongoing organizational factors research. That experience suggests a set of ingredients that appear proper for performing regulatory research on organizational processes. By keeping focused upon these proper ingredients, the research will contribute to the regulatory assessments of utility management through the use of improved methods and measures in investigations, inspections, diagnostics, performance indicators, and PRA insights

  10. Organizational climate and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Benjamin; Ehrhart, Mark G; Macey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organizational culture is briefly defined as the basic assumptions about the world and the values that guide life in organizations. A brief history of climate research is presented, followed by the major accomplishments in research on the topic with regard to levels issues, the foci of climate research, and studies of climate strength. A brief overview of the more recent study of organizational culture is then introduced, followed by samples of important thinking and research on the roles of leadership and national culture in understanding organizational culture and performance and culture as a moderator variable in research in organizational behavior. The final section of the article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations. Throughout, recommendations are made for additional thinking and research.

  11. The CMS workload management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinquilli, M. [CERN; Evans, D. [Fermilab; Foulkes, S. [Fermilab; Hufnagel, D. [Fermilab; Mascheroni, M. [CERN; Norman, M. [UC, San Diego; Maxa, Z. [Caltech; Melo, A. [Vanderbilt U.; Metson, S. [Bristol U.; Riahi, H. [INFN, Perugia; Ryu, S. [Fermilab; Spiga, D. [CERN; Vaandering, E. [Fermilab; Wakefield, Stuart [Imperial Coll., London; Wilkinson, R. [Caltech

    2012-01-01

    CMS has started the process of rolling out a new workload management system. This system is currently used for reprocessing and Monte Carlo production with tests under way using it for user analysis. It was decided to combine, as much as possible, the production/processing, analysis and T0 codebases so as to reduce duplicated functionality and make best use of limited developer and testing resources. This system now includes central request submission and management (Request Manager), a task queue for parcelling up and distributing work (WorkQueue) and agents which process requests by interfacing with disparate batch and storage resources (WMAgent).

  12. Translating organizational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2016-01-01

    This paper takes it point of departure in actor-network-theory (ANT). It responds to the Next Management Theory tracks call for papers that address and further develops our understanding of organizational change as translation processes. It moreover addresses a critique of ANT researchers...... in organizational studies for making descriptions of studied empirical phenomena rather than developing theories and giving normative advice about how organizations or organizational change processes may be theorized, analyzed, managed and/or organized better. A new ANT-inspired theory about the characteristics...... of organizations, organizational change and change agents is therefore developed combining ANT with other theories. The relevance of this view is demonstrated in an analysis of a case where a nurse and the leader of a clinic for orthopedic surgery try to translate and thus implement a risk-management and deviation...

  13. Occupational medicine. Organizational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, L F

    1989-01-01

    Work flow and the administrative processes by which it is controlled are fundamental in shaping the realities of the organization as a system of relationships. Organization is technology in the broadest sense: processes, procedures, policies, controls, formal authority structures, and techniques. Among groups or organizations, it is unusual for changes in sentiment to precede action or organizational rearrangements. Technology and structure must be changed first. This chapter has outlined organizational theory and structures. The components of each have been examined and potential causes of problems identified. Much space has been devoted to understanding group dynamics and behavior. In addition to understanding one's subordinates and peers, the effective manager understands the organizational forces that exist in the workplace. A willingness to listen, communicate, innovate and lead should result in both effectiveness and rewarding experiences for a manager.

  14. Organizational Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning; Grande, Bård

    1996-01-01

    The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept are identified and critically discussed.......The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept are identified and critically discussed....

  15. Conflict: Organizational

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clegg, Stewart; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Sewell, Graham

    2015-01-01

    the characteristics of organizational conflict by appealing to the concept of natural selection: all forms of organizational behavior, including conflictual relations, stem from the effects of heritable traits associated with a universal human nature. Finally, this article proposes a neo-Machiavellian view...

  16. Organizational Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriwal, Madhu; Clegg, Stewart; Collopy, Fred; McDaniel, Reuben, Jr.; Morgan, Gareth; Sutcliffe, Kathleen; Kaufman, Roger; Marker, Anthony; Selwyn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of organizational science, broadly defined as including many fields--organizational behavior and development, management, workplace performance, and so on--were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might…

  17. Organizational Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    approach will in be named: organizational campaigning and means (e.g. Kotter, 2012, p. 9 and Clegg, Kornberger & Pitsis, 2009) that the manager takes control with communication and communication cannels in order to ensure successful organizational changes. Since the changes were not succeeding the approach...

  18. Understanding organizational change for alliancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Keers, Bianca; C. van Fenema, Paul; Zijm, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine an organization’s operational alignment in the process of alliance formation. Design/methodology/approach: A literature study was conducted on the strategic importance of assessing and aligning organizations’ operations for alliancing. Furthermore, an

  19. How a Multidimensional View of Perceived Organizational Support Impacts Self-Efficacy and Task Understanding during Training for Boundary Spanning Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    Perceived organizational support (POS), defined as how much employees feel the organization they work for cares for them and assists them in their needs, has been traditionally characterized in a single dimension...

  20. Workload Characterization of a Leadership Class Storage Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gunasekaran, Raghul [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Zhang, Zhe [ORNL; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Understanding workload characteristics is critical for optimizing and improving the performance of current systems and software, and architecting new storage systems based on observed workload patterns. In this paper, we characterize the scientific workloads of the world s fastest HPC (High Performance Computing) storage cluster, Spider, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). Spider provides an aggregate bandwidth of over 240 GB/s with over 10 petabytes of RAID 6 formatted capacity. OLCFs flagship petascale simulation platform, Jaguar, and other large HPC clusters, in total over 250 thousands compute cores, depend on Spider for their I/O needs. We characterize the system utilization, the demands of reads and writes, idle time, and the distribution of read requests to write requests for the storage system observed over a period of 6 months. From this study we develop synthesized workloads and we show that the read and write I/O bandwidth usage as well as the inter-arrival time of requests can be modeled as a Pareto distribution.

  1. The workload of trainees in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeda, G; Hutter, AW; Groenier, KH; Schuling, J

    During their first training period in general practice the authors felt that they did not encounter the balanced workload which is the foundation for learning to be a GP. Previous studies confirmed the existence of differences in overall and specific workload between trainees and trainers. From

  2. Workload dynamics on clusters and grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive statistical analysis of a variety of workloads collected on production clusters and Grids. The applications are mostly computational-intensive and each task requires single CPU for processing data, which dominate the workloads on current production Grid systems.

  3. Workload modelling for data-intensive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study built upon the requirements of a global data-intensive system, built for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. First, a scalable method is described to capture distributed data management operations in a non-intrusive way. These operations are collected into a globally synchronised sequence of events, the workload. A comparative analysis of this new data-intensive workload against existing computational workloads is conducted, leading to the discovery of the importance of descriptive attributes in the operations. Existing computational workload models only consider the arrival rates of operations, however, in data-intensive systems the correlations between attributes play a central role. Furthermore, the detrimental effect of rapid correlated arrivals, so called bursts, is assessed. A model is proposed that can learn burst behaviour from captured workload, and in turn forecast potential future bursts. To help with the creation of a full representative...

  4. Organizational Blogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerdal-Hjermind, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address and discuss implications of blog usage in a corporate communication context from an employees’ perspective by analyzing the local context and the underlying motivations of corporate blogging as they are being discursively constructed by a group...... of organizational bloggers. The paper presents findings from a case study of a government agency’s corporate blogging activity, traced through focus group interviews with the organizational bloggers....

  5. GRASPing infection: a workload measurement tool for infection control nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trundle, C M; Farrington, M; Anderson, L; Redpath, C K

    2001-11-01

    The GRASP nursing workload management system was used over a five-month period by both the infection control nurses (ICNs) in an infection control team (ICT) in a 1200-bedded university teaching hospital trust. GRASP data were used to quantify and qualify patient and Trust requirements for infection control (IC). The results indicated that care was being prioritised as the average daily patient care requirement was 15.9 h, whereas the ICNs were only able to provide 12.7 h to meet this. Infection control nurses spent 5.3 h dealing with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and only 3.9 h in preparation and delivery of education. A 'fire brigade service' was being provided at the expense of developmental and strategic issues. GRASP provided a method of quantifying, recording and analysing workload. It was used to support recommendations from the Health Quality Service Organizational Audit (Kings Fund), the Department of Health (DoH), the National Audit Office (NAO), and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) for an increased focus on education and risk management in IC. It was also used in a skill-mix exercise, and resulted in the appointment of additional staffing to the ICT. GRASP data could be used for benchmarking with other institutions to provide a flexible system which may be adapted to meet the changing demands of the health service. It provides a means for ICNs to measure and manage their workload, and may be adapted to other members of the ICT. Copyright 2001 The Hospital Infection Society.

  6. Patient Safety Incidents and Nursing Workload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Cuadros Carlesi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the relationship between the workload of the nursing team and the occurrence of patient safety incidents linked to nursing care in a public hospital in Chile. Method: quantitative, analytical, cross-sectional research through review of medical records. The estimation of workload in Intensive Care Units (ICUs was performed using the Therapeutic Interventions Scoring System (TISS-28 and for the other services, we used the nurse/patient and nursing assistant/patient ratios. Descriptive univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. For the multivariate analysis we used principal component analysis and Pearson correlation. Results: 879 post-discharge clinical records and the workload of 85 nurses and 157 nursing assistants were analyzed. The overall incident rate was 71.1%. It was found a high positive correlation between variables workload (r = 0.9611 to r = 0.9919 and rate of falls (r = 0.8770. The medication error rates, mechanical containment incidents and self-removal of invasive devices were not correlated with the workload. Conclusions: the workload was high in all units except the intermediate care unit. Only the rate of falls was associated with the workload.

  7. Identities as organizational practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae; Asmuß, Birte

    Identity has been widely acknowledged as playing a central role in various organizational processes, yet there is still a need to better understand the dynamics and functions of identity work in modern organizations. The present paper is centered within this concern, and examines identity......) reveal the intersubjective, multimodal and embodied nature of identity work; 2) demonstrate identity work as organizational practices, used in order to accomplish specific actions; and 3) pose a question on the view on identity as a layered/leveled phenomenon....

  8. A multilevel approach to relating subjective workload to performance after shifts in task demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mracek, Derek L; Arsenault, Matthew L; Day, Eric Anthony; Hardy, Jay H; Terry, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this laboratory experiment was to demonstrate how taking a longitudinal, multilevel approach can be used to examine the dynamic relationship between subjective workload and performance over a given period of activity involving shifts in task demand. Subjective workload and conditions of the performance environment are oftentimes examined via cross-sectional designs without distinguishing within-from between-person effects. Given the dynamic nature of performance phenomena, multilevel designs coupled with manipulations of task demand shifts are needed to better model the dynamic relationships between state and trait components of subjective workload and performance. With a sample of 75 college students and a computer game representing a complex decision-making environment, increases and decreases in task demand were counterbalanced and subjective workload and performance were measured concurrently in regular intervals within performance episodes. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. Both between- and especially within-person effects were dynamic. Nevertheless, at both levels of analysis, higher subjective workload reflected performance problems, especially more downstream from increases in task demand. As a function of cognitive-energetic processes, shifts in task demand are associated with changes in how subjective workload is related to performance over a given period of activity. Multilevel, longitudinal approaches are useful for distinguishing and examining the dynamic relationships between state and trait components of subjective workload and performance. The findings of this research help to improve the understanding of how a sequence of demands can exceed a performer's capability to respond to further demands.

  9. Organizational culture diagnosis - a new model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Ionuţ Constantin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is a key source of competitive advantage. There is a demonstrated relation between organizational culture and organizational performance. This paper reviews previous research in the field and introduce a new model for understanding, diagnosing and changing organizational culture. The main advantage of the new model is based on regarding culture as the management and work practices that are either hindering or helping an organization's bottom line performance.

  10. Organizational Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    Transparency is an increasingly prominent area of research that offers valuable insights for organizational studies. However, conceptualizations of transparency are rarely subject to critical scrutiny and thus their relevance remains unclear. In most accounts, transparency is associated...... that shape the extant literature, with a focus on three dimensions: conceptualizations, conditions, and consequences. The contribution of the study is twofold: (a) On a conceptual level, we provide a framework that articulates two paradigmatic positions underpinning discussions of transparency, verifiability...... with the sharing of information and the perceived quality of the information shared. This narrow focus on information and quality, however, overlooks the dynamics of organizational transparency. To provide a more structured conceptualization of organizational transparency, this article unpacks the assumptions...

  11. [Nursing workloads and working conditions: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoeller, Roseli; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Neis, Márcia Binder; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires

    2011-06-01

    This study reviews theoretical production concerning workloads and working conditions for nurses. For that, an integrative review was carried out using scientific articles, theses and dissertations indexed in two Brazilian databases, Virtual Health Care Library (Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde) and Digital Database of Dissertations (Banco Digital de Teses), over the last ten years. From 132 identified studies, 27 were selected. Results indicate workloads as responsible for professional weariness, affecting the occurrence of work accidents and health problems. In order to adequate workloads studies indicate some strategies, such as having an adequate numbers of employees, continuing education, and better working conditions. The challenge is to continue research that reveal more precisely the relationships between workloads, working conditions, and health of the nursing team.

  12. Army Field Kitchen Workloads and Fuel Consumption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirejczyk, Harry

    2004-01-01

    .... This report details the results and findings of data collection during unit field training focused on collecting baseline data to quantify the kitchen workloads and fuel consumption levels associated...

  13. ORGANIZATIONAL DISSENT

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIZ, Kaya

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to identify the primary school teachers perceptions of organizational dissent. The working group of the present study is formed by (n:171) primary school teachers working in the central province of Bolu in 2012-2013 academic year. In the study, the data were collected through organizational dissent scale developed by Özdemir (2010). The data were analyzed with the SPSS. Arithmetic means and standard deviations of the answers that teachers gave to the items were cal...

  14. Computer Professionals and Their Perceived Workload

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Chang Boon Lee

    2011-01-01

    This research, conducted in the context of computer professionals, examined the effects of workload on three work outcomes – namely, work exhaustion, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Data collected from a questionnaire survey were used to test the relationships proposed in this research. The results showed that (a) workload was positively related to work exhaustion, job satisfaction and turnover intention; (b) work exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention and negativel...

  15. Emotional exhaustion and workload predict clinician-rated and objective patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Annalena; Meier, Laurenz L.; Manser, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the role of clinician burnout, demographic, and organizational characteristics in predicting subjective and objective indicators of patient safety. Background: Maintaining clinician health and ensuring safe patient care are important goals for hospitals. While these goals are not independent from each other, the interplay between clinician psychological health, demographic and organizational variables, and objective patient safety indicators is poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Method: Participants were 1425 physicians and nurses working in intensive care. Regression analysis (multilevel) was used to investigate the effect of burnout as an indicator of psychological health, demographic (e.g., professional role and experience) and organizational (e.g., workload, predictability) characteristics on standardized mortality ratios, length of stay and clinician-rated patient safety. Results: Clinician-rated patient safety was associated with burnout, trainee status, and professional role. Mortality was predicted by emotional exhaustion. Length of stay was predicted by workload. Contrary to our expectations, burnout did not predict length of stay, and workload and predictability did not predict standardized mortality ratios. Conclusion: At least in the short-term, clinicians seem to be able to maintain safety despite high workload and low predictability. Nevertheless, burnout poses a safety risk. Subjectively, burnt-out clinicians rated safety lower, and objectively, units with high emotional exhaustion had higher standardized mortality ratios. In summary, our results indicate that clinician psychological health and patient safety could be managed simultaneously. Further research needs to establish causal relationships between these variables and support to the development of managerial guidelines to ensure clinicians’ psychological health and patients’ safety. PMID:25657627

  16. Emotional Exhaustion and Workload Predict Clinician-Rated and Objective Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalena eWelp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate the role of clinician burnout, demographic and organizational characteristics in predicting subjective and objective indicators of patient safety. Background: Maintaining clinician health and ensuring safe patient care are important goals for hospitals. While these goals are not independent from each other, the interplay between clinician psychological health, demographic and organizational variables and objective patient safety indicators is poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Method: Participants were 1425 physicians and nurses working in intensive care. (Multilevel regression analysis was used to investigate the effect of burnout as an indicator of psychological health, demographic (e.g., professional role and experience and organizational (e.g., workload, predictability characteristics on standardized mortality ratios, length of stay and clinician-rated patient safety. Results: Clinician-rated patient safety were associated with burnout, trainee status, and professional role. Mortality was predicted by emotional exhaustion. Length of stay was predicted by workload. Contrary to our expectations, burnout did not predict length of stay, and workload and predictability did not predict standardized mortality ratios.Conclusion: At least in the short-term, clinicians seem to be able to maintain safety despite high workload and low predictability. Nevertheless, burnout poses a safety risk. Subjectively, burnt-out clinicians rated safety lower, and objectively, units with high emotional exhaustion had higher standardized mortality ratios. In summary, our results indicate that clinician psychological health and patient safety could be managed simultaneously. Further research needs to establish causal relationships between these variables or and support the development of managerial guidelines to ensure clinicians’ psychological health and patients’ safety.

  17. Three Tails of Organizational Innovation: from the Value Creation Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Chih-Cheng; Ma, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    of presenting the organizational innovation process: two-way interactive triggers for organizational innovation integrating three levels – individual, group and organization, and three tails of organizational innovation process. By exploring the organizational innovation process, this study has extended...... and organizations. More importantly, these three tails are not isolated but integrated - this can be viewed as three stages for organizational innovation process.......Several prior articles have emphasized the importance of organizational innovation and change. To advance our understanding, this paper seeks to address the following question: “in what ways the outcome of organizational innovation process distributed over time” by examining organizational...

  18. On the different "worlds" of intra-organizational knowledge management: Understanding idiosyncratic variation in MNC cross-site knowledge-sharing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Helmut; Lehrer, Mark; Mühlbacher, Jürgen; Müller, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    This qualitative field study investigated cross-site knowledge sharing in a small sample of multinational corporations in three different MNC business contexts (global, multidomestic, transnational). The results disclose heterogeneous "worlds" of MNC knowledge sharing, ultimately raising the question as to whether the whole concept of MNC knowledge sharing covers a sufficiently unitary phenomenon to be meaningful. We derive a non-exhaustive typology of MNC knowledge-sharing practices: self-organizing knowledge sharing, technocratic knowledge sharing, and best practice knowledge sharing. Despite its limitations, this typology helps to elucidate a number of issues, including the latent conflict between two disparate theories of MNC knowledge sharing, namely "sender-receiver" and "social learning" theories (Noorderhaven & Harzing, 2009). More generally, we develop the term "knowledge contextualization" to highlight the way that firm-specific organizational features pre-define which knowledge is considered to be of special relevance for intra-organizational sharing.

  19. Organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, J.

    1999-12-01

    The following organizational factors are considered with respect to the human factor and operating safety of nuclear power plants: external influences; objectives and strategy; positions and ways of management; allocation of resources; working with human resources; operators' training; coordination of work; knowledge of organization and management; proceduralization of the topic; labour organizing culture; self-improvement system; and communication. (P.A.)

  20. Organizational Tinkering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    The bureaucratic structures in which many clinicians work are often obstacles to effective services. The author suggests that the clinician would benefit the organization and its clients--as well as his own position--if he would learn certain tactics for tinkering with organizational structures, rules, and policies. (Author)

  1. Ethical Competencies and the Organizational Competency ‘Responsible University Social Innovation’: looking at new ways of understanding universities and the competency-based education model in the context of significant social changes in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Villar Olaeta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ethical competencies are included in all competency-based education models and are considered essential for the professional preparation of students, especially in terms of their professional conduct and workplace preparedness. As such, the Tuning Academy, along with incorporating ethical competencies in its group of generic competencies, also considers the organizational competency Responsible University Social Innovation (RUSI as part of its Tuning ALFA II Latin América project. This competency, in the area of organizational character, addresses innovation in the context of social responsibility, which it assumes each university should have, in terms of ethical responsibility toward the members of a community. This concept incorporates the equal relationship between the university’s internal community and civil society. By means of interviews with experts in the areas of service-learning, social responsibility, and ethical civil and professional education from the University of Deusto and the Zerbikas Foundation, this article discusses the connection and implementation of both generic ethical competencies and the RUSI organizational competency in higher education in order to respond to the new challenges to professional training in today’s world, all of which ultimately assumes a change in universities’ understandings of themselves as institutions and the role of higher education in general.

  2. Solutions to Organizational Paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin; Worm, Verner; Peihong, Xie

    Organizations face all kinds of paradoxical problems. There exist various solutions to organizational paradoxes. We develop a typology that lists nine possible logical approaches to understanding the relationship between paradoxical opposites, out of which we identify five types of solutions...... to organizational paradox. Four of the five solutions are explicitly associated with four prominent philosophies. We show the relevance of the five solutions to the real world by applying our scheme to understand different solutions to the generic strategy paradox. Finally, we address the question whether...... there is a superior solution and point out the paradox of paradox resolving, namely, paradoxes cannot be resolved once for all and we have to live with them....

  3. The Organizational Design of Offshoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Larsen, Marcus M.; Pedersen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    consisting of a number of offshored activities. In this special issue introduction paper, we argue that an organizational design perspective on offshoring can benefit research and practice in understanding how firms can coordinate and integrate offshoring activities. Specifically, we argue that offshoring......Offshoring can be defined as the relocation of organizational tasks and services to foreign locations. At the same time as the scale and scope of offshoring have reached unprecedented levels in recent years, firms have increasingly been exposed to the challenges relating to managing an organization...... implies an organizational reconfiguration consisting of three stages: disintegration, relocation and reintegration. We discuss the implications of this perspective and outline a research agenda....

  4. Organizational Ignorance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Ann-Christina

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of strategic uses of ignorance or not-knowing in one of the most secretive industries within the financial sector. The focus of the paper is on the relation between imitation and ignorance within the organizational structure of high-frequency trading (HFT) firms...... and investigate the kinds of imitations that might be produced from structures of not-knowing (i.e. structures intended to divide, obscure and protect knowledge). This point is illustrated through ethnographic studies and interviews within five HFT firms. The data show how a black-box structure of ignorance...... is replicated within the organizational setting of these firms and re-enacted by the traders. Towards the end of the paper the politics of the relationship between imitation and ignorance is discussed....

  5. Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Peregrino de Brito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical and empirical analysis of the relationship between human resource management (HRM and organizational performance. Theoretically, we discuss the importance of HRM for the development of resources and its impact on business performance. Empirically, we evaluated articles published on Brazilian academic journals that addressed such relationships. The results showed a lack of studies conducted at this intersection. From the universe of 2,469 articles, only 16 (0.6% sought to relate HRM and organizational performance. We observed a dominance of isolated HR practices, which does not consider HRM as a system, and of operational performance measures, relative to financial and efficiency variables. Most studies show a positive relationship between HRM practices and performance, in line with the literature. However, we point out some methodological issues, such as the difficulty of isolating the HR practices from its context, the failure to consider the temporality of this relationship, and the comparison between companies from different industries.

  6. Understanding the independent influence of duty and achievement striving when predicting the relationship between conscientiousness and organizational cultural profiles and helping behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Henry; Livne, Ephrat; Marinova, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    The theory that 2 facets of the factor conscientiousness, duty and achievement striving, are related to self- or other-centered motives, is supported in 2 studies. In Study 1 (N = 204 undergraduates), the self-centered facet of achievement striving was found to be the most important predictor of attraction toward organizational cultures that were outcome-based, aggressive, and emphasized rewards. Achievement strivers were less attracted to supportive and decisive organizations. In Study 2 (N = 189 part-time MBA students) the other-centered facet of duty was found to be predictive of helping behaviors. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  7. Combat surgical workload in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom: The definitive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Caryn A; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Gurney, Jennifer M

    2017-07-01

    Relatively few publications exist on surgical workload in the deployed military setting. This study analyzes US military combat surgical workload in Iraq and Afghanistan to gain a more thorough understanding of surgical training gaps and personnel requirements. A retrospective analysis of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry was performed for all Role 2 (R2) and Role 3 (R3) military treatment facilities from January 2001 to May 2016. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes were grouped into 18 categories based on functional surgical skill sets. The 189,167 surgical procedures identified were stratified by role of care, month, and year. Percentiles were calculated for the number of procedures for each skill set. A literature search was performed for publications documenting combat surgical workload during the same period. A total of 23,548 surgical procedures were performed at R2 facilities, while 165,619 surgical procedures were performed at R3 facilities. The most common surgical procedures performed overall were soft tissue (37.5%), orthopedic (13.84%), abdominal (13.01%), and vascular (6.53%). The least common surgical procedures performed overall were cardiac (0.23%), peripheral nervous system (0.53%), and spine (0.34%).Mean surgical workload at any point in time clearly underrepresented those units in highly kinetic areas, at times by an order of magnitude or more. The published literature always demonstrated workloads well in excess of the 50th percentile for the relevant time period. The published literature on combat surgical workload represents the high end of the spectrum of deployed surgical experience. These trends in surgical workload provide vital information that can be used to determine the manpower needs of future conflicts in ever-changing operational tempo environments. Our findings provide surgical types and surgical workload requirements that will be useful in surgical training and

  8. Building blocks for organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Rich

    2014-05-01

    To understand the types of organizational change that will best help them meet strategic goals, hospitals and health systems are: Projecting their quality and savings goals for the coming years and weighing their ability to meet them. Looking for partner organizations that share their culture, goals, and capabilities. Assessing the types of organizational arrangements that will provide the desired benefits. Determining the key components needed to make the arrangement fit their goals and culture.

  9. Management of Organizational Change Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir-Codrin Ionescu; Cristina Bolcaș

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary organizations need to understand the meaning of change and to tackle it as a source for improving processes and activities, aiming at increasing the performance and competitiveness. From this perspective, the paper presents approaches to organizational change and highlights the fundamental objectives which the organizations set for themselves by designing and implementing organizational change programs. The conceptual framework of the change management is defined and the stages o...

  10. Computer Professionals and Their Perceived Workload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Chang Boon Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This research, conducted in the context of computer professionals, examined the effects of workload on three work outcomes – namely, work exhaustion, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Data collected from a questionnaire survey were used to test the relationships proposed in this research. The results showed that (a workload was positively related to work exhaustion, job satisfaction and turnover intention; (b work exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention and negatively related to job satisfaction, and (c job satisfaction was negatively related to turnover intention. The contribution of this research is that it shows how workload affects turnover intention, depending on the mediating effects of work exhaustion and job satisfaction. The paper discussed the implications of results for research and practice.

  11. Automated clustering-based workload characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentakalos, Odysseas I.; Menasce, Daniel A.; Yesha, Yelena

    1996-01-01

    The demands placed on the mass storage systems at various federal agencies and national laboratories are continuously increasing in intensity. This forces system managers to constantly monitor the system, evaluate the demand placed on it, and tune it appropriately using either heuristics based on experience or analytic models. Performance models require an accurate workload characterization. This can be a laborious and time consuming process. It became evident from our experience that a tool is necessary to automate the workload characterization process. This paper presents the design and discusses the implementation of a tool for workload characterization of mass storage systems. The main features of the tool discussed here are: (1)Automatic support for peak-period determination. Histograms of system activity are generated and presented to the user for peak-period determination; (2) Automatic clustering analysis. The data collected from the mass storage system logs is clustered using clustering algorithms and tightness measures to limit the number of generated clusters; (3) Reporting of varied file statistics. The tool computes several statistics on file sizes such as average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, frequency, as well as average transfer time. These statistics are given on a per cluster basis; (4) Portability. The tool can easily be used to characterize the workload in mass storage systems of different vendors. The user needs to specify through a simple log description language how the a specific log should be interpreted. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. Section two presents basic concepts in workload characterization as they apply to mass storage systems. Section three describes clustering algorithms and tightness measures. The following section presents the architecture of the tool. Section five presents some results of workload characterization using the tool.Finally, section six presents some concluding remarks.

  12. Why work? : the contribution of value perceptions and efficacy expectations to organizational commitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.

    2006-01-01

    The dissertation describes a project aimed at an understanding of the way both (congruence between) organizational and individual values and efficacy expectations contribute to organizational commitment.

  13. Organizational Creativity and IT-based Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina M. Olszak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to provide a theoretically and empirically grounded discussion on IT-based organizational creativity support. This study attempts to answer the following questions: (1 what is the issue of organizational creativity and its IT-based support, (2 what is the demand for IT –based organizational creativity support; (3 what are the main determinants and barriers to IT-based organizational creativity support; and (4 what success factors are crucial for IT-based organizational creativity support. This paper presents the analysis results of a survey conducted in 25 selected organizations. The paper provides valuable information on the possibilities of IT applications in organizational creativity support as well as the associated success factors. It makes useful contribution to our better understanding of IT-based organizational creativity support issues.

  14. RELATIONSHIP ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT IN HEALTH INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    SEMERCİOĞLU, M.Serhat; ÇETİN, Derya; PEKSOY, Abdülaziz Ali

    2017-01-01

    Shared   and  learned   values,   norms, believes,  behaviors and  symbols  which are known  as  organization culture;  is  a holistic element   that   describes  organizational   aims and helpsorganization members to understand  organizational   objectives   within and beyond  the  organizational  environment. From this point of view, successfulfirms have to establish an organization which is powerful and  unique in  their  organizational  cultures. One     of    the     critical     factors...

  15. HUBUNGAN PERCEIVED ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT TERHADAP ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR MELALUI ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT PADA BEBERAPA PUSKESMAS DI DKI JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalia Rafsiah Sari Sari

    2015-03-01

    relationship Perceived Organizational Support on Organizational Citizenship Behavior through Organizational Commitment. Keywords: Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Citizenship Behavior,Organizational Commitment

  16. Organizational ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2015-01-01

    that incorporates its subjects into new and everchanging lines of subjectification. This transformation of dispositifs (Deleuze, 1992; Foucault, 1980) and authoritative discourses (Bakhtin, 1982) that compose (and is composed of) a contemporary way of living induces in other words new types of embodied...... organizational knowledge and ways of organizing, which have consequences for how subject positions are (re)configured in everyday corporate lives. Such identity work is rarely studied in local discursive practices of today’s modern and emergent corporations. The aspiration in the present article is to scrutinize...

  17. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking.

  18. Understanding organizational commitment: A meta-analytic examination of the roles of the five-factor model of personality and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Daejeong; Oh, In-Sue; Colbert, Amy E

    2015-09-01

    We examined the relationships between the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality traits and three forms of organizational commitment (affective, normative, and continuance commitment) and their variability across individualistic and collectivistic cultures. Meta-analytic results based on 55 independent samples from 50 studies (N = 18,262) revealed that (a) all FFM traits had positive relationships with affective commitment; (b) all FFM traits had positive relationships with normative commitment; and (c) Emotional Stability, Extraversion, and Openness to Experience had negative relationships with continuance commitment. In particular, Agreeableness was found to be the trait most strongly related to both affective and normative commitment. The results also showed that Agreeableness had stronger relationships with affective and normative commitment in collectivistic cultures than in individualistic cultures. We provide theoretical and practical implications of these findings for personality, job attitudes, and employee selection and retention. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Foundations of organizational moral climate theory : Mapping and analyzing the territory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans Bennink

    2012-01-01

    Why consider moral climate and examine about three hundred contributions to organizational moral climate theory? Moral climate has become a key theme in organizational theory and business ethics. It helps understanding organizational morality and manking organizations morally better. Moral climate

  20. Human and Organizational Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshiett, P.B.S.

    2016-01-01

    The Human and Organizational Factors Approach to Industrial Safety (HOFS) consists of identifying and putting in place conditions which encourage a positive contribution from operators (individually and in a team) with regards to industrial safety. The knowledge offered by the HOFS approach makes it possible better to understand what conditions human activity and to act on the design of occupational situations and the organization, in the aim of creating the conditions for safe work. Efforts made in this area can also lead to an improvement in results in terms of the quality of production or occupational safety (incidence and seriousness rates) (Daniellou, F., et al., 2011). Research on industrial accidents shows that they rarely happen as a result of a single event, but rather emerge from the accumulation of several, often seemingly trivial, malfunctions, misunderstandings, incorrect assumptions and other issues. The nuclear community has established rigorous international safety standards and concepts to ensure the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation (IAEA, 2014). A review of major human induced disasters in a number of countries and in different industries yields insights into several of the human and organizational factors involved in their occurrence. Some of these factors relate to failures in: • Design or technology; • Training; • Decision making; • Communication; • Preparation for the unexpected; • Understanding of organizational interdependencies

  1. Operator strategies under varying conditions of workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnegard, Ruth J.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt was made to operationally define and measure strategic behavior in a complex multiple task environment. The Multi-Attribute Task battery was developed to simulate various aspects of flight and consisted of an auditory communication task, monitoring tasks, a tracking tasks, a resource management task which allowed a wide range of responding patterns, and a scheduling window which allowed operators to predict changes in workload. This battery was validated for its sensitivity to strategic behavior, and baseline measures for each individual task were collected. Twenty-four undergraduate and graduate students then performed the battery for four 64 minute sessions which took place over a period of 2 days. Each subject performed the task battery under four levels of workload, which were presented for equal lengths of time during all four sessions. Results indicated that in general, performance improves as a function of experience with the battery, but that performance decreased as workload level increased. The data also showed that subjects developed strategies for responding to the resource management task which allowed them to manage the high workload levels more efficiently. This particular strategy developed over time but was also associated with errors of complacency. These results are presented along with implications for the aviation field and areas of future research.

