WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding ionospheric weather

  1. Ionospheric TEC Weather Map Over South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Wrasse, C. M.; Denardini, C. M.; Pádua, M. B.; de Paula, E. R.; Costa, S. M. A.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Monico, J. F. Galera; Ivo, A.; Sant'Anna, N.

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric weather maps using the total electron content (TEC) monitored by ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers over South American continent, TECMAP, have been operationally produced by Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais's Space Weather Study and Monitoring Program (Estudo e Monitoramento Brasileiro de Clima Especial) since 2013. In order to cover the whole continent, four GNSS receiver networks, (Rede Brasileiro de Monitoramento Contínuo) RBMC/Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics, Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network, International GNSS Service, and Red Argentina de Monitoreo Satelital Continuo, in total 140 sites, have been used. TECMAPs with a time resolution of 10 min are produced in 12 h time delay. Spatial resolution of the map is rather low, varying between 50 and 500 km depending on the density of the observation points. Large day-to-day variabilities of the equatorial ionization anomaly have been observed. Spatial gradient of TEC from the anomaly trough (total electron content unit, 1 TECU = 1016 el m-2 (TECU) 80) causes a large ionospheric range delay in the GNSS positioning system. Ionospheric plasma bubbles, their seeding and development, could be monitored. This plasma density (spatial and temporal) variability causes not only the GNSS-based positioning error but also radio wave scintillations. Monitoring of these phenomena by TEC mapping becomes an important issue for space weather concern for high-technology positioning system and telecommunication.

  2. Ionospheric climatology and weather disturbances: A tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.

    The ionosphere can have a detrimental effect on both civilian and military systems, including OTH radars, HF communications, surveillance, and navigation systems that use GPS satellites. In an attempt to mitigate the adverse effects, specification and forecast models are being developed that are based on sophisticated data assimilation techniques. However, the model development represents a significant challenge because the ionosphere is known to display a marked variation with altitude, latitude, longitude, universal time, season, solar cycle, and geomagnetic activity. This variation results from the couplings, time delays, and feedback mechanisms that are inherent in the system as well as from the effects of solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric, and mesospheric processes. The various processes act in concert to define both a background state (climatology) and a disturbed state (weather), which are described in this tutorial. First, a brief description of the background ionospheric state and the physical processes that are responsible for establishing this state is given. The tutorial then focuses on a discussion of weather disturbances and features, the causes of weather, and the status of weather modeling.

  3. Space weather: Modeling and forecasting ionospheric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzadilla Mendez, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Space weather is the set of phenomena and interactions that take place in the interplanetary medium. It is regulated primarily by the activity originating in the Sun and affects both the artificial satellites that are outside of the protective cover of the Earth's atmosphere as the rest of the planets in the solar system. Among the phenomena that are of great relevance and impact on Earth are the auroras and geomagnetic storms , these are a direct result of irregularities in the flow of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field . Given the high complexity of the physical phenomena involved (magnetic reconnection , particle inlet and ionizing radiation to the atmosphere) one of the great scientific challenges today is to forecast the state of plasmatic means either the interplanetary medium , the magnetosphere and ionosphere , for their importance to the development of various human activities such as radio , global positioning , navigation, etc. . It briefly address some of the international ionospheric modeling methods and contributions and participation that currently has the space group of the Institute of Geophysics Geophysics and Astronomy (IGA) in these activities of modeling and forecasting ionospheric. (author)

  4. Ionospheric Response to Extremes in the Space Environment: Establishing Benchmarks for the Space Weather Action Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, R. A.; Azeem, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    One of the goals of the National Space Weather Action Plan is to establish extreme event benchmarks. These benchmarks are estimates of environmental parameters that impact technologies and systems during extreme space weather events. Quantitative assessment of anticipated conditions during these extreme space weather event will enable operators and users of affected technologies to develop plans for mitigating space weather risks and improve preparedness. The ionosphere is one of the most important regions of space because so many applications either depend on ionospheric space weather for their operation (HF communication, over-the-horizon radars), or can be deleteriously affected by ionospheric conditions (e.g. GNSS navigation and timing, UHF satellite communications, synthetic aperture radar, HF communications). Since the processes that influence the ionosphere vary over time scales from seconds to years, it continues to be a challenge to adequately predict its behavior in many circumstances. Estimates with large uncertainties, in excess of 100%, may result in operators of impacted technologies over or under preparing for such events. The goal of the next phase of the benchmarking activity is to reduce these uncertainties. In this presentation, we will focus on the sources of uncertainty in the ionospheric response to extreme geomagnetic storms. We will then discuss various research efforts required to better understand the underlying processes of ionospheric variability and how the uncertainties in ionospheric response to extreme space weather could be reduced and the estimates improved.

  5. Space weather. Ionospheric control of magnetotail reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotko, William; Smith, Ryan H; Zhang, Binzheng; Ouellette, Jeremy E; Brambles, Oliver J; Lyon, John G

    2014-07-11

    Observed distributions of high-speed plasma flows at distances of 10 to 30 Earth radii (R(E)) in Earth's magnetotail neutral sheet are highly skewed toward the premidnight sector. The flows are a product of the magnetic reconnection process that converts magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail into plasma kinetic and thermal energy. We show, using global numerical simulations, that the electrodynamic interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere produces an asymmetry consistent with observed distributions in nightside reconnection and plasmasheet flows and in accompanying ionospheric convection. The primary causal agent is the meridional gradient in the ionospheric Hall conductance which, through the Cowling effect, regulates the distribution of electrical currents flowing within and between the ionosphere and magnetotail. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Influence of Ionospheric Weather on GNSS Radio Occultation Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.; Pedatella, N. M.; Kuo, Y. H.

    2016-12-01

    Transient loss of lock (LOL) is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (> 6 cycles) occurrence is 23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing 8.3% and 14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low-Earth-orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  7. Geodetic Space Weather Monitoring by means of Ionosphere Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The term space weather indicates physical processes and phenomena in space caused by radiation of energy mainly from the Sun. Manifestations of space weather are (1) variations of the Earth's magnetic field, (2) the polar lights in the northern and southern hemisphere, (3) variations within the ionosphere as part of the upper atmosphere characterized by the existence of free electrons and ions, (4) the solar wind, i.e. the permanent emission of electrons and photons, (5) the interplanetary magnetic field, and (6) electric currents, e.g. the van Allen radiation belt. It can be stated that ionosphere disturbances are often caused by so-called solar storms. A solar storm comprises solar events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which have different effects on the Earth. Solar flares may cause disturbances in positioning, navigation and communication. CMEs can effect severe disturbances and in extreme cases damages or even destructions of modern infrastructure. Examples are interruptions to satellite services including the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), communication systems, Earth observation and imaging systems or a potential failure of power networks. Currently the measurements of solar satellite missions such as STEREO and SOHO are used to forecast solar events. Besides these measurements the Earth's ionosphere plays another key role in monitoring the space weather, because it responses to solar storms with an increase of the electron density. Space-geodetic observation techniques, such as terrestrial GNSS, satellite altimetry, space-borne GPS (radio occultation), DORIS and VLBI provide valuable global information about the state of the ionosphere. Additionally geodesy has a long history and large experience in developing and using sophisticated analysis and combination techniques as well as empirical and physical modelling approaches. Consequently, geodesy is predestinated for strongly supporting space weather monitoring via

  8. Characterizing GPS radio occultation loss of lock due to ionospheric weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Pedatella, Nicholas M.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Transient loss of lock is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (>6 cycles) occurrence is ~23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing ~8.3% and ~14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low Earth orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  9. GNSS-Based Space Weather Systems Including COSMIC Ionospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, Attila; Mandrake, Lukas; Wilson, Brian; Iijima, Byron; Pi, Xiaoqing; Hajj, George; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation outline includes University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) product comparisons, assimilating ground-based global positioning satellites (GPS) and COSMIC into JPL/University of Southern California (USC) Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM), and JPL/USC GAIM validation. The discussion of comparisons examines Abel profiles and calibrated TEC. The JPL/USC GAIM validation uses Arecibo ISR, Jason-2 VTEC, and Abel profiles.

  10. All-sky-imaging capabilities for ionospheric space weather research using geomagnetic conjugate point observing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, C.; Baumgardner, J.; Wroten, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2018-04-01

    Optical signatures of ionospheric disturbances exist at all latitudes on Earth-the most well known case being visible aurora at high latitudes. Sub-visual emissions occur equatorward of the auroral zones that also indicate periods and locations of severe Space Weather effects. These fall into three magnetic latitude domains in each hemisphere: (1) sub-auroral latitudes ∼40-60°, (2) mid-latitudes (20-40°) and (3) equatorial-to-low latitudes (0-20°). Boston University has established a network of all-sky-imagers (ASIs) with sites at opposite ends of the same geomagnetic field lines in each hemisphere-called geomagnetic conjugate points. Our ASIs are autonomous instruments that operate in mini-observatories situated at four conjugate pairs in North and South America, plus one pair linking Europe and South Africa. In this paper, we describe instrument design, data-taking protocols, data transfer and archiving issues, image processing, science objectives and early results for each latitude domain. This unique capability addresses how a single source of disturbance is transformed into similar or different effects based on the unique "receptor" conditions (seasonal effects) found in each hemisphere. Applying optical conjugate point observations to Space Weather problems offers a new diagnostic approach for understanding the global system response functions operating in the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  11. Clouds and troughs of total electron content detected with the ionospheric weather index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric weather W index has been developed with the different thresholds of change in the F2 layer peak electron density NmF2 (proportional to foF2 critical frequency) or total electron content TEC relative their quiet reference for quantifying the ionosphere variability. The thresholds of DTEC=log(TEC/TECq) are selected for the positive and negative logarithm of TEC ratio to the quiet reference median, TECq, at any given location on the Earth. The global W-index maps are produced from Global Ionospheric Maps of Total Electron Content, GIM-TEC, and provided online at http://www.izmiran.ru/services/iweather/ and http://www.iololab.org/. Based on W-index maps, Catalogues of the ionospheric storms and sub-storms are produced available for the users. The second generation of the ionospheric weather indices, designated V index, is recently introduced and applied for the retrospective study of GIM-TEC variability during 1999-2015. Using sliding-window statistical analysis, moving daily-hourly TEC median TECq for 15 preceding days with estimated variance bounds are obtained at cells of GIM-TEC. The ionosphere variability index, V, is expressed in terms of ΔTEC deviation from the median normalized by the standard deviation STD. V index segmentation is introduced from Vn=-4 in step of 1 to Vp=4 specifying TEC storm if an instant TEC is outside of TECq+-1STD. The global maps of V index allow distinguish the clouds of enhanced TEC (positive storm signatures) and troughs of TEC depletion (negative storm signatures) as compared to the background quiet reference TECq map. It is found that the large-scale TEC clouds and troughs are observed in space all over the world constituting up to 20-50 percent of cells of GIM-TEC. The time variation of these plasma patches is partly following to geomagnetic SSC storm onset. As concerns the interplanetary and the solar wind, SW, sources of the ionospheric storms the TEC storms are observed both with IMF and SW precursors and

  12. Assessing models for ionospheric weather specifications over Australia during the 2004 Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth-System (CAWSES) campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Harris, T. J.

    2007-09-01

    The Utah State University (USU) Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) program is developing assimilation models to specify ionospheric weather. In this study the Gauss Markov Kalman Filter (GMKF) GAIM model was used. The period 20 March through 19 April 2004, which spanned the Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth-System (CAWSES) first study period, has been extensively studied to validate the performance of the GAIM model. Although the USU-GAIM model has both regional and global capabilities and can assimilate data from a wide variety of ionospheric observations, for this study the GMKF model was run in a global mode using data only from 162 ground-based GPS slant total electron content (TEC) stations and in situ measurements from three satellites. Using measurements from the 11 ionosonde stations of the Australian Department of Defence sounder network as an independent bottomside ground-truth, the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), Ionospheric Forecast Model (IFM), and GMKF were compared for (1) monthly mean climatology and (2) the day-to-day weather during the 31 day period. A skill score was developed for the day-to-day weather by defining the IRI as the reference model. IFM is found to be a 10% improvement, while the GMKF is 39% more capable to capture weather variability. However, the study also identifies that this global version of GMKF has difficulty around sunrise, during which time the GMKF performance can be poorer than IRI. Excluding this interval from the skill score analysis increases the GMKF ability to track weather to 48%. The use of more data and different data types should further increase the GMKF's ability to capture weather variations.

  13. Constellation of CubeSats for Realtime Ionospheric E-field Measurements for Global Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Swenson, C.; Pilinski, M.; Fish, C. S.; Neilsen, T. L.; Stromberg, E. M.; Azeem, I.; Barjatya, A.

    2014-12-01

    Inexpensive and robust space-weather monitoring instruments are needed to fill upcoming gaps in the Nation's ability to meet requirements for space weather specification and forecasting. Foremost among the needed data are electric fields, since they drive global ionospheric and thermospheric behavior, and because there are relatively few ground-based measurements. We envisage a constellation of CubeSats to provide global coverage of the electric field and its variability. The DICE (Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment) mission was a step towards this goal, with two identical 1.5U CubeSats, each carrying three space weather instruments: (1) double probe instruments to measure AC and DC electric fields; (2) Langmuir probes to measure ionospheric electron density, and; (3) a magnetometer to measure field-aligned currents. DICE launched in October 2011. DICE was the first CubeSat mission to observe a Storm Enhanced Density event, fulfilling a major goal of the mission. Due to attitude control anomalies encountered in orbit, the DICE electric field booms have not yet been deployed. Important lessons have been learned for the implementation of a spin-stabilized CubeSat, and the design and performance of the Attitude Determination & Control System (ADCS). These lessons are now being applied to the DIME SensorSat, a risk-reduction mission that is capable of deploying flexible electric field booms up to a distance of 10-m tip-to-tip from a 1.5U CubeSat. DIME will measure AC and DC electric fields, and will exceed several IORD-2 threshold requirements. Ion densities, and magnetic fields will also be measured to characterize the performance of the sensor in different plasma environments. We show the utility of a constellation of electric field measurements, describe the DIME SensorSat, and demonstrate how the measurement will meet or exceed IORD requirements. The reduced cost of these sensors will enable constellations that can, for the first time, adequately resolve the

  14. The International Reference Ionosphere - 45 Years of International Space Weather Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B. W.; Rawer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) project was started in 1970 when the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) joined forces to establish an internationally accepted reference model for the ionosphere. COSPAR needed such a specification for the evaluation of environmental effects on spacecraft and experiments in space, and URSI for radiowave propagation studies and applications. Because of this operational needs both unions requested that IRI be based primarily on data using all available and reliable data sources from space and ground. Similar activities had been started for the Atmosphere with the COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA) model and for the Earth's magnetic field with the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). This presentation will give a brief overview over the IRI project and the progress made since its inception. An important milestone was reached early last year when IRI was voted to become the ISO standard for the ionosphere; the International Standardization Organization (ISO) is in charge of establishing and publishing international standards. This talk will discuss the most recent status of IRI activities including the development of a Real-Time IRI and the IRI 2015 Workshop, the first COSPAR Capacity Building Workshop on a Space Weather topic, that will be held in Bangkok from November 2 to 13. The IRI model is heavily used for a wide range of applications in science, engineering and education. We will discuss some of the more important ones of these applications and present measures of success that underline the superior performance of the model and the wide acceptance in the science community and science-interested public.

  15. Understanding the dynamic ionospheric signature of the plasmapause (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Sibanda, P.; Zou, S.; Yizengaw, E.

    2010-12-01

    The equatorial edge of the mid-latitude trough has been shown to be an ionospheric signature of the plasmapause from both ground-based and space-based observations. However, identifying the trough is not always possible due to broad latitudinal density gradients, local time and seasonal effects, and storm and substorm dynamics. We review the current methods of identifying the trough from ground and space-based observations and describe the main deficiencies in these methods especially for tracking the trough/plasmapause during storms and substorms. We discuss the ionospheric signature of plasmaspheric plumes and their relationship to trough/plasmapause signatures. We conclude with some new multi-instrument observations that help clarify the ionospheric trough signature during geomagnetically active periods.

  16. UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS AMY MCGOVERN, TIMOTHY SUPINIE, DAVID JOHN GAGNE II, NATHANIEL TROUTMAN,...

  17. Aerosols: The key to understanding Titan's lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cuberos, G. J.; Cardnell, S.; García-Collado, A. J.; Witasse, O.; López-Moreno, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    The Permittivity Wave and Altimetry system on board the Huygens probe observed an ionospheric hidden layer at a much lower altitude than the main ionosphere during its descent through the atmosphere of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. Previous studies predicted a similar ionospheric layer. However, neither previous nor post-Huygens theoretical models have been able to reproduce the measurements of the electrical conductivity and charge densities reported by the Mutual Impedance (MI) and Relaxation Probe (RP) sensors. The measurements were made from an altitude of 140 km down to the ground and show a maximum of charge densities of ≈ 2 ×109 m-3 positive ions and ≈ 450 ×106 m-3 electrons at approximately 65 km. Such a large difference between positive and negative charge densities has not yet been understood. Here, by making use of electron and ion capture processes in to aerosols, we are able to model both electron and positive ion number densities and to reconcile experimental data and model results.

  18. First results of operational ionospheric dynamics prediction for the Brazilian Space Weather program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Adriano; de Souza, Jonas Rodrigues; de Campos Velho, Haroldo Fraga; Pereira, André Grahl; Bailey, Graham John

    2014-07-01

    It is shown the development and preliminary results of operational ionosphere dynamics prediction system for the Brazilian Space Weather program. The system is based on the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model (SUPIM), a physics-based model computer code describing the distribution of ionization within the Earth mid to equatorial latitude ionosphere and plasmasphere, during geomagnetically quiet periods. The model outputs are given in a 2-dimensional plane aligned with Earth magnetic field lines, with fixed magnetic longitude coordinate. The code was adapted to provide the output in geographical coordinates. It was made referring to the Earth’s magnetic field as an eccentric dipole, using the approximation based on International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF-11). During the system operation, several simulation runs are performed at different longitudes. The original code would not be able to run all simulations serially in reasonable time. So, a parallel version for the code was developed for enhancing the performance. After preliminary tests, it was frequently observed code instability, when negative ion temperatures or concentrations prevented the code from continuing its processing. After a detailed analysis, it was verified that most of these problems occurred due to concentration estimation of simulation points located at high altitudes, typically over 4000 km of altitude. In order to force convergence, an artificial exponential decay for ion-neutral collisional frequency was used above mentioned altitudes. This approach shown no significant difference from original code output, but improved substantially the code stability. In order to make operational system even more stable, the initial altitude and initial ion concentration values used on exponential decay equation are changed when convergence is not achieved, within pre-defined values. When all code runs end, the longitude of every point is then compared with its original reference

  19. Nearly relativistic electron fluxes and ionospheric parameters as components of space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Oleksiy; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Matyjasiak, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    We present specific features detected in spatial distributions of magnetospheric high energy electrons and in ionosphere plasma electron densities and temperatures during a deep minimum of 11 year's cycle of solar activity. New outcome comes as a result of joint analysis of experimental data derived from the satellite telescope of electrons and protons STEP-F aboard the low, circular and highly inclined orbit CORONAS-Photon satellite, and from Demeter satellite. The highly sensitive STEP-F instrument flown in 2009 and measured sub-relativistic electron fluxes and protons of intermediate energies by extensive-angled telescopic system of detectors at the height of 550 km covering the wide range of McIlwain L-parameters from 1 up to 20. We present peculiar characteristics of electron flows in well-known Van Allen outer and inner radiation belts, inside the region of South Atlantic Anomaly and outside of mentioned zones observed during the first half of May, 2009. In spite of extremely low solar activity, and the presence of single geomagnetic substorm on May, 6-8, which was characterized by remarkably small Dst =-30 nT, substantial variations of electron fluxes with energies E > 180 keV came into being in all zones of enhanced charge radiation. It was clearly seen elongation of the South Atlantic Anomaly in terms of electron flows up to low and near-equatorial latitudes to eastern-directed longitudes. Throughout the whole period there were recorded two radiation belts in the inner magnetosphere: well-studied at L 2.3, and additional one at L 1.6. The third radiation belt at L 1.6 had specific belt-shaped profile of particle fluxes, and registered at broad range of longitudes that do not coincide with those ones related to the Anomaly location. The analyses of subrelativistic electrons at the heights of upper ionosphere and inospheric plasma parameters has been analysed. From this standpoint we consider electron flux pulsations during various phases of geomagnetic

  20. Using Weather Types to Understand and Communicate Weather and Climate Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prein, A. F.; Hale, B.; Holland, G. J.; Bruyere, C. L.; Done, J.; Mearns, L.

    2017-12-01

    A common challenge in atmospheric research is the translation of scientific advancements and breakthroughs to decision relevant and actionable information. This challenge is central to the mission of NCAR's Capacity Center for Climate and Weather Extremes (C3WE, www.c3we.ucar.edu). C3WE advances our understanding of weather and climate impacts and integrates these advances with distributed information technology to create tools that promote a global culture of resilience to weather and climate extremes. Here we will present an interactive web-based tool that connects historic U.S. losses and fatalities from extreme weather and climate events to 12 large-scale weather types. Weather types are dominant weather situations such as winter high-pressure systems over the U.S. leading to very cold temperatures or summertime moist humid air masses over the central U.S. leading to severe thunderstorms. Each weather type has a specific fingerprint of economic losses and fatalities in a region that is quantified. Therefore, weather types enable a direct connection of observed or forecasted weather situation to loss of life and property. The presented tool allows the user to explore these connections, raise awareness of existing vulnerabilities, and build resilience to weather and climate extremes.

  1. Development of the Beidou Ionospheric Observation Network in China for space weather monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lianhuan; Yue, Xinan; Ning, Baiqi

    2017-08-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) beacon has been widely used in ionospheric monitoring. The Chinese Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) started to operate in 2012, with three kinds of constellations: the medium Earth orbit, the inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit, and the geosynchronous Earth orbit. A compact, portable, and low-power GNSS observation instrument which is named BG2 GNSS ionospheric monitor was developed at the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is capable of tracking BDS, Global Positing System, and Global Navigation Satellite System signals with a sampling rate up to 5 Hz. To use the unique BDS GEO signals for ionospheric monitoring, the Beidou Ionospheric Observation Network (BION) utilizing the BG2 GNSS ionospheric monitor was established recently in China with a total of 30 sites. This paper describes the development of the GNSS ionospheric monitor, the construction of the network, data processing, and preliminary scientific research. As demonstrated in the following paper, the BDS GEO total electron content data have shown unique value in some specific ionospheric studies due to the fact that it is not influenced by the mixed effect of spatial and temporal ionospheric variability as observed with other GNSS signals.

  2. Is It Going to Rain Today? Understanding the Weather Forecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, Jim; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a resource for science teachers to develop a better understanding of weather forecasts, including outlooks, watches, warnings, advisories, severe local storms, winter storms, floods, hurricanes, nonprecipitation hazards, precipitation probabilities, sky condition, and UV index. (MKR)

  3. Wave and plasma measurements and GPS diagnostics of the main ionospheric trough as a hybrid method used for Space Weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rothkaehl

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the main ionospheric trough is a unique region of the ionosphere, where different types of waves and instabilities can be generated. This region of the ionosphere acts like a lens, focusing a variety of indicators from the equator of plasmapause and local ionospheric plasma. This paper reports the results of monitoring the mid-latitude trough structure, dynamics and wave activity. For these purposes, the data gathered by the currently-operating DEMETER satellite and past diagnostics located on IK-19, Apex, and MAGION-3 spacecraft, as well as TEC measurements were used. A global-time varying picture of the ionospheric trough was reconstructed using the sequence of wave spectra registered and plasma measurements in the top-side ionosphere. The authors present the wave activity from ULF frequency band to the HF frequency detected inside the trough region and discuss its properties during geomagnetic disturbances. It is thought that broadband emissions are correlated with low frequency radiation, which is excited by the wave-particle interaction in the equatorial plasmapause and moves to the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field line. In the ionosphere, the suprathermal electrons can interact with these electrostatic waves and excite electron acoustic waves or HF longitudinal plasma waves.

    Furthermore, the electron density trough can provide useful data on the magnetosphere ionosphere dynamics and morphology and, in consequence, can be used for Space Weather purposes.

  4. Wave and plasma measurements and GPS diagnostics of the main ionospheric trough as a hybrid method used for Space Weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rothkaehl

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the main ionospheric trough is a unique region of the ionosphere, where different types of waves and instabilities can be generated. This region of the ionosphere acts like a lens, focusing a variety of indicators from the equator of plasmapause and local ionospheric plasma. This paper reports the results of monitoring the mid-latitude trough structure, dynamics and wave activity. For these purposes, the data gathered by the currently-operating DEMETER satellite and past diagnostics located on IK-19, Apex, and MAGION-3 spacecraft, as well as TEC measurements were used. A global-time varying picture of the ionospheric trough was reconstructed using the sequence of wave spectra registered and plasma measurements in the top-side ionosphere. The authors present the wave activity from ULF frequency band to the HF frequency detected inside the trough region and discuss its properties during geomagnetic disturbances. It is thought that broadband emissions are correlated with low frequency radiation, which is excited by the wave-particle interaction in the equatorial plasmapause and moves to the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field line. In the ionosphere, the suprathermal electrons can interact with these electrostatic waves and excite electron acoustic waves or HF longitudinal plasma waves. Furthermore, the electron density trough can provide useful data on the magnetosphere ionosphere dynamics and morphology and, in consequence, can be used for Space Weather purposes.

  5. Study of ionospheric disturbances over Mexico associated with transient space weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Rodriguez-Martinez, M.; Sergeeva, M. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; De la Luz, V.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of ionospheric disturbances at a location in Mexico (dip latitude: 28 ° , geographic latitude: 19 ° N) using two different parameters: ionospheric scintillation (IONS) and Total Electron Content (TEC). This study employs observations during 2014-2015 of astronomical radio sources at 140 MHz obtained by the MEXican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) and TEC values from Global Ionospheric Maps data. To identify the ionospheric disturbances two indices were used: the wavelet IONS index based on the wavelet transform function of MEXART data and the ionospheric W-index based on the deviation of TEC. A set of 55 wavelet IONS events and 63 W-index events were identified in this interval. We analyzed the association of theses events with solar flares that occurred around the solar zenith and/or geomagnetic storms. During this period, it was observed an incidence of daytime IONS at hours around the solar zenith. Some possible associations with solar flares were found. The preliminary results pointed out that, for this period, daytime scintillations could be linked to the occurrence of Esb -layers. In addition, most of the W-index events were possibly related to geomagnetic storms. We found that the majority of these geomagnetic storms were minor and moderate storms and were characterized by steeper falls of Dst. This first analysis revealed that wavelet methodology is useful in identifying and analyzing ionospheric disturbances. Also, MEXART observations provide a good tool for performing IONS studies at mid latitudes.

  6. Tools for Understanding Space Weather Impacts to Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. C.; Shprits, Y.; Likar, J. J.; Kellerman, A. C.; Quinn, R. A.; Whelan, P.; Reker, N.; Huston, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    Space weather causes dramatic changes in the near-Earth radiation environment. Intense particle fluxes can damage electronic components on satellites, causing temporary malfunctions, degraded performance, or a complete system/mission loss. Understanding whether space weather is the cause of such problems expedites investigations and guides successful design improvements resulting in a more robust satellite architecture. Here we discuss our progress in developing tools for satellite designers, manufacturers, and decision makers - tools that summarize space weather impacts to specific satellite assets and enable confident identification of the cause and right solution.

  7. Challenges and Solutions for GNSS Receivers onboard LEO Satellites Traveling through the Ionosphere during Space Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Y.; Xu, D.; Yang, R.; Jiao, Y.; Rino, C.; Carrano, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation discusses challenges imposed on GNSS receiver carrier-tracking loop for receivers onboard LEO satellites traveling through ionosphere during space weather events and techniques that mitigate the effects. Recent studies show that the ESA's swarm satellites experienced a total loss of GPS signals in areas known for frequent occurrence of ionosphere plasma irregularities. The same phenomena have been observed in other satellite missions. More robust GNSS receiver technologies are needed to improve the navigation capabilities for future LEO satellite missions. A major challenge to characterize GNSS signals traversing ionospheric plasma structures to reach a LEO satellite is the lack of data. To overcome this challenge, we utilized a physics-based GNSS scintillation signal simulator to generate simulated data for analysis and algorithm development. The simulator relies on real scintillation data collected by ground-based receivers as the initializer to generate a realization of ionosphere irregularity structure statistical distribution. A user specifies desired satellite orbit, signal modulation scheme, receiver platform dynamics, and receiver front-end hardware design. These inputs are used to establish the signal propagation geometry to allow interception of the disturbed signal by a realistic GNSS receiver. The simulator results showed that plasma structures lead to strong disturbances on GNSS signals reaching a LEO platform. The disturbances are characterized by simultaneous deep amplitude fades and extremely rapid carrier phase fluctuations. The carrier phase rate is orders of magnitude higher than the ones experienced by receivers on the ground. Such high carrier dynamics far exceeds the range that can be tolerated by the bandwidth of a typical GNSS receiver. The deep amplitude fades further exacerbate the problem. Based on the simulator outputs, we established models of the disturbed signal parameters. These models are used in an adaptive

  8. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.

  9. Effects of space weather on the ionosphere and LEO satellites' orbital trajectory in equatorial, low and middle latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2018-04-01

    We study the effects of space weather on the ionosphere and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites' orbital trajectory in equatorial, low- and mid-latitude (EQL, LLT and MLT) regions during (and around) the notable storms of October/November, 2003. We briefly review space weather effects on the thermosphere and ionosphere to demonstrate that such effects are also latitude-dependent and well established. Following the review we simulate the trend in variation of satellite's orbital radius (r), mean height (h) and orbit decay rate (ODR) during 15 October-14 November 2003 in EQL, LLT and MLT. Nominal atmospheric drag on LEO satellite is usually enhanced by space weather or solar-induced variations in thermospheric temperature and density profile. To separate nominal orbit decay from solar-induced accelerated orbit decay, we compute r, h and ODR in three regimes viz. (i) excluding solar indices (or effect), where r =r0, h =h0 and ODR =ODR0 (ii) with mean value of solar indices for the interval, where r =rm, h =hm and ODR =ODRm and (iii) with actual daily values of solar indices for the interval (r, h and ODR). For a typical LEO satellite at h = 450 km, we show that the total decay in r during the period is about 4.20 km, 3.90 km and 3.20 km in EQL, LLT and MLT respectively; the respective nominal decay (r0) is 0.40 km, 0.34 km and 0.22 km, while solar-induced orbital decay (rm) is about 3.80 km, 3.55 km and 2.95 km. h also varied in like manner. The respective nominal ODR0 is about 13.5 m/day, 11.2 m/day and 7.2 m/day, while solar-induced ODRm is about 124.3 m/day, 116.9 m/day and 97.3 m/day. We also show that severe geomagnetic storms can increase ODR by up to 117% (from daily mean value). However, the extent of space weather effects on LEO Satellite's trajectory significantly depends on the ballistic co-efficient and orbit of the satellite, and phase of solar cycles, intensity and duration of driving (or influencing) solar event.

  10. Understanding the weather signal in national crop-yield variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieler, Katja; Schauberger, Bernhard; Arneth, Almut; Balkovič, Juraj; Chryssanthacopoulos, James; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Folberth, Christian; Khabarov, Nikolay; Müller, Christoph; Olin, Stefan; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Schewe, Jacob; Schmid, Erwin; Warszawski, Lila; Levermann, Anders

    2017-06-01

    Year-to-year variations in crop yields can have major impacts on the livelihoods of subsistence farmers and may trigger significant global price fluctuations, with severe consequences for people in developing countries. Fluctuations can be induced by weather conditions, management decisions, weeds, diseases, and pests. Although an explicit quantification and deeper understanding of weather-induced crop-yield variability is essential for adaptation strategies, so far it has only been addressed by empirical models. Here, we provide conservative estimates of the fraction of reported national yield variabilities that can be attributed to weather by state-of-the-art, process-based crop model simulations. We find that observed weather variations can explain more than 50% of the variability in wheat yields in Australia, Canada, Spain, Hungary, and Romania. For maize, weather sensitivities exceed 50% in seven countries, including the United States. The explained variance exceeds 50% for rice in Japan and South Korea and for soy in Argentina. Avoiding water stress by simulating yields assuming full irrigation shows that water limitation is a major driver of the observed variations in most of these countries. Identifying the mechanisms leading to crop-yield fluctuations is not only fundamental for dampening fluctuations, but is also important in the context of the debate on the attribution of loss and damage to climate change. Since process-based crop models not only account for weather influences on crop yields, but also provide options to represent human-management measures, they could become essential tools for differentiating these drivers, and for exploring options to reduce future yield fluctuations.

  11. Understanding the Effects of Lower Boundary Conditions and Eddy Diffusion on the Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, G.; Ridley, A. J.; Marsh, D. R.; Wu, C.; Paxton, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    The exchange of energy between lower atmospheric regions with the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system is not well understood. A number of studies have observed day-to-day and seasonal variabilities in the difference between data and model output of various IT parameters. It is widely speculated that the forcing from the lower atmosphere, variability in weather systems and gravity waves that propagate upward from troposphere into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) may be responsible for these spatial and temporal variations in the IT region, but their exact nature is unknown. These variabilities can be interpreted in two ways: variations in state (density, temperature, wind) of the upper mesosphere or spatial and temporal changes in the small-scale mixing, or Eddy diffusion that is parameterized within the model.In this study, firstly, we analyze the sensitivity of the thermospheric and ionospheric states - neutral densities, O/N2, total electron content (TEC), peak electron density, and peak electron height - to various lower boundary conditions in the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM). We use WACCM-X and GSWM to drive the lower atmospheric boundary in GITM at 100 km, and compare the results with the current MSIS-driven version of GITM, analyzing which of these simulations match the measurements from GOCE, GUVI, CHAMP, and GPS-derived TEC best. Secondly, we analyze the effect of eddy diffusion in the IT system. The turbulence due to eddy mixing cannot be directly measured and it is a challenge to completely characterize its linear and non-linear effects from other influences, since the eddy diffusion both influences the composition through direct mixing and the temperature structure due to turbulent conduction changes. In this study we input latitudinal and seasonal profiles of eddy diffusion into GITM and then analyze the changes in the thermospheric and ionospheric parameters. These profiles will be derived from both WACC-X simulations

  12. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  13. Satellite navigation—Amazing technology but insidious risk: Why everyone needs to understand space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapgood, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are one of the technological wonders of the modern world. Popularly known as satellite navigation, these systems have provided global access to precision location and timing services and have thereby stimulated advances in industry and consumer services, including all forms of transport, telecommunications, financial trading, and even the synchronization of power grids. But this wonderful technology is at risk from natural phenomena in the form of space weather. GNSS signals experience a slight delay as they pass through the ionosphere. This delay varies with space weather conditions and is the most significant source of error for GNSS. Scientific efforts to correct these errors have stimulated billions of dollars of investment in systems that provide accurate correction data for suitably equipped GNSS receivers in a growing number of regions around the world. This accuracy is essential for GNSS use by aircraft and ships. Space weather also provides a further occasional but severe risk to GNSS: an extreme space weather event may deny access to GNSS as ionospheric scintillation scrambles the radio signals from satellites, and rapid ionospheric changes outstrip the ability of error correction systems to supply accurate corrections. It is vital that GNSS users have a backup for such occasions, even if it is only to hunker down and weather the storm.

  14. A review of vertical coupling in the Atmosphere-Ionosphere system: Effects of waves, sudden stratospheric warmings, space weather, and of solar activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yigit, E.; Koucká Knížová, Petra; Georgieva, K.; Ward, W.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 141, April (2016), s. 1-12 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-24688S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13042 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : atmosphere–ionosphere * vertical coupling * gravity waves * tides * space weather * solar activity Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682616300426

  15. Equatorial and Low-Latitude Ionospheric Response to the Extreme Space Weather Event of March 2015, in the Brazilian Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, P. R.; Cardoso, F. A.; Fejer, B. G.; Kavutarapu, V.; Ribeiro, B. A.; Pillat, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    Fagundes PR, Cardoso FA and Venkatesh KPhysics and Astronomy Laboratory, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo, Brazil In the present investigation we discuss the results on the response of the ionosphere (F-region) in the Brazilian sector, during extreme space weather event of March 2015. This geomagnetic storm has been considered as one of strongest storms in the solar cycle 24 where, the Dst index reached a minimum of -227 nT at 23:00 UT (17/03/2015) with KP reaching to 8-, and the monthly mean F10.7 solar flux was 125 sfu. This space weather event was studied using a large network of 110 GPS stations. It has been noticed that the Total Electron Content (TEC) was severely disturbed during the geomagnetic storm main and recovery phases. A wavelike oscillation with three peaks is observed from equator to low latitudes during the storm main phase on 17th and 18th March, 2015. Using a latitudinal chain of 8 GPS stations from equatorial region to low latitudes the storm time behavior of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) is investigated. It was noticed that the wavelike oscillation peak latitudinal extent decreases from the beginning of main phase to the recovery phase. The first maximum extends beyond from 2oS to 20oS, the second one from 8oS to 18oS and the third one from 13oS to 17oS. In addition, a strong negative phase in TEC variations is observed during the recovery phase on March 18, 2015. This negative phase is found to be stronger at low-latitude compared to the equatorial region. An anomalous behavior of EIA caused by the wavelike oscillations is observed during the main phase on March 17, 2015. Also, due to the strong negative phase in TEC resulted in strong EIA suppression on March 18, 2015.

  16. The role of MEXART in the National Space Weather Laboratory of Mexico: Detection of solar wind, CMEs, ionosphere, active regions and flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Ambriz, J.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; De la Luz, V.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.; Andrade, E.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Chang, O.; Romero Hernandez, E.; Sergeeva, M. A.; Perez Alanis, C. A.; Reyes-Marin, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    The National Space Weather Laboratory - Laboratorio Nacional de Clima Espacial (LANCE) - of Mexico has different ground based instruments to study and monitor the space weather. One of these instruments is the Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) which is principally dedicated to remote sensing the solar wind and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at 140 MHz, the instrument can detect solar wind densities and speeds from about 0.4 to 1 AU by modeling observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS). MEXART is also able to detect ionospheric disturbances associated with transient space weather events by the analysis of ionospheric scintillation (IONS) . Additionally, MEXART has followed the Sun since the beginning of the current Solar Cycle 24 with records of 8 minutes per day, and occasionally, has partially detected the process of strong solar flares. Here we show the contributions of MEXART to the LANCE by reporting recent detections of CMEs by IPS, the arrive of transient events at Earth by IONS, the influence of active regions in the flux of the Sun at 140 MHz and the detection of a M6.5 class flare. Furthermore we report the status of a near real time analysis of IPS data for forecast purposes and the potential contribution to the Worldwide IPS Stations network (WIPSS), which is an effort to achieve a better coverage of the solar wind observations in the inner heliosphere.

  17. Visualizing uncertainty : Towards a better understanding of weather forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Tak, S.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty visualizations are increasingly used in communications to the general public. A well-known example is the weather forecast. Rather than providing an exact temperature value, weather forecasts often show the range in which the temperature will lie. But uncertainty visualizations are also

  18. Towards understanding the electrodynamics of the 3-dimensional high-latitude ionosphere: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, due to observational constraints, ionospheric modelling and data analysis techniques have been devised either in one dimension (e.g. along a single radar beam, or in two dimensions (e.g. over a network of magnetometers. With new upcoming missions like the Swarm ionospheric multi-satellite project, or the EISCAT 3-D project, the time has come to take into account variations in all three dimensions simultaneously, as they occur in the real ionosphere. The link between ionospheric electrodynamics and the neutral atmosphere circulation which has gained increasing interest in the recent years also intrinsically requires a truly 3-dimensional (3-D description. In this paper, we identify five major science questions that need to be addressed by 3-D ionospheric modelling and data analysis. We briefly review what proceedings in the young field of 3-D ionospheric electrodynamics have been made in the past to address these selected question, and we outline how these issues can be addressed in the future with additional observations and/or improved data analysis and simulation techniques. Throughout the paper, we limit the discussion to high-latitude and mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics, and to directly data-driven (not statistical data analysis.

  19. Understanding Transient Forcing with Plasma Instability Model, Ionospheric Propagation Model and GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, K.; Zettergren, M. D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuations in the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals observed as amplitude and phase scintillations are produced by plasma density structures in the ionosphere. Phase scintillation events in particular occur due to structures at Fresnel scales, typically about 250 meters at ionospheric heights and GNSS frequency. Likely processes contributing to small-scale density structuring in auroral and polar regions include ionospheric gradient-drift instability (GDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which result, generally, from magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions (e.g. reconnection) associated with cusp and auroral zone regions. Scintillation signals, ostensibly from either GDI or KHI, are frequently observed in the high latitude ionosphere and are potentially useful diagnostics of how energy from the transient forcing in the cusp or polar cap region cascades, via instabilities, to small scales. However, extracting quantitative details of instabilities leading to scintillation using GNSS data drastically benefits from both a model of the irregularities and a model of GNSS signal propagation through irregular media. This work uses a physics-based model of the generation of plasma density irregularities (GEMINI - Geospace Environment Model of Ion-Neutral Interactions) coupled to an ionospheric radio wave propagation model (SIGMA - Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere) to explore the cascade of density structures from medium to small (sub-kilometer) scales. Specifically, GEMINI-SIGMA is used to simulate expected scintillation from different instabilities during various stages of evolution to determine features of the scintillation that may be useful to studying ionospheric density structures. Furthermore we relate the instabilities producing GNSS scintillations to the transient space and time-dependent magnetospheric phenomena and further predict characteristics of scintillation in different geophysical

  20. A Framework to Understand Extreme Space Weather Event Probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Seth; Fronczyk, Kassandra; Pratt, Lucas M

    2018-03-12

    An extreme space weather event has the potential to disrupt or damage infrastructure systems and technologies that many societies rely on for economic and social well-being. Space weather events occur regularly, but extreme events are less frequent, with a small number of historical examples over the last 160 years. During the past decade, published works have (1) examined the physical characteristics of the extreme historical events and (2) discussed the probability or return rate of select extreme geomagnetic disturbances, including the 1859 Carrington event. Here we present initial findings on a unified framework approach to visualize space weather event probability, using a Bayesian model average, in the context of historical extreme events. We present disturbance storm time (Dst) probability (a proxy for geomagnetic disturbance intensity) across multiple return periods and discuss parameters of interest to policymakers and planners in the context of past extreme space weather events. We discuss the current state of these analyses, their utility to policymakers and planners, the current limitations when compared to other hazards, and several gaps that need to be filled to enhance space weather risk assessments. © 2018 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Space weather effects on lower ionosphere: First investigation from Bharati station during 34th Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Anirban; Saha, Kumarjit; De, Barin Kumar; Subrahmanyam, Kandula Venkata; Shreedevi, P. R.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the solar flare effects on the D-region of the ionosphere with the help of VLF (Very Low Frequency) radio waves using a portable E-field system from Antarctica during the summer period of 34th Indian scientific expedition. Two GPS time synchronized VLF receivers, one located at Bharati, Antarctica (geographical latitude 69.40°S, longitude 76.18°E) and another located at Tripura, India (geographical latitude 23.84°N, longitude 91.28°E) were operated simultaneously to infer common mode changes in the lower ionosphere for a number of solar flares events. The two systems constantly monitored the carrier amplitude and phase of the MSK (Minimum Shift Keying) modulated navy transmitter located in Australia (Callsign: NWC, 19.8 kHz, geographical latitude 21.88°S, longitude 114.13°E), around 5.6 Mm great circle distance from the two receivers. The results are interpreted in terms of Earth-ionosphere wave-guide characteristics. A Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) model study is also performed to infer the changes in the daytime electron density in polar D-region ionosphere during the solar flares. The exponential fit of the modeled electron density change with average X-ray flux change shows an excellent correlation (R2 value 0.95). The exponential fit is utilized to infer the daytime electron density change in the polar ionosphere during solar flare events. The analyses indicate that small solar flares of class 'C' can be very effectively detected with the portable antenna system even if the receiver is located in polar coastal region compared to equatorial region. The expedition results also demonstrate the feasibility of using portable VLF receivers from the coastal stations for monitoring the polar lower ionosphere from Antarctica and open up new opportunities for long term exploration.

  2. Space weather in the thermospheric-ionospheric domain over the Brazilian region: Climatology of ionospheric plasma bubbles in the subequatorial and low-latitude region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, D.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Abdu, M. A.; de Castilho, V. M.; Mascarenhas, M.; Arruda, D. C. S.; Zamlutti, C. J.; Takahashi, H.; Medeiros, A. F.; Buriti, R. A.

    2011-07-01

    The climatology of ionospheric plasma bubbles is studied here by means of a comparison of the frequency of occurrence of the spread-F/plasma bubble events over the South American region using the images from two OI 630 nm imager systems located at the subequatorial station São João do Cariri—CA (7.4 S, 36.5 W, 20 S dip) and the low-latitude station Cachoeira Paulista—CP (22.5 S, 45 W, 33 S dip) in Brazil during the years of 2004 and 2005. The results are discussed in the light of current theory and geomagnetic parameters of the two observation stations.

  3. Capturing the WUnder: Using weather stations and WeatherUnderground to increase middle school students' understanding and interest in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, K. M.; Dunne, P.

    2014-12-01

    New models of elementary- and middle-school level science education are emerging in response to the need for science literacy and the development of the Next Generation Science Standards. One of these models is fostered through the NSF's Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) program, which pairs a graduate fellow with a science teacher at a local school for an entire school year. In our project, a PhD Earth Sciences student was paired with a local middle school science teacher with the goal of installing a weather station, and incorporating the station data into the 8th grade science curriculum. Here we discuss how we were able to use a school weather station to introduce weather and climate material, engage and involve students in the creative process of science, and motivate students through inquiry-based lessons. In using a weather station as the starting point for material, we were able to make science tangible for students and provide an opportunity for each student to experience the entire process of scientific inquiry. This hands-on approach resulted in a more thorough understanding the system beyond a knowledge of the components, and was particularly effective in challenging prior weather and climate misconceptions. We were also able to expand the reach of the lessons by connecting with other weather stations in our region and even globally, enabling the students to become members of a larger system.

  4. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  5. Understanding space weather to shield society: A global road map for 2015-2025 commissioned by COSPAR and ILWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Aylward, Alan D.; Denardini, Clezio M.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Glover, Alexi; Gopalswamy, Nat; Grande, Manuel; Hapgood, Mike; Heynderickx, Daniel; Jakowski, Norbert; Kalegaev, Vladimir V.; Lapenta, Giovanni; Linker, Jon A.; Liu, Siqing; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Mann, Ian R.; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Nandy, Dibyendu; Obara, Takahiro; Paul O'Brien, T.; Onsager, Terrance; Opgenoorth, Hermann J.; Terkildsen, Michael; Valladares, Cesar E.; Vilmer, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    There is a growing appreciation that the environmental conditions that we call space weather impact the technological infrastructure that powers the coupled economies around the world. With that comes the need to better shield society against space weather by improving forecasts, environmental specifications, and infrastructure design. We recognize that much progress has been made and continues to be made with a powerful suite of research observatories on the ground and in space, forming the basis of a Sun-Earth system observatory. But the domain of space weather is vast - extending from deep within the Sun to far outside the planetary orbits - and the physics complex - including couplings between various types of physical processes that link scales and domains from the microscopic to large parts of the solar system. Consequently, advanced understanding of space weather requires a coordinated international approach to effectively provide awareness of the processes within the Sun-Earth system through observation-driven models. This roadmap prioritizes the scientific focus areas and research infrastructure that are needed to significantly advance our understanding of space weather of all intensities and of its implications for society. Advancement of the existing system observatory through the addition of small to moderate state-of-the-art capabilities designed to fill observational gaps will enable significant advances. Such a strategy requires urgent action: key instrumentation needs to be sustained, and action needs to be taken before core capabilities are lost in the aging ensemble. We recommend advances through priority focus (1) on observation-based modeling throughout the Sun-Earth system, (2) on forecasts more than 12 h ahead of the magnetic structure of incoming coronal mass ejections, (3) on understanding the geospace response to variable solar-wind stresses that lead to intense geomagnetically-induced currents and ionospheric and radiation storms, and (4

  6. Positive and negative GPS-TEC ionospheric storm effects during the extreme space weather event of March 2015 over the Brazilian Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Fejer, B. G.; Kavutarapu, Venkatesh; Gil Pillat, Valdir; Cardoso, Felipe Antonio; Ribeiro, Brunno Augusto

    2016-07-01

    We studied the response of the ionosphere (F-region) in the Brazilian sector during extreme space weather event of 17 March 2015 using a large network of 102 GPS-TEC stations. It is observed that the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) was severely disturbed during the storm main and recovery phases. A wavelike oscillation with three peaks was observed in the TEC diurnal variation from equator to low latitudes during the storm main phase on 17th and 18th March, 2015. The latitudinal extent of the wavelike oscillation peaks decreased from the beginning of main phase towards the recovery phase. The first peak extended from beyond 0S to 30S, the second occurred from 6S to 25S, whereas the third diurnal peaks was confined from 13S to 25S. In addition, a strong negative phase in VTEC variations was observed during the recovery phase on March 18-19, 2015. This ionospheric negative phase was stronger at low-latitudes than in the equatorial region. Also, two latitudinal chains of GPS-TEC stations from equatorial region to low latitudes in the East and West Brazilian sectors are used to investigate the storm time behavior of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) in the East and West Brazilian sectors. We observed an anomalous behavior in EIA caused by the wavelike oscillations during the storm main phase on 17 March, and suppression of the EIA, resulting from the negative phase in VTEC, in the storm recovery phase.

  7. Space Weather Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Space Weather Analysis archives are model output of ionospheric, thermospheric and magnetospheric particle populations, energies and electrodynamics

  8. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroid Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominque, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Schriver, David; hide

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the composition of Mercury's crust is key to comprehending the formation of the planet. The regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered via a set of space weathering processes. These processes are the same set of mechanisms that work to form Mercury's exosphere, and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of an intrinsic planetary magnetic field. The alterations need to be understood in order to determine the initial crustal compositions. The complex interrelationships between Mercury's exospheric processes, the space environment, and surface composition are examined and reviewed. The processes are examined in the context of our understanding of these same processes on the lunar and asteroid regoliths. Keywords: Mercury (planet) Space weathering Surface processes Exosphere Surface composition Space environment 3

  9. Understanding the Effects of Energy from the Solar Wind to the Magnetosphere Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    shows dynamic pressure (ρv2), plasma pressure ( nkT ), X component of velocity (Vx), and X component of magnetic field (Bx) at different times of this...ionospheric convection cells , measuring a low CPCP. To cover the poor DMSP data, we uses CPCP predicted from the AMIE procedure [Richmond and Kamide, 1988...convections. For strongly and weakly southward IMF, we observe two cell convection patterns (See the top two panels of Figure 8). After strong Psw arrives

  10. Predicting ionospheric scintillation: Recent advancements and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Currie, J. L.; Terkildsen, M.; Bouya, Z.; Parkinson, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Society greatly benefits from space-based infrastructure and technology. For example, signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are used across a wide range of industrial sectors; including aviation, mining, agriculture and finance. Current trends indicate that the use of these space-based technologies is likely to increase over the coming decades as the global economy becomes more technology-dependent. Space weather represents a key vulnerability to space-based technology, both in terms of the space environment effects on satellite infrastructure and the influence of the ionosphere on the radio signals used for satellite communications. In recent decades, the impact of the ionosphere on GNSS signals has re-ignited research interest into the equatorial ionosphere, particularly towards understanding Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). EPBs are a dominant source of nighttime plasma irregularities in the low-latitude ionosphere, which can cause severe scintillation on GNSS signals and subsequent degradation on GNSS product quality. Currently, ionospheric scintillation event forecasts are not being routinely released by any space weather prediction agency around the world, but this is likely to change in the near future. In this contribution, an overview of recent efforts to develop a global ionospheric scintillation prediction capability within Australia will be given. The challenges in understanding user requirements for ionospheric scintillation predictions will be discussed. Next, the use of ground- and space-based datasets for the purpose of near-real time ionospheric scintillation monitoring will be explored. Finally, some modeling that has shown significant promise in transitioning towards an operational ionospheric scintillation forecasting system will be discussed.

