WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding architecture project

  1. Avionics Architecture for Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Avionics Architectures for Exploration Project team will develop a system level environment and architecture that will accommodate equipment from multiple...

  2. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Project Integration Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Henry

    2008-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) is a distributed, object-oriented, conceptual, software framework for the generation, organization, publication, integration, and consumption of all information involved in any complex technological process in a manner that is intelligible to both computers and humans. In the development of PIA, it was recognized that in order to provide a single computational environment in which all information associated with any given complex technological process could be viewed, reviewed, manipulated, and shared, it is necessary to formulate all the elements of such a process on the most fundamental level. In this formulation, any such element is regarded as being composed of any or all of three parts: input information, some transformation of that input information, and some useful output information. Another fundamental principle of PIA is the assumption that no consumer of information, whether human or computer, can be assumed to have any useful foreknowledge of an element presented to it. Consequently, a PIA-compliant computing system is required to be ready to respond to any questions, posed by the consumer, concerning the nature of the proffered element. In colloquial terms, a PIA-compliant system must be prepared to provide all the information needed to place the element in context. To satisfy this requirement, PIA extends the previously established object-oriented- programming concept of self-revelation and applies it on a grand scale. To enable pervasive use of self-revelation, PIA exploits another previously established object-oriented-programming concept - that of semantic infusion through class derivation. By means of self-revelation and semantic infusion through class derivation, a consumer of information can inquire about the contents of all information entities (e.g., databases and software) and can interact appropriately with those entities. Other key features of PIA are listed.

  4. Architectural project and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Katrine

    2005-01-01

    Discussion of criterias for research including the researchers or designers own project as theme.......Discussion of criterias for research including the researchers or designers own project as theme....

  5. Project Compliance with Enterprise Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foorthuis, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This research project set out to identify effective practices and models for working with projects that are required to comply with Enterprise Architecture (EA), and investigate the benefits and drawbacks brought about by compliance. Research methods used are canonical action research, a statistical

  6. Architecture-Centric Project Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Troy Steven

    2007-01-01

    In recent years studies have been conducted which suggest that taking an architecture first approach to managing large software projects can reduce a significant amount of the uncertainty present in project estimates. As the project progresses, more concrete information is known about the planned system and less risk is present. However, the rate at which risk is alleviated varies across the life-cycle. Research suggests that there exists a significant drop off in risk...

  7. Medical Data Architecture Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Gurram, M.; Wolfe, S.; Marker, N.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2018-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current in-flight medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are a variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable a more medically autonomous crew than the current paradigm. The medical system requirements are being developed in parallel with the exploration mission architecture and vehicle design. ExMC has recognized that in order to make informed decisions about a medical data architecture framework, current methods for medical data management must not only be understood, but an architecture must also be identified that provides the crew with actionable insight to medical conditions. This medical data architecture will provide the necessary functionality to address the challenges of executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. Hence, the products supported by current prototype development will directly inform exploration medical system requirements.

  8. Medical Data Architecture Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Lindsey, A.; Marker, N.; Wolfe, S.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2017-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current International Space Station (ISS) medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable an increasingly autonomous crew than the current ISS paradigm. The MDA will develop capabilities that support automated data collection, and the necessary functionality and challenges in executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. To attain this goal, the first year of the MDA project focused on reducing technical risk, developing documentation and instituting iterative development processes that established the basis for the first version of MDA software (or Test Bed 1). Test Bed 1 is based on a nominal operations scenario authored by the ExMC Element Scientist. This narrative was decomposed into a Concept of Operations that formed the basis for Test Bed 1 requirements. These requirements were successfully vetted through the MDA Test Bed 1 System Requirements Review, which permitted the MDA project to begin software code development and component integration. This paper highlights the MDA objectives, development processes, and accomplishments, and identifies the fiscal year 2017 milestones and

  9. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) addresses the fundamental problem of command, control, and communications systems interoperability....

  10. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Enterprise Architecture Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The project implements an architecture for delivery of integrated health management capabilities for the 21st Century launch complex. The delivered capabilities include anomaly detection, fault isolation, prognostics and physics based diagnostics.

  11. Understanding architecture through drawing: Chinese edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Outline of drawing tools ansd methods in architecture. Case studies of types and subjects. Research into contemporary practice......Outline of drawing tools ansd methods in architecture. Case studies of types and subjects. Research into contemporary practice...

  12. Can enterprise architectures reduce failure in development projects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Klievink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Scant attention has been given to the role of enterprise architecture (EA) in relationship to risk management in information system development projects. Even less attention has been given to the inter-organizational setting. The aim of this paper is to better understand this relationship.

