WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding cerebellar function

  1. Dyslexic Children Show Atypical Cerebellar Activation and Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Orthographic and Phonological Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Le; Zhang, Manli; Yang, Xiujie; Tian, Mengyu; Xie, Weiyi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Li; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have found atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia in either motor-related tasks or language tasks. However, studies investigating atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia have mostly used tasks tapping phonological processing. A question that is yet unanswered is whether the cerebellum in individuals with dyslexia functions properly during orthographic processing of words, as growing evidence shows that the cerebellum is also involved in visual and spatial processing. Here, we investigated cerebellar activation and cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during word processing in dyslexic readers and typically developing readers using tasks that tap orthographic and phonological codes. In children with dyslexia, we observed an abnormally higher engagement of the bilateral cerebellum for the orthographic task, which was negatively correlated with literacy measures. The greater the reading impairment was for young dyslexic readers, the stronger the cerebellar activation was. This suggests a compensatory role of the cerebellum in reading for children with dyslexia. In addition, a tendency for higher cerebellar activation in dyslexic readers was found in the phonological task. Moreover, the functional connectivity was stronger for dyslexic readers relative to typically developing readers between the lobule VI of the right cerebellum and the left fusiform gyrus during the orthographic task and between the lobule VI of the left cerebellum and the left supramarginal gyrus during the phonological task. This pattern of results suggests that the cerebellum compensates for reading impairment through the connections with specific brain regions responsible for the ongoing reading task. These findings enhance our understanding of the cerebellum's involvement in reading and reading impairment.

  2. Composite cerebellar functional severity score: validation of a quantitative score of cerebellar impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Charles, Perrine; Ribai, Pascale; Goizet, Cyril; Le Bayon, Alice; Labauge, Pierre; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Forlani, Sylvie; Jauffret, Celine; Vandenberghe, Nadia; N'guyen, Karine; Le Ber, Isabelle; Devos, David; Vincitorio, Carlo-Maria; Manto, Mario-Ubaldo; Tison, François; Hannequin, Didier; Ruberg, Merle; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra

    2008-05-01

    Reliable and easy to perform functional scales are a prerequisite for future therapeutic trials in cerebellar ataxias. In order to assess the specificity of quantitative functional tests of cerebellar dysfunction, we investigated 123 controls, 141 patients with an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) and 53 patients with autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia (ADSP). We evaluated four different functional tests (nine-hole pegboard, click, tapping and writing tests), in correlation with the scale for the assessment and rating of cerebellar ataxia (SARA), the scale of functional disability on daily activities (part IV of the Huntington disease rating scale), depression (the Public Health Questionnaire PHQ-9) and the EQ-5D visual analogue scale for self-evaluation of health status. There was a significant correlation between each functional test and a lower limb score. The performance of controls on the functional tests was significantly correlated with age. Subsequent analyses were therefore adjusted for this factor. The performances of ADCA patients on the different tests were significantly worse than that of controls and ADSP patients; there was no difference between ADSP patients and controls. Linear regression analysis showed that only two independent tests, the nine-hole pegboard and the click test on the dominant side (P functional severity (CCFS) score calculated as follows: [Formula: see text]. The CCFS score was significantly higher in ADCA patients compared to controls (1.12 +/- 0.18 versus 0.85 +/- 0.05, P(c) < 0.0001) and ADSP patients (1.12 +/- 0.18 versus 0.90 +/- 0.08, P(c) < 0.0001) and was correlated with disease duration (P < 0.0001) but independent of self-evaluated depressive mood in ADCA. Among genetically homogeneous subgroups of ADCA patients (Spinocerebellar ataxia 1, 2, 3), SCA3 patients had significantly lower (better) CCFS scores than SCA2 (P(c) < 0.04) and the same tendency was observed in SCA1. Their CCFS scores remained

  3. Evaluating cerebellar functions using optogenetic transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, John P.; Turecek, Josef; Turner, Eric E.

    2013-03-01

    We employed a transgenic mouse having conditional expression of ChR2(H134R) in neurons of the inferior olive to facilitate understanding of the role of electrical coupling and oscillation in central nervous system function. Two-photon excitation of ChR2-expressing neurons using 64 laser beams restricted to single inferior olive cell bodies depolarized neurons and evoked voltage deflections in neighboring neurons demonstrating electrical coupling. Broader illumination of neuronal ensembles using blue light induced an optical clamp of endogenous electrical rhythms in the inferior olive of acutely-prepared brain slices, which when applied in vivo directly modulated the local field potential activity and induced tremor. The experiments demonstrate novel methods to optically manipulate electrically coupled potentials and rhythmogenesis within a neuronal ensemble. From a functional perspective, the experiments shed light on the cellular and circuitry mechanisms of essential tremor, a prevalent neurological condition, by indicating time- and frequencydependence of tremor upon varying rhythms of inferior olive stimulation. The experiments indicate analog control of a brain rhythm that may be used to enhance our understanding of the functional consequences of central rhythmogenesis.

  4. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as

  5. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2018-03-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  6. The Errors of Our Ways: Understanding Error Representations in Cerebellar-Dependent Motor Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Laurentiu S; Streng, Martha L; Hewitt, Angela L; Ebner, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    The cerebellum is essential for error-driven motor learning and is strongly implicated in detecting and correcting for motor errors. Therefore, elucidating how motor errors are represented in the cerebellum is essential in understanding cerebellar function, in general, and its role in motor learning, in particular. This review examines how motor errors are encoded in the cerebellar cortex in the context of a forward internal model that generates predictions about the upcoming movement and drives learning and adaptation. In this framework, sensory prediction errors, defined as the discrepancy between the predicted consequences of motor commands and the sensory feedback, are crucial for both on-line movement control and motor learning. While many studies support the dominant view that motor errors are encoded in the complex spike discharge of Purkinje cells, others have failed to relate complex spike activity with errors. Given these limitations, we review recent findings in the monkey showing that complex spike modulation is not necessarily required for motor learning or for simple spike adaptation. Also, new results demonstrate that the simple spike discharge provides continuous error signals that both lead and lag the actual movements in time, suggesting errors are encoded as both an internal prediction of motor commands and the actual sensory feedback. These dual error representations have opposing effects on simple spike discharge, consistent with the signals needed to generate sensory prediction errors used to update a forward internal model.

  7. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  8. Mechanisms and functional roles of glutamatergic synapse diversity in a cerebellar circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zampini, Valeria; Liu, Jian K; Diana, Marco A; Maldonado, Paloma P; Brunel, Nicolas; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic currents display a large degree of heterogeneity of their temporal characteristics, but the functional role of such heterogeneities remains unknown. We investigated in rat cerebellar slices synaptic currents in Unipolar Brush Cells (UBCs), which generate intrinsic mossy fibers relaying

  9. Age-related changes in functional connectivity of cerebellar PlV: a FDG PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Bang, Seong Ae; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    The cerebellum is known to have strong connection with cerebral cortex, and it shows the greatest mean shrinkage with aging. Changes in functional connectivity between cerebellum and cortical and subcortical cerebral areas possibly occur in normal aging. In this study, we tested changes of interregional connection between cerebellar posterior inferior vermis (PIV) and cerebrum in healthy subjects divided in three classes of age group (young: 20-30, middle age: 40-50, elderly: over 60 years) using FDG PET. 211 healthy subjects (age, 20-82 y; 134 female) were studied with resting-state brain glucose utilization measured by FDG-PET, cerebellar PIV activity after count-normalization to the whole gray matter mean count was extracted. Using PIV count as a 'seed', the maps of cross-correlation coefficients were computed by measuring the correlation between 'seed' and all the other brain voxels (P < 0.001 uncorrected, k = 100). Across all age groups, positive correlations of metabolic activity in the cerebellar PIV showed in cerebellum itself and bilateral thalamus. An extended positive correlation in cuneus which is served for visual information processing was observed in middle aged and elderly group differently from the young group. Also, in elderly group, this correlation was observed in the frontal areas such as right orbital and precentral gyri. Negative correlation implicating mutual inhibition between the areas was also founded in prefrontal and cingulate cortices and temporoparietal association areas. Comparing with the young group, in theses areas, enlarged negative correlations was founded with aging. We identified age related changes in cerebrocerebellar communication loop which reflect changes in local neuroplasticity in the normal aging brain. Present result may have implication for understanding the functional decline of cerebellum related cognitive ability as well as the deficit of motor coordination in normal aging and its compensation mechanism of brain

  10. Age-related changes in functional connectivity of cerebellar PlV: a FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Bang, Seong Ae; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The cerebellum is known to have strong connection with cerebral cortex, and it shows the greatest mean shrinkage with aging. Changes in functional connectivity between cerebellum and cortical and subcortical cerebral areas possibly occur in normal aging. In this study, we tested changes of interregional connection between cerebellar posterior inferior vermis (PIV) and cerebrum in healthy subjects divided in three classes of age group (young: 20-30, middle age: 40-50, elderly: over 60 years) using FDG PET. 211 healthy subjects (age, 20-82 y; 134 female) were studied with resting-state brain glucose utilization measured by FDG-PET, cerebellar PIV activity after count-normalization to the whole gray matter mean count was extracted. Using PIV count as a 'seed', the maps of cross-correlation coefficients were computed by measuring the correlation between 'seed' and all the other brain voxels (P < 0.001 uncorrected, k = 100). Across all age groups, positive correlations of metabolic activity in the cerebellar PIV showed in cerebellum itself and bilateral thalamus. An extended positive correlation in cuneus which is served for visual information processing was observed in middle aged and elderly group differently from the young group. Also, in elderly group, this correlation was observed in the frontal areas such as right orbital and precentral gyri. Negative correlation implicating mutual inhibition between the areas was also founded in prefrontal and cingulate cortices and temporoparietal association areas. Comparing with the young group, in theses areas, enlarged negative correlations was founded with aging. We identified age related changes in cerebrocerebellar communication loop which reflect changes in local neuroplasticity in the normal aging brain. Present result may have implication for understanding the functional decline of cerebellum related cognitive ability as well as the deficit of motor coordination in normal aging and its compensation

  11. Restoring Cognitive Functions Using Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Techniques in Patients with Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Paul A.; Miall, R. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro–cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral–lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato–rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro–cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed “non-invasive brain stimulation” as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro–cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo

  12. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Pope

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided towards neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed 'non-invasive brain stimulation' as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo

  13. Role of Calcium in Cerebellar Learning and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Gao (Zhenyu)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum, which means little brain in Latin, occupies most of the posterior cranial fossa and connects with the dorsal brainstem (Kandel et al., 2000). The cerebellar cortex is one of the most foliated brain structures, which accounts for 10% of the total volume and over half of

  14. Effect of stretching and proprioceptive loading in hand function among patients with cerebellar tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharasudhan Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Tremor, the most common form of abnormal involuntary movement, affects the performance of activities of daily living. Evidence on effective form of physiotherapy techniques which can help manage intentional tremor and improve hand function among cerebellar dysfunction patients in inconclusive. Hence, this study aims to establish the effectiveness of stretching and proprioceptive loading among cerebellar patients with intentional tremors. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of stretching and proprioceptive loading among patients with cerebellar intention tremor. Materials and Methods: A total of thirty patients with intention tremor due to cerebellar lesion were recruited for this study. They were randomized into two groups, Group I received stretching exercise and Group II received proprioceptive loading exercise. Pre- and post-test outcome measures were taken at the end of duration of 3 weeks intervention. Outcome measures were Fahn's tremor rating scale and nine hole peg test. Results: Statistical analyses were done by McNemar test, Wilcoxon's signed rank test, and Mann–Whitney test. Post-test scores of both groups were compared and found that Group II treated with proprioceptive loading exercise had higher significant result than the group treated with strengthening exercise program. Conclusion: Proprioceptive loading exercise has demonstrated signifi cant effect on reducing cerebellar tremor and improving muscle coordination in reaching activities.

  15. Impaired cerebellar development and function in mice lacking CAPS2, a protein involved in neurotrophin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Kakegawa, Wataru; Mizoguchi, Akira; Washida, Miwa; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Okamoto, Takehito; Nakashima, Hisako; Kimura, Kazushi; Tanaka, Mika; Sekine, Yukiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Nagao, Soichi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2007-03-07

    Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2/CADPS2) is a secretory granule-associated protein that is abundant at the parallel fiber terminals of granule cells in the mouse cerebellum and is involved in the release of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), both of which are required for cerebellar development. The human homolog gene on chromosome 7 is located within susceptibility locus 1 of autism, a disease characterized by several cerebellar morphological abnormalities. Here we report that CAPS2 knock-out mice are deficient in the release of NT-3 and BDNF, and they consequently exhibit suppressed phosphorylation of Trk receptors in the cerebellum; these mice exhibit pronounced impairments in cerebellar development and functions, including neuronal survival, differentiation and migration of postmitotic granule cells, dendritogenesis of Purkinje cells, lobulation between lobules VI and VII, structure and vesicular distribution of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, paired-pulse facilitation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, rotarod motor coordination, and eye movement plasticity in optokinetic training. Increased granule cell death of the external granular layer was noted in lobules VI-VII and IX, in which high BDNF and NT-3 levels are specifically localized during cerebellar development. Therefore, the deficiency of CAPS2 indicates that CAPS2-mediated neurotrophin release is indispensable for normal cerebellar development and functions, including neuronal differentiation and survival, morphogenesis, synaptic function, and motor learning/control. The possible involvement of the CAPS2 gene in the cerebellar deficits of autistic patients is discussed.

  16. Cerebro-cerebellar Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amanda J; Nair, Aarti; Keown, Christopher L; Datko, Michael C; Lincoln, Alan J; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2015-11-01

    The cerebellum plays important roles in sensori-motor and supramodal cognitive functions. Cellular, volumetric, and functional abnormalities of the cerebellum have been found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but no comprehensive investigation of cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in ASD is available. We used resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in 56 children and adolescents (28 subjects with ASD, 28 typically developing subjects) 8-17 years old. Partial and total correlation analyses were performed for unilateral regions of interest (ROIs), distinguished in two broad domains as sensori-motor (premotor/primary motor, somatosensory, superior temporal, and occipital) and supramodal (prefrontal, posterior parietal, and inferior and middle temporal). There were three main findings: 1) Total correlation analyses showed predominant cerebro-cerebellar functional overconnectivity in the ASD group; 2) partial correlation analyses that emphasized domain specificity (sensori-motor vs. supramodal) indicated a pattern of robustly increased connectivity in the ASD group (compared with the typically developing group) for sensori-motor ROIs but predominantly reduced connectivity for supramodal ROIs; and 3) this atypical pattern of connectivity was supported by significantly increased noncanonical connections (between sensori-motor cerebral and supramodal cerebellar ROIs and vice versa) in the ASD group. Our findings indicate that sensori-motor intrinsic functional connectivity is atypically increased in ASD, at the expense of connectivity supporting cerebellar participation in supramodal cognition. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cerebro-cerebellar resting state functional connectivity in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amanda J.; Nair, Aarti; Keown, Christopher L.; Datko, Michael C.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum plays important roles in both sensorimotor and supramodal cognitive functions. Cellular, volumetric, and functional abnormalities of the cerebellum have been found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but no comprehensive investigation of cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in ASD is available. Methods We used resting-state functional connectivity MRI in 56 children and adolescents (28 ASD, 28 typically developing [TD]) aged 8–17 years. Partial and total correlation analyses were performed for unilateral regions of interest (ROIs), distinguished in two broad domains as sensorimotor (premotor/primary motor, somatosensory, superior temporal, occipital) and supramodal (prefrontal, posterior parietal, and inferior and middle temporal). Results There were three main findings: (i) Total correlation analyses showed predominant cerebro-cerebellar functional overconnectivity in the ASD group; (ii) partial correlation analyses that emphasized domain-specificity (sensorimotor vs. supramodal) indicated a pattern of robustly increased connectivity in the ASD group (compared to the TD group) for sensorimotor ROIs, but predominantly reduced connectivity for supramodal ROIs; (iii) this atypical pattern of connectivity was supported by significantly increased non-canonical connections (between sensorimotor cerebral and supramodal cerebellar ROIs, and vice versa) in the ASD group. Conclusions Our findings indicate that sensorimotor intrinsic functional connectivity is atypically increased in ASD, at the expense of connectivity supporting cerebellar participation in supramodal cognition. PMID:25959247

  18. SK2 channel expression and function in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosy, Eric; Piochon, Claire; Teuling, Eva; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels (SK channels) regulate the excitability of neurons and their responsiveness to synaptic input patterns. SK channels contribute to the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following action potential bursts, and curtail excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in neuronal dendrites. Here we review evidence that SK2 channels are expressed in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells during development and throughout adulthood, and play a key role in diverse cellular processes such as the regulation of the spike firing frequency and the modulation of calcium transients in dendritic spines. In Purkinje cells as well as in other types of neurons, SK2 channel plasticity seems to provide an important mechanism allowing these cells to adjust their intrinsic excitability and to alter the probabilities for the induction of synaptic learning correlates, such as long-term potentiation (LTP). PMID:21521760

  19. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoogland, Tycho M

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell (BG) of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an ...

  20. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeuw, Chris; Hoogland, Tycho

    2015-01-01

    textabstractJust as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell (BG) of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and fac...

  1. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Chris I De Zeeuw; Chris I De Zeeuw; Tycho M. Hoogland; Tycho M. Hoogland

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impre...

  2. A hypothetical universal model of cerebellar function: reconsideration of the current dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Ari

    2013-10-01

    The cerebellum is commonly studied in the context of the classical eyeblink conditioning model, which attributes an adaptive motor function to cerebellar learning processes. This model of cerebellar function has quite a few shortcomings and may in fact be somewhat deficient in explaining the myriad functions attributed to the cerebellum, functions ranging from motor sequencing to emotion and cognition. The involvement of the cerebellum in these motor and non-motor functions has been demonstrated in both animals and humans in electrophysiological, behavioral, tracing, functional neuroimaging, and PET studies, as well as in clinical human case studies. A closer look at the cerebellum's evolutionary origin provides a clue to its underlying purpose as a tool which evolved to aid predation rather than as a tool for protection. Based upon this evidence, an alternative model of cerebellar function is proposed, one which might more comprehensively account both for the cerebellum's involvement in a myriad of motor, affective, and cognitive functions and for the relative simplicity and ubiquitous repetitiveness of its circuitry. This alternative model suggests that the cerebellum has the ability to detect coincidences of events, be they sensory, motor, affective, or cognitive in nature, and, after having learned to associate these, it can then trigger (or "mirror") these events after having temporally adjusted their onset based on positive/negative reinforcement. The model also provides for the cerebellum's direction of the proper and uninterrupted sequence of events resulting from this learning through the inhibition of efferent structures (as demonstrated in our lab).

  3. Altered Functional Connectivity of Cognitive-Related Cerebellar Subregions in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia. Previous studies have found disrupted resting state functional connectivities (rsFCs in various brain networks in the AD patients. However, few studies have focused on the rsFCs of the cerebellum and its sub-regions in the AD patients. In this study, we collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI data including 32 AD patients and 38 healthy controls (HCs. We selected two cognitive-related subregions of the cerebellum as seed region and mapped the whole-brain rsFCs for each subregion. We identified several distinct rsFC patterns of the two cognitive-related cerebellar subregions: default-mode network (DMN, frontoparietal network (FPN, visual network (VN and sensorimotor network (SMN. Compared with the controls, the AD patients showed disrupted rsFCs in several different networks (DMN, VN and SMN, predicting the impairment of the functional integration in the cerebellum. Notably, these abnormal rsFCs of the two cerebellar subregions were closely associated with cognitive performance. Collectively, we demonstrated the distinct rsFCs patterns of cerebellar sub-regions with various functional networks, which were differentially impaired in the AD patients.

  4. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates motor function deterioration of spinocerebellar ataxia by rescuing cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei-Hsien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA refers to a disease entity in which polyglutamine aggregates are over-produced in Purkinje cells (PCs of the cerebellum as well as other neurons in the central nervous system, and the formation of intracellular polyglutamine aggregates result in the loss of neurons as well as deterioration of motor functions. So far there is no effective neuroprotective treatment for this debilitating disease although numerous efforts have been made. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess multi-lineage differentiation potentials as well as immuno-modulatory properties, and are theoretically good candidates for SCA treatment. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether transplantation of human MSCs (hMSCs can rescue cerebellar PCs and ameliorate motor function deterioration in SCA in a pre-clinical animal model. Method Transgenic mice bearing poly-glutamine mutation in ataxin-2 gene (C57BL/6J SCA2 transgenic mice were serially transplanted with hMSCs intravenously or intracranially before and after the onset of motor function loss. Motor function of mice was evaluated by an accelerating protocol of rotarod test every 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical stain of whole brain sections was adopted to demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of hMSC transplantation on cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs into mice brain. Results Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs effectively improved rotarod performance of SCA2 transgenic mice and delayed the onset of motor function deterioration; while intracranial transplantation failed to achieve such neuroprotective effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed that intravenous transplantation was more effective in the preservation of the survival of cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs than intracranial injection, which was compatible to rotarod performance of transplanted mice. Conclusion Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs can indeed delay the onset as well as improve the motor

  6. Seeking a unified framework for cerebellar function and dysfunction: from circuit operations to cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the fundamental recognition of its involvement in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum is now also believed to take part in the processing of cognition and emotion. This hypothesis is recurrent in numerous papers reporting anatomical and functional observations, and it requires an explanation. We argue that a similar circuit structure in all cerebellar areas may carry out various operations using a common computational scheme. On the basis of a broad review of anatomical data, it is conceivable that the different roles of the cerebellum lie in the specific connectivity of the cerebellar modules, with motor, cognitive and emotional functions (at least partially segregated into different cerebro-cerebellar loops. We here develop a conceptual and operational framework based on multiple interconnected levels (a meta-levels hypothesis: from cellular/molecular to network mechanisms leading to generation of computational primitives, thence to high-level cognitive/emotional processing, and finally to the sphere of mental function and dysfunction. The main concept explored is that of intimate interplay between timing and learning (reminiscent of the timing and learning machine capabilities long attributed to the cerebellum, which reverberates from cellular to circuit mechanisms. Subsequently, integration within large-scale brain loops could generate the disparate cognitive/emotional and mental functions in which the cerebellum has been implicated. We propose, therefore, that the cerebellum operates as a general-purpose co-processor, whose effects depend on the specific brain centers to which individual modules are connected. Abnormal functioning in these loops could eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of major brain pathologies including not just ataxia but also dyslexia, autism, schizophrenia and depression.

  7. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris I De Zeeuw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impressive range of functions that optimize information processing in the adult brain. In this review we expand on the function of the Bergmann glial cell in the cerebellum to highlight the importance of astrocytes not only in housekeeping functions, but also in contributing to plasticity and information processing in the cerebellum.

  8. Resting state cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity networks: A comparison of anatomical and self-organizing map approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Bernard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum plays a role in a wide variety of complex behaviors. In order to better understand the role of the cerebellum in human behavior, it is important to know how this structure interacts with cortical and other subcortical regions of the brain. To date, several studies have investigated the cerebellum using resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI; Buckner et al., 2011; Krienen & Buckner, 2009; O’Reilly et al., 2009. However, none of this work has taken an anatomically-driven approach. Furthermore, though detailed maps of cerebral cortex and cerebellum networks have been proposed using different network solutions based on the cerebral cortex (Buckner et al., 2011, it remains unknown whether or not an anatomical lobular breakdown best encompasses the networks of the cerebellum. Here, we used fcMRI to create an anatomically-driven cerebellar connectivity atlas. Timecourses were extracted from the lobules of the right hemisphere and vermis. We found distinct networks for the individual lobules with a clear division into motor and non-motor regions. We also used a self-organizing map algorithm to parcellate the cerebellum. This allowed us to investigate redundancy and independence of the anatomically identified cerebellar networks. We found that while anatomical boundaries in the anterior cerebellum provide functional subdivisions of a larger motor grouping defined using our self-organizing map algorithm, in the posterior cerebellum, the lobules were made up of sub-regions associated with distinct functional networks. Together, our results indicate that the lobular boundaries of the human cerebellum are not indicative of functional boundaries, though anatomical divisions can be useful, as is the case of the anterior cerebellum. Additionally, driving the analyses from the cerebellum is key to determining the complete picture of functional connectivity within the structure.

  9. Gain-of-function FHF1 mutation causes early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekierska, Aleksandra; Isrie, Mala; Liu, Yue; Scheldeman, Chloë; Vanthillo, Niels; Lagae, Lieven; de Witte, Peter A M; Van Esch, Hilde; Goldfarb, Mitchell; Buyse, Gunnar M

    2016-06-07

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav)-encoding genes are among early-onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEE) targets, suggesting that other genes encoding Nav-binding proteins, such as fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs), may also play roles in these disorders. To identify additional genes for EOEE, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a family quintet with 2 siblings with a lethal disease characterized by EOEE and cerebellar atrophy. The pathogenic nature and functional consequences of the identified sequence alteration were determined by electrophysiologic studies in vitro and in vivo. A de novo heterozygous missense mutation was identified in the FHF1 gene (FHF1AR114H, FHF1BR52H) in the 2 affected siblings. The mutant FHF1 proteins had a strong gain-of-function phenotype in transfected Neuro2A cells, enhancing the depolarizing shifts in Nav1.6 voltage-dependent fast inactivation, predicting increased neuronal excitability. Surprisingly, the gain-of-function effect is predicted to result from weaker interaction of mutant FHF1 with the Nav cytoplasmic tail. Transgenic overexpression of mutant FHF1B in zebrafish larvae enhanced epileptiform discharges, demonstrating the epileptic potential of this FHF1 mutation in the affected children. Our data demonstrate that gain-of-function FHF mutations can cause neurologic disorder, and expand the repertoire of genetic causes (FHF1) and mechanisms (altered Nav gating) underlying EOEE and cerebellar atrophy. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Disrupted functional connectivity of cerebellar default network areas in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucyi, Aaron; Hove, Michael J; Biederman, Joseph; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Valera, Eve M

    2015-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasingly understood as a disorder of spontaneous brain-network interactions. The default mode network (DMN), implicated in ADHD-linked behaviors including mind-wandering and attentional fluctuations, has been shown to exhibit abnormal spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) within-network and with other networks (salience, dorsal attention and frontoparietal) in ADHD. Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ADHD, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas of the DMN (CerDMN) exhibit altered FC with cortical networks in ADHD. Here, 23 adults with ADHD and 23 age-, IQ-, and sex-matched controls underwent resting state fMRI. The mean time series of CerDMN areas was extracted, and FC with the whole brain was calculated. Whole-brain between-group differences in FC were assessed. Additionally, relationships between inattention and individual differences in FC were assessed for between-group interactions. In ADHD, CerDMN areas showed positive FC (in contrast to average FC in the negative direction in controls) with widespread regions of salience, dorsal attention and sensorimotor networks. ADHD individuals also exhibited higher FC (more positive correlation) of CerDMN areas with frontoparietal and visual network regions. Within the control group, but not in ADHD, participants with higher inattention had higher FC between CerDMN and regions in the visual and dorsal attention networks. This work provides novel evidence of impaired CerDMN coupling with cortical networks in ADHD and highlights a role of cerebro-cerebellar interactions in cognitive function. These data provide support for the potential targeting of CerDMN areas for therapeutic interventions in ADHD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways: shared ideas but different functions in motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eJiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impressive precision of mammalian limb movements relies on internal feedback pathways that convey information about ongoing motor output to cerebellar circuits. The spino-cerebellar tracts (SCT in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord have long been considered canonical neural substrates for the conveyance of internal feedback signals. Here we consider the distinct features of an indirect spino-cerebellar route, via the brainstem lateral reticular nucleus (LRN, and the implications of this pre-cerebellar ‘detour’ for the execution and evolution of limb motor control. Both direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways signal spinal interneuronal activity to the cerebellum during movements, but evidence suggests that direct SCT neurons are mainly modulated by rhythmic activity, whereas the LRN also receives information from systems active during postural adjustment, reaching and grasping. Thus, while direct and indirect spino-cerebellar circuits can both be regarded as internal copy pathways, it seems likely that the direct system is principally dedicated to rhythmic motor acts like locomotion, while the indirect system also provides a means of pre-cerebellar integration relevant to the execution and coordination of de

  12. Functional and structural correlates of motor speed in the cerebellar anterior lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Uwe; Taubert, Marco; Ragert, Patrick; Krug, Jürgen; Villringer, Arno

    2014-01-01

    In athletics, motor performance is determined by different abilities such as technique, endurance, strength and speed. Based on animal studies, motor speed is thought to be encoded in the basal ganglia, sensorimotor cortex and the cerebellum. The question arises whether there is a unique structural feature in the human brain, which allows "power athletes" to perform a simple foot movement significantly faster than "endurance athletes". We acquired structural and functional brain imaging data from 32 track-and-field athletes. The study comprised of 16 "power athletes" requiring high speed foot movements (sprinters, jumpers, throwers) and 16 endurance athletes (distance runners) which in contrast do not require as high speed foot movements. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to identify speed specific regions of interest in the brain during fast and slow foot movements. Anatomical MRI scans were performed to assess structural grey matter volume differences between athletes groups (voxel based morphometry). We tested maximum movement velocity of plantarflexion (PF-Vmax) and acquired electromyographical activity of the lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscle. Behaviourally, a significant difference between the two groups of athletes was noted in PF-Vmax and fMRI indicates that fast plantarflexions are accompanied by increased activity in the cerebellar anterior lobe. The same region indicates increased grey matter volume for the power athletes compared to the endurance counterparts. Our results suggest that speed-specific neuro-functional and -structural differences exist between power and endurance athletes in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  13. Functional and structural correlates of motor speed in the cerebellar anterior lobe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wenzel

    Full Text Available In athletics, motor performance is determined by different abilities such as technique, endurance, strength and speed. Based on animal studies, motor speed is thought to be encoded in the basal ganglia, sensorimotor cortex and the cerebellum. The question arises whether there is a unique structural feature in the human brain, which allows "power athletes" to perform a simple foot movement significantly faster than "endurance athletes". We acquired structural and functional brain imaging data from 32 track-and-field athletes. The study comprised of 16 "power athletes" requiring high speed foot movements (sprinters, jumpers, throwers and 16 endurance athletes (distance runners which in contrast do not require as high speed foot movements. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to identify speed specific regions of interest in the brain during fast and slow foot movements. Anatomical MRI scans were performed to assess structural grey matter volume differences between athletes groups (voxel based morphometry. We tested maximum movement velocity of plantarflexion (PF-Vmax and acquired electromyographical activity of the lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscle. Behaviourally, a significant difference between the two groups of athletes was noted in PF-Vmax and fMRI indicates that fast plantarflexions are accompanied by increased activity in the cerebellar anterior lobe. The same region indicates increased grey matter volume for the power athletes compared to the endurance counterparts. Our results suggest that speed-specific neuro-functional and -structural differences exist between power and endurance athletes in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  14. [Cerebellar hypoplasias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Barbot, Clara; Resende Pereira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar hypoplasias are cerebellar malformations with small but completely formed cerebellum. They can be divided in focal and in diffuse or generalized. It is sometimes difficult to make distinction between cerebellar atrophy (progressive condition) and hipoplasia (not progressive condition). Focal hypoplasias are restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Diffuse hypoplasias refer to both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. If there is associated IVth ventricle enlargement, hypoplasias occur in the context of Dandy-Walker complex, a continuum of posterior fossa cystic anomalies. A revision of cerebellar hypoplasias and associated pathology is done, illustrated with 22 cases tha include focal and diffuse cerebellar hypoplasias, Dandy-Walker malformations and its variant, persistent Blake's pouch cyst, megacisterna magna, PEHO síndrome (progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hipsarrhythmia and optic atrophy), Joubert syndrome, congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia, pontocerebellar hipoplasias Barth type I and II, diffuse subcortical heterotopia. The imaging finding of structural cerebellar anomalies frequently leads to diagnostic incertainty as the anomalies are mostly unspecific, implying an extenuating analytical and genetic workup. Their knowledge and classification may be useful to decide the patient adjusted laboratorial workup.

  15. Dynamic modulation of activity in cerebellar nuclei neurons during pavlovian eyeblink conditioning in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brinke, Michiel Manuel; Heiney, Shane; Wang, Xiaolu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Boele, Henk-Jan; Bakermans, Jacob; Medina, Javier F; Gao, Zhenyu; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-01-01

    While research on the cerebellar cortex is crystallizing our understanding of its function in learning behavior, many questions surrounding its downstream targets remain. Here, we evaluate the dynamics of cerebellar interpositus nucleus (IpN) neurons over the course of Pavlovian eyeblink

  16. Computation of inverse functions in a model of cerebellar and reflex pathways allows to control a mobile mechanical segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadzadeh, M; Tondu, B; Darlot, C

    2005-01-01

    The command and control of limb movements by the cerebellar and reflex pathways are modeled by means of a circuit whose structure is deduced from functional constraints. One constraint is that fast limb movements must be accurate although they cannot be continuously controlled in closed loop by use of sensory signals. Thus, the pathways which process the motor orders must contain approximate inverse functions of the bio-mechanical functions of the limb and of the muscles. This can be achieved by means of parallel feedback loops, whose pattern turns out to be comparable to the anatomy of the cerebellar pathways. They contain neural networks able to anticipate the motor consequences of the motor orders, modeled by artificial neural networks whose connectivity is similar to that of the cerebellar cortex. These networks learn the direct biomechanical functions of the limbs and muscles by means of a supervised learning process. Teaching signals calculated from motor errors are sent to the learning sites, as, in the cerebellum, complex spikes issued from the inferior olive are conveyed to the Purkinje cells by climbing fibers. Learning rules are deduced by a differential calculation, as classical gradient rules, and they account for the long term depression which takes place in the dendritic arborizations of the Purkinje cells. Another constraint is that reflexes must not impede voluntary movements while remaining at any instant ready to oppose perturbations. Therefore, efferent copies of the motor orders are sent to the interneurones of the reflexes, where they cancel the sensory-motor consequences of the voluntary movements. After learning, the model is able to drive accurately, both in velocity and position, angular movements of a rod actuated by two pneumatic McKibben muscles. Reflexes comparable to the myotatic and tendinous reflexes, and stabilizing reactions comparable to the cerebellar sensory-motor reactions, reduce efficiently the effects of perturbing torques

  17. Adaptation, expertise, and giftedness: towards an understanding of cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar network contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Budding, Deborah Ely; Chidekel, Dana

    2010-12-01

    Current cortico-centric models of cognition lack a cohesive neuroanatomic framework that sufficiently considers overlapping levels of function, from "pathological" through "normal" to "gifted" or exceptional ability. While most cognitive theories presume an evolutionary context, few actively consider the process of adaptation, including concepts of neurodevelopment. Further, the frequent co-occurrence of "gifted" and "pathological" function is difficult to explain from a cortico-centric point of view. This comprehensive review paper proposes a framework that includes the brain's vertical organization and considers "giftedness" from an evolutionary and neurodevelopmental vantage point. We begin by discussing the current cortico-centric model of cognition and its relationship to intelligence. We then review an integrated, dual-tiered model of cognition that better explains the process of adaptation by simultaneously allowing for both stimulus-based processing and higher-order cognitive control. We consider the role of the basal ganglia within this model, particularly in relation to reward circuitry and instrumental learning. We review the important role of white matter tracts in relation to speed of adaptation and development of behavioral mastery. We examine the cerebellum's critical role in behavioral refinement and in cognitive and behavioral automation, particularly in relation to expertise and giftedness. We conclude this integrated model of brain function by considering the savant syndrome, which we believe is best understood within the context of a dual-tiered model of cognition that allows for automaticity in adaptation as well as higher-order executive control.

  18. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, particularly younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  19. Reorganization of Functional Brain Maps After Exercise Training: Importance of Cerebellar-Thalamic-Cortical Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Holschneider, DP; Yang, J; Guo, Y; Maarek, J-M I

    2007-01-01

    Exercise training (ET) causes functional and morphologic changes in normal and injured brain. While studies have examined effects of short-term (same day) training on functional brain activation, less work has evaluated effects of long-term training, in particular treadmill running. An improved understanding is relevant as changes in neural reorganization typically require days to weeks, and treadmill training is a component of many neurorehabilitation programs.

  20. Babinski's contributions to cerebellar symptomatology: building the basis of the neurological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Goetz, Christopher G

    2013-12-01

    Several assumptions about the function of the cerebellum and semiotic signs have been described over the centuries. Among the long list of famous researchers who have provided a strong contribution and who have left their names on the highway of cerebellar research, Joseph Babinski appears as a prominent name. The description of various forms of cerebellar symptomatology was a major part of Babinski's work, and clinical terms that he introduced, namely hypermetry , diadochokinesia , and asynergy , remain part of contemporary clinical vocabulary. Babinski studied cerebellar signs in many patients and was able to conduct longitudinal studies that permitted him to understand the evolution of cerebellar dysfunction. Babinski contributions to cerebellar symptomatology continue to influence the most modern theories, including functional and neuropathological studies.

  1. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex.

  2. Altered Cerebellar Organization and Function in Monoamine Oxidase A Hypomorphic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Loai; Bortolato, Marco; Delis, Foteini; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Darling, Ryan D.; Godar, Sean C; Zhang, Junlin; Grant, Samuel; Wang, Gene-Jack; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Chen, Kevin; Volkow, Nora D.; Lin, Rick C.S.; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is the key enzyme for the degradation of brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA). We recently generated and characterized a novel line of MAO-A hypormorphic mice (MAO-ANeo), featuring elevated monoamine levels, social deficits and perseverative behaviors as well as morphological changes in the basolateral amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex. Here we showed that MAO-ANeo mice displayed deficits in motor control, manifested as subtle disturbances in gait, motor coordination, and balance. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebellum revealed morphological changes and a moderate reduction in the cerebellar size of MAO- ANeo mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses using calbindin-D-28k (CB) expression of Purkinje cells revealed abnormal cerebellar foliation with vermal hypoplasia and decreased in Purkinje cell count and their dendritic density in MAO- ANeo mice compared to WT. Our current findings suggest that congenitally low MAO-A activity leads to abnormal development of the cerebellum. PMID:22971542

  3. Repetitive behavior and increased activity in mice with Purkinje cell loss: a model for understanding the role of cerebellar pathology in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Loren A; Goldowitz, Dan; Mittleman, Guy

    2010-02-01

    Repetitive behaviors and hyperactivity are common features of developmental disorders, including autism. Neuropathology of the cerebellum is also a frequent occurrence in autism and other developmental disorders. Recent studies have indicated that cerebellar pathology may play a causal role in the generation of repetitive and hyperactive behaviors. In this study, we examined the relationship between cerebellar pathology and these behaviors in a mouse model of Purkinje cell loss. Specifically, we made aggregation chimeras between Lc/+ mutant embryos and +/+ embryos. Lc/+ mice lose 100% of their Purkinje cells postnatally due to a cell-intrinsic gain-of-function mutation. Through our histological examination, we demonstrated that Lc/++/+ chimeric mice have Purkinje cells ranging from zero to normal numbers. Our analysis of these chimeric cerebella confirmed previous studies on Purkinje cell lineage. The results of both open-field activity and hole-board exploration testing indicated negative relationships between Purkinje cell number and measures of activity and investigatory nose-poking. Additionally, in a progressive-ratio operant paradigm, we found that Lc/+ mice lever-pressed significantly less than +/+ controls, which led to significantly lower breakpoints in this group. In contrast, chimeric mice lever-pressed significantly more than controls and this repetitive lever-pressing behavior was significantly and negatively correlated with total Purkinje cell numbers. Although the performance of Lc/+ mice is probably related to their motor deficits, the significant relationships between Purkinje cell number and repetitive lever-pressing behavior as well as open-field activity measures provide support for a role of cerebellar pathology in generating repetitive behavior and increased activity in chimeric mice.

  4. Visuospatial abilities in cerebellar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, M; Petrosini, L; Misciagna, S; Leggio, M G

    2004-02-01

    Cerebellar involvement in spatial data management has been suggested on experimental and clinical grounds. To attempt a specific analysis of visuospatial abilities in a group of subjects with focal or atrophic cerebellar damage. Visuospatial performance was tested using the spatial subtests of the WAIS, the Benton line orientation test, and two tests of mental rotation of objects-the Minnesota paper form board test (MIN) and the differential aptitude test (DAT). In the Benton line orientation test, a test of sensory analysis and elementary perception, no deficits were present in subjects with cerebellar damage. In MIN, which analyses the capacity to process bidimensional complex figures mentally, and in the DAT, which is based on mental folding and manipulation of tridimensional stimuli, subjects with cerebellar damage were impaired. The results indicate that lesions of the cerebellar circuits affect visuospatial ability. The ability to rotate objects mentally is a possible functional substrate of the observed deficits. A comparison between visuospatial performance of subjects with focal right and left cerebellar lesions shows side differences in the characteristics of the visuospatial syndrome. Thus cerebellar influences on spatial cognition appear to act on multiple cognitive modules.

  5. Prefronto–cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation improves visuospatial memory, executive functions, and neurological soft signs in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minichino A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amedeo Minichino, Francesco Saverio Bersani, Laura Bernabei, Francesco Spagnoli, Lucilla Vergnani, Alessandra Corrado, Ines Taddei, Massimo Biondi, Roberto Delle Chiaie Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Objective: The aim of the study was to improve neuropsychological functioning of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BD using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applied to cerebellar and prefrontal cortices.Methods: Twenty-five BD outpatients underwent prefrontal (anodal and cerebellar (cathodal tDCS for 3 consecutive weeks. All participants were assessed through the Rey Complex Figure Test delay and copy and the Neurological Examination Scale at baseline and after therapy with tDCS.Results: After tDCS treatment, patients showed significant improvements in visuospatial memory tasks. Patients with worse baseline cognitive performances also showed a significant improvement in executive functioning tasks. Neurological Examination Scale total score and motor coordination subscale significantly improved.Conclusion: Prefrontal-excitatory and cerebellar-inhibitory stimulations in euthymic BD patients may lead to better neurocognitive performances. This improvement could result from the modulation of prefronto–thalamic–cerebellar circuit activity pattern, which can be disrupted in BD. Keywords: cerebellum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, neuropsychology, cognition 

  6. Crossed Cerebellar Tracer Uptake on Acute-Stage 123I-Iomazenil SPECT Imaging Predicts 3-Month Functional Outcome in Patients With Nonfatal Hypertensive Putaminal or Thalamic Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Daigo; Komoribayashi, Nobukazu; Omama, Shinichi; Oikawa, Kohki; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Terasaki, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2018-03-13

    Whereas SPECT images obtained 180 minutes after administration of I-iomazenil (IMZ) (late images) are proportional to the distribution of central benzodiazepine receptor-binding potential, SPECT images obtained within 30 minutes after I-IMZ administration (early images) correlate with regional brain perfusion. The aim of the present study was to determine whether crossed cerebellar tracer uptake on acute-stage I-IMZ SPECT imaging predicts 3-month functional outcome in patients with nonfatal hypertensive putaminal or thalamic hemorrhage. Forty-six patients underwent early and late SPECT imaging with I-IMZ within 7 days after the onset of hemorrhage. A region of interest was automatically placed in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres using a 3-dimensional stereotaxic region-of-interest template, and the ratio of the value in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the affected side to that in the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere (ARcbl) was calculated in each patient. Each patient's physical function was measured using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score 3 months after onset. The ARcbl on early (ρ = -0.511, P = 0.0003) and late (ρ = -0.714, P download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  7. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoogland, Tycho M

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of

  8. Falls and cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Damulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the main causes of falls. Whatever their cause is, falls may lead to severe maladjustment in everyday life. In nearly 1 out of 10 cases, they are accompanied by severe injuries, including fractures (most commonly those of the proximal femur and humerus, hands, pelvic bones, and vertebrae, subdural hematoma, and severe soft tissue and head injuries. This process is emphasized to be multifactorial. Particular emphasis is laid on the involvement of the cerebellum and its associations, which may be accompanied by falls. This is clinically manifested mainly by gait disorders. Walking is a result of an interaction of three related functions (locomotion, maintenance of balance and adaptive reactions. In addition to synergies related to locomotion and balance maintenance, standing at rest and walking are influenced bythe following factors: postural and environmental information (proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual, the capacity to interpret and integrate this information, the ability of the musculoskeletal system to make movements, and the capability to optimally modulate these movements in view of the specific situation and the ability to choose and adapt synergy in terms of external factors and the capacities and purposes of an individual. The clinical signs of damage to the cerebellum and its associations are considered in detail. These structures are emphasized to be involved not only in movements, but also in cognitive functions. The major symptoms that permit cerebellar dysfunction to be diagnosed are given. Symptoms in cerebellar injuries are generally most pronounced when suddenly changing the direction of movements or attempting to start walking immediately after a dramatic rise. The magnitude of ataxia also increases in a patient who tries to decrease the step size. Falling tendencies or bending to one side (in other symptoms characteristic of cerebellar diseases suggest injury of the corresponding

  9. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. A Multiple-Plasticity Spiking Neural Network Embedded in a Closed-Loop Control System to Model Cerebellar Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geminiani, Alice; Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2018-06-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in sensorimotor control and cerebellar disorders compromise adaptation and learning of motor responses. However, the link between alterations at network level and cerebellar dysfunction is still unclear. In principle, this understanding would benefit of the development of an artificial system embedding the salient neuronal and plastic properties of the cerebellum and operating in closed-loop. To this aim, we have exploited a realistic spiking computational model of the cerebellum to analyze the network correlates of cerebellar impairment. The model was modified to reproduce three different damages of the cerebellar cortex: (i) a loss of the main output neurons (Purkinje Cells), (ii) a lesion to the main cerebellar afferents (Mossy Fibers), and (iii) a damage to a major mechanism of synaptic plasticity (Long Term Depression). The modified network models were challenged with an Eye-Blink Classical Conditioning test, a standard learning paradigm used to evaluate cerebellar impairment, in which the outcome was compared to reference results obtained in human or animal experiments. In all cases, the model reproduced the partial and delayed conditioning typical of the pathologies, indicating that an intact cerebellar cortex functionality is required to accelerate learning by transferring acquired information to the cerebellar nuclei. Interestingly, depending on the type of lesion, the redistribution of synaptic plasticity and response timing varied greatly generating specific adaptation patterns. Thus, not only the present work extends the generalization capabilities of the cerebellar spiking model to pathological cases, but also predicts how changes at the neuronal level are distributed across the network, making it usable to infer cerebellar circuit alterations occurring in cerebellar pathologies.