  2. Retinopathy of prematurity screening criteria and workload ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Screening guidelines for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) used in high-income countries are not appropriate for middleincome countries, and screening requirements may vary even between units within one city. Objective. To determine optimal ROP screening criteria, and its workload implications, ...

  3. Workload Management Strategies for Online Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Tena B.; Wilkinson, Kelly; Hemby, K. Virginia; McCannon, Melinda; Wiedmaier, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    With increased use of online education, both students and instructors are adapting to the online environment. Online educators must adjust to the change in responsibilities required to teach online, as it is quite intensive during the designing, teaching, and revising stages. The purpose of this study is to examine and update workload management…

  4. Dynamic workload peak detection for slack management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milutinovic, A.; Goossens, Kees; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Kuper, Jan; Kuper, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper an analytical study on dynamism and possibilities on slack exploitation by dynamic power management is presented. We introduce a specific workload decomposition method for work required for (streaming) application processing data tokens (e.g. video frames) with work behaviour patterns

  5. Panel workload assessment in US primary care: accounting for non-face-to-face panel management activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Brian; Tuan, Wen-Jan; White, Jennifer; Schumacher, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of primary care provider (PCP) workload is an important consideration in establishing optimal PCP panel size. However, no widely acceptable measure of PCP workload exists that incorporates the effort involved with both non-face-to-face patient care activities and face-to-face encounters. Accounting for this gap is critical given the increase in non-face-to-face PCP activities that has accompanied electronic health records (EHRs) (eg, electronic messaging). Our goal was to provide a comprehensive assessment of perceived PCP workload, accounting for aspects of both face-to-face and non-face-to-face encounters. Internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatric PCPs completed a self-administered survey about the perceived workload involved with face-to-face and non-face-to-face panel management activities as well as the perceived challenge associated with caring for patients with particular biomedical, demographic, and psychosocial characteristics (n = 185). Survey results were combined with EHR data at the individual patient and PCP service levels to assess PCP panel workload, accounting for face-to-face and non-face-to-face utilization. Of the multiple face-to-face and non-face-to-face activities associated with routine primary care, PCPs considered hospital admissions, obstetric care, hospital discharges, and new patient preventive health visits to be greater workload than non-face-to-face activities such as telephone calls, electronic communication, generating letters, and medication refills. Total workload within PCP panels at the individual patient level varied by overall health status, and the total workload of non-face-to-face panel management activities associated with routine primary care was greater than the total workload associated with face-to-face encounters regardless of health status. We used PCP survey results coupled with EHR data to assess PCP workload associated with both face-to-face as well as non-face-to-face panel management

  6. Organizational Culture and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  7. Toward an organizational cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael J R; Senior, Carl

    2007-11-01

    The research strategy adopted in this article is to connect two different discourses and the ideas, methods, and outputs they contain-these being cognitive neuroscience and organization theory. The main contribution of the article is to present an agenda for the field of organizational cognitive neuroscience. We define what is meant by the term, outline its background, identify why it is important as a new research direction, and then conclude by drawing on Damasio's levels of life regulation as a framework to bind together existing organizational cognitive neuroscience. The article begins by setting the wider debate behind the emergence of organizational cognitive neuroscience by revisiting the nature-nurture debate and uses Pinker to demonstrate that the connection between mind and matter has not been resolved, that new directions are opening up to better understand human nature, and that organizational cognitive neuroscience is one fruitful path forward.

  8. Concepts of organizational behavior applied to occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, L F

    2001-01-01

    People in organizational settings exhibit predictable patterns of behavior. Effective managers understand the psychological underpinnings of group functions. Formal organizational rules and job expectations influence employees. Informal or group dynamics also exert powerful influences. Effective managers try to reduce conflict between organizational and group norms. Informal group cohesion can be harnessed and channeled towards achieving organizational goals and objectives, and informal leaders can be assets to organizational managers. While formal organizational structures can be changed, supervisors should try to accommodate informal group structures when possible. Understanding subordinates is an important skill of successful managers.

  9. DSS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL DIAGNOSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FROWEIN, JC; POSTMA, TJBM

    1992-01-01

    Information technology in relation to organizational diagnosis and organizational change is the subject of extensive and increasing discussion. A condition for change is insight into organizational problems. This paper discusses the relation between the concepts ''problem'', ''decision making'' and

  10. Managing Teacher Workload: Work-Life Balance and Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Sara; Earley, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book is divided into three sections. In the First Section, entitled "Wellbeing and Workload", the authors examine teacher workload and how teachers spend their time. Chapter 1 focuses on what the causes and effects of excessive workload are, especially in relation to wellbeing, stress and, crucially, recruitment and retention?…

  11. Workload based order acceptance in job shop environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Mark; Hans, Elias W.; Olde Weghuis, F.M.; Olde Weghuis, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    In practice, order acceptance and production planning are often functionally separated. As a result, order acceptance decisions are made without considering the actual workload in the production system, or by only regarding the aggregate workload. We investigate the importance of a good workload

  12. Organizational roles and the work and organizational engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borkowska Anna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - The article aims to attempt to define the work and organization engagement of the employees of one of the exclusive hotel spa in Poland. The present paper proposes that organizational roles taken by employees differentiate symptoms of their engagement. The research aims to test the hypothesis and to show the differences at the level of concepts and behaviors. Design/methodology/approach - The following study is an attempt to define the work and organizational engagement of employees of one of the exclusive SPA (sanus per aquam hotels in Poland. The study was conducted using qualitative methods in the form of individual interviews and a group interview. The study described is part of a bigger project implemented in a Hotel. One department within the hotel, the kitchen of the main restaurant, was chosen for analysis. As such, opinions of two managers of various ranks (the Chef and the Deputy Manager of the Hotel and seven persons from the aforementioned department are presented in this paper. Findings - Data analysis allowed us to conclude that organizational roles performed by employees may, in an influential way, shape the level and mental representation of the work and organizational engagement. Our results show that the higher position an employee has in the organizational hierarchy, the better is his/her understanding and the bigger is level of engagement both in work and in the organisation. What’s more, higher organizational role is conducive to mixing these two perspectives, and the lower role makes them clearly separated.

  13. Organizational Commitment through Organizational Socialization Tactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filstad, Cathrine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate how organizational socialization tactics affect newcomers' organizational commitment and learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was conducted using a measurement tool based on Van Maanen and Schein's theory on organizational socialization tactics and Kuvaas' measurement tools of…

  14. Organizational Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Hamid R.; Barko, Christopher D.

    Many organizations today possess substantial quantities of business information but have very little real business knowledge. A recent survey of 450 business executives reported that managerial intuition and instinct are more prevalent than hard facts in driving organizational decisions. To reverse this trend, businesses of all sizes would be well advised to adopt Organizational Data Mining (ODM). ODM is defined as leveraging Data Mining tools and technologies to enhance the decision-making process by transforming data into valuable and actionable knowledge to gain a competitive advantage. ODM has helped many organizations optimize internal resource allocations while better understanding and responding to the needs of their customers. The fundamental aspects of ODM can be categorized into Artificial Intelligence (AI), Information Technology (IT), and Organizational Theory (OT), with OT being the key distinction between ODM and Data Mining. In this chapter, we introduce ODM, explain its unique characteristics, and report on the current status of ODM research. Next we illustrate how several leading organizations have adopted ODM and are benefiting from it. Then we examine the evolution of ODM to the present day and conclude our chapter by contemplating ODM's challenging yet opportunistic future.

  15. Organizational Stress Moderates the Relationship between Mental Health Provider Adaptability and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E.; Dishop, Christopher; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Community mental health providers often operate within stressful work environments and are at high risk for emotional exhaustion, which can negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. This cross-sectional study examines the relationships between organizational stress, provider adaptability, and organizational commitment. Methods Variables were analyzed using moderated multi-level regression in a sample of 311 mental health providers from 49 community mental health programs. Results Stressful organizational climate, characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion, role conflict, and role overload, was negatively related to organizational commitment. Organizational stress moderated the relationship between provider adaptability and organizational commitment, such that those who were more adaptable had greater levels of organizational commitment when organizational stress was low, but were less committed than those who were less adaptable when organizational stress was high. Conclusions In the current study, providers higher in adaptability may perceive their organization as a greater fit when characterized by lower levels of stressfulness; however, highly adaptable providers may also exercise choice that manifests in lower commitment to staying in an overly stressful work environment. Service systems and organizational contexts are becoming increasingly demanding and stressful for direct mental health service providers. Therefore, community mental health organizations should assess and understand their organizational climate and intervene with empirically based organizational strategies when necessary to reduce stressful climates and maintain desirable employees. PMID:27301760

  16. Organizational Stress as Moderator of Relationship Between Mental Health Provider Adaptability and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Dishop, Christopher R; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    Community mental health providers often operate within stressful work environments and are at high risk of emotional exhaustion, which can negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between organizational stress, provider adaptability, and organizational commitment. Variables were analyzed with moderated multilevel regression in a sample of 311 mental health providers from 49 community mental health programs. Stressful organizational climate, characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion, role conflict, and role overload, was negatively related to organizational commitment. Organizational stress moderated the relationship between provider adaptability and organizational commitment, such that those who were more adaptable had greater levels of organizational commitment when organizational stress was low but were less committed than those who were less adaptable when organizational stress was high. Providers higher in adaptability may perceive their organization as a greater fit when the work environment is less stressful; however, highly adaptable providers may also exercise choice that manifests in lower commitment to staying in an overly stressful work environment. Service systems and organizational contexts are becoming increasingly demanding and stressful for direct mental health service providers. Therefore, community mental health organizations should assess and understand their organizational climate and intervene with empirically based organizational strategies when necessary to reduce stressful climates and maintain adaptable employees.

  17. FY17 ASC CSSE L2 Milestone 6018: Power Usage Characteristics of Workloads Running on Trinity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The overall goal of this work was to utilize the Advanced Power Management (APM) capabilities of the ATS-1 Trinity platform to understand the power usage behavior of ASC workloads running on Trinity and gain insight into the potential for utilizing power management techniques on future ASC platforms.

  18. Shift manager workload assessment - A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berntson, K.; Kozak, A.; Malcolm, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    In early 2003, Bruce Power restarted two of its previously laid up units in the Bruce A generating station, Units 3 and 4. However, due to challenges relating to the availability of personnel with active Shift Manager licenses, an alternate shift structure was proposed to ensure the safe operation of the station. This alternate structure resulted in a redistribution of responsibility, and a need to assess the resulting changes in workload. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was contracted to perform a workload assessment based on the new shift structure, and to provide recommendations, if necessary, to ensure Shift Managers had sufficient resources available to perform their required duties. This paper discusses the performance of that assessment, and lessons learned as a result of the work performed during the Restart project. (authors)

  19. Organizational behavior in the new organizational era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, D M

    1997-01-01

    Changes in contemporary firms and their competitive environments translate into a new focus in organizational research. This chapter reviews organizational behavior research reflecting the shift from corporatist organizations to organizing. Key research themes include emerging employment relations, managing the performance paradox, goal setting and self-management, discontinuous information processing, organization learning, organizational change and individual transitions, and the implications of change for work-nonwork relations. Research into organizing is building upon and extending many of the field's traditional concepts. This chapter suggests that some assumptions of organizational behavior research are being superseded by those more responsive to the new organizational era.

  20. Secure Supply Chains : Design Restrictions & Organizational Boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludema, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    An important issue in the design of secure supply chains is the understanding of the relation between supply chains and the organizational responsibility of specific parts of these supply chains. Organizational boundaries change over time by means of vertical and/or horizontal (des)-integration and

  1. Workload, flow, and telepresence during teleoperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, J.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Blair, L.M. [Human Machine Interfaces, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    There is much speculation about the relations among workload, flow, telepresence, and performance during teleoperation, but few data that provide evidence concerning them. This paper presents results an investigation conducted during completion of a pipe cutting task using a teleoperator at ORNL. Results show support for the hypothesis that telepresence is related to expenditure of attentional resources, and some support for the hypothesis that telepresence is related to flow. The discussion examines the results from an attentional resources perspective on teleoperation.

  2. Measurement of Workload: Physics, Psychophysics, and Metaphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopher, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper reviews the results of two experiments in which workload analysis was conducted based upon performance measures, brain evoked potentials and magnitude estimations of subjective load. The three types of measures were jointly applied to the description of the behavior of subjects in a wide battery of experimental tasks. Data analysis shows both instances of association and dissociation between types of measures. A general conceptual framework and methodological guidelines are proposed to account for these findings.

  3. Workload, flow, and telepresence during teleoperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Blair, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    There is much speculation about the relations among workload, flow, telepresence, and performance during teleoperation, but few data that provide evidence concerning them. This paper presents results an investigation conducted during completion of a pipe cutting task using a teleoperator at ORNL. Results show support for the hypothesis that telepresence is related to expenditure of attentional resources, and some support for the hypothesis that telepresence is related to flow. The discussion examines the results from an attentional resources perspective on teleoperation

  4. How a Multidimensional View of Perceived Organizational Support Impacts Self-Efficacy and Task Understanding during Training for Boundary Spanning Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    ...: corporate headquarters, the home office, or the training environment. These dimensions of POS were tested to discover their effect on the self-efficacy and task understanding of individuals training for boundary-spanning tasks...

  5. Assessing organizational performance in intensive care units: a French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, Etienne; Aegerter, Philippe; Dervaux, Benoît; Boumendil, Ariane; Retbi, Aurélia; Jars-Guincestre, Marie Claude; Guidet, Bertrand

    2008-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess and to explain variation of organizational performance in intensive care units (ICUs). This was a prospective multicenter study. The study involved 26 ICUs located in the Paris area, France, participating in a regional database. Data were collected through answers of 1000 ICU personnel to the Culture, Organization, and Management in Intensive Care questionnaire and from the database. Organizational performance was assessed through a composite score related to 5 dimensions: coordination and adaptation to uncertainty, communication, conflict management, organizational change, and organizational learning, Skills developed in relationship with patients and their families. Statistical comparisons between ICUs were performed by analysis of variance with a Scheffé pairwise procedure. A multilevel regression model was used to analyze both individual and structural variables explaining differences of ICU's organizational performance. The organizational performance score differed among ICUs. Some cultural values were negatively correlated with a high level of organizational performance, suggesting improvement potential. Several individual and structural factors were also related to the quality of ICU organization, including absence of burnout, older staff, satisfaction to work, and high workload (P managers to assess the organizational performance of their ICU based on a validated questionnaire. Differences are mainly explained by cultural values and individual well-being factors, introducing new requirements for managing human resources in ICUs.

  6. Predictors of nursing faculty members' organizational commitment in governmental universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Saleh, Mohammad Y N; Abdalkader, Raghed Hussein; Mahadeen, Alia I

    2011-05-01

    It is essential for all university leaders to develop and maintain an effective programme of total quality management in a climate that promotes work satisfaction and employee support. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship of faculty members' organizational commitment to their job satisfaction, perceived organizational support, job autonomy, workload, and pay. A quantitative study, implementing a correlational research design to determine whether relationships existed between organizational commitment and job satisfaction, perceived organizational support, job autonomy, workload and pay. Stepwise linear regression analysis was used to estimate the probability of recorded variables included significant sample characteristics namely, age, experience and other work related attributes. The outcome showed a predictive model of three predictors which were significantly related to faculty members' commitment: job satisfaction, perceived support and age.   Although the findings were positive toward organizational commitment, continued consideration should be given to the fact that faculty members remain committed as the cost associated with leaving is high. A study of this nature increases the compartment in which faculty administrators monitor the work climate, observe and identify factors that may increase or decrease job satisfaction and the work commitment. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. A multidimensional analysis of ethical climate, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and organizational citizenship behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Chen; You, Ching-Sing; Tsai, Ming-Tien

    2012-07-01

    The high turnover of nurses has become a global problem. Several studies have proposed that nurses' perceptions of the ethical climate of their organization are related to higher job satisfaction and organizational commitment and thus lead to higher organizational citizenship behaviors. This study uses hierarchical regression to understand which types of ethical climate, facets of job satisfaction, and the three components of organizational commitment influence different dimensions of organizational citizenship behaviors. Questionnaires were distributed to 450 nurses, and 352 usable questionnaires were returned. The findings of the article suggest that hospitals can increase organizational citizenship behaviors by influencing an organization's ethical climate, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Hospital administrators can foster within organizations, the climate types of caring, law and code and rules climate, satisfaction with coworkers, and affective commitment and normative commitment that increase organizational citizenship behavior, while preventing organizations from developing the type of instrumental climate and continuance commitment that decreases it.

  8. Nurses’ occupational stress in primary health care. Evaluated in connection to organizational social context

    OpenAIRE

    Galdikienė, Nijolė

    2016-01-01

    Stress is one of the most severe occupational risks among nurses working in different health care settings, as well for nurses working in primary health care. Most frequently nurses experience stress when they have a heavy workload, experience conflict with supervisors and staff, or undertake work with high emotional demands. Furthermore, researchers have found potential relationships that exist between stress and the organizational social context (i.e. the organizational culture, organizatio...

  9. The Study of Three Organizational Enigmas; Organizational Economy, Organizational Business and Organizational Skills

    OpenAIRE

    José G. Vargas Hernández; Mohammad Reza Noruzi

    2010-01-01

    Organizational economics makes important contributions to management theory. The focus of structural contingency theory is on the phenomena of the economy significant in organizational management theory and other new paradigms of organizational theories. However, the theory of organizational economics has hardly taken the multiple disciplines of organizational behaviour, strategy and theory, but is aligned with the management theories of psychology, sociology and policy dealing with human mot...

  10. Organizational learning in rare events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyler, Beverly; Beukel, Karin; Andersen, Kristina Vaarst

    In this paper we build a theoretical framework for understanding whether and how firms learn from the rare event of litigating intellectual property cases. We draw on literature on organizational learning from rare events and examine the conditions under which firms can learn from rare events. We...

  11. Measuring Asian nurses' organizational commitment: a critical analysis of the psychometric properties of two organizational commitment instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2013-01-01

    To analyze and compare the psychometric properties and cultural attributes of the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire and the Organizational Commitment Scale to determine their appropriateness for measuring commitment of Asian nurses, the biggest portion of international nurses. The Organizational Commitment Questionnaire was cross-culturally cross-validated when compared with the Organizational Commitment Scale. Both instruments were not tested on Asian nurses. More studies are needed to validate the cultural properties of the Organizational Commitment Scale. Healthcare administrators can use culturally validated instruments, which concern cultural context, including languages and cultural values, to understand Asian nurses' organizational commitment and further lower turnover behavior among them. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Teaching Organizational Culture Using a Projective Technique: Collage Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Saba; Littlefield, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Although the topic of "organizational culture" is an integral part of syllabi across a wide range of core business classes such as Principles of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Human Resource Management, few experiential exercises exist that can enhance student understanding and learning of different layers of organizational culture. In…

  13. Global Leadership and Organizational Change from Past to Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander STELZER

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Organizational theory and organizational research (namely, organizational behavior, have the purpose of organizations – to explain and understand – their origin, their existence and their functioning. Therefore, I try in my work, different approaches to take up. To this end, I chose different books and articles to explain and expand the knowledge on this subject.

  14. An assessment of the impact of organizational culture on employee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding the dynamism of organizational culture and its relationship to employee performance is very crucial to organizational strategic objectives. The primary aim of this paper is to assessthe impact of organizational culture on employee performance. Literature review and library research are adopted to assess how ...

  15. The Bikestuff Simulation: Experiencing the Challenge of Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollag, Keith; Parise, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a 2-hour experiential simulation that helps students understand (a) the challenge of even simple organizational changes, (b) the importance of communication between change agents and organizational members, and (c) the source of resistance to organizational change efforts. Teams of students compete to process the most…

  16. Organizational Blogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerdal-Hjermind, Annette

    analysis, central contextual elements and implications are unfolded and discussed, providing a documented, nuanced and deep insight and understanding into blog usage in a corporate context from the perspective of the employee bloggers. Insights and further understanding about blogging from inside...... and resources, barriers and opportunities, which employees experience when acting as bloggers, as well as when acting on other transparent Web 2.0 mediated communications platforms for corporate purposes....

  17. Management of Organizational Change Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir-Codrin Ionescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary organizations need to understand the meaning of change and to tackle it as a source for improving processes and activities, aiming at increasing the performance and competitiveness. From this perspective, the paper presents approaches to organizational change and highlights the fundamental objectives which the organizations set for themselves by designing and implementing organizational change programs. The conceptual framework of the change management is defined and the stages of the change management process are presented. In the final part of the paper the problem of resistance to change is highlighted by explaining the content of the stages that employees go through in the process of adapting to change within organizations

  18. Organizational learning in rare events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyler, Beverly; Beukel, Karin; Andersen, Kristina Vaarst

    In this paper we build a theoretical framework for understanding whether and how firms learn from the rare event of litigating intellectual property cases. We draw on literature on organizational learning from rare events and examine the conditions under which firms can learn from rare events. We...... find that, when plaintiffs in IP litigation receive quick and clear positive feedback, this helps focus their attention on litigation feedback and motivates them to allocate resources that enhance learning. We explore the moderating effect of case type, finding that organizational learning is most...

  19. Organizational Values and Innovative Organizational Knowledge Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Aparecida Pasquini Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is a source of competitive advantage and is based on the continuous creation of organizational knowledge, which is supported by the individual learning. The individual learning of traditional / comportamentalist and constructivist nature can be understood, by extension, as organizational learning. The knowledge can be innovative if, along with the enabling conditions that characterize it - intention, fluctuation or chaos, autonomy, redundancy and variety of requirements – the process of learning is based on a constructivist nature, the only one capable to generate new learning solutions. The organizational values are beliefs that guide the organizations behavior and constitute motivational goals. This work had as aim to identify the relationship between organizational values and the creation of knowledge. The descriptive exploratory research used the quantitative method. The organizational values appeared in this study mainly associated to the knowledge creation aspects in the internal sphere of the organizations. The orientation towards the external environment appeared less related to the organizational values.

  20. Decision Tree Rating Scales for Workload Estimation: Theme and Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietwille, W. W.; Skipper, J. H.; Rieger, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The modified Cooper-Harper (MCH) scale has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of workload in several different types of aircrew tasks. The MCH scale was examined to determine if certain variations of the scale might provide even greater sensitivity and to determine the reasons for the sensitivity of the scale. The MCH scale and five newly devised scales were studied in two different aircraft simulator experiments in which pilot loading was treated as an independent variable. Results indicate that while one of the new scales may be more sensitive in a given experiment, task dependency is a problem. The MCH scale exhibits consistent sensitivity and remains the scale recommended for general use. The results of the rating scale experiments are presented and the questionnaire results which were directed at obtaining a better understanding of the reasons for the relative sensitivity of the MCH scale and its variations are described.

  1. Fatigue and workload among Danish fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remmen, Line Nørgaard; Herttua, Kimmo; Riss-Jepsen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    . Highest levels of fatigue were observed among fishermen at Danish seiners (mean 10.21), and fatigue scores decreased with more days at sea. However, none of these results were significant. Adjusted analyses showed that physical workload was significantly related to general fatigue (b = 0.20, 95% CI: 0...... was additionally significantly associated to the levels of physical and mental fatigue. Fishermen had a lower average score for all fatigue dimensions compared to those seen in general Danish working population. Prospective studies are required to assess whether the identified associations are causal....

  2. Radionuclide exercise ventriculography and levels of workload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchank, S.

    1982-01-01

    The wealth of useful information made available from the utilization of radionuclide cardiological investigations by non-invasive means is outlined and reasons for investigating results obtained under conditions of increased heart workload are explained. The lack of an accepted protocol for the determination of exercise levels is noted. A format for obtaining increasing heart loads dependent on increasing pulse rate is offered, with justification. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography examinations can be conducted which are simple, reproducible and allow appropriate levels of stress in patients who can benefit from such investigations

  3. The moderating effect of control over work scheduling and overtime on the relationship between workload demands and perceived job risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näswall, Katharina; Burt, Christopher D B; Pearce, Megan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of workload demands on perceived job risk using the Job Demand-Control model as a research framework. The primary objective was to test the hypothesis that employee control over work scheduling and overtime would moderate the relationship between workload demands and perceived job risk. Ninety-six participants working in a variety of industries completed measures of workload demands, and of control over work scheduling and overtime, and a measure of perceived job risk. Workload demands predicted higher perceptions of job risk. However, the results also suggest that control over overtime moderated this relationship, where those with the combination of high workload demands and low control over overtime reported higher levels of perceived risk. The results indicate that the JDC model is applicable to safety research. The results suggest that employee control over workload demands is an important variable to consider in terms of managing workplace safety. The present study also points to important areas for future research to explore in order to further understand the connection between demands and safety.

  4. Organizational Justice Perceptions of Virginia High School Teachers: Relationships to Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William R. Travis

    2012-01-01

    An emergent research base suggests that teacher perceptions of fairness with respect to interactions with school administrators, decision-making processes, and decision outcomes have much to contribute to our understanding of effective schools. This study focused on the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship…

  5. The associations between organizational culture, organizational structure and quality management in European hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Mannion, R.; Hammer, A.; Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; DerSarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To better understand associations between organizational culture (OC), organizational management structure (OS) and quality management in hospitals. Design: A multi-method, multi-level, cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants: As part of the DUQuE project (Deepening

  6. Does organizational culture mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hazana Abdullah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, the relationships among organizational culture, transformational leadership and organizational commitment have been empirically investigated. However, majority of these studies have been focusing on direct effects of either transformational leadership or organizational culture on organizational commitment in large organizations. This approach might not only hinder our understanding on real predictors of organizational commitment but also obscure the presence of spurious relationships. Therefore, this study aims to determine the mediating effect of organizational culture on the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment among small business employees. An explanatory research design was used with cross-sectional survey as data collection technique. Once the composite reliability, construct, and convergent and discriminant validity of the measurement constructs were established, a Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM was run to analyze the structural model and the mediating effect of organizational culture. The results showed that organizational culture mediates the effect of transformational leadership on organizational commitment among small business. This study cautions the generalization of findings obtained from large organizations to be extended to small organizations.

  7. The Study of Three Organizational Enigmas; Organizational Economy, Organizational Business and Organizational Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Vargas Hernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizational economics makes important contributions to management theory. The focus of structural contingency theory is on the phenomena of the economy significant in organizational management theory and other new paradigms of organizational theories. However, the theory of organizational economics has hardly taken the multiple disciplines of organizational behaviour, strategy and theory, but is aligned with the management theories of psychology, sociology and policy dealing with human motivation, induction and enforcement as distinct from the theories of structures, strategies and planning to deal with designs appropriate for a computer on which the will of member compliance is not problematic (Donaldson, 1990. This paper aims at reviewing the organizational economics in detail, its definitions, implications and feature and Elements of organizational economics and also the prescriptive and descriptive organizational economics.

  8. Organizational Behaviour in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Review of: Organizational Behaviour in Construction / Anthony Walker (Wiley-Blackwell,2011 336 pp)......Review of: Organizational Behaviour in Construction / Anthony Walker (Wiley-Blackwell,2011 336 pp)...

  9. Speeding up profiling program's runtime characteristics for workload consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available Workload consolidation is a common method to increase resource utilization of the clusters or data centers while still trying to ensure the performance of the workloads. In order to get the maximum benefit from workload consolidation, the task scheduler has to understand the runtime characteristics of the individual program and schedule the programs with less resource conflict onto the same server. We propose a set of metrics to comprehensively depict the runtime characteristics of programs. The metrics set consists of two types of metrics: resource usage and resource sensitivity. The resource sensitivity refers to the performance degradation caused by insufficient resources. The resource usage of a program is easy to get by common performance analysis tools, but the resource sensitivity can not be obtained directly. The simplest and the most intuitive way to obtain the resource sensitivity of a program is to run the program in an environment with controllable resources and record the performance achieved under all possible resource conditions. However, such a process is very much time consuming when multiple resources are involved and each resource is controlled in fine granularity. In order to obtain the resource sensitivity of a program quickly, we propose a method to speed up the resource sensitivity profiling process. Our method is realized based on two level profiling acceleration strategies. First, taking advantage of the resource usage information, we set up the maximum resource usage of the program as the upper bound of the controlled resource. In this way, the range of controlling resource levels can be narrowed, and the number of experiments can be significantly reduced. Secondly, using a prediction model achieved by interpolation, we can reduce the time spent on profiling even further because the resource sensitivity in most of the resource conditions is obtained by interpolation instead of real program execution. These two profiling

  10. Speeding up profiling program's runtime characteristics for workload consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Qian, Depei; Luan, Zhongzhi; Wei, Guang; Wang, Rui; Yang, Hailong

    2017-01-01

    Workload consolidation is a common method to increase resource utilization of the clusters or data centers while still trying to ensure the performance of the workloads. In order to get the maximum benefit from workload consolidation, the task scheduler has to understand the runtime characteristics of the individual program and schedule the programs with less resource conflict onto the same server. We propose a set of metrics to comprehensively depict the runtime characteristics of programs. The metrics set consists of two types of metrics: resource usage and resource sensitivity. The resource sensitivity refers to the performance degradation caused by insufficient resources. The resource usage of a program is easy to get by common performance analysis tools, but the resource sensitivity can not be obtained directly. The simplest and the most intuitive way to obtain the resource sensitivity of a program is to run the program in an environment with controllable resources and record the performance achieved under all possible resource conditions. However, such a process is very much time consuming when multiple resources are involved and each resource is controlled in fine granularity. In order to obtain the resource sensitivity of a program quickly, we propose a method to speed up the resource sensitivity profiling process. Our method is realized based on two level profiling acceleration strategies. First, taking advantage of the resource usage information, we set up the maximum resource usage of the program as the upper bound of the controlled resource. In this way, the range of controlling resource levels can be narrowed, and the number of experiments can be significantly reduced. Secondly, using a prediction model achieved by interpolation, we can reduce the time spent on profiling even further because the resource sensitivity in most of the resource conditions is obtained by interpolation instead of real program execution. These two profiling acceleration

  11. Approaches to Teaching Organizational Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses fundamental problems in selecting an approach to organizational communications; the purpose of an organizational communication course; the structure and content of organizational communication coursework; and teaching strategies used in the basic course in organizational communication. (RS)

  12. Organizational culture modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Mihaela GHINEA; Constantin BRĂTIANU

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual analysis of organizational culture modeling in the framework of system dynamics. Tom Peters and Robert Waterman demonstrated through their seminal research that organizational culture constitutes one of the most important key success factors in any company trying to achieve excellence in its business. Organizational culture is a strong nonlinear integrator of the organizational intellectual capital acting especially on the emotional knowled...

  13. Organizational culture & employee behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tianya

    2015-01-01

    Organizations are among the key units of the society. During their establishment and development, a specific kind of organizational culture eventually appears. The purpose of organizational culture is to improve solidarity and cohesion, and to stimulate employees' enthusiasm and creativity to improve the organization’s economic efficiency. In addition, organizational culture greatly influences employee behavior. The aim of this study is to find out how organizational culture affects employ...

  14. Organizational injustice: third parties' reactions to mistreatment of employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Moriano, Juan A; Morales, José F

    2013-01-01

    Research on organizational injustice has mainly focused on the victim's perspective. This study attempts to contribute to our understanding of third parties' perspective by empirically testing a model that describes third party reactions to mistreatment of employees. Data were obtained from a sample (N = 334) of Spanish employees from various organizations, nested into 66 work-groups, via a survey regarding their perceptions of organizational mistreatment. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. The proposed model had a limited fit to the data and it was re-specified. Organizational mistreatment, employee performance, and employee organizational commitment explained internal attributions blaming the organization. Moreover, coworkers' organizational identification showed a positive impact on external attributions of responsibility. Lastly, supportive organizational climate and internal attributions accounted for a large percentage of variance in coworkers' perceptions of organizational unfairness. The final model explains the perceptions of injustice on the basis of internal attributions of responsibility in the face of organizational mistreatment of employees.