  13. Unrealized Architectural Projects in Lithuania: Historical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrė Gudelytė

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The “unrealized architectural projects” are the building projects, carried out under the specific design task and intended to be built in a particular place (site, though, for certain reasons and circumstances, have never been constructed. However, up to the present day, the topic of the “unbuilt” has been analyzed just episodically in literature and sources. The article touches upon the historical development of unrealized architectural works, as well as their artistic value and role within various historical periods of Lithuanian architecture. One of the chapters briefly reviews the relevance and development of unrealized projects during the period since Czarist Russian occupation (1795 to the restoration of Lithuanian independence (1990. Furthermore, the deeper analysis of the Soviet period (1940–1990 “dead” architecture is presented. While exploring “the unrealized”, attention has been also paid to what was actu ally built, therefore the prevailing architectural styles, tendencies and examples of the corresponding decade (in Lithuania and worldwide have been studied.Article in Lithuanian

  14. Agile Development and Software Architecture: Understanding Scale and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    Scrum Team A Scrum Team B Temporary sprint team 26 Agile Development and Software Architecture Robert L. Nord, SSTC, April 2012 © 2012 Carnegie...2012 Carnegie Mellon University Agile Development and Software Architecture: Understanding Scale and Risk Software Engineering Institute Carnegie... Agile Development and Software Architecture Robert L. Nord, SSTC, April 2012 © 2012 Carnegie Mellon University The challenge -1 Tradeoffs and their

  15. Understanding map projections: Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usery, E. Lynn; Kent, Alexander J.; Vujakovic, Peter

    2018-01-01

    It has probably never been more important in the history of cartography than now that people understand how maps work. With increasing globalization, for example, world maps provide a key format for the transmission of information, but are often poorly used. Examples of poor understanding and use of projections and the resultant maps are many; for instance, the use of rectangular world maps in the United Kingdom press to show Chinese and Korean missile ranges as circles, something which can only be achieved on equidistant projections and then only from one launch point (Vujakovic, 2014).

  16. Medical Data Architecture (MDA) Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Gurram, M.; Wolfe, S.; Marker, N.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2018-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current in-flight medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are a variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable a more medically autonomous crew than the current paradigm. The medical system requirements are being developed in parallel with the exploration mission architecture and vehicle design. ExMC has recognized that in order to make informed decisions about a medical data architecture framework, current methods for medical data management must not only be understood, but an architecture must also be identified that provides the crew with actionable insight to medical conditions. This medical data architecture will provide the necessary functionality to address the challenges of executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. Hence, the products supported by current prototype development will directly inform exploration medical system requirements.

  17. Medical Data Architecture Project Capabilities and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middour, C.; Krihak, M.; Lindsey, A.; Marker, N.; Wolfe, S.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2017-01-01

    Mission constraints will challenge the delivery of medical care on a long-term, deep space exploration mission. This type of mission will be restricted in the availability of medical knowledge, skills, procedures and resources to prevent, diagnose, and treat in-flight medical events. Challenges to providing medical care are anticipated, including resource and resupply constraints, delayed communications and no ability for medical evacuation. The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project will enable medical care capability in this constrained environment. The first version of the system, called "Test Bed 1," includes capabilities for automated data collection, data storage and data retrieval to provide information to the Crew Medical Officer (CMO). Test Bed 1 seeks to establish a data architecture foundation and develop a scalable data management system through modular design and standardized interfaces. In addition, it will demonstrate to stakeholders the potential for an improved, automated, flow of data to and from the medical system over the current methods employed on the International Space Station (ISS). It integrates a set of external devices, software and processes, and a Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan (SOAP) note commonly used by clinicians. Medical data like electrocardiogram plots, heart rate, skin temperature, respiration rate, medications taken, and more are collected from devices and stored in the Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system, and reported to crew and clinician. Devices integrated include the Astroskin biosensor vest and IMED CARDIAX electrocardiogram (ECG) device with INEED MD ECG Glove, and the NASA-developed Medical Dose Tracker application. The system is designed to be operated as a standalone system, and can be deployed in a variety of environments, from a laptop to a data center. The system is primarily composed of open-source software tools, and is designed to be modular, so new capabilities can be added. The software

  18. Memory in Architecture : Contemporary memorial projects and their predecessors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanovic, S.

    2015-01-01

    This research is focused on several case studies, all contemporary architectural projects, dedicated to commemoration of different atrocities. The process of creating a memorial is bound up with a wide range of influences and affects, like any architectural project. However, building a memorial is

  19. Architecture for Integrated System Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Managing the health of vehicle, crew, and habitat systems is a primary function of flight controllers today. We propose to develop an architecture for automating...

  20. Understanding Applications of Project Planning and Scheduling in Construction Projects

    OpenAIRE

    AlNasseri, Hammad Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Construction project life-cycle processes must be managed in a more effective and predictable way to meet project stakeholders’ needs. However, there is increasing concern about whether know-how effectively improves understanding of underlying theories of project management processes for construction organizations and their project managers. Project planning and scheduling are considered as key and challenging tools in controlling and monitoring project performance, but many worldwide constru...

  1. Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Clear, Nic

    2014-01-01

    When discussing science fiction’s relationship with architecture, the usual practice is to look at the architecture “in” science fiction—in particular, the architecture in SF films (see Kuhn 75-143) since the spaces of literary SF present obvious difficulties as they have to be imagined. In this essay, that relationship will be reversed: I will instead discuss science fiction “in” architecture, mapping out a number of architectural movements and projects that can be viewed explicitly as scien...

  2. Improving Project Management Using Formal Models and Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Theodore; Sturken, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This talk discusses the advantages formal modeling and architecture brings to project management. These emerging technologies have both great potential and challenges for improving information available for decision-making. The presentation covers standards, tools and cultural issues needing consideration, and includes lessons learned from projects the presenters have worked on.