  11. Cerebellar patients demonstrate preserved implicit knowledge of association strengths in musical sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Justus, Timothy; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    Recent findings suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in perceptual and cognitive tasks. Our study investigated whether cerebellar patients show musical priming based on implicit knowledge of tonal-harmonic music. Participants performed speeded phoneme identification on sung target chords, which were either related or less-related to prime contexts in terms of the tonal-harmonic system. As groups, both cerebellar patients and age-matched controls showed facilitated processing for related targets, as previously observed for healthy young adults. The outcome suggests that an intact cerebellum is not mandatory for accessing implicit knowledge stored in long-term memory and for its influence on perception. One patient showed facilitated processing for less-related targets (suggesting sensory priming). The findings suggest directions for future research on auditory perception in cerebellar patients to further our understanding of cerebellar functions.

  12. Functional and structural correlates of motor speed in the cerebellar anterior lobe

    OpenAIRE

    Wenzel, U.; Taubert, M.; Ragert, P.; Krug, J.; Villringer, A.

    2014-01-01

    In athletics, motor performance is determined by different abilities such as technique, endurance, strength and speed. Based on animal studies, motor speed is thought to be encoded in the basal ganglia, sensorimotor cortex and the cerebellum. The question arises whether there is a unique structural feature in the human brain, which allows "power athletes" to perform a simple foot movement significantly faster than "endurance athletes". We acquired structural and functional brain imaging data ...

  13. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  14. A comprehensive assessment of resting state networks: bidirectional modification of functional integrity in cerebro-cerebellar networks in dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria eCastellazzi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI, only functional connectivity (FC reductions in the default mode network (DMN are normally reported as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In this investigation we have developed a comprehensive strategy to characterize the FC changes occurring in multiple networks and applied it in a pilot study of subjects with AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, compared to healthy controls (HC. Resting state networks (RSNs were studied in 14 AD (70±6 years, 12 MCI (74±6 years and 16 HC (69±5 years. RSN alterations were present in almost all the 15 recognized RSNs; overall, 474 voxels presented a reduced FC in MCI and 1244 in AD while 1627 voxels showed an increased FC in MCI and 1711 in AD. The RSNs were then ranked according to the magnitude and extension of FC changes (gFC, putting in evidence 6 RSNs with prominent changes: DMN, frontal cortical network (FCN, lateral visual network (LVN, basal ganglia network (BGN, cerebellar network (CBLN, and the anterior insula network (AIN. Nodes, or hubs, showing alterations common to more than one RSN were mostly localized within the prefrontal cortex and the mesial-temporal cortex. The cerebellum showed a unique behavior where voxels of decreased gFC were only found in AD while a significant gFC increase was only found in MCI. The gFC alterations showed strong correlations (p< 0.001 with psychological scores, in particular MMSE and attention/memory tasks. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that the DMN was affected by remarkable FC increases, that FC alterations extended over several RSNs, that derangement of functional relationships between multiple areas occurred already in the early stages of dementia. These results warrant future work to verify whether these represent compensatory mechanisms that exploit a pre-existing neural reserve through plasticity, which evolve in a state of lack of connectivity between different networks with the worsening of the pathology.

  15. A comprehensive assessment of resting state networks: bidirectional modification of functional integrity in cerebro-cerebellar networks in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Gloria; Palesi, Fulvia; Casali, Stefano; Vitali, Paolo; Sinforiani, Elena; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    In resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), only functional connectivity (FC) reductions in the default mode network (DMN) are normally reported as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this investigation we have developed a comprehensive strategy to characterize the FC changes occurring in multiple networks and applied it in a pilot study of subjects with AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), compared to healthy controls (HC). Resting state networks (RSNs) were studied in 14 AD (70 ± 6 years), 12 MCI (74 ± 6 years), and 16 HC (69 ± 5 years). RSN alterations were present in almost all the 15 recognized RSNs; overall, 474 voxels presented a reduced FC in MCI and 1244 in AD while 1627 voxels showed an increased FC in MCI and 1711 in AD. The RSNs were then ranked according to the magnitude and extension of FC changes (gFC), putting in evidence 6 RSNs with prominent changes: DMN, frontal cortical network (FCN), lateral visual network (LVN), basal ganglia network (BGN), cerebellar network (CBLN), and the anterior insula network (AIN). Nodes, or hubs, showing alterations common to more than one RSN were mostly localized within the prefrontal cortex and the mesial-temporal cortex. The cerebellum showed a unique behavior where voxels of decreased gFC were only found in AD while a significant gFC increase was only found in MCI. The gFC alterations showed strong correlations (p < 0.001) with psychological scores, in particular Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and attention/memory tasks. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that the DMN was affected by remarkable FC increases, that FC alterations extended over several RSNs, that derangement of functional relationships between multiple areas occurred already in the early stages of dementia. These results warrant future work to verify whether these represent compensatory mechanisms that exploit a pre-existing neural reserve through plasticity, which evolve in a state of lack of connectivity between different networks with

  16. Cerebellar Syndromes: A Medical Student Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia K. Sellers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is central to normal motor function and co-ordination, and can be frequently affected in a number of common disease processes. However, medical student teaching relating to cerebellar anatomy and pathology is lacking, leaving many graduates with a significant knowledge gap. Junior doctors need to be able to recognize ‘cerebellar syndromes’ on presentation to hospitals, and to identify and manage reversible causes rapidly and effectively. After review of relevant literature, a simple approach to the functional anatomy and practical classifications of common cerebellar pathology is presented here, with a focus on symptoms, signs and examination techniques essential to medical school final exams.

  17. Cerebellar Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Krumdieck, Carlos F.; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    In order to fully understand the seemingly complex symptomatology of disorders of the cerebellum, it must be remembered the anatomy and physiology of this important segment of the neuraxis. Para poder comprender bien la aparentemente compleja sintomatología de las afecciones del cerebelo, preciso es recordar la anatomía y fisiología de tan importante segmento del neuroeje.

  18. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-04-01

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Psychosis in Machado-Joseph Disease: Clinical Correlates, Pathophysiological Discussion, and Functional Brain Imaging. Expanding the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Neto, Pedro; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gadelha, Ary; Laureano, Maura Regina; de Souza Noto, Cristiano; Garrido, Griselda Jara; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide with a broad range of clinical manifestations, but psychotic symptoms were not previously characterized. We investigated the psychiatric manifestations of a large cohort of Brazilian patients with MJD in an attempt to characterize the presence of psychotic symptoms. We evaluated 112 patients with clinical and molecular diagnosis of MJD from February 2008 to November 2013. Patients with psychotic symptoms were referred to psychiatric evaluation and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis. A specific scale-Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-was used to characterize psychotic symptoms in MJD patients. We also performed an autopsy from one of the patients with MJD and psychotic symptoms. Five patients presented psychotic symptoms. Patients with psychotic symptoms were older and had a late onset of the disease (p < 0.05). SPECT results showed that MJD patients had significant regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) decrease in the cerebellum bilaterally and vermis compared with healthy subjects. No significant rCBF differences were found in patients without psychotic symptoms compared to patients with psychotic symptoms. The pathological description of a patient with MJD and psychotic symptoms revealed severe loss of neuron bodies in the dentate nucleus and substantia nigra. MJD patients with a late onset of the disease and older ones are at risk to develop psychotic symptoms during the disease progression. These clinical findings may be markers for an underlying cortical-cerebellar disconnection or degeneration of specific cortical and subcortical regions that may characterize the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome.

  20. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  1. Time estimation in Parkinson's disease and degenerative cerebellar disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beudel, Martijin; Galama, Sjoukje; Leenders, Klaus L.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2008-01-01

    With functional MRI, we recently identified fronto-cerebellar activations in predicting time to reach a target and basal ganglia activation in velocity estimation, that is, small interval assessment. We now tested these functions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative cerebellar

  2. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anila M. D'Mello

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. In contrast, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  3. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  4. Cerebellar direct current stimulation enhances on-line motor skill acquisition through an effect on accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Gabriela; Spampinato, Danny; Reis, Janine; Ajagbe, Loni; Thompson, Tziporah; Kulkarni, Kopal; Celnik, Pablo

    2015-02-18

    The cerebellum is involved in the update of motor commands during error-dependent learning. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a form of noninvasive brain stimulation, has been shown to increase cerebellar excitability and improve learning in motor adaptation tasks. Although cerebellar involvement has been clearly demonstrated in adaptation paradigms, a type of task that heavily relies on error-dependent motor learning mechanisms, its role during motor skill learning, a behavior that likely involves error-dependent as well as reinforcement and strategic mechanisms, is not completely understood. Here, in humans, we delivered cerebellar tDCS to modulate its activity during novel motor skill training over the course of 3 d and assessed gains during training (on-line effects), between days (off-line effects), and overall improvement. We found that excitatory anodal tDCS applied over the cerebellum increased skill learning relative to sham and cathodal tDCS specifically by increasing on-line rather than off-line learning. Moreover, the larger skill improvement in the anodal group was predominantly mediated by reductions in error rate rather than changes in movement time. These results have important implications for using cerebellar tDCS as an intervention to speed up motor skill acquisition and to improve motor skill accuracy, as well as to further our understanding of cerebellar function. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353285-06$15.00/0.

  5. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Microglial activation underlies cerebellar deficits produced by repeated cannabis exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutando, Laura; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Puighermanal, Emma; Gomis-González, Maria; Delgado-García, José María; Gruart, Agnès; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2013-07-01

    Chronic cannabis exposure can lead to cerebellar dysfunction in humans, but the neurobiological mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Here, we found that in mice, subchronic administration of the psychoactive component of cannabis, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), activated cerebellar microglia and increased the expression of neuroinflammatory markers, including IL-1β. This neuroinflammatory phenotype correlated with deficits in cerebellar conditioned learning and fine motor coordination. The neuroinflammatory phenotype was readily detectable in the cerebellum of mice with global loss of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R, Cb1(-/-) mice) and in mice lacking CB1R in the cerebellar parallel fibers, suggesting that CB1R downregulation in the cerebellar molecular layer plays a key role in THC-induced cerebellar deficits. Expression of CB2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) and Il1b mRNA was increased under neuroinflammatory conditions in activated CD11b-positive microglial cells. Furthermore, administration of the immunosuppressant minocycline or an inhibitor of IL-1β receptor signaling prevented the deficits in cerebellar function in Cb1(-/-) and THC-withdrawn mice. Our results suggest that cerebellar microglial activation plays a crucial role in the cerebellar deficits induced by repeated cannabis exposure.

  7. Cerebellar disorders in childhood: cognitive problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlin, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, increasing evidence of cognitive functions of the cerebellum during development and learning processes could be ascertained. Posterior fossa malformations such as cerebellar hypoplasia or Joubert syndrome are known to be related to developmental problems in a marked to moderate extent. More detailed analyses reveal special deficits in attention, processing speed, visuospatial functions, and language. A study about Dandy Walker syndrome states a relationship of abnormalities in vermis lobulation with developmental problems. Further lobulation or volume abnormalities of the cerebellum and/or vermis can be detected in disorders as fragile X syndrome, Downs's syndrome, William's syndrome, and autism. Neuropsychological studies reveal a relation of dyslexia and attention deficit disorder with cerebellar functions. These functional studies are supported by structural abnormalities in neuroimaging in these disorders. Acquired cerebellar or vermis atrophy was found in groups of children with developmental problems such as prenatal alcohol exposure or extreme prematurity. Also, focal lesions during childhood or adolescence such as cerebellar tumor or stroke are related with neuropsychological abnormalities, which are most pronounced in visuospatial, language, and memory functions. In addition, cerebellar atrophy was shown to be a bad prognostic factor considering cognitive outcome in children after brain trauma and leukemia. In ataxia teleangiectasia, a neurodegenerative disorder affecting primarily the cerebellar cortex, a reduced verbal intelligence quotient and problems of judgment of duration are a hint of the importance of the cerebellum in cognition. In conclusion, the cerebellum seems to play an important role in many higher cognitive functions, especially in learning. There is a suggestion that the earlier the incorrect influence, the more pronounced the problems.

  8. Understanding the Pathophysiology of Spinocerebellar Ataxias through genetics, neurophysiology, structural and functional neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Pal

    2015-12-01

    largely absent with additional activity in contralateral cortices and in thalami in patients with SCA1; increased thalamic function could be one of the causes for disinhibition of the motor cortex contributing to uncoordinated movements.Studies on larger cohort of each subtype of SCAs to validate the above findings, follow-up studies to determine the rate and nature of progression of neurodegeneration and evaluation of pre-symptomatic genetically confirmed SCAs will help understand the pathophysiology of the SCAs.

  9. Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells | Ibhazehiebo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells. ... Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences ... Taken together, our study shows that low dose methamidophos may negatively impact TH-mediated cerebellar neuronal cell development and function, and consequently could interfere with TH-regulated neuronal events ...

  10. Climbing Fiber Signaling and Cerebellar Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Gen; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses have become hallmark features of cerebellar physiology. However, the key role of climbing fiber signaling in cerebellar motor learning has been challenged by recent reports of forms of synaptic and non-synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar cortex that do not involve climbing fiber activity, but might well play a role in cerebellar learning. Moreover, cerebellar LTD does not seem to strictly require climbing fiber activity. These observations make it necessary to re-evaluate the role of climbing fiber signaling in cerebellar function. Here, we argue that climbing fiber signaling is about adjusting relative probabilities for the induction of LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP) at parallel fiber synapses. Complex spike-associated, dendritic calcium transients control postsynaptic LTD and LTP induction. High calcium transients, provided by complex spike activity, do not only favor postsynaptic LTD induction, but simultaneously trigger retrograde cannabinoid signaling, which blocks the induction of presynaptic LTP. Plasticity of the climbing fiber input itself provides additional means to fine-tune complex spike associated calcium signaling and thus to adjust the gain of heterosynaptic climbing fiber control. In addition to dendritic calcium transients, climbing fiber activity leads to the release of the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which facilitates LTD induction at both parallel fiber and climbing fiber synapses. PMID:19597563

  11. Climbing fiber signaling and cerebellar gain control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Ohtsuki

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses have become hallmark features of cerebellar physiology. However, the key role of climbing fiber signaling in cerebellar motor learning has been challenged by recent reports of forms of synaptic and non-synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar cortex that do not involve climbing fiber activity, but might well play a role in cerebellar learning. Moreover, cerebellar LTD does not seem to strictly require climbing fiber activity. These observations make it necessary to re-evaluate the role of climbing fiber signaling in cerebellar function. Here, we argue that climbing fiber signaling is about adjusting relative probabilities for the induction of LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP at parallel fiber synapses. Complex spike-associated, dendritic calcium transients control postsynaptic LTD and LTP induction. High calcium transients, provided by complex spike activity, do not only favor postsynaptic LTD induction, but simultaneously trigger retrograde cannabinoid signaling, which blocks the induction of presynaptic LTP. Plasticity of the climbing fiber input itself provides additional means to fine-tune complex spike associated calcium signaling and thus to adjust the gain of heterosynaptic climbing fiber control. In addition to dendritic calcium transients, climbing fiber activity leads to the release of the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, which facilitates LTD induction at both parallel fiber and climbing fiber synapses.

  12. Torsin A Localization in the Mouse Cerebellar Synaptic Circuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Puglisi

    Full Text Available Torsin A (TA is a ubiquitous protein belonging to the superfamily of proteins called "ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities" (AAA(+ ATPase. To date, a great deal of attention has been focused on neuronal TA since its mutant form causes early-onset (DYT1 torsion dystonia, an inherited movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and abnormal postures. Interestingly, it has been proposed that TA, by interacting with the cytoskeletal network, may contribute to the control of neurite outgrowth and/or by acting as a chaperone at synapses could affect synaptic vesicle turnover and neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, both its peculiar developmental expression in striatum and cerebellum and evidence from DYT1 knock-in mice suggest that TA may influence dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis in the brain. Therefore, to better understand TA function a detailed description of its localization at synaptic level is required. Here, we characterized by means of rigorous quantitative confocal analysis TA distribution in the mouse cerebellum at postnatal day 14 (P14, when both cerebellar synaptogenesis and TA expression peak. We observed that the protein is broadly distributed both in cerebellar cortex and in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN. Of note, Purkinje cells (PC express high levels of TA also in the spines and axonal terminals. In addition, abundant expression of the protein was found in the main GABA-ergic and glutamatergic inputs of the cerebellar cortex. Finally, TA was observed also in glial cells, a cellular population little explored so far. These results extend our knowledge on TA synaptic localization providing a clue to its potential role in synaptic development.

  13. The visuospatial functions in children after cerebellar low-grade astrocytoma surgery: A contribution to the pediatric neuropsychology of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Milczarek, Olga; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to specify whether cerebellar lesions cause visuospatial impairments in children. The study sample consisted of 40 children with low-grade cerebellar astrocytoma, who underwent surgical treatment and 40 healthy controls matched with regard to age and sex. Visuospatial abilities were tested using the spatial WISC-R subtests (Block Design and Object Assembly), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, PEBL Mental Rotation Task, and Benton Visual Retention Test. To exclude general diffuse intellectual dysfunction, the WISC-R Verbal Intelligence IQ, Performance IQ, and Full-Scale IQ scores were analysed. Post-surgical medical consequences were measured with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Compared to controls, the cerebellar group manifested problems with mental rotation of objects, visuospatial organization, planning, and spatial construction processes which could not be explained by medical complications or general intellectual retardation. The intensity of visuospatial syndrome highly depends on cerebellar lesion side. Patients with left-sided cerebellar lesions display more severe spatial problems than those with right-sided cerebellar lesions. In conclusion, focal cerebellar lesions in children affect their visuospatial ability. The impairments profile is characterized by deficits in complex spatial processes such as visuospatial organization and mental rotation, requiring reconstruction of visual stimuli using the imagination, while elementary sensory analysis and perception as well as spatial processes requiring direct manipulation of objects are relatively better preserved. This pattern is analogous to the one previously observed in adult population and appears to be typical for cerebellar pathology in general, regardless of age. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Understanding the Executive Functioning Heterogeneity in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffard, Stephane; Bayard, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by heterogeneous brain abnormalities involving cerebral regions implied in the executive functioning. The dysexecutive syndrome is one of the most prominent and functionally cognitive features of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what extend executive deficits are heterogeneous in schizophrenia…

  15. Understanding Linear Functions and Their Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Linear functions are an important part of the middle school mathematics curriculum. Students in the middle grades gain fluency by working with linear functions in a variety of representations (NCTM 2001). Presented in this article is an activity that was used with five eighth-grade classes at three different schools. The activity contains 15 cards…

  16. Understanding Microbial Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    microbial communities: Function, structure and dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to...dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to December 2014. The programme involved over 150...Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, UK, from 19th August 2014 – 19th December 2014

  17. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation modulates verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Andreas; Macher, Katja; Dukart, Juergen; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies show cerebellar activations in a wide range of cognitive tasks and patients with cerebellar lesions often present cognitive deficits suggesting a cerebellar role in higher-order cognition. We used cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), known to inhibit neuronal excitability, over the cerebellum to investigate if cathodal tDCS impairs verbal working memory, an important higher-order cognitive faculty. We tested verbal working memory as measured by forward and backward digit spans in 40 healthy young participants before and after applying cathodal tDCS (2 mA, stimulation duration 25 min) to the right cerebellum using a randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind, cross-over design. In addition, we tested the effect of cerebellar tDCS on word reading, finger tapping and a visually cued sensorimotor task. In line with lower digit spans in patients with cerebellar lesions, cerebellar tDCS reduced forward digit spans and blocked the practice dependent increase in backward digit spans. No effects of tDCS on word reading, finger tapping or the visually cued sensorimotor task were found. Our results support the view that the cerebellum contributes to verbal working memory as measured by forward and backward digit spans. Moreover, the induction of reversible "virtual cerebellar lesions" in healthy individuals by means of tDCS may improve our understanding of the mechanistic basis of verbal working memory deficits in patients with cerebellar lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  19. Asymmetries in cerebellar plasticity and motor learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titley, Heather K.; Hansel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse has long been considered a cellular correlate for cerebellar motor learning. Functionally, long-term depression and long-term potentiation at these synapses seem to be the reverse of each other, with both pre- and post- synaptic expression occurring in both. However, different cerebellar motor learning paradigms have been shown to be asymmetric and not equally reversible. Here we discuss the asymmetric reversibility shown in the vestibulo-ocular reflex and eye-blink conditioning, and suggest that different cellular plasticity mechanisms might be recruited under different conditions leading to unequal reversibility. PMID:25578035

  20. Dynamic changes in the inner ear function and vestibular neural pathway related to the progression of labyrinthine infarction in patient with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk Rim; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Hong, Sung Kwang

    2011-12-01

    To describe changes in the inner ear function and the vestibular neural pathway according to the progression of a labyrinthine infarction in a patient with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction. A 58-year-old woman with hypertension who presented with isolated inner ear symptoms similar to those of endolymphatic hydrops but finally progressed to an AICA infarction. Serial neurotologic testing according to progression to an AICA infarction and antiplatelet therapy. Radiologic findings and neurotologic parameters, including pure tone audiogram thresholds, spontaneous nystagmus, summating potentials/action potentials on electrocochleography, interaural amplitude difference on the vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test, canal paresis and fixation index on the bithermal caloric test, and gain on oculomotor tests. Our patient initially presented with sudden hearing loss and was diagnosed with an acute AICA infarction on a follow up MRI. Dynamic change in neurotologic testing was observed during disease progression. The vertigo and motion intolerance improved gradually after antiplatelet therapy. Changes in the clinical profile, which were documented during a transition from isolated labyrinthine ischemia to an AICA infarction, suggest that sensitivity to an ischemic injury is variable in different components of the labyrinthine organs in addition to providing a new insight into the response of vestibular neural pathway to ischemic injury.

  1. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Autism

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The size of the cerebellar hemisphere and vermal lobules was measured in ten autistic and eight normal control subjects at the Neuropsychology Research Laboratory, Children’s Hospital Research Center, and the Departments of Neurosciences and Radiology, School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, LaJolla.

  2. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  3. Mathematical models of human cerebellar development in the fetal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Krzysztof; Nowakowska-Kotas, Marta; Kędzia, Alicja

    2018-04-01

    The evaluation of cerebellar growth in the fetal period forms a part of a widely used examination to identify any features of abnormalities in early stages of human development. It is well known that the development of anatomical structures, including the cerebellum, does not always follow a linear model of growth. The aim of the study was to analyse a variety of mathematical models of human cerebellar development in fetal life to determine their adequacy. The study comprised 101 fetuses (48 males and 53 females) between the 15th and 28th weeks of fetal life. The cerebellum was exposed and measurements of the vermis and hemispheres were performed, together with statistical analyses. The mathematical model parameters of fetal growth were assessed for crown-rump length (CRL) increases, transverse cerebellar diameter and ventrodorsal dimensions of the cerebellar vermis in the transverse plane, and rostrocaudal dimensions of the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres in the frontal plane. A variety of mathematical models were applied, including linear and non-linear functions. Taking into consideration the variance between models and measurements, as well as correlation parameters, the exponential and Gompertz models proved to be the most suitable for modelling cerebellar growth in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, the linear model gave a satisfactory approximation of cerebellar growth, especially in older fetuses. The proposed models of fetal cerebellar growth constructed on the basis of anatomical examination and objective mathematical calculations could be useful in the estimation of fetal development. © 2018 Anatomical Society.

  4. Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Taken together, our study shows that low dose methamidophos may negatively impact. TH-mediated cerebellar neuronal cell development and function, and consequently could interfere with TH-regulated neuronal events. Keywords: Methamidophos, Thyroid hormone, Purkinje cells, Granule cell, Neuronal development.

  5. Bilateral effects of unilateral cerebellar lesions as detected by voxel based morphometry and diffusion imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusy Olivito

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, the importance of cerebellar processing for cortical functions has been acknowledged and consensus was reached on the strict functional and structural cortico-cerebellar interrelations. From an anatomical point of view strictly contralateral interconnections link the cerebellum to the cerebral cortex mainly through the middle and superior cerebellar peduncle. Diffusion MRI (dMRI based tractography has already been applied to address cortico-cerebellar-cortical loops in healthy subjects and to detect diffusivity alteration patterns in patients with neurodegenerative pathologies of the cerebellum. In the present study we used dMRI-based tractography to determine the degree and pattern of pathological changes of cerebellar white matter microstructure in patients with focal cerebellar lesions. Diffusion imaging and high-resolution volumes were obtained in patients with left cerebellar lesions and in normal controls. Middle cerebellar peduncles and superior cerebellar peduncles were reconstructed by multi fiber diffusion tractography. From each tract, measures of microscopic damage were assessed, and despite the presence of unilateral lesions, bilateral diffusivity differences in white matter tracts were found comparing patients with normal controls. Consistently, bilateral alterations were also evidenced in specific brain regions linked to the cerebellum and involved in higher-level functions. This could be in line with the evidence that in the presence of unilateral cerebellar lesions, different cognitive functions can be affected and they are not strictly linked to the side of the cerebellar lesion.

  6. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Buchin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR. While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing.

  7. Contribution of cerebellar sensorimotor adaptation to hippocampal spatial memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Passot

    Full Text Available Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation.

  8. Cerebellar Contribution to Social Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, Franziska; Guell, Xavier; Sherman, Janet C; Vangel, Mark G; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2016-12-01

    Emotion attribution (EA) from faces is key to social cognition, and deficits in perception of emotions from faces underlie neuropsychiatric disorders in which cerebellar pathology is reported. Here, we test the hypothesis that the cerebellum contributes to social cognition through EA from faces. We examined 57 patients with cerebellar disorders and 57 healthy controls. Thirty-one patients had complex cerebrocerebellar disease (complex cerebrocerebellar disease group (CD)); 26 had disease isolated to cerebellum (isolated cerebellar disease group (ID)). EA was measured with the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RMET), and informants were administered a novel questionnaire, the Cerebellar Neuropsychiatric Rating Scale (CNRS). EA was impaired in all patients (CD p social skills (p social skills (CD p social skills and autism spectrum behaviors and experienced psychosocial difficulties on the CNRS. This has relevance for ataxias, the cerebellar cognitive affective/Schmahmann syndrome, and neuropsychiatric disorders with cerebellar pathology.

  9. Volumetric Analysis of Cerebral Peduncles and Cerebellar Hemispheres for Predicting Hemiparesis After Hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Jeffrey P; Soni, Pranay; Lee, Sungho; Jehi, Lara; Naduvil Valappi, Ahsan Moosa; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    In some cases of refractory epilepsy, hemispherectomy is the final invasive treatment option. However, predictors of postoperative hemiparesis in these patients have not been widely studied. To investigate how the volumetric analysis of cerebral peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres in patients who have undergone hemispherectomy may determine prognostic implications for postoperative hemiparesis. Twenty-two patients who underwent hemispherectomy at our institution were retrospectively included. Using iPlan/BrainLAB (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) imaging software and a semiautomatic voxel-based segmentation method, we calculated the preoperative cerebral peduncle and cerebellar hemisphere volumes. Cerebral peduncle and cerebellar hemisphere ratios were compared between patients with worsened or unchanged/better hemiparesis postoperatively. The ratios of ipsilateral/contralateral cerebral peduncles (0.570 vs 0.828; P = .02) and contralateral/ipsilateral cerebellar hemispheres (0.885 vs 1.031; P = .009) were significantly lower in patients who had unchanged/improved hemiparesis postoperatively compared with patients who had worsened hemiparesis. Relative risk of worsening hemiparesis was significantly higher in patients with a cerebral peduncle ratio < 0.7 (relative risk, 4.3; P = .03) or a cerebellar ratio < 1.0 (relative risk, 6.4; P = .006). Although patients who undergo hemispherectomy are heterogeneous, we report a method of predicting postoperative hemiparesis using only standard volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. This information could be used in preoperative discussions with patients and families to help better understand that chance of retaining baseline motor function. CST, corticospinal tractfMRI, functional magnetic resonance imagingTMS, transcranial magnetic stimulation.

  10. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in bipolar disorder with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Ann K; Roh, Youkyung S; Ravichandran, Caitlin T; Baker, Justin T; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M

    2017-07-01

    The cerebellum, which modulates affect and cognition in addition to motor functions, may contribute substantially to the pathophysiology of mood and psychotic disorders, such as bipolar disorder. A growing literature points to cerebellar abnormalities in bipolar disorder. However, no studies have investigated the topographic representations of resting state cerebellar networks in bipolar disorder, specifically their functional connectivity to cerebral cortical networks. Using a well-defined cerebral cortical parcellation scheme as functional connectivity seeds, we compared ten cerebellar resting state networks in 49 patients with bipolar disorder and a lifetime history of psychotic features and 55 healthy control participants matched for age, sex, and image signal-to-noise ratio. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed reduced cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in somatomotor A, ventral attention, salience, and frontoparietal control A and B networks relative to healthy control participants. These findings were not significantly correlated with current symptoms. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed evidence of cerebro-cerebellar dysconnectivity in selective networks. These disease-related changes were substantial and not explained by medication exposure or substance use. Therefore, they may be mechanistically relevant to the underlying susceptibility to mood dysregulation and psychosis. Cerebellar mechanisms deserve further exploration in psychiatric conditions, and this study's findings may have value in guiding future studies on pathophysiology and treatment of mood and psychotic disorders, in particular.

  11. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Cerebellar Pathways and their Interplay with Cerebral Macrostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer eKeser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar white matter connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the spinocerebellar, vestibulocerebellar, and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The Spinocerebellar (SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the vestibulocerebellar (VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI. Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20-51 years were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2mm x 2mm x 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC, parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC, temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC. The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM, cerebral white matter (WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~ 3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~ 25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.52 ± 0.43 of the total intracranial volume.

  12. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  13. Transient inhibition of the ERK pathway prevents cerebellar developmental defects and improves long-term motor functions in murine models of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Wang, Yuan; Kim, Sun-Jung; Bornhorst, Miriam; Jecrois, Emmanuelle S; Anthony, Todd E; Wang, Chenran; Li, Yi E; Guan, Jun-Lin; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Zhu, Yuan

    2014-12-23

    Individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) frequently exhibit cognitive and motor impairments and characteristics of autism. The cerebellum plays a critical role in motor control, cognition, and social interaction, suggesting that cerebellar defects likely contribute to NF1-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we show that Nf1 inactivation during early, but not late stages of cerebellar development, disrupts neuronal lamination, which is partially caused by overproduction of glia and subsequent disruption of the Bergmann glia (BG) scaffold. Specific Nf1 inactivation in glutamatergic neuronal precursors causes premature differentiation of granule cell (GC) precursors and ectopic production of unipolar brush cells (UBCs), indirectly disrupting neuronal migration. Transient MEK inhibition during a neonatal window prevents cerebellar developmental defects and improves long-term motor performance of Nf1-deficient mice. This study reveals essential roles of Nf1 in GC/UBC migration by generating correct numbers of glia and controlling GC/UBC fate-specification/differentiation, identifying a therapeutic prevention strategy for multiple NF1-associcated developmental abnormalities.

  14. The clinical impact of cerebellar grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Damasceno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cerebellum is an important site for cortical demyelination in multiple sclerosis, but the functional significance of this finding is not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and cognitive impact of cerebellar grey-matter pathology in multiple sclerosis patients. METHODS: Forty-two relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 30 controls underwent clinical assessment including the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and cerebellar functional system (FS score, and cognitive evaluation, including the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT and the Symbol-Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a 3T scanner and variables of interest were: brain white-matter and cortical lesion load, cerebellar intracortical and leukocortical lesion volumes, and brain cortical and cerebellar white-matter and grey-matter volumes. RESULTS: After multivariate analysis high burden of cerebellar intracortical lesions was the only predictor for the EDSS (p<0.001, cerebellar FS (p = 0.002, arm function (p = 0.049, and for leg function (p<0.001. Patients with high burden of cerebellar leukocortical lesions had lower PASAT scores (p = 0.013, while patients with greater volumes of cerebellar intracortical lesions had worse SDMT scores (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebellar grey-matter pathology is widely present and contributes to clinical dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, independently of brain grey-matter damage.

  15. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  16. Estudio comparativo de las funciones ejecutivas entre pacientes con enfermedad de Parkinson y pacientes con enfermedad degenerativa cerebelosa Comparison study of executive functions in Parkinson's disease and degenerative cerebellar disease's patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Abel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar el rendimiento en tareas de función ejecutiva (FE en sujetos con enfermedad de Parkinson (EP leve a moderada (Hoehn y Yahr OBJECTIVE: To compare executive functions (EF in non-demented mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (PD (Hoehn and Yahr <3 and pure degenerative cerebellar disease (CD in order to evaluate the relative contribution and differential role of basal ganglia and cerebellum in those functions. METHOD: 14 patients with PD and 14 patients with CD matched by sex, education, disease's duration and MMSE were selected. A standardized neuropsychological battery and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST were administered. Z scores were compared for both groups through t-test for independent samples were used. RESULTS: The cerebellar group showed significant lower performance in measures of attention and EF, with a significant increase in both perseverative and non perseverative errors during the WCST. On the other hand the PD group showed a selective increase of non perseverative errors, without reaching significant between group difference. CONCLUSION: The CD group appears to have greater deficits in EF with a pattern of prefrontal dysfunction.

  17. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  18. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Harpanahalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA is a relatively rare neoplasm predominantly occurring in the supratentorial compartment. Among the unusual locations, cerebellum is the most common with few cases reported in the spinal cord and retina. The infratentorial PXA has a female preponderance, occurs in the fourth decade of life and is composite in 2/3 rd of the cases as compared to the supratentorial lesions. Gross total surgical excision is the goal, but is difficult due to the infiltration of the lesion into brainstem/upper cervical cord. Adjuvant radio/chemotherapy for recurrent/progressive/malignant forms have been, reported, but with variable results. This case is of a 25-year-old man who had a cerebellar PXA extending into the upper cervical cord that was sub-totally excised.

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palau Francesc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000, ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000 and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000. Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder, ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1, and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning, electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia.

  20. Understanding Control Function and Failure From a Process Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai; Lind, Morten

    2012-01-01

    In control design, fault-identification and fault tolerant control, the controlled process is usually perceived as a dynamical process, captured in a mathematical model. The design of a control system for a complex process, however, begins typically long before these mathematical models become...... relevant and available. To consider the role of control functions in process design, a good qualitative understanding of the process as well as of control functions is required. As the purpose of a control function is closely tied to the process functions, its failure has a direct effects on the process...... behaviour and its function. This paper presents a formal methodology for the qualitative representation of control functions in relation to their process context. Different types of relevant process and control abstractions are introduced and their application to formal analysis of control failure modes...

  1. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan eHerreros Alonso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  2. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

  3. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea [Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari [Psychobiology Research Unit, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bamford, Sim [Physics Laboratory, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome (Italy); Prueckl, Robert [Guger Technologies OG, Graz (Austria); Verschure, Paul F. M. J., E-mail: paul.verschure@upf.edu [Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-05-21

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

  4. Memory consolidation in the cerebellar cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Kellett

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Several forms of learning, including classical conditioning of the eyeblink, depend upon the cerebellum. In examining mechanisms of eyeblink conditioning in rabbits, reversible inactivations of the control circuitry have begun to dissociate aspects of cerebellar cortical and nuclear function in memory consolidation. It was previously shown that post-training cerebellar cortical, but not nuclear, inactivations with the GABAA agonist muscimol prevented consolidation but these findings left open the question as to how final memory storage was partitioned across cortical and nuclear levels. Memory consolidation might be essentially cortical and directly disturbed by actions of the muscimol, or it might be nuclear, and sensitive to the raised excitability of the nuclear neurons following the loss of cortical inhibition. To resolve this question, we simultaneously inactivated cerebellar cortical lobule HVI and the anterior interpositus nucleus of rabbits during the post-training period, so protecting the nuclei from disinhibitory effects of cortical inactivation. Consolidation was impaired by these simultaneous inactivations. Because direct application of muscimol to the nuclei alone has no impact upon consolidation, we can conclude that post-training, consolidation processes and memory storage for eyeblink conditioning have critical cerebellar cortical components. The findings are consistent with a recent model that suggests the distribution of learning-related plasticity across cortical and nuclear levels is task-dependent. There can be transfer to nuclear or brainstem levels for control of high-frequency responses but learning with lower frequency response components, such as in eyeblink conditioning, remains mainly dependent upon cortical memory storage.

  5. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  6. Structural Alterations within Cerebellar Circuitry Are Associated with General Liability for Common Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Adrienne L.; Knodt, Annchen R.; Houts, Renate; Brigidi, Bartholomew D.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating mental health research encourages a shift in focus towards transdiagnostic dimensional features that are shared across categorical disorders. In support of this shift, recent studies have identified a general liability factor for psychopathology – sometimes called the ‘p factor’ – that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general liability would substantiate its importance in characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the ‘p factor’ contributes to risk. Here we first replicate the ‘p factor’ using cross-sectional data from a volunteer sample of 1,246 university students, and then, using high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, demonstrate that individuals with higher ‘p factor’ scores show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways, as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that higher ‘p factor’ scores are associated with reduced gray matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we observed a significant positive correlation between the white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray matter volume associated with higher ‘p factor’ scores. The results of our analyses provide initial evidence that structural alterations in cortico-cerebellar circuitry supporting core functions related to the basic integration, coordination, and monitoring of information may contribute to a general liability for common mental disorders. PMID:28397842

  7. Understanding schizoaffective disorder: from psychobiology to psychosocial functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U

    2010-01-01

    Psychobiologic evidence and psychosocial functioning in patients with schizoaffective disorder suggest that the disease may be a distinct disorder, a variant of schizophrenia or affective disorders, the comorbidity of schizophrenia and a mood disorder, or an intermediate disorder on a spectrum that ranges from schizophrenia to mood disorders. These data, although inconclusive, contribute to clinicians' understanding of the etiology of the disorder. Further research may lead to an increased understanding of the disorder, improved treatment, and, ultimately, better outcomes. © Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  8. Cerebro-cerebellar connectivity is increased in primary lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Meoded

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased functional connectivity in resting state networks was found in several studies of patients with motor neuron disorders, although diffusion tensor imaging studies consistently show loss of white matter integrity. To understand the relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity, we examined the structural connections between regions with altered functional connectivity in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS, a long-lived motor neuron disease. Connectivity matrices were constructed from resting state fMRI in 16 PLS patients to identify areas of differing connectivity between patients and healthy controls. Probabilistic fiber tracking was used to examine structural connections between regions of differing connectivity. PLS patients had 12 regions with increased functional connectivity compared to controls, with a predominance of cerebro-cerebellar connections. Increased functional connectivity was strongest between the cerebellum and cortical motor areas and between the cerebellum and frontal and temporal cortex. Fiber tracking detected no difference in connections between regions with increased functional connectivity. We conclude that functional connectivity changes are not strongly based in structural connectivity. Increased functional connectivity may be caused by common inputs, or by reduced selectivity of cortical activation, which could result from loss of intracortical inhibition when cortical afferents are intact.

  9. Cerebro-cerebellar connectivity is increased in primary lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meoded, Avner; Morrissette, Arthur E; Katipally, Rohan; Schanz, Olivia; Gotts, Stephen J; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Increased functional connectivity in resting state networks was found in several studies of patients with motor neuron disorders, although diffusion tensor imaging studies consistently show loss of white matter integrity. To understand the relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity, we examined the structural connections between regions with altered functional connectivity in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), a long-lived motor neuron disease. Connectivity matrices were constructed from resting state fMRI in 16 PLS patients to identify areas of differing connectivity between patients and healthy controls. Probabilistic fiber tracking was used to examine structural connections between regions of differing connectivity. PLS patients had 12 regions with increased functional connectivity compared to controls, with a predominance of cerebro-cerebellar connections. Increased functional connectivity was strongest between the cerebellum and cortical motor areas and between the cerebellum and frontal and temporal cortex. Fiber tracking detected no difference in connections between regions with increased functional connectivity. We conclude that functional connectivity changes are not strongly based in structural connectivity. Increased functional connectivity may be caused by common inputs, or by reduced selectivity of cortical activation, which could result from loss of intracortical inhibition when cortical afferents are intact.

  10. Cerebellar contributions to self-motion perception: evidence from patients with congenital cerebellar agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Kilian; Valko, Yulia; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum was historically considered a brain region dedicated to motor control, but it has become clear that it also contributes to sensory processing, particularly when sensory discrimination is required. Prior work, for example, has demonstrated a cerebellar contribution to sensory discrimination in the visual and auditory systems. The cerebellum also receives extensive inputs from the motion and gravity sensors in the vestibular labyrinth, but its role in the perception of head motion and orientation has received little attention. Drawing on the lesion-deficit approach to understanding brain function, we evaluated the contributions of the cerebellum to head motion perception by measuring perceptual thresholds in two subjects with congenital agenesis of the cerebellum. We used a set of passive motion paradigms that activated the semicircular canals or otolith organs in isolation or combination, and compared results of the agenesis patients with healthy control subjects. Perceptual thresholds for head motion were elevated in the agenesis subjects for all motion protocols, most prominently for paradigms that only activated otolith inputs. These results demonstrate that the cerebellum increases the sensitivity of the brain to the motion and orientation signals provided by the labyrinth during passive head movements. PMID:26888100

  11. Suboccipital Decompressive Craniectomy for Cerebellar Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, Oliver G S; Alotaibi, Naif M; Wang, Justin Z; Fatehi, Mostafa; Ibrahim, George M; Benavente, Oscar; Field, Thalia S; Gooderham, Peter A; Macdonald, R Loch

    2018-02-01

    Suboccipital decompressive craniectomy (SDC) for cerebellar infarction has been traditionally performed with minimal high-quality evidence. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to investigate the impact of SDC on functional outcomes, mortality, and adverse events in patients with cerebellar infarcts. A systematic review and meta-analysis in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients with moderate-severe disability after SDC. Secondary outcomes included mortality and adverse events. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the roles of age, preoperative neurologic status, external ventricular drain insertion, and debridement of infarcted tissue on SDC outcomes. Eleven studies (with 283 patients) met our inclusion criteria. The pooled event rate for moderate-severe disability was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20%-37%) and for mortality, it was 20% (95% CI, 12%-31%). The estimated overall rate of adverse events for SDC was 23% (95% CI, 14%-35%). Sensitivity analysis found less mortality with mean age SDC is based on retrospective observational studies. SDC for cerebellar infarction is associated with better outcomes compared with decompressive surgery for hemispheric infarctions. Lack of standardized reporting methods for SDC is a considerable drawback to the development of a better understanding of the impact of this surgery on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using functional genetics to understand breast cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Alan; Bernards, Rene

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screens were for long the prerogative of those that studied model organisms. The discovery in 2001 that gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) can also be brought about in mammalian cells paved the way for large scale loss-of-function genetic screens in higher organisms. In this article, we describe how functional genetic studies can help us understand the biology of breast cancer, how it can be used to identify novel targets for breast cancer therapy, and how it can help in the identification of those patients that are most likely to respond to a given therapy.

  13. Cerebellar contribution to motor and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis: An MRI sub-regional volumetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Alessandro; Pagani, Elisabetta; Riccitelli, Gianna C; Colombo, Bruno; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the role of cerebellar sub-regions on motor and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Whole and sub-regional cerebellar volumes, brain volumes, T2 hyperintense lesion volumes (LV), and motor performance scores were obtained from 95 relapse-onset MS patients and 32 healthy controls (HC). MS patients also underwent an evaluation of working memory and processing speed functions. Cerebellar anterior and posterior lobes were segmented using the Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Toolbox (SUIT) from Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM12). Multivariate linear regression models assessed the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures and motor/cognitive scores. Compared to HC, only secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients had lower cerebellar volumes (total and posterior cerebellum). In MS patients, lower anterior cerebellar volume and brain T2 LV predicted worse motor performance, whereas lower posterior cerebellar volume and brain T2 LV predicted poor cognitive performance. Global measures of brain volume and infratentorial T2 LV were not selected by the final multivariate models. Cerebellar volumetric abnormalities are likely to play an important contribution to explain motor and cognitive performance in MS patients. Consistently with functional mapping studies, cerebellar posterior-inferior volume accounted for variance in cognitive measures, whereas anterior cerebellar volume accounted for variance in motor performance, supporting the assessment of cerebellar damage at sub-regional level.

  14. Understanding emergent functions in self-assembled fibrous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2015-09-01

    Understanding self-assembly processes of nanoscale building blocks and characterizing their properties are both imperative for designing new hierarchical, network materials for a wide range of structural, optoelectrical, and transport applications. Although the characterization and choices of these material building blocks have been well studied, our understanding of how to precisely program a specific morphology through self-assembly still must be significantly advanced. In the recent study by Xie et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 205602), the self-assembly of end-functionalized nanofibres is investigated using a coarse-grained molecular model and offers fundamental insight into how to control the structural morphology of nanofibrous networks. Varying nanoscale networks are observed when the molecular interaction strength is changed and the findings suggest that self-assembly through the tuning of molecular interactions is a key strategy for designing nanostructured networks with specific topologies.