  11. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroidal Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark. R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Schriver, David; Travnicek, Pavel M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Mercury's regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered by a set of space weathering processes. Before we can interpret crustal composition, it is necessary to understand the nature of these surface alterations. The processes that space weather the surface are the same as those that form Mercury's exosphere (micrometeoroid flux and solar wind interactions) and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of a global magnetic field. To comprehend how space weathering acts on Mercury's regolith, an understanding is needed of how contributing processes act as an interactive system. As no direct information (e.g., from returned samples) is available about how the system of space weathering affects Mercury's regolith, we use as a basis for comparison the current understanding of these same processes on lunar and asteroidal regoliths as well as laboratory simulations. These comparisons suggest that Mercury's regolith is overturned more frequently (though the characteristic surface time for a grain is unknown even relative to the lunar case), more than an order of magnitude more melt and vapor per unit time and unit area is produced by impact processes than on the Moon (creating a higher glass content via grain coatings and agglutinates), the degree of surface irradiation is comparable to or greater than that on the Moon, and photon irradiation is up to an order of magnitude greater (creating amorphous grain rims, chemically reducing the upper layers of grains to produce nanometer scale particles of metallic iron, and depleting surface grains in volatile elements and alkali metals). The processes that chemically reduce the surface and produce nanometer-scale particles on Mercury are suggested to be more effective than similar processes on the Moon. Estimated abundances of nanometer-scale particles can account for Mercury's dark surface relative to that of the Moon without requiring macroscopic grains of opaque minerals. The presence of

  12. Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report - Extended Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The effects of space weather on modern technological systems are well documented in both the technical literature and popular accounts. Most often cited perhaps is the collapse within 90 seconds of northeastern Canada's Hydro-Quebec power grid during the great geomagnetic storm of March 1989, which left millions of people without electricity for up to 9 hours. This event exemplifies the dramatic impact that severe space weather can have on a technology upon which modern society critically depends. Nearly two decades have passed since the March 1989 event. During that time, awareness of the risks of severe space weather has increased among the affected industries, mitigation strategies have been developed, new sources of data have become available, new models of the space environment have been created, and a national space weather infrastructure has evolved to provide data, alerts, and forecasts to an increasing number of users. Now, 20 years later and approaching a new interval of increased solar activity, how well equipped are we to manage the effects of space weather? Have recent technological developments made our critical technologies more or less vulnerable? How well do we understand the broader societal and economic impacts of severe space weather events? Are our institutions prepared to cope with the effects of a 'space weather Katrina,' a rare, but according to the historical record, not inconceivable eventuality? On May 22 and 23, 2008, a one-and-a-half-day workshop held in Washington, D.C., under the auspices of the National Research Council's (NRC's) Space Studies Board brought together representatives of industry, the federal government, and the social science community to explore these and related questions. The key themes, ideas, and insights that emerged during the presentations and discussions are summarized in 'Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report' (The National Academies Press, Washington, D

  13. Understanding, modeling and predicting weather and climate extremes: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sillmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Weather and climate extremes are identified as major areas necessitating further progress in climate research and have thus been selected as one of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP Grand Challenges. Here, we provide an overview of current challenges and opportunities for scientific progress and cross-community collaboration on the topic of understanding, modeling and predicting extreme events based on an expert workshop organized as part of the implementation of the WCRP Grand Challenge on Weather and Climate Extremes. In general, the development of an extreme event depends on a favorable initial state, the presence of large-scale drivers, and positive local feedbacks, as well as stochastic processes. We, therefore, elaborate on the scientific challenges related to large-scale drivers and local-to-regional feedback processes leading to extreme events. A better understanding of the drivers and processes will improve the prediction of extremes and will support process-based evaluation of the representation of weather and climate extremes in climate model simulations. Further, we discuss how to address these challenges by focusing on short-duration (less than three days and long-duration (weeks to months extreme events, their underlying mechanisms and approaches for their evaluation and prediction.

  14. Extreme Ionospheric Gradients Observed in South Korea during the Last Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S.; Choi, Y.; Kim, M.; Lee, J.

    2012-12-01

    CONUS threat model. The other 12 dates are newly selected based on two space weather indices, planetary K (Kp) and disturbance, storm time (Dst). An ionospheric gradient of 90.97 mm/km was discovered at 0414UT on November 6, 2001 between stations NAWW and SONC, when PRN 21 was at 20.1° elevation. Most of severe gradients were observed from satellites at low elevation and traveling in a southerly direction of the Korean Peninsula. To locate enhanced-delay regions, we investigate both global ionospheric delay maps generated using the IONosphere MAP Exchange format (IONEX) data provided by International GNSS Service (IGS) and regional delay maps produced using the Korean GPS network stations. To validate observed ionospheric anomaly events, we examine whether similarly large ionospheric gradients are discovered at other nearby station pairs and other satellites whose Ionospheric Pierce Point (IPP) tracks take similar paths. The results from a series of checks support that the equatorial ionospheric anomaly caused severe ionospheric gradients observed from southern stations in South Korea. This study provides a better understanding of ionospheric behavior within the Korean Peninsula under ionospheric storm conditions, and helps investigate the operation and performance of GBAS. Ionospheric threat model developed in each region could be combined into a future global threat model for GBAS.

  15. Developing an ionospheric map for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Okoh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a map of the ionosphere over South Africa is presented in this paper. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI model, South African Bottomside Ionospheric Model (SABIM, and measurements from ionosondes in the South African Ionosonde Network, were combined within their own limitations to develop an accurate representation of the South African ionosphere. The map is essentially in the form of a computer program that shows spatial and temporal representations of the South African ionosphere for a given set of geophysical parameters. A validation of the map is attempted using a comparison of Total Electron Content (TEC values derived from the map, from the IRI model, and from Global Positioning System (GPS measurements. It is foreseen that the final South African ionospheric map will be implemented as a Space Weather product of the African Space Weather Regional Warning Centre.

  16. The CAULDRON game: Helping decision makers understand extreme weather event attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, P.; Otto, F. E. L.

    2014-12-01

    There is a recognition from academics and stakeholders that climate science has a fundamental role to play in the decision making process, but too frequently there is still uncertainty about what, when, how and why to use it. Stakeholders suggest that it is because the science is presented in an inaccessible manner, while academics suggest it is because the stakeholders do not have the scientific knowledge to understand and apply the science appropriately. What is apparent is that stakeholders need support, and that there is an onus on academia to provide it. This support is even more important with recent developments in climate science, such as extreme weather event attribution. We are already seeing the impacts of extreme weather events around the world causing lost of life and damage to property and infrastructure with current research suggesting that these events could become more frequent and more intense. If this is to be the case then a better understanding of the science will be vital in developing robust adaptation and business planning. The use of games, role playing and simulations to aid learning has long been understood in education but less so as a tool to support stakeholder understanding of climate science. Providing a 'safe' space where participants can actively engage with concepts, ideas and often emotions, can lead to deep understanding that is not possible through more passive mechanisms such as papers and web sites. This paper reports on a game that was developed through a collaboration led by the Red Cross/Red Crescent, University of Oxford and University of Reading to help stakeholders understand the role of weather event attribution in the decision making process. The game has already been played successfully at a number of high profile events including COP 19 and the African Climate Conference. It has also been used with students as part of a postgraduate environmental management course. As well as describing the design principles of the

  17. Investigation of Pre-Earthquake Ionospheric Disturbances by 3D Tomographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmur, M.

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric variations before earthquakes have been widely discussed phenomena in ionospheric studies. To clarify the source and mechanism of these phenomena is highly important for earthquake forecasting. To well understanding the mechanical and physical processes of pre-seismic Ionospheric anomalies that might be related even with Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Coupling, both statistical and 3D modeling analysis are needed. For these purpose, firstly we have investigated the relation between Ionospheric TEC Anomalies and potential source mechanisms such as space weather activity and lithospheric phenomena like positive surface electric charges. To distinguish their effects on Ionospheric TEC, we have focused on pre-seismically active days. Then, we analyzed the statistical data of 54 earthquakes that M≽6 between 2000 and 2013 as well as the 2011 Tohoku and the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes in Japan. By comparing TEC anomaly and Solar activity by Dst Index, we have found that 28 events that might be related with Earthquake activity. Following the statistical analysis, we also investigate the Lithospheric effect on TEC change on selected days. Among those days, we have chosen two case studies as the 2011 Tohoku and the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes to make 3D reconstructed images by utilizing 3D Tomography technique with Neural Networks. The results will be presented in our presentation. Keywords : Earthquake, 3D Ionospheric Tomography, Positive and Negative Anomaly, Geomagnetic Storm, Lithosphere

  18. Global Space Weather Observational Network: Challenges and China's Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.

    2017-12-01

    To understand space weather physical processes and predict space weather accurately, global space-borne and ground-based space weather observational network, making simultaneous observations from the Sun to geo-space (magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere), plays an essential role. In this talk, we will present the advances of the Chinese space weather science missions, including the ASO-S (Advanced Space-borne Solar Observatory), MIT (Magnetosphere - Ionosphere- Thermosphere Coupling Exploration), and the ESA-China joint space weather science mission SMILE (Solar wind - Magnetosphere - Ionosphere Link Explore), a new mission to image the magnetosphere. Compared to satellites, ground-based monitors are cheap, convenient, and provide continuous real-time data. We will also introduce the Chinese Meridian Project (CMP), a ground-based program fully utilizing the geographic location of the Chinese landmass to monitor the geo-space environment. CMP is just one arm of a larger program that Chinese scientists are proposing to the international community. The International Meridian Circle Program (IMCP) for space weather hopes to connect chains of ground-based monitors at the longitudinal meridians 120 deg E and 60 deg W. IMCP takes advantage of the fact that these meridians already have the most monitors of any on Earth, with monitors in Russia, Australia, Brazil, the United States, Canada, and other countries. This data will greatly enhance the ability of scientists to monitor and predict the space weather worldwide.

  19. Remote sensing of the Ionosphere over the Murchison Radio Observatory, Western Australia, Leading to an Understanding of Fine Scale Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herne, D. E.; Lynch, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Oberoi, D.; Carrano, C. S.; Williams, J.; Kennewell, J.; Groves, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Murchison Radio Observatory (MRO) is the home of radio astronomy in Australia. Projects currently under development at the MRO include a low-frequency instrument, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The MWA is an aperture synthesis, imaging array that when complete will comprise approximately 8,000 dipole antennas operating in the frequency range, 80 to 300 MHz. Signals in this frequency range are subject to distortions caused by the ionosphere. The effects of scintillation and faraday rotation degrade image quality. In order to ‘unwind’ faraday rotation, the distribution of the electron content in the ionosphere must be determined. Knowledge of the absolute total electron content (TEC) provides information about this distribution. This step is necessary in order to study processes in space involving magnetism. Over a period of two years, TEC measurements have been made over the MRO using high-precision, dual-frequency, GPS systems. Continuous measurements were performed for 12 months and campaign-based measurements at other times, due to the remote location of the MRO. The determination of the GPS receiver biases used to calculate TEC were studied with respect to changing temperatures. TEC measurements are compared to the results of modelling conducted previously (Kennewell et. al. 2005) as part of Australia’s bid to host the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope (SKA). Further, due to the fine grained nature of measurements (on the order of 0.01-0.03 TEC units), fine-scale structure can be resolved in the behaviour of the ionosphere in both temporal and spatial domains and is discussed. This work too, is laying a foundation for the accurate characterisation of the ionosphere over the MRO which is also the possible future site of the SKA. Plans to extend this work and the implementation of useful new measurement regimes are discussed, enabled by facilities currently being established as part of Australia’s ongoing commitment to radio astronomy on the

  20. Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmer, Volker; Bernert, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24 Within the framework of the UN International Space Weather Initiative, and building upon the achievements of the International Heliophysical Year, the German project SIMONE (Sun Ionosphere MOnitoring NEtwork) operates several SID monitors provided by the University of Stanford. Here we present an overview of sudden ionospheric disturbances recorded since 2006 at the high school Gymnasium Walsrode until to date. The continous measurements allow a detailed comparison of locally measured SIDs with the general trend of solar activity during the current solar maximum. We further show that the measurements reveal specific information on the variable response of the dayside ionosphere to solar flares.

  1. Winter Weather Tips: Understanding Alerts and Staying Safe this Season | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Jenna Seiss and Kylie Tomlin, Guest Writers, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Maryland residents face the possibility of dangerous winter weather each year—from icy conditions to frigid temperatures. You may be familiar with the different types of winter weather alerts issued by the National Weather Service (NWS), but do you know what each alert means?  

  2. Space Weather: Where Is The Beef?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.

    Space weather has become a highly fashionable topic in solar-terrestrial physics. It is perhaps the best tool to popularise the field and it has contributed significantly to the dialogue between solar, magnetospheric, and ionospheric scientist, and also to mu- tual understanding between science and engineering communities. While these are laudable achievements, it is important for the integrity of scientific space weather re- search to recognise the central open questions in the physics of space weather and the progress toward solving them. We still lack sufficient understanding of the solar physics to be able to tell in advance when and where a solar eruption will take place and whether it will turn to a geoeffective event. There is much to do to understand ac- celeration of solar energetic particles and propagation of solar mass ejecta toward the Earth. After more than 40 years of research scientific discussion of energy and plasma transfer through the magnetopause still deals mostly with qualitative issues and the rapid acceleration processes in the magnetosphere are not yet explained in a satisfac- tory way. Also the coupling to the ionosphere and from there to the strong induction effects on ground is another complex of research problems. For space weather science the beef is in the investigation of these and related topics, not in marketing half-useful space weather products to hesitant customers.

  3. Studies of the Space Weather Effects in the Ionospheric Brasilian Enviroment in the Middle and Low Latitudes, Wich the Purpose to Development of the Previson pf the Possible Evidences in the Local Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Laysa; Sobral, José; Almeida, Pedro; Marcos Denardini, Clezio; Carlotto Aveiro, Henrique

    In the present paper we show some results related to the study of ionospheric E-region behavior and sporadic layers occurrence over São Lú (2o 31´ S, 44o 16´ W) and Cachoeira Paulista a ıs ° ° (22 39´ S, 45 00´ O), Brazil. The study has the purpose to identify possible evidences of the reaction of the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system to the strong magnetic storm in the ionospheric E-region.. The sporadic layer occurs at E region heights as sharp thickness lower than 10 km, and is characterized by its variability and higher eletron density when compared with its surrounding region. Depending on altitude and latitude of observation the sporadic layer presents distinct morphology and mechanisms of genereration. In order to check the geomagnetic storms effects, we analyzed the E region's ionospheric parameters obtained from ionograms recorded by digital ionosondes. The achieved results evidenced that the E-region and the sporadic layer, depending upon the magnetic activity level and its latitudinal location, may present a different behavior.

  4. Capabilities of software "Vector-M" for a diagnostics of the ionosphere state from auroral emissions images and plasma characteristics from the different orbits as a part of the system of control of space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdyushev, V.; Banshchikova, M.; Chuvashov, I.; Kuzmin, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the paper are presented capabilities of software "Vector-M" for a diagnostics of the ionosphere state from auroral emissions images and plasma characteristics from the different orbits as a part of the system of control of space weather. The software "Vector-M" is developed by the celestial mechanics and astrometry department of Tomsk State University in collaboration with Space Research Institute (Moscow) and Central Aerological Observatory of Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring. The software "Vector-M" is intended for calculation of attendant geophysical and astronomical information for the centre of mass of the spacecraft and the space of observations in the experiment with auroral imager Aurovisor-VIS/MP in the orbit of the perspective Meteor-MP spacecraft.

  5. Antarctic Peninsula troposphere-stratosphere-ionosphere coupling (APTIC) and conjugate events investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.

    2005-04-01

    Researches of troposphere-stratosphere-ionosphere coupling are based on idea of the strong influence of the long- and short-term solar activity variations on the polar terrestrial climate and the asymmetry in the energy deposition from the magnetosphere into the polar ionospheres. The solar activity variations produce changeable impact on magnetosphere and polar ionosphere in both hemispheres. Results of this impact are (1) differences in the ozone concentrations in the Antarctic and Arctic stratosphere due to different forcing in spring; (2) different planetary wave activity; (3) different gravity wave flux intensity depended on strengths of the weather frontal cyclones activity. The study of upper atmosphere in both hemispheres is necessary to better understand various physical mechanisms responsible for the energy transfer from the Sun into atmosphere and ionosphere as well as reverse flux from troposphere to geospace. A simultaneous consideration of phenomena occurring over both polar regions is very important for understanding of these processes. The solution of the problem of energy exchange between neutral atmosphere and geospace plasma is need in study of industrial EM pollution from Earth surface to geospace. A corresponding work must promote modeling space weather on satellite heights and earthquake prediction using ionosphere parameters changes. A determinative significance of Antarctic Peninsula is caused by following features: (1) Antarctic Peninsula is situated near an extremely cyclonic active region - Drake Passage, (2) only this region in Antarctica is magnetically conjugated to industrial area in Northern hemisphere, and (3) this region contains many Antarctic stations which are good equipped by devices to study weather and climate, ozone layer, ionosphere and magnetic field. Last years weather observations at Vernadsky station show that up to 60 atmospheric frontal cyclones (with pressure variation more 20 millibars) swept over Antarctic

  6. Global, real-time ionosphere specification for end-user communication and navigation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W.; Carlson, H. C.; Schunk, R. W.; Thompson, D. C.; Sojka, J. J.; Scherliess, L.; Zhu, L.; Gardner, L. C.

    2010-12-01

    Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects communication and navigation systems. The Utah State University (USU) Space Weather Center (SWC) is a developer and producer of commercial space weather applications. A key system-level component for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system. GAIM, operated by SWC, improves real-time communication and navigation systems by continuously ingesting up to 10,000 slant TEC measurements every 15-minutes from approximately 500 stations. Using a Kalman filter, the background output from the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM) is adjusted to more accurately represent the actual ionosphere. An improved ionosphere leads to more useful derivative products. For example, SWC runs operational code, using GAIM, to calculate and report the global radio high frequency (HF) signal strengths for 24 world cities. This product is updated every 15 minutes at http://spaceweather.usu.edu and used by amateur radio operators. SWC also developed and provides through Apple iTunes the widely used real-time space weather iPhone app called SpaceWx for public space weather education. SpaceWx displays the real-time solar, heliosphere, magnetosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere drivers to changes in the total electron content, for example. This smart phone app is tip of the “iceberg” of automated systems that provide space weather data; it permits instant understanding of the environment surrounding Earth as it dynamically changes. SpaceWx depends upon a distributed network that connects satellite and ground-based data streams with algorithms to quickly process the measurements into geophysical data, incorporate those

  7. Accessing Space Weather Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D.; Weiss, M.; Immer, E. A.; Patrone, D.; Potter, M.; Barnes, R. J.; Colclough, C.; Holder, R.

    2009-12-01

    To meet the needs of our technology based society, space weather forecasting needs to be advanced and this will entail collaboration amongst research, military and commercial communities to find new ways to understand, characterize, and forecast. In this presentation VITMO, the Virtual Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere Observatory will be used as a prototype for a generalized system as a means to bring together a set of tools to access data, models and online collaboration tools to enable rapid progress. VITMO, available at http://vitmo.jhuapl.edu/, currently provides a data access portal for researchers and scientists to enable finding data products as well as access to tools and models. To further the needs of space weather forecasters, the existing VITMO data holdings need to be expanded to provide additional datasets as well as integrating relevant models and model output. VITMO can easily be adapted for the Space Weather domain in its entirety. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how VITMO and the VITMO architecture can be utilized as a prototype in support of integration of Space Weather forecasting tools, models and data.

  8. The Ionospheric-Thermospheric Component of the LWS-Geospace Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    The Geospace Mission Definition Team report made a persuasive case for investigating the ionosphere-thermosphere system with both LEO in situ instruments and GEO ionospheric imaging. The GMDT science objectives were derived from the Living With a Star Science Architecture Team's consideration of space weather effects that concern society. The two highest priority ionospheric objectives are "Determine the effects of the long and short term variability of the Sun on the global-scale behavior of the ionospheric electron density" and "Determine the solar and geospace causes of small scale density irregularities in the 100-1000 km altitude range". These general objectives were then focused on specific science questions such as "How does the ionosphere-thermosphere system vary in response to changing fluxes of solar extreme ultraviolet radiation?", How does the mid- and low-latitude ionosphere-thermosphere system respond to geomagnetic storms?", and "What are the sources and characteristics of ionospheric irregularities at mid-latitudes?". Since the submission of the GMDT report to NASA, the case for investigating the disturbed mid-latitude ionosphere has become even more compelling. Society has become more vulnerable to ionospheric storms through augmented GPS systems for aviation. The ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms has been shown to extend from the equator through mid-latitudes and across the polar caps and from the F region to the equatorial plane. The total electron content from the peak of the positive-phase to the minima of the negative phase varies by up to one order of magnitude. Simulations have demonstrated that thermospheric transport can carry disturbed O/N2 ratios from the auroral zone to the equator. Density irregularities have been discovered with scale lengths of 100 km to the GPS signal Fresnel length (~ 400m). The GMDT developed a strategy to characterize and understand these phenomena. At low altitudes, within the thermosphere, two

  9. Report from ionospheric science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitt, W.J.; Banks, P.M.; Nagy, A.F.; Chappell, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The general strategy to advance knowledge of the ionospheric component of the solar terrestrial system should consist of a three pronged attack on the problem. Ionospheric models should be refined by utilization of existing and new data bases. The data generated in the future should emphasize spatial and temporal gradients and their relation to other events in the solar terrestrial system. In parallel with the improvement in modeling, it will be necessary to initiate a program of advanced instrument development. In particular, emphasis should be placed on the area of improved imaging techniques. The third general activity to be supported should be active experiments related to a better understanding of the basic physics of interactions occurring in the ionospheric environment. These strategies are briefly discussed

  10. Understanding the role of extreme weather event attribution as a climate service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, P.

    2016-12-01

    Any robust, fit for purpose climate service needs to start with the needs of the people who are going to be using the science. However, experience suggests that this is not a simple process taking time, and periods of discussion to identify issues such as what is needed, how it can used, how can it be used in conjunction with other tools etc. As a relatively new science within the field of climate change, attribution of extreme weather events is still exploring how the science can be applied and how best to support decision-makers in using it. This paper reports on the experiences of a 3-year project that looked to identify what an event attribution service for Europe could look like. Key sectors including insurance, local planners, national policy and law were engaged to better understand their needs for the science, and how the science could be best communicated. Whilst many lessons have been learned about stakeholder needs in terms of accessing information, there is still more that needs developing with regards to what the science can say and how this impacts on the decision-making process.

  11. Cubesat-Based Dtv Receiver Constellation for Ionospheric Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcivan, H.; Leveque, K.; Doe, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Radio Aurora Explorer mission, funded by NSF's Space Weather and Atmospheric Research program, has demonstrated the utility of CubeSat-based radio receiver payloads for ionospheric research. RAX has primarily been an investigation of microphysics of meter-scale ionospheric structures; however, the data products are also suitable for research on ionospheric effects on radio propagation. To date, the spacecraft has acquired (1) ground-based UHF radar signals that are backscattered from meter-scale ionospheric irregularities, which have been used to measure the dispersion properties of meter-scale plasma waves and (2) ground-based signals, directly on the transmitter-spacecraft path, which have been used to measure radio propagation disturbances (scintillations). Herein we describe the application of a CubeSat constellation of UHF receivers to expand the latter research topic for global-scale ionospheric tomography. The enabling factor for this expansion is the worldwide availability of ground-based digital television (DTV) broadcast signals whose characteristics are optimal for scintillation analysis. A significant part of the populated world have transitioned, or soon to be transitioned, to DTV. The DTV signal has a standard format that contains a highly phase-stable pilot carrier that can be readily adapted for propagation diagnostics. A multi-frequency software-defined radar receiver, similar to the RAX payload, can measure these signals at a large number of pilot carrier frequencies to make radio ray and diffraction tomographic measurements of the ionosphere and the irregularities contained in it. A constellation of CubeSats, launched simultaneously, or in sequence over years, similar to DMSPs, can listen to the DTV stations, providing a vast and dense probing of the ionosphere. Each spacecraft can establish links to a preprogrammed list of DTV stations and cycle through them using time-division frequency multiplexing (TDFM) method. An on board program can

  12. Ionospheric topside sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W

    1966-10-14

    Over the past few years, the satellite topside sounders have significantly contributed to the understanding of the upper ionosphere. A great quantity of radio echo data has been accumulated, from which the ionospheric electrondensity distribution can be determined. The topside measurements of electron density essentially agree with similar measurements from the ground, except for an occasional 10-percent discrepancy near the peak of the ionosphere. While horizontal non-uniformity is a likely cause, this discrepancy has not yet been adequately explained. The electron-density scale heights measured at a constant altitude indicate both a higher temperature and a heavier mean ion mass at high latitudes. At low latitudes the topside measurements have shown the detailed latitudinal structure of the equatorial anomaly, demonstrating control by the geomagnetic field. A variety of electron-density irregularities have been studied. Most are greatly elongated along the magnetic field, and produce echoes either by lateral scattering, if they are thin, or by longitudinal ducting, if they are thick. Some of the thick irregularities are continuous between the hemispheres and support conjugate echo propagation. The topside sounders have revealed the complex structure of the ionosphere near the auroral zone and at higher latitudes. At night an east-west trough of greatly reduced electron density occurs equatorward of the auroral zone. At the auroral zone itself the electron density is high and quite variable, both in space and time. The electron density at the polar cap within the auroral zone is often uniform and smooth. Ionospheric irregularities are common in the area of the trough and the auroral zone. Among other satellites, the topside sounders have been used in various plasma studies involving the excitation and propagation of waves. These studies suggest that the ionosphere is an appropriate region for future plasma physics investigations, especially with rocket and

  13. An ionospheric index suitable for estimating the degree of ionospheric perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Volker; Kriegel, Martin; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens

    2018-03-01

    Space weather can strongly affect trans-ionospheric radio signals depending on the used frequency. In order to assess the strength of a space weather event from its origin at the sun towards its impact on the ionosphere a number of physical quantities need to be derived from scientific measurements. These are for example the Wolf number sunspot index, the solar flux density F10.7, measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field, the proton density, the solar wind speed, the dynamical pressure, the geomagnetic indices Auroral Electrojet, Kp, Ap and Dst as well as the Total Electron Content (TEC), the Rate of TEC, the scintillation indices S4 and σ(ϕ) and the Along-Arc TEC Rate index index. All these quantities provide in combination with an additional classification an orientation in a physical complex environment. Hence, they are used for brief communication of a simplified but appropriate space situation awareness. However, space weather driven ionospheric phenomena can affect many customers in the communication and navigation domain, which are still served inadequately by the existing indices. We present a new robust index, that is able to properly characterize temporal and spatial ionospheric variations of small to medium scales. The proposed ionospheric disturbance index can overcome several drawbacks of other ionospheric measures and might be suitable as potential driver for an ionospheric space weather scale.

  14. A Review of Ionospheric Scintillation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshi, S

    This is a general review of the existing climatological models of ionospheric radio scintillation for high and equatorial latitudes. Trans-ionospheric communication of radio waves from transmitter to user is affected by the ionosphere which is highly variable and dynamic in both time and space. Scintillation is the term given to irregular amplitude and phase fluctuations of the received signals and related to the electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Key sources of ionospheric irregularities are plasma instabilities; every irregularities model is based on the theory of radio wave propagation in random media. It is important to understand scintillation phenomena and the approach of different theories. Therefore, we have briefly discussed the theories that are used to interpret ionospheric scintillation data. The global morphology of ionospheric scintillation is also discussed briefly. The most important (in our opinion) analytical and physical models of scintillation are reviewed here.

  15. Southern European ionospheric TEC maps based on Kriging technique to monitor ionosphere behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bouza, Marta; Paparini, Claudia; Otero, Xurxo; Herraiz, Miguel; Radicella, Sandro M.; Abe, Oladipo E.; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia

    2017-10-01

    Global or regional Maps of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) are an efficient tool to monitor the delay introduced by the ionosphere in the satellite signals. Ionospheric disturbance periods are of particular interest because these conditions can strongly affect satellite navigation range measurements. This work presents post-processing regional vertical TEC maps over Southern Europe ([35°N-50°N] latitude) obtained by applying Kriging interpolation to GPS derived TEC over more than 100 Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations. These maps are used to study the behavior of the ionosphere during space weather events and their effects. To validate these maps, hereafter called Southern European Ionospheric Maps (SEIMs), their TEC values have been compared with those obtained from EGNOS Message Server (EMS) and with direct experimental TEC data from GNSS stations. Ionospheric space weather events related to geomagnetic storms of March 17th, 2013, February 19th, 2014 and March 17th, 2015 have been selected. To test the methodology, one period of quiet days has been also analyzed. TEC values obtained by SEIMs in the Ionospheric Grid Points (IGPs) defined by EGNOS are very close to those given by EMS and in the period of major geomagnetic storms the difference does not exceed 6 TEC units. These results confirm the good performance of the technique used for obtaining the SEIMs that can be a useful tool to study the ionosphere behavior during geomagnetic storms and their effects in the region of interest.

  16. Space Weather Research: Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Choudhary, R. K.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Manoharan, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Space weather, just like its meteorological counterpart, is of extreme importance when it comes to its impact on terrestrial near- and far-space environments. In recent years, space weather research has acquired an important place as a thrust area of research having implications both in space science and technology. The presence of satellites and other technological systems from different nations in near-Earth space necessitates that one must have a comprehensive understanding not only of the origin and evolution of space weather processes but also of their impact on technology and terrestrial upper atmosphere. To address this aspect, nations across the globe including India have been investing in research concerning Sun, solar processes and their evolution from solar interior into the interplanetary space, and their impact on Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In India, over the years, a substantial amount of work has been done in each of these areas by various agencies/institutions. In fact, India has been, and continues to be, at the forefront of space research and has ambitious future programs concerning these areas encompassing space weather. This review aims at providing a glimpse of this Indian perspective on space weather research to the reader and presenting an up-to-date status of the same.

  17. An Ionospheric Metric Study Using Operational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Harris, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    One of the outstanding challenges in upgrading ionospheric operational models is quantifying their improvement. This challenge is not necessarily an absolute accuracy one, but rather answering the question, "Is the newest operational model an improvement over its predecessor under operational scenarios?" There are few documented cases where ionospheric models are compared either with each other or against "ground truth". For example a CEDAR workshop team, PRIMO, spent almost a decade carrying out a models comparison with ionosonde and incoherent scatter radar measurements from the Millstone Hill, Massachusetts location [Anderson et al.,1998]. The result of this study was that all models were different and specific conditions could be found when each was the "best" model. Similarly, a National Space Weather Metrics ionospheric challenge was held and results were presented at a National Space Weather meeting. The results were again found to be open to interpretation, and issues with the value of the specific metrics were raised (Fuller-Rowell, private communication, 2003). Hence, unlike the tropospheric weather community, who have established metrics and exercised them on new models over many decades to quantify improvement, the ionospheric community has not yet settled on a metric of both scientific and operational value. We report on a study in which metrics were used to compare various forms of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Ionospheric Forecast Model (IFM), and the Utah State University Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements Model (USU-GAIM) models. The ground truth for this study was a group of 11 ionosonde data sets taken between 20 March and 19 April 2004. The metric parameter was the ionosphere's critical frequency. The metric was referenced to the IRI. Hence, the study addressed the specific question what improvement does IFM and USU-GAIM have over IRI. Both strengths (improvements) and weaknesses of these models are discussed

  18. Assessing Space Weather Applications and Understanding: IMF Bz at L1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, P.; Savani, N.; Mays, M. L.; Austin, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    The CCMC - International (CCMC-I) is designed as a self-organizing informal forum for facilitating novel global initiatives on space weather research, development, forecasting and education. Here we capitalize on CCMC'AGUs experience in providing highly utilized web-based services, leadership and trusted relationships with space weather model developers. One of the CCMC-I initiatives is the International Forum for Space Weather Capabilities Assessment. As part of this initiative, within the solar and heliosphere domain, we focus our community discussion on forecasting the magnetic structure of interplanetary CMEs and the ambient solar wind. During the International CCMC-LWS Working Meeting in April 2017 the group instigated open communication to agree upon a standardized process by which all current and future models can be compared under an unbiased test. In this poster, we present our initial findings how we expect different models will move forward with validating and forecasting the magnetic vectors of the solar wind at L1. We also present a new IMF Bz Score-board which will be used to assist in the transitioning of research models into more operational settings.

  19. Operational space weather service for GNSS precise positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jakowski

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The ionospheric plasma can significantly influence the propagation of radio waves and the ionospheric disturbances are capable of causing range errors, rapid phase and amplitude fluctuations (radio scintillations of satellite signals that may lead to degradation of the system performance, its accuracy and reliability. The cause of such disturbances should be sought in the processes originating in the Sun. Numerous studies on these phenomena have been already carried out at a broad international level, in order to measure/estimate these space weather induced effects, to forecast them, and to understand and mitigate their impact on present-day technological systems.

    SWIPPA (Space Weather Impact on Precise Positioning Applications is a pilot project jointly supported by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA. The project aims at establishing, operating, and evaluating a specific space-weather monitoring service that can possibly lead to improving current positioning applications based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS. This space weather service provides GNSS users with essential expert information delivered in the form of several products - maps of TEC values, TEC spatial and temporal gradients, alerts for ongoing/oncoming ionosphere disturbances, etc.

  20. Operational space weather service for GNSS precise positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jakowski

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The ionospheric plasma can significantly influence the propagation of radio waves and the ionospheric disturbances are capable of causing range errors, rapid phase and amplitude fluctuations (radio scintillations of satellite signals that may lead to degradation of the system performance, its accuracy and reliability. The cause of such disturbances should be sought in the processes originating in the Sun. Numerous studies on these phenomena have been already carried out at a broad international level, in order to measure/estimate these space weather induced effects, to forecast them, and to understand and mitigate their impact on present-day technological systems. SWIPPA (Space Weather Impact on Precise Positioning Applications is a pilot project jointly supported by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA. The project aims at establishing, operating, and evaluating a specific space-weather monitoring service that can possibly lead to improving current positioning applications based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS. This space weather service provides GNSS users with essential expert information delivered in the form of several products - maps of TEC values, TEC spatial and temporal gradients, alerts for ongoing/oncoming ionosphere disturbances, etc.

  1. An Ionospheric Index Model based on Linear Regression and Neural Network Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshisaphungo, Mpho; McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2017-04-01

    The ionosphere is well known to reflect radio wave signals in the high frequency (HF) band due to the present of electron and ions within the region. To optimise the use of long distance HF communications, it is important to understand the drivers of ionospheric storms and accurately predict the propagation conditions especially during disturbed days. This paper presents the development of an ionospheric storm-time index over the South African region for the application of HF communication users. The model will result into a valuable tool to measure the complex ionospheric behaviour in an operational space weather monitoring and forecasting environment. The development of an ionospheric storm-time index is based on a single ionosonde station data over Grahamstown (33.3°S,26.5°E), South Africa. Critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) measurements for a period 1996-2014 were considered for this study. The model was developed based on linear regression and neural network approaches. In this talk validation results for low, medium and high solar activity periods will be discussed to demonstrate model's performance.

  2. Understanding the space environment: simulations, statistics and space weather (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, Tuija

    2017-04-01

    Three disruptive transformations have taken place since the 1990's that have reshaped space research in a major way: Increased computational capacity and improved numerical methods have transformed numerical simulations from rough description of the large-scale dynamics to detailed models capable of describing magnetospheric processes to the accuracy that they compare well with in-situ observations. Coordinated satellite programs and multi-satellite missions have increased the coverage of the near-Earth space from single-satellite observations to statistical databases that allow analysis of the environment changes under varying conditions. The increased use of space assets in non-space-related applications has increased the need for accurate space weather monitoring and forecasts that set new requirements for the accuracy and processing times for as well observations and models. In this presentation, we focus on plasma and energy transfer across the bow shock from the solar wind into the magnetosheath, transport through the magnetosheath, and entry into the magnetosphere across the magnetopause. To that end, we use the GUMICS global magnetohydrodynamic simulation and the Themis 5-spacecraft mission plasma and magnetic field measurements. We show that the transport processes are not uniform, but are different during southward and northward IMF, and during strong and weak driving. We conclude by assessing how these results relate to our capabilities of producing valuable space weather services.

  3. Is Space Weather impact different over Africa, and if so why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Doherty, P. H.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing reliance on technology, the impact of space weather will certainly increase unless suitable protective measures are taken. It is well recognized that many space weather impacts arise from structures and dynamics of the equatorial ionosphere which is one of the most complex region that hosts numerous instabilities and irregularities or plasma bubbles. These irregularities cause information loss in satellite communications, as well as degradation in positioning and navigation signals that are used in aviation and maritime industries. An important question with considerable practical importance is whether ionospheric space weather impacts are the same over the American, African, and Asian longitude sectors, or are they different, and if so why? Satellite observations show ionospheric irregularities in the African continent is more prolific event and occurs more frequently in Africa compared to other longitudinal sectors. However, satellite observations are limited to a certain local time; and thus the needs of operational ground-based instruments, in the region like Africa, are essential to understand the physics behind the longitudinal variability of space weather impacts and improve our global forecasting capabilities which are a major objective of the space science community. Using the recently deployed ground-based multi-instruments (augmented with data from space-based instruments), we will present the temporal and seasonal variability of the space weather impacts over the African continent and provide potential evidences about the possible causes that makes the space weather impact in Africa is unique compared to other longitudinal sectors.

  4. The dependence of magnetosphere-ionosphere system on the Earth's magnetic dipole moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Rastaetter, L.

    2017-12-01

    Space weather is increasingly recognized as an international problem affecting several different man-made technologies. The ability to understand, monitor and forecast Earth-directed space weather is of paramount importance for our highly technology-dependent society and for the current rapid developments in awareness and exploration within the heliosphere. It is well known that the strength of the Earth's magnetic field changes over long time scales. We use physics-based simulations with the University of Michigan Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to examine how the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and ground geomagnetic field perturbations respond as the geomagnetic dipole moment changes. We discuss the implication of these results for our community and the end-users of space weather information.

  5. Li-Isotope Fractionation into the Octahedral Framework of Clays: A Way to Understand the Weathering of Basalt in Early Mars Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa-Adams, E.; Gil-Lozano, C.; Bishop, J. L.; Hoser, A.; Davila, A. F.; Fairen, A. G.; Chevrier, V. F.; Gago-Duport, L.

    2017-10-01

    We track the use of lithium isotopes as a proxy to understand the degree and extent of basalt weathering in aqueous mediums, providing important information about the prevailing conditions during the formation of water bodies in the past of Mars.

  6. Understanding land use change impacts on microclimate using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Mitra, Chandana; Dong, Li; Yang, Qichun

    2018-02-01

    To explore potential climatic consequences of land cover change in the Kolkata Metropolitan Development area, we projected microclimate conditions in this area using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model driven by future land use scenarios. Specifically, we considered two land conversion scenarios including an urbanization scenario that all the wetlands and croplands would be converted to built-up areas, and an irrigation expansion scenario in which all wetlands and dry croplands would be replaced by irrigated croplands. Results indicated that land use and land cover (LULC) change would dramatically increase regional temperature in this area under the urbanization scenario, but expanded irrigation tended to have a cooling effect. In the urbanization scenario, precipitation center tended to move eastward and lead to increased rainfall in eastern parts of this region. Increased irrigation stimulated rainfall in central and eastern areas but reduced rainfall in southwestern and northwestern parts of the study area. This study also demonstrated that urbanization significantly reduced latent heat fluxes and albedo of land surface; while increased sensible heat flux changes following urbanization suggested that developed land surfaces mainly acted as heat sources. In this study, climate change projection not only predicts future spatiotemporal patterns of multiple climate factors, but also provides valuable insights into policy making related to land use management, water resource management, and agriculture management to adapt and mitigate future climate changes in this populous region.

  7. Forecasting Space Weather-Induced GPS Performance Degradation Using Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filjar, R.; Filic, M.; Milinkovic, F.

    2017-12-01

    Space weather and ionospheric dynamics have a profound effect on positioning performance of the Global Satellite Navigation System (GNSS). However, the quantification of that effect is still the subject of scientific activities around the world. In the latest contribution to the understanding of the space weather and ionospheric effects on satellite-based positioning performance, we conducted a study of several candidates for forecasting method for space weather-induced GPS positioning performance deterioration. First, a 5-days set of experimentally collected data was established, encompassing the space weather and ionospheric activity indices (including: the readings of the Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) monitors, components of geomagnetic field strength, global Kp index, Dst index, GPS-derived Total Electron Content (TEC) samples, standard deviation of TEC samples, and sunspot number) and observations of GPS positioning error components (northing, easting, and height positioning error) derived from the Adriatic Sea IGS reference stations' RINEX raw pseudorange files in quiet space weather periods. This data set was split into the training and test sub-sets. Then, a selected set of supervised machine learning methods based on Random Forest was applied to the experimentally collected data set in order to establish the appropriate regional (the Adriatic Sea) forecasting models for space weather-induced GPS positioning performance deterioration. The forecasting models were developed in the R/rattle statistical programming environment. The forecasting quality of the regional forecasting models developed was assessed, and the conclusions drawn on the advantages and shortcomings of the regional forecasting models for space weather-caused GNSS positioning performance deterioration.

  8. Magnetotail processes and their ionospheric signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdousi, B.; Raeder, J.; Zesta, E.; Murphy, K. R.; Cramer, W. D.

    2017-12-01

    In-situ observations in the magnetotail are sparse and limited to single point measurements. In the ionosphere, on the other hand, there is a broad range of observations, including magnetometers, auroral imagers, and various radars. Since the ionosphere is to some extent a mirror of plasmasheet processes it can be used as a monitor of magnetotail dynamics. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the coupling between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere in order to properly interpret the ionosphere and ground observations in terms of magnetotail dynamics. For this purpose, the global magnetohydrodynamic model OpenGGCM is used to investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. One of the key processes in magnetotail dynamics are bursty bulk flows (BBFs) which are the major means by which momentum and energy get transferred through the magnetotail and down to the ionosphere. BBFs often manifested in the ionosphere as auroral streamers. This study focuses on mapping such flow bursts from the magnetotail to the ionosphere along the magnetic field lines for three states of the magnetotail: pre-substorm onset through substorm expansion and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) following the substorm. We find that the orientation of streamers in the ionosphere differes for different local times, and that, for both tail and ionospheric signatures, activity increases during the SCM configutation compared to the pre-onset and quiet times. We also find that the background convection in the tail impacts the direction and deflection of the BBFs and the subsequent orientation of the auroral streamers in the ionosphere.

  9. Ionospheric Digital Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ionosphere is that part of the Earth's atmosphere that results mainly from the photo ionization of the upper atmosphere. Traditionally, the following ionospheric...

  10. GNSS Derived Ionospheric TEC Observed Through Different TEC Calibration Techniques in the Brazilian Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Carmo, C. S.; Camargo, P. O.; Monico, J. F. G.; Nicoli Candido, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is becoming a reliable tool for use in air navigation systems. Its use as the main technology for determination of airplanes positioning has various economic and logistic benefits but it depends strongly on the ionospheric layer influences. The Brazilian sector ionosphere, mainly over the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), presents remarkable errors in the GNSS signal as compared to North America and Europe. In order to study the total electron content latitudinal variation of the Brazilian ionosphere we used a pair of GNSS receivers on the ground, one located in the equatorial region (Sao Luis) and other in the southern crest of the EIA (Cachoeira Paulista), to collect the GNSS observables and calculate the vertical TEC using different methods that has proven to work well to describe the ionospheric behavior in the North America and in Europe. We compared this results with a modified Nagoya TEC calculation method used by the EMBRACE (Estudo e Monitoramento BRAsileiro do Clima Espacial - Brazilian Study and Monitoring of Space Weather) program. This work intends to follow the performance of different TEC tuning methods to evaluate the spurious effects of the ionospheric EIA gradients in the TEC determination under typical conditions of the low-latitudes ionosphere in the Brazilian sector. The calculated TEC under different solar cycle conditions, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variations show deviations in the performance of each method and stress the importance of well adjust the GNSS observations to local conditions in order to optimize the TEC evaluation. This study contributes to a better understanding of local GNSS signal errors in the global intent of offering conditions to improve the accuracy, integrity, availability, and continuity requirements for the use of GNSS for air navigation in South America.

  11. Public Sharing and Understanding of Scientific Data - with the Illustration of Weather Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danna Shen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The sharing of scientific data is a problem that attracts worldwide attention. In answer, governments have started to establish many systems to provide the public with scientific data. However, sometimes the access does not consider the public's practical need but just stands as an "official" prototype. In this research, a questionnaire was devised to understand a Beijing citizen's practical need for scientific data and to explore the inconsistency between the needs of the public and the information published by the government. The research looks to find a more effective way to solve this problem.

  12. Quantitative modeling of the ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Fuller-Rowell

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A physical model of the coupled thermosphere and ionosphere has been used to determine the accuracy of model predictions of the ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity, and assess our understanding of the physical processes. The physical model is driven by empirical descriptions of the high-latitude electric field and auroral precipitation, as measures of the strength of the magnetospheric sources of energy and momentum to the upper atmosphere. Both sources are keyed to the time-dependent TIROS/NOAA auroral power index. The output of the model is the departure of the ionospheric F region from the normal climatological mean. A 50-day interval towards the end of 1997 has been simulated with the model for two cases. The first simulation uses only the electric fields and auroral forcing from the empirical models, and the second has an additional source of random electric field variability. In both cases, output from the physical model is compared with F-region data from ionosonde stations. Quantitative model/data comparisons have been performed to move beyond the conventional "visual" scientific assessment, in order to determine the value of the predictions for operational use. For this study, the ionosphere at two ionosonde stations has been studied in depth, one each from the northern and southern mid-latitudes. The model clearly captures the seasonal dependence in the ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity at mid-latitude, reproducing the tendency for decreased ion density in the summer hemisphere and increased densities in winter. In contrast to the "visual" success of the model, the detailed quantitative comparisons, which are necessary for space weather applications, are less impressive. The accuracy, or value, of the model has been quantified by evaluating the daily standard deviation, the root-mean-square error, and the correlation coefficient between the data and model predictions. The modeled quiet-time variability, or standard

  13. Fair weather atmospheric electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R G

    2011-01-01

    Not long after Franklin's iconic studies, an atmospheric electric field was discovered in 'fair weather' regions, well away from thunderstorms. The origin of the fair weather field was sought by Lord Kelvin, through development of electrostatic instrumentation and early data logging techniques, but was ultimately explained through the global circuit model of C.T.R. Wilson. In Wilson's model, charge exchanged by disturbed weather electrifies the ionosphere, and returns via a small vertical current density in fair weather regions. New insights into the relevance of fair weather atmospheric electricity to terrestrial and planetary atmospheres are now emerging. For example, there is a possible role of the global circuit current density in atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation. Beyond natural atmospheric processes, a novel practical application is the use of early atmospheric electrostatic investigations to provide quantitative information on past urban air pollution.

  14. Space weather impact on radio device operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berngardt, Oleg

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews the space weather impact on operation of radio devices. The review is based on recently published papers, books, and strategic scientific plans of space weather investigations. The main attention is paid to ionospheric effects on propagation of radiowaves, basically short ones. Some examples of such effects are based on 2012–2016 ISTP SB RAS EKB radar data: attenuation of ground backscatter signals during solar flares, effects of traveling ionospheric disturbances of different scales in ground backscatter signals, effects of magnetospheric waves in ionospheric scatter signals.

  15. Space weather impact on radio device operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berngardt O.I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the space weather impact on operation of radio devices. The review is based on recently published papers, books, and strategic scientific plans of space weather investigations. The main attention is paid to ionospheric effects on propagation of radiowaves, basically short ones. Some examples of such effects are based on 2012–2016 ISTP SB RAS EKB radar data: attenuation of ground backscatter signals during solar flares, effects of traveling ionospheric disturbances of different scales in ground backscatter signals, effects of magnetospheric waves in ionospheric scatter signals.

  16. Upper ionosphere and magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzano, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    After a presentation of the ionospheric physics and of the earth magnetosphere morphology, generation and dynamics, the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in quiet and perturbed conditions is discussed. Some summary information about other planetary magnetospheres, particularly Venus and Jupiter magnetospheres, are finally given. 41 refs, 24 figs

  17. On forecasting ionospheric total electron content responses to high-speed solar wind streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions in the ionosphere have become increasingly important to forecast, since more and more spaceborne and ground-based technological systems rely on ionospheric weather. Here we explore the feasibility of ionospheric forecasts with the current generation of physics-based models. In particular, we focus on total electron content (TEC predictions using the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM. Simulations are configured in a forecast mode and performed for four typical high-speed-stream events during 2007–2012. The simulated TECs are quantified through a metric, which divides the globe into a number of local regions and robustly differentiates between quiet and disturbed periods. Proposed forecast products are hourly global maps color-coded by the TEC disturbance level of each local region. To assess the forecasts, we compare the simulated TEC disturbances with global TEC maps derived from Global Positioning System (GPS satellite observations. The forecast performance is found to be merely acceptable, with a large number of regions where the observed variations are not captured by the simulations. Examples of model-data agreements and disagreements are investigated in detail, aiming to understand the model behavior and improve future forecasts. For one event, we identify two adjacent regions with similar TEC observations but significant differences in how local chemistry versus plasma transport contribute to electron density changes in the simulation. Suggestions for further analysis are described.

  18. An SDR-based Study of Multi-GNSS Positioning Performance During Fast-developing Space Weather Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Filic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the ionospheric effects on GNSS positioning performance forms an essential pre-requisite for resilient GNSS development. Here we present the results of a study of the effects of a fast-developing space weather disturbance on the positioning performance of a commercial-grade GPS+GLONASS receiver. Using experimentally collected pseudoranges and the RTKLIB, an open-source software-defined GNSS radio receiver operating in the simulation mode, we assessed GNSS positioning performance degradations for various modes of GNSS SDR receiver operation, and identified the benefits of utilisation of multi-GNSS and ionospheric error correction techniques.

  19. Ionospheric Effects of X-Ray Solar Bursts in the Brazilian Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Takahashi, H.; Costa, J. E.; Otsuka, Y.

    2011-12-01

    When the solar X-ray flux in the interplanetary medium reaches values above a certain threshold, some undesired effects affecting radio communications are expected. Basically, the magnitudes of these effects depend on the X-ray peak brightness and duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth atmosphere. An important aspect defining the severity of damages to HF radio communications and LF navigation signals in a certain area is the local time when each event takes place. In order to create more accurate warnings referred to possible radio signal loss or degradation in the Brazilian sector, we analyze TEC maps obtained by a GPS network, formed by dual-frequency receivers spread all over the country, to observe ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events in the 0.1-0.8 nm range measured by GOES satellite. Considering the duration, peak brightness, and local time of the events, the final purpose of this study is to understand and predict the degree of changes suffered by the ionosphere during these X-ray bursts. We intend using these results to create a radio blackout warning product to be offered by the Brazilian space weather program named EMBRACE (Estudo e Monitoramento BRAsileiro do Clima Espacial): Brazilian Monitoring and Study of Space Weather.

  20. Global scale ionospheric irregularities associated with thunderstorm activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulinets, Sergey A.; Depuev, Victor H.

    2003-01-01

    The potential difference near 280 kV exists between ground and ionosphere. This potential difference is generated by thunderstorm discharges all over the world, and return current closes the circuit in the areas of fair weather (so-called fair weather current). The model calculations and experimental measurements clearly demonstrate non-uniform latitude-longitude distribution of electric field within the atmosphere. The recent calculations show that the strong large scale vertical atmospheric electric field can penetrate into the ionosphere and create large scale irregularities of the electron concentration. To check this the global distributions of thunderstorm activity obtained with the satellite monitoring for different seasons were compared with the global distributions of ionosphere critical frequency (which is equivalent to peak electron concentration) obtained with the help of satellite topside sounding. The similarity of the obtained global distributions clearly demonstrates the effects of thunderstorm electric fields onto the Earth's ionosphere. (author)

  1. Non-Uniform Plasma Discharges in Near Earth Space Environment and Ionosphere to Troposphere Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanney, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    excess current of protons in the solar wind, which creates an overall capacitor with inherent non-uniform electric field surrounding the Sun. On a local scale the voltage gradients are quite low, but all objects in this solar capacitor, including the planets and their moon systems, discharge this capacitor over extensive trans-planetary distances, thus creating excessive current flows, which also respond to CMEs and solar flares which carry a far greater potential gradient in the passing solar wind. The key to understanding reactions to non-uniform electric fields in the LEB environment is based on the fact that planetary Debye shielding takes on a new form, which is extended from that of the neutral environment typically considered in previous theoretical models. An attempt is made to solve the fundamental problem of the source of energy that drives these systems. The effects of moons and their positions relative to the planet and solar wind, as well as multiple planetary electrical alignments, are shown to contribute to the overall discharge phenomenon. A connection is made between these energy sources and cyclonic storms, earthquakes and volcanic "trigger" mechanisms. The goal of this research is to create an overall space weather model that couples the single energy source (the non-uniform plasma environment of the Sun created by an excess current of positive charge in the solar wind) to the earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere (and other planetary environments) and ultimately to the low altitude weather systems.

  2. Ionospheric data for two solar cycles available online

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilitza, D.; Papitashvili, N.; Grebowsky, J.; Schar, W.

    2002-01-01

    We report about a project that has as its goal to make a large volume of ionospheric satellite insitu data from the sixties, seventies and early eighties easily accessible for public use The original data exist in various machine-specific, highly compressed, binary encoding on 7- or 9-track magnetic tapes. The intent is to decode the data format and convert all data sets to a common ASCII data format and add solar and magnetic indices for user convenience. The original intent of producing CD-ROMs with these data has meanwhile been overtaken by the rapid development of the internet. Most users now prefer to obtain the data directly online and greatly value web-interfaces to browse, plot and subset the data. Accordingly, the focus has shifted to making the data available online on the anonymous ftp site of NASA's National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft data/ and on the development of a web-interface (ATMOWeb, http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/ atmoweb/) to help users study the data and select interesting time periods. The data considered by this project include data sets from the Alouette I, BE-B (Explorer 22), Alouette 2, DME-A (Explorer 31) , AE-B (Explorer 32), AE-C, -D, -E, OGO-6, ESRO-4, ISIS-I, -2, AEROS-I, -2 Taiyo, ISS-b, Hinotori and DE-2 satellites. The data are primarily electron and ion densities and temperatures measured by Langmuir Probes (LP), Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA), and Ion Mass Spectrometers (IMS) flown on these satellites. The time resolution of the measurements is typically seconds to minutes. This data base covering almost two solar cycles is a unique asset for studies of the variation and variability of ionospheric parameters. It will be an important element in the quest for a better understanding of ionospheric plasma processes and for improved predictions of ionospheric Space Weather. Current models are still very limited in their predictive capabilities especially at equatorial and auroral

  3. Preface: Studies on mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere from equatorial to mid latitudes - Recent investigations and improvements - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavutarapu, Venkatesh; Pezzopane, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Investigations on mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere system are areas of increasing prominence since they are sensitive indicators of climate change and affect satellite-based technologies which have an important role in contemporary life. Compared to the one at high latitudes, the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere exhibit strong spatio-temporal variability in the presence of really complex electrodynamic processes like among others the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly and the Equatorial Spread-F. In addition to this significant quiet-time variability, space weather events cause severe perturbations of the upper atmosphere through solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Studies to achieve a comprehensive understanding on global characteristics of the thermosphere-ionosphere system are of vital importance to develop efficient models to meet the accuracy requirements of satellite-based communication and navigation applications. Further, the current 24th solar cycle is associated with several unique features, such as the deep and prolonged minimum, and the lowest maximum of the past hundred years, which triggered an increased interest to understand the upper atmospheric variability under such extreme and peculiar conditions.