  3. School Students' Responses to Architecture: A Practical Studio Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Describes a project with mixed ability learners attending Deacon's School (Peterborough, England). The project, which emphasized critical response to the built environment, involved students making "pop up cards" based on firsthand observation of local architecture. Students were encouraged to learn about art and design through reacting,…

  4. Understanding Extraordinary Architectural Experiences through Content Analysis of Written Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Richard Ro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study a identifies how people describe, characterize, and communicate in written form Extraordinary Architectural Experiences (EAE, and b expands the traditional qualitative approach to architectural phenomenology by demonstrating a quantitative method to analyze written narratives. Specifically, this study reports on the content analysis of 718 personal accounts of EAEs. Using a deductive, ‘theory-driven’ approach, these narratives were read, coded, and statistically analyzed to identify storyline structure, convincing power, and the relationship between subjective and objective experiential qualities used in the story-telling process. Statistical intercoder agreement tests were conducted to verify the reliability of the interpretations to approach the hard problem of “extraordinary aesthetics” in architecture empirically. The results of this study confirm the aesthetic nature of EAE narratives (and of told experiences by showing their higher dependence on external objective content (e.g., a building’s features and location rather than its internal subjective counterpart (e.g., emotions and sensations, which makes them more outwardly focused. The strong interrelationships and intercoder agreement between the thematic realms provide a unique aesthetic construct revealing EAE narratives as memorable, embodied, emotional events mapped by the externally focused content of place, social setting, time, and building features. A majority of EAE narratives were found to possess plot-structure along with significant relationships to objective-subjective content that further grounded their storylines. This study concludes that content analysis provides not only a valid method to understand written narratives about extraordinary architectural experiences quantitatively, but also a view as to how to map the unique nature of aesthetic phenomenology empirically.

  5. Understanding the causes of architecture changes using OSS mailing lists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Wei; Liang, Peng; Tang, Anthony; Van Vliet, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The causes of architecture changes can tell about why architecture changes, and this knowledge can be captured to prevent architecture knowledge vaporization and architecture degeneration. But the causes are not always known, especially in open source software (OSS) development. This makes it very

  6. The MammoGrid Project Grids Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    McClatchey, Richard; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri; Buncic, Predrag; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Buncic, Predrag; Manset, David; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the recently EU-funded MammoGrid project is, in the light of emerging Grid technology, to develop a European-wide database of mammograms that will be used to develop a set of important healthcare applications and investigate the potential of this Grid to support effective co-working between healthcare professionals throughout the EU. The MammoGrid consortium intends to use a Grid model to enable distributed computing that spans national borders. This Grid infrastructure will be used for deploying novel algorithms as software directly developed or enhanced within the project. Using the MammoGrid clinicians will be able to harness the use of massive amounts of medical image data to perform epidemiological studies, advanced image processing, radiographic education and ultimately, tele-diagnosis over communities of medical "virtual organisations". This is achieved through the use of Grid-compliant services [1] for managing (versions of) massively distributed files of mammograms, for handling the distri...

  7. Deconstruction in Architecture – Continuous Translation through an Open Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Tošić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jacques Derrida developed deconstruction as a way of thinking which constantly examines the nature and possibilities of meaning. The paper analyses spatial-economic, cultural and social context in which deconstructive discourse was translated into architectural discourse. Translation between these two discourses happens vice versa. Deconstructivism emphasizes the formal properties of architecture, like postmodernism, which is the subject of exploration by architects such as Coop Himmelblau, Frank Gehry, Eric Owen Moss, etc. According to some interpretations, the only solution for deconstruction in architectural work is incompleteness, an open project which represents never-ending deconstruction. There are different solutions for open projects, and the article highlights projects by architects mentioned above, which seems to manage to achieve continuous deconstruction in practice.   Article received: December 23, 2016; Article accepted: January 18, 2017; Published online: April 20, 2017 Original scholarly paper How to cite this paper: Tošić, Jovana. "Deconstruction in Architecture – Continuous Translation through an Open Project." AM Journal of Art and Media Studies 20 (2017: 99-107. doi: 10.25038/am.v0i12.170

  8. Understanding Pre-Quantitative Risk in Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches to risk management in projects depend on the ability of teams to identify risks and quantify the probabilities and consequences of these risks (e.g., the 5 x 5 risk matrix). However, long before quantification does - or even can - occur, and long after, teams make decisions based on their pre-quantitative understanding of risk. These decisions can have long-lasting impacts on the project. While significant research has looked at the process of how to quantify risk, our understanding of how teams conceive of and manage pre-quantitative risk is lacking. This paper introduces the concept of pre-quantitative risk and discusses the implications of addressing pre-quantitative risk in projects.