  15. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Sano, Keiji; Kwak, Suyong; Saito, Isamu.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  16. Understanding the Structural Basis of Adhesion GPCR Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araç, Demet; Sträter, Norbert; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Unlike conventional G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), adhesion GPCRs (aGPCRs) have large extracellular regions that are autoproteolytically cleaved from their membrane-embedded seven-pass transmembrane helices. Autoproteolysis occurs within the conserved GPCR-Autoproteolysis INducing (GAIN) domain that is juxtaposed to the transmembrane domain and cleaves the last beta strand of the GAIN domain. The other domains of the extracellular region are variable and specific to each aGPCR and are likely involved in adhering to various ligands. Emerging evidence suggest that extracellular regions may modulate receptor function and that ligand binding to the extracellular regions may induce receptor activation via multiple mechanisms. Here, we summarize current knowledge about the structural understanding for the extracellular regions of aGPCRs and discuss their possible functional roles that emerge from the available structural information.

  17. Distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome after acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Joseph L; Jackler, Robert K; Rigby, Peter L; Pitts, Lawrence H; Cheung, Steven W

    2002-07-01

    To define a clinicopathologic syndrome associated with persistent cerebellar dysfunction after acoustic neuroma (AN) excision. Case series derived from radiographic and clinical chart review. Tertiary referral center. In 12 patients with AN, persistent cerebellar dysfunction developed after AN removal. Each case demonstrated abnormality in the ipsilateral cerebellar peduncle on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebellar function and ambulatory status over the first postoperative year. On magnetic resonance imaging scans, the extent of cerebellar peduncle infarcts was variable. It ranged from focal brain injury (2 cm) spanning the full thickness of the peduncle. Peduncular infarcts were associated with large tumor size (average 3.8 cm, range 2.0-5.5 cm diameter). The long-term functional outcomes (>1 yr) varied. Dysmetria was unchanged or improved in over half of the patients (6 of 11 patients). Gait recovered to normal or to preoperative levels in 5 patients. In the 6 patients with persistent impaired mobility, 2 had mild gait disturbance, 3 required regular use of a cane, and 1 has been dependent on a walker. One patient had sustained mild motor weakness. Three of 11 patients remained dependent on others for activities of daily living. Peduncle injury most likely stems from interruption of distal branches of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). These small vessels are intimately related to the capsule of the tumor and may supply both the neoplasm and the brain parenchyma. It has long been recognized that interruption of the proximal segment of the AICA results in severe injury to the pons, with devastating neurologic sequelae. A limited AICA syndrome caused by loss of its distal ramifications seems a more plausible explanation for peduncular infarction than either venous insufficiency or direct surgical trauma.

  18. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, P.D.; Humphreys, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  19. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  20. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  1. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  2. DESIGN OF LEARNING MATERIALS ON LIMIT FUNCTION BASED MATHEMATICAL UNDERSTANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchamad Subali Noto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In learning process, students are currently cannot be separated from learning difficulties, including the study material algebra limit function. It because the level of students' mathematical understanding regarding the material is still quite low. This study aimed to analyze the barriers to student learning, designing learning materials based on the material mathematics understanding algebra limit function is valid, determine teacher intervention during the implementation of learning materials and to analyze barriers to student learning after the implementation of learning materials. This research is a qualitative research study design using the form Didactical Design Research. Stages of research conducted: 1 analysis of the situation didactic before learning, 2 analysis of metapedadidatik and 3 the retrospective analysis. Data collection techniques used were tests, interviews, questionnaires, and documentation. The instrument used was a matter TKPM (Comprehension Mathematical Ability Test, interview, validation sheet materials, and documentation guidelines. Research results obtained are students experiencing obstacle to learning the material limit algebra functions. These obstacles are 1 students' difficulties in relating the material prerequisites to limit problems. 2 students can not write properly limit symbol, 3 students can not apply a limit theorem, 4 students are not able to determine the limit value at one point, and 5 students cannot determine the value of the limit at infinity. Learning materials that have been made have validation level of  with very valid criteria. The response was given when the student intervention, generally in accordance with response prediction so that interventions carried out in accordance with the design that has been made. After learning materials student learning obstacles implemented reduced/minimized.

  3. Contralateral cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathways reconstruction in humans in vivo: implications for reciprocal cerebro-cerebellar structural connectivity in motor and non-motor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesi, Fulvia; De Rinaldis, Andrea; Castellazzi, Gloria; Calamante, Fernando; Muhlert, Nils; Chard, Declan; Tournier, J Donald; Magenes, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-10-09

    Cerebellar involvement in cognition, as well as in sensorimotor control, is increasingly recognized and is thought to depend on connections with the cerebral cortex. Anatomical investigations in animals and post-mortem humans have established that cerebro-cerebellar connections are contralateral to each other and include the cerebello-thalamo-cortical (CTC) and cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC) pathways. CTC and CPC characterization in humans in vivo is still challenging. Here advanced tractography was combined with quantitative indices to compare CPC to CTC pathways in healthy subjects. Differently to previous studies, our findings reveal that cerebellar cognitive areas are reached by the largest proportion of the reconstructed CPC, supporting the hypothesis that a CTC-CPC loop provides a substrate for cerebro-cerebellar communication during cognitive processing. Amongst the cerebral areas identified using in vivo tractography, in addition to the cerebral motor cortex, major portions of CPC streamlines leave the prefrontal and temporal cortices. These findings are useful since provide MRI-based indications of possible subtending connectivity and, if confirmed, they are going to be a milestone for instructing computational models of brain function. These results, together with further multi-modal investigations, are warranted to provide important cues on how the cerebro-cerebellar loops operate and on how pathologies involving cerebro-cerebellar connectivity are generated.

  4. Location of lesion determines motor vs. cognitive consequences in patients with cerebellar stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Stoodley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar lesions can cause motor deficits and/or the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS; Schmahmann's syndrome. We used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to test the hypothesis that the cerebellar motor syndrome results from anterior lobe damage whereas lesions in the posterolateral cerebellum produce the CCAS. Eighteen patients with isolated cerebellar stroke (13 males, 5 females; 20–66 years old were evaluated using measures of ataxia and neurocognitive ability. Patients showed a wide range of motor and cognitive performance, from normal to severely impaired; individual deficits varied according to lesion location within the cerebellum. Patients with damage to cerebellar lobules III–VI had worse ataxia scores: as predicted, the cerebellar motor syndrome resulted from lesions involving the anterior cerebellum. Poorer performance on fine motor tasks was associated primarily with strokes affecting the anterior lobe extending into lobule VI, with right-handed finger tapping and peg-placement associated with damage to the right cerebellum, and left-handed finger tapping associated with left cerebellar damage. Patients with the CCAS in the absence of cerebellar motor syndrome had damage to posterior lobe regions, with lesions leading to significantly poorer scores on language (e.g. right Crus I and II extending through IX, spatial (bilateral Crus I, Crus II, and right lobule VIII, and executive function measures (lobules VII–VIII. These data reveal clinically significant functional regions underpinning movement and cognition in the cerebellum, with a broad anterior-posterior distinction. Motor and cognitive outcomes following cerebellar damage appear to reflect the disruption of different cerebro-cerebellar motor and cognitive loops.

  5. Up-down asymmetry of cerebellar activation during vertical pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Stefan; Stephan, Thomas; Kalla, Roger; Marti, Sarah; Straumann, Dominik

    2009-09-01

    Animal experiments have demonstrated that the vast majority of vertical gaze-velocity Purkinje cells in the cerebellar floccular lobe, whose firing rate is modulated during vertical smooth pursuit eye movements, show a preference for downward pursuit. Here we validate the functional vertical asymmetry of the cerebellar flocculus in humans using functional magnetic resonance imaging by demonstrating a significantly higher activation of the floccular lobe for downward than for upward pursuit. The findings corroborate our recent hypothesis on the pathogenesis of cerebellar downbeat nystagmus.

  6. Sandy Soil Microaggregates: Rethinking Our Understanding of Hydraulic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradiś, Ashley; Brueck, Christopher; Meisenheimer, Douglas; Wanzek, Thomas; Dragila, Maria Ines

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the peculiar structure of microaggregates in coarse sandy soils that exhibit only external porosity and investigated their control on soil hydrology. The microstructure underpins a hydrologic existence that differs from finer textured soils where aggregates have internal porosity. Understanding the impact of these microaggregates on soil hydrology will permit improved agricultural irrigation management and estimates associated with ecosystem capacity and resiliency. Microstructure was investigated using a digital microscope, and aspects of the structure were quantified by sedimentation and computed microtomography. Sandy soil microaggregates were observed to be comprised of a solid sand-grain core that is coated with fines, presumably cemented by organic media. This microstructure leads to three distinct water pools during drainage: capillary water, followed by thick films (1–20 μm) enveloping the outer surfaces of the crusted microaggregates, followed by adsorbed thin films (<1 μm). The characteristics of the thick films were investigated using an analytical model. These films may provide as much as 10 to 40% saturation in the range of plant-available water. Using lubrication theory, it was predicted that thick film drainage follows a power law function with an exponent of 2. Thick films may also have a role in the geochemical evolution of soils and in ecosystem function because they provide contiguous water and gas phases at relatively high moisture contents. And, because the rough outer crust of these microaggregates can provide good niches for microbial activity, biofilm physics will dominate thick film processes, and consequently hydrologic, biologic, and geochemical functions for coarse sandy soils.

  7. Prenatal MR imaging features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, Francesca; Malova, Mariya; Ramenghi, Luca A.; Cesaretti, Claudia; Parazzini, Cecilia; Doneda, Chiara; Righini, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions have not been sufficiently characterised. We aimed to better define their MR imaging characteristics, documenting the location, extension, evolution stage and anatomic sequelae, and to better understand cerebellar haemorrhage pathophysiology. We screened our foetal MR imaging database (3200 cases) for reports of haemorrhagic lesions affecting only the cerebellum (without any supratentorial bleeding or other clastic lesions), defined as one of the following: T2-weighted hypointense or mixed hypo-/hyperintense signal; rim of T2-weighted hypointense signal covering the surface of volume-reduced parenchyma; T1-weighted hyperintense signal; increased DWI signal. Seventeen cases corresponded to the selection criteria. All lesions occurred before the 26th week of gestation, with prevalent origin from the peripheral-caudal portion of the hemispheres and equal frequency of unilateral/bilateral involvement. The caudal vermis appeared affected in 2/3 of cases, not in all cases confirmed postnatally. Lesions evolved towards malformed cerebellar foliation. The aetiology and pathophysiology were unknown, although in a subset of cases intra- and extracranial venous engorgement seemed to play a key role. Onset from the peripheral and caudal portion of the hemispheres seems characteristic of prenatal cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions. Elective involvement of the peripheral germinal matrix is hypothesised. (orig.)

  8. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko; Yamada, Kazuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  9. Comparative Auditory Neuroscience: Understanding the Evolution and Function of Ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2017-02-01

    Comparative auditory studies make it possible both to understand the origins of modern ears and the factors underlying the similarities and differences in their performance. After all lineages of land vertebrates had independently evolved tympanic middle ears in the early Mesozoic era, the subsequent tens of millions of years led to the hearing organ of lizards, birds, and mammals becoming larger and their upper frequency limits higher. In extant species, lizard papillae remained relatively small (70 mm (made possible by coiling), as do their upper frequency limits (from 12 to >200 kHz). The auditory organs of the three amniote groups differ characteristically in their cellular structure, but their hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity within their respective hearing ranges hardly differ. In the immediate primate ancestors of humans, the cochlea became larger and lowered its upper frequency limit. Modern humans show an unusual trend in frequency selectivity as a function of frequency. It is conceivable that the frequency selectivity patterns in humans were influenced in their evolution by the development of speech.

  10. Amygdala Modulation of Cerebellar Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Sean J; Radley, Jason J; Freeman, John H

    2016-02-17

    Previous studies showed that amygdala lesions or inactivation slow the acquisition rate of cerebellum-dependent eyeblink conditioning, a type of associative motor learning. The current study was designed to determine the behavioral nature of amygdala-cerebellum interactions, to identify the neural pathways underlying amygdala-cerebellum interactions, and to examine how the amygdala influences cerebellar learning mechanisms in rats. Pharmacological inactivation of the central amygdala (CeA) severely impaired acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning, indicating that the amygdala continues to interact with the cerebellum after conditioning is consolidated (Experiment 1). CeA inactivation also substantially reduced stimulus-evoked and learning-related neuronal activity in the cerebellar anterior interpositus nucleus during acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning (Experiment 2). A very small proportion of cerebellar neurons responded to the conditioned stimulus (CS) during CeA inactivation. Finally, retrograde and anterograde tracing experiments identified the basilar pontine nucleus at the confluence of outputs from CeA that may support amygdala modulation of CS input to the cerebellum (Experiment 3). Together, these results highlight a role for the CeA in the gating of CS-related input to the cerebellum during motor learning that is maintained even after the conditioned response is well learned. The current study is the first to demonstrate that the amygdala modulates sensory-evoked and learning-related neuronal activity within the cerebellum during acquisition and retention of associative learning. The findings suggest a model of amygdala-cerebellum interactions in which the amygdala gates conditioned stimulus inputs to the cerebellum through a direct projection from the medial central nucleus to the basilar pontine nucleus. Amygdala gating of sensory input to the cerebellum may be an attention-like mechanism that facilitates cerebellar learning

  11. Neural correlates of cerebellar-mediated timing during finger tapping in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindie du Plessis

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The four cerebellar areas activated by the controls more during rhythmic than non-rhythmic tapping have been implicated in the production of timed responses in several previous studies. These data provide evidence linking binge-like drinking during pregnancy to poorer function in cerebellar regions involved in timing and somatosensory processing needed for complex tasks requiring precise timing.

  12. Developing high-performance cross-functional teams: Understanding motivations, functional loyalties, and teaming fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Teamwork is the key to the future of effective technology management. Today`s technologies and markets have become too complex for individuals to work alone. Global competition, limited resources, cost consciousness, and time pressures have forced organizations and project managers to encourage teamwork. Many of these teams will be cross-functional teams that can draw on a multitude of talents and knowledge. To develop high-performing cross-functional teams, managers must understand motivations, functional loyalties, and the different backgrounds of the individual team members. To develop a better understanding of these issues, managers can learn from experience and from literature on teams and teaming concepts. When studying the literature to learn about cross-functional teaming, managers will find many good theoretical concepts, but when put into practice, these concepts have varying effects. This issue of varying effectiveness is what drives the research for this paper. The teaming concepts were studied to confirm or modify current understanding. The literature was compared with a {open_quotes}ground truth{close_quotes}, a survey of the reality of teaming practices, to examine the teaming concepts that the literature finds to be critical to the success of teams. These results are compared to existing teams to determine if such techniques apply in real-world cases.

  13. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through double feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of the neuron. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and extension of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research.

  14. Cerebellar abnormalities contribute to disability including cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Weier

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is known to be involved not only in motor but also cognitive and affective processes. Structural changes in the cerebellum in relation to cognitive dysfunction are an emerging topic in the field of neuro-psychiatric disorders. In Multiple Sclerosis (MS cerebellar motor and cognitive dysfunction occur in parallel, early in the onset of the disease, and the cerebellum is one of the predilection sites of atrophy. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between cerebellar volumes, clinical cerebellar signs, cognitive functioning and fatigue in MS. Cerebellar volumetry was conducted using T1-weighted MPRAGE magnetic resonance imaging of 172 MS patients. All patients underwent a clinical and brief neuropsychological assessment (information processing speed, working memory, including fatigue testing. Patients with and without cerebellar signs differed significantly regarding normalized cerebellar total volume (nTCV, normalized brain volume (nBV and whole brain T2 lesion volume (LV. Patients with cerebellar dysfunction likewise performed worse in cognitive tests. A regression analysis indicated that age and nTCV explained 26.3% of the variance in SDMT (symbol digit modalities test performance. However, only age, T2 LV and nBV remained predictors in the full model (r(2 = 0.36. The full model for the prediction of PASAT (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test scores (r(2 = 0.23 included age, cerebellar and T2 LV. In the case of fatigue, only age and nBV (r(2 = 0.17 emerged as significant predictors. These data support the view that cerebellar abnormalities contribute to disability, including cognitive impairment in MS. However, this contribution does not seem to be independent of, and may even be dominated by wider spread MS pathology as reflected by nBV and T2 LV.

  15. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Casellato

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning, a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions.

  16. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  17. Timing Tasks Synchronize Cerebellar and Frontal Ramping Activity and Theta Oscillations: Implications for Cerebellar Stimulation in Diseases of Impaired Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Krystal L

    2015-01-01

    Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning, which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here, we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson's disease, autism, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we hypothesize that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. This hypothesis could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic potential of

  18. Timing tasks synchronize cerebellar and frontal ramping activity and theta oscillations: Implications for cerebellar stimulation in diseases of impaired cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Lynn Parker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time, has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. We hypothesis that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. These hypotheses could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic

  19. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (pAsperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  20. Decreased cerebellar-orbitofrontal connectivity correlates with stuttering severity: Whole-brain functional and structural connectivity associations with persistent developmental stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Richard Sitek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Persistent developmental stuttering is characterized by speech production disfluency and affects 1% of adults. The degree of impairment varies widely across individuals and the neural mechanisms underlying the disorder and this variability remain poorly understood. Here, we elucidate compensatory mechanisms related to this variability in impairment using whole-brain functional and white matter connectivity analyses in persistent developmental stuttering. We found that people who stutter had stronger functional connectivity between cerebellum and thalamus than people with fluent speech, while stutterers with the least severe symptoms had greater functional connectivity between left cerebellum and left orbitofrontal cortex. Additionally, people who stutter had decreased functional and white matter connectivity among the perisylvian auditory, motor, and speech planning regions compared to typical speakers, but greater functional connectivity between the right basal ganglia and bilateral temporal auditory regions. Structurally, disfluency ratings were negatively correlated with white matter connections to left perisylvian regions and to the brain stem. Overall, we found increased connectivity among subcortical and reward network structures in people who stutter compared to controls. These connections were negatively correlated with stuttering severity, suggesting the involvement of cerebellum and orbitofrontal cortex may underlie successful compensatory mechanisms by more fluent stutterers.

  1. A genetic approach to understanding asthma and lung function development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common heritable disease of the airways with recurrent episodes of symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction that has increased dramatically in prevalence. The disease is highly heterogeneous with varying age at onset and clinical presentation and most likely represents several...... their effect. In paper I, we investigated the known effect of adult lung function loci on the development of lung function and bronchial responsiveness in children from birth until 7 years of age in the COPSAC2000 birth cohort of 411 children. We measured lung function and bronchial responsiveness at one month...... of age using the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique in sedated neonates and repeated the measurements at age 7 utilizing traditional spirometry assessments. Lung function genetic variants identified in adults were not associated with neonatal lung function or bronchial...

  2. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated plasticity at inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the cerebellar circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eMapelli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The way long-term potentiation (LTP and depression (LTD are integrated within the different synapses of brain neuronal circuits is poorly understood. In order to progress beyond the identification of specific molecular mechanisms, a system in which multiple forms of plasticity can be correlated with large-scale neural processing is required. In this paper we take as an example the cerebellar network , in which extensive investigations have revealed LTP and LTD at several excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Cerebellar LTP and LTD occur in all three main cerebellar subcircuits (granular layer, molecular layer, deep cerebellar nuclei and correspondingly regulate the function of their three main neurons: granule cells (GrCs, Purkinje cells (PCs and deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN cells. All these neurons, in addition to be excited, are reached by feed-forward and feed-back inhibitory connections, in which LTP and LTD may either operate synergistically or homeostatically in order to control information flow through the circuit. Although the investigation of individual synaptic plasticities in vitro is essential to prove their existence and mechanisms, it is insufficient to generate a coherent view of their impact on network functioning in vivo. Recent computational models and cell-specific genetic mutations in mice are shedding light on how plasticity at multiple excitatory and inhibitory synapses might regulate neuronal activities in the cerebellar circuit and contribute to learning and memory and behavioral control.

  4. Comparative Auditory Neuroscience: Understanding the Evolution and Function of Ears

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative auditory studies make it possible both to understand the origins of modern ears and the factors underlying the similarities and differences in their performance. After all lineages of land vertebrates had independently evolved tympanic middle ears in the early Mesozoic era, the subsequent tens of millions of years led to the hearing organ of lizards, birds, and mammals becoming larger and their upper frequency limits higher. In extant species, lizard papillae remained relatively s...

  5. Etiology, Localization and Prognosis in Cerebellar Infarctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Yücel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovasculer disease are the most frequent disease of the brain. Cerebellar infarct remains % 1.5-4.2 of these diseases. Etiological factors, lesion localization, symptoms and findings and relationship with prognosis of our patients with cerebellar infarct were investigated in our study. For this purpose, 32 patients were evaluated who were admitted to the Dicle University Medical School Department of Neurology in 1995-2001 hospitalized with the diagnosis of clinically and radiological confirmed cerebellar infarction.All of patients in the study group, 21 (%65.6 were male and 11 (%34.3 female. Age of overall patients ranged between 40 and 75 years with a mean of 57.8±10.2 years. Atherothrombotic infarct was the most frequent reason at the etiologic clinical classification. The most frequently found localization was the posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct (%50. The leading two risk factors were hypertension (%78.1 and cigarette smoking (%50. The most common sign and symptoms were vertigo (%93.7, vomiting (%75, headache (%68.7 and cerebellar dysfunction findings (%50. The mean duration of hospitalization was 16.3±7.6 days. Overall mortality rate was found to be % 6.2. Finally, the most remarkable risk factors at cerebellar infarct patients are hypertension and atherosclerosis at etiology. We are considering that, controlling of these factors will reduce the appearance frequency of cerebellar infarcts.

  6. Understanding doublecortin-like kinase gene function through transgenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, Geert J.

    2010-01-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) and DCX-domain containing Doublecortin-Like Kinase (DCLK) gene splice variants function during embryonic development, where they play a role in microtubule binding. Although a role for the DCLK gene during embryogenesis is clearly established, it encodes multiple, different

  7. Associations among False Belief Understanding, Counterfactual Reasoning, and Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Nicole R.; Parker, Jessica; Turley-Ames, Kandi

    2009-01-01

    The primary purposes of the present study were to clarify previous work on the association between counterfactual thinking and false belief performance to determine (1) whether these two variables are related and (2) if so, whether executive function skills mediate the relationship. A total of 92 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds completed false belief,…

  8. Understanding and quantifying urban forest structure, functions, and value

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Daniel E. Crane; Jeffrey T. Walton; Daniel B. Twardus; John F. Dwyer

    2002-01-01

    Trees in urban areas can have a significant impact on human health and the environment. Unfortunately, there is relatively little data about the structure, health, functions, and long-term changes in this important resource. In the United States, a number of efforts are underway to assess urban forest attributes at the local to national scales. In addition, tools are...

  9. Viewing the Personality Traits Through a Cerebellar Lens: a Focus on the Constructs of Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, and Alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosini, Laura; Cutuli, Debora; Picerni, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    The variance in the range of personality trait expression appears to be linked to structural variance in specific brain regions. In evidencing associations between personality factors and neurobiological measures, it seems evident that the cerebellum has not been up to now thought as having a key role in personality. This paper will review the most recent structural and functional neuroimaging literature that engages the cerebellum in personality traits, as novelty seeking and harm avoidance, and it will discuss the findings in the context of contemporary theories of affective and cognitive cerebellar function. By using region of interest (ROI)- and voxel-based approaches, we recently evidenced that the cerebellar volumes correlate positively with novelty seeking scores and negatively with harm avoidance scores. Subjects who search for new situations as a novelty seeker does (and a harm avoiding does not do) show a different engagement of their cerebellar circuitries in order to rapidly adapt to changing environments. The emerging model of cerebellar functionality may explain how the cerebellar abilities in planning, controlling, and putting into action the behavior are associated to normal or abnormal personality constructs. In this framework, it is worth reporting that increased cerebellar volumes are even associated with high scores in alexithymia, construct of personality characterized by impairment in cognitive, emotional, and affective processing. On such a basis, it seems necessary to go over the traditional cortico-centric view of personality constructs and to address the function of the cerebellar system in sustaining aspects of motivational network that characterizes the different temperamental traits.

  10. Functional health literacy and healthy eating: Understanding the brazilian food guide recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auristela Magalhães Coelho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the relationship between the functional health literacy of Unified Heath System users and the understanding of food servings in the pocket version of the Brazilian Food Guide. Methods: Functional health literacy was assessed by the Brief Test of functional health literacy. Two dialogue rounds were conducted with patients with adequate functional health literacy (Group 1 and inadequate functional health literacy (Group 2. The dialogues were recorded and analyzed according to the discourse of the collective subject. Results: Most (58.0% users had inadequate functional health literacy. Five core areas were identified: understands serving sizes; does not understand serving sizes; serving sizes are confusing; unfamiliar/uncommon foods; small letters. Group 2 had more trouble understanding. Conclusion: Difficulty understanding hinders health promotion. Individuals need to have access to educational materials that are easier to understand and developed taking their functional health literacy into account.

  11. Nitrogen cycling in corals: the key to understanding holobiont functioning?

    KAUST Repository

    Rädecker, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Corals are animals that form close mutualistic associations with endosymbiotic photosynthetic algae of the genus Symbiodinium. Together they provide the calcium carbonate framework of coral reef ecosystems. The importance of the microbiome (i.e., bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses) to holobiont functioning has only recently been recognized. Given that growth and density of Symbiodinium within the coral host is highly dependent on nitrogen availability, nitrogen-cycling microbes may be of fundamental importance to the stability of the coral–algae symbiosis and holobiont functioning, in particular under nutrient-enriched and -depleted scenarios. We summarize what is known about nitrogen cycling in corals and conclude that disturbance of microbial nitrogen cycling may be tightly linked to coral bleaching and disease.

  12. A theory of cerebellar cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David

    1969-01-01

    1. A detailed theory of cerebellar cortex is proposed whose consequence is that the cerebellum learns to perform motor skills. Two forms of input—output relation are described, both consistent with the cortical theory. One is suitable for learning movements (actions), and the other for learning to maintain posture and balance (maintenance reflexes). 2. It is known that the cells of the inferior olive and the cerebellar Purkinje cells have a special one-to-one relationship induced by the climbing fibre input. For learning actions, it is assumed that: (a) each olivary cell responds to a cerebral instruction for an elemental movement. Any action has a defining representation in terms of elemental movements, and this representation has a neural expression as a sequence of firing patterns in the inferior olive; and (b) in the correct state of the nervous system, a Purkinje cell can initiate the elemental movement to which its corresponding olivary cell responds. 3. Whenever an olivary cell fires, it sends an impulse (via the climbing fibre input) to its corresponding Purkinje cell. This Purkinje cell is also exposed (via the mossy fibre input) to information about the context in which its olivary cell fired; and it is shown how, during rehearsal of an action, each Purkinje cell can learn to recognize such contexts. Later, when the action has been learnt, occurrence of the context alone is enough to fire the Purkinje cell, which then causes the next elemental movement. The action thus progresses as it did during rehearsal. 4. It is shown that an interpretation of cerebellar cortex as a structure which allows each Purkinje cell to learn a number of contexts is consistent both with the distributions of the various types of cell, and with their known excitatory or inhibitory natures. It is demonstrated that the mossy fibre-granule cell arrangement provides the required pattern discrimination capability. 5. The following predictions are made. (a) The synapses from parallel

  13. Students' Understanding of the General Notion of a Function of Two Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Planell, Rafael; Trigueros Gaisman, Maria

    2012-01-01

    In this study we analyze students' understanding of two-variable function; in particular we consider their understanding of domain, possible arbitrary nature of function assignment, uniqueness of function image, and range. We use APOS theory and semiotic representation theory as a theoretical framework to analyze data obtained from interviews with…

  14. Compromised Survival of Cerebellar Molecular Layer Interneurons Lacking GDNF Receptors GFRα1 or RET Impairs Normal Cerebellar Motor Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Sergaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of neurotrophic factors as endogenous survival proteins for brain neurons remains contentious. In the cerebellum, the signals controlling survival of molecular layer interneurons (MLIs are unknown, and direct evidence for the requirement of a full complement of MLIs for normal cerebellar function and motor learning has been lacking. Here, we show that Purkinje cells (PCs, the target of MLIs, express the neurotrophic factor GDNF during MLI development and survival of MLIs depends on GDNF receptors GFRα1 and RET. Conditional mutant mice lacking either receptor lose a quarter of their MLIs, resulting in compromised synaptic inhibition of PCs, increased PC firing frequency, and abnormal acquisition of eyeblink conditioning and vestibulo-ocular reflex performance, but not overall motor activity or coordination. These results identify an endogenous survival mechanism for MLIs and reveal the unexpected vulnerability and selective requirement of MLIs in the control of cerebellar-dependent motor learning.

  15. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology

  16. Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Roumia, S.; Dietrich, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions. (orig.) [de

  17. [Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, W; Roumia, S; Dietrich, P

    2016-11-01

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions.

  18. Cerebellar leukoencephalopathy: most likely histiocytosis-related

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, M.S.; Arts, W.F.M.; Garbern, J.Y.; Hedlund, G.; Winkler, F.; Barbosa, C.; King, M.D.; Bjornstad, A.; Hussain, N.; Beyer, M.K.; Gomez, C.; Patterson, M.C.; Grattan-Smith, P.; Timmons, M.; van der Valk, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Histiocytosis, both Langerhans and non-Langerhans cell type, can be associated with cerebellar white matter abnormalities, thought to be paraneoplastic. The associated clinical picture consists of ataxia, spasticity, and cognitive decline. Hormonal dysfunction is frequent. MRI shows

  19. Cerebellar medulloblastoma presenting with skeletal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barai Sukanta

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are highly malignant brain tumours, but only rarely produce skeletal metastases. No case of medulloblastoma has been documented to have produced skeletal metastases prior to craniotomy or shunt surgery. A 21-year-old male presented with pain in the hip and lower back with difficulty in walking of 3 months′ duration. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were present hence a diagnosis of cerebellar neoplasm or skeletal tuberculosis with cerebellar abscess formation was considered. MRI of brain revealed a lesion in the cerebellum suggestive of medulloblastoma. Bone scan revealed multiple sites of skeletal metastases excluding the lumbar vertebrae. MRI of lumbar spine and hip revealed metastases to all lumbar vertebrae and both hips. Computed tomography-guided biopsy was obtained from the L3 vertebra, which revealed metastatic deposits from medulloblastoma. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology showed the presence of medulloblastoma cells. A final diagnosis of cerebellar medulloblastoma with skeletal metastases was made. He underwent craniotomy and histopathology confirmed medulloblastoma.

  20. Cerebellar ischemic disorder. Presentation of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Zamora-Bastidas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar infarction is rare and has clinical features that can be confused with vertiginous syndrome of peripheral origin. We present three cases treated at the Hospital Universitario San José of Popayán (HUSJ. The dominant clinical symptoms were labyrinthine and ataxic disorder. The third case showed severe left cerebellar infarction. To emphasize the importance of knowing the anatomy of cerebellar blood circulation, the etiology of this specific type of stroke, clinical findings and diagnostic tools currently used, as well as possible complications and appropriate treatment. Neuroimaging is the essential complement to the clinical diagnosis. We conclude that cerebellar infarction symptoms, including dizziness, ataxia and commitment of cranial nerve, according to the vascular territory that compromises the cerebellum.

  1. Cerebellar and prefrontal cortex contributions to adaptation, strategies, and reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jordan A; Ivry, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebellar and Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Adaptation, Strategies, and Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jordan A.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question. PMID:24916295

  3. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention.......Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  4. Cerebellar dysfunction caused by sniffing of toluene-containing thinner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Y. (Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine, Japan); Hisanaga, N.; Ono, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Hamaguchi, Y.; Okamoto, S.

    1982-01-01

    A 19-year-old man who had sniffed lacquer thinner for 8 months was found to suffer from cerebellar dysfunction and visual disorders. He had blurred vision, dysarthria, nystagmus, slight intention tremor, staggering gait and an abnormal EEG. The thinner contained 68% toluene, 18% ethyl acetate, 9% methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), 3% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and 3% butyl acetate. The concentration of each solvent in the plastic bag used for sniffing was 12,000 ppm toluene, 11,500 ppm ethyl acetate, 6,000 ppm IPA and 2,000 ppm MIBK. Previously reported cerebellar dysfunction due to toluene or toluene-containing solvents are summarized and discussed. Based on these reports and the present case, toluene is presumed to impair function in the order of the vermis,cerebellar hemispheres, and cerebrum, when a relatively high concentration of toluene is inhaled. The effects of organic solvents, especially toluene, on the cerebellum are considered to be very important from the viewpoint of occupational health, since toluene is widely used in industry and many workers are exposed to it.

  5. Familial Aggregation of the Cerebellar Signs in Familial Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D.; Hernandez, Nora; Chen, Karen P.; Naranjo, Kelly V.; Park, Jemin; Clark, Lorraine N.; Ottman, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the hallmark feature of essential tremor (ET) is kinetic tremor, patients may exhibit additional motor features (e.g., intention tremor and mild gait ataxia) that are markers of an underlying abnormality of cerebellar function. ET is also a highly familial disorder, but we do not know whether the presence and expression of cerebellar signs are similar across family members. There are simply no published data. The alternative possibility is that these features are not heritable. We tested the specific hypothesis that the presence of cerebellar signs (i.e., intention tremor, tandem gait difficulty) ran in ET families. Methods ET probands and relatives enrolled in a genetic study at Yale and Columbia universities underwent a detailed videotaped neurological examination. Results There were 187 enrollees (59 probands, 128 affected relatives). In a bivariate logistic regression model, the presence of intention tremor in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of intention tremor in the relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28–1.27, p = 0.18). In a similar model, the presence of greater tandem gait difficulty (i.e., a tandem gait score in the upper quartile) in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of such difficulty in the relatives (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.41–3.66, p = 0.73). Discussion The presence of cerebellar signs did not aggregate in families with ET. In the current dataset, these did not seem to be disease features that were heritable. PMID:28176975

  6. Targeting the red nucleus for cerebellar tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, M; Manto, M; Merle, P; Tir, M; Montpellier, D; Constant, J-M; Le Gars, D; Macron, J-M; Krystkowiak, P

    2014-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the thalamus (and especially the ventral intermediate nucleus) does not significantly improve a drug-resistant, disabling cerebellar tremor. The dentato-rubro-olivary tract (Guillain-Mollaret triangle, including the red nucleus) is a subcortical loop that is critically involved in tremor genesis. We report the case of a 48-year-old female patient presenting with generalized cerebellar tremor caused by alcohol-related cerebellar degeneration. Resistance to pharmacological treatment and the severity of the symptoms prompted us to investigate the effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the red nucleus. Intra-operative microrecordings of the red nucleus revealed intense, irregular, tonic background activity but no rhythmic components that were synchronous with upper limb tremor. The postural component of the cerebellar tremor disappeared during insertion of the macro-electrodes and for a few minutes after stimulation, with no changes in the intentional (kinetic) component. Stimulation per se did not reduce postural or intentional tremor and was associated with dysautonomic symptoms (the voltage threshold for which was inversed related to the stimulation frequency). Our observations suggest that the red nucleus is (1) an important centre for the genesis of cerebellar tremor and thus (2) a possible target for drug-refractory tremor. Future research must determine how neuromodulation of the red nucleus can best be implemented in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

  7. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration secondary to ovarian carcinosarcoma: a cerebellar conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Julian David; Sen, Arup; Rowland, Katherine; Viner, Tatyana

    2017-08-07

    We present a case of an elderly female patient who presented with a 6-month history of progressive slurred speech, vertigo, unsteadiness and falls. She underwent an extensive battery of neurological and cardiovascular investigations, none of which demonstrated a diagnostic cause for her symptoms. She was referred to the stroke and neurology teams and was started on treatment for presumed anxiety. As her symptoms continued to progress, she was referred to the falls service. Following a multidisciplinary team discussion, she was reviewed by the consultant geriatrician who felt this may be due to a malignancy so the consultant geriatrician arranged blood testsand CT scan of her chest, abdomen and pelvis. These demonstrated a large left adnexal mass and a raised Ca-125 level. The patient was diagnosed with an ovarian tumour, which was treated surgically. A provisional diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, secondary to ovarian carcinosarcoma, was made. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Aneurysm of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Khursheed Ahmad; Menon, Girish; Nair, Suresh; Abraham, Mathew

    2018-01-01

    Aneurysms arising from anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA-PICA) variant are extremely rare. They usually present with subarachnoid hemorrhage. This is probably the second case report of a large thrombosed AICA-PICA variant aneurysm presenting as a cerebellopontine angle mass lesion with cranial nerve palsy, managed successfully by surgical clipping. PMID:29492120

  9. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Strokes Based on Variant Vascular Anatomy of the Posterior Circulation: Clinical Deficits and Imaging Territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Melissa M; Chen, Stephen R; Diaz-Marchan, Pedro; Schomer, Donald; Kumar, Vinodh A

    2018-04-01

    We report imaging findings of 3 patients with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarcts who presented with atypical clinical findings of cerebellar strokes. AICA strokes are rare, and diagnosis can be difficult because of the high variability of the posterior circulation vascular anatomy. We describe the embryology and variant anatomy of AICA so that clinicians can understand and recognize the patterns of these infarcts. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-12-29

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells.

  11. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  12. Students' Understanding of the Function-Derivative Relationship When Learning Economic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Angel; Llinares, Salvador; Valls, Julia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to characterise students' understanding of the function-derivative relationship when learning economic concepts. To this end, we use a fuzzy metric (Chang 1968) to identify the development of economic concept understanding that is defined by the function-derivative relationship. The results indicate that the understanding…

  13. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Ann K.; Baker, Justin T.; Lewandowski, Kathryn E.; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the “cognitive dysmetria” and “dysmetria of thought” models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks) relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  14. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann K. Shinn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the cognitive dysmetria and dysmetria of thought models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  15. STD-dependent and independent encoding of input irregularity as spike rate in a computational model of a cerebellar nucleus neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Luthman (Johannes); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); R. Maex (Reinoud); N. Davey (Neil); R. Adams (Rod); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); V. Steuber (Volker)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNeurons in the cerebellar nuclei (CN) receive inhibitory inputs from Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex and provide the major output from the cerebellum, but their computational function is not well understood. It has recently been shown that the spike activity of Purkinje cells is

  16. Human iPSC-Derived Cerebellar Neurons from a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia Reveal Disrupted Gene Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam P. Nayler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is a rare genetic disorder caused by loss of function of the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated kinase and is characterized by a predisposition to cancer, pulmonary disease, immune deficiency and progressive degeneration of the cerebellum. As animal models do not faithfully recapitulate the neurological aspects, it remains unclear whether cerebellar degeneration is a neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative phenotype. To address the necessity for a human model, we first assessed a previously published protocol for the ability to generate cerebellar neuronal cells, finding it gave rise to a population of precursors highly enriched for markers of the early hindbrain such as EN1 and GBX2, and later more mature cerebellar markers including PTF1α, MATH1, HOXB4, ZIC3, PAX6, and TUJ1. RNA sequencing was used to classify differentiated cerebellar neurons generated from integration-free A-T and control induced pluripotent stem cells. Comparison of RNA sequencing data with datasets from the Allen Brain Atlas reveals in vitro-derived cerebellar neurons are transcriptionally similar to discrete regions of the human cerebellum, and most closely resemble the cerebellum at 22 weeks post-conception. We show that patient-derived cerebellar neurons exhibit disrupted gene regulatory networks associated with synaptic vesicle dynamics and oxidative stress, offering the first molecular insights into early cerebellar pathogenesis of ataxia-telangiectasia.

  17. Transcranial Cerebellar Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Verb Generation but Not Verb Naming in Poststroke Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangolo, Paola; Fiori, Valentina; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pisano, Francesca; Priori, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Although the role of the cerebellum in motor function is well recognized, its involvement in the lexical domain remains to be further elucidated. Indeed, it has not yet been clarified whether the cerebellum is a language structure per se or whether it contributes to language processing when other cognitive components (e.g., cognitive effort, working memory) are required by the language task. Neuromodulation studies on healthy participants have suggested that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a valuable tool to modulate cognitive functions. However, so far, only a single case study has investigated whether cerebellar stimulation enhances language recovery in aphasic individuals. In a randomized, crossover, double-blind design, we explored the effect of cerebellar tDCS coupled with language treatment for verb improvement in 12 aphasic individuals. Each participant received cerebellar tDCS (20 min, 2 mA) in four experimental conditions: (1) right cathodal and (2) sham stimulation during a verb generation task and (3) right cathodal and (4) sham stimulation during a verb naming task. Each experimental condition was run in five consecutive daily sessions over 4 weeks. At the end of treatment, a significant improvement was found after cathodal stimulation only in the verb generation task. No significant differences were present for verb naming among the two conditions. We hypothesize that cerebellar tDCS is a viable tool for recovery from aphasia but only when the language task, such as verb generation, also demands the activation of nonlinguistic strategies.

  18. Decompression in Chiari Malformation: Clinical, Ocular Motor, Cerebellar, and Vestibular Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolina Goldschagg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTreatment of Chiari malformation can include suboccipital decompression with resection of one cerebellar tonsil. Its effects on ocular motor and cerebellar function have not yet been systematically examined.ObjectiveTo investigate whether decompression, including resection of one cerebellar tonsil, leads to ocular motor, vestibular, or cerebellar deficits.Patients and methodsTen patients with Chiari malformation type 1 were systematically examined before and after (1 week and 3 months suboccipital decompression with unilateral tonsillectomy. The work-up included a neurological and neuro-ophthalmological examination, vestibular function, posturography, and subjective scales. Cerebellar function was evaluated by ataxia rating scales.ResultsDecompression led to a major subjective improvement 3 months after surgery, especially regarding headache (5/5 patients, hyp-/dysesthesia (5/5 patients, ataxia of the upper limbs (4/5 patients, and paresis of the triceps and interosseal muscles (2/2 patients. Ocular motor disturbances before decompression were detected in 50% of the patients. These symptoms improved after surgery, but five patients had new persisting mild ocular motor deficits 3 months after decompression with unilateral tonsillectomy (i.e., smooth pursuit deficits, horizontally gaze-evoked nystagmus, rebound, and downbeat nystagmus without any subjective complaints. Impaired vestibular (horizontal canal, saccular, and utricular function improved in five of seven patients with impaired function before surgery. Posturographic measurements after surgery did not change significantly.ConclusionDecompression, including resection of one cerebellar tonsil, leads to an effective relief of patients’ preoperative complaints. It is a safe procedure when performed with the help of intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, although mild ocular motor dysfunctions were seen in half of the patients, which were fortunately asymptomatic.

  19. Decompression in Chiari Malformation: Clinical, Ocular Motor, Cerebellar, and Vestibular Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschagg, Nicolina; Feil, Katharina; Ihl, Franziska; Krafczyk, Siegbert; Kunz, Mathias; Tonn, Jörg Christian; Strupp, Michael; Peraud, Aurelia

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of Chiari malformation can include suboccipital decompression with resection of one cerebellar tonsil. Its effects on ocular motor and cerebellar function have not yet been systematically examined. To investigate whether decompression, including resection of one cerebellar tonsil, leads to ocular motor, vestibular, or cerebellar deficits. Ten patients with Chiari malformation type 1 were systematically examined before and after (1 week and 3 months) suboccipital decompression with unilateral tonsillectomy. The work-up included a neurological and neuro-ophthalmological examination, vestibular function, posturography, and subjective scales. Cerebellar function was evaluated by ataxia rating scales. Decompression led to a major subjective improvement 3 months after surgery, especially regarding headache (5/5 patients), hyp-/dysesthesia (5/5 patients), ataxia of the upper limbs (4/5 patients), and paresis of the triceps and interosseal muscles (2/2 patients). Ocular motor disturbances before decompression were detected in 50% of the patients. These symptoms improved after surgery, but five patients had new persisting mild ocular motor deficits 3 months after decompression with unilateral tonsillectomy (i.e., smooth pursuit deficits, horizontally gaze-evoked nystagmus, rebound, and downbeat nystagmus) without any subjective complaints. Impaired vestibular (horizontal canal, saccular, and utricular) function improved in five of seven patients with impaired function before surgery. Posturographic measurements after surgery did not change significantly. Decompression, including resection of one cerebellar tonsil, leads to an effective relief of patients' preoperative complaints. It is a safe procedure when performed with the help of intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, although mild ocular motor dysfunctions were seen in half of the patients, which were fortunately asymptomatic.

  20. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  1. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  2. Zebrin II Expressing Purkinje Cell Phenotype—Related and—Unrelated Cerebellar Abnormalities in Ca˅2.1 Mutant, Rolling Mouse Nagoya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Sawada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rolling mouse Nagoya is an ataxic mutant mouse that carries a mutation in a gene encoding for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type Ca2+ channel (Ca˅2.1. This report summarizes our studies and others concerning cerebellar abnormalities in rolling mice based on chemical neuroanatomy. While there are no obvious cerebellar deformations in this mutant mouse, the altered functions of Purkinje cells can be revealed as a reduced expression of type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1 in all Purkinje cells uniformly throughout the cerebellum, and as an ectopic expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH in the Purkinje cell subsets with the zebrin II—immunopositive phenotype. As the mutated Ca˅2.1 channel is expressed at uniform levels in all Purkinje cells, its copresence with RyR1 staining suggests that a Ca˅2.1 channel dysfunction links with the expression of RyR1 in Purkinje cells of rolling mice. However, an ectopic expression of TH in the Purkinje cells is topologically related to the projection of corticotrophin-releasing factor—immunopositive climbing fibers rather than expression of the mutated Ca˅2.1 channel. On the other hand, increased levels of serotonin (5-HT in 5-HTergic fibers were revealed immunohistochemically in Purkinje cells of the vermis of rolling cerebellum. Thus, to determine whether or not cerebellar abnormalities are related to Purkinje cell populations revealed by zebrin II expression is essential for enhancing our understanding of the pathogenesis of hereditary cerebellar ataxic mutants such as rolling mice.