  15. Örgütsel Demokrasi( Organizational Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar ERKAL COŞAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of democracy that is shaped by contemporary economic, political, social and cultural developments makes us re-consider organizational life. The number of studies on organizational democracy rises exponentially whereby contributions to and complexities for the organization are discussed. In this context, this study begins with a conceptualization of organizational democracy from modern business management perspective, which is followed by respectively; a discussion of previous research on organizational democracy, the causes behind the new departure towards organizational democracy, the contributions to organizations, the complexities and problems faced during practical implementation, and finally a literature review on the ways and means of ensuring organizational democracy. With this study, the following questions will be raised to scholarly discussion; is organizational democracy just an ideal emphasizing the human element and employee satisfaction, or is it a strategy that needs managerial attention for attainment of organizational goals in 21 st century?

  16. Organizational learning in the theory of organizational change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of organizational learning has been presented and placed within the referential frame of the organizational change theory. It appears that organizational changes shows to be a wider concept than organizational learning, since every learning includes change, but every change does not necessarily include learning. Organizational learning presents a particular type of organizational change, one which comprises creation and utilization of knowledge, includes changes of both cognitive structures and behaviors of organizational members, and necessarily is normative by its nature. The referential frame of the theory of organizational change is based on the classification of organizational changes and put together all theories into four perspectives: organizational development, organizational transformation, organizational adaptation and process perspective. It can be concluded that the concept of organizational learning is eclectic one, since it includes all types of organizational changes and encompasses all mentioned perspectives of organizational changes. .

  17. Culture and Organizational Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, N.; Yanow, D.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, theories of organizational learning have taken one of two approaches that share a common characterization of learning but differ in focus. One approach focuses on learning by individuals in organizational contexts; the other, on individual learning as a model for organizational

  18. Patient Safety Incidents and Nursing Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Katya Cuadros; Padilha, Kátia Grillo; Toffoletto, Maria Cecília; Henriquez-Roldán, Carlos; Juan, Monica Andrea Canales

    2017-04-06

    to identify the relationship between the workload of the nursing team and the occurrence of patient safety incidents linked to nursing care in a public hospital in Chile. quantitative, analytical, cross-sectional research through review of medical records. The estimation of workload in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) was performed using the Therapeutic Interventions Scoring System (TISS-28) and for the other services, we used the nurse/patient and nursing assistant/patient ratios. Descriptive univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. For the multivariate analysis we used principal component analysis and Pearson correlation. 879 post-discharge clinical records and the workload of 85 nurses and 157 nursing assistants were analyzed. The overall incident rate was 71.1%. It was found a high positive correlation between variables workload (r = 0.9611 to r = 0.9919) and rate of falls (r = 0.8770). The medication error rates, mechanical containment incidents and self-removal of invasive devices were not correlated with the workload. the workload was high in all units except the intermediate care unit. Only the rate of falls was associated with the workload. identificar a relação entre a carga de trabalho da equipe de enfermagem e a ocorrência de incidentes de segurança dos pacientes ligados aos cuidados de enfermagem de um hospital público no Chile. pesquisa transversal analítica quantitativa através de revisão de prontuários médicos. A estimativa da carga de trabalho em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI) foi realizada utilizando o Índice de Intervenções Terapêuticas-TISS-28 e para os outros serviços, foram utilizados os cocientes enfermeira/paciente e auxiliar de enfermagem/ paciente. Foram feitas análises univariada descritiva e multivariada. Para a análise multivariada utilizou-se análise de componentes principais e correlação de Pearson. foram analisados 879 prontuáriosclínicos de pós-alta e a carga de trabalho de 85 enfermeiros e 157

  19. Work-Based Social Interactions, Perceived Stress, and Workload Incongruence as Antecedents of Athletic Trainer Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFreese, J D; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Burnout is an important psychological health concern for working professionals. Understanding how psychological stress and markers of workload contribute to athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of burnout is highly valuable. Both positive (social support) and negative social interactions should be considered when examining relationships among markers of ATs' health and wellbeing. To examine the potential effects of social interactions on the relationships between (1) burnout and perceived stress and (2) burnout and workload incongruence in ATs. Cross-sectional study. Participating ATs completed a computer-based survey during the fall sports season. Responding participants were ATs randomly sampled from the National Athletic Trainers' Association membership (N = 154; men = 78, women = 76; age = 36.8 ± 9.5 years). Participants completed self-report assessments (Perceived Stress Scale, Social Support Questionnaire, Positive and Negative Social Exchanges, Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey) via a secure e-mail link. Workload incongruence was calculated by subtracting anticipated work hours from actual current work hours (6.0 ± 9.6 hours). We used hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine hypothesized relationships among study variables. Social interactions did not affect the relationships between burnout and perceived stress or workload incongruence at the global or dimensional level. However, perceived stress (β = .47, P workplace interventions.

  20. The impact of organizational stress and burnout on client engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    This article explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices, that impact client engagement (K. M. Broome, P. M. Flynn, D. K. Knight, & D. D. Simpson, 2007). This study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the United States. Work environment measures included counselor perceptions of stress, burnout, and work satisfaction at each program, whereas engagement measures included client ratings of participation, counseling rapport, and treatment satisfaction. Using multiple regression, tests of moderation and mediation revealed that staff stress negatively predicted client participation in treatment. Burnout was related to stress but was not related to participation. Two additional organizational measures--workload and influence--moderated the positive relationship between staff stress and burnout. Implications for drug treatment programs are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TASKILLAN II - Pilot strategies for workload management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Leon D.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1990-01-01

    This study focused on the strategies used by pilots in managing their workload level, and their subsequent task performance. Sixteen licensed pilots flew 42 missions on a helicopter simulation, and were evaluated on their performance of the overall mission, as well as individual tasks. Pilots were divided in four groups, defined by the presence or absence of scheduling control over tasks and the availability of intelligence concerning the type and stage of difficulties imposed during the flight. Results suggest that intelligence supported strategies that yielded significant higher performance levels, while scheduling control seemed to have no impact on performance. Both difficulty type and the stage of difficulty impacted performance significantly, with strongest effects for time stresss and difficulties imposed late in the flight.

  2. Organizational Self-Renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan; Selander, Lisen

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has acknowledged the key role of information systems (IS) in helping build sustainable organizations. Although many organizations have implemented strategies for increased sustainability, empirical evidence for the effects of such strategies is sparse, and the understanding...... of the underlying processes to reach ecoeffectiveness is limited. We draw upon the competing values framework and a longitudinal study of Nordea, a large Nordic bank, to develop a theoretical model that explains the processes through which an organization passes as to successfully institutionalize a sustainable...... from other sustainable initiatives, since they are re-enforcing each other. Third, Green IS initiatives can act as ‘motors’ towards eco-effectiveness, in bridging competing models of organizational effectiveness....

  3. Remuneration, workload, and allocation of time in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.J. van den; Westert, G.P.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de; Zee, J. van der

    2006-01-01

    Background: General Practitioners (GPs) can cope with workload by, among others, spending more hours in patient care or by spending less time per patient. The way GPs are paid might affect the way they cope with workload. From an economical point of view, capitation payment is an incentive to

  4. impact of workload induced stress on the professional effectiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    recommendations were made on how management of organization should tackle the issue of workload. .... lighten workload and increases job satisfaction and work ... contributes to the overall teacher effectiveness. Teachers will also appreciate students feeling and assessment of teachers' performance and try to improve.

  5. [Study on mental workload of teachers in primary schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan-mei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Wang, Mian-zhen; Lan, Ya-jia; Fan, Guang-qin; Feng, Chang

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the distribution characteristics and influencing factors of mental workload of teachers in primary schools. National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) was used to assess the mental workload levels for 397 teachers of primary schools in a city. The mental workload (64.34+10.56) of female teachers was significantly higher than that (61.73+ 9.77) of male teachers (Pteachers was younger than 35 years old, there was a positive correlation between the mental workload and age (r=0.146, Pteachers was older than 35 years old, there was a negative correlation between the mental workload and age (r=-0.190, Pteachers with higher education level felt higher mental workload (unstandardized coefficients B=1.524, standardized coefficients /=0.111, Pday (unstandardized coefficients B =4.659, standardized coefficients/3 =0.223, Pteachers in primary schools is closely related to age, educational level and work hours per day. Work hours per day is an important risk factor for mental workload. Reducing work hours per day (8 hours) is an effective measure of alleviating the mental workload of teachers in primary schools.

  6. Strategic workload management and decision biases in aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Mireille; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty pilots flew three simulated landing approaches under conditions of low, medium, and high workload. Workload conditions were created by varying time pressure and external communications requirements. Our interest was in how the pilots strategically managed or adapted to the increasing workload. We independently assessed the pilot's ranking of the priority of different discrete tasks during the approach and landing. Pilots were found to sacrifice some aspects of primary flight control as workload increased. For discrete tasks, increasing workload increased the amount of time in performing the high priority tasks, decreased the time in performing those of lowest priority, and did not affect duration of performance episodes or optimality of scheduling of tasks of any priority level. Individual differences analysis revealed that high-performing subjects scheduled discrete tasks earlier in the flight and shifted more often between different activities.

  7. Using Psychophysiological Sensors to Assess Mental Workload During Web Browsing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Molina, Angel; Retamal, Cristian; Lira, Hernan

    2018-02-03

    Knowledge of the mental workload induced by a Web page is essential for improving users' browsing experience. However, continuously assessing the mental workload during a browsing task is challenging. To address this issue, this paper leverages the correlation between stimuli and physiological responses, which are measured with high-frequency, non-invasive psychophysiological sensors during very short span windows. An experiment was conducted to identify levels of mental workload through the analysis of pupil dilation measured by an eye-tracking sensor. In addition, a method was developed to classify mental workload by appropriately combining different signals (electrodermal activity (EDA), electrocardiogram, photoplethysmo-graphy (PPG), electroencephalogram (EEG), temperature and pupil dilation) obtained with non-invasive psychophysiological sensors. The results show that the Web browsing task involves four levels of mental workload. Also, by combining all the sensors, the efficiency of the classification reaches 93.7%.

  8. Mentoring and coaching on an organizational level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Professor Paul Marinescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at suggesting a few of the advantages of mentoring and coachibng that could be equally beneficial to employees, managers and organizations. Organizational performance can be increased if people understand the sence of their development in connection to the development competencies that are so necessary to organizational performance. The nuances of coaching and mentoring activities emphasize two professions that, if well dosed, can provide satisfactions to both the individual (employee and the organization. Along with other methods and techniques, coaching and mentoring allow for synchronize actions to be taken in order to achieve organizational development.

  9. Strategic Workload and the Cognitive Management of Advanced Multi-Task Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    automation that aids and supports the human crewmember. To design it requires an expanded view of workload as a strategic task management problem...structures, and schema theories of comprehension. The framework addresses mechanisms of attention, situation awareness, and real-time management of multiple streams of activity....framework for understanding human cognitive processing that builds on active theories of perception, connectionist theories of associative knowledge

  10. Scenario Planning as Organizational Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balarezo, Jose; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper identifies four areas in need of future research to enhance our theoretical understanding of scenario planning, and sets the basis for future empirical examination of its effects on individual and organizational level outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: This paper organizes...... existing contributions on scenario planning within a new consolidating framework that includes antecedents, processes, and outcomes. The proposed framework allows for integration of the extant literature on scenario planning from a wide variety of fields, including strategic management, finance, human...

  11. Organizational Linkages: Understanding the Productivity Paradox,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Research Project, Austin, Tex. WILLIAM C. HOWELL, APA Science Directorate, Washington, D.C. ROBERTA L. KLATZKY, Department of Psychology, Carnegie...nature of their relationships, the Productivity Servosystem model de- veloped by Hershauer and Ruch (1978) attempts to present a norma - tive model that

  12. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE SUCCESSFUL GLOBAL BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Eliyana, Anis

    2009-01-01

    A successful business becomes the goal of each individual who is involved in anorganizational business. The capability of business organization to enter and compete inthe global market is one of those ways often used by businessmen to both maintain andachieve a successful organization. With respect to the said issue, the writer would like toanswer the following subject matter: How to understand the organizational culture inorder to be success in global business? And does the organizational cu...

  13. Investigation of the Relationship between Organizational Trust and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Gülsüm; Pala, Adem; Kumartasli, Mehmet; Günel, Ilker; Duyan, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Organizational trust and organizational commitment are considered as the most important entraining factors for organizational success. The most important factor in the formation of organizational commitment is trust that employees have in their organizations. In this study, the relationship between organizational trust and organizational…

  14. Predicting Organizational Commitment from Organizational Culture in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Cemalettin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe organizational culture and commitment and to predict organizational commitment from organizational culture in Turkish primary schools. Organizational Culture Scale (Ipek "1999") and Organizational Commitment Scale (Balay "2000") were used in the data gathering process. The data were collected from…

  15. A Novel Mathematical Model for Determining Faculty Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Leo R; Millette-Snodgrass, Carol; Atef, Eman

    2016-11-25

    Objective. To develop a mathematical model for determining faculty workload at a college of pharmacy with a team-based learning curriculum. Methods. Using faculty provided data, our model calculated activity and weighted means in teaching, scholarship and service. Subsequently, these data were used to develop departmental and institutional workload models. Results. For the pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences department, percent faculty activity mean values were greatest for service followed by teaching and scholarship. These values in the clinical sciences department were greatest for teaching followed by service and scholarship. Overall, the institutional workload model had the largest maximum faculty activity value for teaching, followed by service and then scholarship. Conclusions. A novel faculty workload model proved to be effective in optimizing faculty workload within a college of pharmacy. Since the workload analysis, the faculty service commitment has been substantially changed, by reducing the number of committees at our institution. This type of workload analysis may particularly benefit colleges of pharmacy that employ a team based learning curriculum, with a large time commitment to teaching.

  16. Modeling Organizational Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, Stephen; Secchi, Davide

    2018-01-01

    inner processes, but as the basis for pursuing organizational matters. To develop a theory of organizational cognition, the current work presents an agent-based simulation model based on the case of how individual perception of scientific value is affected by and affects organizational intelligence...... units' (e.g., research groups', departmental) framing of the notorious impact factor. Results show that organizational cognition cannot be described without an intermediate meso scale - called here social organizing - that both filters and enables the many kinds of socially enabled perception, action......This article offers an alternative perspective on organizational cognition based on e-cognition whereby appeal to systemic cognition replaces the traditional computational model of the mind that is still extremely popular in organizational research. It uses information processing, not to explore...

  17. Fuzzy techniques for subjective workload-score modeling under uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohit; Arndt, Dagmar; Kreuzfeld, Steffi; Thurow, Kerstin; Stoll, Norbert; Stoll, Regina

    2008-12-01

    This paper deals with the development of a computer model to estimate the subjective workload score of individuals by evaluating their heart-rate (HR) signals. The identification of a model to estimate the subjective workload score of individuals under different workload situations is too ambitious a task because different individuals (due to different body conditions, emotional states, age, gender, etc.) show different physiological responses (assessed by evaluating the HR signal) under different workload situations. This is equivalent to saying that the mathematical mappings between physiological parameters and the workload score are uncertain. Our approach to deal with the uncertainties in a workload-modeling problem consists of the following steps: 1) The uncertainties arising due the individual variations in identifying a common model valid for all the individuals are filtered out using a fuzzy filter; 2) stochastic modeling of the uncertainties (provided by the fuzzy filter) use finite-mixture models and utilize this information regarding uncertainties for identifying the structure and initial parameters of a workload model; and 3) finally, the workload model parameters for an individual are identified in an online scenario using machine learning algorithms. The contribution of this paper is to propose, with a mathematical analysis, a fuzzy-based modeling technique that first filters out the uncertainties from the modeling problem, analyzes the uncertainties statistically using finite-mixture modeling, and, finally, utilizes the information about uncertainties for adapting the workload model to an individual's physiological conditions. The approach of this paper, demonstrated with the real-world medical data of 11 subjects, provides a fuzzy-based tool useful for modeling in the presence of uncertainties.

  18. Workload composition of the organic horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, R F; Ribeiro, I A V; Tereso, M J A

    2012-01-01

    This project aimed the characterization of the physical workload of the organic horticulture by determining the frequency of exposure of operators to some activity categories. To do this, an adaptation of the PATH method (Posture, Activities, Tools and Handling) was done to be used in the context of agriculture work. The approach included an evaluation of physical effort demanded to perform the tasks in the work systems from an systematic sampling of work situations from a synchronized monitoring of the heart rate; a characterization of posture repertoire adopted by workers by adapting the OWAS method; an identification of pain body areas using the Corlett diagram; and a subjective evaluation of perceived effort using the RPE Borg scale. The results of the individual assessments were cross correlated and explained from an observation of the work activity. Postural demands were more significant than cardiovascular demands for the studied tasks, and correlated positively with the expressions of bodily discomfort. It is expected that, besides the knowledge obtained of the physical effort demanded by organic horticulture, this project will be useful for the development of new technologies directed to minimize the difficulties of the human work and to raise the work productivity.

  19. Organizational architecture of multinational company

    OpenAIRE

    Vrbová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    The Bachelor's Thesis ,,Organizational architecture of multinational company" sets the target to analyse organizational structures used in multinational companies at present. In the teoretical section is briefly described development of this subject, basic concepts associated with organizational architecture such as globalization, multinational companies and organizational architecture. I also generalized main characteristics of organizational forms and describe their pros and cons. The pract...

  20. The Mediating Effect of Organizational Trust on the Link between the Areas of Work Life and Emotional Exhaustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayhan Karapinar, Pinar; Metin Camgoz, Selin; Tayfur Ekmekci, Ozge

    2016-01-01

    The study tests an integrative model that considers the plausible effects of different areas of work life on emotional exhaustion. It also tests the mediating effect of organizational trust on this relationship. More specifically, while perceived incongruence in six areas of work life (workload, fairness, reward, community, control and value) is…

  1. Organizational Change: Is the United States Air Force Doing it Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    lasting organizational change ? A review of organizational theory research shows that to change an organization, leaders must first understand how an...from several perspectives or frameworks to understand its inner workings. Organizational change theories call for leaders to unfreeze, restructure

  2. An Organizational Structure Game (and BINGO! Is Its Name-O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Joan M.

    2018-01-01

    This article describes an in-class, noncomputerized, bingo game to accompany coverage of the topic of organizational structure. The game allows students to be actively involved in learning, solidify recognition and understanding of organizational structure terminology, apply understanding of organizational structure to an analysis of…

  3. Conducting organizational safety reviews - requirements, methods and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Oedewald, P.; Wahlstroem, B. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Rollenhagen, C. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, (Sweden); Kahlbom, U. [RiskPilot (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Organizational safety reviews are part of the safety management process of power plants. They are typically performed after major reorganizations, significant incidents or according to specified review programs. Organizational reviews can also be a part of a benchmarking between organizations that aims to improve work practices. Thus, they are important instruments in proactive safety management and safety culture. Most methods that have been used for organizational reviews are based more on practical considerations than a sound scientific theory of how various organizational or technical issues influence safety. Review practices and methods also vary considerably. The objective of this research is to promote understanding on approaches used in organizational safety reviews as well as to initiate discussion on criteria and methods of organizational assessment. The research identified a set of issues that need to be taken into account when planning and conducting organizational safety reviews. Examples of the issues are definition of appropriate criteria for evaluation, the expertise needed in the assessment and the organizational motivation for conducting the assessment. The study indicates that organizational safety assessments involve plenty of issues and situations where choices have to be made regarding what is considered valid information and a balance has to be struck between focus on various organizational phenomena. It is very important that these choices are based on a sound theoretical framework and that these choices can later be evaluated together with the assessment findings. The research concludes that at its best, the organizational safety reviews can be utilised as a source of information concerning the changing vulnerabilities and the actual safety performance of the organization. In order to do this, certain basic organizational phenomena and assessment issues have to be acknowledged and considered. The research concludes with recommendations on

  4. Conducting organizational safety reviews - requirements, methods and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.; Oedewald, P.; Wahlstroem, B.; Rollenhagen, C.; Kahlbom, U.

    2008-03-01

    Organizational safety reviews are part of the safety management process of power plants. They are typically performed after major reorganizations, significant incidents or according to specified review programs. Organizational reviews can also be a part of a benchmarking between organizations that aims to improve work practices. Thus, they are important instruments in proactive safety management and safety culture. Most methods that have been used for organizational reviews are based more on practical considerations than a sound scientific theory of how various organizational or technical issues influence safety. Review practices and methods also vary considerably. The objective of this research is to promote understanding on approaches used in organizational safety reviews as well as to initiate discussion on criteria and methods of organizational assessment. The research identified a set of issues that need to be taken into account when planning and conducting organizational safety reviews. Examples of the issues are definition of appropriate criteria for evaluation, the expertise needed in the assessment and the organizational motivation for conducting the assessment. The study indicates that organizational safety assessments involve plenty of issues and situations where choices have to be made regarding what is considered valid information and a balance has to be struck between focus on various organizational phenomena. It is very important that these choices are based on a sound theoretical framework and that these choices can later be evaluated together with the assessment findings. The research concludes that at its best, the organizational safety reviews can be utilised as a source of information concerning the changing vulnerabilities and the actual safety performance of the organization. In order to do this, certain basic organizational phenomena and assessment issues have to be acknowledged and considered. The research concludes with recommendations on

  5. Organizational networks and social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Waldstrøm, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for understanding organizational networks and social capital through the lens of “social capital ownership” as well as the private and collective goods provided through this ownership. More specifically, it argues that ownership of social capital in organizations...... is closely connected to four types of social capital – two belonging to the bridging social capital type, and two belonging to the bonding social capital type. The chapter first reviews literature on organizational social capital and then directly focuses on ownership of social capital in organizations......, as well as the derived benefits, or losses. Next, the chapter presents an empirical case apt to illustrate the theoretical findings in part one, namely the nineteenth-century Danish Cooperative Dairy Movement (Svendsen and Svendsen 2004). It is demonstrated how social capital among Danish peasants...

  6. Diagnosing organizational culture: An empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Jofreh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the behavior of members of an organization is a basic step in understanding the organization's culture. In fact, it is always necessary to consider organization culture when a new action is about to happen. In fact, by leveraging culture, it is getting easier to accomplish other tasks within organization. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to find important factors influencing organizational culture in banking industry. The proposed study uses Denison’s standard questionnaire for diagnosing organizational culture. Cronbach alpha has been calculated as 0.927, which is well about the acceptable limit. The results indicate that dimensions of job involvement (2.961 and organizational mission (2.914 are in better position compared with dimensions of compatibility (2.724 and consistency (2.621. The study proposes a new comprehensive organizational framework, which helps building new strategies.

  7. Aligning Organizational Pathologies and Organizational Resilience Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Morales Allende

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing resilient individuals, organizations and communities is a hot topic in the research agenda in Management, Ecology, Psychology or Engineering. Despite the number of works that focus on resilience is increasing, there is not completely agreed definition of resilience, neither an entirely formal and accepted framework. The cause may be the spread of research among different fields. In this paper, we focus on the study of organizational resilience with the aim of improving the level of resilience in organizations. We review the relation between viable and resilient organizations and their common properties. Based on these common properties, we defend the application of the Viable System Model (VSM to design resilient organizations. We also identify the organizational pathologies defined applying the VSM through resilience indicators. We conclude that an organization with any organizational pathology is not likely to be resilient because it does not fulfill the requirements of viable organizations.

  8. Eye Tracking Metrics for Workload Estimation in Flight Deck Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kyle; Schnell, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Flight decks of the future are being enhanced through improved avionics that adapt to both aircraft and operator state. Eye tracking allows for non-invasive analysis of pilot eye movements, from which a set of metrics can be derived to effectively and reliably characterize workload. This research identifies eye tracking metrics that correlate to aircraft automation conditions, and identifies the correlation of pilot workload to the same automation conditions. Saccade length was used as an indirect index of pilot workload: Pilots in the fully automated condition were observed to have on average, larger saccadic movements in contrast to the guidance and manual flight conditions. The data set itself also provides a general model of human eye movement behavior and so ostensibly visual attention distribution in the cockpit for approach to land tasks with various levels of automation, by means of the same metrics used for workload algorithm development.

  9. Monitoring Workload in Throwing-Dominant Sports: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Georgia M; Gabbett, Tim J; Cole, Michael H; Naughton, Geraldine

    2016-10-01

    The ability to monitor training load accurately in professional sports is proving vital for athlete preparedness and injury prevention. While numerous monitoring techniques have been developed to assess the running demands of many team sports, these methods are not well suited to throwing-dominant sports that are infrequently linked to high running volumes. Therefore, other techniques are required to monitor the differing demands of these sports to ensure athletes are adequately prepared for competition. To investigate the different methodologies used to quantitatively monitor training load in throwing-dominant sports. A systematic review of the methods used to monitor training load in throwing-dominant sports was conducted using variations of terms that described different load-monitoring techniques and different sports. Studies included in this review were published prior to June 2015 and were identified through a systematic search of four electronic databases including Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline and SPORTDiscus. Only full-length peer-reviewed articles investigating workload monitoring in throwing-dominant sports were selected for review. A total of 8098 studies were initially retrieved from the four databases and 7334 results were removed as they were either duplicates, review articles, non-peer-reviewed articles, conference abstracts or articles written in languages other than English. After screening the titles and abstracts of the remaining papers, 28 full-text papers were reviewed, resulting in the identification of 20 articles meeting the inclusion criteria for monitoring workloads in throwing-dominant sports. Reference lists of selected articles were then scanned to identify other potential articles, which yielded one additional article. Ten articles investigated workload monitoring in cricket, while baseball provided eight results, and handball, softball and water polo each contributed one article. Results demonstrated varying techniques

  10. Evaluation of Mental Workload among ICU Ward's Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mohammadi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Various performance obstacles are correlated with nurses' workload, affirms the signifi­cance of nursing work system characteristics. Interventions are recommended based on the results of this study in the work settings of nurses in ICUs.

  11. Is aerobic workload positively related to ambulatory blood pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cardiovascular disease is prevalent among workers with high levels of occupational physical activity. The increased risk may be due to a high relative aerobic workload, possibly leading to increased blood pressure. However, studies investigating the relation between relative aerobic...... workload and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are lacking. The aim was to explore the relationship between objectively measured relative aerobic workload and ABP. METHODS: A total of 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were included after informed consent was obtained. A portable device (Spacelabs 90217......) was mounted for 24-h measurements of ABP, and an Actiheart was mounted for 24-h heart rate measurements to calculate relative aerobic workload as percentage of relative heart rate reserve. A repeated-measure multi-adjusted mixed model was applied for analysis. RESULTS: A fully adjusted mixed model...

  12. Workload-Aware Indexing of Continuously Moving Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzoumas, Kostas; Yiu, Man Lung; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2009-01-01

    The increased deployment of sensors and data communication networks yields data management workloads with update loads that are intense, skewed, and highly bursty. Query loads resulting from location-based services are expected to exhibit similar characteristics. In such environments, index...... indexing and achieves workload-awareness by controlling the underlying index’s filtering quality. QU-Trade safely drops index updates, increasing the overlap in the index when the workload is update-intensive, and it restores the filtering capabilities of the index when the workload becomes query......-intensive. This is done in a non-uniform way in space so that the quality of the index remains high in frequently queried regions, while it deteriorates in frequently updated regions. The adaptation occurs online, without the need for a learning phase. We apply QU-Trade to the R-tree and the TPR-tree, and we offer...

  13. Single-pilot workload management in entry-level jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Researchers from the NASA Ames Flight Cognition Lab and the FAAs Flight Deck Human Factors Research Laboratory at the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) examined task and workload management by single pilots in Very Light Jets (VLJs), also c...

  14. Depot Maintenance: Executed Workload and Maintenance Operations at DOD Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-03

    software. This enclosure provides detailed information about each of the 17 depots on executed workload, personnel, capital investments, process...services’ depots from fiscal year 2012 through 2015, and provides detailed information for each of the 17 depots, on executed workload, personnel...Depot Maintenance: Additional Information Needed to Meet DOD’s Core Capability Reporting Requirements, GAO-13-194 (Washington, D.C.: Feb. 11, 2013

  15. ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Amirullah

    2017-01-01

    Hasil penelitian yang telah dilakukan oleh para peneliti tentang organizational citizenship behavior menunjukkan bahwa perilaku sangat penting bagi efektifitas organisasi. Namun masih sedikit penjelasan teoritis tentang bagaimana perilaku tersebut memberikan kontribusi dalam meningkatkan fungsi organisasi. Nahapiet dan Ghoshal (1998) menyatakan bahwa social capital dari perusahaan merupakan sumber keunggulan organisasi yang sangat vital (organizational advantage). Berdasarkan hasil kajian me...

  16. Routines and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sangyoon; Becker, Markus; Knudsen, Thorbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Routines have been perceived as a source of inertia in the process of organizational change. In this study, we suggest an overlooked, but prevalent, mechanism by which the inertial nature of routines helps, rather than hinders, organizational adaptation. Routine-level inertia plays a hidden role...

  17. Teaching Organizational Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakunas, Boris; Holley, William

    2004-01-01

    Kerr and Zigmond (1986) found that 67 percent of all high school teachers surveyed viewed organizational skills as crucial for student success in school. How can teachers get their students to agree? One way is to teach organizational skills just as they would teach writing or computation skills. Explain and demonstrate what students are to do,…

  18. Physical and mental workloads in professional dance teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Eileen M; Schmidt, Mike; Leslie-Spinks, Jeremy; Fischer, Axel; Groneberg, David A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the level of mental and physical workloads in professional dance teachers depending on the trained students' age, technique level, or dance style. A total number of 133 professional dance pedagogues responded to an online cross-sectional questionnaire survey on self-assessment of physical and mental workloads occurring during dance units. The majority of dance teachers estimated their level of physical and mental workload to be almost as high as that of their students, with differences in physical and mental workloads observed depending on dance style, age of students, and technical level. More than 60% of the teachers were convinced that their occupation implies positive effects on their own health in terms of self-realization (78.2%), musculoskeletal system (66.9%), and social relationships (61.7%). Of all respondents, 58.6% stated that their musculoskeletal system was jeopardized by the physically demanding activity. This is followed by the fear of financial insecurity (50.4%). The majority of all dance teachers (males 65.4%, females 63.9%) would like to obtain further education on prevention against or dealing with physical workload. Physical and mental workloads play an important role in dance teaching. Coping with or preventing these loads could be keys to a lifelong, healthy career as a professional dance teacher. Future trials should look at clinical parameters of physical and mental load.

  19. Hayek and Organizational Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Klein, Peter G.

    We briefly survey Hayek’s work and argue for its increasing relevance for organizational scholars. Hayek’s work inspired aspects of the transaction cost approach to the firm as well as knowledge management and knowledge-based view of the firm. But Hayek is usually seen within organizational schol...... scholarship as a narrow, technical economist. We hope to change that perception here by pointing to his work on rules, evolution, entrepreneurship and other aspects of his wide-ranging oeuvre with substantive implications for organizational theory.......We briefly survey Hayek’s work and argue for its increasing relevance for organizational scholars. Hayek’s work inspired aspects of the transaction cost approach to the firm as well as knowledge management and knowledge-based view of the firm. But Hayek is usually seen within organizational...

  20. Governance and organizational theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Quintero Castellanos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this essay is to propose a way to link the theoretical body that has been weaved around governance and organizational theory. For this, a critical exposition is done about what is the theoretical core of governance, the opportunity areas are identified for the link of this theory with organizational theory. The essay concludes with a proposal for the organizational analysis of administrations in governance. The essay addresses with five sections. The first one is the introduction. In the second one, I present a synthesis of the governance in its current use. In the next one are presented the work lines of the good governance. In the fourth part, I show the organizational and managerial limits in the governance theory. The last part develops the harmonization proposal for the governance and organizational theories.

  1. Organizational Learning with Crowdsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlagwein, Daniel; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Extant organizational learning theory conceptualizes organizational learning as an internal, member-based process, sometimes supported by, yet often independent of, IT. Recently, however, several organizations have begun to involve non-members systematically in their learning by using crowdsourcing......, a form of open innovation enabled by state-of-the-art IT. We examine the phenomenon of IT-enabled organizational learning with crowdsourcing in a longitudinal revelatory case study of one such organization, LEGO (2010-14). We studied the LEGO Cuusoo crowdsourcing platform’s secret test in Japan, its...... widely recognized global launch, and its success in generating top-selling LEGO models. Based on an analysis of how crowdsourcing contributes to the organizational learning at LEGO, we propose the “ambient organizational learning” framework. The framework accommodates both traditional, member...