  9. Extensive Evaluation of Using a Game Project in a Software Architecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alf Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extensive evaluation of introducing a game project to a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain…

  10. Understanding and Supporting Software Architectural Decisions : for Reducing Architectural Knowledge Vaporization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tofan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of a software system is the result of architectural decisions on various topics, such as frameworks, patterns, programming languages, or ways to decompose the software system. Such decisions and their rationales are a significant part of the architectural knowledge about a software

  11. Frances: A Tool for Understanding Computer Architecture and Assembly Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondag, Tyler; Pokorny, Kian L.; Rajan, Hridesh

    2012-01-01

    Students in all areas of computing require knowledge of the computing device including software implementation at the machine level. Several courses in computer science curricula address these low-level details such as computer architecture and assembly languages. For such courses, there are advantages to studying real architectures instead of…

  12. Computer architecture evaluation for structural dynamics computations: Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1989-01-01

    The intent of the proposed effort is the examination of the impact of the elements of parallel architectures on the performance realized in a parallel computation. To this end, three major projects are developed: a language for the expression of high level parallelism, a statistical technique for the synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks based upon performance prediction, and a queueing model for the analysis of shared memory hierarchies.

  13. FDMA-PON architecture according to the FABULOUS European project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrate, Silvio; Gaudino, Roberto; Charbonnier, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we wish to introduce the FABULOUS European Project, started on the 1st of October 2012, that proposes a new FDMA-PON architecture adopting Faraday rotation and a R-ONU based on a reflective modulator instead of the conventional reflective SOA, designed on purpose and to be realized in silicon photonics, in order to cope with the target performances set by FSAN and the need of realizing low cost devices for the final user.

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Digital Architecture Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    There are many technologies available to the nuclear power industry to improve efficiency in plant work activities. These range from new control room technologies to those for mobile field workers. They can make a positive impact on a wide range of performance objectives – increase in productivity, human error reduction, validation of results, accurate transfer of data, and elimination of repetitive tasks. It is expected that the industry will more and more turn to these technologies to achieve these operational efficiencies to lower costs. At the same time, this will help utilities manage a looming staffing problem as the inevitable retirement wave of the more seasoned workers affects both staffing levels and knowledge retention. A barrier to this wide-scale implementation of new technologies for operational efficiency is the lack of a comprehensive digital architecture that can support the real-time information exchanges needed to achieve the desired operational efficiencies. This project will define an advanced digital architecture that will accommodate the entire range of system, process, and plant worker activity to enable the highest degree of integration, thereby creating maximum efficiency and productivity. This pilot project will consider a range of open standards that are suitable for the various data and communication requirements of a seamless digital environment. It will map these standards into an overall architecture to support the II&C developments of this research program.

  15. Data System Architectures: Recent Experiences from Data Intensive Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, G.; Frame, M. T.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Latysh, N.; Krassovski, M.; Killeffer, T.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    U.S. Federal agencies are frequently trying to address new data intensive projects that require next generation of data system architectures. This presentation will focus on two new such architectures: USGS's Science Data Catalog (SDC) and DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments - Arctic Data System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) to include records describing datasets, data collections, and observational or remotely-sensed data. The system was built using service oriented architecture and allows USGS scientists and data providers to create and register their data using either a standards-based metadata creation form or simply to register their already-created metadata records with the USGS SDC Dashboard. This dashboard then compiles the harvested metadata records and sends them to the post processing and indexing service using the JSON format. The post processing service, with the help of various ontologies and other geo-spatial validation services, auto-enhances these harvested metadata records and creates a Lucene index using the Solr enterprise search platform. Ultimately, metadata is made available via the SDC search interface. DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments (NGEE) Arctic project deployed a data system that allows scientists to prepare, publish, archive, and distribute data from field collections, lab experiments, sensors, and simulated modal outputs. This architecture includes a metadata registration form, data uploading and sharing tool, a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) tool, a Drupal based content management tool (http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov), and a data search and access tool based on ORNL's Mercury software (http://mercury.ornl.gov). The team also developed Web-metric tools and a data ingest service to visualize geo-spatial and temporal observations.

  16. Understanding Media Architecture (Better): One Space, Three Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Martin; Dalsgaard, Peter; Halskov, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Our group has worked within the field of interactive urban lighting design and media architecture since 2007. In this position paper we outline a presentation where we compare three installations that were created in the period 2008 to 2012 in the same central, public space in a city. By comparin...... and contrasting these three cases in the same space, we get a multi-faceted view on that particular context for media architecture. But we also get the opportunity to reflect on some more general concepts regarding the use of interactive urban lighting design.......Our group has worked within the field of interactive urban lighting design and media architecture since 2007. In this position paper we outline a presentation where we compare three installations that were created in the period 2008 to 2012 in the same central, public space in a city. By comparing...