  4. Ionospheric "Volcanology": Ionospheric Detection of Volcano Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, E.; Shults, K.; Lognonne, P. H.; Rakoto, V.

    2016-12-01

    It is known that volcano eruptions and explosions can generate acoustic and gravity waves. These neutral waves further propagate into the atmosphere and ionosphere, where they are detectable by atmospheric and ionospheric sounding tools. So far, the features of co-volcanic ionospheric perturbations are not well understood yet. The development of the global and regional networks of ground-based GPS/GNSS receivers has opened a new era in the ionospheric detection of natural hazard events, including volcano eruptions. It is now known that eruptions with the volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of more than 2 can be detected in the ionosphere, especially in regions with dense GPS/GNSS-receiver coverage. The co-volcanic ionospheric disturbances are usually characterized as quasi-periodic oscillations. The Calbuco volcano, located in southern Chile, awoke in April 2015 after 43 years of inactivity. The first eruption began at 21:04UT on 22 April 2015, preceded by only an hour-long period of volcano-tectonic activity. This first eruption lasted 90 minutes and generated a sub-Plinian (i.e. medium to large explosive event), gray ash plume that rose 15 km above the main crater. A larger second event on 23 April began at 04:00UT (01:00LT), it lasted six hours, and also generated a sub-Plinian ash plume that rose higher than 15 km. The VEI was estimated to be 4 to 5 for these two events. In this work, we first study ionospheric TEC response to the Calbuco volcano eruptions of April 2015 by using ground-based GNSS-receivers located around the volcano. We analyze the spectral characteristics of the observed TEC variations and we estimate the propagation speed of the co-volcanic ionospheric perturbations. We further proceed with the normal mode summation technique based modeling of the ionospheric TEC variations due to the Calbuco volcano eruptions. Finally, we attempt to localize the position of the volcano from the ionospheric measurements, and we also estimate the time of the

  5. New Ecuadorian VLF and ELF receiver for study the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ericson; Montenegro, Jefferson; Vasconez, Michael; Vicente, Klever

    Crucial physical phenomena occur in the equatorial atmosphere and ionosphere, which are currently understudied and poorly understood. Thus, scientific campaigns for monitoring the equatorial region are required in order to provide the necessary data for the physical models. Ecuador is located in strategic geographical position where these studies can be performed, providing quality data for the scientific community working in understanding the nature of these physical systems. The Quito Astronomical Observatory (QAO) of National Polytechnic School is moving in this direction by promoting research in space sciences for the study of the equatorial zone. With the participation and the valuable collaboration of international initiatives such us AWESOME, MAGDAS, SAVNET and CALLISTO, the Quito Observatory is establishing a new space physics division on the basis of the International Space Weather Initiative. As part of this project, in the QAO has been designed a new system for acquisition and processing VLF and ELF signals propagating in the ionosphere. The Labview Software is used to filtering, processing and conditioning the received signals, avoiding in this way 60 percent of the analog components present in a common receiver. The same software have been programmed to create the spectrograms and the amplitude and phase diagrams of the radio signals. The data is stored neatly in files that can be processed even with other applications.

  6. An SDR-based Study of Multi-GNSS Positioning Performance During Fast-developing Space Weather Storm

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Filic; Renato Filjar; Laura Ruotsalainen

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the ionospheric effects on GNSS positioning performance forms an essential pre-requisite for resilient GNSS development. Here we present the results of a study of the effects of a fast-developing space weather disturbance on the positioning performance of a commercial-grade GPS+GLONASS receiver. Using experimentally collected pseudoranges and the RTKLIB, an open-source software-defined GNSS radio receiver operating in the simulation mode, we assessed GNSS positioning perf...

  7. The F-Region Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics Drifts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ionospheric plasma drift is one of the most essential parameters for understanding the dynamics of ionospheric F-region. F-region electromagnetic drifts are calculated for three seasonal conditions from ionosonde observations acquired during quiet period of a typical year of high and low solar activity at Ibadan (7.4oN, ...

  8. Scientific challenges in thermosphere-ionosphere forecasting – conclusions from the October 2014 NASA JPL community workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannucci Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in forecasting space weather in the thermosphere and ionosphere (T-I led to a community workshop held at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in October, 2014. The workshop focus was “Scientific Challenges in Thermosphere-Ionosphere Forecasting” to emphasize that forecasting presumes a sufficiently advanced state of scientific knowledge, yet one that is still evolving. The purpose of the workshop, and this topical issue that arose from the workshop, was to discuss research frontiers that will lead to improved space weather forecasts. Three areas are discussed in some detail in this paper: (1 the role of lower atmosphere forcing in the response of the T-I to geomagnetic disturbances; (2 the significant deposition of energy at polar latitudes during geomagnetic disturbances; and (3 recent developments in understanding the propagation of coronal mass ejections through the heliosphere and prospects for forecasting the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF using observations at the Lagrangian L5 point. We describe other research presented at the workshop that appears in the topical issue. The possibility of establishing a “positive feedback loop” where improved scientific knowledge leads to improved forecasts is described (Siscoe 2006, Space Weather, 4, S01003; Mannucci 2012, Space Weather, 10, S07003.

  9. The Near Real Time Ionospheric Model of Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaļinka, M.; Zvirgzds, J.; Dobelis, D.; Lazdāns, E.; Reiniks, M.

    2015-11-01

    A highly accurate ionosphere model is necessary to enable a fast and reliable coordinate determination with GNSS in real time. It is a partially ionized atmospheric region ranging up to 1,000 km height, affected by spatial variations, space weather, seasonal and solar cycle dependence. New approaches and algorithms of modelling techniques are sought to provide better solutions in the territory of Latvia. Ionospheric TEC value has large differences in Western Latvia and Eastern Latvia. Actual ionospheric map should be calculated and delivered to the surveyors near real time and published on the WEB. Delivering actual map to rover GNSS devices in a field will provide the surveyors with ionospheric conditions and allow choosing best time for surveying and making geodetic measurements with higher accuracy and reliability.

  10. Ionospheric Irregularities at Mars Probed by MARSIS Topside Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kopf, A. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.

    2018-01-01

    The upper ionosphere of Mars contains a variety of perturbations driven by solar wind forcing from above and upward propagating atmospheric waves from below. Here we explore the global distribution and variability of ionospheric irregularities around the exobase at Mars by analyzing topside sounding data from the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on board Mars Express. As irregular structure gives rise to off-vertical echoes with excess propagation time, the diffuseness of ionospheric echo traces can be used as a diagnostic tool for perturbed reflection surfaces. The observed properties of diffuse echoes above unmagnetized regions suggest that ionospheric irregularities with horizontal wavelengths of tens to hundreds of kilometers are particularly enhanced in the winter hemisphere and at high solar zenith angles. Given the known inverse dependence of neutral gravity wave amplitudes on the background atmospheric temperature, the ionospheric irregularities probed by MARSIS are most likely associated with plasma perturbations driven by atmospheric gravity waves. Though extreme events with unusually diffuse echoes are more frequently observed for high solar wind dynamic pressures during some time intervals, the vast majority of the diffuse echo events are unaffected by varying solar wind conditions, implying limited influence of solar wind forcing on the generation of ionospheric irregularities. Combination of remote and in situ measurements of ionospheric irregularities would offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the ionospheric dynamics at Mars.

  11. Weather Fundamentals: Meteorology. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) looks at how meteorologists gather and interpret current weather data collected from sources…

  12. Global scale ionospheric irregularities associated with thunderstorm activity

    CERN Document Server

    Pulinets, S A

    2002-01-01

    The potential difference near 280 kV exists between ground and ionosphere. This potential difference is generated by thunderstorm discharges all over the world, and return current closes the circuit in the areas of fair weather (so-called fair weather current). The model calculations and experimental measurements clearly demonstrate non-uniform latitude-longitude distribution of electric field within the atmosphere. The recent calculations show that the strong large scale vertical atmospheric electric field can penetrate into the ionosphere and create large scale irregularities of the electron concentration. To check this the global distributions of thunderstorm activity obtained with the satellite monitoring for different seasons were compared with the global distributions of ionosphere critical frequency (which is equivalent to peak electron concentration) obtained with the help of satellite topside sounding. The similarity of the obtained global distributions clearly demonstrates the effects of thunderstor...

  13. The new ionospheric station of Tucumán: first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Cabrera

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available An Advanced Ionospheric Sounder, built at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome, Italy, was installed at Tucumán, Argentina, particularly interesting for its location, near the southern peak of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly. The aim of this installation is to collect a large number of continuous data useful both to study the dynamics of the equatorial ionospheric plasma and to develop reliable regional ionospheric prediction models. Moreover this ionosonde will contribute to the ionospheric database and real time knowledge of Southern Hemisphere ionospheric conditions for space weather applications. The ionosonde is completely programmable and two PCs support the data acquisition, control, storage and on-line processing. In this work the first results, in terms of ionograms and autoscaled characteristics, are presented and briefly discussed.

  14. Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are caused by solar flare enhanced X-rays in the 1 to 10 angstrom range. Solar flares can produce large increases of ionization...

  15. Diagnostic study of coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics in D-region ionosphere via VLF signal propagation characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic disturbances and storms are known to produce significant global disturbances in the ionosphere, including the middle atmosphere and troposphere. There is little understanding about the mechanism and dynamics that drive these processes in lower ionosphere. The ionosphere is also thought to be sensitive to seismic events, and it is believed that it exhibits precursory characteristics as reported in studies via characteristic anomalies in VLF signal. However, distinguishing or separating seismically induced ionospheric fluctuations from those of other origins (e.g., Solar activity, planetary and tidal waves, stratospheric warming etc.) remain vital to robust conclusion, and challenging too. The unique propagation characteristic of VLF radio signal makes it an ideal tool for the study and diagnosis of variability of D-region ionosphere. In this work, we present the analysis of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling dynamics in D-region ionosphere using VLF signal characteristics, and performed an investigation of previously reported 'ionospheric precursors' to understand the true origins of measured anomalies.

  16. Ionosphere monitoring and forecast activities within the IAG working group "Ionosphere Prediction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Mainul; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Erdogan, Eren; Cueto Santamaría, Marta; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Schmidt, Michael; Wilken, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Ionospheric disturbances can affect technologies in space and on Earth disrupting satellite and airline operations, communications networks, navigation systems. As the world becomes ever more dependent on these technologies, ionospheric disturbances as part of space weather pose an increasing risk to the economic vitality and national security. Therefore, having the knowledge of ionospheric state in advance during space weather events is becoming more and more important. To promote scientific cooperation we recently formed a Working Group (WG) called "Ionosphere Predictions" within the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) under Sub-Commission 4.3 "Atmosphere Remote Sensing" of the Commission 4 "Positioning and Applications". The general objective of the WG is to promote the development of ionosphere prediction algorithm/models based on the dependence of ionospheric characteristics on solar and magnetic conditions combining data from different sensors to improve the spatial and temporal resolution and sensitivity taking advantage of different sounding geometries and latency. Our presented work enables the possibility to compare total electron content (TEC) prediction approaches/results from different centers contributing to this WG such as German Aerospace Center (DLR), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Technische Universität München (TUM) and GMV. DLR developed a model-assisted TEC forecast algorithm taking benefit from actual trends of the TEC behavior at each grid point. Since during perturbations, characterized by large TEC fluctuations or ionization fronts, this approach may fail, the trend information is merged with the current background model which provides a stable climatological TEC behavior. The presented solution is a first step to regularly provide forecasted TEC services via SWACI/IMPC by DLR. UPC forecast model is based on applying linear regression to a temporal window of TEC maps in the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) domain

  17. A Study of Ionospheric Storm Association with Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    The bulk association between ionospheric storms and geomagnetic storms have been studied. Hemispheric features of seasonal variation of ionospheric storms in the mid-latitude were also investigated. 188 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤100nT) that occurred during solar cycle 22 and 23 were considered, of which 143 were observed to be identified with an ionospheric storm. Individual ionospheric storms were identified as maximum deviations of the F2 layer peak electron density from quiet time values. Only ionospheric storms that could clearly be associated with the peak of a geomagnetic storms were considered. Data from two mid-latitude ionosonde stations; one in the northern hemisphere (i.e Moscow) and the other in the southern hemisphere (Grahamstown) were used to study ionospheric condition at the time of the individual geomagnetic storms. Results show hemispheric and latitudinal differences in the intensity and nature of ionospheric storms association with different types of geomagnetic storms. These results are significant for our present understanding of the mechanisms which drive the changes in electron density during different types of ionospheric storms.

  18. Considering the potential of IAR emissions for ionospheric sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A. S.; Polyushkina, T. N.; Tsegmed, B.; Oinats, A. V.; Pashinin, A. Yu.; Edemskiy, I. K.; Mylnikova, A. A.; Ratovsky, K. G.

    2017-11-01

    Knowledge of the ionospheric state allows us to adjust the forecasts of radio wave propagation, specify the environment models, and follow the changes of space weather. At present, probing of the ionosphere is produced by radio sounding with ground ionosondes, as well as by raying signals from satellites. We want to draw attention to the possibility of the diagnosis of the ionospheric parameters by detecting ultra-low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic emission generated in the so-called ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR). To do this, we present observations of the IAR emission made simultaneously for the first time at three stations using identical induction magnetometers. The stations are within one-hour difference of local time, two of them are mid-latitudinal; the third one is situated in the auroral zone. We compare frequency and frequency difference between adjacent harmonics of the observed multi-band emission with ionospheric parameters measured at the stations using ionosondes and GPS-observations. Diurnal variations of the ionospheric and ULF emission characteristics are also compared. The results show that there is quite a stable correlation between the resonant frequencies of the resonator bands and the critical frequency of the F2 layer of the ionosphere, namely, the frequency of the IAR emission varies inversely as the critical frequency of the ionosphere. This is due to the fact that the frequency of oscillation captured in the resonator is primarily determined by the Alfvén velocity (which depends on the plasma density) in the ionospheric F2 layer. The correlation is high; it varies at different stations, but is observed distinctly along the whole meridian. However, coefficients of a regression equation that connects the ionosphere critical frequency with DSB frequency vary significantly from day to day at all stations. The reason for such a big spread of the regression parameters is not clear and needs further investigation before we are able to

  19. Extreme Space Weather Events: From Cradle to Grave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete; Baker, Dan; Liu, Ying D.; Verronen, Pekka; Singer, Howard; Güdel, Manuel

    2018-02-01

    Extreme space weather events, while rare, can have a substantial impact on our technologically-dependent society. And, although such events have only occasionally been observed, through careful analysis of a wealth of space-based and ground-based observations, historical records, and extrapolations from more moderate events, we have developed a basic picture of the components required to produce them. Several key issues, however, remain unresolved. For example, what limits are imposed on the maximum size of such events? What are the likely societal consequences of a so-called "100-year" solar storm? In this review, we summarize our current scientific understanding about extreme space weather events as we follow several examples from the Sun, through the solar corona and inner heliosphere, across the magnetospheric boundary, into the ionosphere and atmosphere, into the Earth's lithosphere, and, finally, its impact on man-made structures and activities, such as spacecraft, GPS signals, radio communication, and the electric power grid. We describe preliminary attempts to provide probabilistic forecasts of extreme space weather phenomena, and we conclude by identifying several key areas that must be addressed if we are better able to understand, and, ultimately, predict extreme space weather events.

  20. Beyond the Weather Chart: Weathering New Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Amy Bruno

    1996-01-01

    Describes an early childhood educator's approach to teaching children about rain, rainbows, clouds, precipitation, the sun, air, and wind. Recommends ways to organize study topics and describes experiments that can help children better understand the different elements of weather. (MOK)

  1. Space Weather Forecasting at IZMIRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidash, S. P.; Belov, A. V.; Abunina, M. A.; Abunin, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Since 1998, the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) has had an operating heliogeophysical service—the Center for Space Weather Forecasts. This center transfers the results of basic research in solar-terrestrial physics into daily forecasting of various space weather parameters for various lead times. The forecasts are promptly available to interested consumers. This article describes the center and the main types of forecasts it provides: solar and geomagnetic activity, magnetospheric electron fluxes, and probabilities of proton increases. The challenges associated with the forecasting of effects of coronal mass ejections and coronal holes are discussed. Verification data are provided for the center's forecasts.

  2. Troposphere - ionosphere interaction during tropospheric MCC events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzano, J.R.; Zossi Artigas, M.M. de; Filippi Manzano, A.N. de; Cosio Ragone, A.H. de

    1995-09-01

    The present paper describes the investigation of possible effects of the type of large meteorological events known as Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCC) on the F-region of the ionosphere over Argentina. These warm-season weather systems of huge size are present in the United States (Maddox, 1980) and in South Americal (Velasco and Fritsch, 1987). Their extension can be as large as 1,300,000 Km 2 and they tend to move in different directions over the earth surface. It is expected that these meteorological events should leave its signature in the upper region of the atmosphere. 13 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  3. Understanding the processes involved in weathering and experimental alteration of glassy materials. The case of some volcanic glasses from eastern Sicily (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liotta, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to study the effects of weathering and experimental alteration in order to understand the geochemical processes involved and the variation of mineral phases in altered natural glasses. For the first time, five samples of natural volcanic glasses having different composition were collected in eastern Sicily (Italy) in order to be artificially altered and analyzed. The study of naturally altered samples has allowed to observe the effects of weathering after a period of time corresponding to the age of the sample. Moreover, the use of samples of natural glass of volcanic origin has allowed to obtain some powder or thin plates of fresh silicate glass that have been subjected to artificial alteration in the laboratory, in order to model the geochemical processes that have occurred. Alteration experiments were conducted in pure water at 90 C; samples have been altered from 1 to 1000 days of experiment. The characterization of the samples was obtained by Raman spectroscopy, which showed the effects of the devitrification and the presence of some secondary minerals such as carbonates and anatase on the obsidian thin plates, but also phillipsite and chabazite, two varieties of zeolite usually found in the cavities of oldest basalts. Solid modifications were observed by SEM. The analysis showed the formation of several secondary minerals having a composition compatible with smectites, determined by EDS spectroscopy. All these results allow to test the geochemical modeling in the long term. Further analysis will be needed to reach a full understanding of the weathering of glassy materials. (author)

  4. Plasma Physics of the Subauroral Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-20

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0068 TR-2016-0068 PLASMA PHYSICS OF THE SUBAURORAL SPACE WEATHER Evgeny V. Mishin, et al. 20 March 2016 Final...Oct 2013 to 30 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Plasma Physics of the Subauroral Space Weather 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... plasma processes that control the dynamics of the perturbed inner magnetosphere/subauroral ionosphere termed the subauroral geospace. Our observations

  5. Ionospheric Impacts on UHF Space Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's atmosphere contains regions of ionized plasma caused by the interaction of highly energetic solar radiation. This region of ionization is called the ionosphere and varies significantly with altitude, latitude, local solar time, season, and solar cycle. Significant ionization begins at about 100 km (E layer) with a peak in the ionization at about 300 km (F2 layer). Above the F2 layer, the atmosphere is mostly ionized but the ion and electron densities are low due to the unavailability of neutral molecules for ionization so the density decreases exponentially with height to well over 1000 km. The gradients of these variations in the ionosphere play a significant role in radio wave propagation. These gradients induce variations in the index of refraction and cause some radio waves to refract. The amount of refraction depends on the magnitude and direction of the electron density gradient and the frequency of the radio wave. The refraction is significant at HF frequencies (3-30 MHz) with decreasing effects toward the UHF (300-3000 MHz) range. UHF is commonly used for tracking of space objects in low Earth orbit (LEO). While ionospheric refraction is small for UHF frequencies, it can cause errors in range, azimuth angle, and elevation angle estimation by ground-based radars tracking space objects. These errors can cause significant errors in precise orbit determinations. For radio waves transiting the ionosphere, it is important to understand and account for these effects. Using a sophisticated radio wave propagation tool suite and an empirical ionospheric model, we calculate the errors induced by the ionosphere in a simulation of a notional space surveillance radar tracking objects in LEO. These errors are analyzed to determine daily, monthly, annual, and solar cycle trends. Corrections to surveillance radar measurements can be adapted from our simulation capability.

  6. Ionospheric sources for molecular ion outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Blelly, P. F.; Alcayde, D.; Semeter, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mass-resolved satellite observations have established the presence of molecular ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere, outer magnetosphere, and ring current. Associated molecular outflows originate from the auroral zone F-region ionosphere and, while normally several orders of magnitude less intense than the well-known O+ outflow, are perhaps more closely tied to intense geomagnetic disturbances. Molecular outflow is also fundamentally different from O+ outflow, since molecular ions must first be generated in large quantities in the F-region, and then are subject to very short recombination lifetimes as they escape. Owing to observational difficulties, very little detailed information exists on the generation, energization, and upward transport of molecular ions. Furthermore, the basic geographic and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ionospheric source and higher altitude outflow are only loosely constrained. This research synthesizes both observations and models to gain a better understanding of molecular ion generation and upflow, and the basic characteristics of the ionospheric molecular source during geomagnetic storms. To illustrate ionospheric dynamics associated with published satellite observations of molecular upflow, a 2D ionospheric model is driven by boundary conditions consistent with observed field-aligned currents. These simulations provide detailed information about expected species-dependent ion densities, temperatures, fluxes, and associated transients. Similar model results are also compared against PFISR radar estimates of molecular ions generated by auroral arc activity. A detailed case study of the 24-25 Sept. 1998 geomagnetic storm is presented in which the EISCAT ESR and Tromso radars suggested enhancements in F-region molecular ions and Polar satellite simultaneously observed moleculars in the magnetosphere. Finally, data from Sondrestrom and EISCAT radars during multiple storms are combined in an attempt to build a statistical

  7. Realtime Space Weather Forecasts Via Android Phone App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Haacke, B.; Reynolds, A.

    2010-12-01

    For the past several years, ASTRA has run a first-principles global 3-D fully coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model in real-time for space weather applications. The model is the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM). ASTRA also runs the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) in real-time. Using AMIE to drive the high latitude inputs to the TIMEGCM produces high fidelity simulations of the global thermosphere and ionosphere. These simulations can be viewed on the Android Phone App developed by ASTRA. The SpaceWeather app for the Android operating system is free and can be downloaded from the Google Marketplace. We present the current status of realtime thermosphere-ionosphere space-weather forcasting and discuss the way forward. We explore some of the issues in maintaining real-time simulations with assimilative data feeds in a quasi-operational setting. We also discuss some of the challenges of presenting large amounts of data on a smartphone. The ASTRA SpaceWeather app includes the broadest and most unique range of space weather data yet to be found on a single smartphone app. This is a one-stop-shop for space weather and the only app where you can get access to ASTRA’s real-time predictions of the global thermosphere and ionosphere, high latitude convection and geomagnetic activity. Because of the phone's GPS capability, users can obtain location specific vertical profiles of electron density, temperature, and time-histories of various parameters from the models. The SpaceWeather app has over 9000 downloads, 30 reviews, and a following of active users. It is clear that real-time space weather on smartphones is here to stay, and must be included in planning for any transition to operational space-weather use.

  8. IHY objectives in the African ionospheric irregularities observation campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2008-05-01

    : One of many objectives of IHY is the deployment of networks of small instruments, especially closing the land-based gaps of instruments around the world. One of the regions that have been almost entirely devoid of ground-based instruments is the African continent. Such uneven distribution of ground-based instruments hinders our ability to obtain a global understanding of the equatorial ionosphere. In the African sector, for example, a continuous ground-based observation of the equatorial ionospheric irregularities is not possible due to lack of ground-based instruments, causing many fundamental questions to remain unanswered. Satellite observations indicate the equatorial ionospheric density structures in the African continent respond to space weather effects differently than do other parts of the Earth. For example, in the African equatorial region, satellite observations show that the F-region bubbles are much deeper than the bubbles observed in any other longitudinal sectors, and are very active year round compared with other regions. Observations also show that the bubbles in Africa rises to high altitude (up to 1000+ kilometers) more frequently compared with other longitudes. However, these responses have not been studied in detail by observations from the ground due to the lack of suitable ground-based instrumentation in the region. Thus, the cause of these unique density irregularities in the continent remains a mystery for the scientific community. Therefore, in order to have a better understanding, the scientific communities, using the IHY platform, are now closing the largest land-based gap in ground-based instruments such as GPS receivers and magnetometers. The instrumentation network in African is already developing rapidly with GPS receivers from SCINDA, AMMA, IGS, and AGREES and magnetometers from MAGDAS and AMBER. In addition to new scientific discoveries and advancing space science research in Africa by establishing scientific collaborations

  9. Modeling extreme (Carrington-type) space weather events using three-dimensional MHD code simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Glocer, A.

    2013-12-01

    There is growing concern over possible severe societal consequences related to adverse space weather impacts on man-made technological infrastructure and systems. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made towards the modeling of space weather events. Three-dimensional (3-D) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models have been at the forefront of this transition, and have played a critical role in advancing our understanding of space weather. However, the modeling of extreme space weather events is still a major challenge even for existing global MHD models. In this study, we introduce a specially adapted University of Michigan 3-D global MHD model for simulating extreme space weather events that have a ground footprint comparable (or larger) to the Carrington superstorm. Results are presented for an initial simulation run with ``very extreme'' constructed/idealized solar wind boundary conditions driving the magnetosphere. In particular, we describe the reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and the associated ground induced geoelectric field to such extreme driving conditions. We also discuss the results and what they might mean for the accuracy of the simulations. The model is further tested using input data for an observed space weather event to verify the MHD model consistence and to draw guidance for future work. This extreme space weather MHD model is designed specifically for practical application to the modeling of extreme geomagnetically induced electric fields, which can drive large currents in earth conductors such as power transmission grids.

  10. Ionosphere-related products for communication and navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Carlson, H. C.; Gardner, L. C.; Scherliess, L.; Zhu, L.

    2011-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects communication and navigation systems. The Utah State University (USU) Space Weather Center (SWC) is developing and producing commercial space weather applications. A key system-level component for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system. GAIM, operated by SWC, improves real-time communication and navigation systems by continuously ingesting up to 10,000 slant TEC measurements every 15-minutes from approximately 500 stations. Ionosonde data from several dozen global stations is ingested every 15 minutes to improve the vertical profiles within GAIM. The global, CONUS, Europe, Asia, South America, and other regional sectors are run with a 15-minute cadence. These operational runs enable SWC to calculate and report the global radio high frequency (HF) signal strengths and near vertical incidence skywave (NVIS) maps used by amateur radio operators and emergency responders, especially during the Japan Great Earthquake and tsunami recovery period. SWC has established its first fully commercial enterprise called Q-up as a result of this activity. GPS uncertainty maps are produced by SWC to improve single-frequency GPS applications. SWC also provides the space weather smartphone app called SpaceWx for iPhone, iPad, iPod, and Android for professional users and public space weather education. SpaceWx displays the real-time solar, heliosphere, magnetosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere drivers to changes in the total electron content, for example, as well as global NVIS maps. We describe upcoming improvements for moving space weather information through automated systems into final derivative products.

  11. Ionosphere dynamics over the Southern Hemisphere during the 31 March 2001 severe magnetic storm using multi-instrument measurement data

    OpenAIRE

    Yizengaw, E.; Dyson, P. L.; Essex, E. A.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The effects of the 31 March 2001 severe magnetic storm on the Southern Hemisphere ionosphere have been studied using ground-based and satellite measurements. The prime goal of this comprehensive study is to track the ionospheric response from high-to-low latitude to obtain a clear understanding of storm-time ionospheric change. The study uses a combination of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) obtained from GPS signal group delay and phase advance measurements, i...

  12. On the new modes of planetary-scale electromagnetic waves in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Using an analogy method the frequencies of new modes of the electromagnetic planetary-scale waves (with a wavelength of 103 km or more, having a weather forming nature, are found at different ionospheric altitudes. This method gives the possibility to determine spectra of ionospheric electromagnetic perturbations directly from the dynamic equations without solving the general dispersion equation. It is shown that the permanently acting factor-latitude variation of the geomagnetic field generates fast and slow weakly damping planetary electromagnetic waves in both the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere. The waves propagate eastward and westward along the parallels. The fast waves have phase velocities (1–5km s–1 and frequencies (10–1–10–4, and the slow waves propagate with velocities of the local winds with frequencies (10–4–10–6s–1 and are generated in the E-region of the ionosphere. Fast waves having phase velocities (10-1500km s–1 and frequencies (1–10–3s–1 are generated in the F-region of the ionosphere. The waves generate the geomagnetic pulsations of the order of one hundred nanoTesla by magnitude. The properties and parameters of the theoretically studied electromagnetic waves agree with those of large-scale ultra-low frequency perturbations observed experimentally in the ionosphere. Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; waves propagation; ionosphere atmosphere interactions

  13. Electrodynamical Coupling of Earth's Atmosphere and Ionosphere: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical processes occurring in the atmosphere couple the atmosphere and ionosphere, because both DC and AC effects operate at the speed of light. The electrostatic and electromagnetic field changes in global electric circuit arise from thunderstorm, lightning discharges, and optical emissions in the mesosphere. The precipitation of magnetospheric electrons affects higher latitudes. The radioactive elements emitted during the earthquakes affect electron density and conductivity in the lower atmosphere. In the present paper, we have briefly reviewed our present understanding of how these events play a key role in energy transfer from the lower atmosphere to the ionosphere, which ultimately results in the Earth's atmosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  14. Basic theory and model calculations of the Venus ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Gombosi, T. I.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of current understanding of the physical and chemical processes that control Venus's ionospheric behavior, in view of the data that has been made available by the Venera and Pioneer Venus missions. Attention is given to the theoretical framework used in general planetary ionosphere studies, especially to the equations describing the controlling physical and chemical processes, and to the current status of the ion composition, density and thermal structure models developed to reproduce observed ionospheric behavior. No truly comprehensive and successful model of the nightside ionosphere has been published. Furthermore, although dayside energy balance calculations yield electron and ion temperature values that are in close agreement with measured values, the energetics of the night side eludes understanding.

  15. Enhanced ionosphere-magnetosphere data from the DMSP satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, F.J.; Hardy, D.A.; Gussenhoven, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) represent a series of low-altitude (835 km) polar-orbiting satellites. Their primary objective is related to the observation of the tropospheric weather with a high-resolution white light and infrared imaging system. It is also possible to make images of auroras. On a daily basis, information about auroras is used to assist various communication systems which are affected by the ionospheric disturbances associated with auroras. In the past few years, there have been several improvements in the ionospheric monitoring instrumentation. Since the high-latitude ionosphere is connected to the magnetosphere, the DMSP data are used to monitor magnetospheric processes. The instrumentation of the DMSP satellites is discussed, taking into account the data provided by them. 7 references

  16. Monitoring of ionospheric irregularities with multi-GNSS observations: a new ionosphere activity index and product services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningbo; Li, Zishen; Yuan, Yunbin; Yuan, Hong

    2017-04-01

    and North American regions. The product files are produced on a daily basis with a latency of 3 days. Users now can access these products from the ftp archive of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS, ftp://ftp.gipp.org.cn/product/). These maps can be used for ionospheric weather services, ionospheric irregularity modeling and foresting, as well as other GNSS applications. Although they are provided in a post-processing mode at present, it is expected that the near real-time services will be available since the availability of real-time data streams from the IGS.

  17. Ionosphere and Radio Communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The upperionosphere is used for radio communication and navigationas it reflects long, medium, as well as short radio waves. Sincesolar radiation is the main cause of the existence of ionosphere,any variation in the radiations can affect the entireradio communication system. This article attempts to brieflyintroduce the ...

  18. Ionosphere and Radio Communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ionosphere is used for radio communication and navigation as it reflects long, medium, as well as short radio waves. Since solar radiation is the main cause of the existence of iono- sphere, any variation in the radiations can affect the entire radio communication system. This article attempts to briefly introduce the readers to ...

  19. WEATHER INDEX- THE BASIS OF WEATHER DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botos Horia Mircea

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches the subject of Weather Derivatives, more exactly their basic element the weather index. The weather index has two forms, the Heating Degree Day (HDD and the Cooling Degree Day (CDD. We will try to explain their origin, use and the relationship between the two forms of the index. In our research we started from the analysis of the weather derivatives and what they are based on. After finding out about weather index, we were interested in understanding exactly how they work and how they influence the value of the contract. On the national level the research in the field is scares, but foreign materials available. The study for this paper was based firstly on reading about Weather Derivative, and then going in the meteorogical field and determining the way by which the indices were determined. After this, we went to the field with interest in the indices, such as the energy and gas industries, and figured out how they determined the weather index. For the examples we obtained data from the weather index database, and calculated the value for the period. The study is made on a period of five years, in 8 cities of the European Union. The result of this research is that we can now understand better the importance of the way the indices work and how they influence the value of the Weather Derivatives. This research has an implication on the field of insurance, because of the fact that weather derivative are at the convergence point of the stock markets and the insurance market. The originality of the paper comes from the personal touch given to the theoretical aspect and through the analysis of the HDD and CDD index in order to show their general behaviour and relationship.

  20. The Scientific Foundations of Forecasting Magnetospheric Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Nakamura, R.; Turc, L.; Mejnertsen, L.; Hesse, M.

    2017-11-01

    The magnetosphere is the lens through which solar space weather phenomena are focused and directed towards the Earth. In particular, the non-linear interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetic field leads to the formation of highly inhomogenous electrical currents in the ionosphere which can ultimately result in damage to and problems with the operation of power distribution networks. Since electric power is the fundamental cornerstone of modern life, the interruption of power is the primary pathway by which space weather has impact on human activity and technology. Consequently, in the context of space weather, it is the ability to predict geomagnetic activity that is of key importance. This is usually stated in terms of geomagnetic storms, but we argue that in fact it is the substorm phenomenon which contains the crucial physics, and therefore prediction of substorm occurrence, severity and duration, either within the context of a longer-lasting geomagnetic storm, but potentially also as an isolated event, is of critical importance. Here we review the physics of the magnetosphere in the frame of space weather forecasting, focusing on recent results, current understanding, and an assessment of probable future developments.

  1. Climatology of GNSS ionospheric scintillation at high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spogli, L.; Alfonsi, L.; de Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.; Aquino, M.; Dodson, A.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2009-12-01

    Under perturbed conditions caused by intense solar wind magnetosphere coupling, the ionosphere may become highly turbulent and irregularities, typically enhancements or depletions of the electron density embedded in the ambient ionosphere, can form. Such irregularities cause diffraction effects, mainly due to the random fluctuations of the refractive index of the ionosphere, on the satellites signals passing through them and consequent perturbations may cause GNSS navigation errors and outages, abruptly corrupting its performance. Due to the morphology of the geomagnetic field, whose lines are almost vertical at high latitude, polar areas are characterized by the presence of significant ionospheric irregularities having scale sizes ranging from hundreds of kilometers down to a few centimeters and with highly dynamic structures. The understanding of the effect of such phenomena is important, not only in preparation for the next solar cycle (24), whose maximum is expected in 2012, but also for a deeper comprehension of the dynamics of the high-latitude ionosphere. We analyze the fluctuations in the carrier frequency of the radio waves received on the ground, commonly referred to as ionospheric amplitude and phase scintillations, to investigate the physical processes causing them. The phase scintillations on GNSS signals are likely caused by ionospheric irregularities of scale size of hundreds of meters to few kilometers. The amplitude scintillations on GNSS signals are caused by ionospheric irregularities of scale size smaller than the Fresnel radius, which is of the order of hundreds of meters for GNSS signals, typically embedded into the patches. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG) of the University of Nottingham manage the same kind of GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor) receivers over the European high and mid latitude regions and over Antarctica. The

  2. NASA's Advancements in Space-Based Spectrometry Lead to Improvements in Weather Prediction and Understanding of Climate Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder), was launched, in conjunction with AMSU-A (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) on the NASA polar orbiting research satellite EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua satellite in May 2002 as a next generation atmospheric sounding system. Atmospheric sounders provide information primarily about the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor distribution. This is achieved by measuring outgoing radiation in discrete channels (spectral intervals) which are sensitive primarily to variations of these geophysical parameters. The primary objectives of AIRS/AMSU were to utilize such information in order to improve the skill of numerical weather prediction as well as to measure climate variability and trends. AIRS is a multi-detector array grating spectrometer with 2378 channels covering the spectral range 650/cm (15 microns) to 2660/cm (3.6 microns) with a resolving power (i/a i) of roughly 1200 where a i is the spectral channel bandpass. Atmospheric temperature profile can be determined from channel observations taken within the 15 micron (the long-wave CO2 absorption band) and within the 4.2 micron (the short-wave CO2 absorption band). Radiances in these (and all other) spectral intervals in the infrared are also sensitive to the presence of clouds in the instrument?s field of view (FOV), which are present about 95% of the time. AIRS was designed so as to allow for the ability to produce accurate Quality Controlled atmospheric soundings under most cloud conditions. This was achieved by having 1) extremely low channel noise values in the shortwave portion of the spectrum and 2) a very flat spatial response function within a channel?s FOV. IASI, the high spectral resolution IR interferometer flying on the European METOP satellite, does not contain either of these important characteristics. The AIRS instrument was also designed to be extremely stabile with regard to its spectral radiometric characteristics, which is

  3. From Forecasters to the General Public: A Communication Tool to Understand Decision-making Challenges in Weather-related Early Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terti, G.; Ruin, I.; Kalas, M.; Lorini, V.; Sabbatini, T.; i Alonso, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    New technologies are currently adopted worldwide to improve weather forecasts and communication of the corresponding warnings to the end-users. "EnhANcing emergency management and response to extreme WeatHER and climate Events" (ANYWHERE) project is an innovating action that aims at developing and implementing a European decision-support platform for weather-related risks integrating cutting-edge forecasting technology. The initiative is built in a collaborative manner where researchers, developers, potential users and other stakeholders meet frequently to define needs, capabilities and challenges. In this study, we propose a role-playing game to test the added value of the ANYWHERE platform on i) the decision-making process and the choice of warning levels under uncertainty, ii) the management of the official emergency response and iii) the crisis communication and triggering of protective actions at different levels of the warning system (from hazard detection to citizen response). The designed game serves as an interactive communication tool. Here, flood and flash flood focused simulations seek to enhance participant's understanding of the complexities and challenges embedded in various levels of the decision-making process under the threat of weather disasters (e.g., forecasting/warnings, official emergency actions, self-protection). Also, we facilitate collaboration and coordination between the participants who belong to different national or local agencies/authorities across Europe. The game is first applied and tested in ANYWHERE's workshop in Helsinki (September, 2017) where about 30-50 people, including researchers, forecasters, civil protection and representatives of related companies, are anticipated to play the simulation. The main idea is to provide to the players a virtual case study that well represents realistic uncertainties and dilemmas embedded in the real-time forecasting-warning processes. At the final debriefing step the participants are

  4. Addressing the Influence of Space Weather on Airline Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The advent of satellite-based augmentation systems has made it possible to navigate aircraft safely using radio signals emitted by global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System. As a signal propagates through the earth's ionosphere, it suffers delay that is proportional to the total electron content encountered along the raypath. Since the magnitude of this total electron content is strongly influenced by space weather, the safety and reliability of GNSS for airline navigation requires continual monitoring of the state of the ionosphere and calibration of ionospheric delay. This paper examines the impact of space weather on GNSS-based navigation and provides an overview of how the Wide Area Augmentation System protects its users from positioning error due to ionospheric disturbances

  5. Chemistry in the Thermosphere and Ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roble, Raymond G.

    1986-01-01

    An informative review which summarizes information about chemical reactions in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Topics include thermal structure, ultraviolet radiation, ionospheric photochemistry, thermospheric photochemistry, chemical heating, thermospheric circulation, auroral processes and ionospheric interactions. Provides suggested followup…

  6. Where does the Thermospheric Ionospheric GEospheric Research (TIGER) Program go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.; Avakyan, S. V.; Berdermann, J.; Bothmer, V.; Cessateur, G.; Ciraolo, L.; Didkovsky, L.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Eparvier, F. G.; Gottwald, A.; Haberreiter, M.; Hammer, R.; Jacobi, Ch.; Jakowski, N.; Kretzschmar, M.; Lilensten, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Radicella, S. M.; Schäfer, R.; Schmidt, W.; Solomon, S. C.; Thuillier, G.; Tobiska, W. K.; Wieman, S.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-10-01

    At the 10th Thermospheric Ionospheric GEospheric Research (TIGER/COSPAR) symposium held in Moscow in 2014 the achievements from the start of TIGER in 1998 were summarized. During that period, great progress was made in measuring, understanding, and modeling the highly variable UV-Soft X-ray (XUV) solar spectral irradiance (SSI), and its effects on the upper atmosphere. However, after more than 50 years of work the radiometric accuracy of SSI observation is still an issue and requires further improvement. Based on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data from the SOLAR/SolACES, and SDO/EVE instruments, we present a combined data set for the spectral range from 16.5 to 105.5 nm covering a period of 3.5 years from 2011 through mid of 2014. This data set is used in ionospheric modeling of the global Total Electron Content (TEC), and in validating EUV SSI modeling. For further investigations the period of 3.5 years is being extended to about 12 years by including data from SOHO/SEM and TIMED/SEE instruments. Similarly, UV data are used in modeling activities. After summarizing the results, concepts are proposed for future real-time SSI measurements with in-flight calibration as experienced with the ISS SOLAR payload, for the development of a space weather camera for observing and investigating space weather phenomena in real-time, and for providing data sets for SSI and climate modeling. Other planned topics are the investigation of the relationship between solar EUV/UV and visible/near-infrared emissions, the impact of X-rays on the upper atmosphere, the development of solar EUV/UV indices for different applications, and establishing a shared TIGER data system for EUV/UV SSI data distribution and real-time streaming, also taking into account the achievements of the FP7 SOLID (First European SOLar Irradiance Data Exploitation) project. For further progress it is imperative that coordinating activities in this special field of solar-terrestrial relations and solar physics is

  7. Lower ionosphere response to external forcing: A brief review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovička, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2009), s. 1-14 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1367; GA ČR GA205/08/1356 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : lower ionosphere * space weather forcing * solar activity * solar forcing * atmospheric waves * atmospheric forcing Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.079, year: 2009

  8. Kazakhstan Space Weather Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryakunova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Kazakhstan experimental complex is a center of experimental study of space weather. This complex is situated near Almaty, Kazakhstan and includes experimental setup for registration of cosmic ray intensity (neutron monitor) at altitude of 3340 m above sea level, geomagnetic observatory and setup for registration of solar flux density with frequency of 1 and 3 GHz with 1 second time resolution. Results of space environment monitoring in real time are accessible via Internet. This experimental information is used for space weather investigations and different cosmic ray effects. Almaty mountain cosmic ray station is one of the most suitable and sensitive stations for investigation and forecasting of the dangerous situations for satellites; for this reason Almaty cosmic ray station is included in the world-wide neutron monitor network for the real-time monitoring of the space weather conditions and European Database NMDB (www.nmdb.eu). All data are represented on the web-site of the Institute of Ionosphere (www.ionos.kz) in real time. Since July, 2006 the space environment prediction laboratory represents the forecast of geomagnetic activity every day on the same site (www.ionos.kz/?q=en/node/21).

  9. CDDIS_DORIS_products_ionosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionosphere correction values derived from analysis of Doppler Orbitography by Radiopositioning Integrated on Satellite (DORIS) data. These products are the generated...

  10. AATR an ionospheric activity indicator specifically based on GNSS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, José Miguel; Sanz, Jaume; Rovira-Garcia, Adrià; González-Casado, Guillermo; Ibáñez, D.; Perez, R. Orus

    2018-03-01

    latitude regions which allows to define a planetary index, similar to the geomagnetic ones, (c) the seasonal dependency which is related with the longitude and (d) the variation of the AATR value at different time scales (hourly, daily, seasonal, among others) which confirms most of the well-known time dependences of the ionospheric events, and finally, (e) the relationship with the space weather events.

  11. AATR an ionospheric activity indicator specifically based on GNSS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Miguel

    2018-01-01

    mid latitude regions which allows to define a planetary index, similar to the geomagnetic ones, (c the seasonal dependency which is related with the longitude and (d the variation of the AATR value at different time scales (hourly, daily, seasonal, among others which confirms most of the well-known time dependences of the ionospheric events, and finally, (e the relationship with the space weather events.

  12. New Method for Solving Inductive Electric Fields in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhamäki, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present a new method for calculating inductive electric fields in the ionosphere. It is well established that on large scales the ionospheric electric field is a potential field. This is understandable, since the temporal variations of large scale current systems are generally quite slow, in the timescales of several minutes, so inductive effects should be small. However, studies of Alfven wave reflection have indicated that in some situations inductive phenomena could well play a significant role in the reflection process, and thus modify the nature of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling. The input to our calculation method are the time series of the potential part of the ionospheric electric field together with the Hall and Pedersen conductances. The output is the time series of the induced rotational part of the ionospheric electric field. The calculation method works in the time-domain and can be used with non-uniform, time-dependent conductances. In addition no particular symmetry requirements are imposed on the input potential electric field. The presented method makes use of special non-local vector basis functions called Cartesian Elementary Current Systems (CECS). This vector basis offers a convenient way of representing curl-free and divergence-free parts of 2-dimensional vector fields and makes it possible to solve the induction problem using simple linear algebra. The new calculation method is validated by comparing it with previously published results for Alfven wave reflection from uniformly conducting ionosphere.

  13. Multi-Instrument Observations of Geomagnetic Storms in the Arctic Ionosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Komjathy, Attila; Verkhoglyadova, Olga

    from the solar corona on 16 February and the second one on 18 February. We focus on effects of such solar-originated geomagnetic disturbances on the high latitude ionosphere because our present understanding of the fundamental ionospheric processes – particularly during perturbed times – in this region...... is still incomplete....

  14. Forecasting the Appearance and Evolution of Ionospheric Irregularities and Structures: Their Effects on AF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-21

    thermosphere are highly desirable to elucidate the way the ionosphere couples to its adjacent layers, understand the ionospheric electrodynamics , and...along the radar line of sight: ( ) e Tz r Nϕ λ= − ∆ [12] where re is the classical electron radius and λ is the radio wave frequency. The complex

  15. Ionospheric scintillation observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakane, V.C.K.

    1982-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillation observations made at Legon, Ghana (5.63 deg. N, 0.19 deg. E, dip angle 8.50) during the year 1979 are reported for two geostationary satellites, Marisat and Sirio, transmitting at 257 MHz and 136 MHz, respectively. The night-time scintillation showed a single peak around 2200-3000 hours local time (GMT). Seasonally, Marisat showed a fast decay of scintillation for the months April-June and June-September from around midnight whilst it persisted for the other months January-March and October-December. (author)

  16. Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quasi-static electric field anomaly in the upper ionosphere before an earthquake had been observed as an ionospheric precursor (Gousheva et al. 2009). According to. LAIC model (Lithosphere–Atmosphere–Ionosphere. Coupling model), geochemical, atmospheric and ionospheric parameters are united by a common.

  17. Analysis of ionosphere variability over low-latitude GNSS stations during 24th solar maximum period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ratnam, D.; Sivavaraprasad, G.; Latha Devi, N. S. M. P.

    2017-07-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is a remote sensing tool of space weather and ionospheric variations. However, the interplanetary space-dependent drifts in the ionospheric irregularities cause predominant ranging errors in the GPS signals. The dynamic variability of the low-latitude ionosphere is an imperative threat to the satellite-based radio communication and navigation ranging systems. The study of temporal and spatial variations in the ionosphere has triggered new investigations in modelling, nowcasting and forecasting the ionospheric variations. Hence, in this paper, the dynamism in the day-to-day, month-to-month and seasonal variability of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) has been explored during the solar maximum period, January-December 2013, of the 24th solar cycle. The spatial and temporal variations of the ionosphere are analysed using the TEC values derived from three Indian low-latitude GPS stations, namely, Bengaluru, Guntur and Hyderabad, separated by 13-18° in latitude and 77-81° in longitude. The observed regional GPS-TEC variations are compared with the predicted TEC values of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012 and 2007) models. Ionospheric parameters such as Vertical TEC (VTEC), relative TEC deviation index and monthly variations in the grand-mean of ionosphere TEC and TEC intensity, along with the upper and lower quartiles, are adopted to investigate the ionosphere TEC variability during quiet and disturbed days. The maximum ionospheric TEC variability is found during March and September equinoxes, followed by December solstice while the minimum variability is observed during June solstice. IRI models are in reasonable agreement with GPS TEC but are overestimating during dawn hours (01:00-06:00 LT) as compared to the dusk hours. Higher percentage deviations are observed during equinoctial months than summer over EIA stations, Guntur and Hyderabad. GPS TEC variations are overestimated during dawn hours for all the

  18. Natural hazards monitoring and forecast using the GNSS and other technologies of the ionosphere monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Davidenko, D.

    2013-12-01

    It is well established now that Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling is provided through the local changes of the Global Electric Circuit parameters. Main agent - is column conductivity, modulated mainly at the altitudes of the Global Boundary Layer. We demonstrate the ionospheric effects for different types of natural hazards including volcano eruptions, dusty storms from Western Africa, ionospheric effects from tropical hurricanes, multiple earthquakes. We consider the important role of air ionization from natural (natural ground radioactivity and galactic cosmic rays) and artificial sources (nuclear weapon tests in atmosphere and underground, nuclear power stations and other nuclear enterprises emergencies). We rise also important question that such effects of the ionosphere variability are not taken into account by any ionospheric model and their correct recognition is important not only from the point of view the disasters monitoring but for navigation itself because the magnitude of the ionospheric effects sometimes exceeds the effects from strong magnetic storms and other severe space weather conditions. Some effects like ionospheric effects from tropical hurricanes have more complex physical nature including the formation of streams of neutral atmosphere over the hurricane eye and formation of the strong positive plasma concentration anomaly at the altitude near 1000 km. Some plasma anomalies registered over the tropical depressions before hurricane formation give hope on predictive capabilities of plasma observations over the tropical depressions.

  19. Tridimensional reconstruction of the Co-Seismic Ionospheric Disturbance around the time of 2015 Nepal earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Zhou, Chen; Liu, Yi; Zhai, Changzhi; Wang, Zemin; Liu, Lei

    2018-01-01

    The Co-Seismic Ionospheric Disturbance of the 2015 Nepal earthquake is analyzed in this paper. GNSS data are used to obtain the Satellite-Station TEC sequences. After removing the de-trended TEC variation, a clear ionospheric disturbance was observed 10 min after the earthquake, while the geomagnetic conditions, solar activity, and weather condition remained calm according to the Kp, Dst, F10.7 indices and meteorological records during the period of interest. Computerized ionosphere tomography (CIT) is then used to present the tridimensional ionosphere variation with a 10-min time resolution. The CIT results indicate that (1) the disturbance of the ionospheric electron density above the epicenter during the 2015 Nepal earthquake is confined at a relatively low altitude (approximately 150-300 km); (2) the ionospheric disturbances on the west side and east sides of the epicenter are precisely opposite. A newly established electric field penetration model of the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling is used to investigate the potential physical mechanism.

  20. Ionospheric Data Assimilation and Targeted Observation Strategies: Proof of Concept Analysis in a Geomagnetic Storm Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelich, Eric; Durazo, Juan; Mahalov, Alex

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of the ionosphere involve complex interactions between the atmosphere, solar wind, cosmic radiation, and Earth's magnetic field. Geomagnetic storms arising from solar activity can perturb these dynamics sufficiently to disrupt radio and satellite communications. Efforts to predict ``space weather,'' including ionospheric dynamics, require the development of a data assimilation system that combines observing systems with appropriate forecast models. This talk will outline a proof-of-concept targeted observation strategy, consisting of the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, coupled with the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics Global Circulation Model, to select optimal locations where additional observations can be made to improve short-term ionospheric forecasts. Initial results using data and forecasts from the geomagnetic storm of 26-27 September 2011 will be described. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0096) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant Number DMS-0940314).