  2. CYNICISM IN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca S. GRAMA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic features of the labor market outline the perfect background in which organization are constantly dealing with the necessity to implement change in strategy, structure, processes or culture. On this background the factors that can damage the process of organizational change receive more and more attention. Cynicism in organizational change is a possible source of resistance which starts to capture researchers interests. Organizational cynicism research represents a new subject in the specialized literature of Romania. Research on this topic show that organizational cynicism is the result of attitudes made out of beliefs, affects and behavior toward organization. On the basis of the reviews and conceptualization we propose a research agenda of cynicism on organizational change.

  3. Investigating characteristics of organizational culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjar Salajeqe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Studying the behavior of members of a firm is considered as the primary step in understanding the organization's culture. In fact, it is always essential to study organizations’ culture when a new action is about to occur. In fact, by leveraging culture, it is becoming easier to accomplish other tasks within organizations. This paper presents an empirical investigation to determine important factors influencing organizational culture in food industry. The proposed study has adapted a questionnaire based on Denison organizational culture dimensions and distributed it among different groups of employees who worked for one of Iranian food maker in city of Zahedan, Iran. Cronbach alphas for job involvement, consistency, compatibility and mission are 0.786, 0.779, 0.707 and 0.908, respectively. The results indicate that dimensions of job involvement (3.31 and organizational compatibility (3.16 are in better position compared with dimensions of consistency (3.14 and mission (3.11. The study does not find any significance difference between in internal-external focus. In other words, the organization has paid sufficient attention to internal as well as external affairs.

  4. Cross-cultural organizational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Erez, Miriam; Aycan, Zeynep

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews research on cross-cultural organizational behavior (OB). After a brief review of the history of cross-cultural OB, we review research on work motivation, or the factors that energize, direct, and sustain effort across cultures. We next consider the relationship between the individual and the organization, and review research on culture and organizational commitment, psychological contracts, justice, citizenship behavior, and person-environment fit. Thereafter, we consider how individuals manage their interdependence in organizations, and review research on culture and negotiation and disputing, teams, and leadership, followed by research on managing across borders and expatriation. The review shows that developmentally, cross-cultural research in OB is coming of age. Yet we also highlight critical challenges for future research, including moving beyond values to explain cultural differences, attending to levels of analysis issues, incorporating social and organizational context factors into cross-cultural research, taking indigenous perspectives seriously, and moving beyond intracultural comparisons to understand the dynamics of cross-cultural interfaces.

  5. Work conditions, mental workload and patient care quality: a multisource study in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Holland, Stephan; Wedel, Susanne; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload demands are inherent to emergency departments (ED) work systems. Potential effects of ED providers' work on care quality and patient safety have, however, been rarely addressed. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associations of ED staff's workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload with patient care quality outcomes. We applied a mixed-methods design in a two-step procedure. First, we conducted a time-motion study to observe the rate of interruptions and multitasking activities. Second, during 20-day shifts we assessed ED staff's reports on workflow interruptions, multitasking activities and mental workload. Additionally, we assessed two care quality indicators with standardised questionnaires: first, ED patients' evaluations of perceived care quality; second, patient intrahospital transfers evaluated by ward staff. The study was conducted in a medium-sized community ED (16 600 annual visits). ED personnel's workflow was disrupted on average 5.63 times per hour. 30% of time was spent on multitasking activities. During 20 observations days, data were gathered from 76 ED professionals, 239 patients and 205 patient transfers. After aggregating daywise data and controlling for staffing levels, prospective associations revealed significant negative associations between ED personnel's mental workload and patients' perceived quality of care. Conversely, workflow interruptions were positively associated with patient-related information on discharge and overall quality of transfer. Our investigation indicated that ED staff's capability to cope with demanding work conditions was associated with patient care quality. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the complex effects of interruptions and multitasking in the ED environment for creating safe and efficient ED work and care systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  6. Mental workload and motor performance dynamics during practice of reaching movements under various levels of task difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuggi, Isabelle M; Oh, Hyuk; Shewokis, Patricia A; Gentili, Rodolphe J

    2017-09-30

    The assessment of mental workload can inform attentional resource allocation during task performance that is essential for understanding the underlying principles of human cognitive-motor behavior. While many studies have focused on mental workload in relation to human performance, a modest body of work has examined it in a motor practice/learning context without considering individual variability. Thus, this work aimed to examine mental workload by employing the NASA TLX as well as the changes in motor performance resulting from the practice of a novel reaching task. Two groups of participants practiced a reaching task at a high and low nominal difficulty during which a group-level analysis assessed the mental workload, motor performance and motor improvement dynamics. A secondary cluster analysis was also conducted to identify specific individual patterns of cognitive-motor responses. Overall, both group- and cluster-level analyses revealed that: (i) all participants improved their performance throughout motor practice, and (ii) an increase in mental workload was associated with a reduction of the quality of motor performance along with a slower rate of motor improvement. The results are discussed in the context of the optimal challenge point framework and in particular it is proposed that under the experimental conditions employed here, functional task difficulty: (i) would possibly depend on an individuals' information processing capabilities, and (ii) could be indexed by the level of mental workload which, when excessively heightened can decrease the quality of performance and more generally result in delayed motor improvements. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Organizational climate and hospital nurses' caring practices: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Geneviève; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Clarke, Sean P

    2014-06-01

    Organizational climate in healthcare settings influences patient outcomes, but its effect on nursing care delivery remains poorly understood. In this mixed-methods study, nurse surveys (N = 292) were combined with a qualitative case study of 15 direct-care registered nurses (RNs), nursing personnel, and managers. Organizational climate explained 11% of the variation in RNs' reported frequency of caring practices. Qualitative data suggested that caring practices were affected by the interplay of organizational climate dimensions with patients and nurses characteristics. Workload intensity and role ambiguity led RNs to leave many caring practices to practical nurses and assistive personnel. Systemic interventions are needed to improve organizational climate and to support RNs' involvement in a full range of caring practices. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Relationship Between Leadership Styles and Organizational Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bratnicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Empirical research on entrepreneurship in organizations has brought disparate and often contradictory evidence related to the impact of leadership on creativity in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss the impact of different leadership styles on creativity, with the view to formulating an integrated conceptual model that links creative novelty and creative practicality with leadership. Methodology: The author applied the methodology of meta-theoretical review. In accordance with the principles of theoretical bricolage, a new conceptual model was built on the basis of the multidimensional creativity theory and the leadership theory. In her analysis, the author took into account leadership styles that have already been subject to research; each of them was mapped in the two-dimensional space of organizational creativity. Findings: In order to fully understand the reasons for differences in organizational creativity, the drivers of divergences in the space of creative novelty and creative practicality need to be clarified. Greater knowledge about the impact of leadership styles on the structure and configuration of organizational creativity is necessary. In this paper, the author provides a theoretical framework that illustrates manners in which leadership influences organizational creativity. The model clarifies the role that leadership plays in shaping a unique configuration of organizational creativity, and consequently in ensuring the necessary internal adaptation of an organization. Originality: The value of this research lies in the situational interpretation of various leadership styles in the context of their impact on organizational creativity. The analysis goes beyond the conventional discussion about leadership and creativity, focused on establishing whether a given leadership style proves beneficial or not for organizational creativity. The paper identifies particular effects that several key

  9. How Knowledge Management Is Affected by Organizational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudsalehi, Mehdi; Moradkhannejad, Roya; Safari, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Identifying the impact of organizational structure on knowledge management (KM) is the aim of this study, as well as recognizing the importance of each variable indicator in creating, sharing and utility of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: For understanding relationships between the main variables (organizational structure-KM), the…

  10. Knowledge Sharing and Organizational Change in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Jay; Leisyte, Liudvika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Organizational learning in higher education institutions depends upon the ability of managers and academics to maintain a flow of knowledge across the structural boundaries of the university. This paper aims to understand the boundary conditions that foster or impede the flow of knowledge during organizational change at a large public…

  11. Deriving Value from Inter-Organizational Learning Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winkelen, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to develop the understanding of how organizations can derive more value from participating in inter-organizational learning collaborations. Design/methodology/approach: The collaboration is viewed as one "level" within an extended organizational learning system and both feedback processes between levels and the…

  12. Meaning in organizational networks: From social to digital and back

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, C.; Groenewegen, P.; Ferguson, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    In this essay, we argue that understanding of meaning in relation to organizational networks warrants a more prominent place in organizational theorizing, because it fulfils a distinct role in the emergence and evolution of networks. Whereas prior studies have tended to address network structures or

  13. Transforming organizational capabilities in strategizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    -term evolvements within the companies. We develop our framework of understanding organizational capabilities drawing on dynamic capability, relational capability and strategy as practice concepts, appreciating the performative aspects of developing new routines. Our two cases are taken from one author’s Ph...... reallocated over time thereby creating a growing need for new capabilities and transformed knowledge handling routines. IT emerged into an important resource to support more complex routines of product development as well as specific management and HRM processes assisting the transformation...

  14. A Qualitative Study on Organizational Factors Affecting Occupational Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESKANDARI, Davood; JAFARI, Mohammad Javad; MEHRABI, Yadollah; KIAN, Mostafa Pouya; CHARKHAND, Hossein; MIRGHOTBI, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Background: Technical, human, operational and organizational factors have been influencing the sequence of occupational accidents. Among them, organizational factors play a major role in causing occupational accidents. The aim of this research was to understand the Iranian safety experts’ experiences and perception of organizational factors. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in 2015 by using the content analysis technique. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 safety experts working in Iranian universities and industries and analyzed with a conventional qualitative content analysis method using the MAXQDA software. Results: Eleven organizational factors’ sub-themes were identified: management commitment, management participation, employee involvement, communication, blame culture, education and training, job satisfaction, interpersonal relationship, supervision, continuous improvement, and reward system. The participants considered these factors as effective on occupational accidents. Conclusion: The mentioned 11 organizational factors are probably involved in occupational accidents in Iran. Naturally, improving organizational factors can increase the safety performance and reduce occupational accidents. PMID:28435824

  15. Corporate Reputation and the Discipline of Organizational Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remke, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    interests within organizational communication and corporate reputation research that relates to organizational identity and identification and leadership. Arguing an organizational communicative framework explicates theoretical aspects of corporate reputation that more traditional management and business......Corporate reputation and organizational communication research share some points of theoretical and conceptual overlap, even if the term “corporate reputation” is rarely used within organizational communication scholarship. These shared interests align around theoretical and empirical questions...... related to the core corporate reputation concept. This chapter attempts to highlight these overlaps and offers suggestions as to how organizational communication research can contribute to the understanding of corporate reputation. Specifically, the chapter focuses on the noteworthy overlap of empirical...

  16. Organizational Assessment | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-10-28

    Oct 28, 2011 ... We have developed an organizational performance assessment framework, including a guide for self-assessment. ORGANIZATIONAL ... McGill University, and IDRC. This website aims to improve organizational learning by using organizational assessment frameworks, models, and tools for self-reflection.

  17. EEG-based Workload Estimation Across Affective Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eMühl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Workload estimation from electroencephalographic signals (EEG offers a highly sensitive tool to adapt the human-computer interaction to the user state. To create systems that reliably work in the complexity of the real world, a robustness against contextual changes (e.g., mood, has to be achieved. To study the resilience of state-of-the-art EEG-based workload classification against stress we devise a novel experimental protocol, in which we manipulated the affective context (stressful/non-stressful while the participant solved a task with 2 workload levels. We recorded self-ratings, behavior, and physiology from 24 participants to validate the protocol. We test the capability of different, subject-specific workload classifiers using either frequency-domain, time-domain, or both feature varieties to generalize across contexts. We show that the classifiers are able to transfer between affective contexts, though performance suffers independent of the used feature domain. However, cross-context training is a simple and powerful remedy allowing the extraction of features in all studied feature varieties that are more resilient to task-unrelated variations in signal characteristics. Especially for frequency-domain features, across-context training is leading to a performance comparable to within-context training and testing. We discuss the significance of the result for neurophysiology-based workload detection in particular and for the construction of reliable passive brain-computer interfaces in general.

  18. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health.

  19. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Elvira Pires de Pires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health.

  20. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  1. The organizational measurement manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wealleans, David

    2001-01-01

    ... Relationship of process to strategic measurements Summary 37 36Contents 19/10/2000 1:23 pm Page vi vi THE ORGANIZATIONAL MEASUREMENT MANUAL 4 PART 2 ESTABLISHING A PROCESS MEASUREMENT PROGRAMME...

  2. Fluidity, Identity, and Organizationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobusch, Leonhard; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    that the organizationality of a social collective is accomplished through “identity claims”—i.e., speech acts that concern what the social collective is or does—and negotiations on whether or not these claims have been made on the collective's behalf. We empirically examine the case of the hacker collective Anonymous......This paper examines how fluid social collectives, where membership is latent, contested, or unclear, achieve “organizationality”, that is, how they achieve organizational identity and actorhood. Drawing on the “communicative constitution of organizations” perspective, we argue...... and analyze relevant identity claims to investigate two critical episodes in which the organizationality of Anonymous was contested. Our study contributes to organization studies by showing that fluid social collective are able to temporarily reinstate organizational actorhood through the performance...

  3. ORGANIZATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Derenskaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article is aimed at developing a set of recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. Methodology. For the purposes of the current research, the available information sources on the components of project management system are analysed; the essence of “organizational maturity” and the existing models of organizational maturity are studied. The method of systemic and structural analysis, as well as the method of logical generalization, are employed in order to study the existing models of organizational maturity, to describe levels of organizational maturity, and finally to develop a set of methodological recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. The results of the research showed that the core elements of project management system are methodological, organizational, programtechnical, and motivational components. Project management encompasses a wide range of issues connected with organizational structure, project team, communication management, project participants, etc. However, the fundamental basis for developing project management concept within a given enterprise starts with defining its level of organizational maturity. The present paper describes various models of organizational maturity (staged, continuous, petal-shaped and their common types (H. Кеrzner Organizational Maturity Model, Berkeley PM Maturity Model, Organizational Project Management Maturity Model, Portfolio, Program & Project Management Maturity Model. The analysis of available theoretic works showed that the notion “organizational project maturity” refers to the capability of an enterprise to select projects and manage them with the intention of achieving its strategic goals in the most effective way. Importantly, the level of maturity can be improved by means of formalizing the acquired knowledge, regulating project-related activities

  4. Varieties of Organizational Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Louis R.

    1969-01-01

    The viewpoints and findings of the seven empirical studies of organizational conflict contained in this issue are compared and contrasted. A distinction is made between conflict within a stable organization structure and conflict aimed at changing the organization structure. (Author)

  5. Factors Affecting Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Askarany

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an accumulated body of literature on the diffusion of a variety of relatively new strategic management tools in organizations. However, there is scant research on the level of association between the adoption of these techniques and organizational performance. Investigating the diffusion of six proposed strategic management tools of the past few decades through the lens of organizational change theory, we examine the relationship between the adoption of these techniques and organizational performance in both manufacturing and non-manufacturing organizations in New Zealand. The findings suggest a significant association between the diffusion of these relatively new strategic management tools and organizational performance. The findings also show that the adoption of strategic management tools is equally important for both manufacturing and non-manufacturing organizations.

  6. Auditing Organizational Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    parameters; implement, train, measure and benchmark them. And then audit , audit , audit . Today, more than ever, Organizational Security is an essential...their operations to protect them from either incidental or deliberate attack. Internal (or self-) auditing is essential to the hardening process...moving from planning to executing their missions. Auditing Organizational Security Eugene A. Razzetti 49 Defense AT&L: January–February 2017 Defense

  7. ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE: A THEORITICAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    N. Oyku IYIGUN

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the organizational justice, the main tool to shape employees’ attitudes aimed at the manager or organization in a positive way, in theoretical term. First of all, the concept of the organizational justice was introduced and the importance of the organizational justice was explained. Secondly, previous studies about the concept and basic theories to define organizational justice were discussed comprehensively. The dimensions of organizational justice defi...

  8. Organizational change and resistance: An identity perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, S.B.; Thomas, R; Hardy, C.; Courpasson, D.; Vallas, S.

    2016-01-01

    A classic term in popular and scholarly literature on change management is ‘resistance to change’. It understands resistance in terms of opposition to managerial strategies for organizational change. Since change is generally viewed as reasonable and desirable within this literature, resistance to

  9. Sensemaking, Organizational Culture, and Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Debbie S.; Smythe, Mary Jeanette

    2004-01-01

    While EEOC guidelines for managing sexual harassment prescribe a strong sexual harassment policy and aggressive remedial action following complaints, a communication approach suggests a need for a more complex understanding of sexual harassment as diffused throughout an organizational culture. The present case study uses a sensemaking approach to…

  10. Organizational Implicatons of Gossip and Rumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmanfar, Ramona; Johnson, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The challenge in designing organizational interventions lies in making explicit and available what is usually implicit. Accordingly, a contribution to the understanding of complex and implicit practices such as gossip and rumor, the conditions responsible for their origin, as well as the relation they sustain to the outcome of group survival,…

  11. Constructing Organizational Identity on Internal Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Vibeke Thøis

    2016-01-01

    This study explored how coworkers use internal social media (ISM) to contribute to the construction of organizational identity. The study analyzed 3 months of interactions among coworkers at a large Danish bank on ISM. In addition, 17 coworkers were interviewed to provide additional understanding...

  12. Towards an Organizational Economics of Heterogeneous Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    The notion of “capability” has long been influential in management research as an approach to address firm-level heterogeneity and heterogeneity in competitive outcomes. I discuss how recent advances in economics may allow for a more rigorous understanding and measurement of capability that take...... organizational practices into account. However, economists may also learn from work on capabilities in management research....

  13. Nursing workload in a trauma intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Loppi Goulart

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Severely injured patients with multiple and conflicting injuries present themselves to nursing professionals at critical care units faced with care management challenges. The goal of the present study is to evaluate nursing workload and verify the correlation between workload and the APACHE II severity index. It is a descriptive study, conducted in the Trauma Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital. We used the Nursing Activities Score and APACHE II as instruments. The sample comprised 32 patients, of which most were male, young adults, presenting polytrauma, coming from the Reference Emergency Unit, in surgical treatment, and discharged from the ICU. The average obtained on the Nursing Activities Score instrument was 72% during hospitalization periods. The data displayed moderate correlation between workload and patient severity. In other words, the higher the score, the higher the patient’s mortality risk. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22922.

  14. Pilot mental workload: how well do pilots really perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Charles H; Leung, Ying K

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing mental demands on various aspects of aircrew performance. In particular, the robustness of the prioritization and allocation hierarchy of aviate-navigate-communicate was examined, a hierarchy commonly used within the aviation industry. A total of 42 trainee pilots were divided into three workload groups (low, medium, high) to complete a desktop, computer-based exercise that simulated combinations of generic flight deck activities: flight control manipulation, rule-based actions and higher level cognitive processing, in addition to Air Traffic Control instructions that varied in length from one chunk of auditory information to seven chunks. It was found that as mental workload and auditory input increased, participants experienced considerable difficulty in carrying out the primary manipulation task. A similar decline in prioritization was also observed. Moreover, when pilots were under a high mental workload their ability to comprehend more than two chunks of auditory data deteriorated rapidly.

  15. Thermal models of electric machines with dynamic workloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pohlandt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electric powertrains are increasingly used in off-highway machines because of easy controllability and excellent overall efficiency. The main goals are increasing the energy efficiency of the machine and the optimization of the work process. The thermal behaviour of electric machines with dynamic workloads applied to is a key design factor for electric powertrains in off-highway machines. This article introduces a methodology to model the thermal behaviour of electric machines. Using a noncausal modelling approach, an electric powertrain is analysed for dynamic workloads. Cause-effect relationships and reasons for increasing temperature are considered as well as various cooling techniques. The validation of the overall simulation model of the powertrain with measured field data workloads provides convincing results to evaluate numerous applications of electric machines in off-highway machines.

  16. NERSC-6 Workload Analysis and Benchmark Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antypas, Katie; Shalf, John; Wasserman, Harvey

    2008-08-29

    This report describes efforts carried out during early 2008 to determine some of the science drivers for the"NERSC-6" next-generation high-performance computing system acquisition. Although the starting point was existing Greenbooks from DOE and the NERSC User Group, the main contribution of this work is an analysis of the current NERSC computational workload combined with requirements information elicited from key users and other scientists about expected needs in the 2009-2011 timeframe. The NERSC workload is described in terms of science areas, computer codes supporting research within those areas, and description of key algorithms that comprise the codes. This work was carried out in large part to help select a small set of benchmark programs that accurately capture the science and algorithmic characteristics of the workload. The report concludes with a description of the codes selected and some preliminary performance data for them on several important systems.

  17. NASA TLX: software for assessing subjective mental workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Alex; Chintamani, Keshav K; Pandya, Abhilash K; Ellis, R Darin

    2009-02-01

    The NASA Task Load Index (TLX) is a popular technique for measuring subjective mental workload. It relies on a multidimensional construct to derive an overall workload score based on a weighted average of ratings on six subscales: mental demand, physical demand, temporal demand, performance, effort, and frustration level. A program for implementing a computerized version of the NASA TLX is described. The software version assists in simplifying collection, postprocessing, and storage of raw data. The program collects raw data from the subject and calculates the weighted (or unweighted) workload score, which is output to a text file. The program can also be tailored to a specific experiment using a simple input text file, if desired. The program was designed in Visual Studio 2005 and is capable of running on a Pocket PC with Windows CE or on a PC with Windows 2000 or higher. The NASA TLX program is available for free download.

  18. A study on relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalili

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organizational culture and organization commitment. The study uses two questionnaires, one for measuring organizational commitment originally developed by Meyer and Allen (1991 [Meyer, J. P., & Allen, N. J. (1991. A three-component conceptualization of organizational commitment. Human resource management review, 1(1, 61-89.] and the other one for organizational culture developed by Denison and Spreitzer (1991 [Denison, D. R., & Spreitzer, G. M. (1991. Organizational culture and organizational development: A competing values approach. Research in organizational change and development, 5(1, 1-21.]. The study is accomplished among selected full time employees who work for an Iranian bank named Bank Saderat Iran. Using Pearson correlation test as well as linear regression methods, the study has determined that there were some positive and meaningful relationship between all components of organizational commitment and organizational culture.

  19. Organizational learning in higher education institutions: theories, frameworks, and a potential research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dee, Jay; Leisyte, Liudvika; Paulsen, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Organizational learning is a conceptually rich construct that can inform understandings of a wide range of organizational phenomena. The field of higher education, however, lacks a sufficient body of empirical research on organizational learning in colleges and universities. Moreover, the limited

  20. Employee Perceptions of Organizational Learning as Determinants of Affective Commitment in Knowledge Intensive Firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Vijay; Casey, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Despite considerable research on organizational commitment, a clear understanding of the process through which commitment develops has remained elusive. While there has been discussion in the literature about the possible relationship between organizational learning and organizational commitment, this paper develops a theoretical framework to…

  1. Exploring the Political Underbelly of Organizational Learning: Learning during Pay and Performance Management Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort to better understand the political dimensions of organizational learning, this paper aims to examine learning processes in an organizational context--namely renegotiation of pay and performance management arrangements--where the interests of organizational members are threatened. Design/methodology/approach: Data were derived…

  2. The Relationship between Organizational Justice and Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Nastiezaie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: If managers want workers who go beyond expectations, willingly do acts which is not part of the official duties of their job, and generally have high organizational citizenship behavior, They should have fair treatment of employees in the workplace. Thus, this study aimed to examine the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behavior in staffs of Baharan psychiatry hospital in Zahedan. Methods: In this descriptive – correlational study, 65 questionnaires was distributed among staffs of Baharan psychiatry hospital via random sampling. The study instruments consisted of organizational justice questionnaire  (Nieohoff and Moorman,1993 as well as organizational citizenship behavior questionnaire (Podaskoof et al.,1990. In order to analyze the study data, the Spearman correlation coefficient and multiple regression was applied via SPSS Software (ver.17. Results: Staffs’ perception of organizational justice situation was reported relatively favorable, who demonstrated favorable organizational citizenship behavior. A significant positive correlation was detected between organizational justice (and its three dimensions and organizational citizenship behavior. Furthermore, multiple regression results demonstrated that out of three dimensions of organizational justice, distributive and interactional justice can explain and predict the organizational citizenship behavior. Conclusion: The findings of present study revealed that since the positive role of organizational justice was demonstrated organizational citizenship behavior, training courses necessitate to be held in the managers familiarize in regard with the principles of organizational justice human interaction and the way to implement them in the organizations.

  3. Cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiovascular workload and risk factors among cleaners; a cluster randomized worksite intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshøj, Mette; Krustrup, Peter; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Prescott, Eva; Hansen, Åse Marie; Kristiansen, Jesper; Skotte, Jørgen Henrik; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Søgaard, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-08-13

    measured relative workload, in a population with high physical work demands. Previous intervention studies have lacked robust objective measurements of the relative workload and physical work demands. This study will monitor the relative workload and general physical activity before, during after the intervention, and contribute to the understanding of the previously observed opposing effects on cardiovascular health and mortality from occupational and leisure time physical activity. The study is registered as ISRCTN86682076.

  4. Cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiovascular workload and risk factors among cleaners; a cluster randomized worksite intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korshøj Mette

    2012-08-01

    the cardiovascular health, and additionally decrease the objectively measured relative workload, in a population with high physical work demands. Previous intervention studies have lacked robust objective measurements of the relative workload and physical work demands. This study will monitor the relative workload and general physical activity before, during after the intervention, and contribute to the understanding of the previously observed opposing effects on cardiovascular health and mortality from occupational and leisure time physical activity. Trial registration The study is registered as ISRCTN86682076.

  5. Resilience as a moderator of the indirect effects of conflict and workload on job outcomes among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Julie Jean; Bruk-Lee, Valentina

    2017-12-01

    To examine the relative effects of interpersonal conflict and workload on job outcomes (turnover intentions, burnout, injuries) and examine if resilience moderates the indirect effects of conflict and workload on job outcomes via job-related negative effect. There is interest in understanding resilience in the nursing profession. Placing resilience in the context of the Emotion-Centred Model of Occupational Stress (Spector, ) is a novel approach to understanding how resilience ameliorates the negative effects of workplace stressors. This study used a two-wave survey design to collect data from 97 nurses across medical units. Nurses working in the US were recruited in June 2014 using Qualtrics Panels, an online survey platform service that secures participants for research. Nurses were contacted via email at two time points, two weeks apart and provided a link to an online survey. SPSS v. 23 and PROCESS v2.15 were used to analyse regressions and moderated mediation. Interpersonal conflict predicted turnover intentions and burnout; workload predicted injuries. Job-related negative affect mediated the relationships between stressors and job outcomes except for the direct effect of workload on injuries. Low resilience increased the magnitude of the indirect effects of conflict on job outcomes. Job characteristics like workload predicted unique variability in self-reported physical injuries. Conflict at work, a social stressor, predicted well-being and job attitudes. Highly resilient nurses bounced back after experiencing conflict in the workplace. Resilience should be explored for its potential as a method to reduce the negative effects of social stressors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Workload characterization for the space station data communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcik, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    NASA plans to launch a permanent manned space station in the early 1990's. The station will be used to support a wide variety of activities involving Earth and space observation, satellite maintenance, scientific experimentation, and commercial manufacturing. The control and monitoring of many of these activities will require extensive computer and communications system support. In order to identify an appropriate computer and communication system for supporting the space station, an attempt to characterize the space station's data communications subsystem workload is currently underway. Some of the special aspects of the workload characterization problem are discussed in connection with the space station, and some possible approaches are presented.

  7. The effect of varying task difficulty on subjective workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y.-Y.; Wickens, C. D.; Hart, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of different difficulty distribution patterns on subjective workload, and the presence of a primacy/recency effect in subjective ratings are examined. Eight subjects performed the perceptual central processing required for response selection and manual target acquisition for response execution. The reaction time, movement time, and the percent of correct pattern matching and arithmetic equations are analyzed. The data reveal that subjective rating is unaffected by different task difficulty and no primacy/recency effects are observed in subjective ratings. It is concluded that subjective workload reflects the experience of an ongoing integration process.

  8. Positive Organizational Potential, Organizational Commitment and Organizational Citizenship Behaviour: a French/Polish comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Peyrat-Guillard, Dominique; Glińska-Neweś, Aldona

    2010-01-01

    The analyses presented in this paper are based on the first step of the research project concerning the links between Positive Organizational Potential (POP), Organizational Commitment (OC) and Organizational Citizenship Behaviour (OCB). The survey was conducted in two samples and covered French and Polish firms. The results support a model adopted in the analysis and thus the importance of influence of POP, organizational culture and climate on employees’ behaviours and Organizational Develo...

  9. Using the NASA Task Load Index to Assess Workload in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Darren; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) has been expected to decrease health professional workload. The NASA Task Load Index has become an important tool for assessing workload in many domains. However, its application in assessing the impact of an EMR on nurse's workload has remained to be explored. In this paper we report the results of a study of workload and we explore the utility of applying the NASA Task Load Index to assess impact of an EMR at the end of its lifecycle on nurses' workload. It was found that mental and temporal demands were the most responsible for the workload. Further work along these lines is recommended.

  10. Evaluation of mental workload on digital maintenance systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S. L.; Huang, F. H.; Lin, J. C.; Liang, G. F.; Yenn, T. C.; Hsu, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate operators' mental workload dealing with digital maintenance systems in Nuclear Power Plants. First of all, according to the factors affected the mental workload, a questionnaire was designed to evaluate the mental workload of maintenance operators at the second Nuclear Power (NPP) in Taiwan. Then, sixteen maintenance engineers of the Second NPP participated in the questionnaire survey. The results indicated that the mental workload was lower in digital systems than that in analog systems. Finally, a mental workload model based on Neural Network technique was developed to predict the workload of maintenance operators in digital maintenance systems. (authors)

  11. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics.

  12. Organizational Climate Assessment: a Systemic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentero, Piergiorgio; Setti, Ilaria

    A number of studies showed how the set up of an involving and motivating work environment represents a source for organizational competitive advantage: in this view organizational climate (OC) research occupies a preferred position in current I/O psychology. The present study is a review carried out to establish the breadth of the literature on the characteristics of OC assessment considered in a systemic perspective. An organization with a strong climate is a work environment whose members have similar understanding of the norms and practices and share the same expectations. OC should be considered as a sort of emergent entity and, as such, it can be studied only within a systemic perspective because it is linked with some organizational variables, in terms of antecedents (such as the organization's internal structure and its environmental features) and consequences (such as job performance, psychological well-being and withdrawal) of the climate itself. In particular, when employees have a positive view of their organizational environment, consistently with their values and interests, they are more likely to identify their personal goals with those of the organization and, in turn, to invest a greater effort to pursue them: the employees' perception of the organizational environment is positively related to the key outcomes such as job involvement, effort and performance. OC analysis could also be considered as an effective Organizational Development (OD) tool: in particular, the Survey Feedback, that is the return of the OC survey results, could be an effective instrument to assess the efficacy of specific OD programs, such as Team Building, TQM and Gainsharing. The present study is focused on the interest to investigate all possible variables which are potential moderators of the climate - outcome relationship: therefore future researches in the OC field should consider a great variety of organizational variables, considered in terms of antecedents and effects

  13. Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.; Jacobs, R.; Hofmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions

  14. Organizational Disruptions and Triggers for Divergent Sensemaking

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Matthew S.; Thomas, Gail Fann; Stephens, Kimberlie J.

    2015-01-01

    The article of record as published can be found at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/232948814560281 In recent years, scholars and practitioners alike have sought to better understand the emergent communicative processes involved in the implementation of strategic organizational initiatives. In response, this article builds on sensemaking and sensegiving theory to understand the interactions that developed between internal and external stakeholders in response to a post-9/11 change in...

  15. Conceptions of Conflict in Organizational Conflict Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Clegg, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    from a more reflexive approach and advance our understanding of conflict. In this essay, we emphasize how philosophical and political assumptions about conflict frame knowledge production within the field and we encourage future theory development to build on different notions of conflict to become......Diverse and often unacknowledged assumptions underlie organizational conflict research. In this essay, we identify distinct ways of conceptualizing conflict in the theoretical domain of organizational conflict with the aim of setting a new critical agenda for reflexivity in conflict research....... In doing so, we first apply a genealogical approach to study conceptions of conflict, and we find that three distinct and essentially contested conceptions frame studies of conflict at work. Second, we employ two empirical examples of conflict to illustrate how organizational conflict research can benefit...