  17. Architectures of adaptive integration in large collaborative projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Wright Morton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborations to address complex societal problems associated with managing human-natural systems often require large teams comprised of scientists from multiple disciplines. For many such problems, large-scale, transdisciplinary projects whose members include scientists, stakeholders, and other professionals are necessary. The success of very large, transdisciplinary projects can be facilitated by attending to the diversity of types of collaboration that inevitably occur within them. As projects progress and evolve, the resulting dynamic collaborative heterogeneity within them constitutes architectures of adaptive integration (AAI. Management that acknowledges this dynamic and fosters and promotes awareness of it within a project can better facilitate the creativity and innovation required to address problems from a systems perspective. In successful large projects, AAI (1 functionally meets objectives and goals, (2 uses disciplinary expertise and concurrently bridges many disciplines, (3 has mechanisms to enable connection, (4 delineates boundaries to keep focus but retain flexibility, (5 continuously monitors and adapts, and (6 encourages project-wide awareness. These principles are illustrated using as case studies three large climate change and agriculture projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

  18. Understanding Consistency Maintenance in Service Discovery Architectures during Communication Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    our general model include: (1) service user (SU), (2) service manager (SM), and (3) service cache manager (SCM), where the SCM is an optional...AgentRoot DeviceService or Device Proxy Service Manager (SM) User AgentControl PointClientService User (SU) SLPUPnPJiniGeneric Model Figure 1. Two...party service-discovery architecture deployed in a six-node topology: five service users (SUs) and one service manager (SM). over the UPnP multicast

  19. Project Integration Architecture: A Practical Demonstration of Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) effort is to provide the ability to propagate information between disparate applications. With this ability, applications may then be formed into an application graph constituting a super-application. Such a super-application would then provide all of the analysis appropriate to a given technical system. This paper reports on a small demonstration of this concept in which a Computer Aided Design (CAD) application was connected to an inlet analysis code and geometry information automatically propagated from one to the other. The majority of the work reported involved not the technology of information propagation, but rather the conversion of propagated information into a form usable by the receiving application.

  20. Remembrance and Architecture the House of Fates Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benárd Aurél

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The changes which took place a quarter of a century ago in the countries of Europe’s Eastern Bloc transformed the social conventions of the time. A kind of social dialog has been started, about the Holocaust amongst other things. New memorials and monuments dedicated to the Holocaust have been constructed in the countries of the region as a result. Several phases can be identified in the building of monuments to the Holocaust over the past 25 years. These changes in the process of recollection and in the building of the monuments themselves are typified by the House of Fates project. The memorial center was built in Budapest for the 70th anniversary of the Holocaust. But the changes in recollection did not stop there, did not come to a standstill in Hungary. It is a mark of the sensitivity of the subject that although the center was finished by the fall of 2015, it has still not opened its gates to the public. In the meantime the project has appeared in several Hungarian professional journals, however these articles do not venture far beyond the realm of basic description. Here we are attempting to analyze the project architecturally. Our analysis shows how the initial usage of primary symbols turns to more contemplative, more abstract images and devices.

  1. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ’Catalyst Architecture’ takes its point of departure in a broadened understanding of the role of architecture in relation to developmental problems in large cities. Architectural projects frame particular functions and via their form language, they can provide the user with an aesthetic experience....... The broadened understanding of architecture consists in that an architectural project, by virtue of its placement in the context and of its composition of programs, can have a mediating role in a positive or cultural development of the district in question. In this sense, we talk about architecture as catalyst...... cities on the planet have growing pains and social cohesiveness is under pressure from an increased difference between rich and poor, social segregation, ghettoes, immigration of guest workers and refugees, commercial mass tourism etc. In this context, it is important to ask which role architecture...

  2. A Flexible Fault Management Architecture for Cluster Flight Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies proposes to develop a flexible, service-oriented Fault Management (FM) architecture for cluster fight missions. This FM architecture will...

  3. Understanding epigenetic architecture of suicide neurobiology: A critical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bhaskar; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of environmental cross-talk with genetic makeup is found to be mediated through an epigenetic interface which is associated with prominent reversible and heritable changes at gene expression level. Recent emergence of epigenetic modulation in shaping the genetic information has become a key regulatory factor in answering the underlying complexities associated with several mental disorders. A comprehensive understanding of the pertinent changes in the epigenetic makeup of suicide phenotype exhibits a characteristic signature with the possibility of using it as a biomarker to help predict the risk factors associated with suicide. Within the scope of this current review, the most sought after epigenetic changes of DNA methylation and histone modification are thoroughly scrutinized to understand their close functional association with the broad spectrum of suicide phenotype. PMID:27836463

  4. How to understand architectural quality when working with social housing areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kirstine Brøgger

    2015-01-01

    This paper debates how to understand architectural quality when working with social housing areas. The concept is discussed through three approaches: 1) Social housing is debated in relation to societal and historical contributions. 2) Well known definitions (from the old-timer Vitruvius...... to the current sustainability agenda) are outlined according to their pros´n cons when working with social housing areas. 3) On the ground of interviews with practitioners the everyday use and understanding of the concept is scrutinized In this vein the paper agitates that architectural quality in social housing...

  5. Architecture-Centric Development in Globally Distributed Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Joachim

    In this chapter architecture-centric development is proposed as a means to strengthen the cohesion of distributed teams and to tackle challenges due to geographical and temporal distances and the clash of different cultures. A shared software architecture serves as blueprint for all activities in the development process and ties them together. Architecture-centric development thus provides a plan for task allocation, facilitates the cooperation of globally distributed developers, and enables continuous integration reaching across distributed teams. Advice is also provided for software architects who work with distributed teams in an agile manner.

  6. Architectural, Engineering, and Planning Consultant Services for Airport Grant Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-16

    This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance for airport sponsors in the : selection and employment of architectural, engineering, and planning consultants : under Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airport grant programs. It also : discusses ser...