  1. How to Recognize and Distinguish Low-Latitude Ionospheric Storms Disturbances Produced by TIDs or PPEFs During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, P. R.; Ribeiro, B. A.; Kavutarapu, V.; Fejer, B. G.; Pillat, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of geomagnetic storms on ionosphere are one of the important aspects of the space weather and identifying the possible sources of these perturbations is important. Among the possible sources of ionospheric perturbations, the Travelling Ionospheric Disturbance (TID) and Prompt Penetration Electric Field (PPEF) are the most important. In this study, we present and discuss the ionospheric response in the Brazilian sector due to geomagnetic storms occurred during January 2013 and March 2015. These space weather events were investigated using a network of 100 GPS-TEC stations. It has been noticed that the VTEC was disturbed during main phase in both storms. During the first event (January), a positive ionospheric storm peak in TEC is observed first beyond the EIA crest and sometime later at low-latitude and equatorial region. This delayed response at different latitudes could be a signature of TID propagation. In this specific event a TID propagating to northwest direction with a velocity of about 200 m/s. However, during the second event (March), 3 positive ionospheric storm peaks were observed in the VTEC from equator to low latitudes during the storm main phase, but these 3 peaks do not present wave propagation characteristics. Probably, an eastward electric field penetrated at equatorial and low-latitude regions uplifts the F-region where the recombination rates are lower leading to a positive ionospheric storm. To distinguish if the positive ionospheric storm was produced by TID or PPEF, it is important to observe the positive ionospheric storm changes along the meridional direction. In case of TIDs, a meridional propagation of the disturbance wave with a phase and speed will be observed. Therefore, the perturbation occurs first beyond the EIA crest and sometime later at the low latitudes and finally at the equatorial region. In case of PPEF the positive ionospheric storm takes place almost simultaneously from beyond the EIA crest to equatorial region.

  2. Atmospheric Drag, Occultation ‘N’ Ionospheric Scintillation (ADONIS) mission proposal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hettrich, S.; Kempf, Y.; Perakis, N.; Górski, J.; Edl, M.; Urbář, Jaroslav; Dósa, M.; Gini, F.; Roberts, O. W.; Schindler, S.; Schemmer, M.; Steenari, D.; Joldžić, N.; Ødegaard, L.-K. G.; Sarria, D.; Volwerk, M.; Praks, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, Article Number: A2 (2015), s. 1-14 ISSN 2115-7251 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : ionosphere (general) * thermosphere * space weather * drag * missions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.846, year: 2015 http://www.swsc-journal.org/articles/swsc/abs/2015/01/swsc140006/swsc140006.html

  3. Four top tier challenges for Space Weather Research for the next decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James

    2017-04-01

    The science of space weather is that which (1) develops the knowledge and understanding to predict conditions in space that impact life and society, and (2) leads to operational solutions that protect assets and systems to the benefit of society. Advances over the past decades in this area of research have yielded amazing discoveries and significant strides toward fulfilling the promise of an operational solution to space weather, and have facilitated the enterprise to make its way into the realm of national and international policy. Even if the resources, technologies, and political will were available to take advantage of this progress, our current lack of understanding of space weather would prevent the implementation of a fully operational system. This talk will highlight four distinct areas of research that, if fully understood, could enable operational solutions to space weather impacts, given sufficient resources and political will. These areas are (a) trigger of solar variability, (b) acceleration of mass and energy in interplanetary space, (c) geoeffectiveness of solar wind, and (d) ionospheric variability. A brief description, technical challenges, and possible pathways to resolution will be offered for each of these areas.

  4. Studies of small scale irregularities in the cusp ionosphere using sounding rockets: recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicher, A.; Ilyasov, A. A.; Miloch, W. J.; Chernyshov, A. A.; Moen, J.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Saito, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma irregularities occurring over many scale sizes are common in the ionosphere. Understanding and characterizing the phenomena responsible for these irregularities is not only important from a theoretical point of view, but also in the context of space weather, as the irregularities can disturb HF communication and Global Navigation Satellite Systems signals. Overall, research about the small-scale turbulence has not progressed as fast for polar regions as for the equatorial ones, and for the high latitude ionosphere there is still no agreement nor detailed explanation regarding the formation of irregularities. To investigate plasma structuring at small scales in the cusp ionosphere, we use high resolution measurements from the Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI) sounding rockets, and investigate a region associated with density enhancements and a region characterized by flow shears. Using the ICI-2 electron density data, we give further evidence of the importance of the gradient drift instability for plasma structuring inside the polar cap. In particular, using higher-order statistics, we provide new insights into the nature of the resulting plasma structures and show that they are characterized by intermittency. Using the ICI-3 data, we show that the entire region associated with a reversed flow event (RFE), with the presence of meter-scale irregularities, several flow shears and particle precipitation, is highly structured. By performing a numerical stability analysis, we show that the inhomogeneous-energy-density-driven instability (IEDDI) may be active in relation to RFEs at the rocket's altitude. In particular, we show that the presence of particle precipitation decreases the growth rates of IEDDI and, using a Local Intermittency Measure, we observe a correlation between IEDDI growth rates and electric field fluctuations over several scales. These findings support the view that large-scale inhomogeneities may provide a background for the

  5. On the new modes of planetary-scale electromagnetic waves in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Using an analogy method the frequencies of new modes of the electromagnetic planetary-scale waves (with a wavelength of 103 km or more, having a weather forming nature, are found at different ionospheric altitudes. This method gives the possibility to determine spectra of ionospheric electromagnetic perturbations directly from the dynamic equations without solving the general dispersion equation. It is shown that the permanently acting factor-latitude variation of the geomagnetic field generates fast and slow weakly damping planetary electromagnetic waves in both the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere. The waves propagate eastward and westward along the parallels. The fast waves have phase velocities (1–5km s–1 and frequencies (10–1–10–4, and the slow waves propagate with velocities of the local winds with frequencies (10–4–10–6s–1 and are generated in the E-region of the ionosphere. Fast waves having phase velocities (10-1500km s–1 and frequencies (1–10–3s–1 are generated in the F-region of the ionosphere. The waves generate the geomagnetic pulsations of the order of one hundred nanoTesla by magnitude. The properties and parameters of the theoretically studied electromagnetic waves agree with those of large-scale ultra-low frequency perturbations observed experimentally in the ionosphere.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; waves propagation; ionosphere atmosphere interactions

  6. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  7. The worldwide ionospheric data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    1989-01-01

    The worldwide ionospheric data base is scattered over the entire globe. Different data sets are held at different institutions in the U.S., U.S.S.R., Australia, Europe, and Asia. The World Data Centers on the different continents archive and distribute part of the huge data base; the scope and cross section of the individual data holdings depend on the regional and special interest of the center. An attempt is made to pull together all the strings that point toward different ionospheric data holdings. Requesters are provided with the information about what is available and where to get it. An attempt is also made to evaluate the reliability and compatibility of the different data sets based on the consensus in the ionospheric research community. The status and accuracy of the standard ionospheric models are also discussed because they may facilitate first order assessment of ionospheric effects. This is a first step toward an ionospheric data directory within the framework of NSSDC's master directory.

  8. Mirador - Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Our weather system includes the dynamics of the atmosphere and its interaction with the oceans and land. The improvement of...

  9. Modeling extreme "Carrington-type" space weather events using three-dimensional global MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Glocer, Alex

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing concern over possible severe societal consequences related to adverse space weather impacts on man-made technological infrastructure. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made toward the first-principles modeling of space weather events, and three-dimensional (3-D) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models have been at the forefront of this transition, thereby playing a critical role in advancing our understanding of space weather. However, the modeling of extreme space weather events is still a major challenge even for the modern global MHD models. In this study, we introduce a specially adapted University of Michigan 3-D global MHD model for simulating extreme space weather events with a Dst footprint comparable to the Carrington superstorm of September 1859 based on the estimate by Tsurutani et. al. (2003). Results are presented for a simulation run with "very extreme" constructed/idealized solar wind boundary conditions driving the magnetosphere. In particular, we describe the reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and the associated induced geoelectric field on the ground to such extreme driving conditions. The model setup is further tested using input data for an observed space weather event of Halloween storm October 2003 to verify the MHD model consistence and to draw additional guidance for future work. This extreme space weather MHD model setup is designed specifically for practical application to the modeling of extreme geomagnetically induced electric fields, which can drive large currents in ground-based conductor systems such as power transmission grids. Therefore, our ultimate goal is to explore the level of geoelectric fields that can be induced from an assumed storm of the reported magnitude, i.e., Dst˜=-1600 nT.

  10. Evaluating the Impact of Whole Atmosphere Coupling on Storm Time Response in the Ionosphere and Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, N.; Millward, G. H.; Oehmke, R.; DeLuca, C.; Montuoro, R.; Fang, T. W.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Fedrizzi, M.; Schoonover, J. A.; Akmaev, R. A.; Wang, H.; Li, Z.; Yudin, V.; Yang, W.; Iredell, M.; Trahan, S.; Coster, A. J.; Obana, Y.; Denton, M.; Henderson, M. G.; Middlecoff, J.; Govett, M.; Viereck, R. A.; Richards, P. G.; Kubaryk, A.

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of whole atmospheric coupling on storm time response in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The influence of coupling to terrestrial weather during storm time has drawn little attention. There are some unresolved questions: Whether or not the geo-effectiveness of magnetic storms could be changed when the upper atmosphere has been pre-conditioned by the lower atmospheric forcing; How does the lower atmospheric forcing modulate the recovery to a quiet level from a disturbed level? Recently, we have coupled the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere-Electrodynamics (IPE) model with the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) to investigate the connection between terrestrial and space weather. This presentation focuses on how some typical storm time phenomena in the ionosphere and plasmasphere are affected by the inclusion of forcing from below during geomagnetically active periods in simulations performed using the coupled WAM-IPE model. The presentation focuses on such phenomena as (1) temporal and spatial evolution of the Storm Enhanced Density (SED) plumes/Tongue of Ionizations (TOIs); (2) hemispheric asymmetry in SED plumes/TOIs; (3) coupling between the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere via plumes and refilling, for the two St. Patricks' day storms in 2013 and 2015. The impact of lower atmospheric forcing is evaluated by comparing results with and without including forcing from below. Furthermore, the presentation discusses how the lower atmospheric forcing can influence the differences in storm time response in the ionosphere and plasmasphere.

  11. On the mid-latitude ionospheric storm association with intense geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Kingsley Chukwudi; Ogbonna, Chinasa Edith

    2018-04-01

    The bulk association between ionospheric storms and geomagnetic storms has been studied. Hemispheric features of seasonal variation of ionospheric storms in the mid-latitude were also investigated. 188 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ 100 nT) that occurred during solar cycles 22 and 23 were considered, of which 143 were observed to be identified with an ionospheric storm. Individual ionospheric storms were identified as maximum deviations of the F2 layer peak electron density from quiet time values. Only ionospheric storms that could clearly be associated with the peak of a geomagnetic storm were considered. Data from two mid-latitude ionosonde stations; one in the northern hemisphere (i.e. Moscow) and the other in the southern hemisphere (Grahamstown) were used to study ionospheric conditions at the time of the individual geomagnetic storms. Results show hemispheric and latitudinal differences in the intensity and nature of ionospheric storms association with different types of geomagnetic storms. These results are significant for our present understanding of the mechanisms which drive the changes in electron density during different types of ionospheric storms.

  12. Response of the Equatorial Ionosphere to the Geomagnetic DP2 current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.; Pradipta, R.; Biouele, C. M.; Rabiu, A. B.; Obrou, O.; Bamba, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The response of equatorial ionosphere to the magnetospheric origin DP2 (disturbance polar of the second type) current fluctuations and its impact on the equatorial ionospheric density structure is examined using ground-based multi-instrument observations. The interaction between the solar wind and magnetosphere generates a convection electric field that can penetrate to the ionosphere and cause the DP2 current system. The quasi-periodic DP2 current system, which fluctuates coherently with IMF Bz oscillations, penetrates nearly instantaneously to the dayside equatorial region through the TM0 (zero order transverse magnetic) mode waves in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and modulates the electrodynamics that are responsible for the complicated nature of dayside ionospheric density variations at the equator. In this paper, using multi-instrument (magnetometers, GPS, radar, and ionosonde) observations, we clearly demonstrated that the high-latitude DP2 current system penetrates to the equator and causes the dayside electrodynamics and ionospheric density to fluctuate coherently with the DP2 current as well as with the IMF Bz component. This clearly indicates that understanding of the quasi-periodic DP2 current systems, such as its source, condition of its penetration to the equatorial region, and the impact it can produce onto the ionospheric density distribution is very important information for the ongoing modeling effort to improve the global ionospheric density structure and scintillation forecasting capability.

  13. Space Weather and the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, Anthea; Komjathy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    The ability to monitor space weather in near-real time is required as our society becomes increasingly dependent on technological systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Certain critical applications such as railway control, highway traffic management, emergency response, commercial aviation, and marine navigation require high-precision positioning. As a consequence, these applications require real-time knowledge of space weather effects. In recent years, GPS itself has become recognized as one of the premier remote sensing tools to monitor space weather events. For this reason, Space Weather has opened a special section called "Space Weather Effects on GPS." Papers in this section describe the use of GPS as a monitor of space weather events and discuss how GPS is used to observe ionospheric irregularities and total electron content gradients. Other papers address the implications that these space weather features may have on GPS and on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) operations in general. Space weather impacts on GPS include the introduction of range errors and the loss of signal reception, both of which can have severe effects on marine and aviation navigation, surveying, and other critical real-time applications.

  14. The ionospheric eclipse factor method (IEFM) and its application to determining the ionospheric delay for GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Y.; Tscherning, C.C.; Knudsen, Per

    2006-01-01

    A new method for modeling the ionospheric delay using global positioning system (GPS) data is proposed, called the ionospheric eclipse factor method (IEFM). It is based on establishing a concept referred to as the ionospheric eclipse factor (IEF) lambda of the ionospheric pierce point (IPP...

  15. Climate, weather, and hops

    Science.gov (United States)

    As climate and weather become more variable, hop growers face increased uncertainty in making decisions about their crop. Given the unprecedented nature of these changes, growers may no longer have enough information and intuitive understanding to adequately assess the situation and evaluate their m...

  16. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in the Ionospheric Trough Region During Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Coster, A. J.; Yizengaw, E.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric troughs are regions of remarkable electron density depression at the subauroral and auroral latitudes, and are categorized into the mid-latitude trough or high-latitude trough, depending on their relative location to the auroral oval. Substorms are one fundamental element of geomagnetic activity, during which structured field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection flows develop in the subauroral and auroral ionosphere. The auroral/trough region is expected to experience severe electron density variations during substorms. Accurate specification of the trough dynamics during substorms and understanding its relationship with the structured FACs and convection flows are of important practical purpose, including providing observational foundations for assessing the attendant impact on navigation and communication. In addition, troughs are important since they map to magnetospheric boundaries allowing the remote sensing of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of the mid-latitude and high-latitude troughs during substorms based on multi-instrument observations. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) data, we characterize the location and width of the mid-latitude trough through the substorm lifecycle and compare them with existing trough empirical models. Using a combination of incoherent scattering radar (ISR), GPS TEC, auroral imager and a data assimilative model, we investigate the relationship between the high-latitude trough and FACs as well as convection flows. The high-latitude trough is found to be collocated with a counter-clockwise convection flow vortex east of the Harang reversal region, and downward FACs as part of the substorm current system are suggested to be responsible for the high-latitude trough formation. In addition, complex ionospheric electron temperature within the high-latitude trough is found, i.e., increase in the E region while decrease in the F region. We discuss possible

  17. Ionospheric irregularities at Antarctic using GPS measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Feldstein auroral oval (Feldstein 1963; Holzworth and Meng 1975) for two different levels of magnetic activity (IQ), to investigate the ionospheric regions more affected by scintillation. We choose IQ = 3 as representative of the quiet ionosphere and IQ = 6 for the disturbed ionosphere, and we refer this two ovals as quiet oval ...

  18. International Reference Ionosphere 2016: From ionospheric climate to real-time weather predictions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilitza, D.; Altadill, D.; Truhlík, Vladimír; Shubin, V.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Huang, X.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2017), s. 418-429 ISSN 1539-4956 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-07281J Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : hmF2 * indices * ion composition * IRI-2016 * IRTAM * Real-Time IRI Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016SW001593/abstract

  19. Weather forecast

    CERN Document Server

    Courtier, P

    1994-02-07

    Weather prediction is performed using the numerical model of the atmosphere evolution.The evolution equations are derived from the Navier Stokes equation for the adiabatic part but the are very much complicated by the change of phase of water, the radiation porocess and the boundary layer.The technique used operationally is described. Weather prediction is an initial value problem and accurate initial conditions need to be specified. Due to the small number of observations available (105 ) as compared to the dimension of the model state variable (107),the problem is largely underdetermined. Techniques of optimal control and inverse problems are used and have been adapted to the large dimension of our problem. our problem.The at mosphere is a chaotic system; the implication for weather prediction is discussed. Ensemble prediction is used operationally and the technique for generating initial conditions which lead to a numerical divergence of the subsequent forecasts is described.

  20. An extended TRANSCAR model including ionospheric convection: simulation of EISCAT observations using inputs from AMIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-L. Blelly

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The TRANSCAR ionospheric model was extended to account for the convection of the magnetic field lines in the auroral and polar ionosphere. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian 13-moment approach was used to describe the dynamics of an ionospheric plasma tube. In the present study, one focuses on large scale transports in the polar ionosphere. The model was used to simulate a 35-h period of EISCAT-UHF observations on 16-17 February 1993. The first day was magnetically quiet, and characterized by elevated electron concentrations: the diurnal F2 layer reached as much as 1012m-3, which is unusual for a winter and moderate solar activity (F10.7=130 period. An intense geomagnetic event occurred on the second day, seen in the data as a strong intensification of the ionosphere convection velocities in the early afternoon (with the northward electric field reaching 150mVm-1 and corresponding frictional heating of the ions up to 2500K. The simulation used time-dependent AMIE outputs to infer flux-tube transports in the polar region, and to provide magnetospheric particle and energy inputs to the ionosphere. The overall very good agreement, obtained between the model and the observations, demonstrates the high ability of the extended TRANSCAR model for quantitative modelling of the high-latitude ionosphere; however, some differences are found which are attributed to the precipitation of electrons with very low energy. All these results are finally discussed in the frame of modelling the auroral ionosphere with space weather applications in mind.

  1. An extended TRANSCAR model including ionospheric convection: simulation of EISCAT observations using inputs from AMIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-L. Blelly

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The TRANSCAR ionospheric model was extended to account for the convection of the magnetic field lines in the auroral and polar ionosphere. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian 13-moment approach was used to describe the dynamics of an ionospheric plasma tube. In the present study, one focuses on large scale transports in the polar ionosphere. The model was used to simulate a 35-h period of EISCAT-UHF observations on 16-17 February 1993. The first day was magnetically quiet, and characterized by elevated electron concentrations: the diurnal F2 layer reached as much as 1012m-3, which is unusual for a winter and moderate solar activity (F10.7=130 period. An intense geomagnetic event occurred on the second day, seen in the data as a strong intensification of the ionosphere convection velocities in the early afternoon (with the northward electric field reaching 150mVm-1 and corresponding frictional heating of the ions up to 2500K. The simulation used time-dependent AMIE outputs to infer flux-tube transports in the polar region, and to provide magnetospheric particle and energy inputs to the ionosphere. The overall very good agreement, obtained between the model and the observations, demonstrates the high ability of the extended TRANSCAR model for quantitative modelling of the high-latitude ionosphere; however, some differences are found which are attributed to the precipitation of electrons with very low energy. All these results are finally discussed in the frame of modelling the auroral ionosphere with space weather applications in mind.

  2. Saving a Unique Data Set for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, D.; Benson, R. F.; Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Canadian/US International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program included the four satellites Alouette 1 and 2, ISIS 1 and 2 launched in 1962, 1965, 1969, and 1971, respectively and in operation for 10, 10, 21, and 19 years, respectively. The core experiment on these satellites was a topside sounder that could determine the ionospheric electron density from the orbit altitude down to about 250-500 km near where the ionosphere reaches its point of highest density, the F-peak. The mission was long lasting and highly successful, producing a wealth of information about the topside ionosphere in the form of analog ionosphere soundings on 7-track tapes. The analysis process required a tedious manual scaling of ionogram traces that could then, with appropriate software, be converted into electron density profiles. Even with the combined effort involving ionospheric groups from many countries only a relatively small percentage of the huge volume of recorded ionograms could be converted to electron density profiles. Even with this limited number significant new insights were achieved documented by the many Alouette/ISIS-related papers published in the 1960s and 1970s. Recognizing the importance of this unique data set for space weather research a new effort was undertaken in the late Nineties to analyze more of the Alouette/ISIS ionograms. The immediate cause for action was the threat to the more than 100,000 analog telemetry tapes in storage in Canada because of space limitations and storage costs. We were able to have nearly 20,000 tapes shipped to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for analog-to-digital conversion and succeeded in developing software that automatically scales and converts the ionograms to electron density profiles. This rescue effort is still ongoing and has already produced a significant increase in the information available for the topside ionosphere and has resulted in numerous publications. The data have led to improvements of the

  3. Utilizing Probability Distribution Functions and Ensembles to Forecast lonospheric and Thermosphere Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    Functions and Ensembles to Forecast lonospheric and Thermosphere Space Weather 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0265 5c. PROGRAM... weather forecasting community. They cause important geomagnetic storms that can eventually affect systems in orbit and on the ground. Therefore, the...Ionosphere Storm Forecasts . Space Weather , 13, 125129. doi: 10.1002/2014SW001125. 5. Zou, S., M. B. Moldwin, A. J. Ridley, M. J. Nicolls, A. J. Coster, E. G

  4. Equatorial Ionospheric Response to Different Estimated Disturbed Electric Fields as Investigated Using Sheffield University Plasmasphere Ionosphere Model at INPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M. A.; Batista, I. S.; Souza, J. R.; Foppiano, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Good ionospheric modeling is important to understand anomalous effects, mainly during geomagnetic storm events. Ionospheric electric fields, thermospheric winds, and neutral composition are affected at different degrees, depending on the intensity of the magnetic disturbance which, in turns, affects the electron density distribution at all latitudes. The most important disturbed parameter for the equatorial ionosphere is the electric field, which is responsible for the equatorial ionization anomaly. Here various electric field measurements and models are analyzed: (1) measured by the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar (ISR), (2) from Jicamarca Unattended Long-Term studies of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere (JULIA) radar, (3) deduced from magnetometers, (4) calculated from the time variations of the F layer height (dh'F/dt), and (5) deduced from interplanetary electric field determinations. The response of ionospheric parameters foF2 and hmF2 to the electric fields simulated using the Sheffield University Plasmasphere Ionosphere Model version available at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais is compared with observations for two locations, during the geomagnetic storm events of 17-18 April 2002 and 7-10 November 2004. Results are found to be consistent with the observations in such a way that a hierarchy among the different types of drifts used can be established. When no ISR measurements are available, the drifts deduced from magnetometers or measured by the JULIA are best when including the contribution derived from dh'F/dt for the 18-24 LT time interval. However, when none of these drifts are available, drifts inferred from the interplanetary electric field seem to be a good alternative for some purposes.

  5. Activities of NICT space weather project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Ken T.; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Mamoru

    NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has been in charge of space weather forecast service in Japan for more than 20 years. The main target region of the space weather is the geo-space in the vicinity of the Earth where human activities are dominant. In the geo-space, serious damages of satellites, international space stations and astronauts take place caused by energetic particles or electromagnetic disturbances: the origin of the causes is dynamically changing of solar activities. Positioning systems via GPS satellites are also im-portant recently. Since the most significant effect of positioning error comes from disturbances of the ionosphere, it is crucial to estimate time-dependent modulation of the electron density profiles in the ionosphere. NICT is one of the 13 members of the ISES (International Space Environment Service), which is an international assembly of space weather forecast centers under the UNESCO. With help of geo-space environment data exchanging among the member nations, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide informa-tion on forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. The space weather forecast at NICT is conducted based on the three methodologies: observations, simulations and informatics (OSI model). For real-time or quasi real-time reporting of space weather, we conduct our original observations: Hiraiso solar observatory to monitor the solar activity (solar flare, coronal mass ejection, and so on), domestic ionosonde network, magnetometer HF radar observations in far-east Siberia, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionosonde network (SEALION). Real-time observation data to monitor solar and solar-wind activities are obtained through antennae at NICT from ACE and STEREO satellites. We have a middle-class super-computer (NEC SX-8R) to maintain real-time computer simulations for solar and solar

  6. Daytime Ionosphere Retrieval Algorithm for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Korpela, Eric J.; Sirk, Martin M.; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer Extreme Ultraviolet spectrograph, ICON EUV, will measure altitude profiles of the daytime extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) OII emission near 83.4 and 61.7 nm that are used to determine density profiles and state parameters of the ionosphere. This paper describes the algorithm concept and approach to inverting these measured OII emission profiles to derive the associated O+ density profile from 150-450 km as a proxy for the electron content in the F-region of the ionosphere. The algorithm incorporates a bias evaluation and feedback step, developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory using data from the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) and the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) missions, that is able to effectively mitigate the effects of systematic instrument calibration errors and inaccuracies in the original photon source within the forward model. Results are presented from end-to-end simulations that convolved simulated airglow profiles with the expected instrument measurement response to produce profiles that were inverted with the algorithm to return data products for comparison to truth. Simulations of measurements over a representative ICON orbit show the algorithm is able to reproduce hmF2 values to better than 5 km accuracy, and NmF2 to better than 12% accuracy over a 12-second integration, and demonstrate that the ICON EUV instrument and daytime ionosphere algorithm can meet the ICON science objectives which require 20 km vertical resolution in hmF2 and 18% precision in NmF2.

  7. Ionosphere TEC disturbances before strong earthquakes: observations, physics, modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgaladze, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of the pre-earthquake ionospheric disturbances is discussed. A number of typical TEC (Total Electron Content) relative disturbances is presented for several recent strong earthquakes occurred in different ionospheric conditions. Stable typical TEC deviations from quiet background state are observed few days before the strong seismic events in the vicinity of the earthquake epicenter and treated as ionospheric earthquake precursors. They don't move away from the source in contrast to the disturbances related with geomagnetic activity. Sunlit ionosphere approach leads to reduction of the disturbances up to their full disappearance, and effects regenerate at night. The TEC disturbances often observed in the magnetically conjugated areas as well. At low latitudes they accompany with equatorial anomaly modifications. The hypothesis about the electromagnetic channel of the pre-earthquake ionospheric disturbances' creation is discussed. The lithosphere and ionosphere are coupled by the vertical external electric currents as a result of ionization of the near-Earth air layer and vertical transport of the charged particles through the atmosphere over the fault. The external electric current densities exceeding the regular fair-weather electric currents by several orders are required to produce stable long-living seismogenic electric fields such as observed by onboard measurements of the 'Intercosmos-Bulgaria 1300' satellite over the seismic active zones. The numerical calculation results using the Upper Atmosphere Model demonstrate the ability of the external electric currents with the densities of 10-8-10-9 A/m2 to produce such electric fields. The sumulations reproduce the basic features of typical pre-earthquake TEC relative disturbances. It is shown that the plasma ExB drift under the action of the seismogenic electric field leads to the changes of the F2 region electron number density and TEC. The upward drift velocity component enhances NmF2 and TEC and

  8. Ionospheric forecasting model using fuzzy logic-based gradient descent method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Venkata Ratnam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Space weather phenomena cause satellite to ground or satellite to aircraft transmission outages over the VHF to L-band frequency range, particularly in the low latitude region. Global Positioning System (GPS is primarily susceptible to this form of space weather. Faulty GPS signals are attributed to ionospheric error, which is a function of Total Electron Content (TEC. Importantly, precise forecasts of space weather conditions and appropriate hazard observant cautions required for ionospheric space weather observations are limited. In this paper, a fuzzy logic-based gradient descent method has been proposed to forecast the ionospheric TEC values. In this technique, membership functions have been tuned based on the gradient descent estimated values. The proposed algorithm has been tested with the TEC data of two geomagnetic storms in the low latitude station of KL University, Guntur, India (16.44°N, 80.62°E. It has been found that the gradient descent method performs well and the predicted TEC values are close to the original TEC measurements.

  9. Influence of Thunderstorms on the Structure of the Ionosphere using Composite Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, O.; Sutherland, E.

    2017-12-01

    It is well known in the amateur (ham) radio community that thunderstorms have a significant influence on local and long-distance high-frequency (HF) communications. This study aims to characterize the structure of the ionosphere in response to strong convective activity and cloud electrification. Superposed Epoch Analysis is applied to surface weather observations and ionosonde data at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida from August 2014 to July 2017. Preliminary results indicate that thunderstorms significantly modify the structure of the ionosphere, generating statistically different measurements of several key parameters (e.g., foEs, hmF2, ITEC) compared to clear-sky observations. Seasonal and diurnal influences between the thunderstorm and clear sky cases are also explored. Accurate characterization of the ionosphere in response to thunderstorms has important implications for the effective use of HF communications in civilian and military operations, to include emergency services, aviation, amateur radio, and over-the-horizon radar.

  10. Ionospheric plasma by VHF waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The auto-correlation functions and power spectra of scintillations predict that the scale length of these irregularities varies from 200–500 m having velocity of movement between 75 m/sec to 200 m/sec. These results agree well with the results obtained by other workers. Keywords. Scintillation; ionospheric irregularities ...

  11. Modeling ionospheric disturbance features in quasi-vertically incident ionograms using 3-D magnetoionic ray tracing and atmospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has initiated an experimental program, Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment, utilizing state-of-the-art DSTO-designed high frequency digital receivers. This program seeks to understand ionospheric disturbances at scales < 150 km and temporal resolutions under 1 min through the simultaneous observation and recording of multiple quasi-vertical ionograms (QVI) with closely spaced ionospheric control points. A detailed description of and results from the first campaign conducted in February 2008 were presented by Harris et al. (2012). In this paper we employ a 3-D magnetoionic Hamiltonian ray tracing engine, developed by DSTO, to (1) model the various disturbance features observed on both the O and X polarization modes in our QVI data and (2) understand how they are produced. The ionospheric disturbances which produce the observed features were modeled by perturbing the ionosphere with atmospheric gravity waves.

  12. Effects of High-Latitude Forcing Uncertainty on the Low-Latitude and Midlatitude Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    Ensemble simulations are performed using the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) in order to understand the role of high-latitude forcing uncertainty on the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to the April 2010 geomagnetic storm. The ensemble is generated by perturbing either the high-latitude electric potential or auroral energy flux in the assimilative mapping for ionosphere electrodynamics (AMIE). Simulations with perturbed high-latitude electric potential result in substantial intraensemble variability in the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to the geomagnetic storm, and the ensemble standard deviation for the change in NmF2 reaches 50-100% of the mean change. Such large intraensemble variability is not seen when perturbing the auroral energy flux. In this case, the effects of the forcing uncertainty are primarily confined to high latitudes. We therefore conclude that the specification of high-latitude electric fields is an important source of uncertainty when modeling the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to a geomagnetic storm. A multiple linear regression analysis of the results indicates that uncertainty in the storm time changes in the equatorial electric fields, neutral winds, and neutral composition can all contribute to the uncertainty in the ionosphere electron density. The results of the present study provide insight into the possible uncertainty in simulations of the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to geomagnetic storms due to imperfect knowledge of the high-latitude forcing.

  13. Momentum and Energy Transfer in an Ionospheric Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolin, O.; Brenning, N.; Swenson, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present new data from the subpayload of the GRIT II ionospheric active injection experiment. The analysis made possible by these data provides a good understanding of the momentum transfer between the injected ions and the ambient ionosphere. It resolves the conflict between the two competing...... models for the energy transfer from the newly created ions to hot electrons, while also giving a natural coupling between the energy and momentum transfer processes....

  14. Model based Computerized Ionospheric Tomography in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Hakan; Arikan, Orhan; Arikan, Feza

    2018-04-01

    Reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density distribution in space and time not only provide basis for better understanding the physical nature of the ionosphere, but also provide improvements in various applications including HF communication. Recently developed IONOLAB-CIT technique provides physically admissible 3D model of the ionosphere by using both Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) measurements obtained from a GPS satellite - receiver network and IRI-Plas model. IONOLAB-CIT technique optimizes IRI-Plas model parameters in the region of interest such that the synthetic STEC computations obtained from the IRI-Plas model are in accordance with the actual STEC measurements. In this work, the IONOLAB-CIT technique is extended to provide reconstructions both in space and time. This extension exploits the temporal continuity of the ionosphere to provide more reliable reconstructions with a reduced computational load. The proposed 4D-IONOLAB-CIT technique is validated on real measurement data obtained from TNPGN-Active GPS receiver network in Turkey.

  15. Observations of subauroral ionospheric dynamics during SED plume passage at Millstone Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Erickson, P. J.; Coster, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Storm enhanced density (SED) is a characteristic ionospheric storm time structure, with a significant plasma density enhancement in a narrow zone. SED structures often (but not always) span the continental US with a base in the US northeast at the afternoon and dusk sector, extending westward or northwest into the high latitude dayside cusp region. It is a typical and repeatable space weather phenomenon occurring during the main phase of magnetic storms with intensity ranging from active to disturbed levels. Observations of stormtime ionospheric density enhancement at subauroral latitudes have a long history, and were termed the 'dusk effect' until relatively recently, when dense networks of GNSS receivers have allowed us to view this structure with much finer spatial and temporal resolution. The formation of a SED plume is a topic under intensive community investigation, but in general it is believed that stormtime ionospheric dynamics and processes within the coupling magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system are responsible. For instance, poleward and sunward plasma drifts at the edge of the expanded dusk sector high-latitude convection can be important. Subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) are often observed at the poleward edge of the SED plume where ionospheric conductivity is low. SAPS is a huge westward ion flow that can convect ionospheric plasma from the afternoon or evening sector where solar photoionization production is waning, creating low density or density troughs. Stormtime penetration electric fields also exist, creating enhanced low and mid latitude upward ion drifts that move ionospheric plasma upward from the low altitude region where they are produced. This provides another important ionization source to contribute to maintaining the SED plume. This paper will provide analysis of the relative strength of these factors by using joint datasets of current geospace storm events obtained with the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar, GNSS

  16. Worldwide impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings on the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharenko, Larisa; Coster, Anthea; Zhang, Shun-Rong; Erickson, Phillip; Aponte, Nestor; Harvey, V. Lynn; Pedatella, Nicholas; Maute, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated large variations in the low-latitude ionosphere during strong, persistent meteorological disturbances known as sudden stratospheric warmings. Several possible lower/upper atmosphere coupling mechanisms were identified, including changes in the dynamics of the background neutral atmosphere, modification of solar and lunar tides, and subsequent variations in electric field. We extend these studies using observations by GNSS TEC receivers, by several ionosondes located at low, middle, and high latitudes, and by Jicamarca, Arecibo and Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radars to investigate large-scale ionospheric disturbances for several SSW events. To separate ionospheric anomalies associated with SSW from regular ionospheric behavior, we develop an empirical model of ionospheric parameters (TEC, NmF2) using available long-term data records (10-40 years of data depending on the instrument). The models describe variations in parameters for each longitude/latitude bin (or ionosonde location) as a function of solar activity, geomagnetic activity, day of year, and local time. Ionospheric anomalies are obtained as the difference between the observations and the empirical model. Ionospheric anomalies are observed for both major and minor SSW events, reaching 50-100% variation from expected seasonal behavior for major SSW events and 30-60% variation for minor SSW events. The largest variations in the daytime TEC and NmF2 are observed both in the crests of equatorial ionization anomaly and at 40-60S (geodetic). Recent expansion of GNSS TEC receiver network to high latitudes in the southern hemisphere indicates that SSW anomalies are communicated across the globe and associated with ionospheric disturbances even over Antarctica. Observational studies focused on SSW events present an important opportunity to better understand processes governing the behavior of the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. We use examples of observations from

  17. The High-Latitude Ionosphere and Its Effects on Radio Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ronald W., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    The ionosphere is indeed the place where Earth and space come together. Correspondingly, the ionosphere is subject to the details and complexities of both Earth and space. If one is to develop a logical understanding of even a limited portion of the ionosphere, that knowledge will be constructed on a foundation of many facts of nature. Awareness of those facts will in turn be supported by a vast historical array of scientific effort to ascertain the fundamentals of Earth and space that combine to form the ionosphere as we know it. Fortunately for us, R. D. Hunsucker and J. K. Hargreaves have written a book that goes from the Earth up and comes from the Sun down to arrive at a remarkably detailed physical description of the ionosphere and its impact on human activities, especially radio-frequency (RF) communications. The High-Latitude Ionosphere and its Effects on Radio Propagation is a bit of a misnomer, because the book covers many more topics than its title suggests. The authors set the stage by developing a detailed picture of the density, temperature, chemical, neutral, and charge states of the atmosphere-ionosphere system. Basic models of the ionization and recombination processes are presented with supporting mathematics and graphical examples. Concepts such as the Chapman production function are introduced and applied, whereby ionizing solar radiation produces electron-ion pairs. One can then grasp how the so-called D, E, and F layers of the ionosphere are related to the ionization of specific molecular species. Along the way, the authors are careful to introduce the extensive nomenclature of ionospheric descriptors. There is a comfortable relationship of prose, mathematics, and graphical material. Reading this book is a pleasure for the scientifically curious mind.

  18. Atmospheric Drag, Occultation ‘N’ Ionospheric Scintillation (ADONIS mission proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hettrich Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Drag, Occultation ‘N’ Ionospheric Scintillation mission (ADONIS studies the dynamics of the terrestrial thermosphere and ionosphere in dependency of solar events over a full solar cycle in Low Earth Orbit (LEO. The objectives are to investigate satellite drag with in-situ measurements and the ionospheric electron density profiles with radio occultation and scintillation measurements. A constellation of two satellites provides the possibility to gain near real-time data (NRT about ionospheric conditions over the Arctic region where current coverage is insufficient. The mission shall also provide global high-resolution data to improve assimilative ionospheric models. The low-cost constellation can be launched using a single Vega rocket and most of the instruments are already space-proven allowing for rapid development and good reliability. From July 16 to 25, 2013, the Alpbach Summer School 2013 was organised by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG, the European Space Agency (ESA, the International Space Science Institute (ISSI and the association of Austrian space industries Austrospace in Alpbach, Austria. During the workshop, four teams of 15 students each independently developed four different space mission proposals on the topic of “Space Weather: Science, Missions and Systems”, supported by a team of tutors. The present work is based on the mission proposal that resulted from one of these teams’ efforts.

  19. Study of Ionospheric Perturbations in D-Layer Using VLF Receiver at Tashkent IHY Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2016-07-01

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008 when one VLF receiver and two SuperSID receivers were provided to Uzbekistan IHY cite by Stanford University. The results obtained at Tashkent IHY station are applied to earthquake electromagnetic precursors, lightning, and Solar flares and to ionospheric disturbances originating from gamma ray flares of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters connected with evolution of strongly magnetized neutron stars believed as magnetars. Regular monitoring of the D-layer of ionosphere over Central Asia territory has been performed on the permanent basis. Several Solar events are observed and the analysis has shown that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is examined.

  20. Numerical Simulations to Assess ART and MART Performance for Ionospheric Tomography of Chapman Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prol, Fabricio S; Camargo, Paulo O; Muella, Marcio T A H

    2017-01-01

    The incomplete geometrical coverage of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes the ionospheric tomographic system an ill-conditioned problem for ionospheric imaging. In order to detect the principal limitations of the ill-conditioned tomographic solutions, numerical simulations of the ionosphere are under constant investigation. In this paper, we show an investigation of the accuracy of Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) and Multiplicative ART (MART) for performing tomographic reconstruction of Chapman profiles using a simulated optimum scenario of GNSS signals tracked by ground-based receivers. Chapman functions were used to represent the ionospheric morphology and a set of analyses was conducted to assess ART and MART performance for estimating the Total Electron Content (TEC) and parameters that describes the Chapman function. The results showed that MART performed better in the reconstruction of the electron density peak and ART gave a better representation for estimating TEC and the shape of the ionosphere. Since we used an optimum scenario of the GNSS signals, the analyses indicate the intrinsic problems that may occur with ART and MART to recover valuable information for many applications of Telecommunication, Spatial Geodesy and Space Weather.

  1. High ionospheric activity effects on LatPos RTK network performance in Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobelis, D.; Zvirgzds, J.; Kaļinka, M.

    2017-10-01

    Fast and reliable coordinate determination with GNSS in real time is the main objective of continuous operating reference system (CORS) network users. To provide services for coordinate determination, Network-based Real Time Kinematic (NRTK) system called “LatPos” has been established and operated in Latvia since 2006. One of the factors, affecting the performance of LatPos system services, is activity of ionosphere. Ionosphere is a region of the earth’s atmosphere, from about 60 kilometers up to 1000 km above the earth’s surface, in which there is a high concentration of free electrons, spatially variated, affected by space weather, seasonal and solar cycle changes. Ionospheric activity conditions depending on mentioned factors can be analyzed by LatPos system data. Some data processing strategies has been developed and LatPos RTK network performance results obtained, during different ionospheric activity conditions. This paper focused on both segments: the NRTK performance and the rover receiver coordinate determination possibilities in field when high ionospheric activity occurs.

  2. Early Japanese contributions to space weather research (1945–1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nishida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Major contributions by Japanese scientists in the period of 1945 to 1960 are reviewed. This was the period when the foundation of the space weather research was laid by ground-based observations and theoretical research. Important contributions were made on such subjects as equatorial ionosphere in quiet times, tidal wind system in the ionosphere, formation of the F2 layer, VLF propagation above the ionosphere, and precursory phenomena (type IV radio outburst and polar cap absorption to storms. At the IGY (1957, 1958, research efforts were intensified and new programs in space and Antarctica were initiated. Japanese scientists in this discipline held a tight network for communication and collaboration that has been kept to this day.

  3. Preface: International Reference Ionosphere - Progress in Ionospheric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2010-01-01

    The international reference ionosphere (lRI) is the internationally recommended empirical model for the specification of ionospheric parameters supported by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) and recognized by the International Standardization Organization (ISO). IRI is being continually improved by a team of international experts as new data become available and better models are being developed. This issue chronicles the latest phase of model updates as reported during two IRI-related meetings. The first was a special session during the Scientific Assembly of the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR) in Montreal, Canada in July 2008 and the second was an IRI Task Force Activity at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs in May 2009. This work led to several improvements and additions of the model which will be included in the next version, IRI-201O. The issue is divided into three sections focusing on the improvements made in the topside ionosphere, the F-peak, and the lower ionosphere, respectively. This issue would not have been possible without the reviewing efforts of many individuals. Each paper was reviewed by two referees. We thankfully acknowledge the contribution to this issue made by the following reviewers: Jacob Adeniyi, David Altadill, Eduardo Araujo, Feza Arikan, Dieter Bilitza, Jilijana Cander, Bela Fejer, Tamara Gulyaeva, Manuel Hermindez-Pajares, Ivan Kutiev, John MacDougal, Leo McNamara, Bruno Nava, Olivier Obrou, Elijah Oyeyemi, Vadym Paznukhov, Bodo Reinisch, John Retterer, Phil Richards, Gary Sales, J.H. Sastri, Ludger Scherliess, Iwona Stanislavska, Stamir Stankov, Shin-Yi Su, Manlian Zhang, Y ongliang Zhang, and Irina Zakharenkova. We are grateful to Peggy Ann Shea for her final review and guidance as the editor-in-chief for special issues of Advances in Space Research. We thank the authors for their timely submission and their quick response to the reviewer comments and humbly

  4. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  5. Ionospheric effects of thunderstorms and lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Erin H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Tropospheric thunderstorms have been reported to disturb the lower ionosphere (~65-90 km) by convective atmospheric gravity waves and by electromagnetic field changes produced by lightning discharges. However, due to the low electron density in the lower ionosphere, active probing of its electron distribution is difficult, and the various perturbative effects are poorly understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that by using remotely-detected ?me waveforms of lightning radio signals it is possible to probe the lower ionosphere and its fluctuations in a spatially and temporally-resolved manner. Here we report evidence of gravity wave effects on the lower ionosphere originating from the thunderstorm. We also report variations in the nighttime ionosphere atop a small thunderstorm and associate the variations with the storm’s electrical activity. Finally, we present a data analysis technique to map ionospheric acoustic waves near thunderstorms.

  6. Receivers Gather Data for Climate, Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Signals from global positioning system (GPS) satellites are now being used for more than just location and navigation information. By looking at the radio waves from GPS satellites, a technology developed at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) not only precisely calculates its position, but can also use a technique known as radio occultation to help scientists study the Earth s atmosphere and gravity field to improve weather forecasts, monitor climate change, and enhance space weather research. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), a nonprofit group of universities in Boulder, Colorado, compares radio occultation to the appearance of a pencil when viewed though a glass of water. The water molecules change the path of visible light waves so that the pencil appears bent, just like molecules in the air bend GPS radio signals as they pass through (or are occulted by) the atmosphere. Through measurements of the amount of bending in the signals, scientists can construct detailed images of the ionosphere (the energetic upper part of the atmosphere) and also gather information about atmospheric density, pressure, temperature, and moisture. Once collected, this data can be input into weather forecasting and climate models for weather prediction and climate studies. Traditionally, such information is obtained through the use of weather balloons. In 1998, JPL started developing a new class of GPS space science receivers, called Black Jack, that could take precise measurements of how GPS signals are distorted or delayed along their way to the receiver. By 2006, the first demonstration of a GPS radio occultation constellation was launched through a collaboration among Taiwan s National Science Council and National Space Organization, the U.S. National Science Foundation, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other Federal entities. Called the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC

  7. Comparison between SuperDARN flow vectors and equivalent ionospheric currents from ground magnetometer arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weygand, J. M.; Amm, O.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-01-01

    seasons. This comparison is done over a range of spatial separations, magnetic latitudes, magnetic local times, and auroral electrojet activity to investigate under what conditions the vectors are anti-parallel to one another. Our results show that in general the equivalent ionospheric currents are anti...... that may influence the alignment include ionospheric conductivity gradients and quiet time backgrounds. Our results can be used to approximate the macroscopic (similar to 1000 km) ionospheric convection patterns. The SECS maps represent a value-added product from the raw magnetometer database and can...... be used for contextual interpretation; they can help with our understanding of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms using ground arrays and the magnetospheric spacecraft data, and they can be used as input for other techniques....

  8. Coupling of ionosphere and troposphere during the occurrence of isolated tornadoes on November 20, 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Phan, T.; Smith, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere during time periods with isolated tornadoes on the stormy day of November 20, 1973. Observations are made with a high-frequency CW Doppler array system, in which radio receivers located at a central site monitored signals transmitted from three independent remote sites on three sets of frequencies (4.0125, 4.759, 5.734 MHz) and reflected off the ionosphere approximately halfway between the transmitter and receiver sites. It is shown that the sources of the gravity waves associated with tornadoes are always on the squall lines and near the tornado touchdown locations, and that analyses of ionospheric Doppler sounder observations of medium-scale gravity waves can contribute to the understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere during periods of severe storm activity.

  9. Swarm Products and Space Weather Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Olsen, Nils; Martini, Daniel

    The Swarm satellite constellation mission provides high precision magnetic field data and models and other observations that enable us to explore near Earth space for example in terms of in situ electron density and electric fields. On board GPS observables can be used for sounding ionospheric...... and plasmaspheric electron content and GPS and accelerometer data are used to derive information on thermospheric density.Continuous data sets from LEO satellites, such as Swarm, and often combined with ground observations have been useful in developing empirical models of the temporal occurrence and local...... in aeronomy and space weather. We will emphasize results from the Swarm mission....

  10. ionospheric effects on ionospheric effects on gps signal in low gps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The ionospheric errors equations GPS approach can be written as. 1. 2. (1) and α 40.3. ; denotes the free electrons density per cubic meter•µ , is the ionospheric group delat with respect to propagation in vacuumand f is .... analysing different effects on the state of ionospheric disturbances. MS users particularly the GPS ...

  11. Recent Advances in Atmospheric, Solar-Terrestrial Physics and Space Weather From a North-South network of scientists [2006-2016] PART A: TUTORIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Menvielle, M.; Curto, J-J.; Le Huy, M.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reviews scientific advances achieved by a North-South network between 2006 and 2016. These scientific advances concern Solar Terrestrial Physics, Atmospheric Physics and Space Weather. In this part A, we introduce knowledge on the Sun-Earth system. We consider the physical process of the dynamo which is present in the Sun, in the core of the Earth and also in the regions between the Sun and the Earth, the solar wind-magnetosphere and the ionosphere. Equations of plasma physics and Maxwell's equations will be recalled. In the Sun-Earth system there are permanent dynamos (Sun, Earth's core, solar wind - magnetosphere, neutral wind - ionosphere) and non-permanent dynamos that are activated during magnetic storms in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere. All these dynamos have associated electric currents that affect the variations of the Earth's magnetic field which are easily measurable. That is why a part of the tutorial is also devoted to the magnetic indices which are indicators of the electric currents in the Sun-Earth system. In order to understand some results of the part B, we present some characteristics of the Equatorial region and of the electrodynamics coupling the Auroral and Equatorial regions.

  12. Ionospheric phenomena before strong earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Silina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of several ionospheric parameters before earthquakes with magnitude M > 5.5 located less than 500 km from an ionospheric vertical sounding station is performed. Ionospheric effects preceding "deep" (depth h > 33 km and "crust" (h 33 km earthquakes were analysed separately. Data of nighttime measurements of the critical frequencies foF2 and foEs, the frequency fbEs and Es-spread at the middle latitude station Dushanbe were used. The frequencies foF2 and fbEs are proportional to the square root of the ionization density at heights of 300 km and 100 km, respectively. It is shown that two days before the earthquakes the values of foF2 averaged over the morning hours (00:00 LT–06:00 LT and of fbEs averaged over the nighttime hours (18:00 LT–06:00 LT decrease; the effect is stronger for the "deep" earthquakes. Analysing the coefficient of semitransparency which characterizes the degree of small-scale turbulence, it was shown that this value increases 1–4 days before "crust" earthquakes, and it does not change before "deep" earthquakes. Studying Es-spread which manifests itself as diffuse Es track on ionograms and characterizes the degree of large-scale turbulence, it was found that the number of Es-spread observations increases 1–3 days before the earthquakes; for "deep" earthquakes the effect is more intensive. Thus it may be concluded that different mechanisms of energy transfer from the region of earthquake preparation to the ionosphere occur for "deep" and "crust" events.

  13. Complex network description of the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shikun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xihai; Li, Yihong; Niu, Chao; Yang, Xiaoyun; Liu, Daizhi

    2018-03-01

    Complex networks have emerged as an essential approach of geoscience to generate novel insights into the nature of geophysical systems. To investigate the dynamic processes in the ionosphere, a directed complex network is constructed, based on a probabilistic graph of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) from 2012. The results of the power-law hypothesis test show that both the out-degree and in-degree distribution of the ionospheric network are not scale-free. Thus, the distribution of the interactions in the ionosphere is homogenous. None of the geospatial positions play an eminently important role in the propagation of the dynamic ionospheric processes. The spatial analysis of the ionospheric network shows that the interconnections principally exist between adjacent geographical locations, indicating that the propagation of the dynamic processes primarily depends on the geospatial distance in the ionosphere. Moreover, the joint distribution of the edge distances with respect to longitude and latitude directions shows that the dynamic processes travel further along the longitude than along the latitude in the ionosphere. The analysis of small-world-ness indicates that the ionospheric network possesses the small-world property, which can make the ionosphere stable and efficient in the propagation of dynamic processes.

  14. A STUDY ON THE KOREAN IONOSPHERIC VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hee Bae

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The ionosphere in accordance with solar activity can affect the transmission of radio waves. The effect of the ionosphere on the radio wave propagation are scattering of radio waves, attenuation, angle error, ranging error, and time delay. The present study is based on the Korean ionospheirc data obtained at the AnYang Radio Research Laboratory from January 1985 through October 1989. The data are analyzed to show the daily and the annual variations of the ionosphere. The data are also used to simulate the density distribution of the Korean ionosphere following the Chapman law.

  15. Characterizing Space Weather Effects in the Post-DMSP Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather generally refers to heliophysical phenomena or events that produce a negative impact on manmade systems. While many space weather events originate with impulsive disturbances on the sun, others result from complex internal interactions in the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The reliance of mankind on satellite-based services continues to increase rapidly, yet the global capacity for sensing space weather in the ionosphere seems headed towards decline. A number of recent ionospheric-focused space-based missions are either presently, or soon-to-be, no longer available, and the end of the multi-decade Defense Meteorological Satellite Program is now in sight. The challenge facing the space weather community is how to maintain or increase sensing capabilities in an operational environment constrained by a decreasing numbers of sensors. The upcoming launch of COSMIC-2 in 2016/2018 represents the most significant new capability planned for the future. GNSS RO data has some benefit for background ionospheric models, particularly over regions where ground-based GNSS TEC measurements are unavailable, but the space weather community has a dire need to leverage such missions for far more knowledge of the ionosphere, and specifically for information related to space weather impacts. Meanwhile, the number of ground-based GNSS sensors worldwide has increased substantially, yet progress instrumenting some vastly undersampled regions, such as Africa, remains slow. In fact, the recent loss of support for many existing ground stations in such areas under the former Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) program may actually result in a decrease in such sensing sites over the next 1-2 years, abruptly reversing a positive trend established over the last decade. Here we present potential solutions to the challenges these developments pose to the space weather enterprise. Specific topics include modeling advances required to detect and accurately characterize

  16. Electrodynamics of the Martian Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of the Martian crustal magnetic fields makes a significant modification to the interaction between the solar wind/IMF and the ionosphere of the planet. This paper presents the results of 3-D hybrid simulations of Martian solar wind interaction containing the Martian crustal fields., self-consistent ionospheric chemistry and planetary rotation. It has already been reported that the addition of the crustal fields and planetary rotation makes a significant modification of the ionospheric loss from Mars, Brecht et al., 2016. This paper focuses on two other aspects of the interaction, the electric fields and the current systems created by the solar wind interaction. The results of several simulations will be analyzed and compared. The electric fields around Mars due to its interaction with the solar wind will be examined. Special attention will be paid to the electric field constituents (∇ X B, ∇Pe, ηJ). Regions where the electric field is parallel to the magnetic field will be found and the implications of these regions will be discussed. Current systems for each ion species will be shown. Finally the effects on the electric fields and the current systems due to the rotation of Mars will be examined.