  16. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes......Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings...

  17. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings......Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...

  18. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...... of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings...

  19. Changing organizational culture to implement organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara-Love, R

    1997-02-01

    With the advent of managed care and the restructuring of hospitals, health care is in a state of transition. In the past, healthcare executives seemed to believe that they were isolated from the changes that were occurring in corporate America. However, the need for change in both organizational culture and performance is here. To successfully navigate the "permanent white water" of health care change, examples from business are needed. These examples include work redesign, restructuring, and behavior modification to promote the changes needed for health care to move forward.

  20. Organizational Learning in Schools under Sanction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara S. Finnigan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus on “school turnaround” has become central to policy and practice in the United States as a result of school accountability, yet little remains known about school improvement under sanction. This study uses theories of organizational learning to understand the processes through which educators search for and adopt reform strategies, as well as the extent to which these schools’ organizational culture and climate are conducive to this type of learning. Our mixed methods study involves document analysis, intensive case studies, and a survey of teachers in schools under sanction in a large urban school district in the USA. We found limited evidence of organizational learning, and instead evidence suggested superficial use of restructuring planning, rare diagnoses of root causes of low performance, and limited engagement in learning processes of school staff. In addition, schools relied on exploitation resulting in the recycling of previous practices. In part, the limited organizational learning in evidence was the result of structures and climates within these low-performing schools that inhibited a more learning-oriented approach to reform. Our study has implications for school improvement under accountability policies as it uncovers important challenges that limit organizational learning and, as a result, school improvement under sanction.

  1. The organizational factor in PSA framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcasiu, Mita, E-mail: mmfarcasiu@yahoo.com; Nitoi, Mirela

    2015-11-15

    The goals of the Man–Machine–Organization system analysis are to develop the suitable studies and techniques to identify, prevent and predict the cause of system unavailability. A descriptive concept of man–machine–organization system was developed. MMOS is defined in probability theory in the attempt to find ways for its qualitative and quantitative quantification in a PSA framework. The need for this study was demonstrated by analysis of variance of the complex system unavailability in relation to human error probability (HEP) and organizational error probability (OMP). The PSA model proposed in this paper assesses the organizational factor in MMOS by observing its influence on the human factor and equipment. Thus the influence of organizational factors is evaluated not only on component but also on the human performance. The study highlights the need to improve the understanding of the influence of organizational factors on the safe operation of nuclear installations. Using MMOS concept in PSA could identify any serious deficiencies of human and equipment performance which can sometime be corrected by improvement of the organizational factor.

  2. TU-EF-BRD-03: Mental Workload and Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, L.

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed research will be used to highlight the main points. Historical, medical physicists have leveraged many areas of applied physics, engineering and biology to improve radiotherapy. Research on quality and safety is another area where physicists can have an impact. The key to further progress is to clearly define what constitutes quality and safety research for those interested in doing such research and the reviewers of that research. Learning Objectives: List several tools of quality and safety with references to peer-reviewed literature. Describe effects of mental workload on performance. Outline research in quality and safety indicators and technique analysis. Understand what quality and safety research needs to be going forward. Understand the links between cooperative group trials and quality and safety research

  3. The organizational dynamics enabling patient portal impacts upon organizational performance and patient health: A qualitative study of Kaiser Permanente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.T. Otte-Trojel (Eva Terese); T.G. Rundall (Thomas); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris); M.E. Reed (Mary E.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patient portals may lead to enhanced disease management, health plan retention, changes in channel utilization, and lower environmental waste. However, despite growing research on patient portals and their effects, our understanding of the organizational dynamics that explain

  4. Organizational change theory: implications for health promotion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batras, Dimitri; Duff, Cameron; Smith, Ben J

    2016-03-01

    Sophisticated understandings of organizational dynamics and processes of organizational change are crucial for the development and success of health promotion initiatives. Theory has a valuable contribution to make in understanding organizational change, for identifying influential factors that should be the focus of change efforts and for selecting the strategies that can be applied to promote change. This article reviews select organizational change models to identify the most pertinent insights for health promotion practitioners. Theoretically derived considerations for practitioners who seek to foster organizational change include the extent to which the initiative is modifiable to fit with the internal context; the amount of time that is allocated to truly institutionalize change; the ability of the agents of change to build short-term success deliberately into their implementation plan; whether or not the shared group experience of action for change is positive or negative and the degree to which agencies that are the intended recipients of change are resourced to focus on internal factors. In reviewing theories of organizational change, the article also addresses strategies for facilitating the adoption of key theoretical insights into the design and implementation of health promotion initiatives in diverse organizational settings. If nothing else, aligning health promotion with organizational change theory promises insights into what it is that health promoters do and the time that it can take to do it effectively. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Faculty Acceptance of a Workload Survey in One Major University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Faculty at a state university were asked how they felt about the workload survey administered on campus and whether the NCHEMS' factors were related to their acceptance of the survey. Results upheld one NCHEMS relationship: that a positive attitude toward a survey is related to perceived value of the data for allocating faculty resources and…

  6. gLite Workload Management System Performance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Svraka, N; Belic, A; Bogojevic, A R

    2006-01-01

    In this paper an introduction to the gLite Grid middleware and one of its most important components, Workload Management System (WMS), responsible for management of user jobs is given.Useful performance metrics of gLite WMS are defined from a Grid application point of view, and preliminary results of performance measurements are presented and briefly analyzed.

  7. Workloads in Australian emergency departments a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyneham, Joy; Cloughessy, Liz; Martin, Valmai

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the current workload of clinical nurses, managers and educators in Australian Emergency Departments according to the classification of the department Additionally the relationship of experienced to inexperienced clinical staff was examined. A descriptive research method utilising a survey distributed to 394 Australian Emergency departments with a 21% response rate. Nursing workloads were calculated and a ratio of nurse to patient was established. The ratios included nurse to patient, management and educators to clinical staff. Additionally the percentage of junior to senior clinical staff was also calculated. Across all categories of emergency departments the mean nurse:patient ratios were 1:15 (am shift), 1:7 (pm shift) and 1:4 (night shift). During this period an average of 17.1% of attendances were admitted to hospital. There were 27 staff members for each manager and 23.3 clinical staff for each educator. The percentage of junior staff rostered ranged from 10% to 38%. Emergency nurses cannot work under such pressure as it may compromise the care given to patients and consequently have a negative effect on the nurse personally. However, emergency nurses are dynamically adjusting to the workload. Such conditions as described in this study could give rise to burnout and attrition of experienced emergency nurses as they cannot resolve the conflict between workload and providing quality nursing care.

  8. Workload of window cleaners using ladders differing in rung separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Looze, M.P. de; Kingma, I.; Reijneveld, K.C.N.; Korte, E.M. de; Grinten, M.P. van der; Dieën, J.H. van

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare energetic workload, perceived exertion, perceived discomfort, safety, and mechanical load at lower limb joints among window cleaners during usage of extension ladders with 30 and 35 cm rung separation. Eleven healthy male professional window cleaners

  9. Effects of life event stress, exercise workload, hardiness and coping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of life event stress, exercise workload, hardiness and coping style on susceptibility to the common cold. GA Struwig, M Papaikonomou, P Kruger. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and DanceVol. 12(4) 2006: pp. 369-383. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ...

  10. Perceived Time as a Measure of Mental Workload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Holmegaard, Kristin Due

    2013-01-01

    workload has multiple dimensions of which the perceived time ratio has mainly been linked to the task-related dimension. In this study, we investigate how the perceived time ratio is affected by time constraints, which make time an explicit concern in the execution of tasks, and task success, which...

  11. Objective methods for developing indices of pilot workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of objective methodologies that either have been or have the potential of being applied to the general problem of the measurement of pilot workload as it occurs on relatively short missions or mission phases. Se...

  12. HIV infection, tuberculosis and workload in a general paediatric ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To describe the impact of HIV infection and tuberculosis on the workload of a general paediatric ward at Red Cross War ... Tuberculosis. Any child who had been started on anti-TB medication was regarded as having TB. Children on isoniazid prophylaxis were not included. HIV-TB co-infection ..... King LA, McInerney PA.

  13. Reasons for adopting technological innovations reducing physical workload in bricklaying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.M. de; Vink, P.; Kroon, J.C.A. de

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the adoption of technological innovations to improve the work of bricklayers and bricklayers' assistants is evaluated. Two studies were performed among 323 subjects to determine the adoption of the working methods, the perceived workload, experiences with the working methods, and the

  14. Review of eye-related measures of drivers’ mental workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquart, Gerhard; Cabrall, C.D.D.; de Winter, J.C.F.; Ahram, Tareq; Karwowski, Waldemar; Schmorrow, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of mental workload could be helpful to road safety especially if developments of vehicle automation will increasingly place drivers into roles of supervisory control. With the rapidly decreasing size and increasing resolution of cameras as well as exponential computational power

  15. Development of a nursing workload measurement instrument in burn care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E.; Leeman, J.; Middelkoop, E.

    2009-01-01

    Existing workload measurement instruments fail to represent specific nursing activities in a setting where patients are characterized by a diversity of cause, location, extent and depth of burns, of age and of history. They also do not include educational levels and appropriate time standards. The

  16. Estimation of the workload correlation in a Markov fluid queue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaynar, B.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers a Markov fluid queue, focusing on the correlation function of the stationary workload process. A simulation-based computation technique is proposed, which relies on a coupling idea. Then an upper bound on the variance of the resulting estimator is given, which reveals how the

  17. Filter bank common spatial patterns in mental workload estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvaneh, Mahnaz; Umilta, Alberto; Robertson, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    EEG-based workload estimation technology provides a real time means of assessing mental workload. Such technology can effectively enhance the performance of the human-machine interaction and the learning process. When designing workload estimation algorithms, a crucial signal processing component is the feature extraction step. Despite several studies on this field, the spatial properties of the EEG signals were mostly neglected. Since EEG inherently has a poor spacial resolution, features extracted individually from each EEG channel may not be sufficiently efficient. This problem becomes more pronounced when we use low-cost but convenient EEG sensors with limited stability which is the case in practical scenarios. To address this issue, in this paper, we introduce a filter bank common spatial patterns algorithm combined with a feature selection method to extract spatio-spectral features discriminating different mental workload levels. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, we carry out a comparative analysis between two representative types of working memory tasks using data recorded from an Emotiv EPOC headset which is a mobile low-cost EEG recording device. The experimental results showed that the proposed spatial filtering algorithm outperformed the state-of-the algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy.

  18. HIV infection, tuberculosis and workload in a general paediatric ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. To describe the impact of HIV infection and tuberculosis on the workload of a general paediatric ward at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in 2007. Methods. Prospective descriptive surveillance of the patient composition of a general paediatric ward over a 1-year period. Results. Median bed occupancy was ...

  19. Towards resource disaggregation - Memory scavenging for scientific workloads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uta, Alexandru; Oprescu, Ana Maria; Kielmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Compute clusters, consisting of many, uniformly built nodes, are used to run a large spectrum of different workloads, like tightly coupled (MPI) jobs, MapReduce, or graph-processing data-analytics applications, each of which with their own resource requirements. Many studies consistently highlight

  20. A participatory ergonomics approach to reduce mental and physical workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Peeters, M.; Grundemann, R.W.M.; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Dul, J.

    1995-01-01

    A step-by-step approach to better work, aimed at reducing mental and physical workload in office work, is evaluated. This approach is based on a strong commitment of the management in the enterprise, and on as much direct worker participation as possible. After every step the workers proposed how to

  1. Workload Indicators Of Staffing Need Method in determining optimal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... available working hours, category and individual allowances, annual workloads from the previous year\\'s statistics and optimal departmental establishment of workers. Results: There was initial resentment to the exercise because of the notion that it was aimed at retrenching workers. The team was given autonomy by the ...

  2. The effect of inclement weather on trauma orthopaedic workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Climate change models predict increasing frequency of extreme weather. One of the challenges hospitals face is how to make sure they have adequate staffing at various times of the year. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of this severe inclement weather on hospital admissions, operative workload and cost in the Irish setting. We hypothesised that there is a direct relationship between cold weather and workload in a regional orthopaedic trauma unit. METHODS: Trauma orthopaedic workload in a regional trauma unit was examined over 2 months between December 2009 and January 2010. This corresponded with a period of severe inclement weather. RESULTS: We identified a direct correlation between the drop in temperature and increase in workload, with a corresponding increase in demand on resources. CONCLUSIONS: Significant cost savings could be made if these injuries were prevented. While the information contained in this study is important in the context of resource planning and staffing of hospital trauma units, it also highlights the vulnerability of the Irish population to wintery weather.

  3. Measuring Workload Weak Resilience Signals at a Rail Control Post

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, A.W.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    OCCUPATIONAL APPLICATIONS This article describes an observational study at a rail control post to measure workload weak resilience signals. A weak resilience signal indicates a possible degradation of a system's resilience, which is defined as the ability of a complex socio-technical system to cope

  4. Comparison of physical workload in four Gari -frying working ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All physical labour requires physical exertion which indicates the level of physical workload involved. This paper examines the energy expenditure in four working postures of gari-frying (garification) workers in southwestern Nigeria. The postures include sitting-beside (SB), sitting-in-front (SF), ...

  5. Nonparametric inference from the M/G/1 workload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted; Pitts, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Consider an M/G/1 queue with unknown service-time distribution and unknown traffic intensity ρ. Given systematically sampled observations of the workload, we construct estimators of ρ and of the service-time distribution function, and we study asymptotoic properties of these estimators....

  6. The Effect of Perceiving a Calling on Pakistani Nurses' Organizational Commitment, Organizational Citizenship Behavior, and Job Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Bilal; Shahjehan, Asad; Cheema, Sadia; Javed, Farheen

    2018-03-01

    People differ considerably in the way in which they express and experience their nursing careers. The positive effects associated with having a calling may differ substantially based on individuals' abilities to live out their callings. In a working world where many individuals have little to no choice in their type of employment and thus are unable to live out a calling even if they have one, the current study examined how perceiving a calling and living a calling interacted to predict organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and job stress with career commitment mediating the effect of the interactions on the three outcome variables. The purpose of the study is to investigate the mediating effect of career commitment between the relationships of calling and (a) nurses' attitudes (organizational commitment), (b) behaviors (organizational citizenship behavior), and (c) subjective experiences regarding work (job stress). Using a descriptive exploratory design, data were collected from 332 registered nurses working in Pakistani hospitals. Descriptive analysis and hierarchical regression analysis were used for data analysis. Living a calling moderated the effect of calling on career commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and job stress, and career commitment fully mediated the effect of calling on organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and job stress. Increasing the understanding of calling, living a calling, and career commitment may increase nurses' organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior and decrease job stress. The study provided evidence to help nursing managers and health policy makers integrate knowledge and skills related to calling into career interventions and help nurses discover their calling.

  7. Organizational Communication and Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    is a possible framework to draw the two disciplines together in, because it is a theory about the relation between the social and the media it is based on. First the paper sum up the Luhmann inspired theory about organizations, fleshing out how organizations are thought to communicate in and about media and how......  The paper reflects an interest in the relation between organizational communication and media. It tries to answer the question, how we can observe the relationship between organizational communication and media. It is a work-in-progress which tries to combine organizational studies inspired...... of Niklas Luhmann (Tække & Paulsen 2008, Tække 2008a) with analysis of how organizations communicate in and about media. Using systems theory and form theory, it puts forward a theoretical framework and a strategy for analysing organisational communication in and about media. The medium aspect is inspired...

  8. Organizational Remembering as Narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musacchio Adorisio, Anna Linda

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on organizational remembering in banking. To provide an alternative to the repository image of memory in organization, organizational remembering is conceptualized as narrative, where narrative represents a way to organize the selection and interpretation of the past....... The narrative perspective deals with both the experiential and contextual nature of remembering by addressing concerns raised by critiques of organizational memory studies, namely, the subjective experience of remembering and the social and historical context in which remembering takes place. Antenarrative...... and microhistory methods are employed to discuss narrative fragments of remembering that deviate from consolidated narratives and indicate normal exceptions and an ‘ante’ state of affairs. Based on the study of narrative fragments of remembering in two different banking contexts, the article illustrates how...

  9. Creating organizational cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Just, Sine Nørholm; Gabrielsen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural...... is provided of the merits of this approach by revisiting the case of Enron. Originality/value – The paper constitutes an initial exploration of how social scientific and rhetorical perspectives on organizational change may be brought closer together. It may provide the first step towards the development...

  10. A study on relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khalili

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organizational culture and organization commitment. The study uses two questionnaires, one for measuring organizational commitment originally developed by Meyer and Allen (1991) [Meyer, J. P., & Allen, N. J. (1991). A three-component conceptualization of organizational commitment. Human resource management review, 1(1), 61-89.] and the other one for organizational culture developed by Denison and Spreitzer (1991)...

  11. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Anthropologists have studied organizations since the 1930s. In the 1980s, anthropologists' concepts of culture were instrumentalized by nonanthropologists to promote ‘organizational culture’ as a management tool. In subsequent decades, concern shifted to welding employees from different ‘national...... cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  12. Anticipating Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    This study reports on the extended time period prior to the introduction of the largest ever Health IT implementation in Denmark – Sundhedsplatformen. The focus of the dissertation is on organizational implications of introducing new technology and more specifically the anticipation of organizati......This study reports on the extended time period prior to the introduction of the largest ever Health IT implementation in Denmark – Sundhedsplatformen. The focus of the dissertation is on organizational implications of introducing new technology and more specifically the anticipation...

  13. Corruption and Organizational Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Corruption research is cross-disciplinary and focuses on the violation of rules and norms for individual or organizational benefit and at the cost of wider publics, as epitomized by corporate payment of illegal bribes to public officials with the goal of gaining a contract. Corruption research......, and societal levels, as well as how corruption is and can be responded to through public scandals and more elaborate communicative strategies of corruption control, or anti-corruption. A focus on corruption and corruption control provides organizational communication scholars with entry points to explore...

  14. The Effect of Stages and Levels of Automation and Reliability on Workload and Performance for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    reduced below 70%, the automation was still helpful in aiding the operator. Thus, the reliability threshold for which it begins to harm the workload...attempting to understand the lyrics . We can accomplish any number of tasks at once as long as the combined information from 22 those tasks do not...automation becomes harmful may be difficult without any previous data gathered about the automation to know when or how it fails. Research Goals This

  15. Organizational coherence in health care organizations: conceptual guidance to facilitate quality improvement and organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Terris, Darcey; Hardacre, Jeanne; Spurgeon, Peter; Brown, Claire; Baumgart, Andre; Nyström, Monica E

    2014-01-01

    We sought to improve our understanding of how health care quality improvement (QI) methods and innovations could be efficiently and effectively translated between settings to reduce persistent gaps in health care quality both within and across countries. We aimed to examine whether we could identify a core set of organizational cultural attributes, independent of context and setting, which might be associated with success in implementing and sustaining QI systems in health care organizations. We convened an international group of investigators to explore the issues of organizational culture and QI in different health care contexts and settings. This group met in person 3 times and held a series of conference calls to discuss emerging ideas over 2 years. Investigators also conducted pilot studies in their home countries to examine the applicability of our conceptual model. We suggest that organizational coherence may be a critical element of QI efforts in health care organizations and propose that there are 3 key components of organizational coherence: (1) people, (2) processes, and (3) perspectives. Our work suggests that the concept of organizational coherence embraces both culture and context and can thus help guide both researchers and practitioners in efforts to enhance health care QI efforts, regardless of organizational type, location, or context.

  16. Designing workload analysis questionnaire to evaluate needs of employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Rahmaniyah Dwi; Navi, Muhammad Abdu Haq

    2018-02-01

    Incompatibility between workload with work capacity is one of main problem to make optimal result. In case at the office, there are constraints to determine workload because of non-repetitive works. Employees do work based on the targets set in a working period. At the end of the period is usually performed an evaluation of employees performance to evaluate needs of employees. The aims of this study to design a workload questionnaire tools to evaluate the efficiency level of position as indicator to determine needs of employees based on the Indonesian State Employment Agency Regulation on workload analysis. This research is applied to State-Owned Enterprise PT. X by determining 3 positions as a pilot project. Position A is held by 2 employees, position B is held by 7 employees, and position C is held by 6 employees. From the calculation result, position A has an efficiency level of 1,33 or "very good", position B has an efficiency level of 1.71 or "enough", and position C has an efficiency level of 1.03 or "very good". The application of this tools giving suggestion the needs of employees of position A is 3 people, position B is 5 people, and position C is 6 people. The difference between the number of employees and the calculation result is then analyzed by interviewing the employees to get more data about personal perception. It can be concluded that this workload evaluation tools can be used as an alternative solution to evaluate needs of employees in office.

  17. Benchmarking transaction and analytical processing systems the creation of a mixed workload benchmark and its application

    CERN Document Server

    Bog, Anja

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces a new benchmark for hybrid database systems, gauging the effect of adding OLAP to an OLTP workload and analyzing the impact of commonly used optimizations in historically separate OLTP and OLAP domains in mixed-workload scenarios.

  18. Does Organizational Forgetting Matter? Organizational Survival for Life Coaching Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Erhan; Gormus, Alparslan Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this paper are to determine the role of organizational forgetting in different type of coaching companies and to determine organizational survival based on both knowledge structure of coaching companies and organizational forgetting with core features of organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Within the context of…

  19. Organizational Justice As a Predictor of Organizational Silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Çetin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, relation between teachers' perception for organizational justice and their organizational silence was examined. Sample of this study consists of 300 teachers who work at elementary schools in Siirt. Relational Scanning model was utilized in performance of this study. In this study, Organizational Justice Scale and Organizational…

  20. Organizational Citizenship and Organizational Justice in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kursad; Tasdan, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine primary school teachers' perceptions regarding organizational citizenship and organizational justice. The study also aims to determine whether such perceptions vary depending on the variables of gender, field of study and seniority, and whether organizational citizenship behaviors and…

  1. Organizational theory for dissemination and implementation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Bunger, Alicia C; Powell, Byron J; Turner, Kea; Clary, Alecia S; Klaman, Stacey L; Yu, Yan; Whitaker, Daniel J; Self, Shannon R; Rostad, Whitney L; Chatham, Jenelle R Shanley; Kirk, M Alexis; Shea, Christopher M; Haines, Emily; Weiner, Bryan J

    2017-05-12

    Even under optimal internal organizational conditions, implementation can be undermined by changes in organizations' external environments, such as fluctuations in funding, adjustments in contracting practices, new technology, new legislation, changes in clinical practice guidelines and recommendations, or other environmental shifts. Internal organizational conditions are increasingly reflected in implementation frameworks, but nuanced explanations of how organizations' external environments influence implementation success are lacking in implementation research. Organizational theories offer implementation researchers a host of existing, highly relevant, and heretofore largely untapped explanations of the complex interaction between organizations and their environment. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of organizational theories for implementation research. We applied four well-known organizational theories (institutional theory, transaction cost economics, contingency theories, and resource dependency theory) to published descriptions of efforts to implement SafeCare, an evidence-based practice for preventing child abuse and neglect. Transaction cost economics theory explained how frequent, uncertain processes for contracting for SafeCare may have generated inefficiencies and thus compromised implementation among private child welfare organizations. Institutional theory explained how child welfare systems may have been motivated to implement SafeCare because doing so aligned with expectations of key stakeholders within child welfare systems' professional communities. Contingency theories explained how efforts such as interagency collaborative teams promoted SafeCare implementation by facilitating adaptation to child welfare agencies' internal and external contexts. Resource dependency theory (RDT) explained how interagency relationships, supported by contracts, memoranda of understanding, and negotiations, facilitated SafeCare implementation by balancing

  2. ORGANIZATIONAL CAPITAL IN ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill G. Skripkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new approach to the description of organizational capital in enterprise architecture. This approach is focused on internal consistency of organizational mechanisms and their fit to the requirements of technologies in use and key employees. The description rests on Henry Mintzberg organizational design theory. The value of this description is demonstrated for the case of influence of Ministry of Education and Science policy on the organizational capital of the Russian university.

  3. A study on the effect of organizational justice on organizational citizenship and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghafourian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of organizational justice on organizational citizenship and organizational commitment in Iran. The proposed study designs a questionnaire and distributes it among some employees of Islamic Azad University and, using structural equation modeling, we investigate the effect of organizational justice on organizational citizenship as well as organizational commitment. The study selects 142 people from 255 regular employees who work for the university and distributes the questionnaire designed in Likert scale. Cronbach alphas have been determined for organizational citizenship, organizational justice and commitment as 0.924, 0.94 and 0.73, which are well above the minimum acceptable level. The results indicate that procedural justice has the most effect on organizational commitment followed by interactive justice and distributive justice. In addition, obedience has the most influential effect followed by loyalty, partnership, innovation and behavior. Finally, the survey shows that organizational citizenship is influenced mostly by loyalty and partnership. In summary, the effect of organizational justice on organizational citizenship and organizational commitment has been confirmed.

  4. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding of the o......Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...... of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings...

  5. The Impact of Organizational Learning on Innovativeness in Spanish Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo González Del Campo, Jesús David Sánchez; Škerlavaj, Miha

    Innovativeness is a key factor regarding the survival and progress of a company in modern business environments. The question is how to facilitate innovativeness in organizations. This article studies the impact of the organizational learning process on innovativeness. We understand innovativeness as a combination of (1) innovative culture and (2) technological and process innovation. Organizational learning is a consecutive process of (1) information acquisition, (2) information distribution, (3) information interpretation, and (4) behavioral and cognitive changes. New knowledge obtained through organizational learning improves innovativeness. As a methodological framework, we use the partial least square (PLS) approach to structural equation modeling on data from 107 Spanish companies. The results show that organizational learning has a strong positive direct impact on process, product, and service innovations. In addition, the impact of organizational learning on innovation is also indirect, via innovative culture.

  6. ORGANIZATIONAL RISK COMMUNICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ris communication tools in organizations differs in several ways from many of tools and techniques developed for public meetings. The traditional view of risk communication seeks to manage the public outrage ssociated with site-based issues. Organizational risk communication seek...

  7. Accounting for Organizational Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    2013-01-01

    institutional logics to account for their creation of three different organizational innovations. While the concept of ‘institutional logic’ helped exploring the legitimizing social meanings embedded in the national reform and locally, the concept of ‘translation’ from actor-network theory shed light...

  8. Interdependence Among Organizational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    The interrelationship between a set of organizational variables was investigated at 14 work organizations within a company. The variables were production, quality, costs, job satisfaction of operatives, job satisfaction of supervisors, work anxiety, accidents, absence, labor turnover, and industrial unrest. (Author)

  9. Organizational Learning and Unlearning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to summarize four decades of research into organizational adaptation, learning and unlearning. Design/methodology/approach: The most important contributions to this stream of research have been case studies of organizations struggling to survive serious crises. Findings: Very diverse kinds of organizations run into serious…

  10. Organizational Learning: Leading Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Vivienne; Cook, Tanya Fedoruk

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the interplay among the environment, learning, leaders, and innovations in school systems. Six conditions that, together, have potential to shape an environment that supports organizational learning are illustrated with data from two leaders of innovation: one in an environment that resisted change; the other in a supportive…

  11. Organizational (auto)-ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    induces in other words new types of embodied organizational knowledge and ways of organizing, which have consequences for how subject positions are (re)configured in everyday corporate lives. Such identity work is rarely studied in local discursive practices of today’s modern and emergent corporations...

  12. Processes in Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    Jauch , Glueck . & Os- born. 1978; Koch & Steers, 1978; Morris & Sherman. 1981: Porter, Crampon. & Smith. 1976; Steers. 1977: Stevens. Beyer, & Trice... Jauch , L. R.. Glueck , W F.. & Osborn. R.N. (1978). Organizational loyalty, professional comrrunt-I merit. and academic research productivity. Academy

  13. Workload and job satisfaction among general practitioners: a review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Hutten, J.B.F.

    1991-01-01

    The workload of general practitioners (GPs) is an important issue in health care systems with capitation payment for GPs services. This article reviews the literature on determinants and consequences of workload and job satisfaction of GPs. Determinants of workload are located on the demand side

  14. Nursing Workload and the Changing Health Care Environment: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have impacted nursing workload, quality of care, and patient safety. Traditional nursing workload measures do not guarantee efficiency, nor do they adequately capture the complexity of nursing workload. Review of the literature indicates nurses perceive the quality of their work has diminished. Research has…

  15. Role of Academic Managers in Workload and Performance Management of Academic Staff: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    This small-scale case study focused on academic managers to explore the ways in which they control the workload of academic staff and the extent to which they use the workload model in performance management of academic staff. The links that exist between the workload and performance management were explored to confirm or refute the conceptual…

  16. "Time Is Not Enough." Workload in Higher Education: A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Berghmans, Inneke; Dochy, Filip; Bulckens, Lydwin

    2014-01-01

    Students' workload has been recognised as a major factor in the teaching and learning environment. This paper starts by structuring the different conceptualisations of workload described in the scientific literature. Besides the traditional distinction between objective and subjective or perceived workload, a distinction between conceptualisations…

  17. The associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoer, I.; Ruitenburg, M. M.; Botje, D.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; Sluiter, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups. A questionnaire was sent to 2021 employees of a Dutch railway company. Six aspects of psychosocial workload (work pressure, mental workload, emotional

  18. The associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoer, I.; Ruitenburg, M.M.; Botje, D.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Sluiter, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups. A questionnaire was sent to 2021 employees of a Dutch railway company. Six aspects of psychosocial workload (work pressure, mental workload, emotional

  19. The performance of workload control concepts in job shops : Improving the release method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Land, MJ; Gaalman, GJC

    1998-01-01

    A specific class of production control concepts for jobs shops is based on the principles of workload control. Practitioners emphasise the importance of workload control. However, order release methods that reduce the workload on the shop floor show poor due date performance in job shop simulations.

  20. Organizational Performance and Customer Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Donald; Herbst, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    While behavior systems analysts have recognized the importance of the consumer of organizational products (i.e., receiving system) in developing models of organizational change, few have offered a systematic assessment of the relationship between consumer and organizational practices. In this article we will discuss how a behavior systems approach…

  1. Organizational Change and Vested Interest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, G.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    The nature of organizational change and the value of headquarters is derived from a model with costs of delay, vested interests and costs of organizational change.The value of headquarters is derived from imposed organizational change. It is viewed as an institution which is able to prevent surplus

  2. Organizational Learning and Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia

    2007-01-01

    The impact of crises on organizations has been stronger than ever. This article explores the role of organizational learning in crisis management, an area that has received little attention from HRD community. Recognizing the dynamics and interconnectedness of crisis management, organizational learning, and organizational change, the article…

  3. A systematic review of Registered Nurses; experiences of the influence of workplace culture and climatic factors on nursing workloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Walker, Cheryl; Rogers-Clark, Cath; Pearce, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing workload is an issue that effects both the recruitment and retention of nurses, and patient safety. Historically, measurement has focussed on the delivery of direct patient care and excluded workload of facilitating hands-on care and supporting the organisation via duties that reflect organisation cultural and climate needs. Qualitative research is appropriate to understand this complexity. To determine the best available evidence in relation to registered nurses experiences of workplace cultural and climatic factors that influence nursing workloads, in an acute health care setting. This review sought high quality studies which explored registered nurses' experiences of the influence of cultural and climatic factors on their workloads. Qualitative research studies and opinion-based text were considered. An extensive search of the literature was conducted to identify published and unpublished studies between January 1990 and June 2011 in English, and indexed in the following databases: CINAHL, Medline, Medline-In Process, PsychINFO, Emerald, Current Contents, TRIP, JSTOR Nursing Consult Psychology & Behavioural Sciences collections, Emerald Management Reviews, Emerald Full Text Journals, Embase, Dissertation Abstracts, ERIC, Proquest and MedNar, EBSCOhost, Science Direct, Wiley Interscience. Two independent reviewers (CRW and CRC), using appraisal tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), assessed fifteen articles; one was excluded. Data were extracted from included papers using standardised tools developed by the JBI. Data from qualitative studies and textual/opinion papers were meta-synthesised separately using standardised instruments. Data synthesis involved the pooling of findings, then grouped into categories on the basis of similarity of meaning. The categories were further aggregated into synthesised findings. 14 papers were identified as high quality and meeting the inclusion criteria. 81 findings were identified from the 10 qualitative research

  4. The Impact of Operating Room Distractions on Stress, Workload, and Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Ana; Suliman, Amna; Wharton, Rupert; Babu, E D; Hull, Louise; Vincent, Charles; Sevdalis, Nick; Arora, Sonal

    2015-06-01

    To investigate whether distractions in the operating room (OR) are associated with higher mental workload and stress, and poorer teamwork among OR personnel. Engaging in multiple tasks can affect performance. There is little research on the effect of distractions on surgical team members' behavior and cognitive processes. Ninety general surgery cases were observed in real time. Cases were assessed by a surgeon and a behavioral scientist using 4 validated tools: OR Distractions Assessment Form, the Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery tool, NASA-Task Load Index, and short form of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Analysis of variance was performed to evaluate significant differences between teamwork, workload, and stress level among team members. Correlations (Pearson r) were computed to evaluate associations between variables. The most prevalent distractions were those initiated by external staff, followed by case-irrelevant conversations. Case-irrelevant conversations were associated with poorer team performance. Irrelevant conversations initiated by surgeons were associated with lower teamwork in surgeons (across team skills: r = -0.44 to -0.58, P < 0.05 to 0.01) and anesthesiologists (r = -0.38 and r = -0.40, for coordination and leadership; P < 0.05). Equipment-related distractions correlated with higher stress (r = 0.48, P < 0.05) and lower teamwork (across team skills: r = -0.42 to -0.50, P < 0.05) in nurses. Acoustic distractions correlated with higher stress in surgeons (r = 0.32, P < 0.05) and higher workload in anesthesiologists (r = 0.30, P < 0.05). Although some distractions may be inevitable in the OR, they can also be detrimental to the team. A deeper understanding of the effect of distractions on teams and their outcomes can lead to targeted quality improvement.