  3. Developing Essential Understanding of Functions for Teaching Mathematics in Grades 9-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Gwendolyn; Beckmann, Sybilla; Zbiek, Rose Mary; Cooney, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Are sequences functions? What can't the popular "vertical line test" be applied in some cases to determine if a relation is a function? How does the idea of rate of change connect with simpler ideas about proportionality as well as more advanced topics in calculus? Helping high school students develop a robust understanding of functions requires…

  4. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  5. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to stimulate...

  6. Microstructural Observations on Nissl Substances in the Cerebellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    theophylline and caffeine7,8. Cerebellar injuries have been reported to result from toxins, autoantibodies, structural lesion and inherited cerebellar degeneration9. In view of the reported irreversible toxic effects of quinine on the central nervous system, this work examines microstructural changes in the cerebellar cortex of.

  7. Modality Specific Cerebro-Cerebellar Activations in Verbal Working Memory: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Kirschen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Verbal working memory (VWM engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters and modality (auditory and visual dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44, insular, cingulate (BA 32, and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40 regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI and right inferior (HVIII cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19 and left parietal (BA7/40 cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominately in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22. In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load.

  8. Modality Specific Cerebro-Cerebellar Activations in Verbal Working Memory: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Chen, S. H. Annabel; Desmond, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominately in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load. PMID:20714061

  9. A meta-analysis of cerebellar contributions to higher cognition from PET and fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Keren-Happuch; Chen, Shen-Hsing Annabel; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Desmond, John E

    2014-02-01

    A growing interest in cerebellar function and its involvement in higher cognition have prompted much research in recent years. Cerebellar presence in a wide range of cognitive functions examined within an increasing body of neuroimaging literature has been observed. We applied a meta-analytic approach, which employed the activation likelihood estimate method, to consolidate results of cerebellar involvement accumulated in different cognitive tasks of interest and systematically identified similarities among the studies. The current analysis included 88 neuroimaging studies demonstrating cerebellar activations in higher cognitive domains involving emotion, executive function, language, music, timing and working memory. While largely consistent with a prior meta-analysis by Stoodley and Schmahmann ([2009]: Neuroimage 44:489-501), our results extended their findings to include music and timing domains to provide further insights into cerebellar involvement and elucidate its role in higher cognition. In addition, we conducted inter- and intradomain comparisons for the cognitive domains of emotion, language, and working memory. We also considered task differences within the domain of verbal working memory by conducting a comparison of the Sternberg with the n-back task, as well as an analysis of the differential components within the Sternberg task. Results showed a consistent cerebellar presence in the timing domain, providing evidence for a role in time keeping. Unique clusters identified within the domain further refine the topographic organization of the cerebellum. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow....... It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes...

  11. DNA damage and cell cycle events implicate cerebellar dentate nucleus neurons as targets of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the cerebellum is considered to be predominantly involved in fine motor control, emerging evidence documents its participation in language, impulsive behavior and higher cognitive functions. While the specific connections of the cerebellar deep nuclei (CDN that are responsible for these functions are still being worked out, their deficiency has been termed "cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome" - a syndrome that bears a striking similarity to many of the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Using ectopic cell cycle events and DNA damage markers as indexes of cellular distress, we have explored the neuropathological involvement of the CDN in human AD. Results We examined the human cerebellar dentate nucleus in 22 AD cases and 19 controls for the presence of neuronal cell cycle events and DNA damage using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Both techniques revealed several instances of highly significant correlations. By contrast, neither amyloid plaque nor neurofibrillary tangle pathology was detected in this region, consistent with previous reports of human cerebellar pathology. Five cases of early stage AD were examined and while cell cycle and DNA damage markers were well advanced in the hippocampus of all five, few indicators of either cell cycle events (1 case or a DNA damage response (1 case were found in CDN. This implies that CDN neurons are most likely affected later in the course of AD. Clinical-pathological correlations revealed that cases with moderate to high levels of cell cycle activity in their CDN are highly likely to show deficits in unorthodox cerebellar functions including speech, language and motor planning. Conclusion Our results reveal that the CDN neurons are under cellular stress in AD and suggest that some of the non-motor symptoms found in patients with AD may be partly cerebellar in origin.

  12. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus eGeborek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT, respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF and the ipsilateral LF (iLF at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e. that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed.

  13. Coordinated Scaling of Cortical and Cerebellar Numbers of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble. PMID:20300467

  14. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of 4 different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora, Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  15. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  16. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  17. Case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hiide; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Takashima, Noriko; Inuzuka, Takashi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone against cerebellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    changes in the cerebellar cortex induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) treatment in rats. Methods: Thirty-two adult male albino rats were .... visual fields (100×) in 10 sections were examined for each animal. Stereology. Stereology is a ..... activity and protected against oxidative stress in hypothyroid rats [27]. A similar mechanism ...

  19. Climbing fiber signaling and cerebellar gain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C. Piochon (Claire); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje

  20. Cerebellar Plasticity in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.H. Coesmans (Michiel)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum helps fine-tuning movements by evaluating disparities between intention and action, in order to adjust the execution of movements ‘online’, and to keep movements calibrated in the long term. The cerebellar capacity to store information, which provides the ‘memory’ needed

  1. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsien Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH.

  2. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.

  3. Depressed cerebellar glucose metabolism in supratentorial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patronas, N.J.; Di Chiro, G.; Smith, B.H.; Paz, R. de la; Brooks, R.A.; Milam, H.L.; Kornblith, P.L.; Bairamian, D.; Mansi, L. (National Inst. of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1984-01-16

    Fifty-four patients with supratentorial tumor and one with brainstem tumor were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) using (/sup 18/F)fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG). Twenty-one of these cases had satisfactory studies of the cerebellum. Of these, 12 showed significant metabolic asymmetry between the two cerebellar hemispheres, with the rate of glucose utilization in the hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral tumor being 8-34% lower than on the ipsilateral side, as compared with a right-left asymmetry of only -1.6% +- 2.1% standard deviation for a group of 5 normal subjects. In these 12 cases the tumor involved the sensorimotor cortex and/or the thalamus with varying degrees of hemiparesis being present. For the remaining 9 patients with no significant cerebellar metabolic asymmetry, the tumor involved regions other than the sensorimotor cortex, and unilateral motor dysfunction was not a prominent clinical feature. The correlation between cerebellar metabolic suppression and unilateral motor dysfunction observed in these cases appears to be due to impairment or interruption of the cortico-thalamo-ponto-olivo-cerebellar circuitry by either the tumour itself or by edema. Thus FDG-PET scans are able to detect metabolic changes in areas of the brain remote from the primary lesion.

  4. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  5. Trait-based approaches for understanding microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, S.; Le Roux, X.; Niklaus, P.A.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Lennon, J.T.; Bertilsson, S.A.; Grossart, H.P.; Philippot, L.; Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2014-01-01

    In ecology, biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) research has seen a shift in perspective from taxonomy to function in the last two decades, with successful application of trait-based approaches. This shift offers opportunities for a deeper mechanistic understanding of the role of biodiversity

  6. An Active Learning Exercise to Facilitate Understanding of Nephron Function: Anatomy and Physiology of Renal Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal transport is a central mechanism underlying electrolyte homeostasis, acid base balance and other essential functions of the kidneys in human physiology. Thus, knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the nephron is essential for the understanding of kidney function in health and disease. However, students find this content difficult to…

  7. Secretin Modulates the Postnatal Development of Mouse Cerebellar Cortex Via PKA- and ERK-dependent Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal development of the cerebellum is critical for its intact function such as motor coordination and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. We previously reported that deprivation of secretin (SCT from cerebellar Purkinje neurons impaired motor coordination and motor learning function, while leaving the potential role of SCT in cerebellar development to be determined. SCT and its receptor (SCTR were constitutively expressed in the postnatal cerebellum in a temporal and cell-specific manner. Using a SCT knockout mouse model, we provided direct evidence showing altered developmental patterns of Purkinje cells (PCs and granular cells (GCs. SCT deprivation reduced the PC density, impaired the PC dendritic formation, induced accelerated GC migration and potentiated cerebellar apoptosis. Furthermore, our results indicated the involvement of protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathways in SCT-mediated protective effects against neuronal apoptosis. Results of this study illustrated a novel function of SCT in the postnatal development of cerebellum, emphasizing the necessary role of SCT in cerebellar-related functions.

  8. [Pharmacotherapy of Vestibular Disorders, Nystagmus and Cerebellar Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, K; Böttcher, N; Kremmyda, O; Muth, C; Teufel, J; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T; Strupp, M

    2018-01-01

    There are currently different groups of drugs for the pharmacotherapy of vertigo, nystagmus and cerebellar disorders: antiemetics; anti-inflammatories, antimenieres, and antimigraineous medications and antidepressants, anticonvulsants, aminopyridines as well as acetyl-DL-leucine. In acute unilateral vestibulopathy, corticosteroids improve the recovery of peripheral vestibular function, but currently there is not sufficient evidence for a general recommendation. There is insufficient evidence to support the view that 16 mg t. i. d. or 48 mg t. i. d. betahistine has an effect in Menière's disease. Therefore, higher dosages are recommended. In animal studies, it was shown that betahistine increases cochlear blood flow. In vestibular paroxysmia, oxcarbazepine was effective (one randomized controlled trial (RCT)). Aminopyridines are recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus (two RCTs) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, one RCT). There has been no RCT on the efficacy of beta-blockers or topiramate but one RCT on flunarizine in vestibular migraine. Based on clinical experience, a treatment analogous to that for migraine without aura can be recommended. Acetyl-DL-leucine improved cerebellar ataxia (two observational studies); it also accelerated central compensation in an animal model of acute unilateral lesion, but RCTs were negative. There are ongoing RCTs on treatment of vestibular paroxysmia with carbamazepine (VESPA), acute unilateral vestibulopathy with betahistine (BETAVEST), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with vitamin D (VitD@BPPV), EA2 with 4-aminopyridine versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), and cerebellar ataxias with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT). Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Bruno Perocco; Costa Junior, Leodante Batista da; Lambertucci, Jose Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  11. Physical models have gender‐specific effects on student understanding of protein structure–function relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure–function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3‐dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2‐dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand‐held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure–function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self‐reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context‐specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender‐specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326–335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  12. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-08

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Talpid3-binding centrosomal protein Cep120 is required for centriole duplication and proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanqing Wu

    Full Text Available Granule neuron progenitors (GNPs are the most abundant neuronal type in the cerebellum. GNP proliferation and thus cerebellar development require Sonic hedgehog (Shh secreted from Purkinje cells. Shh signaling occurs in primary cilia originating from the mother centriole. Centrioles replicate only once during a typical cell cycle and are responsible for mitotic spindle assembly and organization. Recent studies have linked cilia function to cerebellar morphogenesis, but the role of centriole duplication in cerebellar development is not known. Here we show that centrosomal protein Cep120 is asymmetrically localized to the daughter centriole through its interaction with Talpid3 (Ta3, another centrosomal protein. Cep120 null mutant mice die in early gestation with abnormal heart looping. Inactivation of Cep120 in the central nervous system leads to both hydrocephalus, due to the loss of cilia on ependymal cells, and severe cerebellar hypoplasia, due to the failed proliferation of GNPs. The mutant GNPs lack Hedgehog pathway activity. Cell biological studies show that the loss of Cep120 results in failed centriole duplication and consequently ciliogenesis, which together underlie Cep120 mutant cerebellar hypoplasia. Thus, our study for the first time links a centrosomal protein necessary for centriole duplication to cerebellar morphogenesis.

  14. The Effects of an Undergraduate Algebra Course on Prospective Middle School Teachers' Understanding of Functions, Especially Quadratic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jonathan T.

    2010-01-01

    Although current reform movements have stressed the importance of developing prospective middle school mathematics teachers' subject matter knowledge and understandings, there is a dearth of research studies with regard to prospective middle school teachers' confidence and knowledge with respect to quadratic functions. This study was intended to…

  15. The challenges of understanding glycolipid functions: An open outlook based on molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manna, M.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    and molecular simulations can be used to shed light on the role of glycolipids in membrane structure and dynamics, receptor function, and other phenomena related to emergence of diseases such as Parkinson's. The cases we discuss highlight the challenge to understand how glycolipids function in cell membranes......Glycolipids are the most complex lipid type in cell membranes, characterized by a great diversity of different structures and functions. The underlying atomistic/molecular interactions and mechanisms associated with these functions are not well understood. Here we discuss how atomistic...

  16. Improving understanding of the functional diversity of fisheries by exploring the influence of global catch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kirsty L; Watson, Reg A; Halpern, Benjamin S; Fulton, Elizabeth A; Blanchard, Julia L

    2017-09-06

    Functional diversity is thought to enhance ecosystem resilience, driving research focused on trends in the functional composition of fisheries, most recently with new reconstructions of global catch data. However, there is currently little understanding of how accounting for unreported catches (e.g. small-scale and illegal fisheries, bycatch and discards) influences functional diversity trends in global fisheries. We explored how diversity estimates varied among reported and unreported components of catch in 2010, and found these components had distinct functional fingerprints. Incorporating unreported catches had little impact on global-scale functional diversity patterns. However, at smaller, management-relevant scales, the effects of incorporating unreported catches were large (changes in functional diversity of up to 46%). Our results suggest there is greater uncertainty about the risks to ecosystem integrity and resilience from current fishing patterns than previously recognized. We provide recommendations and suggest a research agenda to improve future assessments of functional diversity of global fisheries.

  17. Neuro-Otological Aspects of Cerebellar Stroke Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a common cause of a vascular vestibular syndrome. Although vertigo ascribed to cerebellar stroke is usually associated with other neurological symptoms or signs, it may mimic acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV), so called pseudo-APV. The most common pseudo-APV is a cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Recent studies have shown that a normal head impulse result can differentiate acute medial PICA infarction from APV. Therefore, physicians who evaluate stroke patients should be trained to perform and interpret the results of the head impulse test. Cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) can produce a unique stroke syndrome in that it is typically accompanied by unilateral hearing loss, which could easily go unnoticed by patients. The low incidence of vertigo associated with infarction involving the superior cerebellar artery distribution may be a useful way of distinguishing it clinically from PICA or AICA cerebellar infarction in patients with acute vertigo and limb ataxia. For the purpose of prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment, it is imperative to recognize the characteristic patterns of the clinical presentation of each cerebellar stroke syndrome. This paper provides a concise review of the key features of cerebellar stroke syndromes from the neuro-otology viewpoint. PMID:19587812

  18. Psychosocial stress affects the acquisition of cerebellar-dependent sensorimotor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Delia A; Panouillères, Muriel T N; Walsh, Nicholas D

    2018-03-27

    Despite being overlooked in theoretical models of stress-related disorders, differences in cerebellar structure and function are consistently reported in studies of individuals exposed to current and early-life stressors. However, the mediating processes through which stress impacts upon cerebellar function are currently unknown. The aim of the current experiment was to test the effects of experimentally-induced acute stress on cerebellar functioning, using a classic, forward saccadic adaptation paradigm in healthy, young men and women. Stress induction was achieved by employing the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), a task employing mental arithmetic and negative social feedback to generate significant physiological and endocrine stress responses. Saccadic adaptation was elicited using the double-step target paradigm. In the experiment, 48 participants matched for gender and age were exposed to either a stress (n = 25) or a control (n = 23) condition. Saliva for cortisol analysis was collected before, immediately after, and 10, and 30 min after the MIST. Saccadic adaptation was assessed approximately 10 min after stress induction, when cortisol levels peaked. Participants in the stress group reported significantly more stress symptoms and exhibited greater total cortisol output compared to controls. The stress manipulation was associated with slower learning rates in the stress group, while control participants acquired adaptation faster. Learning rates were negatively associated with cortisol output and mood disturbance. Results suggest that experimentally-induced stress slowed acquisition of cerebellar-dependent saccadic adaptation, related to increases in cortisol output. These 'proof-of-principle' data demonstrate that stress modulates cerebellar-related functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The construction of an amino acid network for understanding protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Zhou, Jianhong; Sun, Maomin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) are undirected networks consisting of amino acid residues and their interactions in three-dimensional protein structures. The analysis of AANs provides novel insight into protein science, and several common amino acid network properties have revealed diverse classes of proteins. In this review, we first summarize methods for the construction and characterization of AANs. We then compare software tools for the construction and analysis of AANs. Finally, we review the application of AANs for understanding protein structure and function, including the identification of functional residues, the prediction of protein folding, analyzing protein stability and protein-protein interactions, and for understanding communication within and between proteins.

  20. New supervised learning theory applied to cerebellar modeling for suppression of variability of saccade end points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2013-06-01

    A new supervised learning theory is proposed for a hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units, which can approximate any continuous transformation, and applied to a cerebellar function to suppress the end-point variability of saccades. In motor systems, feedback control can reduce noise effects if the noise is added in a pathway from a motor center to a peripheral effector; however, it cannot reduce noise effects if the noise is generated in the motor center itself: a new control scheme is necessary for such noise. The cerebellar cortex is well known as a supervised learning system, and a novel theory of cerebellar cortical function developed in this study can explain the capability of the cerebellum to feedforwardly reduce noise effects, such as end-point variability of saccades. This theory assumes that a Golgi-granule cell system can encode the strength of a mossy fiber input as the state of neuronal activity of parallel fibers. By combining these parallel fiber signals with appropriate connection weights to produce a Purkinje cell output, an arbitrary continuous input-output relationship can be obtained. By incorporating such flexible computation and learning ability in a process of saccadic gain adaptation, a new control scheme in which the cerebellar cortex feedforwardly suppresses the end-point variability when it detects a variation in saccadic commands can be devised. Computer simulation confirmed the efficiency of such learning and showed a reduction in the variability of saccadic end points, similar to results obtained from experimental data.

  1. Facilitation of Fast Backward Priming After Left Cerebellar Continuous Theta-Burst Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Walker, Louise S T; Bracewell, R Martyn; Thierry, Guillaume; Mari-Beffa, Paloma

    2018-04-01

    Traditional theories of backward priming account only for the priming effects found at long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Here, we suggest that the presence of backward priming at short SOAs may be related to the integrative role of the cerebellum. Previous research has shown that the right cerebellum is involved in forward associative priming. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals some activation of the left cerebellar hemisphere during backward priming; but what this activation represents is unclear. Here we explore this issue using continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) and associative priming in a lexical decision task. We tested the hypothesis that the left cerebellum plays a role in backward priming and that this is dissociated from the role of the right cerebellum in forward priming. Before and after cTBS was applied to their left and right cerebellar hemispheres, participants completed a lexical decision task. Although we did not replicate the forward priming effect reported in the literature, we did find a significant increase in backward priming after left relative to right cerebellar cTBS. We consider how theories of cerebellar function in the motor domain can be extended to language and cognitive models of backward priming.

  2. A spiking network model of cerebellar Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons exhibiting irregular firing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eLennon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While the anatomy of the cerebellar microcircuit is well studied, how it implements cerebellar function is not understood. A number of models have been proposed to describe this mechanism but few emphasize the role of the vast network Purkinje cells (PKJs form with the molecular layer interneurons (MLIs – the stellate and basket cells. We propose a model of the MLI-PKJ network composed of simple spiking neurons incorporating the major anatomical and physiological features. In computer simulations, the model reproduces the irregular firing patterns observed in PKJs and MLIs in vitro and a shift toward faster, more regular firing patterns when inhibitory synaptic currents are blocked. In the model, the time between PKJ spikes is shown to be proportional to the amount of feedforward inhibition from an MLI on average. The two key elements of the model are: (1 spontaneously active PKJs and MLIs due to an endogenous depolarizing current, and (2 adherence to known anatomical connectivity along a parasagittal strip of cerebellar cortex. We propose this model to extend previous spiking network models of the cerebellum and for further computational investigation into the role of irregular firing and MLIs in cerebellar learning and function.

  3. Cortical Amyloid Beta in Cognitively Normal Elderly Adults is Associated with Decreased Network Efficiency within the Cerebro-Cerebellar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Stefanie C; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton; Wyss, Michael; Schreiner, Simon; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Kälin, Andrea; Leh, Sandra; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M; Prüssmann, Klaas P; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of cortical amyloid beta (Aβ) is a correlate of aging and a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). While several higher order cognitive processes involve functional interactions between cortex and cerebellum, this study aims to investigate effects of cortical Aβ deposition on coupling within the cerebro-cerebellar system. We included 15 healthy elderly subjects with normal cognitive performance as assessed by neuropsychological testing. Cortical Aβ was quantified using (11)carbon-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron-emission-tomography late frame signals. Volumes of brain structures were assessed by applying an automated parcelation algorithm to three dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo T1-weighted images. Basal functional network activity within the cerebro-cerebellar system was assessed using blood-oxygen-level dependent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging at the high field strength of 7 T for measuring coupling between cerebellar seeds and cerebral gray matter. A bivariate regression approach was applied for identification of brain regions with significant effects of individual cortical Aβ load on coupling. Consistent with earlier reports, a significant degree of positive and negative coupling could be observed between cerebellar seeds and cerebral voxels. Significant positive effects of cortical Aβ load on cerebro-cerebellar coupling resulted for cerebral brain regions located in inferior temporal lobe, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus. Our findings indicate that brain amyloidosis in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system. While the identified cerebral regions are consistent with established patterns of increased sensitivity for Aβ-associated neurodegeneration, additional studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysfunction of the cerebro-cerebellar system and risk for AD.

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  5. Isolated rhomboencephalosynapsis – a rare cerebellar anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paprocka, Justyna; Jamroz, Ewa; Ścieszka, Ewa; Kluczewska, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Rhomboencephalosynapsis (RES, RS) is a unique entity usually recognized in infancy based on neuroimaging. Cerebellar fusion and absence of cerebellar vermis is often associated with supratentorial findings. Since now there are about 50 cases described worldwide, with approximately 36 patients diagnosed by MRI. The authors present the first in Poland case of this uncommon malformation and review the literature. The authors describe a 28-month-old-girl with microcephaly and proper psychomotor development. The family history was unrelevant. Based on MRI the congenital malformation of posterior fossa-rhombencephalosynapsis was confirmed Presented patient is a typical example of MRI usefulness especially in patients with RES. RES symptoms are mild and that is why the diagnosis is usually made only in adulthood

  6. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Prendiville, Julie S.

    2005-01-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  7. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  8. Students' Perceptions and Development of Conceptual Understanding Regarding Trigonometry and Trigonometric Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Omer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyse university level mathematics education students' perceptions on conceptual understanding of trigonometry and trigonometric functions and their content development of these concepts. A case study was conducted with 90 freshman students of Elementary Mathematics Department. The data were gathered via a scale; they included…

  9. Dynamic Graphics in Excel for Teaching Statistics: Understanding the Probability Density Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Serrano, Vicente; Blasco-Blasco, Olga; Alvarez-Jareno, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we show a dynamic graphic in Excel that is used to introduce an important concept in our subject, Statistics I: the probability density function. This interactive graphic seeks to facilitate conceptual understanding of the main aspects analysed by the learners.

  10. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an…

  11. Urban ecological stewardship: understanding the structure, function and network of community-based urban land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika s. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based...

  12. Integrating Model-Based Learning and Animations for Enhancing Students' Understanding of Proteins Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Hussein-Farraj, Rania

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the context of chemistry education reforms in Israel. The study examined a new biochemistry learning unit that was developed to promote in-depth understanding of 3D structures and functions of proteins and nucleic acids. Our goal was to examine whether, and to what extent teaching and learning via…

  13. New insights on vertebrate olivo-cerebellar climbing fibers from computerized morphological reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Izumi; Brown, Kerry M; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of neuronal connectivity is essential to understanding the architecture of the animal nervous system. Specific labeling and imaging techniques can visualize axons and dendrites of single nerve cells. Two-dimensional manual drawing has long been used to describe the morphology of labeled neuronal elements. However, quantitative morphometry, which is essential to understanding functional significance, cannot be readily extracted unless the detailed neuronal geometry is comprehensively reconstructed in three-dimensional space. We have recently applied an accurate and robust digital reconstruction system to cerebellar climbing fibers, which form highly dense and complex terminal arbors as one of the strongest presynaptic endings in the vertebrate nervous system. Resulting statistical analysis has shown how climbing fibers morphology is special in comparison to other axonal terminals. While thick primary branches may convey excitation quickly and faithfully to the far ends, thin tendril branches, which have a larger bouton density, form the majority of presynaptic outputs. This data set, now publicly available from NeuroMorpho.Org for further modeling and analysis, may constitute the first detailed and comprehensive digital reconstruction of the complete axonal terminal field with identified branch types and full accounting of boutons for any neuronal class in the vertebrate brain.

  14. Cerebellar transcranial static magnetic field stimulation transiently reduces cerebellar brain inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Okada, Y

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) delivered using a compact cylindrical NdFeB magnet over the cerebellum modulates the excitability of the cerebellum and contralateral primary motor cortex, as measured using cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI), motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and resting motor threshold (rMT). These parameters were measured before tSMS or sham stimulation and immediately, 5 minutes and 10 minutes after stimulation. There were no significant changes in CBI, MEPs or rMT over time in the sham stimulation condition, and no changes in MEPs or rMT in the tSMS condition. However, CBI was significantly decreased immediately after tSMS as compared to that before and 5 minutes after tSMS. Our results suggest that tSMS delivered to the cerebellar hemisphere transiently reduces cerebellar inhibitory output but does not affect the excitability of the contralateral motor cortex.

  15. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cythoarquitecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eD’Alessio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test, and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope. Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group, sub-lethal dose of 0.5 ηg and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n=6. Blood–Brain Barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance.

  16. Cerebellar vascular hamartoma in a British Shorthair cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, Catherine E; Granger, Nicolas; Jeffery, Nick D

    2008-04-01

    Cerebellar vascular hamartoma was diagnosed in a 16-month-old cat following magnetic resonance imaging and incisional biopsy. The clinical features were consistent with the cerebellar site of the lesion accompanied by signs attributable to cerebellar herniation through the foramen magnum and increased intra-cranial pressure. A lesion of this type represents a previously unreported differential diagnosis for central nervous system lesions in young cats.

  17. Understanding heavy-oil molecular functionality and relations to fluid properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, S.I. [Schlumberger, DBR Technology Center, Edmonton AB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, knowing oil properties is important to optimizing recovery, transport and refinery. Nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen compounds (NSOs) have an important impact on these properties but this is often overlooked. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of functional groups in connection with heavy oil and asphaltenes. Experiments were carried out with asphaltenes altered by chemical surgery that removed specific functional interactions. Titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy were then done. Results highlighted the fact that functional groups are of key importance in the determination of heavy oil properties and that acidity can be considered the most important interaction. This paper demonstrated that the determination of specific interactions could be more important in assessing heavy oil properties than understanding their hydrocarbon structure; further work is needed to fully understand the role of sulfur and nitrogen species.

  18. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements generalized multiple-scale memory components in real-robot sensorimotor tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eCasellato

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum plays a crucial role in motor learning and it acts as a predictive controller. Modeling it and embedding it into sensorimotor tasks allows us to create functional links between plasticity mechanisms, neural circuits and behavioral learning. Moreover, if applied to real-time control of a neurorobot, the cerebellar model has to deal with a real noisy and changing environment, thus showing its robustness and effectiveness in learning. A biologically inspired cerebellar model with distributed plasticity, both at cortical and nuclear sites, has been used. Two cerebellum-mediated paradigms have been designed: an associative Pavlovian task and a vestibulo-ocular reflex, with multiple sessions of acquisition and extinction and with different stimuli and perturbation patterns. The cerebellar controller succeeded to generate conditioned responses and finely tuned eye movement compensation, thus reproducing human-like behaviors. Through a productive plasticity transfer from cortical to nuclear sites, the distributed cerebellar controller showed in both tasks the capability to optimize learning on multiple time-scales, to store motor memory and to effectively adapt to dynamic ranges of stimuli.

  19. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions reduce motivation in appetitive operant conditioning and open field exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, David J; Kerr, Abigail L; Swain, Rodney A

    2011-02-01

    Recently identified pathways from the dentate nuclei of the cerebellum to the rostral cerebral cortex via the thalamus suggest a cerebellar role in frontal and prefrontal non-motor functioning. Disturbance of cerebellar morphology and connectivity, particularly involving these cerebellothalamocortical (CTC) projections, has been implicated in motivational and cognitive deficits. The current study explored the effects of CTC disruption on motivation in male Long Evans rats. The results of two experiments demonstrate that electrolytic lesions of the cerebellar dentate nuclei lower breaking points on an operant conditioning progressive ratio schedule and decrease open field exploration compared to sham controls. Changes occurred in the absence of motor impairment, assessed via lever pressing frequency and rotarod performance. Similar elevated plus maze performances between lesioned and sham animals indicated that anxiety did not influence task performance. Our results demonstrate hedonic and purposive motivational reduction and suggest a CTC role in global motivational processes. These implications are discussed in terms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism, in which cerebellar damage and motivational deficits often present concomitantly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroprotective Role of Liver Growth Factor “LGF” in an Experimental Model of Cerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Calatrava-Ferreras

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias (CA comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by a lack of motor coordination. They are caused by disturbances in the cerebellum and its associated circuitries, so the major therapeutic goal is to correct cerebellar dysfunction. Neurotrophic factors enhance the survival and differentiation of selected types of neurons. Liver growth factor (LGF is a hepatic mitogen that shows biological activity in neuroregenerative therapies. We investigate the potential therapeutic activity of LGF in the 3-acetylpiridine (3-AP rat model of CA. This model of CA consists in the lesion of the inferior olive-induced by 3-AP (40 mg/kg. Ataxic rats were treated with 5 µg/rat LGF or vehicle during 3 weeks, analyzing: (a motor coordination by using the rota-rod test; and (b the immunohistochemical and biochemical evolution of several parameters related with the olivo-cerebellar function. Motor coordination improved in 3-AP-lesioned rats that received LGF treatment. LGF up-regulated NeuN and Bcl-2 protein levels in the brainstem, and increased calbindin expression and the number of neurons receiving calbindin-positive projections in the cerebellum. LGF also reduced extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations and microglia activation in the cerebellum. In view of these results, we propose LGF as a potential therapeutic agent in cerebellar ataxias.

  1. Vestibulo-Cerebellar Disease Impairs the Central Representation of Self-Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A.; Shaikh, Aasef G.; Palla, Antonella; Straumann, Dominik; Marti, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Transformation of head-fixed otolith signals into a space-fixed frame of reference is essential for perception of self-orientation and ocular motor control. In monkeys the nodulus and ventral uvula of the vestibulo-cerebellum facilitate this transformation by computing an internal estimate of direction of gravity. These experimental findings motivated the hypothesis that degeneration of the vestibulo-cerebellum in humans alter perceptual and ocular motor functions that rely on accurate estimates of gravity, such as subjective visual vertical (SVV), static ocular counterroll (OCR), and gravity-dependent modulation of vertical ocular drifts. We assessed the SVV, OCR, and spontaneous vertical ocular drifts in 12 patients with chronic vestibulo-cerebellar disease and in 10 controls. Substantially increased variability in estimated SVV was noted in the patients. Furthermore, gravity-dependent modulation of spontaneous vertical ocular drifts along the pitch plane was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in the patients. However, the gain and variability of static OCR and errors in SVV were not significantly different. In conclusion, in chronic vestibulo-cerebellar disease SVV and OCR remain intact except for an abnormal variability in the perception of verticality and impaired stabilization of gaze mediated by the otoliths. These findings suggest that OCR and perceived vertical are relatively independent from the cerebellum unless there is a cerebellar imbalance like an acute unilateral cerebellar stroke. The increased trial-to-trial SVV variability may be a general feature of cerebellar disease since a function of the cerebellum may be to compensate for such. SVV variability might be useful to monitor disease progression and treatment response in patients. PMID:21431098

  2. Recent advances in understanding lung function development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Melén

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed critical contributions to our understanding of the determinants and long-term implications of lung function development. In this article, we review studies that have contributed to advances in understanding lung function development and its critical importance for lung health into adult life. In particular, we have focused on early life determinants that include genetic factors, perinatal events, environmental exposures, lifestyle, infancy lower respiratory tract infections, and persistent asthma phenotypes. Longitudinal studies have conclusively demonstrated that lung function deficits that are established by school age may track into adult life and increase the risk of adult lung obstructive diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, these contributions have provided initial evidence in support of a direct influence by early life events on an accelerated decline of lung function and an increased susceptibility to its environmental determinants well into adult life. As such, we argue that future health-care programs based on precision medicine approaches that integrate deep phenotyping with tailored medication and advice to patients should also foster optimal lung function growth to be fully effective.

  3. The Importance of Understanding Hierarchical Relations between High Order Mental Functions in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetto Farina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art in studies on mentalization suggests that capacity to understand other minds (mindreading, self introspection and consciousness, mental time travel in the past and the present, linguistic communication, are different components of a hierarchical organization of several functions reflecting the evolutionary development of the specie and integrates increasingly complex, mutually coordinated brain levels. The understanding of the precise hierarchical relations between them, that reflect the phylo- and ontogenetic evolutionary pathway for adaptation to the complex interpersonal and socio-cultural environment, has an essential application in psychopathology and psychotherapy, in particular for those clinical conditions where the normal integration of high order mental functions is hampered by developmental relational trauma.

  4. Understanding how prevocational training on care farms can lead to functioning, motivation and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen-Dalskau, Lina H; Berget, Bente; Pedersen, Ingeborg; Tellnes, Gunnar; Ihlebæk, Camilla

    2016-12-01

    Prevocational training aims to improve basic vocational and social skills, supporting return to work for people who have been out of work for a long time. Care farms provide prevocational training; the aim of the study was to use the self-determination theory to gain an understanding of how these programmes can lead to healthy functioning and motivation for clients. A total of 194 participants in prevocational training on care farms answered questions about demographic information, their perception of being a colleague, the social community on the farm, experiencing nature and animals and need satisfaction. A cross-sectional design resulting in a structural equation model was used to understand how elements of the care farm context influence satisfaction of three psychological needs. The results showed that a feeling of being a useful colleague led to competence, experiencing a sense of group belonging led to relatedness and autonomy, while receiving social support from the farmer led to satisfaction of all three needs for the participants. The results explain how prevocational training can stimulate participants' functionality, motivation and well-being. This understanding enables initiators and managers of prevocational training to understand and further strengthen the need-supportive elements of such programmes. Implications for Rehabilitation Prevocational training on care farms can facilitate motivation, functioning and well-being for clients. Making clients feel like useful colleagues that belong to a client group will strengthen the positive qualities of these programmes. Support, understanding and acknowledgement from the farmer are the most important elements for a positive development for the clients.

  5. Ecosystem function in waste stabilisation ponds: Improving water quality through a better understanding of biophysical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadouani, Anas; Reichwaldt, Elke S.; Coggins, Liah X.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Zhou, Wenxu; Laurion, Isabelle; Chua, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are highly productive systems designed to treat wastewater using only natural biological and chemical processes. Phytoplankton, microbial communities and hydraulics play important roles for ecosystem functionality of these pond systems. Although WSPs have been used for many decades, they are still considered as 'black box' systems as very little is known about the fundamental ecological processes which occur within them. However, a better understanding of how these highly productive ecosystems function is particularly important for hydrological processes, as treated wastewater is commonly discharged into streams, rivers, and oceans, and subject to strict water quality guidelines. WSPs are known to operate at different levels of efficiency, and treatment efficiency of WSPs is dependent on physical (flow characteristics and sludge accumulation and distribution) and biological (microbial and phytoplankton communities) characteristics. Thus, it is important to gain a better understanding of the role and influence of pond hydraulics and vital microbial communities on pond performance and WSP functional stability. The main aim of this study is to investigate the processes leading to differences in treatment performance of WSPs. This study uses a novel and innovative approach to understand these factors by combining flow cytometry and metabolomics to investigate various biochemical characteristics, including the metabolite composition and microbial community within WSPs. The results of these analyses will then be combined with results from the characterisation of pond hydrodynamics and hydraulic performance, which will be performed using advanced hydrodynamic modelling and advanced sludge profiling technology. By understanding how hydrodynamic and biological processes influence each other and ecosystem function and stability in WSPs, we will be able to propose ways to improve the quality of the treatment using natural processes, with

  6. Understanding, predicting and controlling the physicochemical functionality of rice protein ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Amagliani, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to characterise the nutrient composition and protein profile of a range of intact and hydrolysed rice protein ingredients, to benchmark their physicochemical properties against those of selected commercial dairy protein ingredients, and to develop tailored solutions for understanding, predicting, modifying and controlling their functionality in food systems. The rice protein ingredients studied had protein contents in the range 32-78%, and lower levels of calcium ...

  7. Integrating Model-Based Learning and Animations for Enhancing Students' Understanding of Proteins Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Hussein-Farraj, Rania

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the context of chemistry education reforms in Israel. The study examined a new biochemistry learning unit that was developed to promote in-depth understanding of 3D structures and functions of proteins and nucleic acids. Our goal was to examine whether, and to what extent teaching and learning via model-based learning and animations of biomolecules affect students' chemical understanding. Applying the mixed methods research paradigm, pre- and post-questionnaires as well as class-observations were employed in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data. The research population included 175 grade twelve students, divided into three research groups: (a) hands-on exploration of animations, (b) teacher's demonstrations of animations, (c) traditional learning using textbooks. Findings indicated that the integration of model-based learning and 3D animations enhanced students' understanding of proteins' structure and function and their ability to transfer across different levels of chemistry understanding. Findings also indicated that teachers' demonstrations of animations may enhance students' `knowledge'—a low order thinking skill; however, in order to enhance higher levels of thinking, students should be able to explore 3D animations on their own. Applying constructivist and interpretative analysis of the data, three themes were raised, corresponding to cognitive, affective, and social aspects of learning while exploring web-based models and animations.

  8. Global dysrhythmia of cerebro-basal ganglia-cerebellar networks underlies motor tics following striatal disinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCairn, Kevin W; Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2013-01-09

    Motor tics, a cardinal symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS), are hypothesized to arise from abnormalities within cerebro-basal ganglia circuits. Yet noninvasive neuroimaging of TS has previously identified robust activation in the cerebellum. To date, electrophysiological properties of cerebellar activation and its role in basal ganglia-mediated tic expression remain unknown. We performed multisite, multielectrode recordings of single-unit activity and local field potentials from the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and primary motor cortex using a pharmacologic monkey model of motor tics/TS. Following microinjections of bicuculline into the sensorimotor putamen, periodic tics occurred predominantly in the orofacial region, and a sizable number of cerebellar neurons showed phasic changes in activity associated with tic episodes. Specifically, 64% of the recorded cerebellar cortex neurons exhibited increases in activity, and 85% of the dentate nucleus neurons displayed excitatory, inhibitory, or multiphasic responses. Critically, abnormal discharges of cerebellar cortex neurons and excitatory-type dentate neurons mostly preceded behavioral tic onset, indicating their central origins. Latencies of pathological activity in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex substantially overlapped, suggesting that aberrant signals may be traveling along divergent pathways to these structures from the basal ganglia. Furthermore, the occurrence of tic movement was most closely associated with local field potential spikes in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex, implying that these structures may function as a gate to release overt tic movements. These findings indicate that tic-generating networks in basal ganglia mediated tic disorders extend beyond classical cerebro-basal ganglia circuits, leading to global network dysrhythmia including cerebellar circuits.

  9. Dissociable cerebellar activity during spatial navigation and visual memory in bilateral vestibular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, N M; Sprenger, A; Wojak, J F; Göttlich, M; Münte, T F; Krämer, U M; Helmchen, C

    2015-10-01

    Spatial orientation and navigation depends on information from the vestibular system. Previous work suggested impaired spatial navigation in patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). The aim of this study was to investigate event-related brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during spatial navigation and visual memory tasks in BVF patients. Twenty-three BVF patients and healthy age- and gender matched control subjects performed learning sessions of spatial navigation by watching short films taking them through various streets from a driver's perspective along a route to the Cathedral of Cologne using virtual reality videos (adopted and modified from Google Earth). In the scanner, participants were asked to respond to questions testing for visual memory or spatial navigation while they viewed short video clips. From a similar but not identical perspective depicted video frames of routes were displayed which they had previously seen or which were completely novel to them. Compared with controls, posterior cerebellar activity in BVF patients was higher during spatial navigation than during visual memory tasks, in the absence of performance differences. This cerebellar activity correlated with disease duration. Cerebellar activity during spatial navigation in BVF patients may reflect increased non-vestibular efforts to counteract the development of spatial navigation deficits in BVF. Conceivably, cerebellar activity indicates a change in navigational strategy of BVF patients, i.e. from a more allocentric, landmark or place-based strategy (hippocampus) to a more sequence-based strategy. This interpretation would be in accord with recent evidence for a cerebellar role in sequence-based navigation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lobular patterns of cerebellar resting-state connectivity in adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivito, Giusy; Lupo, Michela; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Clausi, Silvia; Baiocco, Roberto; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by core deficits in social functioning. Core autistics traits refer to poor social and imagination skills, poor attention-switching/strong focus of attention, exceptional attention to detail, as expressed by the autism-spectrum quotient. Over the years, the importance of the cerebellum in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorder has been acknowledged. Neuroimaging studies have provided a strong support to this view, showing both structural and functional connectivity alterations to affect the cerebellum in autism spectrum disorder. According to the underconnectivity theory, disrupted connectivity within cerebello-cerebral networks has been specifically implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorder. However, inconsistent results have been generated across studies. In this study, an integrated approach has been used in a selected population of adults with autism spectrum disorder to analyse both cerebellar morphometry and functional connectivity. In individuals with autism spectrum disorder, a decreased cerebellar grey matter volume affected the right Crus II, a region showing extensive connections with cerebral areas related to social functions. This grey matter reduction correlates with the degree of autistic traits as measured by autism-spectrum quotient. Interestingly, altered functional connectivity was found between the reduced cerebellar Crus II and contralateral cerebral regions, such as frontal and temporal areas. Overall, the present data suggest that adults with autism spectrum disorder present with specific cerebellar structural alterations that may affect functional connectivity within cerebello-cerebral modules relevant to social processing and account for core autistics traits. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Trait-based approaches for understanding microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sascha; Le Roux, Xavier; Niklaus, Pascal A; Van Bodegom, Peter M; Lennon, Jay T; Bertilsson, Stefan; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Philippot, Laurent; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2014-01-01

    In ecology, biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) research has seen a shift in perspective from taxonomy to function in the last two decades, with successful application of trait-based approaches. This shift offers opportunities for a deeper mechanistic understanding of the role of biodiversity in maintaining multiple ecosystem processes and services. In this paper, we highlight studies that have focused on BEF of microbial communities with an emphasis on integrating trait-based approaches to microbial ecology. In doing so, we explore some of the inherent challenges and opportunities of understanding BEF using microbial systems. For example, microbial biologists characterize communities using gene phylogenies that are often unable to resolve functional traits. Additionally, experimental designs of existing microbial BEF studies are often inadequate to unravel BEF relationships. We argue that combining eco-physiological studies with contemporary molecular tools in a trait-based framework can reinforce our ability to link microbial diversity to ecosystem processes. We conclude that such trait-based approaches are a promising framework to increase the understanding of microbial BEF relationships and thus generating systematic principles in microbial ecology and more generally ecology.

  12. Trait-based approaches for understanding microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eKrause

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In ecology, biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF research has seen a shift in perspective from taxonomy to function in the last two decades, with successful application of trait-based approaches. This shift offers opportunities for a deeper mechanistic understanding of the role of biodiversity in maintaining multiple ecosystem processes and services. In this paper, we highlight studies that have focused on BEF of microbial communities with an emphasis on integrating trait-based approaches to microbial ecology. In doing so, we explore some of the inherent challenges and opportunities of understanding BEF using microbial systems. For example, microbial biologists characterize communities using gene phylogenies that are often unable to resolve functional traits. Additionally, experimental designs of existing microbial BEF studies are often inadequate to unravel BEF relationships. We argue that combining eco-physiological studies with contemporary molecular tools in a trait-based framework can reinforce our ability to link microbial diversity to ecosystem processes. We conclude that such trait-based approaches are a promising framework to increase the understanding of microbial BEF relationships and thus generating systematic principles in microbial ecology and more generally ecology.

  13. Trait-based approaches for understanding microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sascha; Le Roux, Xavier; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Van Bodegom, Peter M.; Lennon, Jay T.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Philippot, Laurent; Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2014-01-01

    In ecology, biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) research has seen a shift in perspective from taxonomy to function in the last two decades, with successful application of trait-based approaches. This shift offers opportunities for a deeper mechanistic understanding of the role of biodiversity in maintaining multiple ecosystem processes and services. In this paper, we highlight studies that have focused on BEF of microbial communities with an emphasis on integrating trait-based approaches to microbial ecology. In doing so, we explore some of the inherent challenges and opportunities of understanding BEF using microbial systems. For example, microbial biologists characterize communities using gene phylogenies that are often unable to resolve functional traits. Additionally, experimental designs of existing microbial BEF studies are often inadequate to unravel BEF relationships. We argue that combining eco-physiological studies with contemporary molecular tools in a trait-based framework can reinforce our ability to link microbial diversity to ecosystem processes. We conclude that such trait-based approaches are a promising framework to increase the understanding of microbial BEF relationships and thus generating systematic principles in microbial ecology and more generally ecology. PMID:24904563

  14. Understanding the cognitive underpinnings of functional impairments in early dementia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Clarissa M; Challis, David; Montaldi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Early dementia is marked by cognitive and functional impairments, and although studies indicate an association between these, detailed analyses exploring this relationship are rare. It is crucial to understand how specific cognitive deficits underlie functional deficits to develop successful cognitive interventions. This paper reviews the evidence of impairment in everyday functioning and in working, long-term and prospective memory in early dementia. Findings are evaluated with respect to the relationship between cognitive and functional impairments. From the literature searches, 17 studies on everyday functioning and 40 studies on memory were obtained. Studies were only included if patients had an official diagnosis and were in the early stages of dementia. Complex instrumental activities of daily living were subject to greater impairment than basic activities of daily living. In particular, early dementia patients struggle with finance tasks; a deficit linked to impaired working memory. Regarding cognition, long-term memory is the earliest form of memory to decline as is well recognised. Evidence also indicates deficits in working and prospective memory, with inconsistent evidence about impairments of the former. A major limitation of the literature is a lack of studies assessing individual everyday activities and the associated error patterns that might occur. This review critically assesses the status of translational research for everyday activities in early dementia, an area with critical implications for cognitive-based rehabilitation. Further research is required into the detailed assessment of individual everyday activity and specific memory deficits, in order to effectively map cognitive functions onto functional performance.