  17. CubeSat for Natural-Hazard Estimation With Ionospheric Sciences (CNEWS): A Concept Development to Aid Tsunami Early Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, A.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Yang, Y. M.; Langley, R. B.; Foster, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the University New Brunswick (Canada) and the University of Hawaii have developed a concept to provide open ocean tsunami wave height estimates using very accurate measurements of absolute total electron content (TEC) perturbations. Ionosphere-derived tsunami wave height estimates from our CubeSat for Natural-Hazard Estimation With Ionospheric Sciences (CNEWS) mission will refine the tsunami source energy calculation and improve the tsunami scale calculation for a localized region. As a secondary science objective, transmitting impulsive HF/VHF (10-40 MHz) transmissions through the ionosphere will provide in-situ geomagnetic disturbance measurements, which allow for discrimination between tsunami-induced signatures and space-weather-related fluctuations. NASA has invested several millions of dollars in the development of a tsunami warning system based on geodetic measurements from ground-based GPS stations. Leveraging this investment by simultaneously using ionospheric measurement from this GPS network for the detection of tsunamis represents a significant step forward. GPS ionospheric imaging is limited, however, by the slowly changing satellite geometry and its weak absolute TEC resolution (about 3 TECU). It has also been shown that GPS ionospheric imaging alone cannot distinguish between space weather fluctuations and those due to natural hazards. The very precise ionospheric measurements generated by CNEWS are expected to provide a quasi-static image of tsunami ionospheric signatures that we will use in an advanced model inversion technique to estimate tsunami wave heights at 10 cm (one sigma) uncertainty. The geomagnetic field strength resolution is also a key constraint for discriminating between natural hazards and space weather effects. HF/VHF impulses can resolve absolute TEC measurements at the 0.02 TECU level and geomagnetic field strength may be measured at 50 nT resolution.

  18. Socio-Economic Impacts of Space Weather and User Needs for Space Weather Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worman, S. L.; Taylor, S. M.; Onsager, T. G.; Adkins, J. E.; Baker, D. N.; Forbes, K. F.

    2017-12-01

    The 2015 National Space Weather Strategy and Space Weather Action Plan (SWAP) details the activities, outcomes, and timelines to build a "Space Weather Ready Nation." NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center and Abt Associates are working together on two SWAP initiatives: (1) identifying, describing, and quantifying the socio-economic impacts of moderate and severe space weather; and (2) outreach to engineers and operators to better understand user requirements for space weather products and services. Both studies cover four technological sectors (electric power, commercial aviation, satellites, and GNSS users) and rely heavily on industry input. Findings from both studies are essential for decreasing vulnerabilities and enhancing preparedness.

  19. Present and Future IGS Ionospheric Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krankowski, Andrzej; Wielgosz, Pawel; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; García-Rigo, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is, on one hand, to show the present performance of the combined final and rapid IGS global ionosphere maps (GIMs), and on the other hand to inform the geodetic community on new product - predicted IGS GIMs. In addition, information on future development of IGS ionospheric products will be also presented. Nowadays, the Ionosphere Working Group of IGS generates three types of ionospheric products: final, rapid and predicted, respectively. There are currently four IGS Associate Analysis Centres (IAACs) for the ionospheric products: CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe, University of Berne, Switzerland), ESA/ESOC (European Space Operations Center of ESA, Darmstadt, Germany), JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, U.S.A) and gAGE/UPC (Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain). These centres provide ionosphere maps computed with different approaches. Their maps are uploaded to IGS Ionosphere Product Coordinator, who computes official IGS combined products. Since January 2008, this coordination is carried out by the GRL/UWM (Geodynamics Research Laboratory of the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland). The IGS GIMs are provided in Ionosphere Exchange (IONEX) format with spatial resolution of 5.0 degrees in longitude and 2.5 degrees in latitude, and temporal resolution of 2 hours. Latency of the final and rapid GIMs is 10 days and 1 day, respectively. In November 2009, the IGS Iono WG started to generate predicted ionospheric products 1 and 2 days in advance (requested for ESA's SMOS mission). These new IGS products are currently based on predicted ionosphere maps prepared by UPC and ESA. During period of more than 10 years of continuous IGS ionosphere operation, the techniques used by the IAACs and the strategies of combination have improved in such a way that the combined IGS GIMs are now significantly more accurate and robust. Future plans include, among others, increasing temporal resolution to 1 hour and

  20. Reconstruction of Historical Weather by Assimilating Old Weather Diary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neluwala, P.; Yoshimura, K.; Toride, K.; Hirano, J.; Ichino, M.; Okazaki, A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate can control not only human life style but also other living beings. It is important to investigate historical climate to understand the current and future climates. Information about daily weather can give a better understanding of past life on earth. Long-term weather influences crop calendar as well as the development of civilizations. Unfortunately, existing reconstructed daily weather data are limited to 1850s due to the availability of instrumental data. The climate data prior to that are derived from proxy materials (e.g., tree-ring width, ice core isotopes, etc.) which are either in annual or decadal scale. However, there are many historical documents which contain information about weather such as personal diaries. In Japan, around 20 diaries in average during the 16th - 19th centuries have been collected and converted into a digitized form. As such, diary data exist in many other countries. This study aims to reconstruct historical daily weather during the 18th and 19th centuries using personal daily diaries which have analogue weather descriptions such as `cloudy' or `sunny'. A recent study has shown the possibility of assimilating coarse weather data using idealized experiments. We further extend this study by assimilating modern weather descriptions similar to diary data in recent periods. The Global Spectral model (GSM) of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is used to reconstruct weather with the Local Ensemble Kalman filter (LETKF). Descriptive data are first converted to model variables such as total cloud cover (TCC), solar radiation and precipitation using empirical relationships. Those variables are then assimilated on a daily basis after adding random errors to consider the uncertainty of actual diary data. The assimilation of downward short wave solar radiation using weather descriptions improves RMSE from 64.3 w/m2 to 33.0 w/m2 and correlation coefficient (R) from 0.5 to 0.8 compared with the case without any

  1. Ionospheric scintillation forecasting model based on NN-PSO technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, M.; Venkata Ratnam, D.; Padma Raju, K.; Sai Praharsha, D.; Saathvika, K.

    2017-09-01

    The forecasting and modeling of ionospheric scintillation effects are crucial for precise satellite positioning and navigation applications. In this paper, a Neural Network model, trained using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, has been implemented for the prediction of amplitude scintillation index (S4) observations. The Global Positioning System (GPS) and Ionosonde data available at Darwin, Australia (12.4634° S, 130.8456° E) during 2013 has been considered. The correlation analysis between GPS S4 and Ionosonde drift velocities (hmf2 and fof2) data has been conducted for forecasting the S4 values. The results indicate that forecasted S4 values closely follow the measured S4 values for both the quiet and disturbed conditions. The outcome of this work will be useful for understanding the ionospheric scintillation phenomena over low latitude regions.

  2. Ionospheric Modeling for Precise GNSS Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Memarzadeh, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop a procedure for modeling and predicting ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) for high precision differential GNSS applications. As the ionosphere is a highly dynamic medium, we believe that to have a reliable procedure it is necessary to transfer

  3. Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With time, ionospheric variation analysis is gaining over lithospheric monitoring in serving precursors for earthquake forecast. The current paper ... Lithospheric disturbances or crust vibrations affecting ionosphere are an established fact .... rupts telecommunication systems leading to signal fadeout or communication gap. 3.

  4. Associating an ionospheric parameter with major earthquake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With time, ionospheric variation analysis is gaining over lithospheric monitoring in serving precursors for earthquake forecast. The current paper highlights the association of major (Ms ≥ 6.0) and medium (4.0 ≤ Ms > 6.0) earthquake occurrences throughout the world in different ranges of the Ionospheric Earthquake ...

  5. Ionospheric Anomaly before Kyushu|Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available GIM data released by IGS is used in the article and a new method of combining the Sliding Time Window Method and the Ionospheric TEC correlation analysis method of adjacent grid points is proposed to study the relationship between pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies and earthquake. By analyzing the abnormal change of TEC in the 5 grid points around the seismic region, the abnormal change of ionospheric TEC is found before the earthquake and the correlation between the TEC sequences of lattice points is significantly affected by earthquake. Based on the analysis of the spatial distribution of TEC anomaly, anomalies of 6 h, 12 h and 6 h were found near the epicenter three days before the earthquake. Finally, ionospheric tomographic technology is used to do tomographic inversion on electron density. And the distribution of the electron density in the ionospheric anomaly is further analyzed.

  6. Engaging Scientists and Educators in the IHY: A Case Study of Stanford's Space Weather Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Burress, B.; Hoeksema, T.

    2007-05-01

    The IHY offers unique opportunities to provide education and public outreach programs throughout the world. The Stanford Solar Center has developed a student-focused space weather monitoring program aimed at developing global understanding of the response of Earth's atmosphere to terrestrial and extraterrestrial drivers. Through our educational component, we hope to inspire the next generation of space and Earth scientists and spread the knowledge of our solar system and the exciting process of scientific exploration to the people of the world! Stanford's Solar Center in conjunction with the Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory and local educators have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitor instruments that students around the world can use to track and study solar- and lightning-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, we are deploying these instruments for student use at high school and early university levels. The distribution includes science resources as well as classroom materials and educator support. A centralized database allows collection of, and free access to, world-wide data. Scientists and radio experts serve as mentors to students, and assist them in understanding their data. We will describe the monitor distribution program, focusing particularly on how we are engaging scientists to participate and on the role of educators, plus the resources provided to them, in high schools and universities throughout the world.

  7. Surface Weather, Signal Service and Weather Bureau

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather, Signal Service and Weather Bureau (SWSSWB) Records primarily created by the United States Army Signal Service from 1819 until the paid and voluntary...

  8. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety During Fire Cleanup Wildfires PSAs Related Links Winter Weather About Winter Weather Before a Storm Prepare Your Home Prepare Your Car Winter Weather Checklists During a Storm Indoor Safety During ...

  9. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  10. Space Weather Monitoring and Forecasting Activity in NICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; T. Murata, Ken

    Disturbances of Space environment around the Earth (geospace) is controlled by the activity of the Sun and the solar wind. Disturbances in geospace sometimes cause serious problems to satellites, astronauts, and telecommunications. To minimize the effect of the problems, space weather forecasting is necessary. In Japan, NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) is in charge of space weather forecasting services as a regional warning center of International Space Environment Service. With help of geospace environment data exchanging among the international cooperation, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide information on nowcasts and forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. For prompt reporting of space weather information, we also conduct our original observation networks from the Sun to the upper atmosphere: Hiraiso solar observatory, domestic ionosonde networks, magnetometer & HF radar observations in far-east Siberia and Alaska, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionospheric network (SEALION). ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) real-time beacon data are received using our antenna facilities to monitor the solar and solar wind conditions in near real-time. Our current activities and future perspective of space weather monitoring and forecasting will be introduced in this report.

  11. The science of space weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Jonathan P

    2008-12-13

    The basic physics underpinning space weather is reviewed, beginning with a brief overview of the main causes of variability in the near-Earth space environment. Although many plasma phenomena contribute to space weather, one of the most important is magnetic reconnection, and recent cutting edge research in this field is reviewed. We then place this research in context by discussing a number of specific types of space weather in more detail. As society inexorably increases its dependence on space, the necessity of predicting and mitigating space weather will become ever more acute. This requires a deep understanding of the complexities inherent in the plasmas that fill space and has prompted the development of a new generation of scientific space missions at the international level.

  12. Whistlers and related ionospheric phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Helliwell, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of whistlers and related phenomena is a key element in studies of very-low-frequency propagation, satellite communication, the outer ionosphere, and solar-terrestrial relationships. This comprehensive text presents a history of the study of the phenomena and includes all the elements necessary for the calculation of the characteristics of whistlers and whistler-mode signals.An introduction and brief history are followed by a summary of the theory of whistlers and a detailed explanation of the calculation of their characteristics. Succeeding chapters offer a complete atlas of

  13. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  14. Ionospheric and satellite observations for studying the dynamic behavior of typhoons and the detection of severe storms and tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves associated with severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, typhoons (hurricanes) and tsunamis can be studied through the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere. Reverse ray tracing computations of acoustic-gravity waves observed by an ionospheric Doppler sounder array show that wave sources are in the nearby storm systems and that the waves are excited prior to the storms. Results show that ionospheric observations, together with satellite observations, can contribute to the understanding of the dynamical behavior of typhoons, severe storms and tsunamis.

  15. INSPIRE Project (IoNospheric Sounding for Pre-seismic anomalies Identification REsearch): Main Results and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Andrzej, K.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Cherniak, I.; Zakharenkova, I.; Rothkaehl, H.; Davidenko, D.

    2017-12-01

    The INSPIRE project is dedicated to the study of physical processes and their effects in ionosphere which could be determined as earthquake precursors together with detailed description of the methodology of ionospheric pre-seismic anomalies definition. It was initiated by ESA and carried out by international consortium. The physical mechanisms of the ionospheric pre-seismic anomalies generation from ground to the ionosphere altitudes were formulated within framework of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Coupling (LAIMC) model (Pulinets et al., 2015). The general algorithm for the identification of the ionospheric precursors was formalized which also takes into account the external Space Weather factors able to generate the false alarms. Importance of the special stable pattern called the "precursor mask" was highlighted which is based on self-similarity of pre-seismic ionospheric variations. The role of expert decision in pre-seismic anomalies interpretation for generation of seismic warning is important as well. The algorithm performance of the LAIMC seismo-ionospheric effect detection module has been demonstrated using the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake as a case study. The results of INSPIRE project have demonstrated that the ionospheric anomalies registered before the strong earthquakes could be used as reliable precursors. The detailed classification of the pre-seismic anomalies was presented in different regions of the ionosphere and signatures of the pre-seismic anomalies as detected by ground and satellite based instruments were described what clarified methodology of the precursor's identification from ionospheric multi-instrumental measurements. Configuration for the dedicated multi-observation experiment and satellite payload was proposed for the future implementation of the INSPIRE project results. In this regard the multi-instrument set can be divided by two groups: space equipment and ground-based support, which could be used for real

  16. Recent Activities on the Embrace Space Weather Regional Warning Center: the New Space Weather Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Mendes, Odim; Batista, Inez S.; SantAnna, Nilson; Gatto, Rubens; Takahashi, Hisao; Costa, D. Joaquim; Banik Padua, Marcelo; Campos Velho, Haroldo

    2016-07-01

    On August 2007 the National Institute for Space Research started a task force to develop and operate a space weather program, which is known by the acronyms Embrace that stands for the Portuguese statement "Estudo e Monitoramento BRAasileiro de Clima Espacial" Program (Brazilian Space Weather Study and Monitoring program). The mission of the Embrace/INPE program is to monitor the Solar-Terrestrial environment, the magnetosphere, the upper atmosphere and the ground induced currents to prevent effects on technological and economic activities. The Embrace/INPE system monitors the physical parameters of the Sun-Earth environment, such as Active Regions (AR) in the Sun and solar radiation by using radio telescope, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) information by satellite and ground-based cosmic ray monitoring, geomagnetic activity by the magnetometer network, and ionospheric disturbance by ionospheric sounders and using data collected by four GPS receiver network, geomagnetic activity by a magnetometer network, and provides a forecasting for Total Electronic Content (TEC) - 24 hours ahead - using a version of the SUPIM model which assimilates the two latter data using nudging approach. Most of these physical parameters are daily published on the Brazilian space weather program web portal, related to the entire network sensors available. Regarding outreach, it has being published a daily bulletin in Portuguese and English with the status of the space weather environment on the Sun, the Interplanetary Medium and close to the Earth. Since December 2011, all these activities are carried out at the Embrace Headquarter, a building located at the INPE's main campus. Recently, a comprehensive data bank and an interface layer are under commissioning to allow an easy and direct access to all the space weather data collected by Embrace through the Embrace web Portal. The information being released encompasses data from: (a) the Embrace Digisonde Network (Embrace DigiNet) that monitors

  17. Ionospheric modification and parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejer, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Thresholds and linear growth rates for stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering and for the parametric decay instability are derived by using arguments of energy transfer. For this purpose an expression for the ponderomotive force is derived. Conditions under which the partial pressure force due to differential dissipation exceeds the ponderomotive force are also discussed. Stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are weakly excited by existing incoherent backscatter radars. The parametric decay instability is strongly excited in ionospheric heating experiments. Saturation theories of the parametric decay instability are therefore described. After a brief discussion of the purely growing instability the effect of using several pumps is discussed as well as the effects of inhomogenicity. Turning to detailed theories of ionospheric heating, artificial spread F is discussed in terms of a purely growing instability where the nonlinearity is due to dissipation. Field-aligned short-scale striations are explained in terms of dissipation of the parametrically excited Langmuir waves (plasma oscillations): they might be further amplified by an explosive instability (except the magnetic equator). Broadband absorption is probably responsible for the 'overshoot' effect: the initially observed level of parametrically excited Langmuir waves is much higher than the steady state level

  18. The Ionospheric Connection Explorer Mission: Mission Goals and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immel, T. J.; England, S. L.; Mende, S. B.; Heelis, R. A.; Englert, C. R.; Edelstein, J.; Frey, H. U.; Korpela, E. J.; Taylor, E. R.; Craig, W. W.; Harris, S. E.; Bester, M.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Gérard, J.-C.; Harlander, J. M.; Huba, J. D.; Hubert, B.; Kamalabadi, F.; Makela, J. J.; Maute, A. I.; Meier, R. R.; Raftery, C.; Rochus, P.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stephan, A. W.; Swenson, G. R.; Frey, S.; Hysell, D. L.; Saito, A.; Rider, K. A.; Sirk, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    The Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, is a new NASA Explorer mission that will explore the boundary between Earth and space to understand the physical connection between our world and our space environment. This connection is made in the ionosphere, which has long been known to exhibit variability associated with the sun and solar wind. However, it has been recognized in the 21st century that equally significant changes in ionospheric conditions are apparently associated with energy and momentum propagating upward from our own atmosphere. ICON's goal is to weigh the competing impacts of these two drivers as they influence our space environment. Here we describe the specific science objectives that address this goal, as well as the means by which they will be achieved. The instruments selected, the overall performance requirements of the science payload and the operational requirements are also described. ICON's development began in 2013 and the mission is on track for launch in 2018. ICON is developed and managed by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, with key contributions from several partner institutions.

  19. C/NOFS Remote Sensing of Ionospheric Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. J.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Martinis, C. R.; Gentile, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Alfvn waves play critical roles in the electrodynamic coupling of plasmas at magnetically conjugate regions in near-Earth space. Associated electric (E*) and magnetic (dec B*) field perturbations sampled by sensors on satellites in low-Earth orbits are generally super positions of incident and reflected waves. However, lack of knowledge about ionospheric reflection coefficients (alpha) hinders understanding of generator outputs and load absorption of Alfvn wave energies. Here we demonstrate a new method for estimating using satellite measurements of ambient E* and dec B* then apply it to a case in which the Communication Navigation Outage Forecasting System (CNOFS) satellite flew conjugate to the field of view of a 630.0 nm all-sky imager at El Leoncito, Argentina, while medium-scale traveling ionosphere disturbances were detected in its field of view. In regions of relatively large amplitudes of E* and B*,calculated values ranged between 0.67 and 0.88. This implies that due to impedance mismatches, the generator ionosphere puts out significantly more electromagnetic energy than the load can absorb. Our analysis also uncovered caveats concerning the methods range of applicability in regions of low E* and B*. The method can be validated in future satellite-based auroral studies where energetic particle precipitation fluxes can be used to make independent estimates of alpha.

  20. Climatology of the Ionospheric Scintillations over the Auroral and Cusp European Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spogli, L.; Alfonsi, L.; de Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.; Aquino, M.; Dodson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Under perturbed conditions coming from the outer space, the ionosphere may become highly turbulent and small scale (from centimeters to meters) irregularities, typically enhancements or depletions of the electron density embedded in the ambient ionosphere, can form causing diffraction effects on the satellites signals passing through them. Such effect can abruptly corrupt the performance of the positioning systems affecting, in turn, the awareness and safety of the modern devices. In this paper we analyze data of ionospheric scintillation in the latitudinal range 57°- 88° N during the period October, November and December 2003 as a first step to develop a "scintillation climatology" over the Northern Europe. The behavior of the scintillation occurrence as function of the magnetic local time and of the corrected magnetic latitude is investigated to characterize the scintillation conditions. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG) of the University of Nottingham manage the same kind of GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC monitor) receivers over the European middle and high latitude regions. The results here shown and obtained merging observations from three GISTM, highlight also the possibility to investigate the dynamics of irregularities causing scintillation by combining the information coming from auroral to cusp latitudes. The findings, even if at a very preliminary stage, are here presented also in the frame of possible Space Weather implications.

  1. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field. The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km−1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981.

  2. The Equatorial Scintillations and Space Weather Effects on its Generation during Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktash, Lilia

    Great diversity of the ionospheric phenomena leads to a variety of irregularity types with spatial size from many thousands of kilometers to few centimeters and lifetimes from days to fractions of second. Since the ionosphere strongly influences the propagation of radio waves, signal distortions caused by these irregularities affect short-wave transmissions on Earth, transiono-spheric satellite communications and navigation. In this work the solar wind and the equatorial ionosphere parameters, Kp, Dst, AU, AL indices characterized contribution of different mag-netospheric and ionospheric currents to the H-component of geomagnetic field are examined to test the space weather effect on the generation of ionospheric irregularities producing VLF scintillations. According to the results of the current statistical studies, one can predict scintil-lations from Aarons' criteria using the Dst index, which mainly depicts the magnetospheric ring current field. To amplify Aarons' criteria or to propose new criteria for predicting scintillation characteristics is the question. In the present phase of the experimental investigations of elec-tron density irregularities in the ionosphere new ways are opened up because observations in the interaction between the solar wind -magnetosphere -ionosphere during magnetic storms have progressed greatly. We have examined scintillation relation to magnetospheric and ionospheric currents and show that the factor, which presents during magnetic storms to fully inhibit scin-tillation, is the positive Bz-component of the IMF. During the positive Bz IMF F layer cannot raise altitude where scintillations are formed. The auroral indices and Kp do better for the prediction of the ionospheric scintillations at the equator. The interplanetary magnetic field data and models can be used to explain the relationship between the equatorial ionospheric parameters, h'F, foF2, and the equatorial geomagnetic variations with the polar ionosphere cur-rents and

  3. The SWENET Online Archive: 10 Years of a European Space Weather Community Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Hannah; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain; Beltrami, Pablo; Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Amata, Ermanno; Clarke, Ellen

    The SWENET archive was initially developed as part of the ESA Space Weather Applications Pilot Project, starting in 2003. The Pilot Project supported the development of a network of prototype space weather services, many of which are still active and have been developed further in the intervening time. SWENET was established as the common access portal and data repository for these services, providing a series of analysis tools and added functionalities to both service developers and users. SWENET gives users access to a wealth of space weather data and products that cover ground, Ionospheric and spacecraft effects. The archive has stored information since 2003 and currently houses a large amount of data from ~20 different providers. As part of the initial SWENET development a set of preliminary metrics, or index quality statistics, were provided as an additional service via the SWENET web portal. The objective of this project is to review the database and revisit the existing metrics with a view to assessing the performance of a number of the original prototype services. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these forecasts ensures a reliable service to the end user. As an initial case study, we have selected two services which forecast geomagnetic indices and/or data for analysis, namely the BINCASTS and GIFINT (Dst forecast). We have assessed the corresponding data in the SWENET archive using a selection of metrics that are currently in use by the space weather and meteorology community. Appropriate metrics to each service have been used to compare the model performance to actual observations, helping to identify and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each model.

  4. Ionospheric Anomalies of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake with Multiple Observations during Magnetic Storm Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    Ionospheric anomalies linked with devastating earthquakes have been widely investigated by scientists. It was confirmed that GNSS TECs suffered from drastically increase or decrease in some diurnal periods prior to the earthquakes. Liu et al (2008) applied a TECs anomaly calculation method to analyze M>=5.9 earthquakes in Indonesia and found TECs decadence within 2-7 days prior to the earthquakes. Nevertheless, strong TECs enhancement was observed before M8.0 Wenchuan earthquake (Zhao et al 2008). Moreover, the ionospheric plasma critical frequency (foF2) has been found diminished before big earthquakes (Pulinets et al 1998; Liu et al 2006). But little has been done regarding ionospheric irregularities and its association with earthquake. Still it is difficult to understand real mechanism between ionospheric anomalies activities and its precursor for the huge earthquakes. The M9.0 Tohoku earthquake, happened on 11 March 2011, at 05:46 UT time, was recognized as one of the most dominant events in related research field (Liu et al 2011). A median geomagnetic disturbance also occurred accompanied with the earthquake, which makes the ionospheric anomalies activities more sophisticated to study. Seismic-ionospheric disturbance was observed due to the drastic activities of earth. To further address the phenomenon, this paper investigates different categories of ionospheric anomalies induced by seismology activity, with multiple data sources. Several GNSS ground data were chosen along epicenter from IGS stations, to discuss the spatial-temporal correlations of ionospheric TECs in regard to the distance of epicenter. We also apply GIM TEC maps due to its global coverage to find diurnal differences of ionospheric anomalies compared with geomagnetic quiet day in the same month. The results in accordance with Liu's conclusions that TECs depletion occurred at days quite near the earthquake day, however the variation of TECs has special regulation contrast to the normal quiet

  5. Ranking ICME's efficiency for geomagnetic and ionospheric storms and risk of false alarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.

    2017-11-01

    A statistical analysis is undertaken on ICME's efficiency in producing the geomagnetic and ionospheric storms. The mutually-consistent thresholds for the intense, moderate and weak space weather storms and quiet conditions are introduced with an analytical model based on relations between the equatorial Dst index and geomagnetic indices AE, aa, ap, ap(τ) and the ionospheric Vσ indices. The ionosphere variability Vσ index is expressed in terms of the total electron content (TEC) deviation from the -15-day sliding median normalized by the standard deviation for the 15 preceding days. The intensity of global positive ionospheric storm, Vσp, and negative storm, Vσn, is represented by the relative density of anomalous ±Vσ index occurrence derived from the global ionospheric maps GIM-TEC for 1999-2016. An impact of total 421 ICME events for 1999-2016 on the geomagnetic and ionospheric storms expressed by AE, Dst, aa, ap, ap(τ), Vσp, Vσn indices and their superposition is analyzed using ICME catalogue by Richardson and Cane (2010) during 24 h after the ICME start time t0. Hierarchy of efficiency of ICME → storm relation is established. The ICMEs have a higher probability (22-25%) to be followed by the intense ionospheric and auroral electrojet storms at global and high latitudes as compared to the intense storms at middle and low latitudes (18-20%) and to moderate and weak storms at high latitudes (5-17%). At the same time ICMEs are more effective in producing the moderate storms (24-28%) at the middle and low latitudes as compared to the intense and weak storms at these latitudes (13-22%) and to moderate storms at high latitudes (8-17%). The remaining cases when quiet conditions are observed after ICMEs present higher chance for a false alarm. The risk factor for a false alarm can vary from 18% if the superposition of all indices is considered, to 51-64% for individual AE, Vσp and Vσn indices. The analysis indicates that the mutually-consistent thresholds

  6. Local ionospheric corrections derived from GNSS - A case study with TerraSAR-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisinger, Christoph; Balss, Ulrich; Cong, Xiao Ying; Steigenberger, Peter; Eineder, Michael; Pail, Roland; Hugentobler, Urs

    2013-04-01

    Germany's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X belong to the latest generation of radar satellites which have moved radar remote sensing to a new level. Besides being an all weather and all day imaging system, radar remote sensing offers various advanced methods like SAR interferometry or persistent scatterer interferometry that exploit magnitude and phase information of the radar signal. In order to achieve centimeter to millimeter accuracy with these advanced methods, all occurring error contributions (internal signal delay, orbit, troposphere, ionosphere, solid earth tides, loading effects, ...) have to be taken into account by applying appropriate corrections. Within the project DLR@Uni funded by the German Helmholtz Association HGF, an experimental framework at Wettzell station has been set up to perform a detailed analysis of all the corrections required for high resolution radar satellites and to achieve the goal of a 1cm precision level for absolute radar coordinates. This framework involves a 1.5 meter corner reflector (CR), a 1.5 year series of data takes from TerraSAR-X, and it makes use of the multi-sensor environment of Wettzell station. Besides Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) for orbit assessment and the local geodetic network to control the CR reference coordinates, the Wettzell GNSS receivers are used for generating tropospheric and ionospheric corrections. By comparing the reference radar times (range and azimuth) available from geodetic survey with those from the TerraSAR-X data takes, the quality of the corrections can be investigated. Although often being considered negligible for X-band observations, the conducted experiment has clearly shown the necessity for ionospheric corrections, if the capabilities of current SAR satellites are to be fully exploited. For every TerraSAR-X data take, the ionospheric impact was derived from the geometry-free linear combination of the GNSS measurements and modeled in terms of

  7. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. II: Regional Ionospheric Modelling using GPS and GLONASS to Estimate Ionospheric Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B. S.; Morgan, J.; Ord, S. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Bell, M.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Hancock, P.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple Global Positioning System stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory. In previous work, the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array. Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System stations than is currently available at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory.

  8. Seasonal ionospheric scintillation analysis during increasing solar activity at mid-latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wasiu Akande; Wu, Falin; Agbaje, Ganiyu Ishola; Ednofri, Ednofri; Marlia, Dessi; Zhao, Yan

    2017-09-01

    Monitoring of ionospheric parameters (such as Total Electron Content and scintillation) is of great importance as it affects and contributes to the errors encountered by radio signals. It thus requires constant measurements to avoid disastrous situation for space agencies, parastatals and departments that employ GNSS applications in their daily operations. The research objective is to have a better understanding of the behaviour of ionospheric scintillation at midlatitude as it threatens the performances of satellite communication, navigation systems and military operations. This paper adopts seasonal ionospheric scintillation scenario. The mid-latitude investigation of ionospheric effect of scintillation was conducted during the increasing solar activity from 2011-2015. Ionospheric scintillation data were obtained from four ionospheric monitoring stations located at mid-latitude (i.e Shenzhen North Station, Beijing Changping North Station Branch, Beijing North Station and Beijing Miyun ground Station). The data was collected from January 2011 to December 2015. There were absence of data due to software problem or system failure at some locations. The scintillation phenomenon was computed using Global Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitoring Model. There are four seasons which existed in China namely: Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. The relationship between TEC, amplitude and phase scintillation were observed for each of these seasons. The results indicated that the weak amplitude scintillation was observed as against phase scintillation which was high. Phase scintillation was gradually enhanced from 2011 to 2012 and later declined till 2014. TEC was also at peak around 00:00-10:00 UT (08:00-18:00 LT). The seasonal events temporal density characteristics comply with solar cycle prediction as such it ascended from 2011 to 2013 and then scintillation parameters declined significantly afterwards.

  9. Estimating Parameters for the Earth-Ionosphere Waveguide Using VLF Narrowband Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. C.; Cohen, M.

    2017-12-01

    Estimating the D-region (60 to 90 km altitude) ionospheric electron density profile has always been a challenge. The D-region's altitude is too high for aircraft and balloons to reach but is too low for satellites to orbit at. Sounding rocket measurements have been a useful tool for directly measuring the ionosphere, however, these types of measurements are infrequent and costly. A more sustainable type of measurement, for characterizing the D-region, is remote sensing with very low frequency (VLF) waves. Both the lower ionosphere and Earth's ground strongly reflect VLF waves. These two spherical reflectors form what is known as the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. As VLF waves propagate within the waveguide, they interact with the D-region ionosphere, causing amplitude and phase changes that are polarization dependent. These changes can be monitored with a spatially distributed array of receivers and D-region properties can be inferred from these measurements. Researchers have previously used VLF remote sensing techniques, from either narrowband transmitters or sferics, to estimate the density profile, but these estimations are typically during a short time frame and over a narrow propagation region. We report on an effort to improve the understanding of VLF wave propagation by estimating the commonly known h' and beta two parameter exponential electron density profile. Measurements from multiple narrowband transmitters at multiple receivers are taken, concurrently, and input into an algorithm. The cornerstone of the algorithm is an artificial neural network (ANN), where input values are the received narrowband amplitude and phase and the outputs are the estimated h' and beta parameters. Training data for the ANN is generated using the Navy's Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) model. Emphasis is placed on profiling the daytime ionosphere, which has a more stable and predictable profile than the nighttime. Daytime ionospheric disturbances, from high solar

  10. The Challenge of Weather Prediction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weather and climate prediction. His interests include understanding variability and predictability of all tropical phenomena including the monsoon. B N Goswami .... change the global average annual mean surface temperature Ts' the external solar forcing ..... Colombia, Toronto, London, Sydney. p 532, 1981. •. A Miller, J C ...

  11. The Challenge of Weather Prediction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B N Goswami is with the. Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the Indian Institute of. Science, Bangalore. After his PhD in Plasma Physics he was attracted to this field by the challenges in weather and climate prediction. His interests include understanding variability and predictability of all tropical phenomena.

  12. Characteristics of layers, waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and ionosphere as estimated by GPS space radio-holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, Alexander; Gubenko, Vladimir; Matyugov, Stanislav; Pavelyev, Alexey

    The spatial, seasonal and geographical distrubutions of the intensity of layers, turbulence and internal waves at different altitudes in the atmosphere and ionosphere of the Earth are presented. The results have been obtained on the base of locality principle using a new phase acceleration-intensity method for analysis of the GPS radio occultation signals. This methodology has been applied to mesearements of the inclination and altitude of ionospheric layers. Obtained information has been used for estimation of the front orientation, internal frequency and phase speed of the internal waves in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A new index of the ionospheric activity as measured from the phase of radio waves passed through the ionosphere is introduced and its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the significant influence of ionospheric layers on variations of characteristics of radio waves in transionospheric communication links. Specially for the troposphere the geographical distribution of the weak total absorption (about of 1-2 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies in the Earth atmosphere corresponding to influence of the oxygen and water vapor in the troposphere is measured with accuracy better than 0.1 db. Obtained results expanded the applicable domain of the GPS space radio-holography for global investigation of the natural processes in the atmosphere and ionosphere as function of solar activity and space weather effects. The new phase acceleration-intensity method is also a basic tool which can be applied for data analysis of future planetary radio occultation missions

  13. Ionosphere dynamics over the Southern Hemisphere during the 31 March 2001 severe magnetic storm using multi-instrument measurement data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yizengaw

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the 31 March 2001 severe magnetic storm on the Southern Hemisphere ionosphere have been studied using ground-based and satellite measurements. The prime goal of this comprehensive study is to track the ionospheric response from high-to-low latitude to obtain a clear understanding of storm-time ionospheric change. The study uses a combination of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC obtained from GPS signal group delay and phase advance measurements, ionosonde data, and data from satellite in-situ measurements, such as the Defense Metrological Satellite Program (DMSP, TOPographic EXplorer (TOPEX, and solar wind data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE. A chain of Global Positioning System (GPS stations near the 150° E meridian has been used to give comprehensive latitude coverage extending from the cusp to the equatorial region. A tomographic inversion algorithm has been applied to the GPS TEC measurements to obtain maps of the latitudinal structure of the ionospheric during this severe magnetic storm period, enabling both the spatial and temporal response of the ionosphere to be studied. Analysis of data from several of the instruments indicates that a strong density enhancement occurred at mid-latitudes at 11:00 UT on 31 March 2001 and was followed by equatorward propagating large-scale Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs. The tomographic reconstruction revealed important features in ionospheric structure, such as quasi-wave formations extending finger-like to higher altitudes. The most pronounced ionospheric effects of the storm occurred at high- and mid-latitudes, where strong positive disturbances occurred during the storm main phase, followed by a long lasting negative storm effect during the recovery phase. Relatively minor storm effects occurred in the equatorial region.

  14. On the Ionospheric Holes of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G.; Fedorov, A.; Futaana, Y.; Masunaga, K.; Hartle, R. E.; Stenberg, G.; Budnik, E.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Holmstrom, M.; andre, N.; Barabash, S. V.; Zhang, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most intriguing unsolved mysteries that endures from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter is that of ~1000km wide ``Holes" in the nightside Ionosphere. The phenomena remains unexplained, despite their frequent observation during the first three years of the mission, and more than thirty years having elapsed since their first description in the literature. We present new observations by the ESA Venus Express of Ionospheric Holes at very high altitudes, providing us with the opportunity to study this fascinating phenomena with modern instrumentation. We discuss the insight that these new data give us into the effect of Ionospheric Holes on atmospheric escape, and the evidence that suggests that Ionospheric Holes are due to an internal planetary magnetic field.

  15. Intense Harmonic Emissions Observed in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Kurth, W. S.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Ye, S.-Y.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Hadid, L. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's first Grand Finale orbit was carried out in April 2017. This set of 22 orbits had an inclination of 63° with a periapsis grazing Saturn's ionosphere, thus providing unprecedented coverage and proximity to the planet. Cassini's Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument repeatedly detected intense electrostatic waves and their harmonics near closest approach in the dayside equatorial topside ionosphere. The fundamental modes were found to both scale and trend best with the H+ plasma or lower hybrid frequencies, depending on the plasma composition considered. The fine-structured harmonics are unlike previous observations, which scale with cyclotron frequencies. We explore their generation mechanism and show strong evidence of their association with whistler mode waves, consistent with theory. The possibility of Cassini's presence in the ionosphere influencing the resonance and harmonics is discussed. Given their link to the lower hybrid frequency, these emissions may offer clues to constraining Saturn's ionospheric properties.

  16. Ionospheric Oblique Incidence Soundings by Satellites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The oblique incidence sweep-frequency ionospheric sounding technique uses the same principle of operation as the vertical incidence sounder. The primary difference...

  17. SHOCK WAVE IN IONOSPHERE DURING EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kuznetsov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud

  18. CDDIS_GNSS_products_ionosphere_predicted

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionosphere Total Electron Content (TEC) grids derived from analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data. These products are the generated by analysis...

  19. CDDIS_GNSS_products_ionosphere_rapid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionosphere Total Electron Content (TEC) grids derived from analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data. These products are the generated by analysis...

  20. A spatial analysis of the ionospheric TEC anomalies prior to M7.0+ earthquakes during 2003-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fuying; Lin, Jian; Su, Fanfan; Zhou, Yiyan

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, by using the global navigation satellite system total electron content (GNSS TEC), we conducted a statistical study on the spatial distribution of the seismo-ionospheric precursors (SIPs) before the occurrence of 133 shallow earthquakes of magnitude M ⩾ 7.0 in the global area during 2003-2014. To exclude the effect of space weather and geomagnetic disturbance, we considered the variations in the geomagnetic Dst indices, Kp indices, and the F10.7 indices; the GNSS TEC over the regions of ±10° near the epicenters is then investigated, and the spatial distribution of ionospheric TEC anomalies 0-15 days before the earthquakes is reported for the first time. We also statistically analyzed and compared the counts of the TEC anomalies over the epicenters in the eastern, southern, western, and northern directions 0-15 days prior to the earthquakes. Results show that the maximum occurrence number of ionospheric TEC negative anomalies specially appears over the epicenters and the anomalous behaviors of the ionospheric TEC attenuate slightly with the distance to the epicenters. However, the ionospheric TEC positive anomalies in the western direction have the biggest chance of occurring. Finally, the spatial distribution characteristics of the observed SIPs are explained by the electric-field-coupling model.

  1. Digital processing of ionospheric electron content data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ionospheric electron content data contain periodicities that are produced by a diversity of sources including hydromagnetic waves, gravity waves, and lunar tides. Often these periodicities are masked by the strong daily variation in the data. Digital filtering can be used to isolate the weaker components. The filtered data can then be further processed to provide estimates of the source properties. In addition, homomorphic filtering may be used to identify nonlinear interactions in the ionosphere.

  2. Ionospheric disturbances under low solar activity conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Laštovička, Jan; Hejda, Pavel; Bochníček, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2014), s. 185-196 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1908 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : ionosphere * solar minimum * magnetic storms * ionospheric variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology; DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2014 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S027311771400221X

  3. LIFDAR: A Diagnostic Tool for the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, O. E.; Rodgers, C. T.; Batholomew, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    ITT Corporation proposes a novel system to measure and monitor the ion species within the Earth's ionosphere called Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection and Ranging (LIFDAR). Unlike current ionosphere measurements that detect electrons and magnetic field, LIFDAR remotely measures the major contributing ion species to the electron plasma. The LIFDAR dataset has the added capability to demonstrate stratification and classification of the layers of the ionosphere to ultimately give a true tomographic view. We propose a proof of concept study using existing atmospheric LIDAR sensors combined with a mountaintop observatory for a single ion species that is prevalent in all layers of the atmosphere. We envision the LIFDAR concept will enable verification, validation, and exploration of the physics of the magneto-hydrodynamic models used in ionosphere forecasting community. The LIFDAR dataset will provide the necessary ion and electron density data for the system wide data gap. To begin a proof of concept, we present the science justification of the LIFDAR system based on the model photon budget. This analysis is based on the fluorescence of ionized oxygen within the ionosphere versus altitude. We use existing model abundance data of the ionosphere during normal and perturbed states. We propagate the photon uncertainties from the laser source through the atmosphere to the plasma and back to the collecting optics and detector. We calculate the expected photon budget to determine signal to noise estimates based on the targeted altitude and detection efficiency. Finally, we use these results to derive a LIFDAR observation strategy compatible with operational parameters.

  4. Space Weather: The Solar Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenn, Rainer

    2006-08-01

    The term space weather refers to conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and that can affect human life and health. Our modern hi-tech society has become increasingly vulnerable to disturbances from outside the Earth system, in particular to those initiated by explosive events on the Sun: Flares release flashes of radiation that can heat up the terrestrial atmosphere such that satellites are slowed down and drop into lower orbits, solar energetic particles accelerated to near-relativistic energies may endanger astronauts traveling through interplanetary space, and coronal mass ejections are gigantic clouds of ionized gas ejected into interplanetary space that after a few hours or days may hit the Earth and cause geomagnetic storms. In this review, I describe the several chains of actions originating in our parent star, the Sun, that affect Earth, with particular attention to the solar phenomena and the subsequent effects in interplanetary space.

  5. Space Weather: The Solar Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwenn Rainer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The term space weather refers to conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and that can affect human life and health. Our modern hi-tech society has become increasingly vulnerable to disturbances from outside the Earth system, in particular to those initiated by explosive events on the Sun: Flares release flashes of radiation that can heat up the terrestrial atmosphere such that satellites are slowed down and drop into lower orbits, solar energetic particles accelerated to near-relativistic energies may endanger astronauts traveling through interplanetary space, and coronal mass ejections are gigantic clouds of ionized gas ejected into interplanetary space that after a few hours or days may hit the Earth and cause geomagnetic storms. In this review, I describe the several chains of actions originating in our parent star, the Sun, that affect Earth, with particular attention to the solar phenomena and the subsequent effects in interplanetary space.

  6. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States); MacDonald, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  7. Progress toward forecasting of space weather effects on UHF SATCOM after Operation Anaconda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael A.; Comberiate, Joseph M.; Miller, Ethan S.; Paxton, Larry J.

    2014-10-01

    Space weather impacts on communications are often presented as a raison d'etre for studying space weather (e.g., Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society, 2013). Here we consider a communications outage during Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan that may have been related to ionospheric disturbances. Early military operations occurred during the peak of solar cycle 23 when ionospheric variability was enhanced. During Operation Anaconda, the Battle of Takur Ghar occurred at the summit of a 3191 m Afghan mountaintop on 4 March 2002 when the ionosphere was disturbed and could have affected UHF Satellite Communications (SATCOM). In this paper, we consider UHF SATCOM outages that occurred during repeated attempts to notify a Quick Reaction Force (QRF) on board an MH-47H Chinook to avoid a "hot" landing zone at the top of Takur Ghar. During a subsequent analysis of Operation Anaconda, these outages were attributed to poor performance of the UHF radios on the helicopters and to blockage by terrain. However, it is also possible that ionospheric anomalies together with multipath effects could have combined to decrease the signal-to-noise ratio of the communication links used by the QRF. A forensics study of Takur Ghar with data from the Global Ultraviolet Imager on the NASA Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics mission showed the presence of ionospheric bubbles (regions of depleted electron density) along the line of sight between the Chinook and the UHF communications satellites in geostationary orbit that could have impacted communications. The events of 4 March 2002 motivated us to develop the Mesoscale Ionospheric Simulation Testbed model, which can be used to improve warnings of potential UHF outages during future military operations.

  8. Characterizing the Meso-scale Plasma Flows in Earth's Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielse, C.; Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Gallardo-Lacourt, B.; Deng, Y.; McWilliams, K. A.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Heliophysics Decadal Survey put forth several imperative, Key Science Goals. The second goal communicates the urgent need to "Determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and atmosphere and their response to solar and terrestrial inputs...over a range of spatial and temporal scales." Sun-Earth connections (called Space Weather) have strong societal impacts because extreme events can disturb radio communications and satellite operations. The field's current modeling capabilities of such Space Weather phenomena include large-scale, global responses of the Earth's upper atmosphere to various inputs from the Sun, but the meso-scale ( 50-500 km) structures that are much more dynamic and powerful in the coupled system remain uncharacterized. Their influences are thus far poorly understood. We aim to quantify such structures, particularly auroral flows and streamers, in order to create an empirical model of their size, location, speed, and orientation based on activity level (AL index), season, solar cycle (F10.7), interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) inputs, etc. We present a statistical study of meso-scale flow channels in the nightside auroral oval and polar cap using SuperDARN. These results are used to inform global models such as the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) in order to evaluate the role of meso-scale disturbances on the fully coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. Measuring the ionospheric footpoint of magnetospheric fast flows, our analysis technique from the ground also provides a 2D picture of flows and their characteristics during different activity levels that spacecraft alone cannot.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN IONOSPHERIC TEC ANOMALY VARIATIONS AND FAULT TYPES BEFORE THE EARTHQUAKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ulukavak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are natural phenomena that shake the earth and cause many damage. Since the time of arrival of the earthquakes cannot be determined directly, some signs before the earthquake should be examined and interpreted by examining the environmental changes. One of the methods used for this is monitoring the ionospheric total electron content (TEC changes in total electron content unit (TECU. GPS satellites have begun to be used as a means of monitoring ionospheric TEC anomalies before earthquakes since they began to be used as sensors around the world. In this study, three fault type (normal, thrust and strike-slip faulting of 28 earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 7 (Mw and the percentage changes of TEC anomalies before the earthquakes were investigated. The ionospheric TEC anomalies before the earthquake were calculated according to the 15-day running median statistical analysis method. Different solar and geomagnetic indices have been investigated to determine the active space weather conditions and quiet days before and after the earthquake. The TEC anomalies were determined during the quiet days before the earthquake by comparing the ionospheric anomalies that occurred before the earthquake after the determination of quiet days with the indices of the space weather conditions. The results show that there is a relationship between fault type and the earthquake precursor percentage changes and were determined as 47.6 % TECU for regions where normal faulting, 50.4 % TECU for regions where thrust faulting, and 44.2 % TECU for regions where strike-slip faulting occurred, respectively.

  10. Investigation of the Relationship Between Ionospheric TEC Anomaly Variations and Fault Types Before the Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukavak, M.; Yalçınkaya, M.

    2017-11-01

    Earthquakes are natural phenomena that shake the earth and cause many damage. Since the time of arrival of the earthquakes cannot be determined directly, some signs before the earthquake should be examined and interpreted by examining the environmental changes. One of the methods used for this is monitoring the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) changes in total electron content unit (TECU). GPS satellites have begun to be used as a means of monitoring ionospheric TEC anomalies before earthquakes since they began to be used as sensors around the world. In this study, three fault type (normal, thrust and strike-slip faulting) of 28 earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 7 (Mw) and the percentage changes of TEC anomalies before the earthquakes were investigated. The ionospheric TEC anomalies before the earthquake were calculated according to the 15-day running median statistical analysis method. Different solar and geomagnetic indices have been investigated to determine the active space weather conditions and quiet days before and after the earthquake. The TEC anomalies were determined during the quiet days before the earthquake by comparing the ionospheric anomalies that occurred before the earthquake after the determination of quiet days with the indices of the space weather conditions. The results show that there is a relationship between fault type and the earthquake precursor percentage changes and were determined as 47.6 % TECU for regions where normal faulting, 50.4 % TECU for regions where thrust faulting, and 44.2 % TECU for regions where strike-slip faulting occurred, respectively.

  11. Sub-ionospheric VLF signal anomaly due to geomagnetic storms: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tatsuta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate quantitatively the effect of geomagnetic storms on the sub-ionospheric VLF/LF (Very Low Frequency/Low Frequency propagations for different latitudes based on 2-year nighttime data from Japanese VLF/LF observation network. Three statistical parameters such as average signal amplitude, variability of the signal amplitude, and nighttime fluctuation were calculated daily for 2 years for 16–21 independent VLF/LF transmitter–receiver propagation paths consisting of three transmitters and seven receiving stations. These propagation paths are suitable to simultaneously study high-latitude, low-mid-latitude and mid-latitude D/E-region ionospheric properties. We found that these three statistical parameters indicate significant anomalies exceeding at least 2 times of their standard deviation from the mean value during the geomagnetic storm time period in the high-latitude paths with an occurrence rate of anomaly between 40 and 50 % presumably due to the auroral energetic electron precipitation. The mid-latitude and low-mid-latitude paths have a smaller influence from the geomagnetic activity because of a lower occurrence rate of anomalies even during the geomagnetically active time period (from 20 to 30 %. The anomalies except geomagnetic storm periods may be caused by atmospheric and/or lithospheric origins. The statistical occurrence rates of ionospheric anomalies for different latitudinal paths during geomagnetic storm and non-storm time periods are basic and important information not only to identify the space weather effects toward the lower ionosphere depending on the latitudes but also to separate various external physical causes of lower ionospheric disturbances.

  12. Effect of small-scale ionospheric variability on GNSS radio occultation data quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Mannucci, A. J.; Ao, C. O.; Iijima, B. A.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2015-09-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) measurements are sensitive to thin ionization layers and small-scale ionosphere structures. To evaluate error bounds and possible biases in atmospheric retrievals, we characterized ionospheric irregularities encountered in the affected profiles by analyzing the L1 signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variability at E layer altitudes (from 90 km to 130 km). New metrics to analyze statistical effects of small-scale ionospheric irregularities on refractivity retrievals are proposed. We analyzed refractivity (N) retrievals with Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) ROs in 2011. Using refractivity from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis (NECMWF) as the reference data set, we studied statistical properties of the fractional refractivity bias (ΔN) defined by the difference (NECMWF - N)/NECMWF and averaged in the altitude range from 20 to 25 km for each individual profile. We found that (1) persistently larger variability of the L1 SNR as measured by the interquartile range (IQR) existed when the occultation tangent point was in the 90 km to 110 km altitude range than at higher E layer altitudes; (2) the upper limits on the fractional refractivity bias for COSMIC ROs are 0.06% (for daytime local time), 0.1% (for nighttime local time), and ~0.01% (for all local times); (3) distributions of ΔN are non-Gaussian (leptokurtic); (4) latitudinal distributions of small and large ΔN for different levels of ionospheric variability show large tails (NECMWF > N) occurring around the Himalaya and the Andes regions, which are possibly due to biases in ECMWF analysis. We conclude that the refractivity bias due to small-scale irregularities is small below 25 km altitude and can be neglected.

  13. Space Weather opportunities from the Swarm mission including near real time applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Floberghagen, Rune; Luehr, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    observations of the solar and interplanetary conditions. New opportunities lie in the implementation of in-situ observations of the ionosphere and upper atmosphere onboard low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites. The multi-satellite mission Swarm is equipped with several instruments which will observe...... electromagnetic and atmospheric parameters of the near Earth space environment. Taking advantage of the multi-disciplinary measurements and the mission constellation different Swarm products have been defined or demonstrate great potential for further development of novel space weather products. Examples...... these products in timely manner will add significant value in monitoring present space weather and helping to predict the evolution of several magnetic and ionospheric events. Swarm will be a demonstrator mission for the valuable application of LEO satellite observations for space weather monitoring tools....

  14. Electric field penetration into the ionosphere in the presence of anomalous radon emanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong; Zhang, Hanlu; Hu, Yanli; Wu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The scientists came to consensus that electric field driven mechanism is more probable to explain ionospheric anomalies before earthquakes than the acoustic-driven mechanism (Pulients and Davidenko, 2014), and it is essential to understand how a vertical electric field from the ground penetrates into the ionosphere. Anomalous radon emanation in the epicentral area is believed to change the atmospheric electrical conditions. Considering the effect of radon emanation on atmospheric conductivity, the electric potential equation is established and solved numerically in the presence of a vertical electric field of 1 kV/m on the ground. The results show that radon emanation can strengthen atmospheric conductivity, as a consequence, the resulting electric field is increased by about 60% in the daytime ionosphere. However, the resulting electric field in the ionosphere is very weak (only about 0.3 μV/m), which implies that the penetration of vertical electric field of 1 kV/m in the seismic area is unlikely to produce daytime ionospheric anomalies before earthquakes.