  7. Integrated Cognitive-neuroscience Architectures for Understanding Sensemaking (ICArUS): Transition to the Intelligence Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Case Study P U Pc Pt Ft Pa 1 Clinical vs. Actuarial Geospatial Profiling Strategies X X 2 Route Security in Baghdad X X X X 3 International...Information Sciences , 176, 1570-1589. Burns, K., & Bonaceto, C. (2014). Integrated Cognitive-neuroscience Architectures for Understanding Sensemaking

  8. Method for the Drawing of Newman Projections: Understanding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 3. Method for the Drawing of Newman Projections: Understanding Newman Projections with the Help of Hands ... Keywords. Organic chemistry; stereochemistry; conformational analysis; hands-on learning/manipulatives; Newman projections.

  9. Architectural Theory and Graphical Criteria for Modelling Certain Late Gothic Projects by Hernan Ruiz "the Elder"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luis Ampliato Briones

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily reflects on the need to create graphical codes for producing images intended to communicate architecture. Each step of the drawing needs to be a deliberate process in which the proposed code highlights the relationship between architectural theory and graphic action. Our aim is not to draw the result of the architectural process but the design structure of the actual process; to draw as we design; to draw as we build. This analysis of the work of the Late Gothic architect Hernan Ruiz the Elder, from Cordoba, addresses two aspects: the historical and architectural investigation, and the graphical project for communication purposes.

  10. Numerical linear algebra on emerging architectures: The PLASMA and MAGMA projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agullo, Emmanuel; Demmel, Jim; Dongarra, Jack; Hadri, Bilel; Kurzak, Jakub; Langou, Julien; Ltaief, Hatem; Luszczek, Piotr; Tomov, Stanimire

    2009-01-01

    The emergence and continuing use of multi-core architectures and graphics processing units require changes in the existing software and sometimes even a redesign of the established algorithms in order to take advantage of now prevailing parallelism. Parallel Linear Algebra for Scalable Multi-core Architectures (PLASMA) and Matrix Algebra on GPU and Multics Architectures (MAGMA) are two projects that aims to achieve high performance and portability across a wide range of multi-core architectures and hybrid systems respectively. We present in this document a comparative study of PLASMA's performance against established linear algebra packages and some preliminary results of MAGMA on hybrid multi-core and GPU systems.

  11. Analysis of central enterprise architecture elements in models of six eHealth projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkanen, Hannu; Mykkänen, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale initiatives for eHealth services have been established in many countries on regional or national level. The use of Enterprise Architecture has been suggested as a methodology to govern and support the initiation, specification and implementation of large-scale initiatives including the governance of business changes as well as information technology. This study reports an analysis of six health IT projects in relation to Enterprise Architecture elements, focusing on central EA elements and viewpoints in different projects.

  12. The challenge of making architecture in housing projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen; Andreasen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    For the architect is is a constant challeng to deliver architeture and not just buildings. In a foreign context and essential in the developing world housing the urban poor is more about shelter than architecture as such. However even under server economic constraints good design in housing can...

  13. Beyond EA Frameworks: Towards an Understanding of the Adoption of Enterprise Architecture Management

    OpenAIRE

    Haki, Kazem; Legner, Christine; Ahlemann, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of enterprise architecture management (EAM) in practice, many EAM initiatives either do not fully meet the expected targets or fail. EAM frameworks have been suggested as guidelines to EAM implementation, but our experience indicates that very few companies follow the steps prescribed by such frameworks. Motivated by the diverse approaches that we have observed in practice, our research strives for a broader understanding of how companies adopt EAM in their o...

  14. Using UML Modeling to Facilitate Three-Tier Architecture Projects in Software Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the use of a model-centric approach to facilitate software development projects conforming to the three-tier architecture in undergraduate software engineering courses. Many instructors intend that such projects create software applications for use by real-world customers. While it is important that the first version of these…

  15. Solar System Escape Architecture for Revolutionary Science (SSEARS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Voyager Spacecraft have reached the Heliopause and greatly improved our understanding of the region. This journey took 35 years. A fuller understanding of the...

  16. Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

    2013-09-01

    A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. How computer science can help in understanding the 3D genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Yoli; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Lio', Pietro

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome conformation capture techniques are producing a huge amount of data about the architecture of our genome. These data can provide us with a better understanding of the events that induce critical regulations of the cellular function from small changes in the three-dimensional genome architecture. Generating a unified view of spatial, temporal, genetic and epigenetic properties poses various challenges of data analysis, visualization, integration and mining, as well as of high performance computing and big data management. Here, we describe the critical issues of this new branch of bioinformatics, oriented at the comprehension of the three-dimensional genome architecture, which we call 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', looking beyond the currently available tools and methods, and highlight yet unaddressed challenges and the potential approaches that could be applied for tackling them. Our review provides a map for researchers interested in using computer science for studying 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', to achieve a better understanding of the biological processes that occur inside the nucleus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Understanding Neuronal Architecture in Obesity through Analysis of White Matter Connection Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Justin W; Shott, Megan E; Deguzman, Marisa; Pryor, Tamara L; Frank, Guido K W

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of obesity, our understanding of its neurobiological underpinnings is insufficient. Diffusion weighted imaging and calculation of white matter connection strength are methods to describe the architecture of anatomical white matter tracts. This study is aimed to characterize white matter architecture within taste-reward circuitry in a population of obese individuals. Obese (n = 18, age = 28.7 ± 8.3 years) and healthy control (n = 24, age = 27.4 ± 6.3 years) women underwent diffusion weighted imaging. Using probabilistic fiber tractography (FSL PROBTRACKX2 toolbox) we calculated connection strength within 138 anatomical white matter tracts. Obese women (OB) displayed lower and greater connectivity within taste-reward circuitry compared to controls (Wilks' λ sensory integration and reward processing are key associations that are altered in and might contribute to obesity.