  5. Training improves laparoscopic tasks performance and decreases operator workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jesse S L; Lu, Jirong; Tan, Wee Boon; Lomanto, Davide

    2016-05-01

    It has been postulated that increased operator workload during task performance may increase fatigue and surgical errors. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) is a validated tool for self-assessment for workload. Our study aims to assess the relationship of workload and performance of novices in simulated laparoscopic tasks of different complexity levels before and after training. Forty-seven novices without prior laparoscopic experience were recruited in a trial to investigate whether training improves task performance as well as mental workload. The participants were tested on three standard tasks (ring transfer, precision cutting and intracorporeal suturing) in increasing complexity based on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) curriculum. Following a period of training and rest, participants were tested again. Test scores were computed from time taken and time penalties for precision errors. Test scores and NASA-TLX scores were recorded pre- and post-training and analysed using paired t tests. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyse differences in NASA-TLX scores between the three tasks. NASA-TLX score was lowest with ring transfer and highest with intracorporeal suturing. This was statistically significant in both pre-training (p < 0.001) and post-training (p < 0.001). NASA-TLX scores mirror the changes in test scores for the three tasks. Workload scores decreased significantly after training for all three tasks (ring transfer = 2.93, p < 0.001, precision cutting = 3.74, p < 0.001, intracorporeal suturing = 2.98, p < 0.001). NASA-TLX score is an accurate reflection of the complexity of simulated laparoscopic tasks in the FLS curriculum. This also correlates with the relationship of test scores between the three tasks. Simulation training improves both performance score and workload score across the tasks.

  6. Evaluation of workload among industrial workers with the Need for Recovery Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Cristiane S; Alem, Michele E R; Coury, Helenice J C G

    2011-01-01

    Work conditions can overload a worker's capabilities and result in health complaints. The early identification of hazardous work conditions allows the definition of priorities for more efficient ergonomic interventions. To assess the need for recovery among industrial workers under different work conditions using the Need for Recovery Scale (NFR), and to verify the association between the scores and personal factors, occupational factors and daily activities. 191 workers (mean age of 34.5±8.3 years) from a manufactory industry participated in this study. Workers answered both a questionnaire regarding demographic and occupational factors, and daily activities as well as the NFR. Ergonomic assessment of workplace sectors was carried out based on the Ergonomic Workplace Analysis. The Pearson chi-square test (significance level 5%) was used to verify the association between NFR scores and the variables of interest. The only association was between work sector and NFR score. According to the ergonomic assessment, the work sector with the highest need for recovery also presented the worst environmental and organizational conditions. The Need for Recovery Scale proved to be a helpful tool for differentiating work sectors presenting different workload demands and contributed to the definition of intervention priorities for preserving worker health.

  7. Organizational Value Orientation and Its Impact on Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction of Public School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Pedro; Keller, David

    Although industrial and organizational psychologists have labored for two decades to understand processes governing behavior at work, the literature reveals little empirical work on organization value orientation and its effects on individuals within an organization. From research on personal values and interpersonal relationships, one might…

  8. A modified model of pharmacists' job stress: the role of organizational, extra-role, and individual factors on work-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Caroline A; Kahaleh, Abir A; Doucette, William R; Mott, David A; Pederson, Craig A; Schommer, Jon C

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the effects of job stress continues to be a concern for health-care providers as workload and personnel needs increase. The overall objective of this study was to test a direct effects model of job stress that examines the characteristics of the organizational environment (interpersonal interactions, environmental aspects, the level of compensation and advancement, role stress, and availability of alternative jobs); extra-role factors (work-home conflict); job stress; individual factors (career commitment); and the work-related psychological outcomes of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job turnover intention. A cross-sectional mail survey was sent to a nationwide random sample of 4895 licensed pharmacists in the United States. Previously validated summated Likert-type scales measured each of the study variables. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, and exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the final model. A response rate of 46% was achieved. Psychometric analyses indicated acceptable reliability and validity. The study model fit the data well (CFI[comparative fit index] = 0.90, RMSEA[root mean square error of approximation] = 0.05). Organizational factors in the form of role overload (standardized beta = 0.45) and conflict (0.31) and ease of finding a job with better interpersonal characteristics (0.26) had the largest effects on job stress. Interpersonal characteristics were also one of the strongest predictors of job satisfaction (-0.61) and organizational commitment (-0.70). Work-home conflict directly affected job turnover intention (0.11) and career commitment (-0.16). Other significant, but sometimes, opposite direct effects were found. Job satisfaction and organizational commitment directly affected job turnover intention. Given the increased demand for pharmacy services, health-care organizations will benefit from increasing positive and reducing negative work

  9. Can Organizational Climate be Managed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak; Obel, Børge; Burton, Richard

    2008-01-01

      A leader's job is often to attempt achieving organizational alignment. Many theories propose climate as an effective means to help leaders carry out this task. Nevertheless, our understanding of which exact actions are needed to manage climate remains somewhat diffuse. We present a new cognitive......- oriented view on climate, which enables us to discuss the influence of climate on managing the bal- ance between integration and adaptation. In this article, we argue that climate is not as easy to manage as previously argued. In the short run, climate may serve as an effective emotional inertia...... to maintain the system in fit, as long as it is properly perceived and supported by the leadership style. In the longer run, climate is more influential to change, making it difficult to perceive it properly. This challenge may lead to transformative changes, causing leaders to have little control....

  10. Leadership impact in organizational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venet Shala

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand the impact of organizational leadership and its performance analyzing the concepts and styles of leadership behaviors within organization, in our study case LOGI-KOS, describing good performance through successful leadership impact and its values. Throughout the study, different leadership theories are mentioned. There are two methods which are used to gather information, qualitative and quantitative method. Eye to eye interviews have been organized with the CEO of the organization which is part of our study case and surveys are filled by employees. Empiric study is made possible through surveys in which took part over 28 out of 36 employees. As of the information which was gathered, it indicates that in our case study the leadership behaviors had huge impact within the performance of the organization, which is one of the key factors for success.

  11. Organizational Design Correlates of Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lyngsie, Jacob; Zahra, Shaker A.

    2015-01-01

    these organizational design variables are related to opportunity discovery. We find similar effects. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of our reasoning and results, such as implications for the idea in the innovation and organizational learning literatures that optimal performance over time......Extant research offers relatively little insight into the organizational design correlates of entrepreneurship in established firms. We argue on theoretical grounds that the same organizational designs support the realization as well as the discovery of opportunities. Specifically, decentralized...... requires that firms either vacillate between organizational designs or adopt ambidextrous designs....

  12. TideWatch: Fingerprinting the cyclicality of big data workloads

    KAUST Repository

    Williams, Daniel W.

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsic to \\'big data\\' processing workloads (e.g., iterative MapReduce, Pregel, etc.) are cyclical resource utilization patterns that are highly synchronized across different resource types as well as the workers in a cluster. In Infrastructure as a Service settings, cloud providers do not exploit this characteristic to better manage VMs because they view VMs as \\'black boxes.\\' We present TideWatch, a system that automatically identifies cyclicality and similarity in running VMs. TideWatch predicts period lengths of most VMs in Hadoop workloads within 9% of actual iteration boundaries and successfully classifies up to 95% of running VMs as participating in the appropriate Hadoop cluster. Furthermore, we show how TideWatch can be used to improve the timing of VM migrations, reducing both migration time and network impact by over 50% when compared to a random approach. © 2014 IEEE.

  13. Single Pilot Workload Management During Cruise in Entry Level Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Barbara K.; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Silverman, Evan; Hackworth, Carla; Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Drechsler, Gena; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Advanced technologies and automation are important facilitators of single pilot operations, but they also contribute to the workload management challenges faced by the pilot. We examined task completion, workload management, and automation use in an entry level jet (ELJ) flown by single pilots. Thirteen certificated Cessna Citation Mustang (C510-S) pilots flew an instrument flight rules (IFR) experimental flight in a Cessna Citation Mustang simulator. At one point participants had to descend to meet a crossing restriction prior to a waypoint and prepare for an instrument approach into an un-towered field while facilitating communication from a lost pilot who was flying too low for ATC to hear. Four participants experienced some sort of difficulty with regard to meeting the crossing restriction and almost half (n=6) had problems associated with the instrument approach. Additional errors were also observed including eight participants landing at the airport with an incorrect altimeter setting.

  14. Mission control of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles: a workload analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Stephen R; Wickens, Christopher D; Chang, Dervon

    2005-01-01

    With unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), 36 licensed pilots flew both single-UAV and dual-UAV simulated military missions. Pilots were required to navigate each UAV through a series of mission legs in one of the following three conditions: a baseline condition, an auditory autoalert condition, and an autopilot condition. Pilots were responsible for (a) mission completion, (b) target search, and (c) systems monitoring. Results revealed that both the autoalert and the autopilot automation improved overall performance by reducing task interference and alleviating workload. The autoalert system benefited performance both in the automated task and mission completion task, whereas the autopilot system benefited performance in the automated task, the mission completion task, and the target search task. Practical implications for the study include the suggestion that reliable automation can help alleviate task interference and reduce workload, thereby allowing pilots to better handle concurrent tasks during single- and multiple-UAV flight control.

  15. Measurement of nurses' workload in an oncology outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Alves de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand and the degree of patient care in oncological outpatient services, as well as the complexity of treatment have had an impact on the workload of nurses. This study aimed at measuring the workload and productivity of nurses in an oncological outpatient service. An observational study using a work sampling technique was conducted and included seven nurses working in an oncological outpatient service in the south-eastern region of Brazil. A total of 1,487 intervention or activity samples were obtained. Nurses used 43.2% of their time on indirect care, 33.2% on direct care, 11.6% on associated activities, and 12% on personal activities. Their mean productivity was 88.0%. The findings showed that nurses in this service spend most of their time in indirect care activities. Moreover, the productivity index in this study was above that recommended in the literature.

  16. Conceptualization of actors’ emerging-object-of-activities as hidden exploitative resource for managing organizational change

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an “actor’s emerging-object-of-activity” and its potential use towards increased understanding and learning of the complexity of organizational change management in organizations. The argument that organizations, as activity systems, offers managers of organizational change an antidote to simplistic interpretations of the nature of individual knowledge and action, and organizational cultures and competencies was critically appraised. Paths for understanding...

  17. Organizational factors in Korean NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, D. J.; Kim, Y. I.; Jeong, C. H.; Kim, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational factors are referred to as the factors that influence the achievement of a goal of an organization. Latent problems of an organization could contribute to causing human errors in such stages as design, operation and maintenance, and furthermore, leading to an severe accident. In order to evaluate an organization from the safety viewpoint, it is necessary to identify the organizational factors in a systematic fashion. In this paper, some efforts to identify the organizational factors in Korean NPPs are presented. The study was performed in the following steps: 1) Reviewing the definitions and range of the organizational factors used by the previous 13 researches, 2) Structuring the organizational factors by screening and collating factors, 3) Analysing the organizational factors that is considered to have contributed to the trip events based on the trip report of Korean NPPs, 4) Suggesting a more reliable taxonomy of organizational factors for event analysis by applying the Onion Structure Model to the selected factors

  18. [Organizational climate and burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrańska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of organizational climate and burnout syndrome. It has been assumed that burnout syndrome is dependent on work climate (organizational climate), therefore, two concepts were analyzed: by D. Kolb (organizational climate) and by Ch. Maslach (burnout syndrome). The research involved 239 persons (122 woman, 117 men), aged 21-66. In the study Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Inventory of Organizational Climate were used. The results of statistical methods (correlation analysis, one-variable analysis of variance and regression analysis) evidenced a strong relationship between organizational climate and burnout dimension. As depicted by the results, there are important differences in the level of burnout between the study participants who work in different types of organizational climate. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the organizational climate determines burnout syndrome. Therefore, creating supportive conditions at the workplace might reduce the risk of burnout.

  19. Hipster: hybrid task manager for latency-critical cloud workloads

    OpenAIRE

    Nishtala, Rajiv; Carpenter, Paul M.; Petrucci, Vinicius; Martorell Bofill, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, U. S. data centers accounted for 2.2% of the country's total electricity consumption, a figure that is projected to increase rapidly over the next decade. Many important workloads are interactive, and they demand strict levels of quality-of-service (QoS) to meet user expectations, making it challenging to reduce power consumption due to increasing performance demands. This paper introduces Hipster, a technique that combines heuristics and reinforcement learning to manage latency-crit...

  20. Nurses' workload and its relation with physiological stress reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Dalri, Rita de Cássia de Marchi Barcellos; Silva, Luiz Almeida da; Mendes, Aida Maria Oliveira Cruz; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the relation between the workload and the physiological stress reactions among nurses working at a hospital service.METHODS: cross-sectional, correlational, quantitative study, involving 95 nurses, in 2011 and 2012. Spearman's bivariate Correlation Test was used.RESULTS: most subjects are female, between 23 and 61 years old and working between 21 and 78 hours per week. The most frequent physiological reactions were back pain, fatigue/exhaustion, stiff neck and stomach ac...

  1. Outpatient Workload (RVU) Predictors: Age, Gender & Beneficiary Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-15

    dilemma of over or under estimating workload for medical services associated with enrolled beneficiaries starts with a fundamental change in...gynecological procedures, mammography and obstetrical care (Yano et al., 2003). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that regardless of race...females than males Gender specific medical care and obstetrical care as women reach the age of child-bearing are strongly related to the increase use

  2. The Effects of Workload Transitions in a Multitasking Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    McEvoy, L., Yu, D. (1997). High-resolution EEG mapping of cortical activation related to working memory : Effects of task difficulty, type of...sustained attention. The Journal of General Psychology,120(3), 323-337. Goldberg, D. R., & Stewart, M. R. (1980). Memory overload or expectancy effect ... stimulation on sustained attention. Perception & Psychophysics, 18, 245-249. Matthews, M. L. (1986). The influence of visual workload history on visual

  3. Workload of Attending Physicians at an Academic Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Chen

    2010-08-01

    Conclusion: This study found that work hours among departments differed significantly and that physicians in surgical departments spend the longest hours in clinical work. Those in administrative positions are most involved in clinical work. However, work hours do not definitely represent work intensity, and to define the workload by working hours may be inappropriate for some departments. This possible difference between work hours and work intensity merits further consideration.

  4. Relationship between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents

    OpenAIRE

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Tokuda,Yasuharu; Sato,; Kato,; Matsumoto,; Takekata,; Terai,; Watanabe,; Lim,; Ohde,S; Ishikawa,

    2010-01-01

    Yuji Nishizaki1, Yasuharu Tokuda2, Ekiko Sato1, Keiko Kato1, Akiko Matsumoto1, Miwako Takekata1, Mineko Terai1, Chitose Watanabe3, Yang Ya Lim1, Sachiko Ohde1, Ryoichi Ishikawa11St. Luke’s International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 2Mito Medical Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Saitama City Hospital, Saitama, JapanObjective: To evaluate the relationship between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents in inpatient wards of a general hospital.Methods: A retrospective ...

  5. Organizational Factors that Affect the Implementation of Information Technology: Perspectives of Middle Managers in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzekar, Hosein; Karami, Mahtab

    2014-10-01

    to examine the organizational factors affecting the application of information technology in hospitals. Since the organizational factors are one of the most important determinants of successful projects, by understanding their impact and identifying them it can help planning a systematic IT implementation. In this cross-sectional descriptive study 110 middle managers were chosen from teaching hospitals. Structured questionnaire was used for the data collection. There was a significant relationship between organization resource, organizational knowledge, process, management structure and values and goals with implementation of information technology. Findings showed that organizational factors had a considerable impact on implementation of information technology. Top managers must consider the important aspects of effective organizational factors.

  6. Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs): mapping a research agenda that incorporates an organizational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Carrie A; Lindhorst, Taryn; Tajima, Emiko A

    2015-04-01

    Multidisciplinary coordinated Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) are a growing model of providing health, legal, and emotional support services to victims of sexual assault. This article conceptualizes SARTs from an organizational perspective and explores three approaches to researching SARTs that have the potential of increasing our understanding of the benefits and challenges of multidisciplinary service delivery. These approaches attend to several levels of organizational behavior, including the organizational response to external legitimacy pressures, the inter-organizational networks of victim services, and the negotiation of power and disciplinary boundaries. Possible applications to organizational research on SARTs are explored. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Measuring workload with electrodermal activity during common braking actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, C; Salvia, E; Petit-Boulanger, C

    2014-01-01

    How to assess mental load remains a recurrent question. We aimed to explore whether slight differences in real-world driving task demands could be discriminated by electrodermal response (EDR). A sample of 33 participants was observed under five conditions: controlled braking from 50 to 30 km/h, 80 to 50 km/h, 50 to 0 km/h, 80 to 0 km/h, and a single unexpected emergency braking event from 80 to 0 km/h. The likelihood of EDR and, whenever present, its duration were both correlated with workload as represented by the deceleration demand. A higher base travel speed and the unexpected demand of the emergency braking situation impacted EDR, thus attesting higher workload level. EDR explains why stopping the vehicle from 50 km/h and slowing down from 80 to 50 km/h was of similar strain. The results further demonstrate that EDR measures can be successfully employed to discriminate multiple levels of workload. Common braking elicited different loads as revealed by electrodermal response (EDR) with sensitivity to deceleration of - 0.2 g. Even the slightest braking elicited a strain measurable with EDR. Accordingly, EDR may objectively assess the resulting strain during driving, with enhanced reliability if associated with other variables, e.g. cardiac activity.

  8. Assessment of mental workload and academic motivation in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Kumru Didem; Can, Gulin Feryal; Erdem, Saban Remzi; Muderrisoglu, Ibrahim Haldun

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the level of correlation and direction of linearity between academic motivation and subjective workload. The study was conducted at Baskent University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, from December 2013 to February 2014, and comprised Phase 5 Phase 6 medical students. Subjective workload level was determined by using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scale that was adapted to Turkish. Academic motivation values were obtained with the help of Academic Motivation Scale university form. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 105 subjects, 65(62%) students were in Phase 5 and 40(38%) were in Phase 6. Of the Phase 5 students, 18(27.7%) were boys and 47(72.3%) were girls, while of the Phase 6 students, 16(40%) were boys and 24(60%) were girls. There were significant differences in Phase 5 and Phase 6 students for mental effort (p=0.00) and physical effort (p=0.00). The highest correlation in Phase 5 was between mental effort and intrinsic motivation (r=0.343). For Phase 6, highest correlation was between effort and amotivation (r= -0.375). Subjective workload affected academic motivation in medical students.

  9. Occupational dose and patient workload in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, A.N.; Lagarde, C.S.; Lobriguito, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This study was designed to analyze individual annual dose records of diagnostic radiology staff at a large medical center over a 5-y period (1998-2002). Diagnostic radiology staff was categorized into six occupational subgroups, namely, CT technologists, general radiographers, fluoroscopy technologists, radiologists, nurses and radiologic technology interns. The mean annual dose, collective dose and dose distribution are presented and analyzed for each subgroup. The annual collective dose and the mean annual dose of each subgroup are correlated with its corresponding patient workload, measured in terms of the number of procedures performed per year. Wide variations in dose distribution exist among the six occupational subgroups. More than 80 % of CT technologists and general radiographers do not have measurable exposures ( 20 mSv. The calculated effective dose among radiologists, technologists and nurses involved in interventional procedures are substantially lower than the current dose limits. A strong and statistically significant positive correlation exists between patient workload and the collective dose of radiologists. Patient workload however is not significantly correlated with the collective dose of technologists and nurses. (author)

  10. Driver's workload comparison in waste collection vehicle routing problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aida Mauziah; Abdul-Rahman, Syariza

    2016-10-01

    This paper compares the workload of the drivers for a waste collection benchmark problem. The problem involves ten data sets with different number of customers to be served and different number of disposal facilities available. Previous studies proposed a heuristic algorithm, namely Different Initial Customer (DIC) to solve the problem by constructing initial vehicles routes for the drivers with two main objectives; to minimize the total distance travelled and to minimize the total number of vehicles needed to collect the waste. The results from DIC compared well with other solutions in the literature. However, the balance of the workload among the vehicle drivers is not considered in the solutions. Thus in this paper, we evaluate the quality of the solutions in terms of the total number of customers served by each driver. Then the computational result is compared in terms of the total distance travelled which have been presented in a previous study. Comparison results show that the workload of the drivers are unbalance in terms of these two factors that may cause dissatisfaction among the drivers as well as to the managament.

  11. Relationship between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Sato, Ekiko; Kato, Keiko; Matsumoto, Akiko; Takekata, Miwako; Terai, Mineko; Watanabe, Chitose; Lim, Yang Ya; Ohde, Sachiko; Ishikawa, Ryoichi

    2010-05-26

    To evaluate the relationship between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents in inpatient wards of a general hospital. A retrospective data analysis was conducted involving the internal medicine wards in a teaching hospital in Japan between July 1st and December 31st, 2006. To assess associations between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents, we analyzed the following: the relationships between the level of patients' dependency and the number of incident reports; and the relationships between the presence of accidental falls and the presence of patients transferred from the intensive care unit to the wards. Fifty-five nurses worked on the wards (105 beds). The total number of incidents was 142 over the 184 days of this study. There was a positive trend between the number of incidents and the total patient dependency score. The presence of accidental falls in the wards was associated with the presence of transfers from the intensive care unit to the wards (odds ratio 3.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.48, 6.65). Greater nursing workloads may be related to the higher number of patient safety incidents in inpatient wards of hospitals.

  12. Preliminary study of the pilot's workload during emergency procedures in helicopters air operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Flávio G V; Ribeiro, Selma L O

    2012-01-01

    Military air operations and law enforcement operations in helicopters are examples of activities that require high performance of the operator. This article aimed at presenting a preliminary analysis of data obtained in the initial study in order to validate the instruments and the research protocol that focuses on the analysis of the workload imposed on helicopter pilots in emergency situations. The research was conducted in an environment of real flight training and used the NASA-TLX Scale to assess the workload and an interview guide to obtain reports on the main tasks performed. Preliminary data obtained is related to the participation of 10 (ten) volunteer pilots with experience in different types of helicopters. Four scenarios involving helicopter emergency procedures of HB-350 "Squirrel" were outlined. For this article, the analysis used only the data regarding the Physical and Mental Demands of the NASA-TLX Scale. Preliminarily, the results indicate that the "time pressure" as a factor contributing to increase mental requirement in emergency situations in flight, and that this increase was reflected in the request of mental processes such as: identification of the breakdown, attention and monitoring parameters. Future steps include extending the sample and adding physiological tools to better understand the effects of these types of emergencies on pilot performance and flight safety.

  13. FY17 CSSE L2 Milestone Report: Analyzing Power Usage Characteristics of Workloads Running on Trinity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed as part of a FY17 CSSE L2 milestone to in- vestigate the power usage behavior of ASC workloads running on the ATS-1 Trinity plat- form. Techniques were developed to instrument application code regions of interest using the Power API together with the Kokkos profiling interface and Caliper annotation library. Experiments were performed to understand the power usage behavior of mini-applications and the SNL/ATDM SPARC application running on ATS-1 Trinity Haswell and Knights Landing compute nodes. A taxonomy of power measurement approaches was identified and presented, providing a guide for application developers to follow. Controlled scaling study experiments were performed on up to 2048 nodes of Trinity along with smaller scale ex- periments on Trinity testbed systems. Additionally, power and energy system monitoring information from Trinity was collected and archived for post analysis of "in-the-wild" work- loads. Results were analyzed to assess the sensitivity of the workloads to ATS-1 compute node type (Haswell vs. Knights Landing), CPU frequency control, node-level power capping control, OpenMP configuration, Knights Landing on-package memory configuration, and algorithm/solver configuration. Overall, this milestone lays groundwork for addressing the long-term goal of determining how to best use and operate future ASC platforms to achieve the greatest benefit subject to a constrained power budget.

  14. Energy Organizational Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gina C. Paradis; James Yockey; Tracey LeBeau

    2009-04-17

    As the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) continues to refine and finalize its Strategic Energy Plan, it became necessary to insure that a sustainable organization structure was developed through which the energy program and its initiatives could be nurtured and managed. To that end, SNI undertook a study to thoroughly evaluate the existing organizational structures and assess the requisite changes and/or additions to that framework that would complement the mission of the Strategic Plan. The goal of this study was to analyze, work with staff and leadership and recommend the most effective plan for the development of an organizational framework within which the Seneca could more effectively exercise energy sovereignty – control and manage their natural resource assets – i.e. develop its own energy resources, meet the current and projected energy needs of their community, and “sit at the table” with other regional energy providers to deal with issues on a peer-to-peer basis.

  15. Organizational Relationship Termination Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Geersbro, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Most firms are involved in a number of customer relationships that drain the firm's resources. However, many firms are hesitant to address this problem. This paper investigates customer relationship termination at the organizational level. We develop and analyze the organizational dimensions...... that a firm's percentage of unwanted customers decreases significantly as acceptance of termination increases, if the firm's definition of unwanted customers is well understood, and if a firm has clear termination routines. In addition, general focus on profitability and external constraints on relationship...... termination are found to significantly affect a firm's relationship termination competence. The findings suggest that managers should regard termination as a legitimate option in customer relationship management. In order to decrease the number of unwanted customers, managers must accept termination...

  16. Organizational Culture and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A. Martinez; Nancy Beaulieu; Robert Gibbons; Peter Pronovost; Thomas Wang

    2015-01-01

    Organizations are all around us. Culture is trickier—to analyze and even to see. We consider both the effect of management on culture and the effect of culture on performance. We begin by describing an intervention that dramatically improved outcomes and conspicuously included a culture-change component. We then use details from this intervention to describe potential empirical analyses of the association between organizational culture and performance in this and similar settings. Finally, we...

  17. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Anthropologists have studied organizations since the 1930s. In the 1980s, anthropologists' concepts of culture were instrumentalized by nonanthropologists to promote ‘organizational culture’ as a management tool. In subsequent decades, concern shifted to welding employees from different ‘national...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  18. Investigating organizational change

    OpenAIRE

    Skogly, Marthe Lorentzen; Rognan, Maria Bø

    2017-01-01

    Masteroppgave(MSc) in Master of Science in Leadership and Organizational Psychology - Handelshøyskolen BI, 2017 In today’s business world, most organizations have to change in order to meet the required demands from their surrounding environments, e.g. because of opportunities for growth, economic trends, consumer needs or new technologies. Most organizations have settled with the phrase “change or die”, which constitutes the importance of the changing. However, change is diffi...

  19. Inter-organizational networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Strong and trust-based ties are usually related to homogeneous and complex knowledge, while weak ties are associated with heterogeneous and simple knowledge. Interfirm communities have been shown to depend on trust-based ties, while also relying on getting access to heterogeneous knowledge. These...... goes beyond a mere structural approach to the organization of social networks and hence proposes a tighter integration between research on social networks and organizational design....

  20. Organizational change and resistance: An identity perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ybema, S.B.; Thomas, R; Hardy, C.; Courpasson, D.; Vallas, S.

    2016-01-01

    A classic term in popular and scholarly literature on change management is ‘resistance to change’. It understands resistance in terms of opposition to managerial strategies for organizational change. Since change is generally viewed as reasonable and desirable within this literature, resistance to change promulgates the image of employees digging in their heels, refusing to offer support, and hindering a natural and necessary course of events (e.g., Kotter & Schlesinger, 1979). More recently,...

  1. A contingency analysis of precarious organizational temporariness

    OpenAIRE

    Karmowska, Joanna; Child, John; James, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This paper extends our current understanding of organizational temporariness. The life of a temporary British trade union branch established to recruit Eastern European migrant workers reveals ‘precarious temporariness’, which is less predictable than the ‘planned temporariness’ typically portrayed in the literature. This different type of temporariness was associated with four key contingencies affecting the branch: dispersed governance, bottom-up initiatives, uncertain resourcing, and an ef...

  2. The influence of organizational culture on organizational preferences towards the choice of organizational change strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture, through its assumptions, values, norms and symbols, determines the way in which the members of an organization perceive and interpret the reality within and around their organization, as well as the way they behave in that reality. For this reason we may assume that organizational culture has an impact on the way in which an organization changes, and that matching of organizational culture and change strategy will improve the efficiency of the change process. In this paper specific hypotheses about the causal relationship between certain types of organizational culture and certain change strategies are formulated. Types of organizational culture are differentiated according to Handy’s and Trompenaars’ classifications. Organizational change strategies have been differentiated according to previous work of Chin & Benne but one more strategy has been added. Classifications of both the organizational cultures and of the organizational change strategies are based on the same criteria of differentiation: distribution of power in an organization and orientation toward relationships or tasks. For this reason it is possible to formulate hypotheses about the causal relationship between certain types of organizational cultures and certain types of organizational change strategies. Thus, eight hypotheses are formulated in this paper, relating particular change strategies with particular types of organizational culture.

  3. Influence of organizational factors on safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Metlay, D.S.; Crouch, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for a better understanding of exactly how organizational management factors at a nuclear power plant (NPP) affect plant safety performance, either directly or indirectly, and how these factors might be observed, measured, and evaluated. The purpose of this research project is to respond to that need by developing a general methodology for characterizing these organizational and management factors, systematically collecting information on their status and integrating that information into various types of evaluative activities. Research to date has included the development of the Nuclear Organization and Management Analysis Concept (NOMAC) of a NPP, the identification of key organizational and management factors, and the identification of the methods for systematically measuring and analyzing the influence of these factors on performance. Most recently, two field studies, one at a fossil fuel plant and the other at a NPP, were conducted using the developed methodology. Results are presented from both studies highlighting the acceptability, practicality, and usefulness of the methods used to assess the influence of various organizational and management factors including culture, communication, decision-making, standardization, and oversight. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Relationship between Organizational Culture, Leadership Behavior and Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Yafang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Organizational culture refers to the beliefs and values that have existed in an organization for a long time, and to the beliefs of the staff and the foreseen value of their work that will influence their attitudes and behavior. Administrators usually adjust their leadership behavior to accomplish the mission of the organization, and this could influence the employees' job satisfaction. It is therefore essential to understand the relationship between organizational culture...

  5. An evaluation of organizational change in the Housing & Development Board

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Ai Ling

    2010-01-01

    The need for change is constant in the current business environment. As customers become more informed and demanding, organizations must undergo transformation to meet customers’ expectation. While organizations understand the need for change, organizational transformation is never an easy task. Theories indicated that successful organizational changes are results oriented. They often include a series of critical steps with pitfalls that organization must avoid. The critical steps inc...