  15. Possible ionospheric preconditioning by shear flow leading to equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical shear in the zonal plasma drift speed is apparent in incoherent and coherent scatter radar observations of the bottomside F region ionosphere made at Jicamarca from about 1600–2200 LT. The relative importance of the factors controlling the shear, which include competition between the E and F region dynamos as well as vertical currents driven in the E and F regions at the dip equator, is presently unknown. Bottom-type scattering layers arise in strata where the neutral and plasma drifts differ widely, and periodic structuring of irregularities within the layers is telltale of intermediate-scale waves in the bottomside. These precursor waves appear to be able to seed ionospheric interchange instabilities and initiate full-blown equatorial spread F. The seed or precursor waves may be generated by a collisional shear instability. However, assessing the viability of shear instability requires measurements of the same parameters needed to understand shear flow quantitatively - thermospheric neutral wind and off-equatorial conductivity profiles. Keywords. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities – Space plasma physics (Waves and instabilities

  16. Improving the Nightside Mid-latitude Ionospheric Density in the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The ionosphere and plasmasphere interact with each other through upwelling of plasma into the plasmasphere during the day and downwelling of the plasma into the ionosphere during the night. The storage of ion density in the plasmasphere and subsequent downwelling maintains the ion density in the nighttime mid-latitude ionosphere. Global models of the upper atmosphere that do not contain a plasmasphere, but are limited in altitude, such as the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics Global Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model(GITM) need a boundary condition that allows for some sort of downwelling to occur. In the TIEGCM, this has been set to a constant downward flux, while GITM has had no downwelling specification at all, which has caused the nighttime mid-latitude densities to be much too low. We present a new boundary condition in GITM, where there is downward ion flux from the upper boundary, allowing the ionosphere to be maintained during the night. This new boundary condition is dependent on the the Disturbance Storm Time (Dst), since, as the activity level increases (i.e., Dst decreases), the plasmasphere is eroded and will not serve to supply the ionosphere at night. Various quiet time and active time comparisons to ionosonde electron density and total electron content data will be presented that show that the ionospheric density in GITM is improved due to this new boundary condition.

  17. Analysis of Ionospheric Scintillation Characteristics in Sub-Antarctica Region with GNSS Data at Macquarie Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jinling

    2017-01-12

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective medium to study characteristics of scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation varies greatly in relation with temporal and spatial distribution. In this paper, both temporal and spatial characteristics of scintillation are investigated based on Macquarie Island's GNSS scintillation data collected from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that occurrence rates of amplitude scintillation have a close relationship with solar activity, while phase scintillation is more likely to be generated by geomagnetic activity. In addition, scintillation distribution behaviors related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed for both amplitude and phase scintillation. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of ionospheric scintillation in this region, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions around sub-Antarctica.

  18. A review of atmospheric gravity waves and travelling ionospheric disturbances: 1982-1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW and travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID in the Earth\\'s thermosphere and ionosphere are reviewed. In the past decade, the generation of gravity waves at high latitudes and their subsequent propagation to low latitudes have been studied by several global model simulations and coordinated observation campaigns such as the Worldwide Atmospheric Gravity-wave Study (WAGS, the results are presented in the first part of the review. The second part describes the progress towards understanding the AGW/TID characteristics. It points to the AGW/TID relationship which has been recently revealed with the aid of model-data comparisons and by the application of new inversion techniques. We describe the morphology and climatology of gravity waves and their ionospheric manifestations, TIDs, from numerous new observations.

  19. A review of atmospheric gravity waves and travelling ionospheric disturbances: 1982-1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW and travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID in the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere are reviewed. In the past decade, the generation of gravity waves at high latitudes and their subsequent propagation to low latitudes have been studied by several global model simulations and coordinated observation campaigns such as the Worldwide Atmospheric Gravity-wave Study (WAGS, the results are presented in the first part of the review. The second part describes the progress towards understanding the AGW/TID characteristics. It points to the AGW/TID relationship which has been recently revealed with the aid of model-data comparisons and by the application of new inversion techniques. We describe the morphology and climatology of gravity waves and their ionospheric manifestations, TIDs, from numerous new observations.

  20. Adverse Weather Evokes Nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim

    2018-03-01

    Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that (a) adverse weather evokes nostalgia (Hypothesis 1); (b) adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (Hypothesis 2); (c) preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (Hypothesis 3); and (d) weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (Hypothesis 4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.

  1. Ionospheric and thermospheric couplings: vertical, latitudinal and longitudinal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, V. B.; Carlson, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    The ionosphere, embedded in and tightly coupled to the thermosphere, is strongly influenced by couplings to other geophysical regions. For example, above it, both the magnetosphere and plasmasphere greatly affect the ionosphere by the precipitation of soft and energetic particles, by heat conduction, and by fluxes of thermal particles. Below, the middle atmosphere affects it with upwardly propagating waves (gravity waves, tides, and planetary waves). All the while, polar and auroral regions greatly affect the mid-latitudes by the equatorward penetration of electric fields and winds, and by the equatorward propagation of waves (traveling ionospheric disturbances or TIDs). Exploring these couplings effectively furthers our understanding of at least the dominant processes and interactions that play such an important role in determining the character of this part of the Earths environment. Significant progress during the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) has demanded that the observational, analytical, and theoretical thrusts of the international scientific community be global in all senses. Observationally, this has led to coordinated measurements from many regions, from the poles to the equator, and from ground- and space-based instruments. It has also led to many different instruments, including new ones, measuring an extensive variety of (related) geophysical parameters. Depending on the instrument, measurements have been made continuously or at appropriate intervals to sample different geomagnetic conditions, and diurnal, seasonal, inter-annual, and solar-cycle variations. Extensive analyses have been carried out on these observations. New empirical models have been developed and old ones improved. Theoretical work has led to new and improved first-principles models that are being used to test our understanding of the observations. Our intent is to review this progress and suggest some future directions. Our approach is to illustrate the broad front of

  2. Kilometer-Spaced GNSS Array for Ionospheric Irregularity Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang

    This dissertation presents automated, systematic data collection, processing, and analysis methods for studying the spatial-temporal properties of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) scintillations produced by ionospheric irregularities at high latitudes using a closely spaced multi-receiver array deployed in the northern auroral zone. The main contributions include 1) automated scintillation monitoring, 2) estimation of drift and anisotropy of the irregularities, 3) error analysis of the drift estimates, and 4) multi-instrument study of the ionosphere. A radio wave propagating through the ionosphere, consisting of ionized plasma, may suffer from rapid signal amplitude and/or phase fluctuations known as scintillation. Caused by non-uniform structures in the ionosphere, intense scintillation can lead to GNSS navigation and high-frequency (HF) communication failures. With specialized GNSS receivers, scintillation can be studied to better understand the structure and dynamics of the ionospheric irregularities, which can be parameterized by altitude, drift motion, anisotropy of the shape, horizontal spatial extent and their time evolution. To study the structuring and motion of ionospheric irregularities at the sub-kilometer scale sizes that produce L-band scintillations, a closely-spaced GNSS array has been established in the auroral zone at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska to investigate high latitude scintillation and irregularities. Routinely collecting low-rate scintillation statistics, the array database also provides 100 Hz power and phase data for each channel at L1/L2C frequency. In this work, a survey of seasonal and hourly dependence of L1 scintillation events over the course of a year is discussed. To efficiently and systematically study scintillation events, an automated low-rate scintillation detection routine is established and performed for each day by screening the phase scintillation index. The spaced-receiver technique is applied to cross

  3. Comparative ionospheres: Terrestrial and giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendillo, Michael; Trovato, Jeffrey; Moore, Luke; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2018-03-01

    The study of planetary ionospheres within our solar system offers a variety of settings to probe mechanisms of photo-ionization, chemical loss, and plasma transport. Ionospheres are a minor component of upper atmospheres, and thus their mix of ions observed depends on the neutral gas composition of their parent atmospheres. The same solar irradiance (x-rays and extreme-ultra-violet vs. wavelength) impinges upon each of these atmospheres, with solar flux magnitudes changed only by the inverse square of distance from the Sun. If all planets had the same neutral atmosphere-with ionospheres governed by photochemical equilibrium (production = loss)-their peak electron densities would decrease as the inverse of distance from the Sun, and any changes in solar output would exhibit coherent effects throughout the solar system. Here we examine the outer planet with the most observations of its ionosphere (Saturn) and compare its patterns of electron density with those at Earth under the same-day solar conditions. We show that, while the average magnitudes of the major layers of molecular ions at Earth and Saturn are approximately in accord with distance effects, only minor correlations exist between solar effects and day-to-day electron densities. This is in marked contrast to the strong correlations found between the ionospheres of Earth and Mars. Moreover, the variability observed for Saturn's ionosphere (maximum electron density and total electron content) is much larger than found at Earth and Mars. With solar irradiance changes far too small to cause such effects, we use model results to explore the roles of other agents. We find that water sources from Enceladus at low latitudes, and 'ring rain' at middle latitudes, contribute substantially to variability via water ion chemistry. Thermospheric winds and electrodynamics generated at auroral latitudes are suggested causes of high latitude ionospheric variability, but remain inconclusive due to the lack of relevant

  4. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  5. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health ... Although there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect ...

  6. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  7. Mariners Weather Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Mariners Weather Log (MWL) is a publication containing articles, news and information about marine weather events and phenomena, worldwide environmental impact...

  8. Radar Weather Observation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Weather Observation is a set of archived historical manuscripts stored on microfiche. The primary source of these radar weather observations manuscript records...

  9. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  10. Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Weather Observation Collection consists primarily of hourly, synoptic, daily, and monthly forms submitted to the archive by the National Weather Service...

  11. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  12. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  13. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  14. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  15. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  16. Internet Weather Source

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (NWS) National Telecommunications Gateway provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its...

  17. Space Weather in Operation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The “Space Weather in Operations” effort will provide on-demand and near-real time space weather event information to the Data Access Toolkit (DAT), which is the...

  18. Operational Numerical Weather Prediction at the Met Office and potential ways forward for operational space weather prediction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David

    NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has been in charge of space weather forecast service in Japan for more than 20 years. The main target region of the space weather is the geo-space in the vicinity of the Earth where human activities are dominant. In the geo-space, serious damages of satellites, international space stations and astronauts take place caused by energetic particles or electromagnetic disturbances: the origin of the causes is dynamically changing of solar activities. Positioning systems via GPS satellites are also im-portant recently. Since the most significant effect of positioning error comes from disturbances of the ionosphere, it is crucial to estimate time-dependent modulation of the electron density profiles in the ionosphere. NICT is one of the 13 members of the ISES (International Space Environment Service), which is an international assembly of space weather forecast centers under the UNESCO. With help of geo-space environment data exchanging among the member nations, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide informa-tion on forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. The space weather forecast at NICT is conducted based on the three methodologies: observations, simulations and informatics (OSI model). For real-time or quasi real-time reporting of space weather, we conduct our original observations: Hiraiso solar observatory to monitor the solar activity (solar flare, coronal mass ejection, and so on), domestic ionosonde network, magnetometer HF radar observations in far-east Siberia, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionosonde network (SEALION). Real-time observation data to monitor solar and solar-wind activities are obtained through antennae at NICT from ACE and STEREO satellites. We have a middle-class super-computer (NEC SX-8R) to maintain real-time computer simulations for solar and solar

  19. Considerations in the weathering of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    During weathering, wood-plastic composites (WPCs) can fade and lose stiffness and strength. Weathering variables that induce these changes include exposure to UV light and water. Each variable degrades WPCs independently, but can also act synergistically. Recent efforts have highlighted the need to understand how WPCs weather, and to develop schemes for protection. The...

  20. Shift in fire-ecosystems and weather changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongani Finiza

    2013-01-01

    During recent decades too much focus fell on fire suppression and fire engineering methods. Little attention has been given to understanding the shift in the changing fire weather resulting from the global change in weather patterns. Weather change have gradually changed the way vegetation cover respond to fire occurrence and brought about changes in fire behavior and...

  1. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots

  2. Comparison of global and regional ionospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranner, H.-P.; Krauss, S.; Stangl, G.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling of the Earth's ionosphere means the description of the variability of the vertical TEC (Total Electron Content) in dependence of geographic latitude and longitude, height, diurnal and seasonal variation as well as solar activity. Within the project GIOMO (next Generation near real-time IOnospheric MOdels) the objectives are the identification and consolidation of improved ionospheric modelling technologies. The global models Klobuchar (GPS) and NeQuick (currently in use by EGNOS, in future used by Galileo) are compared to the IGS (International GNSS Service) Final GIM (Global Ionospheric Map). Additionally a RIM (Regional Ionospheric Map) for Europe provided by CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is investigated. Furthermore the OLG (Observatorium Lustbühel Graz) regional models are calculated for two test beds with different latitudes and extensions (Western Austria and the Aegean region). There are three different approaches, two RIMs are based on spherical harmonics calculated either from code or phase measurements and one RIM is based on a Taylor series expansion around a central point estimated from zero-difference observations. The benefits of regional models are the local flexibility using a dense network of GNSS stations. Near real-time parameters are provided within ten minutes after every clock hour. All models have been compared according to their general behavior, the ability to react upon extreme solar events and the robustness of estimation. A ranking of the different models showed a preference for the RIMs while the global models should be used within a fall-back strategy.

  3. Study of Ionospheric Indexes T and MF2 related to R12 for Solar Cycles 19-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Lucia

    2013-04-01

    Modern worldwide communications are mainly based on satellite systems, remote communication networks, and advanced technologies. The most important space weather "meteorological" events produce negative effects on signal transmissions. Magnetic storm conditions that follow coronal mass ejections are particularly of great importance for radio communication at HF frequencies (3-30 MHz range), because the Ionization increase (or decrease), significantly over (or below), the Average Values. Nowadays new technologies make possible to establish Geophysical Observatories and monitor the sun almost in real time giving information about geomagnetic indices. Space Weather programs have interesting software predictions of foF2 producing maps and plots, every some minutes. The Average Values of the ionospheric parameters mainly depend on the position, hour, season and the phase of the 11-year cycle of the solar activity. Around 1990´s several ionospheric indexes were suggested to better predict the state of the foF2 monthly media, as: IF2, G, T and MF2, based on foF2 data from different latitude ionospheric observatories. They really show better seasonal changes than monthly solar indexes of solar flux F10.7 or the international sunspot numbers Ri. The main purpose of this paper is to present an analogic model for the ionospheric index MF2, to establish the average long term predictions of this index. Changes of phase from one cycle to the other of one component of the model is found to fit the data. The usefulness of this model could be the prediction of the ionospheric normal conditions for one entire solar cycle having just the prediction of the maximum of the next smooth sunspot number R12. In this presentation, comparisons of the Australian T index and and the Mikhailov MF2 index show an hysteresis variation with the solar monthly index Ri, such dependence is quite well represented by a polynomial fit of degree 6 for rising and decaying fases for solar cycles 19, 20 and

  4. Electromagnetic fields of ionospheric point dipoles in the earthionosphere waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybachek, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of excitation of the spherical earth-anisotropic ionosphere waveguide by ionospheric dipole sources. The solution obtained is based on a generalized reciprocity theorem which provides a relationship to the problem of finding electromagnetic fields in the ionosphere created by sources located in the waveguide. Some results of the calculations are presented

  5. Ionospheric correction for spaceborne single-frequency GPS based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1972a, b) and. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. (Rawer et al. 1978; Bilitza 1986, 2001; Bilitza and .... studies need to be done on the Klobuchar model for GPS onboard GRACE. SLM mapping functions for ... The concept of the ionospheric single layer model. (SLM) is usually used in ionosphere research, i.e.,.

  6. Calibration of regional ionospheric delay with uncombined precise ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trons in the Earth's ionosphere are concentrated on the ionospheric shell at an altitude H(typically chosen as 350, 400 or 450 km) over the Earth's surface. Meanwhile, sTEC values are mapped to the vertical TEC (vTEC) at the ionospheric pierce point (IPP). The corresponding equation can be expressed as (Chang et al.

  7. Characteristics of low latitude ionospheric E-region irregularities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    154°E, dip angle = 37.3°, sub-ionospheric dip = 34°) have been analyzed to study the behaviour of ionospheric E-region irregularities during the active solar and magnetic periods. The autocorrelation functions, power spectral densities, signal de-correlation times are computed to study the temporal features of ionospheric ...

  8. New advantages of the combined GPS and GLONASS observations for high-latitude ionospheric irregularities monitoring: case study of June 2015 geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring, tracking and nowcasting of the ionospheric plasma density disturbances using dual-frequency measurements of the Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are effectively carried out during several decades. Recent rapid growth and modernization of the ground-based segment gives an opportunity to establish a great database consisting of more than 6000 stations worldwide which provide GPS signals measurements with an open access. Apart of the GPS signals, at least two-third of these stations receive simultaneously signals transmitted by another Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)—the Russian system GLONASS. Today, GLONASS signal measurements are mainly used in navigation and geodesy only and very rarely for ionosphere research. We present the first results demonstrating advantages of using several independent but compatible GNSS systems like GPS and GLONASS for improvement of the permanent monitoring of the high-latitude ionospheric irregularities. For the first time, the high-resolution two-dimensional maps of ROTI perturbation were made using not only GPS but also GLONASS measurements. We extend the use of the ROTI maps for analyzing ionospheric irregularities distribution. We demonstrate that the meridional slices of the ROTI maps can be effectively used to study the occurrence and temporal evolution of the ionospheric irregularities. The meridional slices of the geographical sectors with a high density of the GPS and GLONASS measurements can represent spatio-temporal dynamics of the intense ionospheric plasma density irregularities with very high resolution, and they can be effectively used for detailed study of the space weather drivers on the processes of the ionospheric irregularities generation, development and their lifetimes. Using a representative database of 5800 ground-based GNSS stations located worldwide, we have investigated the occurrence of the high-latitude ionospheric plasma density irregularities during the geomagnetic storm of

  9. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  10. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes, while ensuring their health and safety.

  11. Representation of the Auroral and Polar Ionosphere in the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research presents a selection of papers that document the progress in developing and improving the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), a widely used standard for the parameters that describe the Earths ionosphere. The core set of papers was presented during the 2010 General Assembly of the Committee on Space Research in Bremen, Germany in a session that focused on the representation of the auroral and polar ionosphere in the IRI model. In addition, papers were solicited and submitted from the scientific community in a general call for appropriate papers.

  12. New Applications for Detecting Natural Hazards Using Ground and Space-Based GNSS-Derived Ionospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, A.; Butala, M.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Wilson, B. D.; Iijima, B.; Akopian, V.; Mannucci, A.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and University of Southern California (USC) have jointly developed the Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) to monitor space weather, study storm effects, and provide ionospheric calibration for various customers including NASA flight projects. JPL/USC GAIM is a physics-based 3D data assimilation model using 4DVAR and Kalman filter approaches to solve for ion and electron density states and other key ionospheric drivers. The JPL/USC GAIM technologies, now operating in real-time and post-processing modes, can routinely accept as input ground GPS TEC data from 1200+ sites including streaming and hourly GPS stations, occultation links from CHAMP, SAC-C, COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites, UV limb and nadir scans. In the presentation, first we will discuss recent advances in our assimilating ground-based GPS, C/NOFS and COSMIC occultation measurements using our GAIM system characterizing the ionosphere in 3D. We will elaborate on our improved space-based bias estimation techniques to generate high precision calibrated TEC measurements to be assimilated into GAIM. We will discuss the benefits of adding GLONASS measurements to our GIM and GAIM processing technologies. New and upcoming applications and first results will be shown for estimating very high precision TEC perturbations using real-time and post-processed GNSS observations from GEONET and IGS networks. We will demonstrate initial steps on how to integrate this GNSS ionosphere-based technology into a global tsunami warning system. Additional potential applications might include the remote sensing of ionospheric TEC perturbations generated by other natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and human-made events such as nuclear tests.

  13. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    Previous investigations on ionospheric responses to solar flares focused mainly on the photoionization caused by the increased X-rays and extreme ultraviolet irradiance. However, little attention was paid to the related electrodynamics. In this letter, we explored the equatorial electric field (EEF) and electrojet (EEJ) in the ionosphere at Jicamarca during flares from 1998 to 2008. It is verified that solar flares increase dayside eastward EEJ but decrease dayside eastward EEF, revealing a negative correlation between EEJ and EEF. The decreased EEF weakens the equatorial fountain effect and depresses the low-latitude electron density. During flares, the enhancement in the Cowling conductivity may modulate ionospheric dynamo and decrease the EEF. Besides, the decreased EEF is closely related to the enhanced ASY-H index that qualitatively reflects Region 2 field-aligned current (R2 FAC). We speculated that solar flares may also decrease EEF through enhancing R2 FAC that leads to an overshielding-like effect.

  14. Ionospheric irregularities in periods of meteorological disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchevkina, O. P.; Karpov, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    The results of observations of the total electron content (TEC) in periods of storm disturbances of meteorological situation are presented in the paper. The observational results have shown that a passage of a meteorological storm is accompanied by a substantial decrease in values of TEC and critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 region. The decreases in values of these ionospheric parameters reach 50% and up to 30% in TEC and critical frequency of the F2 layer, respectively, as compared to meteorologically quiet days. Based on qualitative analysis, it is found that the processes related to formation of local regions of thermospheric heating due to a dissipation of AGW coming into the upper atmosphere from the region of the meteorological disturbance in the lower atmosphere are a possible cause of these ionospheric disturbances.

  15. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Chemistry of Weathering

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    Several important developments in our understanding of the chemistry of weathering have occurred in the last few years: 1. There has been a major breakthrough in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the kinetics of sil icate dissolution, and there have been major advances in computer modeling of weathering processes. 2. There has been a growing recognition of the importance of organic solutes in the weathering process, and hence of the inter-relationships between mineral weathering and the terrestrial ecosystem. 3. The impact of acid deposition ("acid rain") has been widely recognized. The processes by which acid deposition is neutral ized are closely related to the processes of normal chemical weathering; an understanding of the chemistry of weathering is thus essential for predicting the effects of acid deposition. 4. More high-qual ity data have become available on the chemical dynamics of smal I watersheds and large river systems, which represent the integrated effects of chemical weathering.

  16. VHF Scintillation in an Artificially Heated Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Layne, J.; Light, M. E.; Pigue, M. J.; Rivera, L.

    2017-12-01

    As part of an ongoing project to characterize very-high-frequency (VHF) radio wave propagation through structured ionospheres, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been conducting a set of experiments to measure the scintillation effects of VHF transmissions under a variety of ionospheric conditions. Previous work (see 2015 Fall AGU poster by D. Suszcynsky et al.) measured the S4 index and ionospheric coherence bandwidth in the 32 - 44 MHz frequency range under naturally scintillated conditions in the equatorial region at Kwajalein Atoll during three separate campaigns centered on the 2014 and 2015 equinoxes. In this paper, we will present preliminary results from the February and September, 2017 High Altitude Auroral Research Project (HAARP) Experimental Campaigns where we are attempting to make these measurements under more controlled conditions using the HAARP ionospheric heater in a twisted-beam mode. Two types of measurements are made by transmitting VHF signals through the heated ionospheric volume to the Radio Frequency Propagation (RFProp) satellite experiment. The S4 scintillation index is determined by measuring the power fluctuations of a 135-MHz continuous wave signal and the ionospheric coherence bandwidth is simultaneously determined by measuring the delay spread of a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) signal in the 130 - 140 MHz frequency range. Additionally, a spatial Fourier transform of the CW time series is used to calculate the irregularity spectral density function. Finally, the temporal evolution of the time series is used to characterize spread-Doppler clutter effects arising from preferential ray paths to the satellite due to refraction off of isolated density irregularities. All results are compared to theory and scaled for comparison to the 32 - 44 MHz Kwajalein measurements.

  17. Travelling ionospheric disturbance over California mid 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hawarey

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the GPS data collected by more than 130 permanent GPS stations that belong to the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN around the launch of a Minuteman-II missile on 8 July 2000 (UTC is processed to reveal traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID all over the network on average 15 min after the launch. This TID was initially perceived to be excited by the launch itself, but this conclusion is challenged by the propagation direction. This is because this TID seems to travel towards the air force base from where the launch took place, not far away from it. This challenge is based on the assumption that TID is occurring at one single ionospheric altitude. While the nature of ionosphere supports such horizontally-guided propagation, multi-altitude ionospheric pierce points are hypothesized, which would support the suggestion that detected TID is excited by the missile launch itself, despite the apparent reverse direction of propagation. The overall analysis rules out any extra-terrestrial sources like solar flares, or seismic sources like earthquakes, which confirms the conclusion of TID excitation by the launch. There is apparent coherence of the TID for about 45 min and the propagation speed of TID within the layer of ionosphere is calculated to be approximately equal to 1230 m/s. While the usual assumption for TID is that they occur around an altitude of 350 km, such sound speed can only occur at much higher altitudes. Further research is recommended to accurately pinpoint the ionospheric pierce points and develop an algorithm to locate the source of TID in case it is totally unknown.

  18. The ionosphere disturbances observation on the Kharkiv incoherent scatter radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iu.; Lysenko, V.

    2009-04-01

    he ionosphere plasma characteristics are responding on variations of solar and magnetic activity. The research of an ionosphere structure and dynamics is important as for understanding physics of processes and for radiophysical problems solution. The method incoherent scatter (IS) of radio waves allows determining experimentally both regular variations of the basic parameters ionosphere, and their behavior during perturbation. The equipment and measurement technique, developed by authors, are allows obtaining certain data about behavior of an ionosphere during various origin and intensity ionosphere perturbations. The Institute of Ionsphere IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6oN, 36.3oE, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7oN, 117.8oE) was used to observe the processes in the ionosphere. The radar is operate with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power of ~2.0 MW. The double-frequency measuring channel mode with compound sounding signal was employed for experiments. That provided ~ 20-km resolution in range ~100-400 km and ~100-km in range ~200-1100 km. Over a period of series of experiment are obtained data about variations of electron density simultaneous in the heights interval 100-1000 km, including three sun eclipses, two superstrong and a few moderate magnetic storms, as well as disturbance, is caused by powerful rockets starts. During strong geomagnetic storm on November 8-12, 2004 was observed night time increasing of electronic temperature up to 3000 Љ and ions temperature up to 2000K. Usually at this time temperature of ions is equal to temperature of electrons. During negative ionosphere storm was observed decreasing of electronic density at maximum F2 layer. The height of a F2 layer maximum was increased by 150 km and 70 km at daytime. The interesting phenomenon - high-power backscatter signal coherent backscatter was observed first time during geogeomagnetic storm 29-30 may 2003. A usually

  19. Model of traveling ionospheric disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorenko Yury P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multiscale semi-empirical model of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs is developed. The model is based on the following assumptions: (1 TIDs are generated by acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs and propagate as pressure waves; (2 time intervals between adjacent extrema of atmospheric pressure oscillations in a disturbance source are constant; (3 the pressure extrema propagate from the source up to ~14 000 km at a constant horizontal velocity; (4 the velocity of each extremum is determined only by its number in a TID train. The model was validated using literature data on disturbances generated by about 20 surface and high-altitude nuclear explosions, two volcano explosions, one earthquake and by energetic proton precipitation events in the magnetospheric cusp of the northern hemisphere. Model tests using literature data show that the spatial and temporal TID periods may be predicted with an accuracy of 12%. Adequacy of the model was also confirmed by our observations collected using transionospheric sounding. The following TID parameters: amplitudes, horizontal spatial periods, and a TID front inclination angle in a vertical plane are increasing as the distance between an AGW and the excitation source is increasing. Diurnal and seasonal variability of the TID occurrence, defined as ratio of TID events to the total number of observations for the corresponding period, is not observed. However, the TID occurrence was growing from ~50% in 1987 to ~98% in 2010. The results of other studies asserting that the TID occurrence does not depend on the number of sunspots and magnetic activity are confirmed. The TID occurrence has doubled over the period from 1987 to 2010 indicating increasing solar activity which is not associated with sunspot numbers. The dynamics of spatial horizontal periods was studied in a range of 150–35 000 km.

  20. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  1. A statistical approach for identifying the ionospheric footprint of magnetospheric boundaries from SuperDARN observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lointier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and tracking the projection of magnetospheric regions on the high-latitude ionosphere is of primary importance for studying the Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system and for space weather applications. By its unique spatial coverage and temporal resolution, the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provides key parameters, such as the Doppler spectral width, which allows the monitoring of the ionospheric footprint of some magnetospheric boundaries in near real-time. In this study, we present the first results of a statistical approach for monitoring these magnetospheric boundaries. The singular value decomposition is used as a data reduction tool to describe the backscattered echoes with a small set of parameters. One of these is strongly correlated with the Doppler spectral width, and can thus be used as a proxy for it. Based on this, we propose a Bayesian classifier for identifying the spectral width boundary, which is classically associated with the Polar Cap boundary. The results are in good agreement with previous studies. Two advantages of the method are: the possibility to apply it in near real-time, and its capacity to select the appropriate threshold level for the boundary detection.

  2. Space Weathering of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  3. Ground-based acoustic parametric generator impact on the atmosphere and ionosphere in an active experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. G. Rapoport

    2017-01-01

    , measurements of electromagnetic and acoustic fields, study of the variations in ionospheric transparency for the radio emissions from galactic radio sources, optical measurements, and the impact on atmospheric aerosols. The proposed approach can be useful for better understanding the mechanism of the acoustic channel of seismo-ionospheric coupling.

  4. Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System (WIOBSS) for the investigation of midlatitude ionospheric irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhou, Xiaoming; Qiao, Lei; Gong, Wanlin

    2018-03-01

    An upgrade of Wuhan Ionospheric Backscattering Sounding System (WIOBSS) was developed in 2015. Based on the Universal Serial Bus (USB), and a high performance FPGA, the newly designed WIOBSS has a completely digital structure, which makes it portable and flexible. Two identical WIOBSSs, which were situated at Mile (24.31°N, 103.39°E) and Puer (22.74°N, 101.05°E) respectively, were used to investigate the ionospheric irregularities. The comparisons of group distance, Doppler shift and width between Mile-Puer and Puer-Mile VHF ionospheric propagation paths indicate that the reciprocity of the irregularities is satisfied at midlatitude region. The WIOBSS is robust in the detection of ionospheric irregularities.

  5. An Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) to Develop New Instrument Technology to Study the Auroral Ionosphere and Stratospheric Ozone Layer Using Ultralight Balloon Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowling, M.; Ahmad, H.; Gamblin, R.; Guala, D.; Hermosillo, D.; Pina, M.; Marrero, E.; Canales, D. R. J.; Cao, J.; Ehteshami, A.; Bering, E. A., III; Lefer, B. L.; Dunbar, B.; Bias, C.; Shahid, S.

    2015-12-01

    This project is currently engaging twelve undergraduate students in the process of developing new technology and instrumentation for use in balloon borne geospace investigations in the auroral zone. Motivation stems from advances in microelectronics and consumer electronic technology. Given the technological innovations over the past 20 years it now possible to develop new instrumentation to study the auroral ionosphere and stratospheric ozone layer using ultralight balloon payloads for less than 6lbs and $3K per payload. The University of Houston Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) team has built ten such payloads for launch using 1500 gm latex weather balloons deployed in Houston, TX, Fairbanks, AK, and as well as zero pressure balloons launched from northern Sweden. The latex balloon project will collect vertical profiles of wind velocity, temperature, electrical conductivity, ozone, and odd nitrogen. This instrument payload will also produce profiles of pressure, electric field, and air-earth electric current. The zero pressure balloons will obtain a suite of geophysical measurements including: DC electric field, electric field and magnetic flux, optical imaging, total electron content of ionosphere via dual-channel GPS, X-ray detection, and infrared/UV spectroscopy. Students flew payloads with different combinations of these instruments to determine which packages are successful. Data collected by these instruments will be useful in understanding the nature of electrodynamic coupling in the upper atmosphere and how the global earth system is changing. Twelve out of the launched fifteen payloads were successfully launched and recovered. Results and best practices learned from lab tests and initial Houston test flights will be discussed.

  6. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and 'pestilence' associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations.

  7. Longitudinal Differences in the Low-latitude Ionosphere and in the Ionospheric Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Liu, H.; Tsugawa, T.; Batista, I. S.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of longitudinal differences in ionospheric parameters can illuminate variety of mechanisms responsible for ionospheric variability. In this study, we aim to 1) quantitatively describe major features of longitudinal differences in peak electron density in the low-latitude ionosphere; 2) examine differences in ionospheric variability at different longitude sectors, and 3) illustrate longitudinal differences in ionospheric response to a large disturbance event, sudden stratospheric warming of 2016. We examine NmF2 observations by a network of ionosondes in the American (30-80W) and Asian (110-170E) longitudinal sectors. Selected instruments are located in the vicinity of EIA troughs (Jicamarca, Sao Luis, Guam, Kwajalein), northern and southern crests of EIA (Boa Vista, Tucuman, Cachoeira Paulista, Okinawa), and beyond EIA crests (Ramey, Yamagawa, Kokubunji). To examine main ionospheric features at each location, we use long-term datasets collected at each site to construct empirical models that describe variations in NmF2 as a function of local time, season, solar flux, and geomagnetic activity. This set of empirical models can be used to accurately describe background ionospheric behavior and serve as a set of observational benchmarks for global circulation models. It reveals, for example, higher NmF2 in the EIA trough in the Asian sector as compared to the American sector. Further, we quantitatively describe variability in NmF2 as a difference between local observations and local empirical model, and find that American sector's EIA trough has overall higher variability that maximizes for all local times during wintertime, while Asian sector trough variability does not change significantly with season. Additionally, local empirical models are used to isolate ionospheric features resulting from dynamical disturbances of different origin (e.g. geomagnetic storms, convective activity, sudden stratospheric warming events, etc.). We illustrate this approach with

  8. Coupled storm-time magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere simulations including microscopic ionospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkin, V. G.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Zhang, B.; Liu, J.; Wang, W.; Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.; Lyon, J.

    2017-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system becomes activated in ways that are unique to disturbed conditions. This leads to emergence of physical feedback loops that provide tighter coupling between the system elements, often operating across disparate spatial and temporal scales. One such process that has recently received renewed interest is the generation of microscopic ionospheric turbulence in the electrojet regions (electrojet turbulence, ET) that results from strong convective electric fields imposed by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. ET leads to anomalous electron heating and generation of non-linear Pedersen current - both of which result in significant increases in effective ionospheric conductances. This, in turn, provides strong non-linear feedback on the magnetosphere. Recently, our group has published two studies aiming at a comprehensive analysis of the global effects of this microscopic process on the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In one study, ET physics was incorporated in the TIEGCM model of the ionosphere-thermosphere. In the other study, ad hoc corrections to the ionospheric conductances based on ET theory were incorporated in the conductance module of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetosphere model. In this presentation, we make the final step toward the full coupling of the microscopic ET physics within our global coupled model including LFM, the Rice Convection Model (RCM) and TIEGCM. To this end, ET effects are incorporated in the TIEGCM model and propagate throughout the system via thus modified TIEGCM conductances. The March 17, 2013 geomagnetic storm is used as a testbed for these fully coupled simulations, and the results of the model are compared with various ionospheric and magnetospheric observatories, including DMSP, AMPERE, and Van Allen Probes. Via these comparisons, we investigate, in particular, the ET effects on the global magnetosphere indicators such as the

  9. Computing tomorrow's weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Peter

    2009-06-01

    The development of computer models that simulate the Earth's atmosphere, allowing us to predict weather and anticipate climate change, is one of the triumphs of 20th-century science. Weather forecasting used to be very hit-and-miss, based on rough rules of thumb and the assumption that similar weather patterns would evolve in a similar manner. But from 1950 onwards, digital computers revolutionized the field, transforming it from a woolly empirical activity to a precise, quantitative, science-based procedure. Weather forecasting was among the first computational sciences and is still a major application for high-end computers today. In Weather by the Numbers, the historian Kristine Harper tells the fascinating story of how numerical weather prediction became possible.

  10. Application of Geostationary GNSS and SBAS Satellites for Studying Ionospheric TEC Disturbances of Geomagnetic and Meteorological Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padokhin, A. M.; Kurbatov, G. A.; Yasyukevich, Y.; Yasyukevich, A.

    2017-12-01

    With the development of GNSS and SBAS constellations, the coherent multi-frequency L band transmissions are now available from a number of geostationary satellites. These signals can be used for ionospheric TEC estimations in the same way as widely used GPS/GLONASS signals. In this work, we compare noise patterns in TEC estimations based on different geostationary satellites data: augmentation systems (Indian GAGAN, European EGNOS and American WAAS), and Chinese COMPASS/Beidou navigation system. We show that noise level in geostationary COMPASS/Beidou TEC estimations is times smaller than noise in SBAS TEC estimation and corresponds to those of GPS/GLONASS at the same elevation angles. We discuss the capabilities of geostationary TEC data for studying ionospheric variability driven by space weather and meteorological sources at different time scales. Analyzing data from IGS/MGEX receivers we present geostationary TEC response on X-class Solar flares of current cycle, moderate and strong geomagnetic storms, including G4 St. Patrick's day Storm 2015 and recent G3 storm of the end of May 2017. We also discuss geostationary TEC disturbances in near equatorial ionosphere caused by two SSW events (minor and major final warming of 2015-2016 winter season) as well as geostationary TEC response on typhoons activity near Taiwan in autumn 2016. Our results show large potential of geostationary TEC estimations with GNSS and SBAS signals for continuous ionospheric monitoring.

  11. Space Weather Observations by GNSS Radio Occultation: From FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC to FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S; Pedatella, Nicholas; Anthes, Richard A; Mannucci, Anthony J; Straus, Paul R; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2014-11-01

    The joint Taiwan-United States FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) mission, hereafter called COSMIC, is the first satellite constellation dedicated to remotely sense Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere using a technique called Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO). The occultations yield abundant information about neutral atmospheric temperature and moisture as well as space weather estimates of slant total electron content, electron density profiles, and an amplitude scintillation index, S4. With the success of COSMIC, the United States and Taiwan are moving forward with a follow-on RO mission named FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (COSMIC-2), which will ultimately place 12 satellites in orbit with two launches in 2016 and 2019. COSMIC-2 satellites will carry an advanced Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) RO receiver that will track both GPS and Russian Global Navigation Satellite System signals, with capability for eventually tracking other GNSS signals from the Chinese BeiDou and European Galileo system, as well as secondary space weather payloads to measure low-latitude plasma drifts and scintillation at multiple frequencies. COSMIC-2 will provide 4-6 times (10-15X in the low latitudes) the number of atmospheric and ionospheric observations that were tracked with COSMIC and will also improve the quality of the observations. In this article we focus on COSMIC/COSMIC-2 measurements of key ionospheric parameters.

  12. Data ingestion and assimilation in ionospheric models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Nava, B.; Galkin, I.; Angling, M.; Stankov, S. M.; Coisson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3/4 (2009), s. 235-253 ISSN 1593-5213 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1356; GA MŠk OC 091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : ionosphere * models * data assimilation * data ingestion Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2009

  13. Ionospheric error analysis in gps measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pugliano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of the ionosphere on GPS positioning applications are presented in this paper. Specifically, the study, based upon a differential approach, was conducted utilizing GPS measurements acquired by various receivers located at increasing inter-distances. The experimental research was developed upon the basis of two groups of baselines: the first group is comprised of "short" baselines (less than 10 km; the second group is characterized by greater distances (up to 90 km. The obtained results were compared either upon the basis of the geometric characteristics, for six different baseline lengths, using 24 hours of data, or upon temporal variations, by examining two periods of varying intensity in ionospheric activity respectively coinciding with the maximum of the 23 solar cycle and in conditions of low ionospheric activity. The analysis revealed variations in terms of inter-distance as well as different performances primarily owing to temporal modifications in the state of the ionosphere.

  14. Correcting ionospheric Faraday rotation for ASKAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Gaensler, Bryan; Landecker, Tom L.; Willis, Tony

    2012-10-01

    Next-generation polarisation surveys, such as the POSSUM survey on ASKAP, aim to measure weak, statistical, cosmological effects associated with weak magnetic fields, and so will require unprecedented accuracy and stability for measuring polarisation vectors and their Faraday rotation measures (RMs). Ionospheric Faraday rotation (IFR) corrupts polarization observations and cannot be ignored at mid to low frequencies. In aperture-synthesis polarimetry IFR rotates individual visibilities and leads to a loss of coherence and accuracy of polarization angle determination. Through the POSSUM survey science team we have been involved in developing detailed ionospheric prediction software (POSSUM memos #10a,b) that will be used to correct the observed visibilities on ASKAP before imaging to obtain sufficiently accurate polarization and RM data. To provide a stringent test of this software, we propose a continuous 24 hr observing block using the 1.1-3.1 GHz band to monitor the variations caused by the time-variable ionosphere in the polarization angle and RM of a strongly polarized calibrator source, PKS B1903-802. We request a total of 96 hrs (4 x 24 hrs) to monitor the changes in the ionosphere every 3 to 6 months until BETA/ASKAP-12 is taking reliable polarization data.

  15. Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation. S Ram. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v12i1.15563 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  16. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979–2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8–5.9 tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  17. Ionosphere and its Influence on Radio Communications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dynamics. R S Dabas. 1. Discovery of Ionosphere. In 1882, the Scottish physicist Balfour Stewart suggested that the continuous but minor variations in Earth's magnetic field might be caused by the ..... and magnetic storms. Varying solar activity ... long-term (11 years) periodicity in the solar activity. In general, it has been ...

  18. A new ionospheric tomographic algorithm – constrained ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the above algorithms. Finally, the new method is applied to reconstruct the IED distributions using the regional GNSS observation (i.e., GPS) over. China. 2. Tomographic formulation. As is well known, one measurable parameter of the ionosphere is the total electron content (TEC), which is the line integral of IED along ray ...

  19. (VTEC) in the Ionosphere for GPS Observations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... artificial intelligence for establishing correction models of ionospheric delay. For instance,. Habarulena et al., (2007) used backpropagation neural network to establish a VTEC model of a region comprised of various observations stations. Hu et al., (2014) proposed a hybrid VTEC prediction technique of ...

  20. Ionospheric irregularities at Antarctic using GPS measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    receiver is modified high performance NOVATEL. OEM4 dual frequency GPS C/A code .... purpose of TEC analysis, ionospheric data is con- sidered above 20. ◦ elevation of ... Contour of occurrence of amplitude scintillation (left panel) and phase scintillation (right panel) at Maitri during. March 2008. Maps are overlapped ...

  1. Weather it's Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, A.; Lashof, D.

    2004-12-01

    For almost two decades both national polls and in-depth studies of global warming perceptions have shown that people commonly conflate weather and global climate change. Not only are current weather events such as anecdotal heat waves, droughts or cold spells treated as evidence for or against global warming, but weather changes such as warmer weather and increased storm intensity and frequency are the consequences most likely to come to mind. Distinguishing weather from climate remains a challenge for many. This weather 'framing' of global warming may inhibit behavioral and policy change in several ways. Weather is understood as natural, on an immense scale that makes controlling it difficult to conceive. Further, these attributes contribute to perceptions that global warming, like weather, is uncontrollable. This talk presents an analysis of data from public opinion polls, focus groups, and cognitive studies regarding people's mental models of and 'frames' for global warming and climate change, and the role weather plays in these. This research suggests that priming people with a model of global warming as being caused by a "thickening blanket of carbon dioxide" that "traps heat" in the atmosphere solves some of these communications problems and makes it more likely that people will support policies to address global warming.

  2. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  3. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  4. Multi-instrument observations of the solar eclipse on 20 March 2015 and its effects on the ionosphere over Belgium and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Stanimir M.; Bergeot, Nicolas; Berghmans, David; Bolsée, David; Bruyninx, Carine; Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Clette, Frédéric; De Backer, Hugo; De Keyser, Johan; D'Huys, Elke; Dominique, Marie; Lemaire, Joseph F.; Magdalenić, Jasmina; Marqué, Christophe; Pereira, Nuno; Pierrard, Viviane; Sapundjiev, Danislav; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; Van der Linden, Ronald; Verhulst, Tobias G. W.; West, Matthew J.

    2017-08-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred on 20 March 2015, with a totality path passing mostly above the North Atlantic Ocean, which resulted in a partial solar eclipse over Belgium and large parts of Europe. In anticipation of this event, a dedicated observational campaign was set up at the Belgian Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (STCE). The objective was to perform high-quality observations of the eclipse and the associated effects on the geospace environment by utilising the advanced space- and ground-based instrumentation available to the STCE in order to further our understanding of these effects, particularly on the ionosphere. The study highlights the crucial importance of taking into account the eclipse geometry when analysing the ionospheric behaviour during eclipses and interpreting the eclipse effects. A detailed review of the eclipse geometry proves that considering the actual obscuration level and solar zenith angle at ionospheric heights is much more important for the analysis than at the commonly referenced Earth's surface or at the plasmaspheric heights. The eclipse occurred during the recovery phase of a strong geomagnetic storm which certainly had an impact on (some of) the ionospheric characteristics and perhaps caused the omission of some "low-profile" effects. However, the analysis of the ionosonde measurements, carried out at unprecedented high rates during the eclipse, suggests the occurrence of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Also, the high temporal and spatial resolution measurements proved very important in revealing and estimating some finer details of the delay in the ionospheric reaction and the ionospheric disturbances.

  5. Possibility to study ionospheric earthquakes precursors using CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, Valery; Lappas, Vaios

    It is generally accepted that the earthquakes (EQ) are the most dangerous natural phenomena leading to the multiple losses in human lives and economics. The space observations must be included into the global chain of the EQ precursors monitoring at least as the initial warning to pay greater attention to the ground segment data. As the common opinion agrees, only in combination of multiple observation sites and set of monitored parameters the further progress at the way to raise EQ precursors detection probability may be obtained. There is necessary to answer two important questions before to plan any experiment to study ionospheric precursors of EQ. First one - whether the variations in the ionosphere definitely connected with the EQ preparation process do exist, and the second one - if they do, whether using these signals the precursors of EQ can be reliably identified and used for, if not prediction, then for the warning that the EQ in the given area approaches. The first successful mission dedicated to this problem solution was DEMETER (in orbit during more than 6 years from June 2004 until December 2010). The statistics of this study is impressive: altogether, about 9000 EQs with magnitude larger than M = 5.0 and depth lower than 40 km occurred all over the world during the analyzed period. In the result, the conclusion made there suggests that, obviously, there are real perturbations in the ionosphere connected with the seismic activity, but they are rather weak and at the present stage of data processing may be revealed only with the help of statistical analysis. To realize the study of ionospheric precursors, first it is imperative to clarify the mechanism of energy transfer along the chain “lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere”. Many hypotheses of such a mechanism exist, from which the mostly supported are fair weather currents (FWC) and atmospheric gravity waves (AGW), both of which have their pros and contras. The following minimal set of physical

  6. Spire's 3U CubeSat GNSS-RO Constellation for Meteorological and Space Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V.; Duly, T.; Ector, D.; Irisov, V.; Nogues-Correig, O.; Tan, L.; Yuasa, T.

    2017-12-01

    Spire Global, Inc., is a leading player in the nanosatellite sector and the first commercial company to provide GNSS radio occultation measurements to support meteorological and space weather forecasting. Each Spire satellite is equipped with a state-of-the-art, in-house designed software receiver, which is capable of open-loop tracking of occulted GNSS signals. By utilizing this receiver on a low-earth orbiting, 3U satellite constellation platform, Spire is able to provide high-quality profile measurements of the lower atmosphere as well as ionospheric total electron content and scintillation data at unprecedented low cost, coverage, and latency. In this talk, we provide an overview of the current capabilities of Spire's satellite constellation and radio occultation processing system. Recent results describing the state of the lower atmosphere and ionosphere will be presented and briefly discussed. Finally, we focus on Spire's future capabilities, and the potential impacts on both the meteorological and space weather scientific communities.

  7. The International Reference Ionosphere 2012 – a model of international collaboration☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilitza Dieter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI project was established jointly by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI in the late sixties with the goal to develop an international standard for the specification of plasma parameters in the Earth’s ionosphere. COSPAR needed such a specification for the evaluation of environmental effects on spacecraft and experiments in space, and URSI for radiowave propagation studies and applications. At the request of COSPAR and URSI, IRI was developed as a data-based model to avoid the uncertainty of theory-based models which are only as good as the evolving theoretical understanding. Being based on most of the available and reliable observations of the ionospheric plasma from the ground and from space, IRI describes monthly averages of electron density, electron temperature, ion temperature, ion composition, and several additional parameters in the altitude range from 60 km to 2000 km. A working group of about 50 international ionospheric experts is in charge of developing and improving the IRI model. Over time as new data became available and new modeling techniques emerged, steadily improved editions of the IRI model have been published. This paper gives a brief history of the IRI project and describes the latest version of the model, IRI-2012. It also briefly discusses efforts to develop a real-time IRI model. The IRI homepage is at http://IRImodel.org.

  8. The numerical simulation on ionospheric perturbations in electric field before large earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Zhao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many observational results have shown electromagnetic abnormality in the ionosphere before large earthquakes. The theoretical simulation can help us to understand the internal mechanism of these anomalous electromagnetic signals resulted from seismic regions. In this paper, the horizontal and vertical components of electric and magnetic field at the topside ionosphere are simulated by using the full wave method that is based on an improved transfer matrix method in the lossy anisotropic horizontally stratified ionosphere. Taken account into two earthquakes with electric field perturbations recorded by the DEMETER satellite, the numerical results reveal that the propagation and penetration of ULF (ultra-low-frequency electromagnetic waves into the ionosphere is related to the spatial distribution of electron and ion densities at different time and locations, in which the ion density has less effect than electron density on the field intensity. Compared with different frequency signals, the minimum values of electric and magnetic field excited by earthquakes can be detected by satellite in current detection capability have also been calculated, and the lower frequency wave can be detected easier.

  9. Weather and emotional state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions

  10. Weather, Climate and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, T.

    2016-12-01

    To climatologists food security is dominated by the impacts of weather and climate on food systems. But the link between the atmosphere and food security is more complex. Extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones impact directly on agriculture, but they also impact on the logistical distribution of food and can thus disrupt the food supply chain, especially in urban areas. Drought affects human life and health as well as impacting dramatically on the sustainable development of society. It represents a pending danger for vulnerable agricultural systems that depend on the rainfall, water supply and reservoirs. Developed countries are affected, but the impact is disproportionate within the developing world. Drought, especially when it results in famine, can change the life and economic development of developing nations and stifle their development for decades. A holistic approach is required to understand the phenomena, to forecast catastrophic events such as drought and famine and to predict their societal consequences. In the Food Security recommendations of the Rio+20 Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for Sustainable Development it states that it is important "To understand fully how to measure, assess and reduce the impacts of production on the natural environment including climate change, recognizing that different measures of impact (e.g. water, land, biodiversity, carbon and other greenhouse gases, etc) may trade-off against each other..." This talk will review the historical link between weather, climate, drought and food supplies; examine the international situation; and summarise the response of the scientific community

  11. Observations and Impact Assessments of Extreme Space Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.

    2007-05-01

    "Space weather" refers to conditions on the Sun, in the solar wind, and in Earth`s magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Activity on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections can lead to high levels of radiation in space and can cause major magnetic storms at the Earth. Space radiation can come as energetic particles or as electromagnetic emissions. Adverse conditions in the near-Earth space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids. This can lead to a variety of socioeconomic losses. Astronauts and airline passengers exposed to high levels of radiation are also at risk. Society`s vulnerability to space weather effects is an issue of increasing concern. We are dependent on technological systems that are becoming more susceptible to space weather disturbances. We also have a permanent human presence in space with the International Space Station and the President and NASA have expressed a desire to expand our human space activities with missions to the moon and Mars. This will make space weather of even greater concern in the future. In this talk I will describe many space weather effects and will describe some of the societal and economic impacts that extreme events have had.

  12. Global Magnetospheric Simulations: coupling with ionospheric and solar wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Amaya, Jorge; Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Vapirev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    We present results on the global fully kinetic model of the magnetosphere of the Earth. The simulations are based on the iPic3D code [1] that treats kinetically all plasma species solving implicitly the equations of motion for electrons and ions, coupled with the Maxwell equations. We present results of our simulations and discuss the coupling at the inner boundary near the Earth with models of the ionosphere and at the outer boundary with models of the arriving solar wind. The results are part of the activities of the Swiff FP7 project: www.swiff.eu [1] Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin, Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Volume 80, Issue 7, March 2010, Pages 1509-1519, ISSN 0378-4754, 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038 [2] Giovanni Lapenta, Particle simulations of space weather, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 231, Issue 3, 1 February 2012, Pages 795-821, ISSN 0021-9991, 10.1016/j.jcp.2011.03.035.

  13. Designing a Weather Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  14. Fabulous Weather Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  15. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather

  16. Tales of future weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeleger, W.; van den Hurk, B.J.J.M.; Min, E.; van Oldenborgh, G.J.; Wang, X.; Petersen, A.C.; Stainforth, D.A.; Vasileiadou, E.; Smith, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Society is vulnerable to extreme weather events and, by extension, to human impacts on future events. As climate changes weather patterns will change. The search is on for more effective methodologies to aid decision-makers both in mitigation to avoid climate change and in adaptation to changes. The

  17. Weather and road capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore......, the capacity of the highway seems to be reduced in bad weather and there are indications that travel time variability is also increased, at least in free-flow conditions. Heavy precipitation reduces speed and capacity by around 5-8%, whereas snow primarily reduces capacity. Other weather variables......-parametrically against traffic density and in step 2 the residuals from step 1 are regressed linearly against the weather variables. The choice of a non-parametric method is made to avoid constricting ties from a parametric specification and because the focus here is not on the relationship between traffic flow...