  15. Understanding immune function as a pace of life trait requires environmental context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieleman, B Irene

    2018-01-01

    This article provides a brief historical perspective on the integration of physiology into the concept of the pace of life of birds, evaluates the fit of immune function into this framework, and asks what it will take to fruitfully understand immune functioning of birds in pace of life studies in the future. In the late 1970s, physiology started to seriously enter avian life history ecology, with energy as the main currency of interest, inspired by David Lack's work in the preceding decades emphasizing how food availability explained life history variation. In an effort to understand the trade-off between survival and reproduction, and specifically the mortality costs associated with hard work, in the 1980s and 1990s, other physiological phenomena entered the realm of animal ecologists, including endocrinology, oxidative stress, and immunology. Reviewing studies thus far to evaluate the role of immune function in a life history context and particularly to address the questions whether immune function (1) consistently varies with life history variation among free-living bird species and (2) mediates life history trade-offs in experiments with free-living bird species; I conclude that, unlike energy metabolism, the immune system does not closely covary with life history among species nor mediates the classical trade-offs within individuals. Instead, I propose that understanding the tremendous immunological variation uncovered among free-living birds over the past 25 years requires a paradigm shift. The paradigm should shift from viewing immune function as a costly trait involved in life history trade-offs to explicitly including the benefits of the immune system and placing it firmly in an environmental and ecological context. A first step forward will be to quantify the immunobiotic pressures presented by diverse environmental circumstances that both shape and challenge the immune system of free-living animals. Current developments in the fields of infectious

  16. From Process Understanding Via Soil Functions to Sustainable Soil Management - A Systemic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschlaeger, U.; Bartke, S.; Bartkowski, B.; Daedlow, K.; Helming, K.; Kogel-Knabner, I.; Lang, B.; Rabot, E.; Russell, D.; Stößel, B.; Weller, U.; Wiesmeier, M.; Rabot, E.; Vogel, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and the provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which requires preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained: filter for clean water, carbon sequestration, provision and recycling of nutrients, and habitat for biological activity. All these soil functions result from the interaction of a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes that are not yet sufficiently understood. In addition, we lack understanding about the interplay between the socio-economic system and the soil system and how soil functions benefit human wellbeing. Hence, a solid and integrated assessment of soil quality requires the consideration of the ensemble of soil functions and its relation to soil management to finally be able to develop site-specific options for sustainable soil management. We present an integrated modeling approach that investigates the influence of soil management on the ensemble of soil functions. It is based on the mechanistic relationships between soil functional attributes, each explained by a network of interacting processes as derived from scientific evidence. As the evidence base required for feeding the model is for the most part stored in the existing scientific literature, another central component of our work is to set up a public "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive knowledge base on soil processes as a basis for model developments. The connection to the socio-economic system is established using the Drivers-Pressures-Impacts-States-Responses (DPSIR) framework where our improved understanding about soil ecosystem processes is linked to ecosystem services and resource efficiency via the soil functions.

  17. Cerebellar involvement in metabolic disorders: a pattern-recognition approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinlin, M.; Boltshauser, E.; Blaser, S.

    1998-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism can affect the cerebellum during development, maturation and later during life. We have established criteria for pattern recognition of cerebellar abnormalities in metabolic disorders. The abnormalities can be divided into four major groups: cerebellar hypoplasia (CH), hyperplasia, cerebellar atrophy (CA), cerebellar white matter abnormalities (WMA) or swelling, and involvement of the dentate nuclei (DN) or cerebellar cortex. CH can be an isolated typical finding, as in adenylsuccinase deficiency, but is also occasionally seen in many other disorders. Differentiation from CH and CA is often difficult, as in carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome or 2-l-hydroxyglutaric acidaemia. In cases of atrophy the relationship of cerebellar to cerebral atrophy is important. WMA may be diffuse or patchy, frequently predominantly around the DN. Severe swelling of white matter is present during metabolic crisis in maple syrup urine disease. The DN can be affected by metabolite deposition, necrosis, calcification or demyelination. Involvement of cerebellar cortex is seen in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Changes in DN and cerebellar cortex are rather typical and therefore most helpful; additional features should be sought as they are useful in narrowing down the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Histogenesis of human foetal cerebellar cortex | Krishna Veni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy Journal of Africa ... The aim of this study is to demonstrate the various histological features of human foetal cerebellum in spontaneously aborted fetuses of different gestational ages for analyzing the cerebellar histology. ... The knowledge of cerebellar anatomy has a tremendous neurosurgical importance.

  19. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Gao (Zhenyu); Proietti-Onori, M. (Martina); Z. Lin (Zhanmin); M.M. ten Brinke (Michiel); H.J. Boele (Henk-Jan); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); T.J.H. Ruigrok (Tom); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractClosed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex

  20. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.W.J. Bosman (Laurens); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); J. Shapiro (Joël); B.F.M. Rijken (Bianca); F. Zandstra (Froukje); B. van der Ende (Barry); C.B. Owens (Cullen); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); J.R. de Gruijl (Jornt); T.J.H. Ruigrok (Tom); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre-parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of

  1. A Case of Adrenoleukodystrophy Presenting as Progressive Cerebellar Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunguk Jung

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is a hereditary neurological disorder affecting the nervous system and adrenal cortex. The phenotype of X-ALD ranges from the rapidly progressive cerebral form to milder adrenomyeloneuropathy. However, cerebellar manifestations are rare. We report a case of adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as progressive cerebellar dysfunction resembling olivopontocerebellar degeneration, with a review of the literature

  2. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and

  3. Cerebellar Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma | Biluts | East and Central African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To increase awareness of PMA within the neurosurgical community, the authors reviewed a case of 11-year-old male child who presented with truncal and cerebellar ataxia and vomiting and right cerebellar tumor diagnosed as PA radiologically but PMA on histopathology examination. These findings indicate that PMA may ...

  4. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, M.J.; Walker, M.T.; Han, G. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Gottardi-Littell, N.R. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chandler, J.P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) occurring in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The histomorphology of this uncommon glial (astrocytic) neoplasm is discussed. The occurrence of this tumor within the posterior fossa is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cerebellar PXA in a patient with NF1. (orig.)

  5. Postural responses to multidirectional stance perturbations in cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Maaike; Allum, John H J; Visser, Jasper E; Grüneberg, Christian; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Kremer, H P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of patients with focal cerebellar damage underscored the importance of the cerebellum for balance control. These studies were restricted to postural control in the pitch plane, and focused mainly on leg muscle responses. Here, we examined the effect of degenerative cerebellar

  6. ASSESSING CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING IN MATHEMATICS: Using Derivative Function to Solve Connected Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin ORHUN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Open and distance education plays an important role in the actualization of cultural goals as well as in societal developments. This is an independent teaching and learning method for mathematics which forms the dynamic of scientific thinking. Distance education is an important alternative to traditional teaching applications. These contributions brought by technology enable students to participate actively in having access to information and questioning it. Such an application increases students’ motivation and teaches how mathematics can be used in daily life. Derivative is a mathematical concept which can be used in many areas of daily life. The aim of this study is to enable the concept of derivatives to be understood well by using the derivative function in the solution of various problems. It also aims at interpreting difficulties theoretically in the solution of problems and determining mistakes in terms of teaching methods. In this study, how various aspects of derivatives are understood is emphasized. These aspects concern the explanation of concepts and process, and also their application to certain concepts in physics. Students’ depth of understanding of derivatives was analyzed based on two aspects of understanding; theoretical analysis and contextual application. Follow-up interviews were conducted with five students. The results show that the students preferred to apply an algebraic symbolic aspect instead of using logical meanings of function and its derivative. In addition, in relation to how the graph of the derivative function affects the aspect of function, it was determined that the students displayed low performance.

  7. Mutation-related differences in exploratory, spatial and depressive-like behavior in pcd and Lurcher cerebellar mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eTuma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is not only essential for motor coordination but is also involved in cognitive and affective processes. These functions of the cerebellum and mechanisms of their disorders in cerebellar injury are not completely understood. There is a wide spectrum of cerebellar mutant mice which are used as models of hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Nevertheless, they differ in pathogenesis of manifestation of the particular mutation and also in the strain background. The aim of this work was to compare spatial navigation, learning and memory in pcd and Lurcher mice, two of the most frequently used cerebellar mutants. The mice were tested in the open field for exploration behavior, in the Morris water maze with visible as well as reversal hidden platform tasks and in the forced swimming test for motivation assessment. Lurcher mice showed different space exploration activity in the open field and a lower tendency to depressive-like behavior in the forced swimming test compared with pcd mice. Severe deficit of spatial navigation was shown in both cerebellar mutants. However, the overall performance of Lurcher mice was better than that of pcd mutants. Lurcher mice showed the ability of visual guidance despite difficulties with the direct swim towards a goal. In the probe trial test, Lurcher mice preferred the visible platform rather than the more recent localization of the hidden goal.

  8. Greater disruption to control of voluntary saccades in autistic disorder than Asperger's disorder: evidence for greater cerebellar involvement in autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley-Cary, Chloe; Rinehart, Nicole; Tonge, Bruce; White, Owen; Fielding, Joanne

    2011-03-01

    It remains unclear whether autism and Asperger's disorder (AD) exist on a symptom continuum or are separate disorders with discrete neurobiological underpinnings. In addition to impairments in communication and social cognition, motor deficits constitute a significant clinical feature in both disorders. It has been suggested that motor deficits and in particular the integrity of cerebellar modulation of movement may differentiate these disorders. We used a simple volitional saccade task to comprehensively profile the integrity of voluntary ocular motor behaviour in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA) or AD, and included measures sensitive to cerebellar dysfunction. We tested three groups of age-matched young males with normal intelligence (full scale, verbal, and performance IQ estimates >70) aged between 11 and 19 years; nine with AD, eight with HFA, and ten normally developing males as the comparison group. Overall, the metrics and dynamics of the voluntary saccades produced in this task were preserved in the AD group. In contrast, the HFA group demonstrated relatively preserved mean measures of ocular motricity with cerebellar-like deficits demonstrated in increased variability on measures of response time, final eye position, and movement dynamics. These deficits were considered to be consistent with reduced cerebellar online adaptation of movement. The results support the notion that the integrity of cerebellar modulation of movement may be different in AD and HFA, suggesting potentially differential neurobiological substrates may underpin these complex disorders.

  9. Brainstem and cerebellar changes after cerebrovascular accidents: magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, A.; Takase, Y.; Nomiyama, K.; Egashira, R.; Kudo, S.

    2006-01-01

    We illustrate the various types of secondary degeneration in the brainstem and/or cerebellum detected on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained after cerebrovascular accidents. The changes include: (a) ipsilateral nigral degeneration after striatal infarction; (b) Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem after supratentorial pyramidal tract or motor cortex injury; (c) Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract in the brainstem after frontal lobe infarction; (d) ipsilateral brainstem atrophy and crossed cerebellar atrophy due to an extensive supratentorial lesion; (e) ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle atrophy, contralateral rubral degeneration, contralateral inferior olivary degeneration and ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after dentate nucleus hemorrhage; (f) ipsilateral inferior olivary degeneration after pontine tegmentum hemorrhage; (g) bilateral wallerian degeneration of the pontocerebellar tracts after ventromedial pontine infarction or basis pontis hemorrhage; and (h) ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after middle cerebellar peduncle hemorrhage. (orig.)

  10. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora ePicerni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI. High resolution T1-weighted and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM or White Matter (WM volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD, and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  11. Brainstem and cerebellar changes after cerebrovascular accidents: magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Takase, Y.; Nomiyama, K.; Egashira, R.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    We illustrate the various types of secondary degeneration in the brainstem and/or cerebellum detected on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained after cerebrovascular accidents. The changes include: (a) ipsilateral nigral degeneration after striatal infarction; (b) Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem after supratentorial pyramidal tract or motor cortex injury; (c) Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract in the brainstem after frontal lobe infarction; (d) ipsilateral brainstem atrophy and crossed cerebellar atrophy due to an extensive supratentorial lesion; (e) ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle atrophy, contralateral rubral degeneration, contralateral inferior olivary degeneration and ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after dentate nucleus hemorrhage; (f) ipsilateral inferior olivary degeneration after pontine tegmentum hemorrhage; (g) bilateral wallerian degeneration of the pontocerebellar tracts after ventromedial pontine infarction or basis pontis hemorrhage; and (h) ipsilateral cerebellar atrophy after middle cerebellar peduncle hemorrhage. (orig.)

  12. The endovascular treatment of bilateral infarction of middle cerebellar peduncles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qihao; Jing, Guoxian; Han, Ju

    2017-01-01

    Infarction of the symmetrical middle cerebellar peduncles is often induced by ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Adams described the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) syndrome as early as 1943, but clinical and imaging studies following this failed to shed more light regarding the condition until the advent of magnetic resonance imaging that comprehension regarding AICA improved significantly. Infarction of the middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP) is uncommon and the endovascular treatment of this condition is even more rare. We studied 4 patients with simultaneous bilateral cerebellar infarction of whom 2 received intracranial vascular therapy and demonstrated improvement in symptoms. Our findings suggest that patients with vertebral basilar artery stenosis with potential bilateral cerebellar infarction may benefit from endovascular treatment. PMID:28064332

  13. Understanding volatility correlation behavior with a magnitude cross-correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Woo Cheol; Oh, Gabjin; Kim, Seunghwan

    2006-06-01

    We propose an approach for analyzing the basic relation between correlation properties of the original signal and its magnitude fluctuations by decomposing the original signal into its positive and negative fluctuation components. We use this relation to understand the following phenomenon found in many naturally occurring time series: the magnitude of the signal exhibits long-range correlation, whereas the original signal is short-range correlated. The applications of our approach to heart rate variability signals and high-frequency foreign exchange rates reveal that the difference between the correlation properties of the original signal and its magnitude fluctuations is induced by the time organization structure of the correlation function between the magnitude fluctuations of positive and negative components. We show that this correlation function can be described well by a stretched-exponential function and is related to the nonlinearity and the multifractal structure of the signals.

  14. Functional traits can improve our understanding of niche- and dispersal-based processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Xun, Yanhan; Cai, Huiying; Jin, Guangze

    2018-03-01

    Ecologists often determine the relative importance of niche- and dispersal-based processes via variation partitioning based on species composition. Functional traits and their proxies of phylogeny are expected to increase the detection of niche-based processes and reduce the unexplained variation relative to species identity. We collected eight adult tree traits and phylogenetic data of 41 species and employed a phylogenetic fuzzy weighting method to address this issue in a 9-ha temperate forest dynamics plot. We used redundancy analysis to relate species, phylogenetic and functional compositions to environmental (soil resources and topography) and spatial variables. We also performed multi-scaled analyses on spatial variables by adding environment as the covariates to determine if functional traits increase the detection of niche-based processes at broad scales. The functional traits and intraspecific variation of the wood density among ontogenetic stages could dramatically increase the detection of niche-based processes and reduce the unexplained variation relative to species identity. Phylogenetic and functional compositions were mainly driven by total soil P and elevation, while species composition was weakly affected by multiple environmental variables. After controlling for the environment, a larger amount of the compositional variations in seed mass and maximum height were explained by finer-scaled spatial variables, indicating that dispersal processes may be important at fine spatial scales. Our results suggested that considering functional traits and their intraspecific variations could improve our understanding of ecological processes and increase our ability to predict the responses of plants to environmental change.

  15. Loss of GPRC5B impairs synapse formation of Purkinje cells with cerebellar nuclear neurons and disrupts cerebellar synaptic plasticity and motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takamitsu; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Kinoshita, Masami O; Tatsukawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Chika; Oshima, Eriko; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Le, Tung Dinh; Akagi, Takumi; Tohyama, Koujiro; Nagao, Soichi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2018-02-23

    GPRC5B is a membrane glycoprotein robustly expressed in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). Its function is unknown. In Gprc5b -/- mice that lack GPRC5B, PCs develop distal axonal swellings in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Numerous misshapen mitochondria, which generated excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), accumulated in these distal axonal swellings. In primary cell cultures of Gprc5b -/- PCs, pharmacological reduction of ROS prevented the appearance of such swellings. To examine the physiological role of GPRC5B in PCs, we analyzed cerebellar synaptic transmission and cerebellum-dependent motor learning in Gprc5b -/- mice. Patch-clamp recordings in cerebellum slices in vitro revealed that the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC synapses was normal in adult Gprc5b -/- mice, whereas the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-DCN neuron synapses was attenuated in juvenile Gprc5b -/- mice. In Gprc5b -/- mice, long-term motor learning was impaired in both the rotarod test and the horizontal optokinetic response eye movement (HOKR) test. These observations suggest that GPRC5B plays not only an important role in the development of distal axons of PCs and formation of synapses with DCN neurons, but also in the synaptic plasticity that underlies long-term motor learning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebellar-inspired adaptive control of a robot eye actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Alexander; Anderson, Sean R; Pipe, A G; Melhuish, Chris; Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, a model of cerebellar function is implemented and evaluated in the control of a robot eye actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles. The investigated control problem is stabilization of the visual image in response to disturbances. This is analogous to the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) in humans. The cerebellar model is structurally based on the adaptive filter, and the learning rule is computationally analogous to least-mean squares, where parameter adaptation at the parallel fiber/Purkinje cell synapse is driven by the correlation of the sensory error signal (carried by the climbing fiber) and the motor command signal. Convergence of the algorithm is first analyzed in simulation on a model of the robot and then tested online in both one and two degrees of freedom. The results show that this model of neural function successfully works on a real-world problem, providing empirical evidence for validating: 1) the generic cerebellar learning algorithm; 2) the function of the cerebellum in the VOR; and 3) the signal transmission between functional neural components of the VOR.

  17. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Laurens W J; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Shapiro, Jöel; Rijken, Bianca F M; Zandstra, Froukje; van der Ende, Barry; Owens, Cullen B; Potters, Jan-Willem; de Gruijl, Jornt R; Ruigrok, Tom J H; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2010-10-01

    The cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre–parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of Purkinje cells. We used, for the first time, the mouse whisker system as a model system to study the encoding of somatosensory input by Purkinje cells.We show that most Purkinje cells in ipsilateral crus 1 and crus 2 of awake mice respond to whisker stimulation with complex spike and/or simple spike responses. Single-whisker stimulation in anaesthetised mice revealed that the receptive fields of complex spike and simple spike responses were strikingly different. Complex spike responses, which proved to be sensitive to the amplitude, speed and direction of whisker movement, were evoked by only one or a few whiskers. Simple spike responses, which were not affected by the direction of movement, could be evoked by many individual whiskers. The receptive fields of Purkinje cells were largely intermingled, and we suggest that this facilitates the rapid integration of sensory inputs from different sources. Furthermore, we describe that individual Purkinje cells, at least under anaesthesia, may be bound in two functional ensembles based on the receptive fields and the synchrony of the complex spike and simple spike responses. The ‘complex spike ensembles’ were oriented in the sagittal plane, following the anatomical organization of the climbing fibres, while the ‘simple spike ensembles’ were oriented in the transversal plane, as are the beams of parallel fibres.

  18. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim P. Valentijn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to understand the complexity of integrated care.Methods:  The search method involved a combination of electronic database searches, hand searches of reference lists (snowball method and contacting researchers in the field. The process of synthesizing the literature was iterative, to relate the concepts of primary care and integrated care. First, we identified the general principles of primary care and integrated care. Second, we connected the dimensions of integrated care and the principles of primary care. Finally, to improve content validity we held several meetings with researchers in the field to develop and refine our conceptual framework.Results: The conceptual framework combines the functions of primary care with the dimensions of integrated care. Person-focused and population-based care serve as guiding principles for achieving integration across the care continuum. Integration plays complementary roles on the micro (clinical integration, meso (professional and organisational integration and macro (system integration level. Functional and normative integration ensure connectivity between the levels.Discussion:  The presented conceptual framework is a first step to achieve a better understanding of the inter-relationships among the dimensions of integrated care from a primary care perspective.

  19. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P; Schepman, Sanneke M; Opheij, Wilfrid; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to understand the complexity of integrated care. The search method involved a combination of electronic database searches, hand searches of reference lists (snowball method) and contacting researchers in the field. The process of synthesizing the literature was iterative, to relate the concepts of primary care and integrated care. First, we identified the general principles of primary care and integrated care. Second, we connected the dimensions of integrated care and the principles of primary care. Finally, to improve content validity we held several meetings with researchers in the field to develop and refine our conceptual framework. The conceptual framework combines the functions of primary care with the dimensions of integrated care. Person-focused and population-based care serve as guiding principles for achieving integration across the care continuum. Integration plays complementary roles on the micro (clinical integration), meso (professional and organisational integration) and macro (system integration) level. Functional and normative integration ensure connectivity between the levels. The presented conceptual framework is a first step to achieve a better understanding of the inter-relationships among the dimensions of integrated care from a primary care perspective.

  20. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  1. Insights into cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar development is an extensive process that begins during early embryonic stages and persists more than one year after birth in human. Therefore, the cerebellum is susceptible to acquire various developmental abnormalities leading to numerous diseases such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor. One third of the patients with medulloblastoma are incurable and survivors have a poor quality of life due to the aggressiveness of the broad-spectrum treatments. Within the past few years, it has been highlighted that medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease that is divided in four molecular subgroups. This recent advance in the field, combined with the development of associated preclinical models for each subgroup, should enable, in the future, the discovery and use of targeted therapy in clinical treatments for each subtype of medulloblastoma. In this review, we first aim to show how deregulation of cerebellar development can lead to medulloblastoma formation and then to present the advances in the molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma and the associated preclinical models. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Bergmann glia modulate cerebellar Purkinje cell bistability via Ca2+-dependent K+ uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wang, Weishan; Takano, Takahiro; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebellar Bergmann glia display coordinated Ca2+ transients in live mice. However, the functional significance of Bergmann glial Ca2+ signaling remains poorly understood. Using transgenic mice that allow selective stimulation of glial cells, we report here that cytosolic Ca2+ regulates uptake of K+ by Bergmann glia, thus providing a powerful mechanism for control of Purkinje cell-membrane potential. The decline in extracellular K+ evoked by agonist-induced Ca2+...

  3. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jerome A.; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities. PMID:27775567

  4. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome A. Staal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  5. Functional Diversity as a New Framework for Understanding the Ecology of an Emerging Generalist Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Aaron; Guégan, Jean-François; Benbow, M Eric; Williamson, Heather; Small, Pamela L C; Quaye, Charles; Boakye, Daniel; Merritt, Richard W; Gozlan, Rodolphe E

    2016-09-01

    Emerging infectious disease outbreaks are increasingly suspected to be a consequence of human pressures exerted on natural ecosystems. Previously, host taxonomic communities have been used as indicators of infectious disease emergence, and the loss of their diversity has been implicated as a driver of increased presence. The mechanistic details in how such pathogen-host systems function, however, may not always be explained by taxonomic variation or loss. Here we used machine learning and methods based on Gower's dissimilarity to quantify metrics of invertebrate functional diversity, in addition to functional groups and their taxonomic diversity at sites endemic and non-endemic for the model generalist pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer. Changes in these metrics allowed the rapid categorisation of the ecological niche of the mycobacterium's hosts and the ability to relate specific host traits to its presence in aquatic ecosystems. We found that taxonomic diversity of hosts and overall functional diversity loss and evenness had no bearing on the mycobacterium's presence, or whether the site was in an endemic area. These findings, however, provide strong evidence that generalist environmentally persistent bacteria such as M. ulcerans can be associated with specific functional traits rather than taxonomic groups of organisms, increasing our understanding of emerging disease ecology and origin.

  6. Understanding the Functionality of Human Activity Hotspots from Their Scaling Pattern Using Trajectory Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human activity hotspots are the clusters of activity locations in space and time, and a better understanding of their functionality would be useful for urban land use planning and transportation. In this article, using trajectory data, we aim to infer the functionality of human activity hotspots from their scaling pattern in a reliable way. Specifically, a large number of stopping locations are extracted from trajectory data, which are then aggregated into activity hotspots. Activity hotspots are found to display scaling patterns in terms of the sublinear scaling relationships between the number of stopping locations and the number of points of interest (POIs, which indicates economies of scale of human interactions with urban land use. Importantly, this scaling pattern remains stable over time. This finding inspires us to devise an allometric ruler to identify the activity hotspots, whose functionality could be reliably estimated using the stopping locations. Thereafter, a novel Bayesian inference model is proposed to infer their urban functionality, which examines the spatial and temporal information of stopping locations covering 75 days. Experimental results suggest that the functionality of identified activity hotspots are reliably inferred by stopping locations, such as the railway station.

  7. Towards a Stochastic Predictive Understanding of Ecosystem Functioning and Resilience to Environmental Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem processes respond differently to hydrometeorological variability across timescales, and so does our scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Process-based modeling of ecosystem functioning is therefore challenging, especially when long-term predictions are envisioned. Here we analyze the statistical properties of hydrometeorological and ecosystem variability, i.e., the variability of ecosystem process related to vegetation carbon dynamics, from hourly to decadal timescales. 23 extra-tropical forest sites, covering different climatic zones and vegetation characteristics, are examined. Micrometeorological and reanalysis data of precipitation, air temperature, shortwave radiation and vapor pressure deficit are used to describe hydrometeorological variability. Ecosystem variability is quantified using long-term eddy covariance flux data of hourly net ecosystem exchange of CO2 between land surface and atmosphere, monthly remote sensing vegetation indices, annual tree-ring widths and above-ground biomass increment estimates. We find that across sites and timescales ecosystem variability is confined within a hydrometeorological envelope that describes the range of variability of the available resources, i.e., water and energy. Furthermore, ecosystem variability demonstrates long-term persistence, highlighting ecological memory and slow ecosystem recovery rates after disturbances. We derive an analytical model, combining deterministic harmonics and stochastic processes, that represents major mechanisms and uncertainties and mimics the observed pattern of hydrometeorological and ecosystem variability. This stochastic framework offers a parsimonious and mathematically tractable approach for modelling ecosystem functioning and for understanding its response and resilience to environmental changes. Furthermore, this framework reflects well the observed ecological memory, an inherent property of ecosystem functioning that is currently not

  8. Cerebellar areas dedicated to social cognition? A comparison of meta-analytic and connectivity results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Baetens, Kris; Mariën, Peter; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2015-08-01

    A recent meta-analysis explored the role of the cerebellum in social cognition and documented that this part of the brain is critically implicated in social cognition, especially in more abstract and complex forms of mentalizing. The authors found an overlap with clusters involved in sensorimotor (during mirror and self-judgment tasks) as well as in executive processes (across all tasks) documented in earlier nonsocial cerebellar meta-analyses, and hence interpreted their results in terms of a domain-general function of the cerebellum. However, these meta-analytic results might be interpreted in a different, complementary way. Indeed, the results reveal a striking overlap with the parcellation of cerebellar topography offered by a recent functional connectivity analysis. In particular, the majority of social cognitive activity in the cerebellum can also be explained as located within the boundaries of a default/mentalizing network of the cerebellum, with the exception of the involvement of primary and integrative somatomotor networks for self-related and mirror tasks, respectively. Given the substantial overlap, a novel interpretation of the meta-analytic findings is put forward suggesting that cerebellar activity during social judgments might reflect a more domain-specific mentalizing functionality in some areas of the cerebellum than assumed before.

  9. The Knockout of Secretin in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Impairs Mouse Motor Coordination and Motor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Chung, Sookja Kim; Chow, Billy Kwok Chong

    2014-01-01

    Secretin (SCT) was first considered to be a gut hormone regulating gastrointestinal functions when discovered. Recently, however, central actions of SCT have drawn intense research interest and are supported by the broad distribution of SCT in specific neuronal populations and by in vivo physiological studies regarding its role in water homeostasis and food intake. The direct action of SCT on a central neuron was first discovered in cerebellar Purkinje cells in which SCT from cerebellar Purkinje cells was found to potentiate GABAergic inhibitory transmission from presynaptic basket cells. Because Purkinje neurons have a major role in motor coordination and learning functions, we hypothesize a behavioral modulatory function for SCT. In this study, we successfully generated a mouse model in which the SCT gene was deleted specifically in Purkinje cells. This mouse line was tested together with SCT knockout and SCT receptor knockout mice in a full battery of behavioral tasks. We found that the knockout of SCT in Purkinje neurons did not affect general motor ability or the anxiety level in open field tests. However, knockout mice did exhibit impairments in neuromuscular strength, motor coordination, and motor learning abilities, as shown by wire hanging, vertical climbing, and rotarod tests. In addition, SCT knockout in Purkinje cells possibly led to the delayed development of motor neurons, as supported by the later occurrence of key neural reflexes. In summary, our data suggest a role in motor coordination and motor learning for SCT expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:24356714

  10. Cerebellar-inspired algorithm for adaptive control of nonlinear dielectric elastomer-based artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emma D; Assaf, Tareq; Pearson, Martin J; Rossiter, Jonathan M; Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Dean, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Electroactive polymer actuators are important for soft robotics, but can be difficult to control because of compliance, creep and nonlinearities. Because biological control mechanisms have evolved to deal with such problems, we investigated whether a control scheme based on the cerebellum would be useful for controlling a nonlinear dielectric elastomer actuator, a class of artificial muscle. The cerebellum was represented by the adaptive filter model, and acted in parallel with a brainstem, an approximate inverse plant model. The recurrent connections between the two allowed for direct use of sensory error to adjust motor commands. Accurate tracking of a displacement command in the actuator's nonlinear range was achieved by either semi-linear basis functions in the cerebellar model or semi-linear functions in the brainstem corresponding to recruitment in biological muscle. In addition, allowing transfer of training between cerebellum and brainstem as has been observed in the vestibulo-ocular reflex prevented the steady increase in cerebellar output otherwise required to deal with creep. The extensibility and relative simplicity of the cerebellar-based adaptive-inverse control scheme suggests that it is a plausible candidate for controlling this type of actuator. Moreover, its performance highlights important features of biological control, particularly nonlinear basis functions, recruitment and transfer of training. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. The dynamic relationship between cerebellar Purkinje cell simple spikes and the spikelet number of complex spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K; Xiao, Jianqiang; Houghton, Conor; Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y; Lang, Eric J; Apps, Richard; Cerminara, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex and fire two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. Previous studies have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events, even though the waveform is composed of varying numbers of spikelets. The extent to which differences in spikelet number affect simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains unclear. We found that complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets are preceded by higher simple spike firing rates but, following the complex spike, simple spikes are reduced in a manner that is graded with spikelet number. This dynamic interaction has important implications for cerebellar information processing, and suggests that complex spike spikelet number may maintain Purkinje cells within their operational range. Purkinje cells are central to cerebellar function because they form the sole output of the cerebellar cortex. They exhibit two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. It is widely accepted that interaction between these two types of impulse is central to cerebellar cortical information processing. Previous investigations of the interactions between simple spikes and complex spikes have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events. However, complex spikes are composed of an initial large spike followed by a number of secondary components, termed spikelets. The number of spikelets within individual complex spikes is highly variable and the extent to which differences in complex spike spikelet number affects simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains poorly understood. In anaesthetized adult rats, we have found that Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe vermis and hemisphere have high simple spike firing frequencies that precede complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets. This finding was also evident in a small sample of Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe hemisphere in awake cats. In addition

  12. Understanding Service Composition with Non-functional Properties Using Declarative Model-to-model Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Mäuhlhäuser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing applications comprising service composition is a complex task. Therefore, to lower the skill barrier for developers, it is important to describe the problem at hand on an abstract level and not to focus on implementation details. This can be done using declarative programming which allows to describe only the result of the problem (which is what the developer wants rather than the description of the implementation. We therefore use purely declarative model-to-model transformations written in a universal model transformation language which is capable of handling even non functional properties using optimization and mathematical programming. This makes it easier to understand and describe service composition and non-functional properties for the developer.

  13. Real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system based on a spiking neural network model of motor learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xiao, Na; Zhai, Xiaolong; Chan, Pak Kwan; Tin, Chung

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Damage to the brain, as a result of various medical conditions, impacts the everyday life of patients and there is still no complete cure to neurological disorders. Neuroprostheses that can functionally replace the damaged neural circuit have recently emerged as a possible solution to these problems. Here we describe the development of a real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system to substitute neural function in cerebellar circuitry for learning delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC). Approach. The system was empowered by a biologically realistic spiking neural network (SNN) model of the cerebellar neural circuit, which considers the neuronal population and anatomical connectivity of the network. The model simulated synaptic plasticity critical for learning DEC. This SNN model was carefully implemented on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform for real-time simulation. This hardware system was interfaced in in vivo experiments with anesthetized rats and it used neural spikes recorded online from the animal to learn and trigger conditioned eyeblink in the animal during training. Main results. This rat-FPGA hybrid system was able to process neuronal spikes in real-time with an embedded cerebellum model of ~10 000 neurons and reproduce learning of DEC with different inter-stimulus intervals. Our results validated that the system performance is physiologically relevant at both the neural (firing pattern) and behavioral (eyeblink pattern) levels. Significance. This integrated system provides the sufficient computation power for mimicking the cerebellar circuit in real-time. The system interacts with the biological system naturally at the spike level and can be generalized for including other neural components (neuron types and plasticity) and neural functions for potential neuroprosthetic applications.

  14. Real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system based on a spiking neural network model of motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xiao, Na; Zhai, Xiaolong; Kwan Chan, Pak; Tin, Chung

    2018-02-01

    Damage to the brain, as a result of various medical conditions, impacts the everyday life of patients and there is still no complete cure to neurological disorders. Neuroprostheses that can functionally replace the damaged neural circuit have recently emerged as a possible solution to these problems. Here we describe the development of a real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system to substitute neural function in cerebellar circuitry for learning delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC). The system was empowered by a biologically realistic spiking neural network (SNN) model of the cerebellar neural circuit, which considers the neuronal population and anatomical connectivity of the network. The model simulated synaptic plasticity critical for learning DEC. This SNN model was carefully implemented on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform for real-time simulation. This hardware system was interfaced in in vivo experiments with anesthetized rats and it used neural spikes recorded online from the animal to learn and trigger conditioned eyeblink in the animal during training. This rat-FPGA hybrid system was able to process neuronal spikes in real-time with an embedded cerebellum model of ~10 000 neurons and reproduce learning of DEC with different inter-stimulus intervals. Our results validated that the system performance is physiologically relevant at both the neural (firing pattern) and behavioral (eyeblink pattern) levels. This integrated system provides the sufficient computation power for mimicking the cerebellar circuit in real-time. The system interacts with the biological system naturally at the spike level and can be generalized for including other neural components (neuron types and plasticity) and neural functions for potential neuroprosthetic applications.

  15. Reorganization of the Cerebro-Cerebellar Network of Language Production in Patients with Congenital Left-Hemispheric Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidzba, K.; Wilke, M.; Staudt, M.; Krageloh-Mann, I.; Grodd, W.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with congenital lesions of the left cerebral hemisphere may reorganize language functions into the right hemisphere. In these patients, language production is represented homotopically to the left-hemispheric language areas. We studied cerebellar activation in five patients with congenital lesions of the left cerebral hemisphere to assess…

  16. Leptin Enhances NR2B-mediated NMDA Responses Via a MAPK-dependent Process in Cerebellar Granule Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, A. J.; Wallace, L; Durakoglugil, D; Harvey, J.

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that the hormone leptin regulates energy balance via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, evidence is accumulating that leptin plays a key role in numerous CNS functions. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in many extrahypothalamic brain regions, with high levels found in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the hippocampus, leptin has been shown to facilitate NMDA receptor function and modulate synaptic plasticity. A role for leptin in cerebellar function is also indicated as leptin-deficient rodents display reduced mobility that is unrelated to obesity. Here we show that leptin receptor immunolabeling can be detected in cultured cerebellar granule cells, being expressed at the somatic plasma membrane and also concentrated at synapses. Furthermore, leptin facilitated NR2B NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in cerebellar granule cells via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway. These findings provide the first direct evidence for a cellular action of leptin in cerebellar neurons. In addition, given that NMDA receptor activity in the cerebellum is crucial for normal locomotor function, these data also have important implications for the potential role of leptin in the control of movement. PMID:16413128

  17. Update on the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Roger; Teufel, Julian; Feil, Katharina; Muth, Caroline; Strupp, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An overview of the current pharmacotherapy of central vestibular syndromes and the most common forms of central nystagmus as well as cerebellar disorders is given. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus, a frequent form of acquired persisting fixation nystagmus, and upbeat nystagmus. Animal studies showed that this non-selective blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels increases Purkinje cell excitability and normalizes the irregular firing rate, so that the inhibitory influence of the cerebellar cortex on vestibular and deep cerebellar nuclei is restored. The efficacy of 4-AP in episodic ataxia type 2, which is most often caused by mutations of the PQ-calcium channel, was demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial. It was also shown in an animal model (the tottering mouse) of episodic ataxia type 2. In a case series, chlorzoxazone, a non-selective activator of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, was shown to reduce the DBN. The efficacy of acetyl-DL-leucine as a potential new symptomatic treatment for cerebellar diseases has been demonstrated in three case series. The ongoing randomized controlled trials on episodic ataxia type 2 (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. acetazolamide vs. placebo; EAT2TREAT), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG-trial), cerebellar gait disorders (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. placebo; FACEG) and cerebellar ataxia (acetyl-DL-leucine vs. placebo; ALCAT) will provide new insights into the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders.

  18. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hao Chen

    Full Text Available Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1 were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118, sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296, and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102. Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118 of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296 of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516 of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia.

  19. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hao; Lee, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Jin-An

    2017-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD) in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1) were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118), sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296), and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102). Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH) in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs) previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118) of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296) of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516) of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia. PMID:28481932

  20. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hao; Lee, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Jin-An; Liao, Yi-Chu; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD) in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1) were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118), sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296), and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102). Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH) in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs) previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118) of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296) of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516) of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia.

  1. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled.

  2. Making Sense of Abstract Algebra: Exploring Secondary Teachers' Understandings of Inverse Functions in Relation to Its Group Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on semi-structured, task-based interviews to explore secondary teachers' (N = 7) understandings of inverse functions in relation to abstract algebra. In particular, a concept map task is used to understand the degree to which participants, having recently taken an abstract algebra course, situated inverse functions within its…

  3. An attempt to understand kidney's protein handling function by comparing plasma and urine proteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the help of proteomics technology, the human plasma and urine proteomes, which closely represent the protein compositions of the input and output of the kidney, respectively, have been profiled in much greater detail by different research teams. Many datasets have been accumulated to form "reference profiles" of the plasma and urine proteomes. Comparing these two proteomes may help us understand the protein handling aspect of kidney function in a way, however, which has been unavailable until the recent advances in proteomics technology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After removing secreted proteins downstream of the kidney, 2611 proteins in plasma and 1522 in urine were identified with high confidence and compared based on available proteomic data to generate three subproteomes, the plasma-only subproteome, the plasma-and-urine subproteome, and the urine-only subproteome, and they correspond to three groups of proteins that are handled in three different ways by the kidney. The available experimental molecular weights of the proteins in the three subproteomes were collected and analyzed. Since the functions of the overrepresented proteins in the plasma-and-urine subproteome are probably the major functions that can be routinely regulated by excretion from the kidney in physiological conditions, Gene Ontology term enrichment in the plasma-and-urine subproteome versus the whole plasma proteome was analyzed. Protease activity, calcium and growth factor binding proteins, and coagulation and immune response-related proteins were found to be enriched. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The comparison method described in this paper provides an illustration of a new approach for studying organ functions with a proteomics methodology. Because of its distinctive input (plasma and output (urine, it is reasonable to predict that the kidney will be the first organ whose functions are further elucidated by proteomic methods in the near future. It

  4. Towards an integrated understanding of how micro scale processes shape groundwater ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susanne I; Cuthbert, Mark O; Schwientek, Marc

    2017-08-15

    Micro scale processes are expected to have a fundamental role in shaping groundwater ecosystems and yet they remain poorly understood and under-researched. In part, this is due to the fact that sampling is rarely carried out at the scale at which microorganisms, and their grazers and predators, function and thus we lack essential information. While set within a larger scale framework in terms of geochemical features, supply with energy and nutrients, and exchange intensity and dynamics, the micro scale adds variability, by providing heterogeneous zones at the micro scale which enable a wider range of redox reactions. Here we outline how understanding micro scale processes better may lead to improved appreciation of the range of ecosystems functions taking place at all scales. Such processes are relied upon in bioremediation and we demonstrate that ecosystem modelling as well as engineering measures have to take into account, and use, understanding at the micro scale. We discuss the importance of integrating faunal processes and computational appraisals in research, in order to continue to secure sustainable water resources from groundwater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding the Functions of Long Non-Coding RNAs through Their Higher-Order Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have been discovered in eukaryotes, very few molecular mechanisms have been characterized due to an insufficient understanding of lncRNA structure. Therefore, investigations of lncRNA structure and subsequent elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms are urgently needed. However, since lncRNA are high molecular weight molecules, which makes their crystallization difficult, obtaining information about their structure is extremely challenging, and the structures of only several lncRNAs have been determined so far. Here, we review the structure–function relationships of the widely studied lncRNAs found in the animal and plant kingdoms, focusing on the principles and applications of both in vitro and in vivo technologies for the study of RNA structures, including dimethyl sulfate-sequencing (DMS-seq, selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension-sequencing (SHAPE-seq, parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS, and fragmentation sequencing (FragSeq. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of lncRNA biological functions by studying them at the structural level.

  6. Ataxia cerebelar aguda na criança Acute cerebellar ataxia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 6 crianças com ataxia cerebelar aguda. Admitem os autores a presença de um fator etiológico de caráter viral comum a todos êles, discutindo os mecanismos patogênicos com base nos casos da literatura. A evolução foi favorável em todos os pacientes, com regressão completa da sintomatologia, dentro do período de 6 a 60 dias.Clinical observations of 6 children with acute cerebellar ataxia and respective laboratorial data are reported. Considerations are made in order to support the hypothesis of involving virus. The evolution of the disorder was a nonfatal one and the patients regained normal cerebellar function within a period of 6 to 60 days.

  7. Proposed diagnostic criteria for cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulewicz, David J; Roberts, Leslie; McLean, Catriona A; MacDougall, Hamish G; Halmagyi, G Michael; Storey, Elsdon

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosis of ataxic disorders is an important clinical challenge upon which prognostication, management, patient solace, and, above all, the hope of future treatment all rely. Heritable diseases and the possibility of affected offspring carry the added burden of portending adverse health, social and financial ramifications. Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is an inherited multisystem ataxia compromising cerebellar, vestibular, and sensory function. It is not uncommon, but despite early attempts the genetic defect is yet to be identified. As the search for the causative gene continues, we have found it useful to further define this syndrome in terms of its likely phenotype. We propose staged diagnostic criteria based on the identified pathology in CANVAS. We envisage that these criteria will aid the clinician in diagnosing CANVAS and the researcher in further elucidating this complex disorder.

  8. Cerebellar plasticity and motor learning deficits in a copy-number variation mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochon, Claire; Kloth, Alexander D; Grasselli, Giorgio; Titley, Heather K; Nakayama, Hisako; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Wan, Vivian; Simmons, Dana H; Eissa, Tahra; Nakatani, Jin; Cherskov, Adriana; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko; Takumi, Toru; Kano, Masanobu; Wang, Samuel S-H; Hansel, Christian

    2014-11-24

    A common feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the impairment of motor control and learning, occurring in a majority of children with autism, consistent with perturbation in cerebellar function. Here we report alterations in motor behaviour and cerebellar synaptic plasticity in a mouse model (patDp/+) for the human 15q11-13 duplication, one of the most frequently observed genetic aberrations in autism. These mice show ASD-resembling social behaviour deficits. We find that in patDp/+ mice delay eyeblink conditioning--a form of cerebellum-dependent motor learning--is impaired, and observe deregulation of a putative cellular mechanism for motor learning, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. Moreover, developmental elimination of surplus climbing fibres--a model for activity-dependent synaptic pruning--is impaired. These findings point to deficits in synaptic plasticity and pruning as potential causes for motor problems and abnormal circuit development in autism.

  9. Consumer understanding and use of health claims: the case of functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Azzurra; Mariani, Angela; Vecchio, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    As widely acknowledged functional foods (FFs) may contribute to improve human health due to the presence of specific components useful for their protective action against several diseases. However it is essential that consumers are able to comprehend and assess the properties of FFs health claims play a central role in helping consumers to select among food alternatives, beyond providing protection against unsupported or misleading statements about foods properties. At the same time health claims are the main marketing tool that the food industry could use to differentiate FFs from other products. Clearly, massive investments in research and development are necessary to enter the FF market segment, together with the possibility to protect innovation through patents. Current paper aims to examine factors influencing consumer understanding and use of food health claims on FFs, as well as providing several indications for developers, marketers and policy makers. After a brief review of the literature the results of a quantitative survey conducted online on 650 Italian consumers are presented. Results show that consumer use and understanding of health claims on FFs depend on different variables such as socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge and confidence with nutrition information but also wording and variables related specifically to the product. Furthermore, different segments with a diverse degree of use and understanding of health claims have been identified. Therefore, to boost market growth, more efforts are needed by policy makers and marketers to provide better information on nutrition and health aspects of FF using an approach capable to ensure truthful, significant and clear information. Finally some recent patents related to the FFs market with specific regard to components and/or functionality investigated in the current paper are reviewed.