  6. The impact of selected organizational variables and managerial leadership on radiation therapists' organizational commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akroyd, Duane; Legg, Jeff; Jackowski, Melissa B.; Adams, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of selected organizational factors and the leadership behavior of supervisors on radiation therapists' commitment to their organizations. The population for this study consists of all full time clinical radiation therapists registered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) in the United States. A random sample of 800 radiation therapists was obtained from the ARRT for this study. Questionnaires were mailed to all participants and measured organizational variables; managerial leadership variable and three components of organizational commitment (affective, continuance and normative). It was determined that organizational support, and leadership behavior of supervisors each had a significant and positive affect on normative and affective commitment of radiation therapists and each of the models predicted over 40% of the variance in radiation therapists organizational commitment. This study examined radiation therapists' commitment to their organizations and found that affective (emotional attachment to the organization) and normative (feelings of obligation to the organization) commitments were more important than continuance commitment (awareness of the costs of leaving the organization). This study can help radiation oncology administrators and physicians to understand the values their radiation therapy employees hold that are predictive of their commitment to the organization. A crucial result of the study is the importance of the perceived support of the organization and the leadership skills of managers/supervisors on radiation therapists' commitment to the organization.

  7. ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Luciana GUÞÃ

    2013-01-01

    Throught this paper, our main objective is to propose a conceptual model that links the notions of organizational learning (as capability and as a process) and organizational performance. Our contribution consists in analyzing the literature on organizational learning and organizational performance and in proposing an integrated model, that comprises: organizational learning capability, the process of organizational learning, organizational performance, human capital (the value and uniqueness...

  8. INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina ŞOMĂCESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the relationship between the organizational communication and organizational culture. The starting point of our analysis is that the two variables are in interdependent relation. Our study, performed in a large public organization operating in Romania and abroad, identified a positive association between the two variables. The organizational communication helps the organization to disseminate the culture among the employees. Also, the organizational culture is developed through the interactions and communications among the staff. The management of the organizations must encourage and promote an open communication in order to create a culture that sustain the performance.

  9. The Organizational Economics of Organizational Capability and Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Argyres, Nicholas; Felin, Teppo

    For decades, the literatures on firm capabilities and organizational economics have been at odds with each other, specifically relative to explaining organizational boundaries and heterogeneity. We briefly trace the history of the relationship between the capabilities literature and organizational...... economics and point to the dominance of a “capabilities first” logic in this relationship. We argue that capabilities considerations are inherently intertwined with questions about organizational boundaries and internal organization, and use this point to respond to the prevalent “capabilities first” logic....... We offer an integrative research agenda that focuses, first, on the governance of capabilities and, second, on the capability of governance....

  10. Understanding and Representing Changing Work Structures and Practices through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Stacey M. B.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: Organizational Communication, Advanced Organizational Communication, Organizing Work, Management/Organizational History. Objectives: This activity will help students to understand major shifts in the organization of work and creatively represent changing work structures and practices. An optional follow-up assignment is included. A…

  11. Organizational architecture of multinational companies

    OpenAIRE

    Sikorová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of the bachelor thesis Organizational Architecture of Multinational Companies is to elaborate the overview of organizational structures that are used by modern global companies. The thesis contains an analysis of such companies development, principles of functioning, pros and cons and the opportunities which these brings. It also contains a description of the basic concepts associated with organizational architecture such as globalization, multinational companies and organizatio...

  12. Leadership, Culture and Organizational Change

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir-Codrin Ionescu

    2014-01-01

    An effective leadership, an evolutionary organizational culture and permanent connection to change may ensure a company’s success within an ever more dynamic competitive environment. The scientific approach of this paper is in line with theoretical and applied research in the field by the presentation of the connections existing among leadership, organizational culture and organizational change. The paper highlights the triad “vision – motivation – momentum”, the mission and the defining coor...

  13. Striving for Excellence: Organizational Climate Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Phipps

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To describe steps undertaken by the University of Connecticut Libraries to respond to the results of an organizational climate assessment. More than 80% of the Libraries’ staff members completed the ClimateQUAL® survey instrument in the spring of 2007. An organizational development consultant designed a format for focus groups to provide anonymous, but more detailed, experience-based information to help the Libraries discover, understand, and respond to the root causes of “problem” areas indicated by the survey results.Methods – In November 2007, the consultant conducted five 90-minute, on-site focus group sessions, each with 7-15 participants. Two of the sessions were open to all staff members, while the others focused on underrepresented minority group members, team leaders, and the staff of one specific team.Results – A summary report based on compiled data and including recommendations was submitted and discussed with the Libraries’ Leadership Group. In line with organizational development practice, recommendations were made to engage those closest to the “problems” (i.e., the staff to design and recommend improvements to internal systems. The consultant advised the formation of six teams to address internal systems, and an initial three teams comprised of staff members from across the library were formed. These teams were charged with formulating a set of recommended actions that will contribute to a healthier organizational climate in three areas: leadership and team decision making; performance management; and hiring, merit, and promotion. The findings, recommendations, and progress-to-date of each team are summarized.Conclusion – The ClimateQUAL® results and the follow-up with the organizational development consultant helped in identifying potential problem areas within the Libraries’ internal systems. The consultant made recommendations that led to the development of concrete roadmaps, benchmarks, and

  14. Understanding the group dynamics and success of teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Michael; Bagrow, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Complex problems often require coordinated group effort and can consume significant resources, yet our understanding of how teams form and succeed has been limited by a lack of large-scale, quantitative data. We analyse activity traces and success levels for approximately 150 000 self-organized, online team projects. While larger teams tend to be more successful, workload is highly focused across the team, with only a few members performing most work. We find that highly successful teams are significantly more focused than average teams of the same size, that their members have worked on more diverse sets of projects, and the members of highly successful teams are more likely to be core members or ‘leads’ of other teams. The relations between team success and size, focus and especially team experience cannot be explained by confounding factors such as team age, external contributions from non-team members, nor by group mechanisms such as social loafing. Taken together, these features point to organizational principles that may maximize the success of collaborative endeavours. PMID:27152217

  15. Organizational identification moderates the impact of organizational justice on job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guo; Jia, Libin; Zhao, Jian

    2016-03-09

    Few studies concern the moderator effect of organizational identification between organizational justice and job satisfaction. This study aimed to examine the trilateral relationship among organizational identification, organizational justice and job satisfaction, especially focus on the moderator effect of organizational identification. 354 staffs completed the measures of organizational justice, organizational identification and job satisfaction. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that organizational identification moderated the association between organizational justice and job satisfaction. When staffs reported a low level of organizational identification, those with high organizational justice reported higher scores in job satisfaction than those with low organizational justice. However, the impact of organizational justice on job satisfaction was not significant in high organizational identification group. Organizational identification can significantly moderate the impact of organizational justice on job satisfaction. The significance and limitations of the results are discussed.

  16. Leveraging organizational dynamics in buildings to change behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Elizabeth L.

    Buildings may be stationary, but they are not static; they are dynamic and active collectives of agents and actors, and play an important cultural and social role in shaping norms and influencing outcomes in the built environment. This research develops and applies a unique framework that conceptualizes the urban multifamily residential building as an organization, and seeks to use this lens to better understand the role of organizational characteristics in influencing energy efficiency in buildings. This work finds that an organizational analogy is a fruitful approach for understanding buildings, and that buildings in many ways can and do function successfully as organizations. In particular, eight organizational characteristics are explored here that extend well to buildings. These eight organizational characteristics are also explored more deeply to support an argument that some buildings have an organizational advantage that well positions them to undertake energy efficiency initiatives. One organizational characteristic -- the ownership type of the building -- is determined to be particularly important in driving energy outcomes in multifamily buildings in New York City. In particular, it was found that cooperative buildings in the New York City housing market consume less energy citywide than other types of multifamily properties, holding all else equal. Conversely, it was also found that rental buildings tend to consume more energy citywide. Subsequent qualitative case study work in a small Brooklyn cooperative building offers a deeper understanding of organizational decentralization and its role in driving decision-making and outcomes in the building. Additional comparative work in two rental properties -- one high-income and one low-income -- adds additional context and understanding to economic considerations such as the influence of income in overriding centralized efforts to operate the building efficiently. Ultimately, this research develops an analogy

  17. Organizational Reconfiguration and Strategic Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the organizational reconfiguration of offshoring on firms’ strategies. A consequence of offshoring is the need to reintegrate the geographically relocated organizational activities into a coherent organizational architecture. In order to d...... this, firms need a high degree of architectural knowledge, which is typically gained through learning by doing. We therefore argue that firms with more offshoring experience are more likely to include organizational objectives in their offshoring strategies. We develop and find support...

  18. MEASUREMENT OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Adrianis Gómez Degraves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This research had as an objective analyze in a rigorous way, theoretical aspects related to the Organizational Intelligence construct, based on the Fifth Discipline by Peter Senge and the driver elements as the knowledge management, Environment Monitoring and Innovation. To do this, it was developed an exploratory research documentary, under a bibliographical design, obtaining as result the definition of Organizational Intelligence construct, its operationalization and development of organizational practices that brings an instrument scale. The document review provided basic elements, theoretical in the construction of a measurement scale of Organizational Intelligence.

  19. Whistleblowing and organizational ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Susan L

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss an external whistleblowing event that occurred after all internal whistleblowing through the hierarchy of the organization had failed. It is argued that an organization that does not support those that whistle blow because of violation of professional standards is indicative of a failure of organizational ethics. Several ways to build an ethics infrastructure that could reduce the need to resort to external whistleblowing are discussed. A relational ethics approach is presented as a way to eliminate the negative consequences of whistleblowing by fostering an interdependent moral community to address ethical concerns.

  20. Organizational Culture and Industrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    behaviours. In-group/out-group particularist values that have been handed over from preindustrial society tend to overlay and replace impersonal and universalistic bureaucracies and market exchange typical ofindustrial society. The paper shows how these values shape the culture of organizations in Latin......Drawing on a revised version ofHofstede's theory ofindustrialization and cultural change contained in his explanation of individualism and collectivism, the paper proposes that countries which are in the earlier stages of industrialization have a common culture that governs organizational...

  1. Organizational issues = change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Nancy M; Riley, Robert T

    2003-03-01

    Information systems fail for a number of reasons. Several failure reasons include communication, complexity, organization, technology, and leadership. Failure can be outlined in four major categories: technical shortcomings, project management shortcomings, organizational issues, and the continuing information explosion. Change management is the process of assisting individuals and organizations in passing from an old way of doing things to a new way of doing things. Change management starts early in a technical process, as the need for making major changes starts at the conceptual level. This paper briefly covers the people side of implementing new information systems, and describes resistance to change and various strategies to manage technological change.

  2. Organizational Culture and Industrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    Drawing on a revised version ofHofstede's theory ofindustrialization and cultural change contained in his explanation of individualism and collectivism, the paper proposes that countries which are in the earlier stages of industrialization have a common culture that governs organizational...... behaviours. In-group/out-group particularist values that have been handed over from preindustrial society tend to overlay and replace impersonal and universalistic bureaucracies and market exchange typical ofindustrial society. The paper shows how these values shape the culture of organizations in Latin...

  3. Employee organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Života

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of research on organizational commitment as a type of attitudes that show the identification level of employees with their organizations and their willingness to leave them. The research has been conducted with intention to determine the level of organizational commitment on the territory of Novi Sad, as well as to question whether there is a difference between certain categories of examinees for each commitment base. The research comprised 237 examinees employed in organizations on the territory of Novi Sad. Status of independent variables have gained: gender, years of working experience, educational level, working experience in one or more organizations and estimation of level of personal potentials utility. The questionnaire used is taken from the Greenberg and Baron's 'Behaviour in Organizations', p. 170, done according to set of questions by Meyer and Allen, in 1991. The data have been worked on by calculating arithmetic mean, and by application of Pearson Chi-square test. The results have shown that there is a below average level of organizational (AS=2.88, with the most intensive continual (AS=3.23, and the least intensive normative organizational dedication (AS=2.41. The gender of examinees does not represent relevant source of differences in the levels of each type of three mentioned commitment. Years of working experience and level of educational attainment represent a significant source of differences for continual (YWE: Pearson Chi-square = 30,38; df = 8; p = .000 (LEA: Pearson Chi-square = 7,381; df = 2; p = .05 and normative (YWE: Pearson Chi- square = 20,67; df = 8; p = .000 (LEA: Pearson Chi-square = 10,79; df = 2; p = .00 base of commitment. Work in one or more organizations has shown as a significant source of differences in the level of continual commitment (Pearson Chi-square = 7, 59; df = 2; p = .05. The level of affective commitment is statistically significantly related only to the estimation

  4. Impact of promoting self-care in nursing workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trettene, Armando Dos Santos; Fontes, Cassiana Mendes Bertoncelo; Razera, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Gomide, Marcia Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of promoting self-care in nursing workload and associate it to the variables: age, gender, socioeconomic status, education, marital status and number of children of caregivers. Prospective study with 31 children and their caregivers. Participants were assessed at two moments, 1st and 2nd hospitalization, the nursing workload was measured by the Nursing Activities Score (NAS). The mean NAS in the 1st hospitalization was 60.9% and in the 2nd hospitalization was 41.6%, that is, 14.6 and 9.9 hours of nursing, respectively. The nursing workload on the first day of hospitalization was higher compared to the last day, both for the 1st (penfermagem e associá-la às variáveis: idade, gênero, classificação socioeconômica, escolaridade, estado civil e número de filhos dos cuidadores. Estudo prospectivo, onde participaram 31 crianças e seus respectivos cuidadores. Os participantes foram avaliados em dois momentos, 1ª e 2ª internação, quanto à carga de trabalho de enfermagem mensurada por meio do Nursing Activities Score (NAS). A média NAS na 1ª internação foi de 60,9%, e na 2ª internação foi de 41,6%, ou seja, 14,6 e 9,9 horas de enfermagem, respectivamente. A carga de trabalho de enfermagem no primeiro dia de internação foi maior quando comparada ao último dia, tanto na 1ª (penfermagem referente à promoção do autocuidado correspondeu a 14,6 horas e foi superior ao determinado pela legislação existente.

  5. Measurement and scaling of workload in complex performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, W D; Jennings, A E; Alluisi, E A

    1979-04-01

    Two groups of paid male volunteers (Groups I, N = 51, tested with identical schedules on two successive days; Group II, N = 43, tested on one day only) performed over nine intervals on various combinations of the six tasks of the CAMI Multiple Task Performance Battery. Two of the tasks involved monitoring static (lights) and dynamic (meters) processes, and four more-active tasks involved mental arithmetic, elementary problem solving, pattern identification, two-dimensional compensatory tracking. Five of the nine intervals provided different complex tasks consisting of concurrent monitoring tasks and two of the active tasks. Other trials provided data on the single active tasks as well as the combined monitoring tasks. The results indicated that all performance measures--a total of 12 for the six tasks--varied significantly as a function of the different task-combination conditions. A standard psychological scaling technique (Thurstone Case V) was applied to the monitoring data (response times for green and red lights, and for meter monitoring) to develop an index of workload for the five complex task combinations. Since better performance was presumed to indicate a lower workload, workload was inferred to increase as performance declined across conditions. The best performances, which were assigned scale values of 0, were found to be associated with single-task performances, as expected. Scale values for the complex task-combination conditions were found to be consistent between groups and between the two days of testing of Group I (r's of 0.947 to 0.993). Although the scale values are specific to the task and task-combination conditions employed, the scaling-procedure application shows promise for cases in which quantitative measures of performance can be acquired with moderately large samples of subjects (N's greater than 50).

  6. Relationship between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Nishizaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Nishizaki1, Yasuharu Tokuda2, Ekiko Sato1, Keiko Kato1, Akiko Matsumoto1, Miwako Takekata1, Mineko Terai1, Chitose Watanabe3, Yang Ya Lim1, Sachiko Ohde1, Ryoichi Ishikawa11St. Luke’s International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 2Mito Medical Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Saitama City Hospital, Saitama, JapanObjective: To evaluate the relationship between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents in inpatient wards of a general hospital.Methods: A retrospective data analysis was conducted involving the internal medicine wards in a teaching hospital in Japan between July 1st and December 31st, 2006. To assess associations between nursing workloads and patient safety incidents, we analyzed the following: the relationships between the level of patients’ dependency and the number of incident reports; and the relationships between the presence of accidental falls and the presence of patients transferred from the intensive care unit to the wards.Results: Fifty-five nurses worked on the wards (105 beds. The total number of incidents was 142 over the 184 days of this study. There was a positive trend between the number of incidents and the total patient dependency score. The presence of accidental falls in the wards was associated with the presence of transfers from the intensive care unit to the wards (odds ratio 3.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.48, 6.65.Conclusion: Greater nursing workloads may be related to the higher number of patient safety incidents in inpatient wards of hospitals. Keywords: risk management, bed control, incident report, patient dependency, nursing care, diagnosis and procedure combination

  7. Organizational learning capability and organizational citizenship behaviour in the health sector: examining the role of happiness at work from a gender perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Vallina, Andrés; Alegre, Joaquin; Fernández, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    Both researchers and managers are interested in finding the factors that raise organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), particularly in the health sector. In this complex context, characterized by a high workload, it becomes essential that physicians voluntarily contribute beyond their official job description. Our research aims to evidence the working conditions that promote OCB, considering the role of organizational learning capability through happiness at work. Our research was based on a sample of 167 allergists at Spanish public hospitals, and by means of structural equation models, interesting results were found. We offer to hospital managers both a tool and an explanation for the fostering of OCB. Physicians that progress through learning, under positive attitudes at work, may indeed behave more civically, going beyond their job description. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lean Six Sigma implementation and organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between four organizational cultural types defined by the Competing Values Framework and three Lean Six Sigma implementation components - management involvement, use of Lean Six Sigma methods and Lean Six Sigma infrastructure. The study involved surveying 446 human resource and quality managers from 223 hospitals located in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island using the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument. Findings - In total, 104 completed responses were received and analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance. Follow-up analysis of variances showed management support was significant, F(3, 100)=4.89, p cultures having significant interactions with management support. The relationship between organizational culture and Lean Six Sigma in hospitals provides information on how specific cultural characteristics impact the Lean Six Sigma initiative key components. This information assists hospital staff who are considering implementing quality initiatives by providing an understanding of what cultural values correspond to effective Lean Six Sigma implementation. Managers understanding the quality initiative cultural underpinnings, are attentive to the culture-shared values and norm's influence can utilize strategies to better implement Lean Six Sigma.

  9. Evaluating and optimizing the NERSC workload on Knights Landing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T; Cook, B; Deslippe, J; Doerfler, D; Friesen, B; He, Y; Kurth, T; Koskela, T; Lobet, M; Malas, T; Oliker, L; Ovsyannikov, A; Sarje, A; Vay, JL; Vincenti, H; Williams, S; Carrier, P; Wichmann, N; Wagner, M; Kent, P; Kerr, C; Dennis, J

    2017-01-30

    NERSC has partnered with 20 representative application teams to evaluate performance on the Xeon-Phi Knights Landing architecture and develop an application-optimization strategy for the greater NERSC workload on the recently installed Cori system. In this article, we present early case studies and summarized results from a subset of the 20 applications highlighting the impact of important architecture differences between the Xeon-Phi and traditional Xeon processors. We summarize the status of the applications and describe the greater optimization strategy that has formed.

  10. Clean Energy Use for Cloud Computing Federation Workloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahav Biran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cloud providers seek to maximize their market share. Traditionally, they deploy datacenters with sufficient capacity to accommodate their entire computing demand while maintaining geographical affinity to its customers. Achieving these goals by a single cloud provider is increasingly unrealistic from a cost of ownership perspective. Moreover, the carbon emissions from underutilized datacenters place an increasing demand on electricity and is a growing factor in the cost of cloud provider datacenters. Cloud-based systems may be classified into two categories: serving systems and analytical systems. We studied two primary workload types, on-demand video streaming as a serving system and MapReduce jobs as an analytical systems and suggested two unique energy mix usage for processing that workloads. The recognition that on-demand video streaming now constitutes the bulk portion of traffic to Internet consumers provides a path to mitigate rising energy demand. On-demand video is usually served through Content Delivery Networks (CDN, often scheduled in backend and edge datacenters. This publication describes a CDN deployment solution that utilizes green energy to supply on-demand streaming workload. A cross-cloud provider collaboration will allow cloud providers to both operate near their customers and reduce operational costs, primarily by lowering the datacenter deployments per provider ratio. Our approach optimizes cross-datacenters deployment. Specifically, we model an optimized CDN-edge instance allocation system that maximizes, under a set of realistic constraints, green energy utilization. The architecture of this cross-cloud coordinator service is based on Ubernetes, an open source container cluster manager that is a federation of Kubernetes clusters. It is shown how, under reasonable constraints, it can reduce the projected datacenter’s carbon emissions growth by 22% from the currently reported consumption. We also suggest operating

  11. The Relationship between Organizational Commitment and Organizational Climate in Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Adela J.; Scott, D. R.; Pace, R. Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational climate. Subjects were chosen from three large Australian automotive component manufacturing companies. A questionnaire was administered to 1,413 employees from forty-two countries of origin. A 97.8 percent response rate yielded 1,382…

  12. The Importance of Organizational Learning for Organizational Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Special Issue is intended to heighten awareness of the importance of organizational learning in addressing the demands of organizational sustainability, and in particular triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability. A definition of TBL sustainability is provided, together with an exploration of the practical issues relevant to adopting…

  13. The Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support and Teachers' Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayir, Funda

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: It can be said that one of the key factors ensuring teachers adaptation to developments is teachers' level of commitment to their schools. In this commitment, the teacher is expected to internalize the organizational objectives. The teacher's perception of organizational support is important for him to internalize the…

  14. The Effects of Organizational Training on Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Cagri; Culha, Osman

    2010-01-01

    This empirical study investigated the impact of organizational training on employee commitment focusing on employees' emotional and affective responses towards their organization. Organizational training is conceptualized within a multidimensional framework consisting of motivation for training, access to training, benefits from training and…

  15. Organizational Theories and Analysis: A Feminist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irefin, Peace; Ifah, S. S.; Bwala, M. H.

    2012-06-01

    This paper is a critique of organization theories and their failure to come to terms with the fact of the reproduction of labour power within a particular form of the division of labour. It examines feminist theory and its aims to understand the nature of inequality and focuses on gender, power relations and sexuality part of the task of feminists which organizational theories have neglected is to offer an account of how the different treatments of the sexes operate in our culture. The paper concludes that gender has been completely neglected within the organizational theory which result in a rhetorical reproduction of males as norms and women as others. It is recommended that only radical form of organization theory can account for the situation of women in organisational setting

  16. Methodology and applications for organizational safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Takeharu; Makino, Maomi

    2004-01-01

    The mission of our activity is making 'guidance of safety culture for understanding and evaluations' which comes in much more useful and making it substantial by clarifying positioning of safety culture within evaluation of the quality management. This is pointed out by 'Discussion on how to implement safety culture sufficiently and possible recommendation' last year by falsification issue of TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company). We have been developing the safety culture evaluation structured by three elements. One is safety culture evaluation support tool (SCET), another is organizational reliability model (ORM), third is system for safety. This paper describes mainly organizational reliability model (ORM) and its applications as well as ticking the system for safety culture within quality management. (author)

  17. Organizational factors influencing improvements in safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, A.; Nichols, M.L.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.; Thurber, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of conceptual and empirical research conducted by this research team, and published in NUREG-CR 5437, suggested that processes of organizational problem solving and learning provide a promising area for understanding improvement in safety-related performance in nuclear power plants. In this paper the authors describe the way in which they have built upon that work and gone much further in empirically examining a range of potentially important organizational factors related to safety. The paper describes (1) overall trends in plant performance over time on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission performance indicators, (2) the major elements in the conceptual framework guiding the current work, which seeks among other things to explain those trends, (3) the specific variables used as measures of the central concepts, (4) the results to date of the quantitative empirical work and qualitative work in progress, and (5) conclusions from the research

  18. Managing organizational culture within a management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comeau, L.; Watts, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) is currently undergoing a major refurbishment of its nuclear reactor. At the same time, a small team is designing the organization that will operate the plant after refurbishment. This paper offers a high level overview of the Post-Refurbishment Organization (PRO) project and will focus primarily on the approach used to address organizational culture and human system dynamics. We will describe how various tools, used to assess organization culture, team performance, and individual self-understanding, are used collectively to place the right person in the right position. We will explain how the career system, Pathfinder, is used to integrate these tools to support a comprehensive model for organization design and development. Finally, we demonstrate how the management of organizational cultural and human system dynamics are integrated into the PLGS Integrated Management System. (author)

  19. Exploring Organizational Smoking Policies and Employee Vaping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaochuan; English, Master Thomas M; Whitman, Marilyn V

    2017-04-01

    Cigarette consumption has become global threat to both smokers and organizations. However, little is known about organizational smoking and vaping policies, and their influence to employees' smoking and vaping behavior. We collected data from 456 employed smokers, vapers, and/or dual users. Smoking and/or vaping behavior, along with perceived organizational smoking/vaping policies were examined. Vapers reported perceiving more stringent smoking policy, while vapers who reported having workplace vaping policies perceived having generally more stringent vaping policy. Most smokers and vapers are well informed about smoking policy; however, a considerable portion of them do not have a good understanding about organizational vaping policy. Organizations should not consider smoking and vaping to be the same when setting policy. Employers should ensure that organizational vaping policies are present and clear to all employees.

  20. Organizational Identity and Culture in the Context of Managed Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Schultz, Majken; Skov, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article presents top and middle managers’ experiences and understandings of how organizational identity and culture were entangled with transformational change as it unfolded over a 5-year period in Carlsberg Group. Combining ethnography and grounded theory methods with engaged scholarship...... their organization’s identity led middle managers and employees both to support and resist new organizational identity claims made by top management. Within these identity activation processes we found frequent references relating new identity claims to organizational culture. Further analysis of the data revealed...... tensions of intention, pacing, and focus arising between the “old” culture and new claims, as well as evidence that cultural change mechanisms, including dis-embedding, dis-enchanting, and dis-respecting the “old” culture, had been used. We conclude that organizational identity and culture were related...

  1. Cultural revelations: shining a light on organizational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noumair, Debra A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a model for how elements of group relations and organization development perspectives can be combined in a successful organizational consultancy and to demonstrate through a case analysis what blending the two can look like in practice. The further aim of this paper is to provide readers-group therapists in particular-with an increased understanding of how to use therapeutic skills and theories in organizational consultation. The case study is provided to illustrate actual interventions and depict the use of self-as-instrument as one tool available to organizational change consultants. Throughout the paper, ideas are offered on how to engage organizational clients to work with what is irrational and unconscious as well as what is rational and conscious.

  2. Organizational Network Evolution and Governance Strategies in Megaprojects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Lu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The organization is the key factor for megaprojects in which thousands of connections and relations intertwine and influence the project performance. However, organizational evolution in megaprojects has not been fully studied. This study investigates the evolution of the organizational network of a megaproject in China using social network analysis (SNA, and then proposes corresponding governance strategies. The result shows that megaproject organizations evolve towards more connected networks but are differentiated for various investors. For government invested projects, the organizational network is well connected, cooperative, yet unstable and require strategic long-term governance policies; for private invested projects, the network is stable, but collaboration among participants is low, which indicates a need to establish collaborative governance structures. The result complements the organizational evolution theory for megaprojects and offers effective strategies for governing megaproject organizations. This study also helps practitioners better understand the nature and characteristics of megaproject organizations.

  3. A REVIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Caleb REMANDA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A are the most widespread and most reliable international operations in the strategic market. Theoretically, they can respond to a certain amount of conventional goals like creating intrinsic value and performance. Integrating an organizational culture in an M&A process can help top management from both organizations understand cultural differences as fast as possible, in order to reduce consequences. The question remains as to whether we can go from a theoretical case to a practical one and achieve results beyond expectations. In this 2015 study we took into account cultural changes, communicated them to the members going into the process, and demonstrated the fundamental role that organizational culture plays. By comparing several approaches surrounding organizational culture, we conclude that this concept should extended to further perspectives, such as the importance of acculturation, cultural tolerance and organizational identity, all present before, during, and after the M&A process.

  4. The impact of organizational culture on knowledge sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Sahar Khazaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between knowledge management and organizational culture, adopting the view of knowledge. Understanding how different cultural types are associated with specific knowledge management should shed light on how the relationship between organizational culture and knowledge management is manifested in the choices of organizations. For this research, the quantitative research design will be used. A survey questionnaire will be employed in achieving the objectives of this research. Results indicate that successful KM application should go beyond the operational side into social, human and organizational aspects to create individual commitment towards KM implementation. This discussion also emphasizes the importance of the collective knowledge and knowledge network concepts on the organizational level.

  5. Workload Classification & Software Energy Measurement for Efficient Scheduling on Private Cloud Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, James W.; Sommerville, Ian

    2011-01-01

    At present there are a number of barriers to creating an energy efficient workload scheduler for a Private Cloud based data center. Firstly, the relationship between different workloads and power consumption must be investigated. Secondly, current hardware-based solutions to providing energy usage statistics are unsuitable in warehouse scale data centers where low cost and scalability are desirable properties. In this paper we discuss the effect of different workloads on server power consumpt...

  6. Nonparametric estimation of the stationary M/G/1 workload distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted

    In this paper it is demonstrated how a nonparametric estimator of the stationary workload distribution function of the M/G/1-queue can be obtained by systematic sampling the workload process. Weak convergence results and bootstrap methods for empirical distribution functions for stationary...... associated sequences are used to derive asymptotic results and bootstrap methods for inference about the workload distribution function. The potential of the method is illustrated by a simulation study of the M/D/1 model....

  7. ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE-EVENT SIMULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE-EVENT SIMULATION...in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-16-M-166 ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE-EVENT SIMULATION...UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENV-MS-16-M-166 ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE-EVENT SIMULATION Erich W

  8. Development scenarios for organizational memory information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Well-managed organizational memories have been emphasized in the recent management literature as important sources for business success. Organizational memory infonnation systems (OMIS) have been conceptualized as a framework for information technologies to support these organizational memories.

  9. Assessing organizational capacity for achieving meaningful use of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Christopher M; Malone, Robb; Weinberger, Morris; Reiter, Kristin L; Thornhill, Jonathan; Lord, Jennifer; Nguyen, Nicholas G; Weiner, Bryan J

    2014-01-01

    Health care institutions are scrambling to manage the complex organizational change required for achieving meaningful use (MU) of electronic health records (EHR). Assessing baseline organizational capacity for the change can be a useful step toward effective planning and resource allocation. The aim of this article is to describe an adaptable method and tool for assessing organizational capacity for achieving MU of EHR. Data on organizational capacity (people, processes, and technology resources) and barriers are presented from outpatient clinics within one integrated health care delivery system; thus, the focus is on MU requirements for eligible professionals, not eligible hospitals. We conducted 109 interviews with representatives from 46 outpatient clinics. Most clinics had core elements of the people domain of capacity in place. However, the process domain was problematic for many clinics, specifically, capturing problem lists as structured data and having standard processes for maintaining the problem list in the EHR. Also, nearly half of all clinics did not have methods for tracking compliance with their existing processes. Finally, most clinics maintained clinical information in multiple systems, not just the EHR. The most common perceived barriers to MU for eligible professionals included EHR functionality, changes to workflows, increased workload, and resistance to change. Organizational capacity assessments provide a broad institutional perspective and an in-depth clinic-level perspective useful for making resource decisions and tailoring strategies to support the MU change effort for eligible professionals.

  10. The Effect of Organizational Justice and Perceived Organizational Support on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Organizational Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Kamile

    2015-01-01

    Problem of Study: Research on social exchange relationships does not take into account another vital component of organizational life--namely an individual's sense of belonging and identity. Organizational identification is one of the most crucial factors holding employees together and keeping them committed to the organization. Many studies…

  11. Organizational Climate and Teacher Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Stephen Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of school climate and teacher commitment in elementary schools in Alabama. A total of 67 elementary schools were surveyed and 1353 teachers voluntarily participated in the study. The instruments used in this study were the Organizational Climate Index (OCI) and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ).…

  12. Organizational Silence in Sports Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Gulsum; Pala, Adem; Yilmaz, Taner; Duyan, Mehdi; Gunel, Ilker

    2016-01-01

    Organizational silence can be defined as a way of behaviour belonging to men and women employees in the organization exhibited without reflecting their feelings, ideas, concerns and suggestions related with their workplaces, works for which they are responsible or other activities of the organization. In the period of organizational silence,…

  13. Organizational Learning through Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad Kashif; Ilyas, Muhammad; Aslam, Usman; Ubaid-Ur-Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The transformation of firms from resource-based-view to knowledge-based-view has extended the importance of organizational learning. Thus, this study aims to develop an organizational learning model through transformational leadership with indirect effect of knowledge management process capability and interactive role of…

  14. Organizational Change and Vested Interests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.J. Hendrikse (George)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe nature of organizational change and the value of headquarters is analyzed in a dynamic bargaining model. Organizational change can be either imposed, or voluntary and immediate, or voluntary and delayed. Headquarters derives it value from preventing surplus reducing endogenous

  15. Organizational Barriers to Transition: Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, John; Justice, Thomas I., Ed.