  18. Observations by the CUTLASS radar, HF Doppler, oblique ionospheric sounding, and TEC from GPS during a magnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-diagnostic observations, covering a significant area of northwest Europe, were made during the magnetic storm interval (28–29 April 2001 that occurred during the High Rate SolarMax IGS/GPS-campaign. HF radio observations were made with vertical sounders (St. Petersburg and Sodankyla, oblique incidence sounders (OIS, on paths from Murmansk to St. Petersburg, 1050 km, and Inskip to Leicester, 170 km, Doppler sounders, on paths from Cyprus to St. Petersburg, 2800 km, and Murmansk to St. Petersburg, and a coherent scatter radar (CUTLASS, Hankasalmi, Finland. These, together with total electron content (TEC measurements made at GPS stations from the Euref network in northwest Europe, are presented in this paper. A broad comparison of radio propagation data with ionospheric data at high and mid latitudes, under quiet and disturbed conditions, was undertaken. This analysis, together with a geophysical interpretation, allow us to better understand the nature of the ionospheric processes which occur during geomagnetic storms. The peculiarity of the storm was that it comprised of three individual substorms, the first of which appears to have been triggered by a compression of the magnetosphere. Besides the storm effects, we have also studied substorm effects in the observations separately, providing an improved understanding of the storm/substorm relationship. The main results of the investigations are the following. A narrow trough is formed some 10h after the storm onset in the TEC which is most likely a result of enhanced ionospheric convection. An enhancement in TEC some 2–3 h after the storm onset is most likely a result of heating and upwelling of the auroral ionosphere caused by enhanced currents. The so-called main effect on ionospheric propagation was observed at mid-latitudes during the first two substorms, but only during the first substorm at high latitudes. Ionospheric irregularities observed by CUTLASS were clearly related to the

  19. Derivation of a planetary ionospheric storm index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary ionospheric storm index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999–2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or −1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or −2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or −3 for the moderate ionospheric storm, and 4 or −4 for intense ionospheric storm at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric storm Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere storm. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp storms is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric storms with Dst≤−100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.

  20. Derivation of a planetary ionospheric storm index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary ionospheric storm index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999–2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or −1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or −2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or −3 for the moderate ionospheric storm, and 4 or −4 for intense ionospheric storm at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric storm Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere storm. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp storms is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric storms with Dst≤−100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.

  1. Evolution of ionospheric disturbances excited by earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, Elvira; Heki, Kosuke; Afraimovich, Edward; Kiryushkin, Vladislav; Shalimov, Sergei

    Earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere. Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) measurements we studied ionosphere response to the Kuril Islands Earthquakes of 04 October 1994 (M8.1) and 15 November 2006 (M7.9). High spatial resolution of the Japanese dense GPS array (GEONET) allowed us to analyze the dynamical characteristics of the observed traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in detail. This provided us more information about the processes of an atmospheric wave propagation and transformation from the ground to the ionosphere (i.e. transformation of acoustic waves to shock-acoustic waves, SAW) and then to TIDs propagating for more than 1800 km. Such observations of the evolution of disturbances in the ionosphere have been performed for the first time. The observed TIDs appeared in TEC records of the closest to the epicenter GPS receivers 10 min after the quake in the form of N-type wave as a response to propagation of SAW. The amplitude of the signal is about 0.6 TEC units for the records in the near-field ( 100-200 km) of the suspected TIDs source, and about 1 TEC units at a distance of 200-350 km. Within first 600 km the propagation velocity was about 1.3 km/s. Our results coincide with previous results of SAW investigations. We managed to track the subsequent evolution of the propagating TIDs: starting from 400- 500 km out of the source the wave seems to divide into two separate waves, which henceforth propagate with different velocities - about 1.7 km/s and 600 m/s. We suggest that the TEC response in the far field of the TIDs source is a mixture of the damping SAW (the "fast" wave) and TIDs propagating in the atmospheric waveguide (the "slow" wave). Other possibility is that the record shows a separation of the positive (the "fast" wave) and

  2. Radio Tomography of Ionospheric Structures (probably) due to Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Nesterov, I.; Andreeva, E.; Rekenthaler, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric radio-tomography (RT) utilizes radio signals transmitted from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS), including low-orbiting (LO) navigational systems such as Transit, Tsikada, etc., and high-orbiting (HO) navigational systems such as GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou, etc. The signals that are transmitted from the LO navigational satellites and recorded by ground receiving chains can be inverted for almost instantaneous (5-8 min) 2D snapshots of electron density. The data from the networks of ground receivers that record the signals of the HO satellites are suitable for implementing high-orbital RT (HORT), i.e. reconstructing the 4D distributions of the ionospheric electron density (one 3D image every 20-30 min). In the regions densely covered by the GNSS receivers, it is currently possible to get a time step of 2-4 min. The LORT and HORT approaches have a common methodical basis: in both these techniques, the integrals of electron density along the ray between the satellite and the receiver are measured, and then the tomographic procedures are applied to reconstruct the distributions of electron density. We present several examples of the experiments on the ionospheric RT, which are related to the Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (USAI) coupling. In particular, we demonstrate examples of RT images of the ionosphere after industrial explosions, rocket launches, and modification of the ionosphere by high-power radio waves. We also show RT cross sections reflecting ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquakes (EQ) and tsunami waves. In these cases, there is an evident cause-and-effect relationship. The perturbations are transferred between the geospheres predominantly by acoustic gravity waves (AGW), whose amplitudes increase with increasing height. As far as EQ are concerned, the cause of the USAI coupling mechanism is not obvious. It is clear, however, that the regular RT studies can promote the solution of this challenging problem

  3. St. Patrick's Day 2015 geomagnetic storm analysis based on Real Time Ionosphere Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rigo, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Alberto García-Rigo (1), David Roma-Dollase (2), Manuel Hernández-Pajares (1), Zishen Li (3), Michael Terkildsen (4), German Olivares (4), Reza Ghoddousi-Fard (5), Denise Dettmering (6), Eren Erdogan (6), Haris Haralambous (7), Yannick Béniguel (8), Jens Berdermann (9), Martin Kriegel (9), Anna Krypiak-Gregorczyk (10), Tamara Gulyaeva (11), Attila Komjathy (12), Panagiotis Vergados (12), Joachim Feltens (13,19), René Zandbergen (13), Tim Fuller-Rowell (14), David Altadill (15), Nicolas Bergeot (16), Andrzej Krankowski (17), Loukis Agrotis (18), Ivan Galkin (20), Raul Orus-Perez (21) 1. UPC-IonSAT research group, Technical University of Catalonia, Spain 2. Department of Engineering: Electronics, University of Barcelona (UB), Spain 3. Academy of Opto-Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China 4. Bureau of Meteorology, Space Weather Services, Australia 5. Canadian Geodetic Survey, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) / Government of Canada, Canada 6. Deutsches Geodätisches Forschungsinstitut der Technischen Universität München (DGFI-TUM), Germany 7. Frederick University Cyprus, Cyprus 8. IEEA, France 9. Institute of Communications and Navigation, DLR, Germany 10. Institute of Geodesy, UWM, Poland 11. Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia 12. NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, USA 13. Navigation Support Office, ESA-ESOC, Germany 14. NOAA affiliate, USA 15. Observatori de l'Ebre (OE), CSIC - Universitat Ramon Llull, 43520 Roquetes, Spain 16. Planetology and Reference Systems, Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB), Belgium 17. Space Radio-Diagnostics Research Centre, UWM (SRRC/UWM), Poland 18. SYMBAN Limited, ESA-ESOC, Germany 19. Telespazio VEGA Deutschland GmbH c/o ESA-ESOC, Germany 20. University of Massachusetts Lowell, Space Science Lab, USA 21. Wave Interaction and Propagation Section (TEC-EEP), ESA-ESTEC, The Netherlands IAG's Real Time

  4. Ionospheric responses during equinox and solstice periods over Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatay, Secil; Cinar, Ali; Arikan, Feza

    2017-11-01

    Ionospheric electron density is the determining variable for investigation of the spatial and temporal variations in the ionosphere. Total Electron Content (TEC) is the integral of the electron density along a ray path that indicates the total variability through the ionosphere. Global Positioning System (GPS) recordings can be utilized to estimate the TEC, thus GPS proves itself as a useful tool in monitoring the total variability of electron distribution within the ionosphere. This study focuses on the analysis of the variations of ionosphere over Turkey that can be grouped into anomalies during equinox and solstice periods using TEC estimates obtained by a regional GPS network. It is observed that noon time depletions in TEC distributions predominantly occur in winter for minimum Sun Spots Numbers (SSN) in the central regions of Turkey which also exhibit high variability due to midlatitude winter anomaly. TEC values and ionospheric variations at solstice periods demonstrate significant enhancements compared to those at equinox periods.

  5. A clear link connecting the troposphere and ionosphere: ionospheric reponses to the 2015 Typhoon Dujuan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Xu, Yahui; Kuo, Chungyen; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi

    2017-09-01

    The global navigation satellite system (GNSS) total electron content (TEC) sequences were used to capture the arrival time and location of the ionosphere disturbances in response to the 2015 Typhoon Dujuan. After removing the de-trended TEC variation, the clear ionosphere disturbances on the typhoon landing day could be distinguished, and these disturbances disappeared from the TEC sequences before and after the typhoon landing day. The foF2 data observed by Xiamen ionosonde station also show ionosphere disturbances. Based on the advantages of GNSS multi-point observations, the disturbances horizontal velocity in the ionosphere were estimated according to the linear theory for a dispersion relation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in an isothermal atmosphere. The average horizontal velocity (˜ 240 m/s) and the radial velocity (˜ 287 m/s) were used in the two-dimensional grid search for the origin point on the Earth's surface. The origin area was determined to be on the eastern side of Taiwan. Lastly, a possible physical mechanism is discussed in this study. When typhoons land on Taiwan, the severe convective storms and the drag effect from the Central Mountains create an ideal location for development of AGWs. Topographic conditions, like the high lapse rate, contribute to the formation of AGWs, which then propagates into the ionosphere altitude.

  6. Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer: TIEGCM-ICON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, Astrid

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection explorer (ICON) will study the coupling between the thermosphere and ionosphere at low- and mid-latitudes by measuring the key parameters. The ICON mission will also employ numerical modeling to support the interpretation of the observations, and examine the importance of different vertical coupling mechanisms by conducting numerical experiments. One of these models is the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model-ICON (TIEGCM-ICON) which will be driven by tidal perturbations derived from ICON observations using the Hough Mode Extension method (HME) and at high latitude by ion convection and auroral particle precipitation patterns from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE). The TIEGCM-ICON will simulate the thermosphere-ionosphere (TI) system during the period of the ICON mission. In this report the TIEGCM-ICON is introduced, and the focus is on examining the effect of the lower boundary on the TI-system to provide some guidance for interpreting future ICON model results.

  7. Environmental Education Tips: Weather Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Audrey H.

    1989-01-01

    Provides weather activities including questions, on weather, heating the earth's surface, air, tools of the meteorologist, clouds, humidity, wind, and evaporation. Shows an example of a weather chart activity. (RT)

  8. Topside ionosphere of Mars: Variability, transient layers, and the role of crustal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopika, P. G.; Venkateswara Rao, N.

    2018-04-01

    The topside ionosphere of Mars is known to show variability and transient topside layers. In this study, we analyzed the electron density profiles measured by the radio occultation technique aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft to study the topside ionosphere of Mars. The electron density profiles that we used in the present study span between 1998 and 2005. All the measurements are done from the northern high latitudes, except 220 profiles which were measured in the southern hemisphere, where strong crustal magnetic fields are present. We binned the observations into six measurement periods: 1998, 1999-north, 1999-south, 2000-2001, 2002-2003, and 2004-2005. We found that the topside ionosphere in the southern high latitudes is more variable than that from the northern hemisphere. This feature is clearly seen with fluctuations of wavelengths less than 20 km. Some of the electron density profiles show a transient topside layer with a local maximum in electron density between 160 km and 210 km. The topside layer is more prone to occur in the southern hemispheric crustal magnetic field regions than in the other regions. In addition, the peak density of the topside layer is greater in regions of strong crustal magnetic fields than in other regions. The variability of the topside ionosphere and the peak density of the topside layer, however, do not show one-to-one correlation with the strength of the crustal magnetic fields and magnetic field inclination. The results of the present study are discussed in the light of current understanding on the topside ionosphere, transient topside layers, and the role of crustal magnetic fields on plasma motions.

  9. Exploring the role of ionospheric drivers during the extreme solar minimum of 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Klenzing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the recent solar minimum, solar activity reached the lowest levels observed during the space age, resulting in a contracted atmosphere. This extremely low solar activity provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand the variability of the Earth's ambient ionosphere. The average E × B drifts measured by the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI on the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS satellite during this period are found to have several differences from the expected climatology based on previous solar minima, including downward drifts in the early afternoon and a weak to non-existent pre-reversal enhancement. Using SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere as a computational engine, we investigate the effects of these electrodynamical changes as well as the contraction of the thermosphere and reduced EUV ionization on the ionosphere. The sensitivity of the simulations to wind models is also discussed. These modeled ionospheres are compared to the C/NOFS average topside ion density and composition and Formosa Satellite-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate average NmF2 and hmF2. In all cases, incorporating the VEFI drift data significantly improves the model results when compared to both the C/NOFS density data and the F3/C GOX data. Changing the MSIS and EUVAC models produced changes in magnitude, but not morphology with respect to local time. The choice of wind model modulates the resulting topside density and composition, but only the use of the VEFI E × B drifts produces the observed post-sunset drop in the F peak.

  10. Electron heating and airglow emission due to lightning effects on the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Michael N.; Kelley, Michael C.

    2009-10-01

    This study is the first attempt to consider lightning effects on the F2 region. Although pulsed electric fields parallel to the geomagnetic field have been observed by every rocket flight over active thunderstorms at thermospheric heights, their existence remains controversial. Predicting the disturbance of ionospheric parameters induced by these electric fields may lead to verifying them using ground-based ionospheric observations. This study is also important for understanding the kinetics of ionospheric plasma disturbed by pulsed parallel electric fields. These fields can accelerate electrons from pulse to pulse. If the pause between flashes is longer than τ en , electrons are scattered by elastic collisions with neutrals and transformed into thermal electrons with a corresponding electron temperature enhancement. Inelastic collisions of electrons with neutrals will become more important with increased energy and, subsequently, the electron energy distribution (EED) can differ from a Maxwellian distribution. The vibrational excitation of N2 is extremely important as a source of inelastic collisions for energy ≥2 eV. This vibrational barrier can influence the EED. An electron kinetics model induced by pulsed parallel electric fields in ionospheric plasma is developed here. The accelerated and heated electrons can excite airglow in the F2 region. Excitation of red line emissions is most effective. Red line intensities during thunderstorms are predicted to be much higher than the background intensity. Our model also predicts a significant increase in electron temperature in the F2 region during a strong thunderstorm. Opportunities for observing the ionospheric effects of parallel electric fields induced by lightning are discussed.

  11. Radio Observations of the Ionosphere From an Imaging Array and a CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isham, B.; Gustavsson, B.; Bullett, T. W.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Rincón-Charris, A.; Bruhn, F.; Funk, P.

    2017-12-01

    radio data received by GimmeRF in the topside ionosphere, with the goal of better understanding the geometry and therefore the mechanisms of the radio emission processes.

  12. Performance evaluation of linear time-series ionospheric Total Electron Content model over low latitude Indian GPS stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Venkata Ratnam, D.

    2017-10-01

    Precise modeling of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) is a critical aspect of Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) services intended for the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) applications as well as Earth Observation System (EOS), satellite communication, and space weather forecasting applications. In this paper, linear time series modeling has been carried out on ionospheric TEC at two different locations at Koneru Lakshmaiah University (KLU), Guntur (geographic 16.44° N, 80.62° E; geomagnetic 7.55° N) and Bangalore (geographic 12.97° N, 77.59° E; geomagnetic 4.53° N) at the northern low-latitude region, for the year 2013 in the 24th solar cycle. The impact of the solar and geomagnetic activity on periodic oscillations of TEC has been investigated. Results confirm that the correlation coefficient of the estimated TEC from the linear model TEC and the observed GPS-TEC is around 93%. Solar activity is the key component that influences ionospheric daily averaged TEC while periodic component reveals the seasonal dependency of TEC. Furthermore, it is observed that the influence of geomagnetic activity component on TEC is different at both the latitudes. The accuracy of the model has been assessed by comparing the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model TEC and TEC measurements. Moreover, the absence of winter anomaly is remarkable, as determined by the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between the linear model TEC and GPS-TEC. On the contrary, the IRI2012 model TEC evidently failed to predict the absence of winter anomaly in the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) crest region. The outcome of this work will be useful for improving the ionospheric now-casting models under various geophysical conditions.

  13. Impending ionospheric anomaly preceding the Iquique Mw8.2 earthquake in Chile on 2014 April 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinyun; Li, Wang; Yu, Hongjuan; Liu, Zhimin; Zhao, Chunmei; Kong, Qiaoli

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the coupling relationship between great earthquake and ionosphere, the GPS-derived total electron contents (TECs) by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe and the foF2 data from the Space Weather Prediction Center were used to analyse the impending ionospheric anomalies before the Iquique Mw8.2 earthquake in Chile on 2014 April 1. Eliminating effects of the solar and geomagnetic activities on ionosphere by the sliding interquartile range with the 27-day window, the TEC analysis results represent that there were negative anomalies occurred on 15th day prior to the earthquake, and positive anomalies appeared in 5th day before the earthquake. The foF2 analysis results of ionosonde stations Jicamarca, Concepcion and Ramey show that the foF2 increased by 40, 50 and 45 per cent, respectively, on 5th day before the earthquake. The TEC anomalous distribution indicates that there was a widely TEC decrement over the epicentre with the duration of 6 hr on 15th day before the earthquake. On 5th day before the earthquake, the TEC over the epicentre increased with the amplitude of 15 TECu, and the duration exceeded 6 hr. The anomalies occurred on the side away from the equator. All TEC anomalies in these days were within the bounds of equatorial anomaly zone where should be the focal area to monitor ionospheric anomaly before strong earthquakes. The relationship between ionospheric anomalies and geomagnetic activity was detected by the cross wavelet analysis, which implied that the foF2 was not affected by the magnetic activities on 15th day and 5th day prior to the earthquake, but the TECs were partially affected by anomalous magnetic activity during some periods of 5th day prior to the earthquake.

  14. Solar cycle variations in the ionosphere of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cano, B.; Lester, M.; Witasse, Ol; Blelly, P.L.; Cartacci, M.; Radicella, S.M.; Herraiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable changes in the Martian ionosphere, which have been analysed with Mars Express plasma datasets in this paper. In general, lower densities and temperatures of the ionosphere are found during the low solar activity phase, while higher densities and temperatures are found during the high solar activity phase. In this paper, we assess the degree of influence of the long term solar flux variations in the ionosphere of Mars. (Author)

  15. PRECURSORS OF EARTHQUAKES: VLF SIGNALSIONOSPHERE IONOSPHERE RELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ULAS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available lot of people have died because of earthquakes every year. Therefore It is crucial to predict the time of the earthquakes reasonable time before it had happed. This paper presents recent information published in the literature about precursors of earthquakes. The relationships between earthquakes and ionosphere are targeted to guide new researches in order to study further to find novel prediction methods.

  16. Investigation of ionospheric irregularities by radio holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; Popov, A. A.; Tereshchenko, A. D.; Khudukon, B. Z.

    Methodological aspects of the design of a radio-holography experiment for the investigation of ionospheric irregularities are considered on the basis of a theoretical examination of the formation of a diffraction field by two coherent satellite signals. The equipment needed to implement such an experiment is described, and results of first observations performed at high latitudes (in the Murmansk region) on February 8, 1978 are examined.

  17. Energetics of the dayside ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobe, Zoltan; Nagy, Andrew F.; Brace, Larry H.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    1993-01-01

    A reanalysis of the Pioneer Venus electron temperature data base showed a strong correlation between elevated electron temperatures and induced magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere above about 200 km. These results suggest, although not conclusively, that the elevated temperatures are the result of reduced vertical conductivities caused by the horizontal, induced fields with a possible contribution from energy deposition by magnetosheath electrons moving along the field from the tail region.

  18. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, W.C.; Mahoney, M.J.; Jacobson, A.R.; Knowles, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities. 10 references

  19. Ionospheric Measurements in the Wake of Solar Maximum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreasen, Angela

    2004-01-01

    .... The measurements were performed using a variety of radiowave techniques, most involving transionospheric radio propagation, and included observations of ionospheric perturbations via high-power...

  20. Ionospheric parameters as the precursors of disturbed geomagnetic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Sergeeva, M. A.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2017-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms and substorms are the principal elements of the disturbed Space Weather conditions. The aim of the study was to reveal the ionospheric precursors that can be used to forecast geomagnetic disturbance beginning. To study the ionospheric processes before, during and after magnetic storms and substorms data from Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory was used (geomagnetic coordinates: 64.1oN, 119.2oE). In earlier works the Main Effect (ME) was revealed for substorms. It consists of the following steps: (a) the increase of critical frequency foF2 from its quiet median before and during the substorm growth phase, four-five hours before To moment that is the moment of the expansion phase onset, (b) the foF2 decrease to the level lower than its median just after To and until Te that is the moment of the end of the expansion phase, (c) the issue ;a; repeated during the recovery phase (d) two bell-shape spikes in the cutoff frequency values foEs: first spike occurs three hours before To, second spike - during the expansion phase within the interval between To and Te. In the present work it is shown that ME manifestations can be used as precursors of magnetic substorms at high-latitudes (geomagnetic latitudes 50oN-65oN). In particular, the foF2 growth some hours before To can be used as a precursor of substorm development. The first foEs bell-shaped spike also can be used for short-term forecasting, two-three hours in advance of a substorm. Furthermore, the storms between 2008 and 2012 were studied. It was revealed that the similar ME also takes place in the case of magnetic storms but within the different time scale. More specifically, the first ME maximum in foF2 values occurs one-two days before the storm beginning and can be used as its precursor. In addition, the foEs spike takes place approximately ten hours before a storm and also can be used for the prediction of the storm beginning.

  1. Fate of Ice Grains in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamil, O.; Cravens, T. E.; Reedy, N. L.; Sakai, S.

    2018-02-01

    It has been proposed that the rings of Saturn can contribute both material (i.e., water) and energy to its upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Ionospheric models require the presence of molecular species such as water that can chemically remove ionospheric protons, which otherwise are associated with electron densities that greatly exceed those from observation. These models adopt topside fluxes of water molecules. Other models have shown that ice grains from Saturn's rings can impact the atmosphere, but the effects of these grains have not been previously studied. In the current paper, we model how ice grains deposit both material and energy in Saturn's upper atmosphere as a function of grain size, initial velocity (at the "top" of the atmosphere, defined at an altitude above the cloud tops of 3,000 km), and incident angle. Typical grain speeds are expected to be roughly 15-25 km/s. Grains with radii on the order of 1-10 nm deposit most of their energy in the altitude range of 1,700-1,900 km, and can vaporize, depending on initial velocity and impact angle, contributing water mass to the upper atmosphere. We show that grains in this radius range do not significantly vaporize in our model at initial velocities lower than about 20 km/s.

  2. Equinoctial transitions in the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    Full Text Available Equinoctial summer/winter transitions in the parameters of the F2-region are analyzed using ground-based ionosonde and incoherent scatter observations. Average transition from one type of diurnal NmF2 variation to another takes 20–25 days, but cases of very fast (6–10 days transitions are observed as well. Strong day-time NmF2 deviations of both signs from the monthly median, not related to geomagnetic activity, are revealed for the transition periods. Both longitudinal and latitudinal variations take place for the amplitude of such quiet time NmF2 deviations. The summer-type diurnal NmF2 variation during the transition period is characterized by decreased atomic oxygen concentration [O] and a small equatorward thermospheric wind compared to winter-type days with strong poleward wind and increased [O]. Molecular N2 and O2 concentrations remain practically unchanged in such day-to-day transitions. The main cause of the F2-layer variations during the transition periods is the change of atomic oxygen abundance in the thermosphere related to changes of global thermospheric circulation. A possible relationship with an equinoctial transition of atomic oxygen at the E-region heights is discussed.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (thermosphere – composition and chemistry – Ionosphere (ionosphere- atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  3. Statistical properties of ionospheric stimulated electromagnetic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Karlsson

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed the statistical properties of the stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE spectral features in the steady state, reached after a long period of continuous HF pumping of the ionosphere in experiments performed at the Sura ionospheric radio research facility in Russia. Using a digital filter bank method, we have been able to analyse complex valued signals within narrow frequency bands. Each of the SEE spectral features are thereby separated into a number of narrow spectral components. Statistical tests were performed for all these spectral components and the distributions of the spectral amplitudes and phases were evaluated. Also, a test for sinusoidal components was performed. These tests showed that all observed SEE features were indistinguishable from coloured Gaussian noise. The test results exclude that the SEE features can be the result of a single isolated coherent process, but does not rule out that there could be many statistically independent parametric wave-wave processes taking place simultaneously at various parts of the HF-pumped ionosphere, as long as the superposition from all these is incoherent. Furthermore, from the test results, we cannot exclude the possibility that the waveforms of some, or all, of the SEE features may be chaotic.

  4. Equinoctial transitions in the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Equinoctial summer/winter transitions in the parameters of the F2-region are analyzed using ground-based ionosonde and incoherent scatter observations. Average transition from one type of diurnal NmF2 variation to another takes 20–25 days, but cases of very fast (6–10 days transitions are observed as well. Strong day-time NmF2 deviations of both signs from the monthly median, not related to geomagnetic activity, are revealed for the transition periods. Both longitudinal and latitudinal variations take place for the amplitude of such quiet time NmF2 deviations. The summer-type diurnal NmF2 variation during the transition period is characterized by decreased atomic oxygen concentration [O] and a small equatorward thermospheric wind compared to winter-type days with strong poleward wind and increased [O]. Molecular N2 and O2 concentrations remain practically unchanged in such day-to-day transitions. The main cause of the F2-layer variations during the transition periods is the change of atomic oxygen abundance in the thermosphere related to changes of global thermospheric circulation. A possible relationship with an equinoctial transition of atomic oxygen at the E-region heights is discussed.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (thermosphere – composition and chemistry – Ionosphere (ionosphere- atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  5. Weather Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  6. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  7. Space Weather Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of space weather datasets from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and from the World Data Service for Geophysics,...

  8. Winter weather demand considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Winter weather has varied effects on travel behavior. Using 418 survey responses from the Northern Virginia : commuting area of Washington, D.C. and binary logit models, this study examines travel related changes under : different types of winter wea...

  9. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  10. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  11. National Weather Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Daily Briefing Damage/Fatality/Injury Statistics Forecast Models GIS Data Portal NOAA Weather Radio Publications SKYWARN Storm Spotters StormReady TsunamiReady EDUCATION Be A Force of Nature NWS Education Home ...

  12. Cape Kennedy Weather Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized data taken from original weather observations taken at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida. Elements recorded are wind speed and direction,...

  13. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  14. Surface Weather Observations Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  15. 3-Dimensional Weather Visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Nimitz, Sarah; Forsyth, Duke; Knittle, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Senior Design Project presentation and report for CS 4624 Multimedia/Hypertext Capstone. Two Zip archives also are provided, with software for each of the front and back end parts of the system. Project deliverables are provided, including a detailed description of the creation of a polling and parsing system for keeping track of severe weather warnings, as delivered by the National Weather Service, and an interface to allow the user to view a representation of Doppler radar data in three ...

  16. Temporal distribution characteristics of GNSS ionospheric occultation data and its effects in earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal distribution characteristics of COSMIC occultation data are analyzed in detail, and the limitations in earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection caused by the temporal distribution characteristics of COSMIC occultation data are discussed using the example of the Wenchuan earthquake. The results demonstrate that there is no fixed temporal resolution for COSMIC occultation data when compared with other ionospheric observation techniques. Therefore, occultation data cannot currently be independently utilized in research studies but can only be used as a complement to other ionospheric observation techniques for applications with high temporal resolution demands, such as earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection.

  17. Exploring Earth's Ionosphere with CINDI: Bringing an Upper Atmosphere Mission into Pre-College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.; Richardson, J. M.; Olson, C.

    2003-12-01

    We will present the Education and Public Outreach work in progress for the joint Air Force/NASA project CINDI (Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamic Investigation), which will launch in early 2004 on a US Air Force C/NOFS (Communications/Navigations Outage Forecast System) Satellite. CINDI, in conjunction with the other instruments on C/NOFS, will study how radio signals sent through the ionosphere are affected by variability with this layer of the atmosphere. The Educational outreach for CINDI is focused on helping students, educators, and the general public better understand the link between the ionosphere and our technological civilization. The ionosphere is typically neglected in pre-college science classes despite its impact on modern society and the substantial resources invested by funding agencies on furthering our understanding of this atmospheric layer. Our approach is to increase student understanding of the terrestrial ionosphere and Sun-Earth connections through strong connections to existing pre-college curricula and standards. We have created a partnership between the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences and the Science Education Program within the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to produce a quality Educator Guide and a Summer Educator Workshop. A senior graduate student in physics and an experienced middle school educator in UTD's Science Education Master of Science Teaching Program have been partnered to ensure that our the Educator Guide and Workshop will contain both science and pedagogy, and be easily integrated into secondary science classes. The summer 2004 workshop will be offered in the Dallas area, which has a significant population of minority and economically disadvantaged students. We will recruit teachers from districts that serve a large number of underserved/underrepresented students. The Educator Guide and workshop materials will be made available on the CINDI Web site for distribution to a national audience.

  18. Activity of Science and Operational Research of NICT Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubo, Yuki

    Operational space weather forecast is for contribution to social infrastructure than for academic interests. These user need will determine the target of research, e.g., the precision level, spatial and temporal resolution and/or required lead time. We, NICT, aim two target in the present mid-term strategic plan, which are (1) forecast of ionospheric disturbance influencing to satellite positioning, and (2) forecast of disturbance in radiation belt influencing to satellite operation. We have our own observation network and develop empirical and numerical models for achieving each target. However in actual situation, it is much difficult to know the user needs quantitatively. Most of space weather phenomena makes the performance of social infrastructure poor, for example disconnect of HF communication, increase of GNSS error. Most of organizations related to these operation are negative to open these information. We have personal interviews to solve this issue. In this interview, we try to collect incident information related to space weather in each field, and to retrieve which space weather information is necessary for users. In this presentation we will introduce our research and corresponding new service, in addition to our recent scientific results.

  19. Impact of multiple frequency scattering on GNSS performance under adverse ionospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aditi; Paul, Ashik

    One of the major deterrents to successful implementation of SBAS may be linked to sharp latitudinal gradients of ionization occurring during the daytime and intense Space Weather events in the post sunset hours, affecting transionospheric satellite links particularly in the equatorial region. These phenomena have the potential to cause serious damage to the technological infrastructure on which society relies. GPS modernization program is focused on addition of a new navigation signal L5 to the GPS constellation. The L5 is exclusively reserved for aviation navigation services and is designed with a protected spectrum, higher power, and greater bandwidth to support life-critical and high performance applications. Overall robustness of this dual-frequency mechanism to ionospheric scintillations could be ascertained through a study of correlated scintillations. Understanding the correlation of signal fades across two frequencies is important to assess their collective mitigation effectiveness. The Indian Regional Navigational Satellite System (IRNSS) will operate at L1 (1575.42 MHz), L5 (1176.45 MHz) and S-band (2492.42 MHz) frequencies. A multi-constellation, multi-frequency GNSS receiver is operational at University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India (22.58deg N, 88.38deg E geographic; magnetic dip: 32deg N) since April 2013. Special emphasis was given to analyzing signals from satellite vehicles equipped to transmit L5 frequency. On April 12, 2013, amplitude scintillation and associated fluctuations in carrier-to-noise ratios (CNO) were noted on SV1 link during 14:15-14:50UT from Calcutta. The S4 indices at the three frequencies, L1, L2 and L5, were affected to different extent with L2 and L5 values showing close correspondence and L1 suffering least scintillations. Correlation coefficient of S4 and carrier-to-noise ratios (CNO) between different combination of frequencies (L1:L2, L2:L5; L1:L5) were calculated at 3 minutes interval during periods of scintillation. As L2

  20. Weather Support for the 2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, J.; Potter, T.; Dunn, L.; Steenburgh, W. J.; Eubank, M.; Splitt, M.; Onton, D. J.

    2002-02-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games will be hosted by Salt Lake City, Utah, during February-March 2002. Adverse weather during this period may delay sporting events, while snow and ice-covered streets and highways may impede access by the athletes and spectators to the venues. While winter snowstorms and other large-scale weather systems typically have widespread impacts throughout northern Utah, hazardous winter weather is often related to local terrain features (the Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake are the most prominent ones). Examples of such hazardous weather include lake-effect snowstorms, ice fog, gap winds, downslope windstorms, and low visibility over mountain passes.A weather support system has been developed to provide weather information to the athletes, games officials, spectators, and the interested public around the world. This system is managed by the Salt Lake Olympic Committee and relies upon meteorologists from the public, private, and academic sectors of the atmospheric science community. Weather forecasting duties will be led by National Weather Service forecasters and a team of private, weather forecasters organized by KSL, the Salt Lake City NBC television affiliate. Other government agencies, commercial firms, and the University of Utah are providing specialized forecasts and support services for the Olympics. The weather support system developed for the 2002 Winter Olympics is expected to provide long-term benefits to the public through improved understanding,monitoring, and prediction of winter weather in the Intermountain West.

  1. Differences in the importance of weather and weather-based decisions among campers in Ontario parks (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel J.; Gough, William A.

    2017-10-01

    Parks and protected areas represent an important resource for tourism in Canada, in which camping is a common recreational activity. The important relationship between weather and climate with recreation and tourism has been widely acknowledged within the academic literature. Howbeit, the need for activity-specific assessments has been identified as an on-going need for future research in the field of tourism climatology. Furthermore, very little is known about the interrelationships between personal characteristics and socio-demographics with weather preferences and behavioural thresholds. This study uses a stated climate preferences approach (survey responses) to explore differences in the importance of weather and related weather-based decisions among summer campers in Ontario parks. Statistically significant differences were found among campers for each of the four dependent variables tested in this study. Physically active campers placed greater importance on weather but were still more tolerant of adverse weather conditions. Older campers placed greater importance on weather. Campers travelling shorter distances placed greater importance on weather and were more likely to leave the park early due to adverse weather. Campers staying for longer periods of time were less likely to leave early due to weather and were willing to endure longer durations of adverse weather conditions. Beginner campers placed greater importance on weather, were more likely to leave early due to weather and recorded lower temporal weather thresholds. The results of this study contribute to the study of tourism climatology by furthering understanding of how personal characteristics such as gender, age, activity selection, trip duration, distance travelled, travel experience and life cycles affect weather preferences and decisions, focusing this time on recreational camping in a park tourism context.

  2. Coupling of the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere/Thermosphere and Oxygen Outflow-- MIT Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, S.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of the MIT mission is to understand the coupling of the magnetosphere and ionosphere from the prospective of particles. It will focus on the outflow of the ionosphere particles (mainly oxygen ions) from the Earth, including the acceleration mechanisms of oxygen ions and their relative importance in different regions, the importance of these ions while transferred into the magnetosphere and the roles they played in magnetosphere activities. A constellation of four satellites orbiting at three elliptical orbits will provide the unique opportunities to observed there ions at three different altitude with temporal changes of the flux of these particles and the magnetic field environments. The conceptual design of the spacecraft and a summary of the payload will be presented. The MIT mission was selected as one of the five candidates for the upcoming mission plan in China.

  3. From the Ionosphere to the Classroom: Exploring the Earth's Upper Atmosphere with CINDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    CINDI (Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamic Investigation) is a NASA funded instrument scheduled for an early 2005 launch by the Air Force on board the C/NOFS (Communications/Navigations Outage Forecast System) satellite. In preparation for this launch, our education and public outreach program is well under way, and focuses on making the difficult-to-visualize science of the ionosphere understandable to students in middle school and above. Our formal education strategy is to create engaging and usable materials that meet teachers' needs and integrate well into existing curriculum in today's era of high stakes testing. We will present our middle school educator guide, a preview of our new CINDI comic book, highlights from our 2004 educator workshops, and future plans to bring the ionosphere into classrooms around the country.

  4. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    capable of generating various responses including alerting external observatories or reallocating internal observing capacity to create short cadence (1-10 sec) images of the Sun. More uniquely, the core development, already invested by LOFAR to produce astronomical images of the sky, makes an excellent framework on which to build a near real-time ionospheric monitor and thereby study the effects of space weather events on our atmosphere. One of the key technical challenges to producing high quality scientific images in the low frequency radio regime are the effects of the active ionosphere over the detector array on signal propagation through the earth's atmosphere. To correct for these effects, the current LOFAR system includes an adaptive calibration employing both single and multi-layer phase screen models for the ionosphere. The output of this calibration automatically produces continuous ionospheric measurements with a data cadence in seconds. Although limited to the sky over the array, the resulting TEC maps can have vertical and horizontal resolutions down to 2m and relative accuracies of 0.001 TECU. The intent is to publish both Solar and ionospheric data-streams to the space weather community providing an excellent complement to existing space-based monitoring assets. In this presentation, we will describe the current and planned capabilities of the LOFAR system as well as show some first examples of the potential data products taken during the ongoing commissioning phase. We will also discuss plans to build upon the current LOFAR infrastructure and provide a source of near real-time monitoring data to the space weather community.

  5. Preseismic Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Masashi

    Preseismic atmospheric and ionospheric disturbances besides preseismic geo-electric potential anomalies and ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geomagnetic variations observed on the ground have been reported. Both the phenomena have been found since the 1980s and a number of papers have been published. Since most of the reported phenomena transiently appear with accompanying quiescence before the mainshock, this prevents us to intuitively recognize a correlation between the anomaly appearance and the earthquake occurrence. Some of them, however, showed that anomalies monotonically grew into the mainshock, of which a variation supports the concept of seismic nucleation process under the pre-earthquake state. For example, Heki [GRL, 2011] reported that ionospheric electron density monotonically enhanced tens of minutes prior to the subduction mega-earthquake. However, this preseismic enhancement is apparent variation attributed to tsunamigenic ionospheric hole [Kakinami and Kamogawa et al, GRL, 2012], namely wide and long-duration depression of ionospheric electron after tsunami-excited acoustic waves reach the ionosphere. Since the tsunamigenic ionospheric hole could be simulated [Shinagawa et al., GRL, 2013], the reported variations are high-possibly pseudo phenomena [Kamogawa and Kakinami, JGR, 2013]. Thus, there are barely a few reports which show the preseismic monotonic variation supported by the concept of the seismic nucleation process. As far as we discuss the preseismic geoelectromagnetical and atmospheric-ionospheric anomalies, preseismic transient events from a few weeks to a few hours prior to the mainshock are paid attention to for the precursor study. In order to identify precursors from a number of anomalies, one has to show a statistical significance of correlation between the earthquake and the anomalies, to elucidate the physical mechanism, or to conduct both statistical and physical approach. Since many speculation of the physical mechanism have been

  6. Bayesian estimation for ionospheric calibration in radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Tol, S.

    2009-01-01

    Radio astronomical observations at low frequencies (< 250 MHz), can be severely distorted by fluctuations in electron density in the ionosphere. The free electrons cause a phase change of electromagnetic waves traveling through the ionosphere. This effect increases for lower frequencies. For this

  7. Estimation of ionospheric energy dissipation for the year 2012 using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, data for the electron precipitation energy(ep) and joule heating energy(jh) have been used in the computation of both mean daily and hourly ionospheric ... with 90% confidence level, which indicates that ionospheric energy dissipation is the dominant channel of energy transfer in that year from the solar wind.

  8. Rocket Measurements Within a Polar Cap Arc: Ionospheric Modelling,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-19

    References Aarons, Jules , Global morphology of ionospheric scintillations, Proc. IEEE, 70, 360, 1982. Banks, P.M., Chapell, C.R., and A.F. Nagy, A new model...penetration of soft electrons into the ionosphere, Planet. Space Sci., 24, 409, 1975. Mantas, George P., Carlson, Herbert C. Jr., and Caesar H. LaHoz

  9. Study of ionospheric anomalies due to impact of typhoon using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and image processing are used to determine Total Electron Content. (TEC) anomalies in the F-layer of the ionosphere relating to Typhoon Nakri for 29 May, 2008 (UTC). PCA and image processing are applied to the global ionospheric map (GIM) with transforms conducted for the time ...

  10. Study of ionospheric anomalies due to impact of typhoon using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ionospheric parameters; Geofisica Pura e Applicata 40. 235–240. Bishop R L and Straus P R 2006 Characterizing ionospheric variations in the vicinity of hurricanes and typhoons using GPS occultation measurements, AGU Fall Meet- ing (San Francisco, Dec. 11–15, 2006); EOS Transactions,. American Geophysical Union ...

  11. Study of ionospheric anomalies due to impact of typhoon using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and image processing are used to determine Total Electron Content (TEC) anomalies in the F-layer of the ionosphere relating to Typhoon Nakri for 29 May, 2008 (UTC). PCA and image processing are applied to the global ionospheric map (GIM) with transforms conducted for the time ...

  12. estimation of ionospheric energy dissipation for the year 2012 using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    both mean daily and hourly ionospheric energy dissipation using Østgaard's empirical relation. The computation has been ... energy dissipation is the dominant channel of energy transfer in that year from the solar wind. This is consistent with many ..... converted to thermal energy for dissipation in the ionosphere (Kallio, et ...

  13. Comparison of two views on the structure of ionospheric currents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are two views on the structure of ionospheric currents, here symbolized as VIEW 1 and VIEW 2. The essential difference between them is that VIEW I supports the existence of two ionospheric current layers in the dip equatorial zone as measured by many rockets (Onwumechili,1992b,c). Contrary to the rocket ...

  14. GPS-based ionospheric tomography with a constrained adaptive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Fredman and Nickisch 2001; Kunitsyn et al. 2010). At present, GPS-based ionospheric tomography is the research focus in the fields of space geodesy and space physics since it can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional variation information of the ionosphere. This is very useful for the develop- ment of GNSS such ...

  15. Effects of geomagnetic storm on low latitude ionospheric total ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    netospheric polar cap region causes a disturbance in geomagnetic field. As a result of this distur- bance, the energy inputs from the magnetosphere to the upper atmosphere can cause a dramatic change in electron density of the F region of the ionosphere. Geomagnetic storms produce large and. Keywords. Ionospheric ...

  16. A study of the ionospheric signature of ion supply from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loranc, M.A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the ionosphere as a source of magnetospheric plasma; in particular, the observations of upwelling ions (UWI) by the DE-1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer have illustrated the significance of low-energy ion supply to the magnetosphere. The composition of the UWI implies an ionospheric source, and the Dynamics Explorer dual satellite mission provides an opportunity to search for the ionospheric signature of UWI. Magnetometer data from both satellites are used to determine magnetic conjunctions of the satellites; these conjunctions are searched for correlated observations of UWI and upward flowing thermal ion (UFI) events. Four cases of correlated observations are presented as proof of that the UFI are indeed the ionospheric signature of UWI; it is found from these examples that the event are associated with intense field-aligned currents at both satellites and with anti-sunward convection, enhanced fluxes of low-energy precipitating electrons from the boundary plasma sheet, and upward thermal ion fluxes in excess of 10 9 cm -2 s -1 at DE-2. While USI are primarily a dayside phenomena, UFI are found in all local time sectors sampled by DE-2

  17. Ionospheric Electron Densities at Mars: Comparison of Mars Express Ionospheric Sounding and MAVEN Local Measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Fowler, C.M.; Kopf, A.J.; Andersson, L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Andrews, D.J.; Truhlík, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 12 (2017), s. 12393-12405 E-ISSN 2169-9402 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Mars * ionosphere * MARSIS * Mars Express * MAVEN * radar sounding Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024629/full

  18. Weather and Climate Modifications Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R. L.; Slinn, W. G.N.; Laulainen, N. S.; Kleckner, E. W.; Thorp, J. M.; Wolf, M. A.

    1976-03-01

    This section is comprised of seven papers. Human activity can change the average atmospheric temperature and humidity values, as well as the chemical composition of the air. These changes affect local and regional weather and climate, and may have a significant influence on global climate. Examples of human activity that produce these changes are the increase of CO/sub 2/ content of the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuel; the production of aerosols by industry, automobiles, home heating units and agricultural practices; the releases of large quantities of heat and water vapor from the cooling facilities of large fossil and nuclear power plants; and t modification of the earth's albedo due to urbanization, agricullture, deforestation reservoirs and soil spills. Research activities have resulted in an overview of the important natural and anthropogenic perturbations of weather and climate, and the resulting need for further climatic research; a theoretical study that may contribute to a better understanding of atmospheric electricity; atmospheric turbidity data at the Hanford site and their relationships to changes in the aerosol size distribution; initial efforts in determining the optical properties of aerosols such that we can better understand the radiative properties of the atmosphere; and the characterization of large power plant cooling tower plumes through the use of long exposure photography and instrumented aircraft. (auth)

  19. A Study on the Radio Propagation in the Korean Ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hee Bae

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the ionosphere on the radio wave propagation are scattering of radio waves, attenuation, angle error, ranging error, and time delay. If ionospheric conditions are suitable, the charged particles can remove energy from radio waves and thus attenuate the signal. Also, a radio wave traveling a path along which the electron density is not constant undergoes changes in direction, position and time of propagation. The present study is based on Korean ionospheric data obtained at the AnYong Radio Research Institute from Jan. 1985 through Oct. 1989. The data are used to simulate the Korean ionosphere following the Chapman law. The effects of the model ionosphere on the radio wave propagation, such as the angle, position error, time delay, and the attenuation, are studies for the various cases of the wave frequency and the altitude.

  20. Ionospheric Cycle Slip Processing in Triple-frequency GNSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Lingyong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method based on three linear independence geometry-free and ionosphere-free (GIF combinations to detect and repair cycle-slip is advanced to finishing the cycle slip processing under the higher ionospheric activity. In order to ensure that the cycle slip correction is accurate, the repair value is validated by a second-order, time-difference phase ionospheric residual (STPIR combination. And then, this method is validated and analyzed by using the triple-frequency data with higher ionospheric error. The experiment results show that this method can nearly detect and repair all the cycle slip except several insensitive cycle slip under high ionospheric activity. So this method can be used to cycle slip procession in triple-frequency precise point position and other un-differenced dynamic navigation and position.

  1. Ionospheric disturbances in D-layer recorded by VLF receiver at Tashkent IHY station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008. Solar flare events are permanently observed and the analysis showed that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is explained. We have studied VLF amplitude anomalies related to the earthquakes (EQs) occurred in the recent years with magnitude more than 5 on the path way from the VLF transmitters to the Tashkent station assuming that propagation of VLF ground-based transmitters signals can be perturbed by EQ preparation can be detectable from the ground-based measurements in the VLF bands. For analyzing narrowband data we have used the Nighttime Fluctuation (NF) method paying attention to the data obtained during the local nighttime (20:00 LT-04:00 LT). The mean nighttime amplitude (or trend) and nighttime fluctuation are found to increase significantly before the EQ occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. The obtained results have revealed an agreement with VLF amplitude anomalies observed in Tashkent VLF station during the strong EQs occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. Some results are presented to show the probing potentiality of VLF waves to predict short term EQs with high magnitude.

  2. Martian Atmospheric and Ionospheric plasma Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Rickard

    2016-04-01

    Solar forcing is responsible for the heating, ionization, photochemistry, and erosion processes in the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of the terrestrial planets. Of the four terrestrial planets, the Earth is the only one with a fully developed biosphere, while our kin Venus and Mars have evolved into arid inhabitable planets. As for Mars, there are ample evidences for an early Noachian, water rich period on Mars. The question is, what made Mars evolve so differently compared to the Earth? Various hydrosphere and atmospheric evolution scenarios for Mars have been forwarded based on surface morphology, chemical composition, simulations, semi-empiric (in-situ data) models, and the long-term evolution of the Sun. Progress has been made, but the case is still open regarding the changes that led to the present arid surface and tenuous atmosphere at Mars. This presentation addresses the long-term variability of the Sun, the solar forcing impact on the Martian atmosphere, and its interaction with the space environment - an electromagnetic wave and particle interaction with the upper atmosphere that has implications for its photochemistry, composition, and energization that governs thermal and non-thermal escape. Non-thermal escape implies an electromagnetic upward energization of planetary ions and molecules to velocities above escape velocity, a process governed by a combination of solar EUV radiation (ionization), and energy and momentum transfer by the solar wind. The ion escape issue dates back to the early Soviet and US-missions to Mars, but the first more accurate estimates of escape rates came with the Phobos-2 mission in 1989. Better-quality ion composition measurement results of atmospheric/ionospheric ion escape from Mars, obtained from ESA Mars Express (MEX) instruments, have improved our understanding of the ion escape mechanism. With the NASA MAVEN spacecraft orbiting Mars since Sept. 2014, dual in-situ measurement with plasma instruments are now

  3. Constructing Data Albums for Significant Severe Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ethan; Zavodsky, Bradley; Ramachandran, Rahul; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Li, Xiang; Bakare, Rohan; Basyal, Sabin; Conover, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Data Albums provide a one-stop-shop combining datasets from NASA, NWS, online new sources, and social media. Data Albums will help meteorologists better understand severe weather events to improve predictive models. Developed a new ontology for severe weather based off current hurricane Data Album and selected relevant NASA datasets for inclusion.

  4. The Varying Core Magnetic Field from a Space Weather Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandea, Mioara; Purucker, Michael

    2018-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent advances in our understanding of geomagnetism, and its relevance to terrestrial space weather. It also discusses specific core magnetic field features such as the dipole moment decay, the evolution of the South Atlantic anomaly, and the location of the magnetic poles that are of importance for the practice of space weather.

  5. Use of indigenous knowledge to determine weather patterns: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the prevalence and erratic nature of changes in weather patterns, these patterns are still difficult to determine. People in the agricultural sector, in particular, need to understand weather pattern changes because of the effects of these changes on their social and economic lives. Many agriculturalists, especially ...

  6. Weather derivatives: Business hedge instrument from weather risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Bojan S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the late 1990s, a new financial market was developed - a market for weather derivatives, so that the risk managers could hedge their exposure to weather risk. After a rather slow start, the weather derivatives market had started to grow rapidly. Risk managers could no longer blame poor financial results on the weather. Weather risk could now be removed by hedging procedure. This paper will explain briefly what the weather derivatives are and will point out at some of the motives for use of derivatives. Thereafter we will look at the history of the weather risk market, how the weather derivatives market has developed in recent years and also who are the current and potential players in the weather derivatives market.

  7. Spaceborne weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  8. Present and Future IGS Ionosphere Working Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krankowski, Andrzej

    Nowadays the Ionosphere Working Group of the International GNSS Service (IGS) generates two types of ionospheric products: final and rapid, respectively. This IGS Iono WG started the routine generation of ionosphere vertical total electron content (TEC) maps in June 1998. There are currently four IGS Associate Analysis Centres (IAACs) for ionosphere products: CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe, University of Berne, Switzerland), ESA/ESOC (European Space Operations Center of ESA, Darmstadt, Germany), JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, U.S.A), and gAGE/UPC (Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain). These centres provide products computed with different approaches. The products are transmitted to an IGS Ionosphere Product Coordinator, who produces a weighted combined product. Presently the weights are defined by the IAAC global TEC maps evaluation carried out by 1 UPC center. From January 2008, this coordination is carried out by the GRL/UWM (Geodynamics Research Laboratory of the University of the Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland). The IGS produces a Final Ionosphere product in IONEX format with resolution of 5 degrees in longitude and 2.5 degrees in latitude with a latency of 10 days, and a rapid solution with a latency of 1 day. During a period of about 10 years of continuous IGS ionosphere operation, the techniques used by the IAACs and the strategies of combination have improved in such a way that the combined IGS Ionosphere TEC maps are now significantly more accurate and robust. The purpose of this paper is, on one hand, to show the present performance of the combined final and rapid IGS Ionosphere TEC maps, and on the other hand to summarize the present and future related activities within the IGS Ionosphere WG.

  9. Anthropogenic Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Balogh, A.; Erickson, P. J.; Huba, J. D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2017-11-01

    Anthropogenic effects on the space environment started in the late 19th century and reached their peak in the 1960s when high-altitude nuclear explosions were carried out by the USA and the Soviet Union. These explosions created artificial radiation belts near Earth that resulted in major damages to several satellites. Another, unexpected impact of the high-altitude nuclear tests was the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) that can have devastating effects over a large geographic area (as large as the continental United States). Other anthropogenic impacts on the space environment include chemical release experiments, high-frequency wave heating of the ionosphere and the interaction of VLF waves with the radiation belts. This paper reviews the fundamental physical process behind these phenomena and discusses the observations of their impacts.