  19. Knowledge and Architectural Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the specific knowledge residing in architectural practice. It is based on the research of 35 PhD fellows in the ADAPT-r (Architecture, Design and Art Practice Training-research) project. The ADAPT-r project innovates architectural research in combining expertise from academia...... and from practice in order to highlight and extract the specific kind of knowledge which resides and is developed in architectural practice (creative practice research). The paper will discuss three ongoing and completed PhD projects and focusses on the outcomes and their contribution to the field....... Specific to these research projects is that the researcher is within academia but stays emerged in architectural practice. The projects contribute to a better understanding of architectural practice, how it develops and what kind of knowledge is crucial. Furthermore, the paper will develop a reflection...

  20. Coupling root architecture and pore network modeling - an attempt towards better understanding root-soil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Understanding root-soil interactions is of high importance for environmental and agricultural management. Root uptake is an essential component in water and solute transport modeling. The amount of groundwater recharge and solute leaching significantly depends on the demand based plant extraction via its root system. Plant uptake however not only responds to the potential demand, but in most situations is limited by supply form the soil. The ability of the plant to access water and solutes in the soil is governed mainly by root distribution. Particularly under conditions of heterogeneous distribution of water and solutes in the soil, it is essential to capture the interaction between soil and roots. Root architecture models allow studying plant uptake from soil by describing growth and branching of root axes in the soil. Currently root architecture models are able to respond dynamically to water and nutrient distribution in the soil by directed growth (tropism), modified branching and enhanced exudation. The porous soil medium as rooting environment in these models is generally described by classical macroscopic water retention and sorption models, average over the pore scale. In our opinion this simplified description of the root growth medium implies several shortcomings for better understanding root-soil interactions: (i) It is well known that roots grow preferentially in preexisting pores, particularly in more rigid/dry soil. Thus the pore network contributes to the architectural form of the root system; (ii) roots themselves can influence the pore network by creating preferential flow paths (biopores) which are an essential element of structural porosity with strong impact on transport processes; (iii) plant uptake depend on both the spatial location of water/solutes in the pore network as well as the spatial distribution of roots. We therefore consider that for advancing our understanding in root-soil interactions, we need not only to extend our root models

  1. Numerical linear algebra on emerging architectures: The PLASMA and MAGMA projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo, Emmanuel; Demmel, Jim; Dongarra, Jack; Hadri, Bilel; Kurzak, Jakub; Langou, Julien; Ltaief, Hatem; Luszczek, Piotr [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee (United States); Tomov, Stanimire, E-mail: eagullo@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: dongarra@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: hadri@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: kurzak@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: ltaief@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: luszczek@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: tomov@eecs.utk.ed, E-mail: demmel@cs.berkeley.ed, E-mail: julien.langou@ucdenver.ed

    2009-07-01

    The emergence and continuing use of multi-core architectures and graphics processing units require changes in the existing software and sometimes even a redesign of the established algorithms in order to take advantage of now prevailing parallelism. Parallel Linear Algebra for Scalable Multi-core Architectures (PLASMA) and Matrix Algebra on GPU and Multics Architectures (MAGMA) are two projects that aims to achieve high performance and portability across a wide range of multi-core architectures and hybrid systems respectively. We present in this document a comparative study of PLASMA's performance against established linear algebra packages and some preliminary results of MAGMA on hybrid multi-core and GPU systems.

  2. S-1 project. Volume I. Architecture. 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The US Navy is one of the world's largest users of digital computing equipment having a procurement cost of at least $50,000, and is the single largest such computer customer in the Department of Defense. Its projected acquisition plan for embedded computer systems during the first half of the 80s contemplates the installation of over 10,000 such systems at an estimated cost of several billions of dollars. This expenditure, though large, is dwarfed by the 85 billion dollars which DOD is projected to spend during the next half-decade on computer software, the near-majority of which will be spent by the Navy; the life-cycle costs of the 700,000+ lines of software for a single large Navy weapons systems application (e.g., AEGIS) have been conservatively estimated at most of a billion dollars. The S-1 Project is dedicated to realizing potentially large improvements in the efficiency with which such very large sums may be spent, so that greater military effectiveness may be secured earlier, and with smaller expenditures. The fundamental objectives of the S-1 Project's work are first to enable the Navy to be able to quickly, reliably and inexpensively evaluate at any time what is available from the state-of-the-art in digital processing systems and what the relevance of such systems may be to Navy data processing applications: and second to provide reference prototype systems to support possible competitive procurement action leading to deployment of such systems.