  10. Cerebellar abiotrophy in a family of Border Collie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, J R; Slocombe, R E; Mitten, R W; Jedwab, D

    2002-11-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophies have a nonsex-linked, autosomal, recessively inherited basis in a number of species, and lesions typically reflect profound and progressive loss of Purkinje cells. In this report, an unusual form of abiotrophy is described for two sibling Border Collies. Extensive loss of the cerebellar granular cell layer was present with relative sparing of Purkinje cells of two female pups. The biochemical basis for this form of cerebellar abiotrophy is unknown, but the lack of disease in other siblings supports an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance.

  11. Ocular tilt reaction due to a cerebellar hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Kozue

    2014-01-01

    A 78-year-old man with essential hypertension abruptly developed complete ocular tilt reaction (OTR) which consisted of concomitant skew deviation with left hypertropia, extorsion of the right eye and intorsion of the left, and rightward head tilt. Cranial computed tomography demonstrated a localized cerebellar hemorrhage involving the left nodulus. The patient became asymptomatic within two weeks. This is a first reported case of complete OTR due to a cerebellar hemorrhage. Concomitant skew deviation is a common symptom of cerebellar lesions. Moreover, unilateral damage to the utricular pathway due to involvement of the left nodulus might cause rightward conjugate ocular torsion and rightward head tilt.

  12. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmezoğlu, K; Sperling, B; Henriksen, T

    1993-01-01

    Four patients with clinical signs of cerebellar stroke were studied twice by SPECT using 99mTc-HMPAO as a tracer for cerebral blood flow (CBF). When first scanned 6 to 22 days after onset, all had a region of very low CBF in the symptomatic cerebellar hemisphere, and a mild to moderate CBF...... reduction (average 10%) in contralateral hemispheric cortex. In all four cases clinical signs of unilateral cerebellar dysfunction were still present when rescanned 1 to 4 months later and the relative CBF decrease in the contralateral cortex of the forebrain also remained. The basal ganglia contralateral...

  13. From Cerebellar Activation and Connectivity to Cognition: A Review of the Quadrato Motor Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Dotan Ben-Soussan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the cerebellum is increasingly recognized, not only in motor control but also in cognitive learning and function. Nevertheless, the relationship between training-induced cerebellar activation and electrophysiological and structural changes in humans has yet to be established. In the current paper, we suggest a general model tying cerebellar function to cognitive improvement, via neuronal synchronization, as well as biochemical and anatomical changes. We then suggest that sensorimotor training provides an optimal paradigm to test the proposed model and review supporting evidence of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT, a sensorimotor training aimed at increasing attention and coordination. Subsequently, we discuss the possible mechanisms through which QMT may exert its beneficial effects on cognition (e.g., increased creativity, reflectivity, and reading, focusing on cerebellar alpha activity as a possible mediating mechanism allowing cognitive improvement, molecular and anatomical changes. Using the example of QMT research, this paper emphasizes the importance of investigating whole-body sensorimotor training paradigms utilizing a multidisciplinary approach and its implications to healthy brain development.

  14. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  15. Understanding human thiol dioxygenase enzymes: structure to function, and biology to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Bibekananda; Kulharia, Mahesh; Mantha, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a significant metabolic activity in humans, especially of sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine (Cys). Cys is cytotoxic and neurotoxic in nature; hence, mammalian cells maintain a constant intracellular level of Cys. Metabolism of Cys is mainly regulated by two thiol dioxygenases: cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and 2-aminoethanethiol dioxygenase (ADO). CDO and ADO are the only human thiol dioxygenases reported with a role in Cys metabolism and localized to mitochondria. This metabolic pathway is important in various human disorders, as it is responsible for the synthesis of antioxidant glutathione and is also for the synthesis of hypotaurine and taurine. CDO is the most extensively studied protein, whose high-resolution crystallographic structures have been solved. As compared to CDO, ADO is less studied, even though it has a key role in cysteamine metabolism. To further understand ADO's structure and function, the three-dimensional structures have been predicted from I-TASSER and SWISS-MODEL servers and validated with PROCHECK software. Structural superimposition approach using iPBA web server further confirmed near-identical structures (including active sites) for the predicted protein models of ADO as compared to CDO. In addition, protein-protein interaction and their association in patho-physiology are crucial in understanding protein functions. Both ADO and CDO interacting partner profiles have been presented using STRING database. In this study, we have predicted a 3D model structure for ADO and summarized the biological roles and the pathological consequences which are associated with the altered expression and functioning of ADO and CDO in case of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  16. Changes in cerebellar activity and inter-hemispheric coherence accompany improved reading performance following Quadrato Motor Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Avirame, Keren; Glicksohn, Joseph; Goldstein, Abraham; Harpaz, Yuval; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia is a multifactorial reading deficit that involves multiple brain systems. Among other theories, it has been suggested that cerebellar dysfunction may be involved in dyslexia. This theory has been supported by findings from anatomical and functional imaging. A possible rationale for cerebellar involvement in dyslexia could lie in the cerebellum's role as an oscillator, producing synchronized activity within neuronal networks including sensorimotor networks critical for reading. If these findings are causally related to dyslexia, a training regimen that enhances cerebellar oscillatory activity should improve reading performance. We examined the cognitive and neural effects of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT), a structured sensorimotor training program that involves sequencing of motor responses based on verbal commands. Twenty-two adult Hebrew readers (12 dyslexics and 10 controls) were recruited for the study. Using Magnetoencephalography (MEG), we measured changes in alpha power and coherence following QMT in a within-subject design. Reading performance was assessed pre- and post-training using a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. Our results demonstrate improved performance on a speeded reading task following one month of intensive QMT in both the dyslexic and control groups. Dyslexic participants, but not controls, showed significant increase in cerebellar oscillatory alpha power following training. In addition, across both time points, inter-hemispheric alpha coherence was higher in the dyslexic group compared to the control group. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the combination of motor and language training embedded in QMT increases cerebellar oscillatory activity in dyslexics and improves reading performance. These results support the hypothesis that the cerebellum plays a role in skilled reading, and begin to unravel the underlying mechanisms that mediate cerebellar contribution in cognitive and neuronal augmentation.

  17. Distinct roles of neuroepithelial-like and radial glia-like progenitor cells in cerebellar regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslin, Jan; Kroehne, Volker; Ganz, Julia; Hans, Stefan; Brand, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Zebrafish can regenerate after brain injury, and the regenerative process is driven by resident stem cells. Stem cells are heterogeneous in the vertebrate brain, but the significance of having heterogeneous stem cells in regeneration is not understood. Limited availability of specific stem cells might impair the regeneration of particular cell lineages. We studied regeneration of the adult zebrafish cerebellum, which contains two major stem and progenitor cell types: ventricular zone and neuroepithelial cells. Using conditional lineage tracing we demonstrate that cerebellar regeneration depends on the availability of specific stem cells. Radial glia-like cells are thought to be the predominant stem cell type in homeostasis and after injury. However, we find that radial glia-like cells play a minor role in adult cerebellar neurogenesis and in recovery after injury. Instead, we find that neuroepithelial cells are the predominant stem cell type supporting cerebellar regeneration after injury. Zebrafish are able to regenerate many, but not all, cell types in the cerebellum, which emphasizes the need to understand the contribution of different adult neural stem and progenitor cell subtypes in the vertebrate central nervous system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Is Cerebellar Architecture Shaped by Sensory Ecology in the New Zealand Kiwi (Apteryx mantelli).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Craciun, Iulia; Mulvany-Robbins, Bridget E; Wylie, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Among some mammals and birds, the cerebellar architecture appears to be adapted to the animal's ecological niche, particularly their sensory ecology and behavior. This relationship is, however, not well understood. To explore this, we examined the expression of zebrin II (ZII) in the cerebellum of the kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), a fully nocturnal bird with auditory, tactile, and olfactory specializations and a reduced visual system. We predicted that the cerebellar architecture, particularly those regions receiving visual inputs and those that receive trigeminal afferents from their beak, would be modified in accordance with their unique way of life. The general stripe-and-transverse region architecture characteristic of birds is present in kiwi, with some differences. Folium IXcd was characterized by large ZII-positive stripes and all Purkinje cells in the flocculus were ZII positive, features that resemble those of small mammals and suggest a visual ecology unlike that of other birds. The central region in kiwi appeared reduced or modified, with folium IV containing ZII+/- stripes, unlike that of most birds, but similar to that of Chilean tinamous. It is possible that a reduced visual system has contributed to a small central region, although increased trigeminal input and flightlessness have undoubtedly played a role in shaping its architecture. Overall, like in mammals, the cerebellar architecture in kiwi and other birds may be substantially modified to serve a particular ecological niche, although we still require a larger comparative data set to fully understand this relationship. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Understanding the bonding nature of uranyl ion and functionalized graphene: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wei, Yue-Zhou; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-03-20

    Studying the bonding nature of uranyl ion and graphene oxide (GO) is very important for understanding the mechanism of the removal of uranium from radioactive wastewater with GO-based materials. We have optimized 22 complexes between uranyl ion and GO applying density functional theory (DFT) combined with quasi-relativistic small-core pseudopotentials. The studied oxygen-containing functional groups include hydroxyl, carboxyl, amido, and dimethylformamide. It is observed that the distances between uranium atoms and oxygen atoms of GO (U-OG) are shorter in the anionic GO complexes (uranyl/GO(-/2-)) compared to the neutral GO ones (uranyl/GO). The formation of hydrogen bonds in the uranyl/GO(-/2-) complexes can enhance the binding ability of anionic GO toward uranyl ions. Furthermore, the thermodynamic calculations show that the changes of the Gibbs free energies in solution are relatively more negative for complexation reactions concerning the hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalized anionic GO complexes. Therefore, both the geometries and thermodynamic energies indicate that the binding abilities of uranyl ions toward GO modified by hydroxyl and carboxyl groups are much stronger compared to those by amido and dimethylformamide groups. This study can provide insights for designing new nanomaterials that can efficiently remove radionuclides from radioactive wastewater.

  20. Understanding the complexities of functional ability in Alzheimer's disease: more than just basic and instrumental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Coley, Nicola; Lepage, Benoit; Cantet, Christelle; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2014-05-01

    Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (AD) is defined by both cognitive and functional decline; new criteria allow for identification of milder, non-functionally impaired patients. Understanding loss of autonomy in AD is essential, as later stages represent a significant burden and cost to patients, their families, and society. The purpose of the present analyses was to determine the factor structure of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADCS-ADL) in a cohort of AD patients. Baseline ADCS-ADL assessments of 734 AD patients from the PLASA study were included in an exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Because the ADCS-ADL was designed to assess change over time, change from baseline scores over 2 years were also analyzed using an EFA. Factorial solutions were evaluated based on cross-loading, non-loadings, and number of items per factor. Mean age at baseline was 79.3, mean MMSE was 19.8 and 73.3% of participants were female. Baseline data suggested a 4-factor solution that included factors for basic ADLs (BADLs), domestic/household activities, communication/engagement with the environment, and outside activities. The change scores EFA suggested a 2-factor solution of BADLs and instrumental ADLs (IADLs). Distinct factors of IADLs should be considered for further validation as areas of attention to catch early functional decline.

  1. Understanding multicellular function and disease with human tissue-specific networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Casey S.; Krishnan, Arjun; Wong, Aaron K.; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Zelaya, Rene A.; Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Zhang, Ran; Hartmann, Boris M.; Zaslavsky, Elena; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Dolinski, Kara; Grosser, Tilo; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and cell-type identity lie at the core of human physiology and disease. Understanding the genetic underpinnings of complex tissues and individual cell lineages is crucial for developing improved diagnostics and therapeutics. We present genome-wide functional interaction networks for 144 human tissues and cell types developed using a data-driven Bayesian methodology that integrates thousands of diverse experiments spanning tissue and disease states. Tissue-specific networks predict lineage-specific responses to perturbation, reveal genes’ changing functional roles across tissues, and illuminate disease-disease relationships. We introduce NetWAS, which combines genes with nominally significant GWAS p-values and tissue-specific networks to identify disease-gene associations more accurately than GWAS alone. Our webserver, GIANT, provides an interface to human tissue networks through multi-gene queries, network visualization, analysis tools including NetWAS, and downloadable networks. GIANT enables systematic exploration of the landscape of interacting genes that shape specialized cellular functions across more than one hundred human tissues and cell types. PMID:25915600

  2. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Thibaut

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation—TMS and brain oscillations (electroencephalography—EEG. In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold—MT—of the affected and unaffected sides and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery.

  3. Unilateral absence of cerebellar hemisphere: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdogan, N.; Ozturk, O. [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri (Turkey); Kocakoc, E. [Department of Radiology, Women' s Hospital, Sivas (Turkey); Bekar, D. [Department of Neurology, City Hospital, Sivas (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a 38-year-old woman with absence of right cerebellar hemisphere incidentally discovered by MR imaging. No cerebellar abnormality was detected on neurological examination. Tissue probably representing dysgenetic cerebellar tissue with no corticomedullary differentiation was present, connected to the right superior cerebellar peduncle. Ipsilateral enlargement of the pons and cerebral peduncle were additional findings. Although the terms ''aplasia'' or ''agenesis'' have been used to describe this entity, intrauterine destruction is the presumed pathogenetic mechanism in our case, and therefore these terms have been avoided. Asymmetry of pons and mesencephalon may be related to compensatory reorganisation or to the impairment of sequential development of nuclei and neural tracts. (orig.)

  4. Asterixis as a Presentation of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gallelli, Luca; Di Benedetto, Olindo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Asterixis is not yet considered a common neurological sign of cerebellum infarction, and the pathogenic mechanism for asterixis remains elusive. We report a 58-year-old male with moderate hypertension who presented to our emergency department for acute headache in both cervical and occipital regions of the left side. About 2 hours later the patient developed ipsilateral asterixis in the upper left limb; 3 days later the asterixis disappeared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed cerebellar infarctions at the left superior cerebellar artery. In conclusion, we observed that a transitory asterixis associated with ipsilateral headache can be an initial clinical manifestation of ipsilateral cerebellar infarctions in the superior cerebellar artery area. PMID:23359270

  5. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  6. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmezoğlu, K; Sperling, B; Henriksen, T

    1993-01-01

    Four patients with clinical signs of cerebellar stroke were studied twice by SPECT using 99mTc-HMPAO as a tracer for cerebral blood flow (CBF). When first scanned 6 to 22 days after onset, all had a region of very low CBF in the symptomatic cerebellar hemisphere, and a mild to moderate CBF...... reduction (average 10%) in contralateral hemispheric cortex. In all four cases clinical signs of unilateral cerebellar dysfunction were still present when rescanned 1 to 4 months later and the relative CBF decrease in the contralateral cortex of the forebrain also remained. The basal ganglia contralateral...... to the cerebellar lesion CBF showed variable alterations. A relative CBF decrease was seen in upper part of basal ganglia in all four cases, but it was not a constant phenomenon. A relative CBF increase in both early and late SPECT scans was seen at low levels of neostriatum in two cases. The remote CBF changes...

  7. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  8. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  9. Anomalous cerebellar anatomy in Chinese children with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hui eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia (DD claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia.

  10. Mitotic events in cerebellar granule progenitor cells that expand cerebellar surface area are critical for normal cerebellar cortical lamination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-03-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereologic principles. We demonstrate that, during the proliferative phase of the external granular layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that, during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β events lie upstream of α events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify intermitotic times for β events on a per-cell basis in postnatal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereologic studies.

  11. Using Sandia's Z Machine and Density Functional Theory Simulations to Understand Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2017-06-01

    The use of Z, NIF, and Omega have produced many breakthrough results in high pressure physics. One area that has greatly benefited from these facilities is the planetary sciences. The high pressure behavior of planetary materials has implications for numerous geophysical and planetary processes. The continuing discovery of exosolar super-Earths demonstrates the need for accurate equation of state data to better inform our models of their interior structures. Planetary collision processes, such as the moon-forming giant impact, require understanding planetary materials over a wide-range of pressures and temperatures. Using Z, we examined the shock compression response of some common planetary materials: MgO, Mg2SiO4, and Fe2O3 (hematite). We compare the experimental shock compression measurements with density functional theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. The combination of experiment and theory provides clearer understanding of planetary materials properties at extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Metabolomics: An Essential Tool to Understand the Function of Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanez, Jessica E.; Peters, Jeffrey M.; Correll, Jared B.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Patterson, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear hormone transcription factors (PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ) is regulated by a wide array of ligands including natural and synthetic chemicals. PPARs have important roles in control of energy metabolism and are known to influence inflammation, differentiation, carcinogenesis, and chemical toxicity. As such, PPARs have been targeted as therapy for common disorders such as cancer, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes. The recent application of metabolomics, or the global, unbiased measurement of small molecules found in biofluids, or extracts from cells, tissues, or organisms, has advanced our understanding of the varied and important roles that the PPARs have in normal physiology as well as in pathophysiological processes. Continued development and refinement of analytical platforms, and the application of new bioinformatics strategies, have accelerated the widespread use of metabolomics and have allowed further integration of small molecules into systems biology. Recent studies using metabolomics to understand PPARα function, as well as to identify PPARα biomarkers associated with drug efficacy/toxicity and drug-induced liver injury, will be discussed. PMID:23197196

  13. Transient cerebellopontine demyelinisation revealed by MRI in acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufricht, C.A.; Tenner, W.; Rosenmayr, F.; Stiglbauer, R.

    1990-01-01

    An eight year old boy was admitted to our ward with a history of abrupt onset of rapidly progressive gait disorder, nausea, vertigo and vomiting. The clinical as well as the laboratory findings suggested the diagnosis of acute cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, showed marked demyelinisation in the cerebellar region and visual evoked potentials were pathologic. After immunosuppression the patient promptly improved clinically and the lesions depicted by MRI disappeared almost completely. (orig.)

  14. Caspase-mediated apoptosis induction in zebrafish cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Winter, Barbara; Müller-Brown, Karina; Kühn, Ralf; Wurst, Wolfgang; Köster, Reinhard W

    2016-11-15

    The zebrafish is a well-established model organism in which to study in vivo mechanisms of cell communication, differentiation and function. Existing cell ablation methods are either invasive or they rely on the cellular expression of prokaryotic enzymes and the use of antibiotic drugs as cell death-inducing compounds. We have recently established a novel inducible genetic cell ablation system based on tamoxifen-inducible Caspase 8 activity, thereby exploiting mechanisms of cell death intrinsic to most cell types. Here, we prove its suitability in vivo by monitoring the ablation of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in transgenic zebrafish that co-express the inducible caspase and a fluorescent reporter. Incubation of larvae in tamoxifen for 8 h activated endogenous Caspase 3 and cell death, whereas incubation for 16 h led to the near-complete loss of PCs by apoptosis. We observed synchronous cell death autonomous to the PC population and phagocytosing microglia in the cerebellum, reminiscent of developmental apoptosis in the forebrain. Thus, induction of apoptosis through targeted activation of caspase by tamoxifen (ATTAC TM ) further expands the repertoire of genetic tools for conditional interrogation of cellular functions. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Pharmacotherapy of vestibular and cerebellar disorders and downbeat nystagmus: translational and back-translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupp, Michael; Zwergal, Andreas; Feil, Katharina; Bremova, Tatiana; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    There are currently eight groups of drugs for the pharmacotherapy of vertigo, nystagmus, and cerebellar disorders: antiemetics; anti-inflammatories, antimenieres, and antimigraineous medications; antidepressants, anticonvulsants, aminopyridines, and acetyl-DL-leucine ("the eight A's"). In acute unilateral vestibulopathy, corticosteroids improve the recovery of peripheral vestibular function, but there is not sufficient current evidence for a general recommendation. There is also insufficient evidence that 48 or 144 mg/day betahistine has an effect in Ménière's disease. Therefore, higher dosages are currently recommended; in animal studies, it was shown that betahistine increases cochlear blood flow. In vestibular paroxysmia, oxcarbazepine was effective (one yet not randomized controlled trial (RCT)). Aminopyridines are recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus (two RCTs) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, one RCT). There are so far no RCTs on vestibular migraine, so currently no treatment can be recommended. Acetyl-dl-leucine improves cerebellar ataxia (three observational studies); it also accelerates central compensation in an animal model of acute unilateral lesion, but RCTs were negative. There are ongoing RCTs on vestibular paroxysmia with carbamazepine (VESPA), acute unilateral vestibulopathy with betahistine (BETAVEST), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with vitamin D (VitD@BPPV), EA2 with 4-aminopyridine versus acetazolamide (EAT-2-TREAT), and cerebellar ataxias with acetyl-DL-leucine (ALCAT). © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Cerebellar activation in verb generation. Activation study with positron emission tomography in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Eriko [Inst. for Rehabilitation and Mental Health, Kyowa, Akita (Japan); Kanno, Iwao; Sadato, Norihiro; Senda, Michio; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagata, Ken

    1999-06-01

    To investigate the role of cerebellum in language function, we used the silent verb generation task in PET activation study. Subjects were 11 right-handed, healthy men with the mean age of 24.3. We used two experimental conditions, resting state and verb generation, and measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) alternately and repeatedly, three times for each condition. In the verb generation task, the subject was asked to silently think of as many verbs associated with auditorily given noun as he could. The subtraction image between verb generation and resting state showed activation foci at the left inferior to middle frontal lobe as well as temporal lobe in the supratentorium, consistent with previous studies. In the infratentorium, there were significant foci at bilateral cerebellar hemisphere and brain stem, which was predominantly seen over the right cerebellum. Activations were seen in the superior-lateral part of the right cerebellar hemisphere including the right dentate nucleus, and in the inferior-lateral part of the left cerebellar hemisphere. The amount of CBF increase by the task as compared with the resting condition in the upper cerebellum showed an increasing trend from the first to the third measurement. The present results suggest specific roles of the cerebellum in word retrieval as well as the practice-related changes during verbal learning. (author)

  17. Cerebellar activation in verb generation. Activation study with positron emission tomography in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Eriko; Kanno, Iwao; Sadato, Norihiro; Senda, Michio; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagata, Ken

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the role of cerebellum in language function, we used the silent verb generation task in PET activation study. Subjects were 11 right-handed, healthy men with the mean age of 24.3. We used two experimental conditions, resting state and verb generation, and measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) alternately and repeatedly, three times for each condition. In the verb generation task, the subject was asked to silently think of as many verbs associated with auditorily given noun as he could. The subtraction image between verb generation and resting state showed activation foci at the left inferior to middle frontal lobe as well as temporal lobe in the supratentorium, consistent with previous studies. In the infratentorium, there were significant foci at bilateral cerebellar hemisphere and brain stem, which was predominantly seen over the right cerebellum. Activations were seen in the superior-lateral part of the right cerebellar hemisphere including the right dentate nucleus, and in the inferior-lateral part of the left cerebellar hemisphere. The amount of CBF increase by the task as compared with the resting condition in the upper cerebellum showed an increasing trend from the first to the third measurement. The present results suggest specific roles of the cerebellum in word retrieval as well as the practice-related changes during verbal learning. (author)

  18. Neurochemical, pharmacological, and developmental studies on cerebellar receptors for dicarboxylic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, N.A.; Roberts, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding of L-[ 3 H]glutamate ([ 3 H]Glu) and L[ 3 H]Asp) to cerebellar membranes represented a time-, temperature-, pH- and protein-dependent interaction which was both saturable and reversible. Binding sites for both radioligands appeared maximally enriched in synaptosomal fractions isolated by gradient centrifugation. Kinetically derived dissociation constant (K/sub off//K/sub on/ . K/sub d/) for [ 3 H]Glu binding to this fraction indicated high-affinity (433 nM). Competition experiments employing analogs of excitatory amino acids, including new antagonists, helped identify binding sites for [ 3 H]Glu and [ 3 H]Asp as receptors with differential pharmacological specificities. Membrane freezing reduced numbers of both receptor types, but binding activity could be recovered partially by incubation at 37 degrees C. Glu receptors exhibited a pronounced deleterious sensitivity to thiol modifying reagents and L-Glu (50-1000 microM) provided protection against these compounds during co-incubation with cerebellar membranes. It is suggested that cold storage may induce partially reversible receptor inactivation by promoting sulfhydryl group/bond modification. Rat cerebellar glutamatergic function (endogenous Glu content, Glu uptake and receptor sites) exhibited an apparent ontogenetic peak between days 8-12 postpartum with a plateauing profile from day 30 to adulthood. The accelerated development (days 8-12) coincides with the first demonstrable Glu release and kainic acid neurotoxicity, as described previously

  19. Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) - a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figura, Monika; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Kolasa, Anna; Janik, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    CANVAS (cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome) is a rare neurological syndrome of unknown etiology. The main clinical features include bilateral vestibulopathy, cerebellar ataxia and sensory neuropathy. An abnormal visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex is the hallmark of the disease. We present a case of 58-year-old male patient who has demonstrated gait disturbance, imbalance and paresthesia of feet for 2 years. On examination ataxia of gait, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, absence of plantar reflexes, fasciculations of thigh muscles, gaze-evoked downbeat nystagmus and abnormal visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex were found. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebellar atrophy. Vestibular function testing showed severely reduced horizontal nystagmus in response to bithermal caloric stimulation. Nerve conduction study revealed loss of upper and lower limb sensory nerve action potentials. The course of illness was progressive with ataxic gait and unsteadiness as the most disabling symptoms. We report 4-year follow-up of the patient since the beginning of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Audiovestibular loss in anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction: a window to early detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung

    2012-02-15

    Acute audiovestibular loss is a common neurotological condition that is characterized by sudden onset of severe prolonged (lasting days) vertigo and hearing loss and is diagnosed by the presence of canal paresis to caloric stimulation and sensorineural hearing loss on pure tone audiogram. Before 2000, papers on anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory infarction focused mostly on associated brainstem and cerebellar findings, without a detailed description of neurotological findings. Since 2000, several reports have demonstrated that acute audiovestibular loss is an important sign for the diagnosis of AICA territory infarction. To date, at least eight subgroups of AICA infarction have been identified according to the pattern of neurotological presentations, among which the most common pattern of audiovestibular dysfunction is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Because audiovestibular loss may occur in isolation before ponto-cerebellar infarction involving AICA distribution, audiovestibular loss may serve as a window to prevent the progression of acute audiovestibular loss into more widespread areas of infarction in posterior circulation (mainly in the AICA territory). Clinician should keep in mind that acute audiovestibular loss may herald impending AICA territory infarction, especially when patients had basilar artery occlusive disease presumably close to the origin of the AICA on brain MRA, even if other central signs are absent and MRI does not demonstrate acute infarction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marie K; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV), serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  2. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie K Bosch

    Full Text Available Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV, serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES, a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  3. Altered Cerebellar Activity in Visceral Pain-Related Fear Conditioning in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, J; Labrenz, F; Ernst, T M; Icenhour, A; Langhorst, J; Forsting, M; Timmann, D; Elsenbruch, S

    2017-04-01

    There is evidence to support a role of the cerebellum in emotional learning processes, which are demonstrably altered in patients with chronic pain. We tested if cerebellar activation is altered during visceral pain-related fear conditioning and extinction in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Cerebellar blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data from N = 17 IBS patients and N = 21 healthy controls, collected as part of a previous fMRI study, was reanalyzed utilizing an advanced normalizing method of the cerebellum. The differential fear conditioning paradigm consisted of acquisition, extinction, and reinstatement phases. During acquisition, two visual conditioned stimuli (CS) were presented either paired (CS+) or unpaired (CS-) with painful rectal distension as unconditioned stimulus (US). In the extinction phase, the CS+ and CS- were presented without US. For reinstatement, unpaired US presentations were followed by unpaired CS+ and CS- presentations. Group differences in cerebellar activation were analyzed for the contrasts CS+ > CS- and CS- > CS+. During acquisition, IBS patients revealed significantly enhanced cerebellar BOLD responses to pain-predictive (CS+) and safety (CS-) cues compared to controls (p  CS- and CS- > CS+. Group differences were most prominent in the contrast CS- > CS+. During extinction and reinstatement, no significant group differences were found. During visceral pain-related fear conditioning, IBS patients showed increased activations in circumscribed areas of the medial, intermediate, and lateral cerebellum. These areas are involved in autonomic, somatosensory, and cognitive functions and likely contribute to the different aspects of pain-related fear. The cerebellum contributes to altered pain-related fear learning in IBS.

  4. Distinct cerebellar lobules process arousal, valence and their interaction in parallel following a temporal hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliadis, Charis; Ioannides, Andreas A; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Papadelis, Christos

    2015-04-15

    The cerebellum participates in emotion-related neural circuits formed by different cortical and subcortical areas, which sub-serve arousal and valence. Recent neuroimaging studies have shown a functional specificity of cerebellar lobules in the processing of emotional stimuli. However, little is known about the temporal component of this process. The goal of the current study is to assess the spatiotemporal profile of neural responses within the cerebellum during the processing of arousal and valence. We hypothesized that the excitation and timing of distinct cerebellar lobules is influenced by the emotional content of the stimuli. By using magnetoencephalography, we recorded magnetic fields from twelve healthy human individuals while passively viewing affective pictures rated along arousal and valence. By using a beamformer, we localized gamma-band activity in the cerebellum across time and we related the foci of activity to the anatomical organization of the cerebellum. Successive cerebellar activations were observed within distinct lobules starting ~160ms after the stimuli onset. Arousal was processed within both vermal (VI and VIIIa) and hemispheric (left Crus II) lobules. Valence (left VI) and its interaction (left V and left Crus I) with arousal were processed only within hemispheric lobules. Arousal processing was identified first at early latencies (160ms) and was long-lived (until 980ms). In contrast, the processing of valence and its interaction to arousal was short lived at later stages (420-530ms and 570-640ms respectively). Our findings provide for the first time evidence that distinct cerebellar lobules process arousal, valence, and their interaction in a parallel yet temporally hierarchical manner determined by the emotional content of the stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Shaping pseudoneglect with transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation and music listening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia ePicazio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive brain stimulation modulates cortical excitability depending on the initial activation state of the structure being stimulated. Combination of cognitive with neurophysiological stimulations has been successfully employed to modulate responses of specific brain regions. The present research combined a neurophysiological pre-conditioning with a cognitive conditioning stimulation to modulate behavior. We applied this new state-dependency approach to investigate the cerebellar role in musical and spatial information processing, given that a link between musical perception and visuo-spatial abilities and a clear cerebellar involvement in music perception and visuo-spatial tasks have been reported. Cathodal, anodal or sham transcranial cerebellar Direct Current Stimulation (tcDCS pre-conditioning was applied on the left cerebellar hemisphere followed by conditioning stimulation through music or white noise listening in a sample of healthy subjects performing a Line Bisection Task (LBT. The combination of the cathodal stimulation with music listening resulted in a marked attentional shift toward the right hemispace, compensating thus the natural leftward bias of the baseline condition (pseudoneglect. Conversely, the anodal or sham pre-conditioning stimulations combined with either music and white noise conditioning listening did not modulate spatial attention. The efficacy of the combined stimulation (cathodal pre-conditioning and music conditioning and the absence of any effect of the single stimulations provide a strong support to the state-dependency theory. They propose that tcDCS in combination with music listening could act as a rehabilitative tool to improve cognitive functions in the presence of neglect or other spatial disorders.

  6. Shaping pseudoneglect with transcranial cerebellar direct current stimulation and music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazio, Silvia; Granata, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura; Oliveri, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation modulates cortical excitability depending on the initial activation state of the structure being stimulated. Combination of cognitive with neurophysiological stimulations has been successfully employed to modulate responses of specific brain regions. The present research combined a neurophysiological pre-conditioning with a cognitive conditioning stimulation to modulate behavior. We applied this new state-dependency approach to investigate the cerebellar role in musical and spatial information processing, given that a link between musical perception and visuo-spatial abilities and a clear cerebellar involvement in music perception and visuo-spatial tasks have been reported. Cathodal, anodal or sham transcranial cerebellar Direct Current Stimulation (tcDCS) pre-conditioning was applied on the left cerebellar hemisphere followed by conditioning stimulation through music or white noise listening in a sample of healthy subjects performing a Line Bisection Task (LBT). The combination of the cathodal stimulation with music listening resulted in a marked attentional shift toward the right hemispace, compensating thus the natural leftward bias of the baseline condition (pseudoneglect). Conversely, the anodal or sham pre-conditioning stimulations combined with either music and white noise conditioning listening did not modulate spatial attention. The efficacy of the combined stimulation (cathodal pre-conditioning and music conditioning) and the absence of any effect of the single stimulations provide a strong support to the state-dependency theory. They propose that tcDCS in combination with music listening could act as a rehabilitative tool to improve cognitive functions in the presence of neglect or other spatial disorders.

  7. Reduced contralateral hemispheric flow measured by SPECT in cerebellar lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soenmezoglu, K.; Sperling, B.; Lassen, N.A.; Henriksen, T.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Four patients with clinical signs of cerebellar stroke were studied twice by SPECT using 99m Tc-HMPAO as a tracer for cerebral blood flow (CBF). When first scanned 6 to 22 days after onset, all had a region of very low CBF in the symptomatic cerebellar hemisphere, and a mild to moderate CBF reduction (average 10%) in contralateral hemispheric cortex. In all four cases clinical signs of unilateral cerebellar dysfunction were still present when rescanned 1 to 4 months later and the relative CBF decrease in the contralateral cortex of the forebrain also remained. The basal ganglia contralateral to the cerebellar lesion CBF showed variable alterations. A relative CBF decrease was seen in upper part of basal ganglia in all four cases, but it was not a constant phenomenon. A relative CBF increase in both early and late SPECT scans was seen at low levels of neostriatum in two cases. The remote CBF changes in cerebellar stroke seen in the forebrain are probably caused by reduced or abolished cerebellar output. The term ''Crossed Cerebral Diaschisis'' may be used to describe these CBF changes that would appear to reflect both decreased and increased neuronal activity. (au)

  8. Sonographic maturation of third-trimester cerebellar foliation after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsten, Alex; Lequin, Maarten; Govaert, Paul

    2006-05-01

    The development of cerebellar folia of third-trimester preterms has not been described with ultrasound before. We set out to determine normal development of the pons and cerebellar folia for future measurements of hypoplasia and atrophy. Study sonograms were made in preterms admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit with postmenstrual age (PMA) from 25 wk until term. On a weekly basis, transcranial measurements were made in the axial and coronal planes at the asterion with high-frequency transducers (8.5 and 13 MHz). The axial images showed the pons and fourth ventricle. The coronal images showed cerebellar folia and white matter. In the same coronal plane, the depth of cerebellar fissures at the rostral cerebellar convexity could be observed. A total of 172 cranial sonograms were performed on 98 neonates. The development of folia could be measured with ultrasound through the asterion. We showed that pons area, mean of three fissure depths, hemisphere area, and number of folia in the horizontal fissure correlated significantly with PMA. Hemisphere area described the same trend of growth as the transverse cerebellar diameter used in fetal sonography.

  9. Gait and Cognition: A Complementary Approach to Understanding Brain Function and the Risk of Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Verghese, Joe; Beauchet, Olivier; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, clinicians and researchers have performed gait assessments and cognitive assessments separately when evaluating older adults. Increasing evidence from clinical practice, epidemiological studies, and clinical trials shows that gait and cognition are inter-related in older adults. Quantifiable alterations in gait among older adults are associated with falls, dementia, and disability. At the same time, emerging evidence indicates that early disturbances in cognitive processes such as attention, executive function, and working memory are associated with slower gait and gait instability during single and dual-task testing, and that these cognitive disturbances assist in the prediction of future mobility loss, falls, and progression to dementia. This paper reviews the importance of the gait-cognition inter-relationship in aging and presents evidence that gait assessments can provide a window into the understanding of cognitive function and dysfunctions, and fall risk in older people in clinical practice. To this end, the benefits of dual-task gait assessments (e.g., walking while performing an attention-demanding task) as a marker of fall risk are summarized. Further, we also present a potential complementary approach for reducing the risk of falls by improving certain aspects of cognition through both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Untangling the relationship between early gait disturbances and early cognitive changes may be helpful for identifying older adults at higher risk of experiencing mobility decline, falls and the progression to dementia. PMID:23110433

  10. Gait and cognition: a complementary approach to understanding brain function and the risk of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Verghese, Joe; Beauchet, Olivier; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, clinicians and researchers have performed gait assessments and cognitive assessments separately when evaluating older adults, but increasing evidence from clinical practice, epidemiological studies, and clinical trials shows that gait and cognition are interrelated in older adults. Quantifiable alterations in gait in older adults are associated with falls, dementia, and disability. At the same time, emerging evidence indicates that early disturbances in cognitive processes such as attention, executive function, and working memory are associated with slower gait and gait instability during single- and dual-task testing and that these cognitive disturbances assist in the prediction of future mobility loss, falls, and progression to dementia. This article reviews the importance of the interrelationship between gait and cognition in aging and presents evidence that gait assessments can provide a window into the understanding of cognitive function and dysfunction and fall risk in older people in clinical practice. To this end, the benefits of dual-task gait assessments (e.g., walking while performing an attention-demanding task) as a marker of fall risk are summarized. A potential complementary approach for reducing the risk of falls by improving certain aspects of cognition through nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments is also presented. Untangling the relationship between early gait disturbances and early cognitive changes may be helpful in identifying older adults at risk of experiencing mobility decline, falls, and progression to dementia. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Understanding the Role of Negative Emotions in Adult Learning and Achievement: A Social Functional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna D. Rowe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of emotions in adult learning and achievement has received increasing attention in recent years. However, much of the emphasis has been on test anxiety, rather than the wider spectrum of negative emotions such as sadness, grief, boredom and anger. This paper reports findings of a qualitative study exploring the experience and functionality of negative emotions at university. Thirty-six academic staff and students from an Australian university were interviewed about emotional responses to a range of learning events. Data analysis was informed by a prototype approach to emotion research. Four categories of discrete negative emotions (anger, sadness, fear, boredom were considered by teachers and students to be especially salient in learning, with self-conscious emotions (guilt, embarrassment, shame mentioned by more students than staff. While negative emotions were frequently viewed as detrimental to motivation, performance and learning, they were also construed under some circumstances as beneficial. The findings are discussed in relation to the value of social functional approaches for a better understanding of the diverse roles of negative emotions in learning and achievement.

  12. Understanding the Role of Negative Emotions in Adult Learning and Achievement: A Social Functional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Anna D; Fitness, Julie

    2018-02-20

    The role of emotions in adult learning and achievement has received increasing attention in recent years. However, much of the emphasis has been on test anxiety, rather than the wider spectrum of negative emotions such as sadness, grief, boredom and anger. This paper reports findings of a qualitative study exploring the experience and functionality of negative emotions at university. Thirty-six academic staff and students from an Australian university were interviewed about emotional responses to a range of learning events. Data analysis was informed by a prototype approach to emotion research. Four categories of discrete negative emotions (anger, sadness, fear, boredom) were considered by teachers and students to be especially salient in learning, with self-conscious emotions (guilt, embarrassment, shame) mentioned by more students than staff. While negative emotions were frequently viewed as detrimental to motivation, performance and learning, they were also construed under some circumstances as beneficial. The findings are discussed in relation to the value of social functional approaches for a better understanding of the diverse roles of negative emotions in learning and achievement.

  13. Understanding recovery: changes in the relationships of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) components over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A M; Perruccio, A V; Ibrahim, S; Hogg-Johnson, S; Wong, R; Badley, E M

    2012-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework describes human functioning through body structure and function, activity and participation in the context of a person's social and physical environment. This work tested the temporal relationships of these components. Our hypotheses were: 1) there would be associations among physical impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions within time; 2) prior status of a component would be associated with future status; 3) prior status of one component would influence status of a second component (e.g. prior activity limitations would be associated with current participation restrictions); and, 4) the magnitude of the within time relationships of the components would vary over time. Participants from Canada with primary hip or knee joint replacement (n = 931), an intervention with predictable improvement in pain and disability, completed standardized outcome measures pre-surgery and five times in the first year post-surgery. These included physical impairment (pain), activity limitations and participation restrictions. ICF component relationships were evaluated cross-sectionally and longitudinally using path analysis adjusting for age, sex, BMI, hip vs. knee, low back pain and mood. All component scores improved significantly over time. The path coefficients supported the hypotheses in that both within and across time, physical impairment was associated with activity limitation and activity limitation was associated with participation restriction; prior status and change in a component were associated with current status in another component; and, the magnitude of the path coefficients varied over time with stronger associations among components to three months post surgery than later in recovery with the exception of the association between impairment and participation restrictions which was of similar magnitude at all times. This work enhances understanding of the

  14. Diagnosis problems of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Shnaider

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare form of the paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS. PCD is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS affecting the Purkinje cells and possibly other cells of the cerebellum. PCD is characterized by a rapid onset resulting in disability for a few days or weeks; a slow progredient increase in cerebellar symptomatology is observed less often. PCD develops in 1–3% of cancer patients; its fraction accounts for 25% of all forms of PNS. The mean incidence rate of PCD is about 2 cases per 1,000 cancer patients. PCD develops in patients with cancer of the ovary, uterus and fallopian tubes, with small cell lung cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma. The incidence rate among females is 3 times higher than that among males. Females aged 50–65 years are most likely to suffer from PCD. PCDs are divided into four main subgroups that differ in terms of prognosis and range of associated antineuronal antibodies. In the last decade, different classes of anti-onconeuronal antibodies associated with PCD have been described; 9 of them have been best studied. Anti-Yo and anti-Hu antibodies are most frequently detected upon PCD. PCD can be also diagnosed without anti-onconeuronal antibodies associated with it or their titer in the blood can be low. Differential diagnosis of PCD is complex and is conducted for a wide range of CNS diseases. No single approach to treating PCD currently exists. Surgical removal of the tumor, the source of production of anti-onconeuronal antigens, followed by radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, does not solve the problem completely, but may reduce severity of the clinical manifestations of PCD or stabilize the pathological process. This explains the need for rapid and profound search for a tumor in patients suspected with PCD. The authors described a clinical case of an acute debut of PCD in 47-year-old female, 6 months after which, the patient was diagnosed with breast

  15. Urban Ecological Stewardship: Understanding the Structure, Function and Network of Community-based Urban Land Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based urban land managers, an assessment was conducted in 2004 by the research subcommittee of the Urban Ecology Collaborative. The goal of the assessment was to better understand the role of stewardship organizations engaged in urban ecology initiatives in selected major cities in the Northeastern U.S.: Boston, New Haven, New York City, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. A total of 135 active organizations participated in this assessment. Findings include the discovery of a dynamic social network operating within cities, and a reserve of social capital and expertise that could be better utilized. Although often not the primary land owner, stewardship groups take an increasingly significant responsibility for a wide range of land use types including street and riparian corridors, vacant lots, public parks and gardens, green roofs, etc. Responsibilities include the delivery of public programs as well as daily maintenance and fundraising support. While most of the environmental stewardship organizations operate on staffs of zero or fewer than ten, with small cohorts of community volunteers, there is a significant difference in the total amount of program funding. Nearly all respondents agree that committed resources are scarce and insufficient with stewards relying upon and potentially competing for individual donations, local foundations, and municipal support. This makes it a challenge for the groups to grow beyond their current capacity and to develop long-term programs critical to resource management and education. It also fragments groups, making it difficult for planners and

  16. Cerebellar herniation after cervical transforaminal epidural injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, William A; Mendez, Robert J; Paine, Gregory F; Mazzilli, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to inform readers of potential catastrophic complications associated with performing cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. A 31-year-old man presented to the pain clinic with a history of cervical radicular pain and right upper-extremity radicular symptoms. He was referred from the orthopedic spine clinic for evaluation for epidural steroid injection, having failed conservative treatment consisting of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, oral steroids, and physical therapy. After undergoing a transforaminal epidural steroid injection at the right C8 nerve root, he developed a cerebellar infarct and brainstem herniation. He survived but has residual deficits of persistent diplopia on right lateral gaze and difficulties with short-term memory loss and concentration. Although transforaminal epidural steroid injections are an efficacious treatment for radicular syndromes, there can be catastrophic complications. In light of the growing body of similar case reports, further investigation is warranted to establish a safe protocol for the use of this modality.

  17. Inferior cerebellar peduncular lesion causes a distinct vestibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J-H; Seo, J-D; Choi, Y R; Kim, M-J; Kim, H-J; Kim, J S; Choi, K-D

    2015-07-01

    The inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP) contains various fibres to and from the cerebellum relating to the integration of the proprioceptive and vestibular functions. However, the full clinical features of isolated unilateral ICP lesions have not been defined in humans. Eight consecutive patients with isolated unilateral ICP lesions at the pontine level (six with stroke, one with multiple sclerosis and one with brainstem encephalitis) received bedside neurological and neuro-otological evaluations and underwent laboratory tests including measurements of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and ocular torsion, bithermal caloric tests and pure tone audiometry. All patients developed isolated acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) with ipsilesional spontaneous nystagmus (n = 7) and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (OTR) and/or SVV tilt (n = 7). In view of the normal head impulse test in all patients and skew deviation in one, our patients met the criteria for AVS from central lesions. Five patients showed a directional dissociation between the OTR/SVV tilt and body lateropulsion that fell to the lesion side whilst the OTR/SVVtilt was contraversive. A unilateral ICP lesion at the pontine level leads to the development of isolated AVS. However, a negative head impulse test and directional dissociation between OTR/SVV tilt and body lateropulsion may distinguish lesions involving unilateral ICP at the pontine level from those affecting other vestibular structures. © 2015 EAN.