  10. Performance of GPS slant total electron content and IRI-Plas-STEC for days with ionospheric disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feza Arikan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Total Electron Content (TEC is an important observable parameter of the ionosphere which forms the main source of error for space based navigation and positioning systems. Since the deployment of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS, cost-effective estimation of TEC between the earth based receiver and Global Positioning System (GPS satellites became the major means of investigation of local and regional disturbance for earthquake precursor and augmentation system studies. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI extended to plasmasphere (IRI-Plas is the most developed ionospheric and plasmaspheric climatic model that provides hourly, monthly median of electron density distribution globally. Recently, IONOLAB group (www.ionolab.org has presented a new online space weather service that can compute slant TEC (STEC on a desired ray path for a given date and time using IRI-Plas model (IRI-Plas-STEC. In this study, the performance of the model based STEC is compared with GPS-STEC computed according to the estimation method developed by the IONOLAB group and includes the receiver bias as IONOLAB-BIAS (IONOLAB-STEC. Using Symmetric Kullback–Leibler Distance (SKLD, Cross Correlation (CC coefficient and the metric norm (L2N to compare IRI-Plas-STEC and IONOLAB-STEC for the month of October 2011 over the Turkish National Permanent GPS Network (TNPGN-Active, it has been observed that SKLD provides a good indicator of disturbance for both earthquakes and geomagnetic storms.

  11. Ionospheric precursors of earthquakes recorded by VLF receiver at Tashkent IHY station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojiev, S. R.; Ahmedov, B. J.; Eshkuvatov, H. E.

    2014-08-01

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008. We have studied VLF amplitude anomalies related to the EQs occurred in 2008-2009 years with magnitude more than 5 on the path way from the VLF transmitters to the Tashkent station assuming that propagation of VLF ground-based transmitters signals can be perturbed by EQ preparation detectable from the ground-based measurements in the VLF bands. For analyzing narrowband data we have used the nighttime fluctuation (NF) method paying attention to the data obtained during the local nighttime (20:00 LT-04:00 LT) in Tashkent where the VLF receiver is operating. The mean nighttime amplitude (or trend) and nighttime fluctuation are found to increase significantly before the EQ occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. The obtained results have revealed an agreement with VLF amplitude anomalies observed in Tashkent VLF station during the strong EQs occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. Some results are presented to show the probing potentiality of VLF waves to predict short term EQs with high magnitude.

  12. Observations of Global and Regional Ionospheric Irregularities and Scintillation Using GNSS Tracking Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Valant-Spaight, Bonnie; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Romans, Larry J.; Skone, Susan; Sparks, Lawrence; Hall, G. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The rate of TEC index (ROTI) is a measurement that characterizes ionospheric irregularities. It can be obtained from standard GNSS dual-frequency phase data collected using a geodetic type of GNSS receiver. By processing GPS data from ground-based networks of International GNSS Service and Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS), ROTI maps have been produced to observe global and regional scintillation activities. A major mid-latitude scintillation event in the contiguous United States is reported here that was captured in ROTI maps produced using CORS GPS data collected during a space weather storm. The analyses conducted in this work and previously by another group indicate that ROTI is a good occurrence indicator of both amplitude and phase scintillations of GPS L-band signals, even though the magnitudes of ROTI, S4, and sigma(sub phi) can be different. For example, our analysis indicates that prominent ROTI and the L1 phase scintillation (sigma(sub phi)) are well correlated temporally in the polar region while L1 amplitude scintillation rarely occurs. The differences are partially attributed to physics processes in different latitude regions, such as high-speed plasma convection in the polar region that can suppress the amplitude scintillation. An analysis of the impact of ionospheric scintillation on precise positioning, which requires use of dual-frequency phase data, is also conducted. The results indicate that significant (more than an order of magnitude) positioning errors can occur under phase scintillation conditions.

  13. Estuary wader capacity following severe weather mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.A.; Baillie, S.R.; Clark, N.A.; Langston, R.H.W.

    1993-01-01

    The building of a tidal power barrage across an estuary may lead to substantial changes in its ecology. Many of Britain's estuaries hold internationally important numbers of waders. Careful consideration, therefore, needs to be given to the likely effects of tidal power barrages on wader populations. The opportunity for increased understanding of the mechanisms which govern wader populations was provided by a period of severe winter weather in 1991, which resulted in a substantial mortality of waders in eastern England. Such conditions are known to be stressful to birds and the study objectives were to investigate both the effects of and recovery from severe weather. (author)

  14. Spatial-temporal distribution of the ionospheric perturbations prior to Ms≥6.0 earthquakes in China main land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wan, Weixing; Shen, Xuhui; Zhang, Xuemin

    2015-04-01

    Recently, earthquake precursor in the ionosphere is becoming one of the most challenging issues both in earthquake science and ionospheric science field. Based on the analysis of ionospheric data before strong EQs, some perturbations have been found in D, E, F layers respectively over the epicentral areas, including case and statistics studies. For the earthquake monitoring and prediction, we need to understand the evolutional features both in temporal series and spatial distribution in order to build their relationship with earthquakes. In this study, using GPS TEC data (from Jet Populsion Laboratry), we have statistically analyzed the ionospheric perturbations prior to the Ms≥6.0 earthquakes in China main land from November 1st, 1998 to December 31st, 2010. For each earthquake, LB=M-1.5(M-LQ) and UB=M+1.5(UQ-M) were selected as the threshold to abstract the disturbance from 0 to 15 days around the epicenter, and then we summed all the earthquakes results. The obtained results indicated that the GPS TEC had the same variation trend above the epicenter and eastern, southern, western, northern directions 15 days before earthquakes, and decrease occurred in all the 5 directions from 3 days to 5 days. Through different space scale analysis of ±10°, ±20°, ±30°, it was found that the maximum seismo-ionospheric disturbance didn't appear just above the epicenter, but shifted to the magnetic equator, and it was worth to point out that the effected region in ionosphere was about ±15°. Besides this, prior to earthquakes, positive anomalies appeared in the southwestern direction before 14th, 10th days, and there were obviously negative anomalies in the southeastern direction before 5th day. At last, a hypothesis of electrostatic field channel in lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling was used to explain the observed phenomena. If there is penetration or secondary electric field in the ionosphere, it will move upward along the magnetic lines, causing E×B motion

  15. Long time series analysis of ionospheric TEC disturbance over seismically region in southwest China during low solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiangxiang; Yu, Tao; Shan, Xinjian; Liu, Zhan; Wang, Zhenjie

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there are growing interests in studying the seismo-ionospheric disturbance prior to earthquakes, mainly including the anomalies in the electric field, magnetic field and plasma parameters. However, there are still some controversies over this topic, mainly because of strong day-to-day variability of the ionosphere itself. It is hard to determine whether the different forms of ionospheric disturbances are associated with earthquakes or not. Using data of Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONC) and IGS (International GNSS Service), we attempt to give a statistical investigation about the total electron content (TEC) perturbation before 30 Mw6.0+ earthquakes during January 2000 to December 2010 in China. To determine the abnormal TEC signals, a quartile-based process is performed. At each time point we calculated the median M using the TEC values at the same local time for the preceding 15 days. In addition, we calculated the maps of differential TEC from global ionosphere maps (GIM) in the above period. It is shown that TEC anomalies were detected before 20 earthquakes, nearly 67%. The anomalies represent positive before most events and occurred mostly within 2-6 days before the shocks, significantly during the afternoon period, 1200-2000LT. Part of perturbations appeared more than one time. Moreover, the affected area of TEC is not coincide with the vertical projection of the epicenter but shifts equatorward and is controlled by equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest. On the other hand, we analyzed variations of TEC over southwest China during a period of low solar and geomagnetic activity in April-October 2008, based on the data of CMONC. During that time, six large earthquakes with magnitude M≧6.0 occurred around the southwest region of China. The method to detect abnormal TEC signals is same with above statistical study. Known that the decisive role in the ionosphere state is performed by space weather effects, we compared the TEC

  16. Weather at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This report gives general information about how to become a meteorologist and what kinds of jobs exist in that field. Then it goes into detail about why weather is monitored at LANL, how it is done, and where the data can be accessed online.

  17. Weather, Climate, and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Information from the American Institute of Medical Climatologists on human responses to weather and climatic conditions, including clouds, winds, humidity, barometric pressure, heat, cold, and other variables that may exert a pervasive impact on health, behavior, disposition, and the level of efficiency with which individuals function is reviewed.…

  18. Rainy Weather Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Presents ideas on the use of rainy weather for activities in the earth, life, and physical sciences. Topics include formation and collision of raindrops, amount and distribution of rain, shedding of water by plants, mapping puddles and potholes, rainbow formation, stalking storms online, lightning, and comparing particles in the air before and…

  19. Energy and the weather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roggen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Energy companies need to take the weather forecast into account these days. Proper anticipation of wind, sunshine and rain may yield a considerable profit for a programme manager, a trader or a renewable energy producer. Meteo Consult has made the energy market one of its priority issues and is developing all kinds of services to advise and assist the sector [nl

  20. Digital ionospheric sounding in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, B.; Bibl, K.

    1981-01-01

    New ionogram observation techniques were applied at the Goose Bay Ionospheric Observatory (GBIO) in Newfoundland, Canada, and aboard AFGL's Airborne Ionospheric Observatory (AIO), using the Digisonde 128PS system. A receiving array of four crossed-loop antennas at GBIO enabled incidence angle and polarization measurements within the ionogram in addition to the Doppler observations. The Doppler information in the propagation ionograms between the GBIO Digisonde and the moving AIO sounder facilitates the interpreting of different modes of propagation. Software for the AFGL CDC 6600 computer and for a microcomputer was developed for the processing of the digital ionograms. The identification of ordinary and extraordinary echoes in the Goose Bay ionograms greatly simplify the automatic processing of ionograms. Indeed, it became clear that for automatic ionogram trace identification the O and X tagging is a prerequisite. In support of the ESD 414L project an ionogram communicator (ICOM) was added to the GBIO Digisonde providing - via telephone lines - realtime ionogram printouts at the Over-The-Horizon Backscatter Experimental Radar System in Maine. Another Digisonde station was equipped and brought to operation in Keflavik, Iceland, to provide environmental data for the OTH radar operation.

  1. First tomographic image of ionospheric outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Dyson, P. L.; Fraser, B. J.; Morley, S.

    2006-10-01

    An image of the dayside low-energy ion outflow event that occurred on 16 December 2003 was constructed with ground- and space-based GPS (Global Positioning System) Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ion drift meter data from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program). A tomographic reconstruction technique has been applied to the GPS TEC data obtained from the GPS receiver on the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite FedSat. The two dimensional tomographic image of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere reveals a spectacular beam-like dayside ion outflow emanating from the cusp region. The transverse components of the magnetic field in FedSat's NewMag data show the presence of field aligned current (FAC) sheets, indicating the existence of low-energy electron precipitation in the cusp region. The DMSP ion drift data show upward ion drift velocities and upward fluxes of low-energy ions and electrons at the orbiting height of the DMSP spacecraft in the cusp region. This study presents the first tomographic image of the flux tube structure of ionospheric ion outflows from 0.13 Re up to 3.17 Re altitude.

  2. Near real-time ionospheric monitoring over Europe at the Royal Observatory of Belgium using GNSS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergeot Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various scientific applications and services increasingly demand real-time information on the effects of space weather on Earth’s atmosphere. In this frame, the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB takes advantage of the dense EUREF Permanent GNSS Network (EPN to monitor the ionosphere over Europe from the measured delays in the GNSS signals, and provides publicly several derived products. The main ROB products consist of ionospheric vertical Total Electron Content (TEC maps over Europe and their variability estimated in near real-time every 15 min on 0.5° × 0.5° grids using GPS observations. The maps are available online with a latency of ~3 min in IONEX format at ftp://gnss.oma.be and as interactive web pages at www.gnss.be. This paper presents the method used in the ROB-IONO software to generate the maps. The ROB-TEC maps show a good agreement with widely used post-processed products such as IGS and ESA with mean differences of 1.3 ± 0.9 and 0.4 ± 1.6 TECu respectively for the period 2012 to mid-2013. In addition, we tested the reliability of the ROB-IONO software to detect abnormal ionospheric activity during the Halloween 2003 ionospheric storm. For this period, the mean differences with IGS and ESA maps are 0.9 ± 2.2 and 0.6 ± 6.8 TECu respectively with maximum differences (>38 TECu occurring during the major phase of the storm. These differences are due to the lower resolution in time and space of both IGS and ESA maps compared to the ROB-TEC maps. A description of two recent events, one on March 17, 2013 and one on February 27, 2014 also highlights the capability of the method adopted in the ROB-IONO software to detect in near real-time abnormal ionospheric behaviour over Europe. In that frame, ROB maintains a data base publicly available with identified ionospheric events since 2012.

  3. Alfven waves in the auroral ionosphere: A numerical model compared with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, D.J.; Kelley, M.C.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The authors solve a linear numerical model of Alfven waves reflecting from the high-latitude ionosphere, both to better understanding the role of the ionosphere in the magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling process and to compare model results with in situ measurements. They use the model to compute the frequency-dependent amplitude and phase relations between the meridional electric and the zonal magnetic fields due to Alfven waves. These relations are compared with measurements taken by an auroral sounding rocket flow in the morningside oval and by the HILAT satellite traversing the oval at local noon. The sounding rocket's trajectory was mostly parallel to the auroral oval, and is measured enhanced fluctuating field energy in regions of electron precipitation. The rocket-measured phase data are in excellent agreement with the Alfven wave model, and the relation between the modeled and the measured by HILAT are related by the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity Σ p , indicating that the measured field fluctuations were due mainly to structured field-aligned current systems. A reason for the relative lack of Alfven wave energy in the HILAT measurements could be the fact that the satellite traveled mostly perpendicular to the oval and therefore quickly traversed narrow regions of electron precipitation and associated wave activity

  4. Effects of the Ionosphere on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Abaham, Saji; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Among the remote sensing applications currently being considered from space is the measurement of sea surface salinity. The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation and for modeling energy exchange with the atmosphere. Passive microwave remote sensors operating near 1.4 GHz (L-band) could provide data needed to fill the gap in current coverage and to complement in situ arrays being planned to provide subsurface profiles in the future. However, the dynamic range of the salinity signal in the open ocean is relatively small and propagation effects along the path from surface to sensor must be taken into account. In particular, Faraday rotation and even attenuation/emission in the ionosphere can be important sources of error. The purpose or this work is to estimate the magnitude of these effects in the context of a future remote sensing system in space to measure salinity in L-band. Data will be presented as a function of time location and solar activity using IRI-95 to model the ionosphere. The ionosphere presents two potential sources of error for the measurement of salinity: Rotation of the polarization vector (Faraday rotation) and attenuation/emission. Estimates of the effect of these two phenomena on passive remote sensing over the oceans at L-band (1.4 GHz) are presented.

  5. Observations and modeling of ionospheric disturbance excited by 2015 Calbuco volcano eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. C.; Lin, C. C. H.; Chen, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions could trigger acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that propagate to the upper atmosphere with increasing oscillation amplitudes. At the ionospheric heights, perturbations in neutrals could affect the plasma through momentum exchanges and lead to disturbances of electron density detectable by dual-frequency observation of GPS. In this study, we observed ionospheric total electron content (TEC) disturbances resulting from the Plinian volcano eruption of Calbuco, Chile in 2015. The eruption event was consist of two major eruptions occurred during 22- 23 April. Observations show clear time rate change of TEC disturbances followed by disturbance oscillations. Spectral analysis of the TEC disturbances indicates two distinguished frequency peaks at 3.7 and 4.4 mHz. To understand the mechanism responsible to the oscillations, we perform theoretical simulations using a nonlinear and non-hyrostatic atmosphere-ionosphere perturbation model. By applying a point source of energy deposition to synthetic the volcano eruption effect in the model, simulations show ion density disturbances with the similar oscillation peak appearing around 3.7 mHz. Comparisons between the detailed simulation results and observations will also be made.

  6. Electrodynamics and temporal characteristics of the East African ionosphere inferred from ground-based observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtie, B.; Negussie, M.; Radichella, S.; Nava, B.; Yizengaw, E.; Groves, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Information on the characteristics of the equatorial ionosphere inferred from observations is vital to understand its electrodynamics. In this paper we present the characteristics of the East African ionosphere inferred from ground based observations. These observations are made using chain of GPS receivers and the daily and seasonally characteristics of the ionosphere are presented. We have also used an empirical model to reproduce these observations. This is done by comparing the total electron content (TEC) measurements obtained from a ground-based GPS receiver and the corresponding values obtained from the empirical model, which is driven solely by the daily values of F10.7 solar index as input. We found that the model is capable of reproducing the measurement values quite well in the time intervals 0200- 0400 UT for a year. Also, we have shown that the model gives better approximation of the real measurements in June and December Solstices than in March and October equinox. We have discussed the possible electrodynamics scenarios that could yield these observational results.

  7. A survey of customers of space weather information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Rabanal, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an analysis of the users of space weather information based on 2783 responses to an online survey among subscribers of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center e-mail services. The survey requested information focused on the three NOAA space weather scales: geomagnetic storms, solar radiation storms, and radio blackouts. Space weather information is most commonly obtained for reasons of human safety and continuity or reliability of operations. The information is primarily used for situational awareness, as aid to understand anomalies, to avoid impacts on current and near-future operations by implementing mitigating strategies, and to prepare for potential near-future impacts that might occur in conjunction with contingencies that include electric power outages or GPS perturbations. Interest in, anticipated impacts from, and responses to the three main categories of space weather are quite uniform across societal sectors. Approximately 40% of the respondents expect serious to very serious impacts from space weather events if no action were taken to mitigate or in the absence of adequate space weather information. The impacts of space weather are deemed to be substantially reduced because of the availability of, and their response to, space weather forecasts and alerts. Current and near-future space weather conditions are generally highly valued, considered useful, and generally, though not fully, adequate to avoid or mitigate societal impacts. We conclude that even among those receiving space weather information, there is considerable uncertainty about the possible impacts of space weather and thus about how to act on the space weather information that is provided.

  8. Performance Analysis of Different NeQuick Ionospheric Model Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ningbo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Galileo adopts NeQuick model for single-frequency ionospheric delay corrections. For the standard operation of Galileo, NeQuick model is driven by the effective ionization level parameter Az instead of the solar activity level index, and the three broadcast ionospheric coefficients are determined by a second-polynomial through fitting the Az values estimated from globally distributed Galileo Sensor Stations (GSS. In this study, the processing strategies for the estimation of NeQuick ionospheric coefficients are discussed and the characteristics of the NeQuick coefficients are also analyzed. The accuracy of Global Position System (GPS broadcast Klobuchar, original NeQuick2 and fitted NeQuickC as well as Galileo broadcast NeQuickG models is evaluated over the continental and oceanic regions, respectively, in comparison with the ionospheric total electron content (TEC provided by global ionospheric maps (GIM, GPS test stations and JASON-2 altimeter. The results show that NeQuickG can mitigate ionospheric delay by 54.2%~65.8% on a global scale, and NeQuickC can correct for 71.1%~74.2% of the ionospheric delay. NeQuick2 performs at the same level with NeQuickG, which is a bit better than that of GPS broadcast Klobuchar model.

  9. Application of generalized singular value decomposition to ionospheric tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bhuyan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The electron density distribution of the low- and mid-latitude ionosphere has been investigated by the computerized tomography technique using a Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD based algorithm. Model ionospheric total electron content (TEC data obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere 2001 and slant relative TEC data measured at a chain of three stations receiving transit satellite transmissions in Alaska, USA are used in this analysis. The issue of optimum efficiency of the GSVD algorithm in the reconstruction of ionospheric structures is being addressed through simulation of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA, in addition to its application to investigate complicated ionospheric density irregularities. Results show that the Generalized Cross Validation approach to find the regularization parameter and the corresponding solution gives a very good reconstructed image of the low-latitude ionosphere and the EIA within it. Provided that some minimum norm is fulfilled, the GSVD solution is found to be least affected by considerations, such as pixel size and number of ray paths. The method has also been used to investigate the behaviour of the mid-latitude ionosphere under magnetically quiet and disturbed conditions.

  10. Influence of Ionospheric Irregularities on GNSS Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tinin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used numerical simulation to study the effects of ionospheric irregularities on accuracy of global navigation satellite system (GNSS measurements, using ionosphere-free (in atmospheric research and geometry-free (in ionospheric research dual-frequency phase combinations. It is known that elimination of these effects from multifrequency GNSS measurements is handi-capped by diffraction effects during signal propagation through turbulent ionospheric plasma with the inner scale being smaller than the Fresnel radius. We demonstrated the possibility of reducing the residual ionospheric error in dual-frequency GNSS remote sensing in ionosphere-free combination by Fresnel inversion. The inversion parameter, the distance to the virtual screen, may be selected from the minimum of amplitude fluctuations. This suggests the possibility of improving the accuracy of GNSS remote sensing in meteorology. In the study of ionospheric disturbances with the aid of geometry-free combination, the Fresnel inversion eliminates only the third-order error. To eliminate the random TEC component which, like the measured average TEC, is the first-order correction, we should use temporal filtering (averaging.

  11. A teaching-learning sequence about weather map reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrikas, Achilleas; Stavrou, Dimitrios; Skordoulis, Constantine

    2017-07-01

    In this paper a teaching-learning sequence (TLS) introducing pre-service elementary teachers (PET) to weather map reading, with emphasis on wind assignment, is presented. The TLS includes activities about recognition of wind symbols, assignment of wind direction and wind speed on a weather map and identification of wind characteristics in a weather forecast. Sixty PET capabilities and difficulties in understanding weather maps were investigated, using inquiry-based learning activities. The results show that most PET became more capable of reading weather maps and assigning wind direction and speed on them. Our results also show that PET could be guided to understand meteorology concepts useful in everyday life and in teaching their future students.

  12. Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) Model - An Unified Concept for Earthquake Precursors Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulinets, S.; Ouzounov, D.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a conception of complex multidisciplinary approach to the problem of clarification the nature of short-term earthquake precursors observed in atmosphere, atmospheric electricity and in ionosphere and magnetosphere. Our approach is based on the most fundamental principles of tectonics giving understanding that earthquake is an ultimate result of relative movement of tectonic plates and blocks of different sizes. Different kind of gases: methane, helium, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide leaking from the crust can serve as carrier gases for radon including underwater seismically active faults. Radon action on atmospheric gases is similar to the cosmic rays effects in upper layers of atmosphere: it is the air ionization and formation by ions the nucleus of water condensation. Condensation of water vapor is accompanied by the latent heat exhalation is the main cause for observing atmospheric thermal anomalies. Formation of large ion clusters changes the conductivity of boundary layer of atmosphere and parameters of the global electric circuit over the active tectonic faults. Variations of atmospheric electricity are the main source of ionospheric anomalies over seismically active areas. Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model can explain most of these events as a synergy between different ground surface, atmosphere and ionosphere processes and anomalous variations which are usually named as short-term earthquake precursors. A newly developed approach of Interdisciplinary Space-Terrestrial Framework (ISTF) can provide also a verification of these precursory processes in seismically active regions. The main outcome of this paper is the unified concept for systematic validation of different types of earthquake precursors united by physical basis in one common theory.

  13. The effect of tail stretching on the ionospheric accessibility of relativistic electron beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, J.; Johnson, J.; Sanchez, E. R.; Kaganovich, I.; Greklek-McKeon, M.; Powis, T.

    2017-12-01

    New accelerator technologies have made it possible to install a lightweight electron beam accelerator onto small to medium satellites. Electron beams fired along the geomagnetic field would be able to carry energy flux into the ionosphere if they were fired into the loss cone, making these particles observable from the ground. Such an experiment would provide a way to accurately map field lines. One of the important challenges to utilizing this concept is understanding accessibility of these electrons to the ionosphere. While relativistic electron beams are generally more stable than lower energy beams, they are more sensitive to the effects of field-line curvature, which can significantly modify the loss cone [Porazik et al., 2014] making accessibility to the ionosphere sensitive to the launch angle with respect to the magnetic field. We examine the loss cone for 1 MeV electrons in a realistic magnetospheric geometry considering, in particular, the role of field-line stretching. To map the loss cone, we consider conservation of the first adiabatic invariant to second order in ρ/L using the asymptotic series derived by Gardner [Phys Fluids, 1966], which is valid on the midnight meridian. We investigate the loss cones for different magnetic field models controlled by a stretching parameter over the entire midnight meridian. We found that, because tail stretching increases field line curvature near the midplane but decreases curvature elsewhere, accessibility to the ionosphere is increased by tail stretching in regions above and below the midplane, although accessibility of particles passing through the midplane is reduced. This result implies that satellites armed with electron beam accelerators may be able to visibly affect the atmosphere from distances greater than previously anticipated.

  14. Weatherization Works: An interim report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation is the first comprehensive evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program since 1984. The evaluation was designed to accomplish the following goals: Estimate energy savings and cost effectiveness; Assess nonenergy impacts; Describe the weatherization network; Characterize the eligible population and resources; and Identify factors influencing outcomes and opportunities for the future. As a national program, weatherization incorporates considerable diversity due to regional differences. Therefore, evaluation results are presented both in aggregate and for three climate regions: cold, moderate and hot.

  15. Seismo-Ionospheric Coupling as Intensified EIA Observed by Satellite Electron Density and GPS-TEC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, K.; Jangsoo, C.; Kim, S. G.; Jeong, K. S.; Parrot, M.; Pulinets, S. A.; Oyama, K. I.

    2014-12-01

    Examples of intensified EIA features temporally and spatially related to large earthquakes observed by satellites and GPS-TEC are introduced. The precursory, concurrent, and ex-post enhancements of EIA represented by the equatorial electron density, which are thought to be related to the M8.7 Northern Sumatra earthquake of March 2005, the M8.0 Pisco earthquake of August 2007, and the M7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008, are shown with space weather condition. Based on the case studies, statistical analysis on the ionospheric electron density data measured by the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite (DEMETER) over a period of 2005-2010 was executed in order to investigate the correlation between seismic activity and equatorial plasma density variations. To simplify the analysis, three equatorial regions with frequent earthquakes were selected and then one-dimensional time series analysis between the daily seismic activity indices and the EIA intensity indices were performed for each region with excluding the possible effects from the geomagnetic and solar activity. The statistically significant values of the lagged cross-correlation function, particularly in the region with minimal effects of longitudinal asymmetry, indicate that some of the very large earthquakes with M > 7.0 in the low latitude region can accompany observable seismo-ionospheric coupling phenomena in the form of EIA enhancements, even though the seismic activity is not the most significant driver of the equatorial ionospheric evolution. The physical mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric coupling to explain the observation and the possibility of earthquake prediction using the EIA intensity variation are discussed.

  16. The USGS geomagnetism program and its role in space weather monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J.J.; Finn, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic storms result from the dynamic interaction of the solar wind with the coupled magnetospheric-ionospheric system. Large storms represent a potential hazard for the activities and infrastructure of a modern, technologically based society [Baker et al., 2008]; they can cause the loss of radio communications, reduce the accuracy of global positioning systems, damage satellite electronics and affect satellite operations, increase pipeline corrosion, and induce voltage surges in electric power grids, causing blackouts. So while space weather starts with the Sun and is driven by the solar wind, it is on, or just above, the surface of the Earth that the practical effects of space weather are realized. Therefore, ground-based sensor networks, including magnetic observatories [Love, 2008], play an important role in space weather monitoring. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. The USGS Geomagnetism Program and its role in Space-Weather Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Finn, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic storms result from the dynamic interaction of the solar wind with the coupled magnetospheric-ionospheric system. Large storms represent a potential hazard for the activities and infrastructure of a modern, technologically based society [Baker et al., 2008]; they can cause the loss of radio communications, reduce the accuracy of global positioning systems, damage satellite electronics and affect satellite operations, increase pipeline corrosion, and induce voltage surges in electric power grids, causing blackouts. So while space weather starts with the Sun and is driven by the solar wind, it is on, or just above, the surface of the Earth that the practical effects of space weather are realized. Therefore, ground-based sensor networks, including magnetic observatories [Love, 2008], play an important role in space weather monitoring.

  18. The USGS Geomagnetism Program and Its Role in Space Weather Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Finn, Carol A.

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic storms result from the dynamic interaction of the solar wind with the coupled magnetospheric-ionospheric system. Large storms represent a potential hazard for the activities and infrastructure of a modern, technologically based society [Baker et al., 2008]; they can cause the loss of radio communications, reduce the accuracy of global positioning systems, damage satellite electronics and affect satellite operations, increase pipeline corrosion, and induce voltage surges in electric power grids, causing blackouts. So while space weather starts with the Sun and is driven by the solar wind, it is on, or just above, the surface of the Earth that the practical effects of space weather are realized. Therefore, ground-based sensor networks, including magnetic observatories [Love, 2008], play an important role in space weather monitoring.

  19. Review on the solar spectral variability in the EUV for space weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lilensten

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The solar XUV-EUV flux is the main energy source in the terrestrial diurnal thermosphere: it produces ionization, dissociation, excitation and heating. Accurate knowledge of this flux is of prime importance for space weather. We first list the space weather applications that require nowcasting and forecasting of the solar XUV-EUV flux. We then review present models and discuss how they account for the variability of the solar spectrum. We show why the measurement of the full spectrum is difficult, and why it is illusory to retrieve it from its atmospheric effects. We then address the problem of determining a set of observations that are adapted for space weather purposes, in the frame of ionospheric studies. Finally, we review the existing and future space experiments that are devoted to the observation of the solar XUV-EUV spectrum.

  20. Impact of terrestrial weather on the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Akmaev, R. A.; Wu, F.; Anghel, A.; Maruyama, N.; Anderson, D. N.; Codrescu, M. V.; Iredell, M.; Moorthi, S.; Juang, H.-M.; Hou, Y.-T.; Millward, G.

    2008-05-01

    A whole atmosphere model has been developed to demonstrate the impact of terrestrial weather on the upper atmosphere. The dynamical core is based on the NWS Global Forecast System model, which has been extended to cover altitudes from the ground to 600 km. The model includes the physical processes responsible for the stochastic nature of the lower atmosphere, which is a source of variability for the upper atmosphere. The upper levels include diffusive separation, wind induced transport of major species, and uses specific enthalpy as the dependent variable, to accommodate composition dependent gas constants and specific heats. A one-year model simulation reveals planetary waves explicitly up to 100 km altitude. At higher altitude, multi-day periodicities in the dynamics appear as a modulation of tidal amplitudes, particularly the migrating semi-diurnal tide in the lower thermosphere dynamo region. The penetration of planetary wave periodicities from tropospheric weather into the upper atmosphere can explain terrestrial weather sources of variability in the thermospheric and ionospheric.

  1. Space Weather Effects Produced by the Ring Current Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganushkina, Natalia; Jaynes, Allison; Liemohn, Michael

    2017-11-01

    One of the definitions of space weather describes it as the time-varying space environment that may be hazardous to technological systems in space and/or on the ground and/or endanger human health or life. The ring current has its contributions to space weather effects, both in terms of particles, ions and electrons, which constitute it, and magnetic and electric fields produced and modified by it at the ground and in space. We address the main aspects of the space weather effects from the ring current starting with brief review of ring current discovery and physical processes and the Dst-index and predictions of the ring current and storm occurrence based on it. Special attention is paid to the effects on satellites produced by the ring current electrons. The ring current is responsible for several processes in the other inner magnetosphere populations, such as the plasmasphere and radiation belts which is also described. Finally, we discuss the ring current influence on the ionosphere and the generation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC).

  2. Whistler Wave Propagation Through the Ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Invernón, F. J.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the attenuation of whistler waves generated by hypotetical Venusian lightning occurring at the altitude of the cloud layer under different ionospheric conditions. We use the Stanford full-wave method for stratified media of Lehtinen and Inan (2008) to model wave propagation through the ionosphere of Venus. This method calculates the electromagnetic field created by an arbitrary source in a plane-stratified medium (i.e., uniform in the horizontal direction). We see that the existence of holes in electronic densities and the magnetic field configuration caused by solar wind play an important role in the propagation of electromagnetic waves through the Venusian ionosphere.

  3. Ionospheric Cycle Slip Processing in Triple-frequency GNSS

    OpenAIRE

    HUANG Lingyong; ZHAI Guojun; OUYANG Yongzhong; XU Guangxiu; LI Kaifeng; HUANG Xianyuan; FAN Long

    2015-01-01

    A new method based on three linear independence geometry-free and ionosphere-free (GIF) combinations to detect and repair cycle-slip is advanced to finishing the cycle slip processing under the higher ionospheric activity. In order to ensure that the cycle slip correction is accurate, the repair value is validated by a second-order, time-difference phase ionospheric residual (STPIR) combination. And then, this method is validated and analyzed by using the triple-frequency data with higher ion...

  4. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 Th is winter season ... can affect your heart, especially if you have cardiovascular disease . Some people who are outdoors in cold weather ...

  5. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  6. Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI) is an integrated database of severe weather records for the United States. SWDI enables a user to search through a variety...

  7. COSMIC Payload in NCAR-NASPO GPS Satellite System for Severe Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai-Chen, C.

    Severe weather, such as cyclones, heavy rainfall, outburst of cold air, etc., results in great disaster all the world. It is the mission for the scientists to design a warning system, to predict the severe weather systems and to reduce the damage of the society. In Taiwan, National Satellite Project Office (NSPO) initiated ROCSAT-3 program at 1997. She scheduled the Phase I conceptual design to determine the mission for observation weather system. Cooperating with National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR), NSPO involved an international cooperation research and operation program to build a 32 GPS satellites system. NCAR will offer 24 GPS satellites. The total expanse will be US 100 millions. NSPO also provide US 80 millions for launching and system engineering operation. And NCAR will be responsible for Payload Control Center and Fiducial Network. The cooperative program contract has been signed by Taiwan National Science Council, Taipei Economic Cultural Office of United States and American Institute in Taiwan. One of the payload is COSMIC, Constellation Observation System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate. It is a GPS meteorology instrument system. The system will observe the weather information, e. g. electron density profiles, horizontal and vertical TEC and CFT scintillation and communication outage maps. The mission is to obtain the weather data such as vertical temperature profiles, water vapor distribution and pressure distribution over the world for global weather forecasting, especially during the severe weather period. The COSMIC Conference held on November, 1998. The export license was also issued by Department of Commerce of Unites States at November, 1998. Recently, NSPO begun to train their scientists to investigate the system. Scientists simulate the observation data to combine the existing routine satellite infrared cloud maps, radar echo and synoptic weather analysis for severe weather forecasting. It is hopeful to provide more accurate

  8. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Romanov, Alexey; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positive correlation between the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies and the Tohoku earthquake. This study may lead to a better understanding of the response of the atmosphere/ionosphere to the Great Tohoku earthquake.

  9. Study of GNSS Loss of Lock Characteristics under Ionosphere Scintillation with GNSS Data at Weipa (Australia) During Solar Maximum Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Fu, Lianjie; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Chunxi

    2017-09-25

    One of the adverse impacts of scintillation on GNSS signals is the loss of lock status, which can lead to GNSS geometry and visibility reductions that compromise the accuracy and integrity of navigation performance. In this paper the loss of lock based on ionosphere scintillation in this solar maximum phase has been well investigated with respect to both temporal and spatial behaviors, based on GNSS observatory data collected at Weipa (Australia; geographic: 12.45° S, 130.95° E; geomagnetic: 21.79° S, 214.41° E) from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that the percentage of occurrence of loss of lock events under ionosphere scintillation is closely related with solar activity and seasonal shifts. Loss of lock behaviors under ionosphere scintillation related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed, with some distinct characteristics found. The influences of daytime scintillation and geomagnetic storms on loss of lock have also been discussed in details. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of-loss of lock under ionosphere scintillation in global regions, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions at Australian low latitudes.

  10. Artificial periodic irregularities in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Rietveld

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial periodic irregularities (API are produced in the ionospheric plasma by a powerful standing electromagnetic wave reflected off the F region. The resulting electron-density irregularities can scatter other high-frequency waves if the Bragg scattering condition is met. Such measurements have been performed at mid-latitudes for two decades and have been developed into a useful ionospheric diagnostic technique. We report here the first measurements from a high-latitude station, using the EISCAT heating facility near Tromsø, Norway. Both F-region and lower-altitude ionospheric echoes have been obtained, but the bulk of the data has been in the E and D regions with echoes extending down to 52-km altitude. Examples of API are shown, mainly from the D region, together with simultaneous VHF incoherent-scatter-radar (ISR data. Vertical velocities derived from the rate of phase change during the irregularity decay are shown and compared with velocities derived from the ISR. Some of the API-derived velocities in the 75–115-km height range appear consistent with vertical neutral winds as shown by their magnitudes and by evidence of gravity waves, while other data in the 50–70-km range show an unrealistically large bias. For a comparison with ISR data it has proved difficult to get good quality data sets overlapping in height and time. The initial comparisons show some agreement, but discrepancies of several metres per second do not yet allow us to conclude that the two techniques are measuring the same quantity. The irregularity decay time-constants between about 53 and 70 km are compared with the results of an advanced ion-chemistry model, and height profiles of recorded signal power are compared with model estimates in the same altitude range. The calculated amplitude shows good agreement with the data in that the maximum occurs at about the same height as that of the measured amplitude. The calculated time-constant agrees very well with the

  11. An Overview of Scientific and Space Weather Results from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; de la Beaujardiere, O.; Hunton, D.; Heelis, R.; Earle, G.; Strauss, P.; Bernhardt, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission of the Air Force Research Laboratory is described. C/NOFS science objectives may be organized into three categories: (1) to understand physical processes active in the background ionosphere and thermosphere in which plasma instabilities grow; (2) to identify mechanisms that trigger or quench the plasma irregularities responsible for signal degradation; and (3) to determine how the plasma irregularities affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves. The satellite was launched in April, 2008 into a low inclination (13 deg), elliptical (400 x 850 km) orbit. The satellite sensors measure the following parameters in situ: ambient and fluctuating electron densities, AC and DC electric and magnetic fields, ion drifts and large scale ion composition, ion and electron temperatures, and neutral winds. C/NOFS is also equipped with a GPS occultation receiver and a radio beacon. In addition to the satellite sensors, complementary ground-based measurements, theory, and advanced modeling techniques are also important parts of the mission. We report scientific and space weather highlights of the mission after nearly four years in orbit

  12. Whether weather affects music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen L.; Williams, Paul D.

    2012-09-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London [Richardson, 2012]. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for artists Claude Monet, John Constable, and William Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies [e.g., Baker and Thornes, 2006].

  13. World Day ionospheric observations at Millstone Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Holt, J. M.; Loriot, G. B.; Oliver, W. L.

    1985-05-01

    A comprehensive program of multistation observations is being pursued on a regular schedule with the aim to provide an adequate data base for the study and modeling of the global ionosphere. A global network of incoherent scatter radars operates monthly on predetermined radar World Days designated on the International Geophysical Calendar. Fully steerable radars at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, and Millstone Hill, MA, provide coverage at polar, auroral, and subauroral latitudes, while the facilities at Arecibo, PR, and Jicamarca, Peru monitor the low-latitude and equatorial region. A description is given of the observations conducted with the aid of the MIT Millstone Hill radar facility. Questions of data intercomparison and aspects of data availability are also discussed.

  14. Magnetosphere - Ionosphere - Thermosphere (MIT) Coupling at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, J. N.; Ray, L. C.; Achilleos, N.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter's upper atmospheric temperature is considerably higher than that predicted by Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) heating alone. Simulations incorporating magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects into general circulation models have, to date, struggled to reproduce the observed atmospheric temperatures under simplifying assumptions such as azimuthal symmetry and a spin-aligned dipole magnetic field. Here we present the development of a full three-dimensional thermosphere model coupled in both hemispheres to an axisymmetric magnetosphere model. This new coupled model is based on the two-dimensional MIT model presented in Yates et al., 2014. This coupled model is a critical step towards to the development of a fully coupled 3D MIT model. We discuss and compare the resulting thermospheric flows, energy balance and MI coupling currents to those presented in previous 2D MIT models.

  15. Signatures of mesospheric particles in ionospheric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Friedrich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The state of the ionosphere during the 2007 ECOMA/MASS campaign is described by in-situ observations by three sounding rockets launched from the Andøya Rocket Range and by ground based observations. The ground based measurements included the incoherent scatter radar EISCAT near Tromsø (both on UHF and VHF, as well as an MF radar, a meteor radar and an imaging riometer all located in the close vicinity of the rocket range. The pronounced electron density bite-outs seen by two of the rockets could not be detected from the ground, but the associated PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes provide indirect evidence of pronounced perturbations of mesospheric electron densities.

  16. Hydrological scenarios for two selected Alpine catchments for the 21st century using a stochastic weather generator and enhanced process understanding for modelling of seasonal snow and glacier melt for improved water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Ulrich; Schneeberger, Klaus; Dabhi, Hetal; Dubrovsky, Martin; Hanzer, Florian; Marke, Thomas; Oberguggenberger, Michael; Rössler, Ole; Schmieder, Jan; Rotach, Mathias; Stötter, Johann; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    The overall objective of HydroGeM³ is to quantify and assess both water demand and water supply in two coupled human-environment mountain systems, i.e. Lütschine in Switzerland and Ötztaler Ache in Austria. Special emphasis is laid on the analysis of possible future seasonal water scarcity. The hydrological response of high Alpine catchments is characterised by a strong seasonal variability with low runoff in winter and high runoff in spring and summer. Climate change is expected to cause a seasonal shift of the runoff regime and thus it has significant impact on both amount and timing of the release of the available water resources, and thereof, possible future water conflicts. In order to identify and quantify the contribution of snow and ice melt as well as rain to runoff, streamflow composition will be analysed with natural tracers. The results of the field investigations will help to improve the snow and ice melt and runoff modules of two selected hydrological models (i.e. AMUNDSEN and WaSiM) which are used to investigate the seasonal water availability under current and future climate conditions. Together, they comprise improved descriptions of boundary layer and surface melt processes (AMUNDSEN), and of streamflow runoff generation (WaSiM). Future meteorological forcing for the modelling until the end of the century will be provided by both a stochastic multi-site weather generator, and downscaled climate model output. Both approches will use EUROCORDEX data as input. The water demand in the selected study areas is quantified for the relevant societal sectors, e.g. agriculture, hydropower generation and (winter) tourism. The comparison of water availability and water demand under current and future climate conditions will allow the identification of possible seasonal bottlenecks of future water supply and resulting conflicts. Thus these investigations can provide a quantitative basis for the development of strategies for sustainable water management in

  17. Magnetic and solar effects on ionospheric absorption at high latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pietrella

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Some periods of intense solar events and of strong magnetic storms have been selected and their effects on the ionospheric D region have been investigated on the basis of ionospheric absorption data derived from riometer measurements made at the Italian Antarctic Base of Terra Nova Bay (geographic coordinates: 74.69 S, 164.12 E; geomagnetic coordinates: 77.34 S, 279.41 E. It was found that sharp increases in ionospheric absorption are mainly due to solar protons emission with an energy greater than 10 MeV. Moreover, the day to night ratios of the ionospheric absorption are greater than 2 in the case of strong events of energetic protons emitted by the Sun, while during magnetic storms, these ratios range between 1 and 2.

  18. The Shock Wave in the ionosphere during an Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud.

  19. CAT scanning of the ionosphere: Pros and cons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excellent Spatial coverage. Excellent Spatial coverage. Snapshots of the large scale features (km-scale) of the ionosphere. bottomside and topside. Information on remote and inaccessible regions. Inexpensive.

  20. ADAPTIVE MODEL REFINEMENT FOR THE IONOSPHERE AND THERMOSPHERE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ADAPTIVE MODEL REFINEMENT FOR THE IONOSPHERE AND THERMOSPHERE ANTHONY M. D’AMATO∗, AARON J. RIDLEY∗∗, AND DENNIS S. BERNSTEIN∗∗∗ Abstract. Mathematical models of...

  1. The MITRA as a solar and ionospheric instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeharry, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    The MITRA is an international/pan-African radioastronomy project which aims to do extremely wide field imaging with heterogeneous non coplanar arrays. It can be used for solar and ionospheric studies.

  2. SAMI3_ICON: Model of the Ionosphere/Plasmasphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huba, J. D.; Maute, A.; Crowley, G.

    2017-10-01

    The NRL ionosphere/plasmasphere model SAMI3 has been modified to support the NASA ICON mission. Specifically, SAMI3_ICON has been modified to import the thermospheric composition, temperature, and winds from TIEGCM-ICON and the high-latitude potential from AMIE data. The codes will be run on a daily basis during the ICON mission to provide ionosphere and thermosphere properties to the science community. SAMI3_ICON will provide ionospheric and plasmaspheric parameters such as the electron and ion densities, temperatures, and velocities, as well as the total electron content (TEC), peak ionospheric electron density (NmF2) and height of the F layer at NmF2 (hmF2).

  3. Measurements of the Absorptive Properties of the Ionosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absorption of radio waves occurs when electrons responding to the wave fields collide with and transfer energy to the neutral particles. A study of ionospheric...

  4. Low ionospheric reactions on tropical depressions prior hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Aleksandra; Radovanović, Milan; Milovanović, Boško; Kovačević, Andjelka; Bajčetić, Jovan; Popović, Luka Č.

    2017-10-01

    We study the reactions of the low ionosphere during tropical depressions (TDs) which have been detected before the hurricane appearances in the Atlantic Ocean. We explore 41 TD events using very low frequency (VLF) radio signals emitted by NAA transmitter located in the USA and recorded by VLF receiver located in Belgrade (Serbia). We found VLF signal deviations (caused ionospheric turbulence) in the case of 36 out of 41 TD events (88%). Additionally, we explore 27 TDs which have not been developed in hurricanes and found similar low ionospheric reactions. However, in the sample of 41 TDs which are followed by hurricanes the typical low ionosphere perturbations seem to be more frequent than other TDs.

  5. MGS RS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 5600 ionospheric electron density profiles (EDS files) derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data. The profiles were...

  6. Global GPS Ionospheric Modelling Using Spherical Harmonic Expansion Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Kyu Choi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a global ionosphere model based on measurements from a worldwide network of global positioning system (GPS. The total number of the international GPS reference stations for development of ionospheric model is about 100 and the spherical harmonic expansion approach as a mathematical method was used. In order to produce the ionospheric total electron content (TEC based on grid form, we defined spatial resolution of 2.0 degree and 5.0 degree in latitude and longitude, respectively. Two-dimensional TEC maps were constructed within the interval of one hour, and have a high temporal resolution compared to global ionosphere maps which are produced by several analysis centers. As a result, we could detect the sudden increase of TEC by processing GPS observables on 29 October, 2003 when the massive solar flare took place.

  7. Modelling the Main Ionospheric Trough Across the Northern Hemisphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Cathryn

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Bath as follows: The contractor will investigate disturbances in the Northern Hemisphere ionosphere using a Multi-instrument data analysis (MIDAS) imaging algorithm...

  8. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 1016 electrons/m2 with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the

  9. Ionosphere research with a HF/MF cubesat radio instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Esa; Aikio, Anita; Alho, Markku; Fontell, Mathias; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kauristie, Kirsti; Kestilä, Antti; Koskimaa, Petri; Mäkelä, Jakke; Mäkelä, Miika; Turunen, Esa; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Verronen, Pekka

    2017-04-01

    New technology provides new possibilities to study geospace and 3D ionosphere by using spacecraft and computer simulations. A type of nanosatellites, CubeSats, provide a cost effective possibility to provide in-situ measurements in the ionosphere. Moreover, combined CubeSat observations with ground-based observations gives a new view on auroras and associated electromagnetic phenomena. Especially joint and active CubeSat - ground based observation campaigns enable the possibility of studying the 3D structure of the ionosphere. Furthermore using several CubeSats to form satellite constellations enables much higher temporal resolution. At the same time, increasing computation capacity has made it possible to perform simulations where properties of the ionosphere, such as propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the medium frequency, MF (0.3-3 MHz) and high frequency, HF (3-30 MHz), ranges is based on a 3D ionospheric model and on first-principles modelling. Electromagnetic waves at those frequencies are strongly affected by ionospheric electrons and, consequently, those frequencies can be used for studying the plasma. On the other hand, even if the ionosphere originally enables long-range telecommunication at MF and HF frequencies, the frequent occurrence of spatiotemporal variations in the ionosphere disturbs communication channels, especially at high latitudes. Therefore, study of the MF and HF waves in the ionosphere has both a strong science and technology interests. We introduce recently developed simulation models as well as measuring principles and techniques to investigate the arctic ionosphere by a polar orbiting CubeSat whose novel AM radio instrument measures HF and MF waves. The cubesat, which contains also a white light aurora camera, is planned to be launched in late 2017 (http://www.suomi100satelliitti.fi/eng). The new models are (1) a 3D ray tracing model and (2) a 3D full kinetic electromagnetic simulation. We also introduce how combining of the

  10. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hongping; Xu, Peiliang; Geng, Jianghui; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-02-27

    Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC) semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 10 16 electrons/m²) with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the new proposed

  11. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hongping; Xu, Peiliang; Geng, Jianghui; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC) semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 1016 electrons/m2) with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the new proposed

  12. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  13. Ionospheric data available on CD-ROM and on NDADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilitza, D.

    1996-01-01

    Information is provided on two CD-ROMs (for PCs) with ionospheric data: the ionosonde CD issued by NGDC/WDC-A-STP/NOAA/Boulder and the Atmosphere Explorer CD produced by NSSDC/WDC-A-R and S/NASA/Greenbelt. We also briefly describe the ionospheric/thermospheric data available through NSSDC's automated mail retrieval system (NDADS) and explain the procedure for obtaining NDADS data. (author). 3 figs

  14. Effect of the Ionosphere on Space and Terrestrial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    of the ionospheric conditions along the path. shown schematically in Figure 1. The energetic par- ticle data were obtained by the Space Sciences Labor ...Adaptive tures, of difficult inclusion in clima - Ionospheric Range Error Correction for tological models. To accommodate then High Accuracy Radars, URSI...that size and a consistent identification in clima - are effervescent from hour to hour. tology, such as the nighttime trough and the plasmapause

  15. Far-field coseismic ionospheric disturbances of Tohoku earthquake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnov, V. M.; Drobzheva, Ya. V.; Chum, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 135, December (2015), s. 12-21 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-07281J Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : earthquake * infrasonic waves * ionospheric disturbances * infrasound triggered by the earthquake * co-seismic ionospheric perturbations * modeling * remote sensing Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682615300584

  16. Satellite observations of ionosphere disturbance prior to large earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    小山, 孝一郎; 児玉, 哲哉; Oyama, Koichiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports ionosphere disturbance which is observed by satellite before large earthquakes. Ionosphere disturbance caused by large earthquakes shows different features, depending on local time, height, epicenter location, and distance from the epicenter. When satellite altitude is high, the effect of large earthquakes does not appear right over the epicenter, but appears over geomagnetic equator and in higher latitude. While the identification of the epicenter location and day of earth...

  17. Space weather in the EU’s FP7 Space Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiarini Paola

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Technological infrastructures in space and on ground provide services on which modern society and economies rely. Space weather related research is funded under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (FP7 of the European Union in response to the need of protecting such critical infrastructures from the damage which could be caused by extreme space weather events. The calls for proposals published under the topic “Security of space assets from space weather events” of the FP7 Space Theme aimed to improve forecasts and predictions of disruptive space weather events as well as identify best practices to limit the impacts on space- and ground-based infrastructures and their data provision. Space weather related work was also funded under the topic “Exploitation of space science and exploration data”, which aims to add value to space missions and Earth-based observations by contributing to the effective scientific exploitation of collected data. Since 2007 a total of 20 collaborative projects have been funded, covering a variety of physical phenomena associated with space weather, from ionospheric disturbances and scintillation, to geomagnetically induced currents at Earth’s surface, to coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles. This article provides an overview of the funded projects, touching upon some results and referring to specific websites for a more exhaustive description of the projects’ outcomes.

  18. Space Weather Services of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, K.; Hong, S.; Jangsuk, C.; Dong Kyu, K.; Jinyee, C.; Yeongoh, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  19. Ionospheric scintillation observations over Kenyan region - Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Xiao, Yu; Ming, Ou

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to the rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a satellite signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. By analyzing ionospheric scintillation observation datasets from satellite signals such as GPS signals we can study the morphology of ionospheric bubbles. At low latitudes, the diurnal behavior of scintillation is driven by the formation of large-scale equatorial density depletions which form one to two hours after sunset via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism near the magnetic equator. In this work we present ionospheric scintillation activity over Kenya using data derived from a newly installed scintillation monitor developed by CRIRP at Pwani University (39.78°E, 3.24°S) during the period August to December, 2014. The results reveal the scintillation activity mainly occurs from post-sunset to post-midnight hours, and ceases around 04:00 LT. We also found that the ionospheric scintillation tends to appear at the southwest and northwest of the station. These locations coincide with the southern part of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly crest over Kenya region. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  20. High-latitude ionospheric outflows characterized through analytic formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, W.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances involving multi-fluid treatments have begun to allow the prospect of global magnetospheric models to simulate the dynamics of multiple ion species, such as various ion species originating from sources in the solar wind and terrestrial ionosphere. Such opportunities for the dynamic treatment of ionospheric ions within the magnetosphere portend a need for realistic accessible methods of estimating ionospheric outflows as linked plasma sources for these global models. Toward this end, in this presentation, the results of numerous physics-based simulations of ionospheric plasma outflows under varied driving agents are distilled in terms of relatively compact analytic expressions. The simulations are conducted with the UT Arlington Dynamic Fluid (DyFK) ionospheric plasma transport code. These analytic expressions for O+ and H+ densities, temperatures and flow velocities are obtained at the 3 RE altitudes corresponding to typical inner boundary levels for certain current global magnetospheric models. These O+ and H+ parameters are expressed as functions of precipitation electron energy flux levels, characteristic energy levels of the precipitating electrons, the peak spectral wave densities for low-frequency electrostatic waves which transversely heat ionospheric ions, and solar zenith angle.