    This study sought to identify the barriers that negatively impact the ability of disabled youth to successfully make a transition from school into employment and a quality adult life, and sought to specifically define organizational disincentives to successful transition. Current research is reviewed relating to organizational barriers to…

  16. Commissioning the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure with experiment workloads

    CERN Document Server

    Medrano Llamas, Ramón; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Denis, Marek Kamil; Cinquilli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    In order to ease the management of their infrastructure, most of the WLCG sites are adopting cloud based strategies. In the case of CERN, the Tier 0 of the WLCG, is completely restructuring the resource and configuration management of their computing center under the codename Agile Infrastructure. Its goal is to manage 15,000 Virtual Machines by means of an OpenStack middleware in order to unify all the resources in CERN's two datacenters: the one placed in Meyrin and the new on in Wigner, Hungary. During the commissioning of this infrastructure, CERN IT is offering an attractive amount of computing resources to the experiments (800 cores for ATLAS and CMS) through a private cloud interface. ATLAS and CMS have joined forces to exploit them by running stress tests and simulation workloads since November 2012. This work will describe the experience of the first deployments of the current experiment workloads on the CERN private cloud testbed. The paper is organized as follows: the first section will explain th...

  17. Generating Shifting Workloads to Benchmark Adaptability in Relational Database Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, Tilmann; Lang, Andreas; Hackl, Thomas; Sick, Bernhard; Kosch, Harald

    A large body of research concerns the adaptability of database systems. Many commercial systems already contain autonomic processes that adapt configurations as well as data structures and data organization. Yet there is virtually no possibility for a just measurement of the quality of such optimizations. While standard benchmarks have been developed that simulate real-world database applications very precisely, none of them considers variations in workloads produced by human factors. Today’s benchmarks test the performance of database systems by measuring peak performance on homogeneous request streams. Nevertheless, in systems with user interaction access patterns are constantly shifting. We present a benchmark that simulates a web information system with interaction of large user groups. It is based on the analysis of a real online eLearning management system with 15,000 users. The benchmark considers the temporal dependency of user interaction. Main focus is to measure the adaptability of a database management system according to shifting workloads. We will give details on our design approach that uses sophisticated pattern analysis and data mining techniques.

  18. Collective workload organization in confined excavation of granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Linevich, Vadim; Goodisman, Michael A.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    Many social insects collectively construct large nests in complex substrates; such structures are often composed of narrow tunnels. The benefits of collective construction, including reduced construction costs per worker come with challenges of navigation in crowded, confined spaces. Here we study the workforce organization of groups of S. invicta fire ants creating tunnels in wet granular media. We monitor the activity levels of marked (painted) workers-defined as a number of tunnel visits over 12 hours- during initiation of tunnels. The activity levels are described by a Lorenz curve with a Gini coefficient of ~ 0 . 7 indicating that a majority of the excavation is performed by a minority of workers. We hypothesize that this workload distribution is beneficial for excavation in crowded conditions, and use a 2D cellular automata (CA) model to reproduce behaviors of the excavating ants. CA simulations reveal that tunnel construction rates decrease in groups of equally active animals compared to groups with the natural workload distribution. We use predictions of the CA model to organize collective excavation of granular material by teams of digging robots, and use the robots to test hypotheses of crowded excavation in the physical world. We acknowledge support of National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems division.

  19. Workloads, strain processes and sickness absenteeism in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Aline Mininel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the workloads, strain processes and sickness absenteeism among nursing workers from a teaching hospital in the Brazilian Central-West. METHOD: a descriptive and cross-sectional study was developed with a quantitative approach, based on the theoretical framework of the social determination of the health-disease process. Data were collected between January and December 2009, based on records of complaints related to occupational exposure among nursing professionals, filed in the software Monitoring System of Nursing Workers' Health. For the sake of statistical analysis, relative and absolute frequencies of the variables and the risk coefficient were considered. RESULTS: 144 notifications of occupational exposure were registered across the analysis period, which represented 25% of the total nursing population at the hospital. The physiological and psychic workloads were the most representative, corresponding to 37% and 36%, respectively. These notifications culminated in 1567 days of absenteeism for disease treatment. CONCLUSIONS: the findings evidence the impact of occupational illnesses on the absenteeism of nursing workers, and can be used to demonstrate the importance of institutional investments in occupational health surveillance.

  20. [Impact of chronic illness on hospital nursing workloads].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés, S; Valdavida, E; Menéndez, C; Natal, C

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the short-term impact of chronic illness in hospital units and to establish a method that allows nursing workloads to be adapted according to the care needs of patients. A descriptive study of the evolution of workloads of nursing staff associated with the care needs of patients between 1 July 2014 and 30 June 2016, in a county hospital. The care needs of the patients were assessed daily using an adaptation of the Montesinos scheme. The estimated times of nursing care and auxiliary nursing required by the patients, based on their level of dependence for time distribution, were based on the standards and recommendations of the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality. During the study period, there was a change in the patient care needs, with no increase in activity, which resulted in an increase in the nursing staffing needs of 1,396 theoretical hours per year. This increase implies an increase in the workforce of 5 nurses in the second period. In the study period, the needs for direct nursing care increased by 7%, this increase is not related to the increase in activity, but to the level of dependency of the patients with chronic diseases. This increase occurred in both medical and surgical units. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Sleep deprivation increases cognitive workload during simulated surgical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasko, Jonathan M; Pauli, Eric M; Kunselman, Allen R; Haluck, Randy S

    2012-01-01

    There have been conflicting reports of the effects of modest sleep deprivation on surgical skills. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 24-hour call shift on technical and cognitive function, as well as the ability to learning a new skill. Thirty-one students trained to expert proficiency on a virtual reality part-task trainer. They then were randomized to either a control or sleep-deprived group. On the second testing day they were given a novel task. Fatigue was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index was used to assess cognitive capabilities. There was no difference between the control and sleep-deprived groups for performance or learning of surgical tasks. Subjectively, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale showed an increase in sleepiness. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index showed an increase in total subjective mental workload for the sleep-deprived group. Sleep-deprived subjects were able to complete the tasks despite the increased workload, and were able to learn a new task proficiently, despite an increase in sleepiness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of iPads to Decrease Faculty Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Sarah; Hess, Kari; Peek, Gina

    2016-10-01

    Multiple faculty were present during a simulation for competency assessments of students, thus creating an increased workload and fatigue. Faculty used technology to reduce the workload and maintain interrater reliability, at little to no cost. The use of high-fidelity simulators, tablet computers, and a university video platform were used to record student competency assessments. One faculty member could perform the assessment, but other course faculty could review the results. Seventy-four competency assessments were recorded, and faculty determined that the tablet provided a viable and inexpensive method to record the competency assessments. The ability for faculty to review the recordings helped in maintaining rater and interrater reliability and a method for student remediation. Time spent in the competency assessment, especially during evening hours, was decreased. A tablet computer and video platform provided an inexpensive method to reduce faculty contact hours and maintain interrater reliability. It also provided a valuable method to allow students to review their own performance for remediation. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(10):590-591.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The Indirect Effects of Servant Leadership Behavior on Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Job Performance: Organizational Justice as a Mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Zehir

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Therelationship between leader and followers plays a vital role, particularly ineducational institutions where a keen understanding of human character and highlevel of social interaction ought to be facilitated. For this reason, in starkcontrast to contemporary leaders who see people only as units of production orexpendable resources in a profit and loss statement, servant leadership focuseson meeting the needs of followers, making them reach their maximum potentialand so perform optimally in order to achieve organizational goals andobjectives. This study examines theeffects of servant leadership behaviors of private college principals onteachers’ organizationalcitizenship behavior and job performance. Using 300 respondents from theprivate education institutes in Turkey, servant leadership behavior is examinedfor its indirect effects on organizational citizenship behavior and jobperformance by its impact on organizational justice. Organizational justiceacts as a mediator between the variables in question. All the results are insupport of the studied mediation effects. Implications of the findings andsuggestions for future research are discussed

  4. The Impact of Heavy Perceived Nurse Workloads on Patient and Nurse Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura MacPhee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationships between seven workload factors and patient and nurse outcomes. (1 Background: Health systems researchers are beginning to address nurses’ workload demands at different unit, job and task levels; and the types of administrative interventions needed for specific workload demands. (2 Methods: This was a cross-sectional correlational study of 472 acute care nurses from British Columbia, Canada. The workload factors included nurse reports of unit-level RN staffing levels and patient acuity and patient dependency; job-level nurse perceptions of heavy workloads, nursing tasks left undone and compromised standards; and task-level interruptions to work flow. Patient outcomes were nurse-reported frequencies of medication errors, patient falls and urinary tract infections; and nurse outcomes were emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. (3 Results: Job-level perceptions of heavy workloads and task-level interruptions had significant direct effects on patient and nurse outcomes. Tasks left undone mediated the relationships between heavy workloads and nurse and patient outcomes; and between interruptions and nurse and patient outcomes. Compromised professional nursing standards mediated the relationships between heavy workloads and nurse outcomes; and between interruptions and nurse outcomes. (4 Conclusion: Administrators should work collaboratively with nurses to identify work environment strategies that ameliorate workload demands at different levels.

  5. Quantifying Intraoperative Workloads Across the Surgical Team Roles: Room for Better Balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Denny; Lowndes, Bethany; Thiels, Cornelius; Bingener, Juliane; Abdelrahman, Amro; Lyons, Rebecca; Hallbeck, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Surgical performance, provider health, and patient safety can be compromised when workload demands exceed individual capability on the surgical team. The purpose of this study is to quantify and compare intraoperative workload among surgical team members. Observations were conducted for an entire surgical day for 33 participating surgeons and their surgical team at one medical institution. Workload (mental, physical, case complexity, distractions, and case difficulty) was measured for each surgical team member using questions from validated questionnaires. Statistical analyses were performed with a mixed effects model. A total of 192 surgical team members participated in 78 operative cases, and 344 questionnaires were collected. Procedures with high surgeon mental and physical workload included endovascular and gastric surgeries, respectively. Ratings did not differ significantly among surgeons and residents, but scrub nurses physical demand ratings were 14-22 (out of 100) points lower than the surgeons, residents, and surgical assistants. Residents reported the highest mental workload, averaging 19-24 points higher than surgical assistants, scrub nurses, and circulating nurses. Mental and physical demands exceeded 50 points 28-45 % of the time for surgeons and residents. Workload did not differ between minimally invasive and open techniques. The workload questionnaires are an effective tool for quantifying intraoperative workload across the surgical team to ensure mental and physical demands do not exceed thresholds where performance may decrease and injury risk increase. This tool has the potential to measure the safety of current procedures and drive design of workload interventions.

  6. Effects of Cognitive Workload on Decision Accuracy, Shooting Performance, and Cortical Activity of Soldiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerick, S. E; Allender, L. E

    2004-01-01

    .... Subjective measures were self reports of workload and stress, behavioral measures were primary and secondary task performance, and physiological measures were event-related spectral perturbation...

  7. Effects of Visual, Auditory, and Tactile Navigation Cues on Navigation Performance, Situation Awareness, and Mental Workload

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Bradley M

    2007-01-01

    .... Results from both experiments indicate that augmented visual displays reduced time to complete navigation, maintained situation awareness, and drastically reduced mental workload in comparison...

  8. Impact of Conflict Avoidance Responsibility Allocation on Pilot Workload in a Distributed Air Traffic Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligda, Sarah V.; Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Vu, Kim-Phuong; Strybel, Thomas Z.; Battiste, Vernol; Johnson, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot workload was examined during simulated flights requiring flight deck-based merging and spacing while avoiding weather. Pilots used flight deck tools to avoid convective weather and space behind a lead aircraft during an arrival into Louisville International airport. Three conflict avoidance management concepts were studied: pilot, controller or automation primarily responsible. A modified Air Traffic Workload Input Technique (ATWIT) metric showed highest workload during the approach phase of flight and lowest during the en-route phase of flight (before deviating for weather). In general, the modified ATWIT was shown to be a valid and reliable workload measure, providing more detailed information than post-run subjective workload metrics. The trend across multiple workload metrics revealed lowest workload when pilots had both conflict alerting and responsibility of the three concepts, while all objective and subjective measures showed highest workload when pilots had no conflict alerting or responsibility. This suggests that pilot workload was not tied primarily to responsibility for resolving conflicts, but to gaining and/or maintaining situation awareness when conflict alerting is unavailable.

  9. Survey of Job Satisfaction and Organizational Climate at the University Computing Centre (Srce), Zagreb

    OpenAIRE

    Zagar, Damir Danijel

    2009-01-01

    Organizational environment determines behavior of the organization’s members. Therefore, in order to efficiently manage human resources in an organization, it is crucial to know and understand this environment. Being used to describe organizational environment, organizational climate and culture are one of the most important psychosocial constructs influencing successful organization functioning and development. During recent thirty years these constructs are attracting the interest for bot...

  10. Benchmarks and performance indicators: two tools for evaluating organizational results and continuous quality improvement efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, T

    1996-04-01

    Benchmarks are tools that can be compared across companies and industries to measure process output. The key to benchmarking is understanding the composition of the benchmark and whether the benchmarks consist of homogeneous groupings. Performance measures expand the concept of benchmarking and cross organizational boundaries to include factors that are strategically important to organizational success. Incorporating performance measures into a balanced score card will provide a comprehensive tool to evaluate organizational results.

  11. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees' shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (M age = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals' perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work.

  12. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees’ shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (Mage = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals’ perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work. PMID:27458405

  13. Speeding up profiling program’s runtime characteristics for workload consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Qian, Depei; Luan, Zhongzhi; Wei, Guang; Wang, Rui; Yang, Hailong

    2017-01-01

    Workload consolidation is a common method to increase resource utilization of the clusters or data centers while still trying to ensure the performance of the workloads. In order to get the maximum benefit from workload consolidation, the task scheduler has to understand the runtime characteristics of the individual program and schedule the programs with less resource conflict onto the same server. We propose a set of metrics to comprehensively depict the runtime characteristics of programs. The metrics set consists of two types of metrics: resource usage and resource sensitivity. The resource sensitivity refers to the performance degradation caused by insufficient resources. The resource usage of a program is easy to get by common performance analysis tools, but the resource sensitivity can not be obtained directly. The simplest and the most intuitive way to obtain the resource sensitivity of a program is to run the program in an environment with controllable resources and record the performance achieved under all possible resource conditions. However, such a process is very much time consuming when multiple resources are involved and each resource is controlled in fine granularity. In order to obtain the resource sensitivity of a program quickly, we propose a method to speed up the resource sensitivity profiling process. Our method is realized based on two level profiling acceleration strategies. First, taking advantage of the resource usage information, we set up the maximum resource usage of the program as the upper bound of the controlled resource. In this way, the range of controlling resource levels can be narrowed, and the number of experiments can be significantly reduced. Secondly, using a prediction model achieved by interpolation, we can reduce the time spent on profiling even further because the resource sensitivity in most of the resource conditions is obtained by interpolation instead of real program execution. These two profiling acceleration

  14. Including Organizational Cultural Parameters in Work Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Handley, Holly A; Heacox, Nancy J

    2004-01-01

    .... In order to represent the organizational impact on the work process, five organizational cultural parameters were identified and included in an algorithm for modeling and simulation of cultural...

  15. Organizational use of evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    2004-01-01

    Organizations perform evaluations in order to demonstrate their trustworthiness to theoutside world and to produce knowledge for use by the management of the organization.In the planning and application of specific evaluations in the organization, differentparticipants or stakeholders very often...... disclose different, hidden or conflicting agendas.In recent years, the use of evaluations in organizations has grown rapidly and we havewitnessed the rise of a new bureaucratic instrument in the realm of knowledgeproduction in organizations, viz., internal evaluations. Such evaluations produce a set ofdata...... as part of the evaluation process and the long-term impact of this new systematicallyorganised set of data on organizational activities are normally not taken seriously intoconsideration when the use of evaluations in organizations are discussed. Saiddifferently, evaluations have become a major factor...

  16. Organizational use of evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    2004-01-01

    disclose different, hidden or conflicting agendas.In recent years, the use of evaluations in organizations has grown rapidly and we havewitnessed the rise of a new bureaucratic instrument in the realm of knowledgeproduction in organizations, viz., internal evaluations. Such evaluations produce a set ofdata......Organizations perform evaluations in order to demonstrate their trustworthiness to theoutside world and to produce knowledge for use by the management of the organization.In the planning and application of specific evaluations in the organization, differentparticipants or stakeholders very often...... as part of the evaluation process and the long-term impact of this new systematicallyorganised set of data on organizational activities are normally not taken seriously intoconsideration when the use of evaluations in organizations are discussed. Saiddifferently, evaluations have become a major factor...

  17. Corporate entrepreneurship, organizational learning and knowledge implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Eric Nielsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main research purpose in this paper is to perform an in-depth analysis of the relationships between corporate entrepreneurship, organizational learning and knowledge, the topic mostly neglected by academicians so far. The main research objective is to conduct a comprehensive analysis and make a step forward in understanding the nature of interdependencies, expand the knowledge base and offer a more profound answer to the dilemma of how to make an organization more innovative and flexible, by using the internal cognitive potential. Qualitative research incorporates a descriptive study, a comparison and an innovative interpretation of the relevant scientific achievements. The main result indicates that the knowledge implementation results in various forms of corporate entrepreneurship, more specifically the application of technical knowledge, lead to product lines extension, the integrative initiating of a new platform development and the exploitative creating of a new business venture. Knowledge is not only a result of organizational learning and corporate entrepreneurship, but also the trigger of future entrepreneurial activities. The research implications refer to the improved contemplation of the corporate entrepreneurship concept from a theoretical standpoint, while the practical contribution lies in providing recommendations to managers on how to stimulate specific types of entrepreneurial initiatives through corresponding approaches to organizational learning and knowledge. Finally, the potential avenue of research is indicated in relation to entrepreneurship as a learning process.

  18. INTEGRATION OF PANDA WORKLOAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH SUPERCOMPUTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, K [University of Texas at Arlington; Jha, S [Rutgers University; Maeno, T [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Mashinistov, R. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Nilsson, P [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Novikov, A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Oleynik, D [University of Texas at Arlington; Panitkin, S [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Poyda, A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Ryabinkin, E. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Teslyuk, A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Tsulaia, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Velikhov, V. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Wen, G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; Wenaus, T [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the funda- mental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the dis- covery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 140 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data cen- ters are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3+ petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking runs will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, Europe and Russia (in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Com- puting Facility (OLCF), Supercomputer at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute , IT4 in Ostrava, and others). The current approach utilizes a modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single- threaded workloads in parallel on Titan s multi-core worker nodes. This implementation was tested with a variety of

  19. Integration of Panda Workload Management System with supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, K.; Jha, S.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Nilsson, P.; Novikov, A.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Poyda, A.; Read, K. F.; Ryabinkin, E.; Teslyuk, A.; Velikhov, V.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 140 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3+ petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking runs will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, Europe and Russia (in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), Supercomputer at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute", IT4 in Ostrava, and others). The current approach utilizes a modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run singlethreaded workloads in parallel on Titan's multi-core worker nodes. This implementation was tested with a variety of Monte-Carlo workloads

  20. A critical examination of the time and workload involved in the design and delivery of an e-module in postgraduate clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgaty, Laura

    2013-05-01

    Although there is increasing pressure on Universities to implement e-learning, this 'glorious revolution' has been met with disappointing results and universities have struggled to engage academic staff, who are major stakeholders, with its use. Although literature suggests online teaching adds to traditional faculty workload, information surrounding the actual 'cost' to individuals is sparse. For academics involved in postgraduate clinical education, it is even more incomplete. Involvement can be a risky undertaking for academics unfamiliar with the resources required. This study outlines staff resources required to create an e-module for busy, practicing clinicians. Data (web analytics, email traffic, and work logs) was collected and statistical analysis performed outlining time involved, work patterns and responsibilities. Data analysis revealed 75% of academic time occurred out of normal office hours. Sixteen total staff hours (12 planning and four delivery) were required to support one hour student online activity. Technical responsibilities were essential throughout, but unpredictable. Universities struggle to engage staff with e-learning due to its unrecognized and (many academics believe) unsustainable workload. Avoiding 'traditional' workload assumptions that are inaccurate, this study provides academics and managers involved in clinical education clear guidance and an increased understanding of workload with a goal to inform practice.

  1. A sociogenomic perspective on neuroscience in organizational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Seth M; Harms, P D

    2014-01-01

    We critically examine the current biological models of individual organizational behavior, with particular emphasis on the roles of genetics and the brain. We demonstrate how approaches to biology in the organizational sciences assume that biological systems are simultaneously causal and essentially static; that genotypes exert constant effects. In contrast, we present a sociogenomic approach to organizational research, which could provide a meta-theoretical framework for understanding organizational behavior. Sociogenomics is an interactionist approach that derives power from its ability to explain how genes and environment operate. The key insight is that both genes and the environment operate by modifying gene expression. This leads to a conception of genetic and environmental effects that is fundamentally dynamic, rather than the static view of classical biometric approaches. We review biometric research within organizational behavior, and contrast these interpretations with a sociogenomic view. We provide a review of gene expression mechanisms that help explain the dynamism observed in individual organizational behavior, particularly factors associated with gene expression in the brain. Finally, we discuss the ethics of genomic and neuroscientific findings for practicing managers and discuss whether it is possible to practically apply these findings in management.

  2. A sociogenomic perspective on neuroscience in organizational behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Michael Spain

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We critically examine the current biological models of individual organizational behavior, with particular emphasis on the roles of genetics and the brain. We demonstrate how approaches to biology in the organizational sciences assume that biological systems are simultaneously causal and essentially static; that genotypes exert constant effects. In contrast, we present a sociogenomic approach to organizational research, which could provide a meta-theoretical framework for understanding organizational behavior. Sociogenomics is an interactionist approach that derives power from its ability to explain how genes and environment operate. The key insight is that both genes and the environment operate by modifying gene expression. This leads to a conception of genetic and environmental effects that is fundamentally dynamic, rather than the static view of classical biometric approaches. We review biometric research within organizational behavior, and contrast these interpretations with a sociogenomic view. We provide a review of gene expression mechanisms that help explain the dynamism observed in individual organizational behavior, particularly factors associated with gene expression in the brain. Finally, we discuss the ethics of genomic and neuroscientific findings for practicing managers and discuss whether it is possible to practically apply these findings in management.

  3. A sociogenomic perspective on neuroscience in organizational behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Seth M.; Harms, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    We critically examine the current biological models of individual organizational behavior, with particular emphasis on the roles of genetics and the brain. We demonstrate how approaches to biology in the organizational sciences assume that biological systems are simultaneously causal and essentially static; that genotypes exert constant effects. In contrast, we present a sociogenomic approach to organizational research, which could provide a meta-theoretical framework for understanding organizational behavior. Sociogenomics is an interactionist approach that derives power from its ability to explain how genes and environment operate. The key insight is that both genes and the environment operate by modifying gene expression. This leads to a conception of genetic and environmental effects that is fundamentally dynamic, rather than the static view of classical biometric approaches. We review biometric research within organizational behavior, and contrast these interpretations with a sociogenomic view. We provide a review of gene expression mechanisms that help explain the dynamism observed in individual organizational behavior, particularly factors associated with gene expression in the brain. Finally, we discuss the ethics of genomic and neuroscientific findings for practicing managers and discuss whether it is possible to practically apply these findings in management. PMID:24616682

  4. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammon, Debra L; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W; Waitzman, Norman J; Magill, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is key to the successful implementation of major improvement strategies. Transformation to a patient-centered medical home (PCHM) is such an improvement strategy, requiring a shift from provider-centric care to team-based care. Because this shift may impact provider satisfaction, it is important to understand the relationship between provider satisfaction and organizational culture, specifically in the context of practices that have transformed to a PCMH model. This was a cross-sectional study of surveys conducted in 2011 among providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (mean, 4.14; scale of 1-5) and interactions with patients (mean, 4.12) and were least satisfied with time spent working (mean, 3.47), paperwork (mean, 3.45), and compensation (mean, 3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics, with family/clan and hierarchical cultures the most common. Significant correlations (P ≤ .05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included family/clan culture negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial culture positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational culture positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical culture negatively correlated with the Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended.

  5. Moderating effects of nurses' organizational justice between organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Lack of existing literature on the correlation among organizational justice, organizational support, and organizational citizenship behaviors has created a research gap in previous evidence-based practice (EBP) studies on nursing personnel. To investigate whether organizational justice among nurses has a moderating effect between their organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors in order to bridge such a gap of existing literature with the EBP study on nursing personnel. Nursing staff of one large and influential hospital in Taiwan was surveyed. Four hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 386 were collected with a valid response rate of 96.50%. SPSS 17.0 and Amos 17.0 statistical software packages were used for data analysis. Nurses' organizational support positively influences their organizational citizenship behaviors, and their organizational justice perception has a positive moderating effect between organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors. Results call hospitals' attention to the type of individual behaviors that may improve organizational performance. When nursing staff perceive fair and impartial treatment by the organization and supportive emotional attachment, behaviors beneficial for the organization are expressed in return. Subjective perceptions of nursing staff play an important role in organizational exchange relationship; the higher the degree of nursing staff's perceived organizational justice, the higher the degree of their organizational support, perception, and exhibition of organizational citizenship behaviors such as altruistic behavior and dedication to the work. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Plain Language and Organizational Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Pedersen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Changing the language in an organization is a major organizational change. In this article, I discuss some of the organizational challenges for one specific language change implementation, taking the stance that language change must be treated as any other organizational change for it to have an effect. I work with the case of the Danish tax authorities’ language project aimed at producing more readable letters. The empirical data that I work with are two qualitative informant interviews. One recorded at the language project’s headquarters where they lay out the general lines for the project, and the other at the payment center where they use the revised letters.

  7. Conceptualizing inter-organizational triads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Mette; Holma, Anne-Maria; Havila, Virpi

    2016-01-01

    of inter-organizational phenomena. However, not all studies involving a context of three actors are actually examining triads. This paper offers a robust definition of three-actor constellations qualifying as triads. Moreover, it elaborates on different types of inter-organizational triads, based on two...... aspects of collectivity; cohesion and the ability to act as a single entity. The definition of inter-organizational triads and the categorization of different types of triads will hopefully encourage further studies of triads; the smallest and simplest network which offers insights, which cannot...... be achieved in the study of single actors or dyads....

  8. Integration Of PanDA Workload Management System With Supercomputers

    CERN Document Server

    Klimentov, Alexei; The ATLAS collaboration; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Nilsson, Paul; Oleynik, Danila; Panitkin, Sergey; Read, Kenneth; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 140 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 100,000 co...

  9. Rheoencephalographic and electroencephalographic measures of cognitive workload: analytical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Montgomery, R. W.; Guisado, R.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of mental workload assessment by rheoencephalographic (REG) and multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. During the performance of this research, unique testing, analytical and display procedures were developed for REG and EEG monitoring that extend the current state of the art and provide valuable tools for the study of cerebral circulatory and neural activity during cognition. REG records are analyzed to provide indices of the right and left hemisphere hemodynamic changes that take place during each test sequence. The EEG data are modeled using regression techniques and mathematically transformed to provide energy-density distributions of the scalp electrostatic field. These procedures permit concurrent REG/EEG cognitive testing not possible with current techniques. The introduction of a system for recording and analysis of cognitive REG/EEG test sequences facilitates the study of learning and memory disorders, dementia and other encephalopathies.

  10. Rheoencephalographic and electroencephalographic measures of cognitive workload: analytical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, L D; Montgomery, R W; Guisado, R

    1995-05-01

    This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of mental workload assessment by rheoencephalographic (REG) and multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. During the performance of this research, unique testing, analytical and display procedures were developed for REG and EEG monitoring that extend the current state of the art and provide valuable tools for the study of cerebral circulatory and neural activity during cognition. REG records are analyzed to provide indices of the right and left hemisphere hemodynamic changes that take place during each test sequence. The EEG data are modeled using regression techniques and mathematically transformed to provide energy-density distributions of the scalp electrostatic field. These procedures permit concurrent REG/EEG cognitive testing not possible with current techniques. The introduction of a system for recording and analysis of cognitive REG/EEG test sequences facilitates the study of learning and memory disorders, dementia and other encephalopathies.

  11. DIRAC pilot framework and the DIRAC Workload Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casajus, Adrian; Graciani, Ricardo; Paterson, Stuart; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, has pioneered the use of pilot jobs in the Grid. Pilot Jobs provide a homogeneous interface to an heterogeneous set of computing resources. At the same time, Pilot Jobs allow to delay the scheduling decision to the last moment, thus taking into account the precise running conditions at the resource and last moment requests to the system. The DIRAC Workload Management System provides one single scheduling mechanism for jobs with very different profiles. To achieve an overall optimisation, it organizes pending jobs in task queues, both for individual users and production activities. Task queues are created with jobs having similar requirements. Following the VO policy a priority is assigned to each task queue. Pilot submission and subsequent job matching are based on these priorities following a statistical approach.

  12. Raising the Institutional Research Profile: Assessing the Context and Expanding the Use of Organizational Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmley, Kelli A.

    2009-01-01

    Institutional researchers can extend their dexterity in assessing the decision-making process at a university by developing a more robust array of organizational frames. The application of four organizational frames (structural frame, human resource frame, political frame, and symbolic frame) "deepens one's appreciation and understanding of…

  13. A reference model for the development of networked organizational communication: A communication perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sjoerd A.; Isaias, P.

    2002-01-01

    Organizational communication is increasingly based on electronic networks. The growth is seldom the result of a planned organizational development of these technologies, but mostly driven by 'rapid' technology developments and best user practices. To enable organizations to understand and to steer

  14. An Investigation of Organizational Culture Changes and Effectiveness at Jefferson College: 1963-Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Dena M.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental factor in the internal dynamics of a college is its culture. Central to understanding organizational culture is to minimize the occurrence and consequences of cultural conflict and help foster the development of shared goals. Modifying organizational culture is important. Without culture change, there is little hope of enduring…

  15. Psychometric Issues in Organizational Stressor Research: A Review and Implications for Sport Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Rachel; Fletcher, David

    2012-01-01

    Organizational stressors can potentially elicit a number of undesirable consequences for sport performers. It is, therefore, imperative that psychologists better understand the demands that athletes encounter via their exploration and assessment. However, although researchers have identified a wide range of organizational stressors in competitive…

  16. Globalization and Organizational Change: Engineers' Experiences and Their Implications for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    The demand for flexible engineers presents significant challenges to engineering education. Among these is the need for engineers to be prepared to understand and deal with organizational change. Yet engineering education and research on engineers have overlooked the impact of organizational change on engineering work. After outlining the impact…

  17. Individual Readiness for Organizational Change and Its Implications for Human Resource and Organization Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myungweon; Ruona, Wendy E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual readiness for organizational change reflects the concept of "unfreezing" proposed by Lewin (1947/1997b) and is critical to successful change implementation. Understanding the conditions conducive to individual readiness for organizational change, instead of the more traditional focus on resistance to change, can be useful for designing…

  18. Simultaneous Versus Sequential Complementarity in the Adoption of Technological and Organizational Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battisti, Giuliana; Rabbiosi, Larissa; Colombo, Massimo G.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally suggested that technological and organizational innovations, being complementary, need to be adopted simultaneously. Nevertheless, sequential rather than simultaneous adoption of these two types of innovation may be optimal. In this paper, we analyze the pattern of mutual causation...... of technological and organizational innovations and contribute to the understanding of their interdependencies......

  19. Exploring the Effects of Empowerment, Innovation, Professionalism, Conflict, and Participation on Teacher Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliman, Stephanie Layne

    2012-01-01

    Improved understanding of teacher retention depends on systematic research on working conditions, teachers' perceptions of their work environments, and the effect of condition-of-work variables on organizational commitment. The examination of organizational commitment in K-12 teachers is a construct with implications for long-term relationships in…

  20. Organizational Segmentation and the Prestige Economy: Deprofessionalization in High-and Low-Resource Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinger, Kelly Ochs; Taylor, Barrett J.; Coco, Lindsay; Slaughter, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Research often considers vertical stratification between U.S. higher education institutions. Yet differences also exist within higher education institutions, which we term "organizational segmentation." We understand organizational segmentation as a consequence of the external "prestige economy," which favors research revenues…