  18. Cerebellar atrophy in neurodegeneration-a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellersen, Helena M; Guo, Christine C; O'Callaghan, Claire; Tan, Rachel H; Sami, Saber; Hornberger, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The cerebellum has strong cortical and subcortical connectivity, but is rarely taken into account for clinical diagnosis in many neurodegenerative conditions, particularly in the absence of clinical ataxia. The current meta-analysis aims to assess patterns of cerebellar grey matter atrophy in seven neurodegenerative conditions (Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (MSP)). We carried out a systematic search in PubMed (any date: 14 July 2016) and a hand search of references from pertinent articles according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The authors were contacted to provide missing coordinate data. Peer-reviewed studies with direct comparison of patient and control groups, and availability of coordinate data of grey matter cerebellar atrophy in patients were included. These coordinates were used in an anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analysis. Across 54 studies, clusters of cerebellar atrophy were found for AD, ALS, FTD, MSA, and PSP. Atrophy patterns were largely disease-specific, with overlap in certain areas of the cerebellar hemisphere, which showed marked atrophy in AD, ALS, FTD and PSP (Crus I/II), and MSA and PSP (lobules I-IV), respectively. Atrophy colocated with cerebellar areas implicated for motor (PSP, MSA) or cognitive symptoms (FTD, ALS, PSP) in the diseases. Our findings suggest that cerebellar changes are largely disease-specific and correspond to cortical or subcortical changes in neurodegenerative conditions. High clinical variability in PD and HD samples may explain the absence of findings for consistent grey matter loss across studies. Our results have clinical implications for diagnosis and cerebellar neuroimaging referencing approaches. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  19. Microvascular anatomy of the cerebellar parafloccular perforating space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Pablo; Dujovny, Manuel; Onyekachi, Ibe; Sockwell, Noressia; Cremaschi, Fabián; Savastano, Luis E

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellopontine angle is a common site for tumor growth and vascular pathologies requiring surgical manipulations that jeopardize cranial nerve integrity and cerebellar and brainstem perfusion. To date, a detailed study of vessels perforating the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle-namely, the paraflocculus or parafloccular perforating space-has yet to be published. In this report, the perforating vessels of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in the parafloccular space, or on the cisternal surface of the middle cerebellar peduncle, are described to elucidate their relevance pertaining to microsurgery and the different pathologies that occur at the cerebellopontine angle. Fourteen cadaveric cerebellopontine cisterns (CPCs) were studied. Anatomical dissections and analysis of the perforating arteries of the AICA and posterior inferior cerebellar artery at the parafloccular space were recorded using direct visualization by surgical microscope, optical histology, and scanning electron microscope. A comprehensive review of the English-language and Spanish-language literature was also performed, and findings related to anatomy, histology, physiology, neurology, neuroradiology, microsurgery, and endovascular surgery pertaining to the cerebellar flocculus or parafloccular spaces are summarized. A total of 298 perforating arteries were found in the dissected specimens, with a minimum of 15 to a maximum of 26 vessels per parafloccular perforating space. The average outer diameter of the cisternal portion of the perforating arteries was 0.11 ± 0.042 mm (mean ± SD) and the average length was 2.84 ± 1.2 mm. Detailed schematics and the surgical anatomy of the perforating vessels at the CPC and their clinical relevance are reported. The parafloccular space is a key entry point for many perforating vessels toward the middle cerebellar peduncle and lateral brainstem, and it must be respected and protected during surgical approaches to the

  20. Jatropha curcas, a biofuel crop: functional genomics for understanding metabolic pathways and genetic improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghuly, Fatemeh; Laimer, Margit

    2013-10-01

    Jatropha curcas is currently attracting much attention as an oilseed crop for biofuel, as Jatropha can grow under climate and soil conditions that are unsuitable for food production. However, little is known about Jatropha, and there are a number of challenges to be overcome. In fact, Jatropha has not really been domesticated; most of the Jatropha accessions are toxic, which renders the seedcake unsuitable for use as animal feed. The seeds of Jatropha contain high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which negatively impact the biofuel quality. Fruiting of Jatropha is fairly continuous, thus increasing costs of harvesting. Therefore, before starting any improvement program using conventional or molecular breeding techniques, understanding gene function and the genome scale of Jatropha are prerequisites. This review presents currently available and relevant information on the latest technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) to decipher important metabolic pathways within Jatropha, such as oil and toxin synthesis. Further, it discusses future directions for biotechnological approaches in Jatropha breeding and improvement. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Multilevel functional genomics data integration as a tool for understanding physiology: a network biology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Peter K; Turan, Nil; Egginton, Stuart; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The overall aim of physiological research is to understand how living systems function in an integrative manner. Consequently, the discipline of physiology has since its infancy attempted to link multiple levels of biological organization. Increasingly this has involved mathematical and computational approaches, typically to model a small number of components spanning several levels of biological organization. With the advent of "omics" technologies, which can characterize the molecular state of a cell or tissue (intended as the level of expression and/or activity of its molecular components), the number of molecular components we can quantify has increased exponentially. Paradoxically, the unprecedented amount of experimental data has made it more difficult to derive conceptual models underlying essential mechanisms regulating mammalian physiology. We present an overview of state-of-the-art methods currently used to identifying biological networks underlying genomewide responses. These are based on a data-driven approach that relies on advanced computational methods designed to "learn" biology from observational data. In this review, we illustrate an application of these computational methodologies using a case study integrating an in vivo model representing the transcriptional state of hypoxic skeletal muscle with a clinical study representing muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. The broader application of these approaches to modeling multiple levels of biological data in the context of modern physiology is discussed. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Complexities in Understanding Attentional Functioning among Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eLane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Parental reports of attention problems and clinical symptomatology of ADHD among children with fetal alcohol syndrome disorder (FASD were assessed in relation to performance on standardized subtests of attantional control/shifting and selective attention from the Test of Everyday Attention for Children (TEA-Ch; Manly et al., 1998. The participants included 14 children with FASD with a mean CA of 11.7 years and a mean MA of 9.7 years, and 14 typically developing (TD children with no reported history of prenatal exposure to alcohol or attention problems with a mean CA of 8.4 years and a mean MA of 9.6 years. The children with FASD were rated by their caregivers as having clinically significant attention difficulties for their developmental age. The reported symptomatology for the majority of the children with FASD were consistent with a diagnosis of ADHD, combined type, and only one child had a score within the average range. These reports are consistent with the finding here that the children with FASD demonstrated difficulties on the Creature Counting subtest of attentional control/shifting, but inconsistent with the finding that they outperformed the TD children on the Map Mission subtest of selective attention. These findings are considered within the context of the complexity in understanding attentional functioning among children with FASD and discrepancies across sources of information and components of attention.

  3. An Analysis of Grade 11 Learners' Levels of Understanding of Functions in Terms of APOS Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimhande, Tinoda; Naidoo, Ana; Stols, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a study of six Grade 11 learners' levels of understanding of concepts related to the function definition and representation. Task-based clinical interviews were used to elicit the learners' interpretations and reasoning when working with these function-related concepts. Indicators for Action-Process-Object-Schema (APOS)…

  4. Paraneoplastic cerebellar syndromes associated with antibodies against Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenkenbecher, Philipp; Chacko, Lisa; Pul, Refik; Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Wegner, Florian; Wurster, Ulrich; Stangel, Martin; Skripuletz, Thomas

    2017-12-18

    The paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome presents as severe neuroimmunological disease associated with malignancies. Antibodies against antigens expressed by tumor cells cross-react with proteins of cerebellar Purkinje cells leading to neuroinflammation and neuronal loss. These antineuronal antibodies are preferentially investigated by serological analyses while examination of the cerebrospinal fluid is only performed infrequently. We retrospectively investigated 12 patients with antineuronal antibodies against Purkinje cells with a special focus on cerebrospinal fluid. Our results confirm a subacute disease with a severe cerebellar syndrome in 10 female patients due to anti-Yo antibodies associated mostly with gynecological malignancies. While standard cerebrospinal fluid parameters infrequently revealed pathological results, all patients presented oligoclonal bands indicating intrathecal IgG synthesis. Analyses of anti-Yo antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid by calculating the antibody specific index revealed intrathecal synthesis of anti-Yo antibodies in these patients. In analogy to anti-Yo syndrome, an intrathecal production of anti-Tr antibodies in one patient who presented with a paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome was detected. In an additional patient, anti-Purkinje cell antibodies of unknown origin in the cerebrospinal fluid but not in serum were determined suggesting an isolated immune reaction within the central nervous system (CNS) and underlining the importance of investigating the cerebrospinal fluid. In conclusion, patients with a cerebellar syndrome display a distinct immune reaction within the cerebrospinal fluid including intrathecal synthesis of disease-specific antibodies. We emphasize the importance of a thorough immunological work up including investigations of both serum and cerebrospinal fluid.

  5. [Pseudo-tumoral cerebellar infarction and Arnold-Chiari malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, H; Jomin, M; Rousseaux, M

    1980-01-01

    A pseudo-tumoral cerebellar infarction developed in a 48-year-old man over the course of several days. External drainage improved the patients condition, and a subsequent operation showed a type I Arnold-Chiari malformation with cerebellar amygdalae descending to the level of C2. The infarcted postero-external part of the cerebellar lobe and the left amygdala were resected. The left postero-inferior cerebellar artery was thrombosed between the inferior border of the malformation and the posterior arch of C2. Almost total clinical recovery occurred. The Arnold-Chiari malformation had been clinically silent until the present infarction. A low dysraphia with a dermal sinus, sacral dehiscence and a low cord were present, but had caused no clinical disorders. The genetic origin of the dysraphism was confirmed by the presence of lumbosacral myelomeningocele with hydrocephalus in a relative of the patient. The relationship between postero-inferior cerebellar artery thrombosis and an Arnold-Chiari malformation is discussed: a causal relationship, already suggested in previous reports, is likely in the present case.

  6. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  7. Understanding the Structure-Function Relationships of Dendrimers in Environmental and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    We are living an era wherein nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in our lives. Dendrimers are special polymeric NPs with unique physiochemical properties, which have been intensely explored for a variety of applications. Current studies on dendrimers are bottlenecked by insufficient understandings of their structure and dynamic behaviors from a molecular level. With primarily computational approaches supplemented by many other experimental technics, this dissertation aims to establish structure-function relationships of dendrimers in environmental and biomedical applications. More specifically, it thoroughly investigates the interactions between dendrimers and different biomolecules including carbon-based NPs, metal-based NPs, and proteins/peptides. Those results not only provide profound knowledge for evaluating the impacts of dendrimers on environmental and biological systems but also facilitate designing next-generation functional polymeric nanomaterials. The dissertation is organized as following. Chapter 1 provides an overview of current progresses on dendrimer studies, where methodology of Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD), my major research tool, is also introduced. Two directions of utilizing dendrimers will be discussed in following chapters. Chapter 2 will focus on environmental applications of dendrimers, where two back-to-back studies are presented. I will start from describing some interesting observations from experiments i.e. dendrimers dispersed model oil molecules. Then, I will reveal why surface chemistries of dendrimers lead to different remediation efficiencies by computational modelings. Finally, I will demonstrate different scenarios of dendrimer-small molecules association. Chapter 3 is centered on dendrimers in the biomedical applications including two subtopics. In the first topic, we will discuss dendrimers as surfactants that modulating the interactions between proteins and NPs. Some fundamental concepts regarding to NPs

  8. A Functional Approach towards Understanding the Role of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain in an Endomycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, Louis; Lucic-Mercy, Eva; Nogales, Amaia; Poghosyan, Areg; Schneider, Carolin; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are crucial components of fertile soils, able to provide several ecosystem services for crop production. Current economic, social and legislative contexts should drive the so-called “second green revolution” by better exploiting these beneficial microorganisms. Many challenges still need to be overcome to better understand the mycorrhizal symbiosis, among which (i) the biotrophic nature of AMF, constraining their production, while (ii) phosphate acts as a limiting factor for the optimal mycorrhizal inoculum application and effectiveness. Organism fitness and adaptation to the changing environment can be driven by the modulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, strongly connected to the phosphorus processing. Nevertheless, the role of the respiratory function in mycorrhiza remains largely unexplored. We hypothesized that the two mitochondrial respiratory chain components, alternative oxidase (AOX) and cytochrome oxidase (COX), are involved in specific mycorrhizal behavior. For this, a complex approach was developed. At the pre-symbiotic phase (axenic conditions), we studied phenotypic responses of Rhizoglomus irregulare spores with two AOX and COX inhibitors [respectively, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] and two growth regulators (abscisic acid – ABA and gibberellic acid – Ga3). At the symbiotic phase, we analyzed phenotypic and transcriptomic (genes involved in respiration, transport, and fermentation) responses in Solanum tuberosum/Rhizoglomus irregulare biosystem (glasshouse conditions): we monitored the effects driven by ABA, and explored the modulations induced by SHAM and KCN under five phosphorus concentrations. KCN and SHAM inhibited in vitro spore germination while ABA and Ga3 induced differential spore germination and hyphal patterns. ABA promoted mycorrhizal colonization, strong arbuscule intensity and positive mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD). In ABA treated plants, R. irregulare

  9. Predictive Understanding of Mountainous Watershed Hydro-Biogeochemical Function and Response to Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Williams, K. H.; Agarwal, D.; Banfield, J. F.; Beller, H. R.; Bouskill, N.; Brodie, E.; Maxwell, R. M.; Nico, P. S.; Steefel, C. I.; Steltzer, H.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Wainwright, H. M.; Dwivedi, D.; Newcomer, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Recognizing the societal importance, vulnerability and complexity of mountainous watersheds, the `Watershed Function' project is developing a predictive understanding of how mountainous watersheds retain and release downgradient water, nutrients, carbon, and metals. In particular, the project is exploring how early snowmelt, drought, floods and other disturbances will influence mountainous watershed dynamics at seasonal to decadal timescales. Located in the 300km2 East River headwater catchment of the Upper Colorado River Basin, the project is guided by several constructs. First, the project considers the integrated role of surface and subsurface flow and biogeochemical reactions - from bedrock to the top of the vegetative canopy, from terrestrial through aquatic compartments, and from summit to receiving waters. The project takes a system-of-systems perspective, focused on developing new methods to quantify the cumulative watershed hydrobiogeochemical response to perturbations based on information from select subsystems within the watershed, each having distinct vegetation-subsurface biogeochemical-hydrological characteristics. A `scale-adaptive' modeling capability, in development using adaptive mesh refinement methods, serves as the organizing framework for the SFA. The scale-adaptive approach is intended to permit simulation of system-within-systems behavior - and aggregation of that behavior - from genome through watershed scales. This presentation will describe several early project discoveries and advances made using experimental, observational and numerical approaches. Among others, examples may include:quantiying how seasonal hydrological perturbations drive biogeochemical responses across critical zone compartments, with a focus on N and C transformations; metagenomic documentation of the spatial variability in floodplain meander microbial ecology; 3D reactive transport simulations of couped hydrological-biogeochemical behavior in the hyporheic zone; and

  10. Building an Understanding of Functions: A Series of Activities for Pre-Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, Olivia M.

    2008-01-01

    Building block toys can be used to illustrate various concepts connected with functions including graphs and rates of change of linear and exponential functions, piecewise functions, and composition of functions. Five brief activities suitable for a pre-calculus course are described.

  11. Ataxias and cerebellar dysfunction: involvement of synaptic plasticity deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Adaptive processes within cerebellar circuits, such as long-term depression and long-term potentiation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, have long been seen as important to cerebellar motor learning, and yet little attention has been given to any possible significance of these processes for cerebellar dysfunction and disease. Several forms of ataxia are caused by mutations in genes encoding for ion channels located at key junctures in pathways that lead to the induction of synaptic plasticity, suggesting that there might be an association between deficits in plasticity and the ataxic phenotype. Herein we explore this possibility and examine the available evidence linking the two together, highlighting specifically the role of P/Q-type calcium channels and their downstream effector small-conductance calcium-sensitive (SK2) potassium channels in the regulation of synaptic gain and intrinsic excitability, and reviewing their connections to ataxia. PMID:21232209

  12. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  13. The Clinical Differentiation of Cerebellar Infarction from Common Vertigo Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson, James A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the emergency department approach to diagnosing cerebellar infarction in the patient presenting with vertigo. Vertigo is defined and identification of a vertigo syndrome is discussed. The differentiation of common vertigo syndromes such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere’s disease, migrainous vertigo, and vestibular neuritis is summarized. Confirmation of a peripheral vertigo syndrome substantially lowers the likelihood of cerebellar infarction, as do indicators of a peripheral disorder such as an abnormal head impulse test. Approximately 10% of patients with cerebellar infarction present with vertigo and no localizing neurologic deficits. The majority of these may have other signs of central vertigo, specifically direction-changing nystagmus and severe ataxia.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:273-277.

  14. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  15. Anterior Inferior cerebellar artery infarction misdiagnosed as inner ear disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T; Ikemiyagi, Y; Ikemiyagi, F; Tamura, Y; Suzuki, M; Tsuyusaki, Y

    2016-08-01

    Anterior Inferior cerebellar artery infarction misdiagnosed as inner ear disease. The clinical >resentation of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction may mimic that of inner ear disease. lethodology: This report presents two patients with cerebellar artery infarction initially misdiagnosed with inner ear lisease. ase Report: Both the patients presented with sudden hearing loss and vertigo. The patient in case 1 was initially liagnosed with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The patient in case 2 presented with 17 days of vertigo and iearing loss. Both were correctly diagnosed with AICA infarction after performing magnetic resonance imaging. esults and Conclusions: We differentiated AICA from inner ear disease based on the variability in degree and frequency ange of hearing loss, the duration of vertigo, and the manifestation of nystagmus. Because cases of AICA infarction and nner ear disease may present with si'milar symptoms, a detailed examination including clinical course assessments, aboratory findings, and neurological imaging is essential for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  16. The Contributions of Cerebro-Cerebellar Circuitry to Executive Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Cherie L.; Desmond, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Contributions of cerebro-cerebellar function to executive verbal working memory were examined using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while 16 subjects completed two versions of the Sternberg task. In both versions subjects were presented with two or six target letters during the encoding phase, which were held in memory during the maintenance phase. A single probe letter was presented during the retrieval phase. In the “match condition”, subjects decided whether the probe matched the target letters. In the “executive condition”, subjects created a new probe by counting two alphabetical letters forward (e.g., f → h) and decided whether the new probe matched the target letters. Neural activity during the match and executive conditions was compared during each phase of the task. There were four main findings. First, cerebro-cerebellar activity increased as a function of executive load. Second, the dorsal cerebellar dentate co-activated with the supplementary motor area (SMA) during encoding. This likely represented the formation of an articulatory (motor) trajectory. Third, the ventral cerebellar dentate co-activated with anterior prefrontal regions BA 9/46 and the pre-SMA during retrieval. This likely represented the manipulation of information and formation of a response. A functional dissociation between the dorsal “motor” dentate and “cognitive” ventral dentate agrees with neuroanatomical tract tracing studies that have demonstrated separate neural pathways involving each region of the dentate: the dorsal dentate projects to frontal motor areas (including the SMA), and the ventral dentate projects to frontal cognitive areas (including BA 9/46 and the pre-SMA). Finally, activity during the maintenance phase in BA 9, anterior insula, pre-SMA and ventral dentate predicted subsequent accuracy of response to the probe during the retrieval phase. This finding underscored the significant contribution of the pre

  17. Integrating community assembly and biodiversity to better understand ecosystem function: the Community Assembly and the Functioning of Ecosystems (CAFE) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannar-Martin, Katherine H; Kremer, Colin T; Ernest, S K Morgan; Leibold, Mathew A; Auge, Harald; Chase, Jonathan; Declerck, Steven A J; Eisenhauer, Nico; Harpole, Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Isbell, Forest; Koffel, Thomas; Larsen, Stefano; Narwani, Anita; Petermann, Jana S; Roscher, Christiane; Cabral, Juliano Sarmento; Supp, Sarah R

    2018-02-01

    The research of a generation of ecologists was catalysed by the recognition that the number and identity of species in communities influences the functioning of ecosystems. The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) is most often examined by controlling species richness and randomising community composition. In natural systems, biodiversity changes are often part of a bigger community assembly dynamic. Therefore, focusing on community assembly and the functioning of ecosystems (CAFE), by integrating both species richness and composition through species gains, losses and changes in abundance, will better reveal how community changes affect ecosystem function. We synthesise the BEF and CAFE perspectives using an ecological application of the Price equation, which partitions the contributions of richness and composition to function. Using empirical examples, we show how the CAFE approach reveals important contributions of composition to function. These examples show how changes in species richness and composition driven by environmental perturbations can work in concert or antagonistically to influence ecosystem function. Considering how communities change in an integrative fashion, rather than focusing on one axis of community structure at a time, will improve our ability to anticipate and predict changes in ecosystem function. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dopamine controls Parkinson's tremor by inhibiting the cerebellar thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, Michiel F; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Aarts, Esther; Timmer, Monique H M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-03-01

    Parkinson's resting tremor is related to altered cerebral activity in the basal ganglia and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit. Although Parkinson's disease is characterized by dopamine depletion in the basal ganglia, the dopaminergic basis of resting tremor remains unclear: dopaminergic medication reduces tremor in some patients, but many patients have a dopamine-resistant tremor. Using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging, we test how a dopaminergic intervention influences the cerebral circuit involved in Parkinson's tremor. From a sample of 40 patients with Parkinson's disease, we selected 15 patients with a clearly tremor-dominant phenotype. We compared tremor-related activity and effective connectivity (using combined electromyography-functional magnetic resonance imaging) on two occasions: ON and OFF dopaminergic medication. Building on a recently developed cerebral model of Parkinson's tremor, we tested the effect of dopamine on cerebral activity associated with the onset of tremor episodes (in the basal ganglia) and with tremor amplitude (in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit). Dopaminergic medication reduced clinical resting tremor scores (mean 28%, range -12 to 68%). Furthermore, dopaminergic medication reduced tremor onset-related activity in the globus pallidus and tremor amplitude-related activity in the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus. Network analyses using dynamic causal modelling showed that dopamine directly increased self-inhibition of the ventral intermediate nucleus, rather than indirectly influencing the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit through the basal ganglia. Crucially, the magnitude of thalamic self-inhibition predicted the clinical dopamine response of tremor. Dopamine reduces resting tremor by potentiating inhibitory mechanisms in a cerebellar nucleus of the thalamus (ventral intermediate nucleus). This suggests that altered dopaminergic projections to the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit have a role

  19. Understanding the hydrological functioning of headwater streams using periodic observations of river flow state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, Aurélien; Leblois, Etienne; Pella, Hervé; Datry, Thibault; Sauquet, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Due to their upstream position in river networks, many headwater streams (HS) experience recurrent flow cessation and/or drying events. They have many ecological values since they are located at the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and contribute to good status of rivers (sediment flux, input of organic matter…). However, the understanding of HS remains limited because gauging stations are preferentially located along perennial rivers and, consequently, the proportion of intermittent rivers (IR) is highly underestimated. In France, the observation network ONDE ("Observatoire National Des Etiages", in French) was designed by ONEMA to complement discharge data from the conventional French River Flow Monitoring network (HYDRO) to better understand HS dynamics. ONDE provides visual observations of flow state at 3300 sites along river channels located throughout France since 2012. One observation is made every month between April and October and the frequency of observations may increase during drought period to 4 visits / month. One of the following flow states is assigned at each observation: "flowing", "no flow" or "dry". The objective of this work is to combine and valorize information from both networks in order to describe the hydrological functioning of headwater streams at a regional scale. A special attention is given to characterize spatial distribution and frequency of flow intermittence and to explore how flow intermittence patterns are related to environmental drivers. A first analyze of the ONDE network indicated that 35% of sites have shown that at least one zero-flow event between 2012 and 2016 against only 8% with the HYDRO database considering gauging stations as intermittent when the mean number of zero flows ≥ 5 days/year. The proportion of zero-flow events for 93 ONDE sites was higher than 50%. Conversely, no drying events were observed for 1680 sites (50 %) during the observation period. These dry events mainly occurs during

  20. [Cerebellar infarction in vascular teritorry of arteria cerebelli superior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Dejan; Savić, Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar vascular diseases are focal cerebrovascular diseases in posterior circulation--vertebrobasilar system. The cerebellum is supplied by three main arteries arising from the vertebrobasilar system: arteria cerebelli inferior posterior, arteria cerebelli inferior anterior and arteria cerebelli superior. Cerebelar infarctions are rare but unpredictable disorders. The aim of this study was determination of main risk factors, clinical presentation and prognosis of the cerebellar infarctions in distal vascular teritorry of the arteria cerebelli superior. We evaluated 60 patients hospitalized after acute cerebellar infarction among other hospitalized patients in five year period. In 18 patients computerized tomography demonstrated infarction in distal vascular teritorry of the arteria cerebelli superior. All patients underwent clinical and other diagnostic investigations (computerized tomography, electrocardyography and standard blood tests) and were questioned by phone after finishing hospital treatment. Cerebellar infarcts in distal vascular teritorry of arteria cerebell superior was 30% of all cerebellar infarcts. The most frequent risk factor was hypertension (66.7%). Symptomatology and clinical signs were heterogenous but the most frequent were instability (77.8%), vertigo (72.2%) and vomiting (55.6%) followed by ataxia of the limbs (77.8%) and the body (61.1%), nystagmus (55.6%) and disarthria (33.3%) in clinical presentation. All patients had good recovery in hospital and one year afterwards. Infarctions in distribution of arteria cerebelli superior are rare and have multiple risk factors and various clinical features in majority of other studies as in this one. Mass effects are present in several studies but none in this one which reflects contraversions present in other published investigations. Cerebellar infarctions in vascular teritorry of arteria cerebelli superior have multiple risk factors, mostly heterogenous clinical presentations with

  1. Cerebellar induced differential polyglot aphasia: A neurolinguistic and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; van Dun, Kim; Van Dormael, Johanna; Vandenborre, Dorien; Keulen, Stefanie; Manto, Mario; Verhoeven, Jo; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2017-12-01

    Research has shown that linguistic functions in the bilingual brain are subserved by similar neural circuits as in monolinguals, but with extra-activity associated with cognitive and attentional control. Although a role for the right cerebellum in multilingual language processing has recently been acknowledged, a potential role of the left cerebellum remains largely unexplored. This paper reports the clinical and fMRI findings in a strongly right-handed (late) multilingual patient who developed differential polyglot aphasia, ataxic dysarthria and a selective decrease in executive function due to an ischemic stroke in the left cerebellum. fMRI revealed that lexical-semantic retrieval in the unaffected L1 was predominantly associated with activations in the left cortical areas (left prefrontal area and left postcentral gyrus), while naming in two affected non-native languages recruited a significantly larger bilateral functional network, including the cerebellum. It is hypothesized that the left cerebellar insult resulted in decreased right prefrontal hemisphere functioning due to a loss of cerebellar impulses through the cerebello-cerebral pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. DTI fiber tractography of cerebro-cerebellar pathways and clinical evaluation of ataxia in childhood posterior fossa tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Myung Eun; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Khajuria, Rajiv K; Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Koustenis, Elisabeth; Bruhn, Harald; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric posterior fossa (PF) tumor survivors experience long-term motor deficits. Specific cerebrocerebellar connections may be involved in incidence and severity of motor dysfunction. We examined the relationship between long-term ataxia as well as fine motor function and alteration of differential cerebellar efferent and afferent pathways using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography. DTI-based tractography was performed in 19 patients (10 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and 9 medulloblastoma patients (MB)) and 20 healthy peers. Efferent Cerebello-Thalamo-Cerebral (CTC) and afferent Cerebro-Ponto-Cerebellar (CPC) tracts were reconstructed and analyzed concerning fractional anisotropy (FA) and volumetric measurements. Clinical outcome was assessed with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). Kinematic parameters of fine motor function (speed, automation, variability, and pressure) were obtained by employing a digitizing graphic tablet. ICARS scores were significantly higher in MB patients than in PA patients. Poorer ICARS scores and impaired fine motor function correlated significantly with volume loss of CTC pathway in MB patients, but not in PA patients. Patients with pediatric post-operative cerebellar mutism syndrome showed higher loss of CTC pathway volume and were more atactic. CPC pathway volume was significantly reduced in PA patients, but not in MB patients. Neither relationship was observed between the CPC pathway and ICARS or fine motor function. There was no group difference of FA values between the patients and healthy peers. Reduced CTC pathway volumes in our cohorts were associated with severity of long-term ataxia and impaired fine motor function in survivors of MBs. We suggest that the CTC pathway seems to play a role in extent of ataxia and fine motor dysfunction after childhood cerebellar tumor treatment. DTI may be a useful tool to identify relevant structures of the CTC pathway and possibly avoid surgically induced long

  3. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s SRX685882,SRX685880,SRX685883,SRX685885,SRX685877,SRX685878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar granule neuron...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule... neurons SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule n...eurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule... neurons SRX685885,SRX685878,SRX685882,SRX685877,SRX685880,SRX685883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar gran...ule neurons SRX685882,SRX685880,SRX685883,SRX685885,SRX685877,SRX685878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX0...62942,SRX143820,SRX685286,SRX685285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar gr...anule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX0...62942,SRX143820,SRX685285,SRX685286 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar gr...anule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 No description Neural Cerebellar Cortex http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule... neurons SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX112...18103 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 Input control Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX06...2943,SRX1028898,SRX143824,SRX085442,SRX968954,SRX1318104,SRX1318103,SRX685926 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX062940,S...92,SRX1318090,SRX1318091,SRX1318089,SRX1318093,SRX1318094 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX0...62939,SRX143819,SRX209672,SRX1028899,SRX968953 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 Input control Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX14...3824,SRX062943,SRX085442,SRX968954,SRX1028898,SRX685926,SRX1318104,SRX1318103 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar gr...anule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar gran...ule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX0...62939,SRX143819,SRX209672,SRX1028899,SRX968953 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX112...5781,SRX1125780,SRX1125783,SRX1125782,SRX1125788,SRX1125789 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Cerebellar gr...anule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar gran...ule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellar granule n...eurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX323...85926 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 Unclassified Neural Cerebellar gran...ule neurons http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX0...62939,SRX143819,SRX209672,SRX1028899,SRX968953 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 TFs and others Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX0...62939,SRX143819,SRX209672,SRX1028899,SRX968953 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 Input control Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX06...2943,SRX085442,SRX143824,SRX685926,SRX968954,SRX1318104,SRX1028898,SRX1318103 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar Cortex SRX323...85926 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 All antigens Neural Cerebellar gran...ule neurons SRX685885,SRX685878,SRX685882,SRX685877,SRX685880,SRX685883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  20. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex mm9 No description Neural Cerebellar Cortex http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex.bed ...

  1. Roles of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors during the sensory stimulation-evoked field potential responses in mouse cerebellar cortical molecular layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Zhao, Jing-Tong; Chu, Chun-Ping; Li, Yu-Zi; Qiu, De-Lai

    2017-11-01

    The functions of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in cerebellar cortex have been widely studied under in vitro condition, but their roles during the sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer in living animals are currently unclear. We here investigated the roles of NMDARs during the air-puff stimulation on ipsilateral whisker pad-evoked field potential responses in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in urethane-anesthetized mice by electrophysiological recording and pharmacological methods. Our results showed that cerebellar surface administration of NMDA induced a dose-dependent decrease in amplitude of the facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory responses (P1) in the molecular layer, accompanied with decreases in decay time, half-width and area under curve (AUC) of P1. The IC 50 of NMDA induced inhibition in amplitude of P1 was 46.5μM. In addition, application of NMDA induced significant increases in the decay time, half-width and AUC values of the facial stimulation-evoked excitatory responses (N1) in the molecular layer. Application of an NMDAR blocker, D-APV (250μM) abolished the facial stimulation-evoked P1 in the molecular layer. These results suggested that NMDARs play a critical role during the sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in vivo in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  3. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  4. Biliary atresia and cerebellar hypoplasia in polysplenia syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderdood, Kurt; Op de Beeck, Bart; Desprechins, Brigitte; Osteaux, Michel [Department of Radiology, Free University Brussels, AZ-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2003-09-01

    We report a 3.5-month-old boy with polysplenia syndrome who demonstrated hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava, extrahepatic biliary atresia, multiple splenunculi, bowel malrotation, and the rare finding of brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia. A possible pathogenesis for cerebellar hypoplasia in this syndrome is suggested after review of the literature. The importance of seeking associated anomalies in biliary atresia, which may be possible indicators of polysplenia syndrome, is stressed since these patients need appropriate management when surgery is considered. (orig.)

  5. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  6. A role of TARPs in the expression and plasticity of calcium-permeable AMPARs: evidence from cerebellar neurons and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bats, Cécile; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G

    2013-11-01

    The inclusion of GluA2 subunits has a profound impact on the channel properties of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), in particular rendering them impermeable to calcium. While GluA2-containing AMPARs are the most abundant in the central nervous system, GluA2-lacking calcium-permeable AMPARs are also expressed in wide variety of neurons and glia. Accumulating evidence suggests that the dynamic control of the GluA2 content of AMPARs plays a critical role in development, synaptic plasticity, and diverse neurological conditions ranging from ischemia-induced brain damage to drug addiction. It is thus important to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating the balance of AMPAR subtypes, particularly the role of their co-assembled auxiliary subunits. The discovery of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs), initially within the cerebellum, has transformed the field of AMPAR research. It is now clear that these auxiliary subunits play a key role in multiple aspects of AMPAR trafficking and function in the brain. Yet, their precise role in AMPAR subtype-specific regulation has only recently received particular attention. Here we review recent findings on the differential regulation of calcium-permeable (CP-) and -impermeable (CI-) AMPARs in cerebellar neurons and glial cells, and discuss the critical involvement of TARPs in this process. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Glutamate Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling in cerebellar Purkinje cells in health and disease [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu Kano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is a brain structure involved in coordination, control, and learning of movements, as well as certain aspects of cognitive function. Purkinje cells are the sole output neurons from the cerebellar cortex and therefore play crucial roles in the overall function of the cerebellum. The type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1 is a key “hub” molecule that is critically involved in the regulation of synaptic wiring, excitability, synaptic response, and synaptic plasticity of Purkinje cells. In this review, we aim to highlight how mGluR1 controls these events in Purkinje cells. We also describe emerging evidence that altered mGluR1 signaling in Purkinje cells underlies cerebellar dysfunctions in several clinically relevant mouse models of human ataxias.

  8. Human cerebellar responses to brush and heat stimuli in healthy and neuropathic pain subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, D; Moulton, E A; Tully, S; Schmahmann, J D; Becerra, L

    2008-01-01

    Though human pain imaging studies almost always demonstrate activation in the cerebellum, the role of the cerebellum in pain function is not well understood. Here we present results from two studies on the effects of noxious thermal heat and brush applied to the right side of the face in a group of healthy subjects (Group I) and a group of patients with neuropathic pain (Group II) who are more sensitive to both thermal and mechanical stimuli. Statistically significant activations and volumes of activations were defined in the cerebellum. Activated cerebellar structures were identified by colocalization of fMRI activation with the 'MRI Atlas of the Human Cerebellum'. Functional data (obtained using a 3T magnet) were defined in terms of maximum voxels and volume of activation in the cerebellum. Volume maps were then mapped onto two millimeter serial slices taken through the cerebellum in order to identify activation within regions defined by the activation volume. The data indicate that different regions of the cerebellum are involved in acute and chronic pain processing. Heat produces greater contralateral activation compared with brush, while brush resulted in more ipsilateral/bilateral cerebellar activation. Further, innocuous brush stimuli in healthy subjects produced decreased cerebellar activation in lobules concerned with somatosensory processing. The data also suggest a dichotomy of innocuous stimuli/sensorimotor cerebellum activation versus noxious experience/cognitive/limbic cerebellum activation. These results lead us to propose that the cerebellum may modulate the emotional and cognitive experience that distinguishes the perception of pain from the appreciation of innocuous sensory stimulation.

  9. Low and high dietary folic acid levels perturb postnatal cerebellar morphology in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Peña-Melián, Ángel; Maestro-de-Las-Casas, Carmen; Úbeda, Natalia; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    The brain is particularly sensitive to folate metabolic disturbances, because methyl groups are critical for brain functions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different dietary levels of folic acid (FA) on postnatal cerebellar morphology, including the architecture and organisation of the various layers. A total of forty male OFA rats (a Sprague-Dawley strain), 5 weeks old, were classified into the following four dietary groups: FA deficient (0 mg/kg FA); FA supplemented (8 mg/kg FA); FA supra-supplemented (40 mg/kg FA); and control (2 mg/kg FA) (all n 10 per group). Rats were fed ad libitum for 30 d. The cerebellum was quickly removed and processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Slides were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (to label Bergmann glia), calbindin (to label Purkinje cells) and NeuN (to label post-mitotic neurons). Microscopic analysis revealed two types of defect: partial disappearance of fissures and/or neuronal ectopia, primarily in supra-supplemented animals (incidence of 80 %, P≤0·01), but also in deficient and supplemented groups (incidence of 40 %, P≤0·05), compared with control animals. The primary fissure was predominantly affected, sometimes accompanied by defects in the secondary fissure. Our findings show that growing rats fed an FA-modified diet, including both deficient and supplemented diets, have an increased risk of disturbances in cerebellar corticogenesis. Defects caused by these diets may have functional consequences in later life. The present study is the first to demonstrate that cerebellar morphological defects can arise from deficient, as well as high, FA levels in the diet.

  10. Delineating function and connectivity of optokinetic hubs in the cerebellum and the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehl, Ria Maxine; Hinkel, Carolin; Bauermann, Thomas; Eulenburg, Peter Zu

    2017-12-01

    Optokinetic eye movements are crucial for keeping a stable image on the retina during movements of the head. These eye movements can be differentiated into a cortically generated response (optokinetic look nystagmus) and the highly reflexive optokinetic stare nystagmus, which is controlled by circuits in the brainstem and cerebellum. The contributions of these infratentorial networks and their functional connectivity with the cortical eye fields are still poorly understood in humans. To map ocular motor centres in the cerebellum and brainstem, we studied stare nystagmus using small-field optokinetic stimuli in the horizontal and vertical directions in 22 healthy subjects. We were able to differentiate ocular motor areas of the pontine brainstem and midbrain in vivo for the first time. Direction and velocity-dependent activations were found in the pontine brainstem (nucleus reticularis, tegmenti pontis, and paramedian pontine reticular formation), the uvula, flocculus, and cerebellar tonsils. The ocular motor vermis, on the other hand, responded to constant and accelerating velocity stimulation. Moreover, deactivation patterns depict a governing role for the cerebellar tonsils in ocular motor control. Functional connectivity results of these hubs reveal the close integration of cortico-cerebellar ocular motor and vestibular networks in humans. Adding to the cortical concept of a right-hemispheric predominance for visual-spatial processing, we found a complementary left-sided cerebellar dominance for our ocular motor task. A deeper understanding of the role of the cerebellum and especially the cerebellar tonsils for eye movement control in a clinical context seems vitally important and is now feasible with functional neuroimaging.

  11. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Helmchen

    Full Text Available The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia.The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects.Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements and postural (postural sway speed parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM.Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg's ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg's ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients.Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia.

  12. Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Dae Kwon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

  13. Expression and function of nuclear receptor coregulators in brain : understanding the cell-specific effects of glucocorticoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Siem van der

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the raising awareness of the role of glucocorticoids in the onset of numerous (neuro)-pathologies constitutes the increasing necessity of understanding the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in bodily processes and brain functioning. Glucocorticoids mediate their effects by binding

  14. Symbolic Understanding of Pictures in Low-Functioning Children with Autism: The Effects of Iconicity and Naming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Calum; Allen, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated whether symbolic understanding of pictures in low-functioning children with autism is mediated by iconicity and language. In Experiment 1, participants were taught novel words paired with unfamiliar pictures that varied in iconicity (black-and-white line drawings, greyscale photographs, colour line drawings, colour…

  15. Understanding fungal functional biodiversity during the mitigation of environmentally dispersed pentachlorophenol in cork oak forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varela, Adelia; Martins, Celso; Nunez, Oscar; Martins, Isabel; Houbraken, Jos A. M. P.; Martins, Tiago M.; Leitao, M. Cristina; McLellan, Iain; Vetter, Walter; Galceran, M. Teresa; Samson, Robert A.; Hursthouse, Andrew; Pereira, Cristina Silva

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is globally dispersed and contamination of soil with this biocide adversely affects its functional biodiversity, particularly of fungi – key colonizers. Their functional role as a community is poorly understood, although a few pathways have been already elucidated in pure

  16. Challenges in microbial ecology: building predictive understanding of community function and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, S.; Allen, R.J.; Pfeiffer, T.; Curtis, T.P.; Wiuf, C.; Sloan, W.T.; Cordero, O.X.; Brown, S.P.; Momeni, B.; Shou, W.; Kettle, H.; Flint, H.J.; Haas, A.F.; Laroche, B.; Kreft, J.U.; Rainey, P.B.; Freilich, S.; Schuster, S.; Milferstedt, K.; van der Meer, J.R.; Groβkopf, T.; Huisman, J.; Free, A.; Picioreanu, C.; Quince, C.; Klapper, I.; Labarthe, S.; Smets, B.F.; Wang, H; Soyer, O.S.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of microbial communities (MCs) cannot be overstated. MCs underpin the biogeochemical cycles of the earth’s soil, oceans and the atmosphere, and perform ecosystem functions that impact plants, animals and humans. Yet our ability to predict and manage the function of these highly

  17. Understanding and solving disorder in the substitution pattern of amino functionalized MIL-47(V)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, J.; Dubbeldam, D.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic energies and elastic constants of four amino functionalized MIL-47(V) supercells were computed using plane wave density functional theory to determine the influence of the substituent positions on the organic linker. An inverse relationship between the ab initio energies and the elastic

  18. Group Theory of Wannier Functions Providing the Basis for a Deeper Understanding of Magnetism and Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Krüger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the group theory of optimally-localized and symmetry-adapted Wannier functions in a crystal of any given space group G or magnetic group M. Provided that the calculated band structure of the considered material is given and that the symmetry of the Bloch functions at all of the points of symmetry in the Brillouin zone is known, the paper details whether or not the Bloch functions of particular energy bands can be unitarily transformed into optimally-localized Wannier functions symmetry-adapted to the space group G, to the magnetic group M or to a subgroup of G or M. In this context, the paper considers usual, as well as spin-dependent Wannier functions, the latter representing the most general definition of Wannier functions. The presented group theory is a review of the theory published by one of the authors (Ekkehard Krüger in several former papers and is independent of any physical model of magnetism or superconductivity. However, it is suggested to interpret the special symmetry of the optimally-localized Wannier functions in the framework of a nonadiabatic extension of the Heisenberg model, the nonadiabatic Heisenberg model. On the basis of the symmetry of the Wannier functions, this model of strongly-correlated localized electrons makes clear predictions of whether or not the system can possess superconducting or magnetic eigenstates.

  19. The Effect of the Use of Number Lines Representations on Student Understanding of Basic Function Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, James R.

    Researchers and educators are calling for increased use of technology and attention to function concepts in school mathematics. Students often have considerable difficulty gleaning pointwise and global information from Cartesian (R squared) representations of functions, whether they are hand- or machine-produced. Described here is an interactive…

  20. Lack of connexin43-mediated Bergmann glial gap junctional coupling does not affect cerebellar long-term depression, motor coordination, or eyeblink conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Tanaka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bergmann glial cells are specialized astrocytes in the cerebellum. In the mature cerebellar molecular layer, Bergmann glial processes are closely associated with Purkinje cells, enclosing Purkinje cell dendritic synapses with a glial sheath. There is intensive gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial processes, but their significance in cerebellar functions is not known. Connexin43 (Cx43, a major component of astrocytic gap junction channels, is abundantly expressed in Bergmann glial cells. To examine the role of Cx43-mediated gap junctions between Bergmann glial cells in cerebellar functions, we generated Cx43 conditional knockout mice with the S100b-Cre transgenic line (Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre, which exhibited a significant loss of Cx43 in the Bergmann glial cells and astrocytes in the cerebellum with a postnatal onset. The Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal cerebellar architecture. Although gap junctional coupling between the Bergmann glial cells measured by spreading of microinjected Lucifer yellow was virtually abolished in Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice, electrophysiologic analysis revealed that cerebellar long-term depression could be induced and maintained normally in thier cerebellar slices. In addition, at the behavioral level, Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal motor coordination in the rotarod task and normal conditioned eyelid response. Our findings suggest that Cx43-mediated gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial cells is not necessary for the neuron-glia interactions required for cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning.

  1. The meaning of isometries as function of a set of points and the process of understanding of geometric transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Thaqi, Xhevdet; Gimenez, Joaquim; Aljimi, Ekrem

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we try to show that in the process of understanding of isometric transformations, the meaning of isometric transformations is characterized as a function of whole figure to whole figure, as a function of the parts of the figure to the correspondent parts of the figure, and as a function of the set of points of figure to set of points of the same or other figures. This perception of isometric transformation has been observed in an experimental study which...

  2. In vitro study of uptake and synthesis of creatine and its precursors by cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes suggests some hypotheses on the physiopathology of the inherited disorders of creatine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carducci Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of the inherited disorders of creatine (Cr synthesis and transport in the last few years disclosed the importance of blood Cr supply for the normal functioning of the brain. These putatively rare diseases share a common pathogenetic mechanism (the depletion of brain Cr and similar phenotypes characterized by mental retardation, language disturbances, seizures and movement disorders. In the effort to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating Cr pool inside the nervous tissue, Cr transport and synthesis and related gene transcripts were explored in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes. Methods Cr uptake and synthesis were explored in vitro by incubating monotypic primary cultures of rat type I astrocytes and cerebellar granule cells with: a D3-Creatine (D3Cr and D3Cr plus β-guanidinopropionate (GPA, an inhibitor of Cr transporter, and b labelled precursors of Guanidinoacetate (GAA and Cr (Arginine, Arg; Glycine, Gly. Intracellular D3Cr and labelled GAA and Cr were assessed by ESI-MS/MS. Creatine transporter (CT1, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT, and S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT gene expression was assessed in the same cells by real time PCR. Results D3Cr signal was extremely high in cells incubated with this isotope (labelled/unlabelled Cr ratio reached about 10 and 122, respectively in cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes and was reduced by GPA. Labelled Arg and Gly were taken up by the cells and incorporated in GAA, whose concentration paralleled that of these precursors both in the extracellular medium and inside the cells (astrocytes. In contrast, the increase of labelled Cr was relatively much more limited since labelled Cr after precursors' supplementation did not exceed 2,7% (cerebellar granule cells and 21% (astrocytes of unlabelled Cr. Finally, AGAT, GAMT and SLC6A8 were expressed in both kind of cells. Conclusions Our

  3. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellick, GS; Barker, KT; Stolte-Dijkstra, [No Value; Fleischmann, C; Coleman, RJ; Garrett, C; Gloyn, AL; Edghill, EL; Hattersley, AT; Wellauer, PK; Goodwin, G; Houlston, RS

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment(1,2). We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

  4. Microstructural Observations on Nissl Substances in the Cerebellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study assessed some microstructural effects of quinine, commonly used in malaria chemotherapy, especially in chloroquine-resistant and cerebral malaria, on the Nissl substance in the cerebellar cortex of adult Wistar rats using microanatomical studies. Methods: Twenty seven adult male Wistar rats, weighing ...

  5. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebellar lesions: straight versus oblique frame positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Brawanski, Nina; Dinc, Nazife; Behmanesh, Bedjahn; Kammerer, Sara; Dubinski, Daniel; Seifert, Volker; Marquardt, Gerhard; Weise, Lutz

    2017-10-26

    Biospies of brain lesions with unknown entity are an everyday procedure among many neurosurgical departments. Biopsies can be performed frame-guided or frameless. However, cerebellar lesions are a special entity with a more complex approach. All biopsies in this study were performed stereotactically frame guided. Therefore, only biopsies of cerebellar lesions were included in this study. We compared whether the frame was attached straight versus oblique and we focused on diagnostic yield and complication rate. We evaluated 20 patients who underwent the procedure between 2009 and 2017. Median age was 56.5 years. 12 (60%) Patients showed a left sided lesion, 6 (30%) showed a lesion in the right cerebellum and 2 (10%) patients showed a midline lesion. The stereotactic frame was mounted oblique in 12 (60%) patients and straight in 8 (40%) patients. Postoperative CT scan showed small, clinically silent blood collection in two (10%) of the patients, one (5%) patient showed haemorrhage, which caused a hydrocephalus. He received an external ventricular drain. In both patients with small haemorrhage the frame was positioned straight, while in the patient who showed a larger haemorrhage the frame was mounted oblique. In all patients a final histopathological diagnosis was established. Cerebellar lesions of unknown entity can be accessed transcerebellar either with the stereotactic frame mounted straight or oblique. Also for cerebellar lesions the procedure shows a high diagnostic yield with a low rate of severe complications, which need further treatment.

  6. The patterns of clinical presentations of cerebellar syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gait-ataxia was the most common sign (83%). Cerebrovascular disease was the most common aetiology (25%). Conclusion: Cerebellar syndromes are not rare in Sudan. However, they were diagnosed more commonly at the central regions of the country probably because of more awareness of patients and better facilities

  7. Behavioral correlates of complex spike synchrony in cerebellar microzones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Gruijl, Jornt R; Hoogland, Tycho M; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-01

    The olivo-cerebellar system is crucial for smooth and well timed execution of movements based on sensory and proprioceptive cues. The inferior olive (IO) plays a pivotal role in this process by synchronizing its activity across neurons internally through connexin36 gap junctions and providing a

  8. The molecular understanding of interfacial interactions of functionalized graphene and chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-ping; Luo, Xue-gang; Lin, Xiao-yan; Lu, Xiong; Tang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The type of the functional groups can be used to modulating interactions between graphene sheet and chitosan. - Highlights: • Investigate interfacial interactions between chitosan and functionalized graphene by DFT. • Observe covalent linkages between COOH-modified graphene and chitosan units. • Multi-functionalized graphene regulates the interfacial interactions with chitosan. • It is useful for guiding the preparation of graphene/chitosan composites. - Abstract: Graphene-reinforced chitosan scaffolds have been extensively studied for several years as promising hard tissue replacements. However, the interfacial interactions between graphene and chitosan are strongly related to the solubility, processability, and mechanical properties of graphene-reinforced chitosan (G–C) composites. The functionalization of graphene is regarded as the most effective way to improve the abovementioned properties of the G–C composite. In this study, the interfacial interactions between chitosan and functionalized graphene sheets with carboxylization (COOH-), amination (NH 2 -), and hydroxylation (OH-) groups were systematically studied at the electronic level using the method of ab initio simulations based on quantum mechanics theory and the observations were compared with reported experimental results. The covalent linkages between COOH-modified graphene and the chitosan units were demonstrated and the combination of multi-functionalization on graphene could regulate the interfacial interactions between graphene and the chitosan. The interfacial interactions between chitosan and properly functionalized graphene are critical for the preparation of G–C-based composites for tissue engineering scaffolds and other applications.

  9. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, P.P.; Schepman, S.M.; Opheij, W.; Bruijnzeels, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to

  10. On the Axiomatization of Mathematical Understanding: Continuous Functions in the Transition to Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction to general topology represents a challenging transition for students of advanced mathematics. It requires the generalization of their previous understanding of ideas from fields like geometry, linear algebra, and real or complex analysis to fit within a more abstract conceptual system. Students must adopt a new lexicon of…

  11. Metagenomics-enabled understanding of the functions and activities of microbial communities at ERSP field research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2014-01-08

    The focus of our work is to better understand the bioremediation of uranium in the subsurface. To evaluate the natural occurring uranium-immobilizing bacterial populations, we have anaerobically enriched uranium contaminated soil sediments (FW107, FW102-2, and FW102-3) collected from ORNL iFRC site (S3 area).

  12. Understanding the Attitude-Action Gap: Functional Integration of Environmental Aspects in Car Purchase Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Olivier; Macharis, Cathy; Lebeau, Kenneth; Turcksin, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at understanding how a general positive attitude toward the environment results in a limited purchase of environmentally friendlier cars, often referred to as the attitude-action gap. In a first experiment 27 volunteers performed a judgment task on car purchase intention. Participants were asked to evaluate the probability of…

  13. On the role of patterns in understanding the functioning of soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we review the role of patterns to improve our understanding of water, mass and energy exchange processes in soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems. We explore the main mechanisms that lead to the formation of patterns in these systems and discuss different approaches to characterizing and...

  14. Challenges in microbial ecology: Building predictive understanding of community function and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widder, Stefanie; Allen, Rosalind J.; Pfeiffer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The importance of microbial communities (MCs) cannot be overstated. MCs underpin the biogeochemical cycles of the earth's soil, oceans and the atmosphere, and perform ecosystem functions that impact plants, animals and humans. Yet our ability to predict and manage the function of these highly...... complex, dynamically changing communities is limited. Building predictive models that link MC composition to function is a key emerging challenge in microbial ecology. Here, we argue that addressing this challenge requires close coordination of experimental data collection and method development...

  15. SK2 channel expression and function in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosy, Eric; Piochon, Claire; Teuling, Eva; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels (SK channels) regulate the excitability of neurons and their responsiveness to synaptic input patterns. SK channels contribute to the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following action potential bursts, and curtail excitatory postsynaptic potentials

  16. Effects of acetyl-DL-leucine on cerebellar ataxia (ALCAT trial): study protocol for a multicenter, multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phase III trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feil, K.; Adrion, C.; Teufel, J.; Bosch, S.; Claassen, J.; Giordano, I.; Hengel, H.; Jacobi, H.; Klockgether, T.; Klopstock, T.; Nachbauer, W.; Schols, L.; Stendel, C.; Uslar, E.; Warrenburg, B.P. van de; Berger, I.; Naumann, I.; Bayer, O.; Muller, H.H.; Mansmann, U.; Strupp, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebellar ataxia (CA) is a frequent and often disabling condition that impairs motor functioning and impacts on quality of life (QoL). No medication has yet been proven effective for the symptomatic or even causative treatment of hereditary or non-hereditary, non-acquired CA. So far,

  17. Leptin enhances NR2B-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate responses via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent process in cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, A J; Wallace, L; Durakoglugil, D; Harvey, J

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that the hormone leptin regulates energy balance via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, evidence is accumulating that leptin plays a key role in numerous CNS functions. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in many extrahypothalamic brain regions, with high levels found in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the hippocampus leptin has been shown to facilitate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function and modulate synaptic plasticity. A role for leptin in cerebellar function is also indicated as leptin-deficient rodents display reduced mobility that is unrelated to obesity. Here we show that leptin receptor immunolabeling can be detected in cultured cerebellar granule cells, being expressed at the somatic plasma membrane and also concentrated at synapses. Furthermore, leptin facilitated NR2B N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in cerebellar granule cells via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway. These findings provide the first direct evidence for a cellular action of leptin in cerebellar neurons. In addition, given that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity in the cerebellum is crucial for normal locomotor function, these data also have important implications for the potential role of leptin in the control of movement.

  18. Age-related Purkinje cell death is steroid dependent : ROR alpha haplo-insufficiency impairs plasma and cerebellar steroids and Purkinje cell survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janmaat, Sonja; Akwa, Yvette; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Bakouche, Joelle; Gautheron, Vanessa; Liere, Philippe; Eychenne, Bernard; Pianos, Antoine; Luiten, Paul; Groothuis, Ton; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Mariani, Jean; Sherrard, Rachel M.; Frederic, Florence

    2011-01-01

    A major problem of ageing is progressive impairment of neuronal function and ultimately cell death. Since sex steroids are neuroprotective, their decrease with age may underlie age-related neuronal degeneration. To test this, we examined Purkinje cell numbers, plasma sex steroids and cerebellar

  19. Distinct cerebellar regions related to motor and cognitive performance in SCA6 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentiya, Zubir; Khan, Noore-Sabah; Ergun, Ezgi; Ying, Sarah H; Desmond, John E

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate a correlation between anatomic regional changes in Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6) patients and measures of cognitive performance on neuropsychological tests. Neurocognitive testing was conducted on 24 SCA6 and 28 control subjects. For each cognitive test, SCA6 patients were compared against the controls using Student's t-test. For the cerebellar patients, using voxel based morphometry, correlations between cerebellar gray matter volume at each voxel and performance on the neuropsychological exams were calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient implemented in SPM8. Compared to controls, SCA6 patients exhibited significantly impaired performance on the following cognitive tests: Rey-Auditory Verbal Learning Test Trial V, Controlled Oral Word Association phonemic test and semantic-verb test, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure copy test as well as immediate and delayed visuo-spatial memory recall test, Trail Making Test (TMT) Part A and Part B, Stroop Color Task completion time, Stroop Color-Word Task score, and Grooved Pegboard Test (GPT) Dominant and Non-Dominant Hand time. Correlations of gray matter density with cognitive test performance were determined for all SCA6 subjects. Using a p-value threshold of 0.001 and family-wise small volume error correction, significant correlations were found for GPT Non-Dominant, GPT Dominant, TMT Part A, and TMT Part B. Different regional patterns of cerebellar involvement were found for the motoric GPT task and the executive version of the TMT. The results for the GPT strongly indicated that the integrity of medial superior hemispheric regions was associated with motor task performance, whereas executive cognitive function was localized in distinctly different inferior regions. This is the first VBM study to differentiate cognitive and motor contributions of the cerebellum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Convergence of primary sensory cortex and cerebellar nuclei pathways in the whisker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Carmen B; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2018-01-01

    To safely maneuver through the environment the brain needs to compare active sensory information with ongoing motor programs. This process occurs at various levels in the brain: at the lower level, i.e., in the spinal cord, reflexes are generated for the most primitive motor responses; at the intermediate level, i.e., in the brainstem, various nuclei co-process sensory- and motor-related inputs; and, at the higher level cerebellum and thalamo-cortical networks individually compute suitable commands for fine-tuned motor output. For sensorimotor processes the integrative capacities of the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum have been the topic of detailed analysis. Here, we use higher order sensorimotor integration in the whisker system as a model to evaluate the convergence pattern of primary sensory cortex projections and the cerebellar output nuclei throughout several brain nuclei. This prospective review focuses not only on the thalamus, but also incorporates extra-thalamic structures that could function as comparators of cerebellar output and sensory cortex output. Based on the literature on anatomical and physiological studies in the rodent brain and our qualitative data on the convergence of cerebellar sensory cortical projections we identify the superior colliculus as well as the zona incerta and the anterior pretectal nucleus as suitable candidates for cerebello-cortical convergence. Including these putative comparators we discuss the potential routes for sensorimotor information flow between the cerebellum and cerebral sensory cortex with a focus on the modulation of thalamic activity by extra-thalamic structures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Mice lacking the transcription factor SHOX2 display impaired cerebellar development and deficits in motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Jessica M; McAllister, Brendan B; Dyck, Richard H; Percival, Christopher J; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Cobb, John

    2015-03-01

    Purkinje cells of the developing cerebellum secrete the morphogen sonic hedgehog (SHH), which is required to maintain the proliferative state of granule cell precursors (GCPs) prior to their differentiation and migration to form the internal granule layer (IGL). Despite a wealth of knowledge regarding the function of SHH during cerebellar development, the upstream regulators of Shh expression during this process remain largely unknown. Here we report that the murine short stature homeobox 2 (Shox2) gene is required for normal Shh expression in dorsal-residing Purkinje cells. Using two different Cre drivers, we show that elimination of Shox2 in the brain results in developmental defects in the inferior colliculus and cerebellum. Specifically, loss of Shox2 in the cerebellum results in precocious differentiation and migration of GCPs from the external granule layer (EGL) to the IGL. This correlates with premature bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) expression in granule cells of the dorsal cerebellum. The size of the neonatal cerebellum is reduced in Shox2-mutant animals, which is consistent with a reduction in the number of GCPs present in the EGL, and could account for the smaller vermis and thinner IGL present in adult Shox2mutants. Shox2-mutant mice also display reduced exploratory activity, altered gait and impaired motor coordination. Our findings are the first to show a role for Shox2 in brain development. We provide evidence that Shox2 plays an important role during cerebellar development, perhaps to maintain the proper balance of Shh and Bmp expression levels in the dorsal vermis, and demonstrate that in the absence of Shox2, mice display both cerebellar impairments and deficits in motor coordination, ultimately highlighting the importance of Shox2 in the cerebellum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasticity of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells in Behavioral Training of Body Balance Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray X. Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural responses to sensory inputs caused by self-generated movements (reafference and external passive stimulation (exafference differ in various brain regions. The ability to differentiate such sensory information can lead to movement execution with better accuracy. However, how sensory responses are adjusted in regard to this distinguishability during motor learning is still poorly understood. The cerebellum has been hypothesized to analyze the functional significance of sensory information during motor learning, and is thought to be a key region of reafference computation in the vestibular system. In this study, we investigated Purkinje cell (PC spike trains as cerebellar cortical output when rats learned to balance on a suspended dowel. Rats progressively reduced the amplitude of body swing and made fewer foot slips during a 5-min balancing task. Both PC simple (SSs; 17 of 26 and complex spikes (CSs; 7 of 12 were found to code initially on the angle of the heads with respect to a fixed reference. Using periods with comparable degrees of movement, we found that such SS coding of information in most PCs (10 of 17 decreased rapidly during balance learning. In response to unexpected perturbations and under anesthesia, SS coding capability of these PCs recovered. By plotting SS and CS firing frequencies over 15-s time windows in double-logarithmic plots, a negative correlation between SS and CS was found in awake, but not anesthetized, rats. PCs with prominent SS coding attenuation during motor learning showed weaker SS-CS correlation. Hence, we demonstrate that neural plasticity for filtering out sensory reafference from active motion occurs in the cerebellar cortex in rats during balance learning. SS-CS interaction may contribute to this rapid plasticity as a form of receptive field plasticity in the cerebellar cortex between two receptive maps of sensory inputs from the external world and of efference copies from the will center for

  3. Drosophila Malpighian Tubules: A Model for Understanding Kidney Development, Function, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Naveen Kumar; Verma, Puja; Tapadia, Madhu G

    The Malpighian tubules of insects are structurally simple but functionally important organs, and their integrity is important for the normal excretory process. They are functional analogs of human kidneys which are important physiological organs as they maintain water and electrolyte balance in the blood and simultaneously help the body to get rid of waste and toxic products after various metabolic activities. In addition, it receives early indications of insults to the body such as immune challenge and other toxic components and is essential for sustaining life. According to National Vital Statistics Reports 2016, renal dysfunction has been ranked as the ninth most abundant cause of death in the USA. This chapter provides detailed descriptions of Drosophila Malpighian tubule development, physiology, immune function and also presents evidences that Malpighian tubules can be used as a model organ system to address the fundamental questions in developmental and functional disorders of the kidney.

  4. Teachers' Understanding of the Role of Executive Functions in Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Camilla; Cragg, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychology research has suggested an important role for executive functions, the set of skills that monitor and control thought and action, in learning mathematics. However, there is currently little evidence about whether teachers are aware of the importance of these skills and, if so, how they come by this information. We conducted an online survey of teachers' views on the importance of a range of skills for mathematics learning. Teachers rated executive function skills, and in particular inhibition and shifting, to be important for mathematics. The value placed on executive function skills increased with increasing teaching experience. Most teachers reported that they were aware of these skills, although few knew the term “executive functions.” This awareness had come about through their teaching experience rather than from formal instruction. Researchers and teacher educators could do more to highlight the importance of these skills to trainee or new teachers. PMID:25674156

  5. Expanding our understanding of leaf functional syndromes in savanna systems: the role of plant growth form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo; Franco, Augusto Cesar

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of leaf strategies has been a common theme in ecology, especially where multiple sources of environmental constraints (fire, seasonal drought, nutrient-poor soils) impose a strong selection pressure towards leaf functional diversity, leading to inevitable tradeoffs among leaf traits, and ultimately to niche segregation among coexisting species. As diversification on leaf functional strategies is dependent on integration at whole plant level, we hypothesized that regardless of phylogenetic relatedness, leaf trait functional syndromes in a multivariate space would be associated with the type of growth form. We measured traits related to leaf gas exchange, structure and nutrient status in 57 coexisting species encompassing all Angiosperms major clades, in a wide array of plant morphologies (trees, shrubs, sub-shrubs, herbs, grasses and palms) in a savanna of Central Brazil. Growth forms differed in mean values for the studied functional leaf traits. We extracted 4 groups of functional typologies: grasses (elevated leaf dark respiration, light-saturated photosynthesis on a leaf mass and area basis, lower values of leaf Ca and Mg), herbs (high values of SLA, leaf N and leaf Fe), palms (high values of stomatal conductance, leaf transpiration and leaf K) and woody eudicots (sub-shrubs, shrubs and trees; low SLA and high leaf Ca and Mg). Despite the large range of variation among species for each individual trait and the independent evolutionary trajectory of individual species, growth forms were strongly associated with particular leaf trait combinations, suggesting clear evolutionary constraints on leaf function for morphologically similar species in savanna ecosystems.

  6. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  7. Cerebellar motor learning: when is cortical plasticity not enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porrill

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical Marr-Albus theories of cerebellar learning employ only cortical sites of plasticity. However, tests of these theories using adaptive calibration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR have indicated plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and the brainstem. To resolve this long-standing conflict, we attempted to identify the computational role of the brainstem site, by using an adaptive filter version of the cerebellar microcircuit to model VOR calibration for changes in the oculomotor plant. With only cortical plasticity, introducing a realistic delay in the retinal-slip error signal of 100 ms prevented learning at frequencies higher than 2.5 Hz, although the VOR itself is accurate up to at least 25 Hz. However, the introduction of an additional brainstem site of plasticity, driven by the correlation between cerebellar and vestibular inputs, overcame the 2.5 Hz limitation and allowed learning of accurate high-frequency gains. This "cortex-first" learning mechanism is consistent with a wide variety of evidence concerning the role of the flocculus in VOR calibration, and complements rather than replaces the previously proposed "brainstem-first" mechanism that operates when ocular tracking mechanisms are effective. These results (i describe a process whereby information originally learnt in one area of the brain (cerebellar cortex can be transferred and expressed in another (brainstem, and (ii indicate for the first time why a brainstem site of plasticity is actually required by Marr-Albus type models when high-frequency gains must be learned in the presence of error delay.

  8. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder

  9. Cerebellar damage diminishes long-latency responses to multijoint perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautman, Paxson; Rasquinha, Russell J.; Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Scott, Stephen H.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the cerebellum can cause significant problems in the coordination of voluntary arm movements. One prominent idea is that incoordination stems from an inability to predictively account for the complex mechanical interactions between the arm's several joints. Motivated by growing evidence that corrective feedback control shares important capabilities and neural substrates with feedforward control, we asked whether cerebellar damage impacts feedback stabilization of the multijoint arm appropriate for the arm's intersegmental dynamics. Specifically, we tested whether cerebellar dysfunction impacts the ability of posterior deltoid to incorporate elbow motion in its long-latency response (R2 = 45–75 ms and R3 = 75–100 ms after perturbation) to an unexpected torque perturbation. Healthy and cerebellar-damaged subjects were exposed to a selected pattern of shoulder-elbow displacements to probe the response pattern from this shoulder extensor muscle. The healthy elderly subjects expressed a long-latency response linked to both shoulder and elbow motion, including an increase/decrease in shoulder extensor activity with elbow flexion/extension. Critically, cerebellar-damaged subjects displayed the normal pattern of activity in the R3 period indicating an intact ability to rapidly integrate multijoint motion appropriate to the arm's intersegmental dynamics. However, cerebellar-damaged subjects had a lower magnitude of activity that was specific to the long-latency period (both R2 and R3) and a slightly delayed onset of multijoint sensitivity. Taken together, our results suggest that the basic motor pattern of the long-latency response is housed outside the cerebellum and is scaled by processes within the cerebellum. PMID:23390311

  10. Assessment of the cerebellar neurotoxic effects of nicotine in prenatal alcohol exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Majrashi, Mohammed; Ramesh, Sindhu; Govindarajulu, Manoj; Bloemer, Jenna; Fujihashi, Ayaka; Crump, Bailee-Ryan; Hightower, Harrison; Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Moore, Timothy; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2018-02-01

    The adverse effects of prenatal nicotine and alcohol exposure on human reproductive outcomes are a major scientific and public health concern. In the United States, substantial percentage of women (20-25%) of childbearing age currently smoke cigarettes and consume alcohol, and only a small percentage of these individuals quit after learning of their pregnancy. However, there are very few scientific reports on the effect of nicotine in prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum of the offspring. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the cerebellar neurotoxic effects of nicotine in a rodent model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). In this study, we evaluated the behavioral changes, biochemical markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis, mitochondrial functions and the molecular mechanisms associated with nicotine in prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum. Prenatal nicotine and alcohol exposure induced oxidative stress, did not affect the mitochondrial functions, increased the monoamine oxidase activity, increased caspase expression and decreased ILK, PSD-95 and GLUR1 expression without affecting the GSK-3β. Thus, our current study of prenatal alcohol and nicotine exposure on cerebellar neurotoxicity may lead to new scientific perceptions and novel and suitable therapeutic actions in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Gait rehabilitation in a patient affected with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease associated with pyramidal and cerebellar features and blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Paolo

    2003-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, an inherited neuropathy characterized by length-dependent degeneration of the motor and sensory nerve fibers with consequent distal muscle atrophy and sensory reduction, can be associated with symptoms and signs of involvement of the central nervous system and/or cranial nerves. We present a patient with relatively severe CMT, cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal involvement, and blindness due to Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. The patient presented with poor standing and gait, with consequent severe disability. Factors responsible for the patient's functional impairment (plantarflexor failure, footdrop, foot rotation, knee flexor contracture, poor proprioception, cerebellar dysfunction, spastic paraparesis, blindness) were identified and addressed by a rehabilitation management, which included, as a main intervention, ankle stabilization by drop-foot boots instead of ankle-foot orthoses. Improved balance and independent ambulation resulted from rehabilitation.

  12. Understanding the functions and relationships of the glymphatic system and meningeal lymphatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louveau, Antoine; Plog, Benjamin A; Antila, Salli

    2017-01-01

    to the peripheral (CNS-draining) lymph nodes. We speculate on the relationship between the two systems and their malfunction that may underlie some neurological diseases. Although much remains to be investigated, these new discoveries have changed our understanding of mechanisms underlying CNS immune privilege...... and CNS drainage. Future studies should explore the communications between the glymphatic system and meningeal lymphatics in CNS disorders and develop new therapeutic modalities targeting these systems....

  13. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  14. Using Genetically Engineered Animal Models in the Postgenomic Era to Understand Gene Function in Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Matthew T.; Harris, R. Adron; Noronha, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, researchers have made substantial progress in identifying genetic variations that underlie the complex phenotype of alcoholism. Not much is known, however, about how this genetic variation translates into altered biological function. Genetic animal models recapitulating specific characteristics of the human condition have helped elucidate gene function and the genetic basis of disease. In particular, major advances have come from the ability to manipulate genes through a variety of genetic technologies that provide an unprecedented capacity to determine gene function in the living organism and in alcohol-related behaviors. Even newer genetic-engineering technologies have given researchers the ability to control when and where a specific gene or mutation is activated or deleted, allowing investigators to narrow the role of the gene’s function to circumscribed neural pathways and across development. These technologies are important for all areas of neuroscience, and several public and private initiatives are making a new generation of genetic-engineering tools available to the scientific community at large. Finally, high-throughput “next-generation sequencing” technologies are set to rapidly increase knowledge of the genome, epigenome, and transcriptome, which, combined with genetically engineered mouse mutants, will enhance insight into biological function. All of these resources will provide deeper insight into the genetic basis of alcoholism. PMID:23134044

  15. Estimation of Time-Varying Coherence and Its Application in Understanding Brain Functional Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-varying coherence is a powerful tool for revealing functional dynamics between different regions in the brain. In this paper, we address ways of estimating evolutionary spectrum and coherence using the general Cohen's class distributions. We show that the intimate connection between the Cohen's class-based spectra and the evolutionary spectra defined on the locally stationary time series can be linked by the kernel functions of the Cohen's class distributions. The time-varying spectra and coherence are further generalized with the Stockwell transform, a multiscale time-frequency representation. The Stockwell measures can be studied in the framework of the Cohen's class distributions with a generalized frequency-dependent kernel function. A magnetoencephalography study using the Stockwell coherence reveals an interesting temporal interaction between contralateral and ipsilateral motor cortices under the multisource interference task.

  16. Optogenetic modulation and multi-electrode analysis of cerebellar networks in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Kruse

    Full Text Available The firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs, as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, determine and tune motor behavior. PC firing is modulated by various inputs from different brain regions and by cell-types including granule cells (GCs, climbing fibers and inhibitory interneurons. To understand how signal integration in PCs occurs and how subtle changes in the modulation of PC firing lead to adjustment of motor behaviors, it is important to precisely record PC firing in vivo and to control modulatory pathways in a spatio-temporal manner. Combining optogenetic and multi-electrode approaches, we established a new method to integrate light-guides into a multi-electrode system. With this method we are able to variably position the light-guide in defined regions relative to the recording electrode with micrometer precision. We show that PC firing can be precisely monitored and modulated by light-activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 expressed in PCs, GCs and interneurons. Thus, this method is ideally suited to investigate the spatio/temporal modulation of PCs in anesthetized and in behaving mice.

  17. Impaired Feedforward Control and Enhanced Feedback Control of Speech in Patients with Cerebellar Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrell, Benjamin; Agnew, Zarinah; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Houde, John; Ivry, Richard B

    2017-09-20

    The cerebellum has been hypothesized to form a crucial part of the speech motor control network. Evidence for this comes from patients with cerebellar damage, who exhibit a variety of speech deficits, as well as imaging studies showing cerebellar activation during speech production in healthy individuals. To date, the precise role of the cerebellum in speech motor control remains unclear, as it has been implicated in both anticipatory (feedforward) and reactive (feedback) control. Here, we assess both anticipatory and reactive aspects of speech motor control, comparing the performance of patients with cerebellar degeneration and matched controls. Experiment 1 tested feedforward control by examining speech adaptation across trials in response to a consistent perturbation of auditory feedback. Experiment 2 tested feedback control, examining online corrections in response to inconsistent perturbations of auditory feedback. Both male and female patients and controls were tested. The patients were impaired in adapting their feedforward control system relative to controls, exhibiting an attenuated anticipatory response to the perturbation. In contrast, the patients produced even larger compensatory responses than controls, suggesting an increased reliance on sensory feedback to guide speech articulation in this population. Together, these results suggest that the cerebellum is crucial for maintaining accurate feedforward control of speech, but relatively uninvolved in feedback control. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Speech motor control is a complex activity that is thought to rely on both predictive, feedforward control as well as reactive, feedback control. While the cerebellum has been shown to be part of the speech motor control network, its functional contribution to feedback and feedforward control remains controversial. Here, we use real-time auditory perturbations of speech to show that patients with cerebellar degeneration are impaired in adapting feedforward control of

  18. Modulation of 7 T fMRI Signal in the Cerebellar Cortex and Nuclei During Acquisition, Extinction, and Reacquisition of Conditioned Eyeblink Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Thomas M; Thürling, Markus; Müller, Sarah; Kahl, Fabian; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Boele, Henk-Jan; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Diedrichsen, Jörn; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Ladd, Mark E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2017-08-01

    Classical delay eyeblink conditioning is likely the most commonly used paradigm to study cerebellar learning. As yet, few studies have focused on extinction and savings of conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs). Saving effects, which are reflected in a reacquisition after extinction that is faster than the initial acquisition, suggest that learned associations are at least partly preserved during extinction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that acquisition-related plasticity is nihilated during extinction in the cerebellar cortex, but retained in the cerebellar nuclei, allowing for faster reacquisition. Changes of 7 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals were investigated in the cerebellar cortex and nuclei of young and healthy human subjects. Main effects of acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition against rest were calculated in conditioned stimulus-only trials. First-level β values were determined for a spherical region of interest (ROI) around the acquisition peak voxel in lobule VI, and dentate and interposed nuclei ipsilateral to the unconditioned stimulus. In the cerebellar cortex and nuclei, fMRI signals were significantly lower in extinction compared to acquisition and reacquisition, but not significantly different between acquisition and reacquisition. These findings are consistent with the theory of bidirectional learning in both the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. It cannot explain, however, why conditioned responses reappear almost immediately in reacquisition following extinction. Although the present data do not exclude that part of the initial memory remains in the cerebellum in extinction, future studies should also explore changes in extracerebellar regions as a potential substrate of saving effects. Hum Brain Mapp 38:3957-3974, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Understanding Pervasive Language Impairment in Young Children: Exploring Patterns in Narrative Language and Functional Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Anna Jeddeloh

    2013-01-01

    Research has identified language impairment as a pervasive disability (Bishop & Edmundson, 1987; Greenhalgh & Strong, 2001). Classroom communication behaviors have a role in the maintenance of special education eligibility and functional communication difficulties for young children with language impairment. This paper reviews the…

  20. A Dyadic Approach to Understanding the Link Between Sexual Functioning and Sexual Satisfaction in Heterosexual Couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascoal, Patrícia M.; Byers, E. Sandra; Alvarez, Maria-João; Santos-Iglesias, Pablo; Nobre, Pedro J.; Pereira, Cicero Roberto; Laan, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that several dimensions of sexual functioning (e.g., sexual desire, arousal, orgasm) are associated with the sexual satisfaction of individuals in a committed mixed-sex (male-female) relationship. We extended this research by comparing a dyadic model that included both

  1. Excisional Precision Matters: Understanding the Influence of Excisional Volume Loss on Renal Function After Partial Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Julien; Maurice, Matthew J; Mouracade, Pascal; Kara, Onder; Malkoc, Ercan; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2017-08-01

    Renal function after partial nephrectomy (PN) may depend on modifiable factors including ischemia time, excision of healthy parenchyma (excisional volume loss, EVL), and reconstructive methods. We retrospectively reviewed our institutional robotic PN database to identify the predictors of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) preservation (GFR-P) at 3-12 mo postoperatively, during which GFR decline plateaus. Baseline clinical, sociodemographic, and radiologic characteristics were captured. Univariate and multivariate (MV) linear regression analyses were performed and marginal effects were employed to examine the relative effect of EVL on renal function. A total of 647 patients who underwent robotic PN had GFR data at a median follow-up of 6 mo. On MV models, EVL was significantly correlated with GFR-P following log transformation (p=0.001). Each doubling of EVL caused a 1.5% decrease in GFR-P. Ischemia time and tumor complexity were not significantly associated with GFR-P. In summary, GFR-P after PN appears to be significantly associated with the excised volume of benign parenchyma. At a high-volume tertiary care center, we investigated the impact of surgical factors on kidney function after kidney cancer surgery. We found that the surgical precision with which the tumor is excised significantly impacts kidney function at 3-12 mo after surgery. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality of life and social production functions : A framework for understanding health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, J.; Lindenberg, S.; Steverink, N.; Vonkorff, M.

    1997-01-01

    Quality of life (QofL) has emerged as a new outcome paradigm. It is now the endpoint in various taxonomies of patient outcomes, in which relationships are modeled amongst biological abnormalities, symptom status, functional status, disability, health perceptions and quality of life. Although current

  3. Phloem function: A key to understanding and manipulating plant responses to rising atmospheric [CO2]?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) directly stimulates photosynthesis and reduces stomatal conductance in C3 plants. Both of these physiological effects have the potential to alter phloem function at elevated [CO2]. Recent research has clearly established that photosynthetic...

  4. Probability density of wave function of excited photoelectron: understanding XANES features

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šipr, Ondřej

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2001), s. 232-234 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A02/98:Z1-010-914 Keywords : XANES * PED - probability density of wave function Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2001

  5. Towards understanding the evolution and functional diversification of DNA-containing plant organelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leister, Dario Michael

    2016-01-01

    of plant nuclear genomes that have emerged since 2000. Here I review the results of these attempts to reconstruct the evolution and functions of plant DNA-containing organelles, focusing in particular on data from nuclear genomes. In addition, I discuss proteomic approaches to the direct identification...

  6. Teachers' Understanding of the Role of Executive Functions in Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Camilla; Cragg, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychology research has suggested an important role for executive functions, the set of skills that monitor and control thought and action, in learning mathematics. However, there is currently little evidence about whether teachers are aware of the importance of these skills and, if so, how they come by this information. We conducted an…

  7. Maternal yolk testosterone in canary eggs : toward a better understanding of mechanisms and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Wendt; Boonen, Sofie; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Eens, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Maternal yolk androgens in avian eggs have been shown to affect numerous offspring traits. These changes in offspring phenotype represent examples of maternal effects and are thought to adjust offspring development to the posthatching environment. When studying the functional consequences of yolk

  8. A Visualisation-Based Semiotic Analysis of Learners' Conceptual Understanding of Graphical Functional Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudaly, Vimolan

    2014-01-01

    Within the South African school curriculum, the section on graphical functional relationships consists of signs which include symbols, notation and imagery. In a previous article we explored the role visualisation played in the way learners understood mathematical concepts. That paper reported on the learners' fixation with the physical features…

  9. Understanding the Emergence and Functioning of River Committees in a Catchment of the Pangani Basin, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans C. Komakech

    2011-06-01

    To explain the difference in the performance of the three RCs we need to consider factors related to heterogeneity. We find that the functioning of RCs is strongly influenced by group size, spatial distance, heterogeneity of users and uses, and market forces.

  10. Understanding Parent-Child Social Informant Discrepancy in Youth with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Calhoun, Casey D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; De Los Reyes, Andres

    2012-01-01

    We investigated discrepancies between parent- and self-reported social functioning among youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Three distinct samples showed discrepancies indicating that parents viewed their children as performing one standard deviation below a standardization mean, while youth viewed themselves as comparably-skilled…

  11. Sharpening the edges of understanding the structure/function of the LPA1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Mandi; Nguyen, Giang; Radhakrishna, Harish; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-01-01

    Since the molecular cloning of the vzg-1/Edg-2/LPA1 gene, studies have attempted to characterize LPA1 receptor functionality into a single categorical role, different from the other Edg-family LPA receptors. The desire to categorize LPA1 function has highlighted its complexity and demonstrated that the LPA1 receptor does not have one absolute function throughout every system. The central nervous system is highly enriched in the LPA1 receptor, suggesting an integral role in neuronal processes. Metastatic and invasive breast cancer also appears to have LPA-mediated LPA1 receptor functions that enhance phenotypes associated with tumorigenesis. LPA1 possesses a number of motifs conserved among G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): a DRY-like motif, a PDZ domain, Ser/Thr predicted sites of phosphorylation, a dileucine motif, double cysteines in the tail and conserved residues that stabilize structure and determine ligand binding. The third intracellular loop of the LPA1 receptor may be the crux of receptor signaling and attenuation with phosphorylation of Thr-236 potentially a key determinant of basal LPA1 signaling. Mutagenesis data supports the notion that Thr-236 regulates this process since mutating Thr-236 to Ala-236 increased basal and LPA-mediated serum response factor (SRF) signaling activity and Lys-236 further increased this basal signaling. Here we describe progress on defining the major functions of the LPA1 receptor, discuss a context dependent dualistic role as both a negative regulator in cancer and a proto-oncogene, outline its structural components at the molecular amino-acid level and present mutagenesis data on the third intracellular loop of the receptor. PMID:18501205

  12. Medial cerebellar nuclear projections and activity patterns link cerebellar output to orofacial and respiratory behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianyi eLu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that the cerebellum plays an important role in coordinating both respiratory and orofacial movements. However, the pathway by which the cerebellum engages brainstem substrates underlying these movements is not well understood. We used tract-tracing techniques in mice to show that neurons in the medial deep cerebellar nucleus (mDCN project directly to these putative substrates. Injection of an anterograde tracer into the mDCN produced terminal labeling in the ventromedial medullary reticular formation, which was stronger on the contralateral side. Correspondingly, injection of retrograde tracers into these same areas resulted in robust neuronal cell labeling in the contralateral mDCN. Moreover, injection of two retrograde tracers at different rostral - caudal brainstem levels resulted in a subset of double-labeled cells, indicating that single mDCN neurons collateralize to multiple substrates. Using an awake and behaving recording preparation, we show that spiking activity in mDCN neurons is correlated with respiratory and orofacial behaviors, including whisking and fluid licking. Almost half of the recorded neurons showed activity correlated with more than one behavior, suggesting that these neurons may in fact modulate multiple brainstem substrates. Collectively, these results describe a potential pathway through which the cerebellum could modulate and coordinate respiratory and orofacial behaviors.

  13. Tool use ability depends on understanding of functional dynamics and not specific joint contribution profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross eParry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in cognitive neuroscience have become increasingly interested in how different aspects of tool use are integrated and represented by the brain. Comparatively less attention has been directed towards tool use actions themselves and how effective tool use behaviors are coordinated. In response, we take this opportunity to consider the mechanical principles of tool use actions and their relationship to motor learning. Using kinematic analysis, we examine both functional dynamics and joint contribution profiles of subjects with different levels of experience in a primordial percussive task. Our results show that the ability to successfully produce stone flakes using the Oldowan method did not correspond with any particular joint contribution profile. Rather, expertise in this tool use action was principally associated with the subject’s ability to regulate the functional parameters that define the task itself.

  14. CHRONIC FUNCTIONAL CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN — FROM UNDERSTANDING THE PROBLEM TO THE PROPER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.F. Privorotskiy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional origin is known in 95% of children with constipation. According to ICD-10 there is traditional distinction between syndrome of irritated bowel and proper functional constipation which have wide spectrum of causes. Rome criteria III propose initial diagnostic criteria of these disorders but the use of the criteria in pediatrics is frequently complicated. Clinical practice of pediatrician demands differentiation of constipations into hypertonic and hypotonic ones. Treatment programs include necessary component — laxative drugs which are useful in cases of subcompensated and decompensated types of constipation. One of the laxative drugs is Forlax containing polyethyleneglycol 4.000; it can be given to children 6 months old and older. The literature data shows high efficiency and safety of the drug.Key words: children, constipation, laxative drugs.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(6:69-77

  15. How the mind understands other minds: cognitive psychology, attachment and reflective function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, Massimo; Corradi, Marina

    2006-04-01

    Jung's epistemological relativistic attitude was very advanced for his time and very much in line with the contemporary philosophy of science. Further, Jung states that the patient's unconscious has the capacity to represent itself by creating metaphors which give the therapist all the help he might need in treating his patient. As such, Jungian analysts have not been encouraged to embark on theoretical work and as a result, the Jungian movement has been lacking those theories that connect general psychological principles with clinical practices. In an attempt to enlarge our 'middle-range theories', we shall discuss Peter Fonagy's concept of reflective function. In our opinion, the theoretical hypothesis regarding the instinct of reading the mind (Baron-Cohen 1995) and Fonagy's idea of reflective function are extremely useful in our Jungian clinical practice and these concepts are utilizable because they are not at odds with analytical psychology's general epistemological and theoretical framework.

  16. Computerized Electroencephalogram. A model of understanding the brain function in childhood psychosis and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, J; Itil, T M

    1975-09-01

    Computer analysis of the electroencephalogram (CEEG) in psychotic children before and after pharmacotherapy, normal children of schizophrenic mothers, and matched normal children of normal parents indicated significant intergroup differences. The psychotic children had more slow, as well as very fast, EEG waves. With drug therapy the EEG showed a partial "normalization," as fast EEG activity decreased. The EEG and auditory evoked potential of children of schizophrenic mothers were strikingly similar to those of psychotic children and schizophrenic adults, with significant decreases of the average EEG amplitude and the evoked potential latencies. Psychotic children were distinctly differentiated from the normal children by discriminant function analysis of the EEG and EP. Quantitative analysis of brain functions in the mentally ill can help determine the neurophysiological correlates of behavior, a more scientific diagnostic classification, prognosis, and selection of therapy.

  17. Analysis of Undergraduate Students’ Mathematical Understanding Ability of the Limit of Function Based on APOS Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afgani, M. W.; Suryadi, D.; Dahlan, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to know the level of undergraduate students’ mathematical understanding ability based on APOS theory perspective. The APOS theory provides an evaluation framework to describe the level of students’ understanding and mental structure about their conception to a mathematics concept. The levels of understanding in APOS theory are action, process, object, and schema conception. The subjects were 59 students of mathematics education whom had attended a class of the limit of function at a university in Palembang. The method was qualitative descriptive with 4 test items. The result showed that most of students were still at the level of action conception. They could calculate and use procedure precisely to the mathematics objects that was given, but could not reach the higher conception yet.

  18. Predicting future forests: Understanding diverse phenological responses within a community and functional trait framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkovich, E. M.; Flynn, D. F. B.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years increasing attention has focused on plant phenology as an important indicator of the biological impacts of climate change, as many plants have shifted their leafing and flowering earlier with increasing temperatures. As data have accumulated, researchers have found a link between phenological responses to warming and plant performance and invasions. Such work suggests phenology may not only be a major impact of warming, but a critical predictor of future plant performance. Yet alongside this increasing interest in phenology, important issues remain unanswered: responses to warming for species at the same site or in the same genus vary often by weeks or more and the explanatory power of phenology for performance and invasions when analyzed across diverse datasets remains low. We propose progress can come from explicitly considering phenology within a community context and as a critical plant trait correlated with other major plant functional traits. Here, we lay out a framework for our proposal: specifically we review how we expect phenology and phenological cues of different species within a community to vary and what other functional traits are predicted to co-vary with phenological traits. Much research currently suggests phenology is a critical functional trait that is shaped strongly by the environment. Plants are expected to adjust their phenologies to avoid periods of high abiotic risk and/or high competition. Thus we may expect phenology to correlate strongly to other traits involved in mitigating risk and high competition. Results from recent meta-analyses as well as experimental and observational research from 28 species in northeastern North American temperate forests suggest that species within a community show the predicted diversified set of phenological cues. We review early work on links to other functional traits and in closing review how these correlations may in turn determine the diversity of phenological responses observed for

  19. Understanding right ventricular dysfunction and functional tricuspid regurgitation accompanying mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Abello, Lina Maria; Klein, Allan L; Marwick, Thomas H; Nowicki, Edward R; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Puwanant, Sarinya; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2013-05-01

    The study objective was to correlate the degree of tricuspid regurgitation with clinical indicators of right-sided heart failure and both qualitative and quantitative measures of right-sided heart morphology and function in patients with degenerative mitral valve disease. From 2001 to 2007, 1833 patients with degenerative mitral valve disease, structurally normal tricuspid valve, and no coronary artery disease underwent surgery. Right-sided heart morphology (right ventricular base-to-apex length, tethering distance and area, and right atrial systolic area) and right ventricular function (tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, myocardial performance index, and tricuspid valve annular shortening) were measured on preoperative transthoracic echocardiograms for 100 randomly selected patients from each of tricuspid regurgitation grades 0, 1+, and 2+, and for all 93 patients with tricuspid regurgitation grade 3+/4+. Multivariable regression was used to evaluate the association of left- and right-sided heart morphology and function with tricuspid regurgitation. Increasing tricuspid regurgitation grade was associated with higher right ventricular pressure (P tricuspid regurgitation was present. When tricuspid regurgitation was 3+/4+, both tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and myocardial performance index were almost certainly abnormal. Changes in right-sided heart morphology and right ventricular dysfunction were synergistic in relation to severity of tricuspid regurgitation. Functional tricuspid regurgitation accompanying mitral valve disease is associated with proportional changes in right-sided heart morphology; however, severe tricuspid regurgitation is nearly always associated with right ventricular dysfunction, suggesting a synergistic relationship. Right ventricular dysfunction is likely as important as tricuspid regurgitation because it offers an explanation for the negative prognostic impact of tricuspid regurgitation and has implications for the

  20. Understanding the Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Executive Function, Complex Task Performance and Situation Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Grugle, Nancy Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Both sleep deprivation and loss of situation awareness (SA) have been cited as primary causal factors contributing to the accident and injury rate in the military and civilian sector (e.g., transportation). Despite the numerous references to both factors as causal in nature, much of the literature on the effects of sleep deprivation on executive function is anecdotal. Research has produced mixed results regarding the nature and extent of performance degradation on a variety of lower-level a...