  3. Understanding and Managing Process Interaction in IS Development Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a challenge for the IS project manager, since business change and information systems development usually are performed as separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage......-technical innovation in a situation where the organisational change process and the IS development process are parallel but incongruent. We also argue that iterative software engineering frameworks are well structured to support process interaction. Finally, we advocate that the IS project manager needs to manage...... the relationship between these two kinds of processes. To understand the interaction between information systems development and planned organisational change we introduce the concept of process interaction. We draw on a longitudinal case study of an IS development project that used an iterative and incremental...

  4. Social and cultural capital in project marketing service firms: Danish architectural firms on the German market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Tikkanen, Henrikki; Alajoutsijärvi, Kimmo

    2002-01-01

    , cultural capital accumulation entails such things as building visible buildings, winning design competitions, or obtaining important tenders, whereas social capital is accumulated through the recognition by other construction industry actors that one is a member of their circles. The cases presented......This article analyses the marketing activities of three Danish architectural firms in Germany during the 1990s from a perspective that is new to project marketing, in that the Bourdivan concepts of social and cultural capital are applied to the offerings and activities of firms. In architecture...... provide support for our claim that the accumulation of social and cultural capital is crucial to acquiring architectural projects, while also indicating that cultural and social capital are internationally transferable to a limited extent only. This in turn suggests that national construction industries...

  5. Business Architecture Development at Public Administration - Insights from Government EA Method Engineering Project in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Katariina; Leppänen, Mauri

    Governments worldwide are concerned for efficient production of services to customers. To improve quality of services and to make service production more efficient, information and communication technology (ICT) is largely exploited in public administration (PA). Succeeding in this exploitation calls for large-scale planning which embraces issues from strategic to technological level. In this planning the notion of enterprise architecture (EA) is commonly applied. One of the sub-architectures of EA is business architecture (BA). BA planning is challenging in PA due to a large number of stakeholders, a wide set of customers, and solid and hierarchical structures of organizations. To support EA planning in Finland, a project to engineer a government EA (GEA) method was launched. In this chapter, we analyze the discussions and outputs of the project workshops and reflect emerged issues on current e-government literature. We bring forth insights into and suggestions for government BA and its development.

  6. Understanding Project Based Production through Socio-technical Modularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    This paper develops an approach for understanding Project Based Production. This form of production is characterized by unique deliverables, high complexity, high value, high risk, profound uncertainty and many stakeholders and is increasingly important the postmodern society. Common...... with the starting point in system theory and a strong bias towards industrial production, the predominant understanding of modularity faces difficulty in explaining practices of Project Based Production in both social – technical and dynamic – stable aspects. Illustrated by a case the paper addresses this gap...... as an entanglement of product, process, organizational and institutional modularity. The paper concludes proposing central questions for the development of the concept of modularity for understanding, designing and managing of PBP....

  7. A Collaborative Long-Term Project: Early Childhood Education, Environmental Education, and Landscape Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luera, Gail R.; Hong, Seong B.

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the common guiding principles of environment, representation, and collaboration in the disciplines of environmental education, early childhood education, and landscape architecture provided the foundation for a school-based garden project. Shows how the gardening activities and integration of the three philosophies helped to enhance…

  8. The Pedagogic Architecture of MOOC: A Research Project on Educational Courses in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Díaz, Elia; Rodríguez-Hoyos, Carlos; Salvador, Adelina Calvo

    2017-01-01

    This study has been carried out within the context of the ECO European Project (E-learning, Communication Open-Data: Massive Mobile, Ubiquitous, and Open Learning) which is being financed by the European Union over four years (2014-17). It analyses the pedagogic architecture of MOOC on pedagogic/educational subjects in Spanish over one academic…

  9. The Architecture of Co-operation : A Project for organizing collective creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borra, B.

    2014-01-01

    The Architecture of Co-operation investigates the relationship between the collective subject and urban form through co-operation as means of production. The point is how individuals can organize co-operation today for the city as a project and what could be the role of architects into this process.

  10. Memorandum of understanding for the TWRS characterization retrieval project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JO, J.

    1999-01-01

    During fiscal year 1999, various programs and projects will require analyses from the 222-S Laboratory. In order to prioritize and successfully meet the analytical demands of all the customers, multiple organizations across the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) must work together. One of the projects that will require analyses from the 222-S Laboratory is the retrieval project. Successful completion of retrieval project objectives requires cooperation among four TWRS organizations. The requirements and expectations regarding retrieval project analytical work were examined in order to define roles and responsibilities for each of these TWRS organizations. This memorandum of understanding (MOU) documents the results of this review and establishes the roles and responsibilities. This MOU is subdivided into three sections, the first of which is this introduction. Section 2 provides a summary of the overall roles and responsibilities with respect to retrieval project analytical work for the four TWRS organizations involved. The final section describes the individual interfaces involved in performing retrieval project analytical work, and discusses the roles and responsibilities with respect to each individual interface

  11. Developing Engineering Students’ Understanding of Sustainability Using Project Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Jollands

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Project based learning (PjBL can be an effective approach to developing graduate attributes, but it depends on how it is implemented. Chemical Engineering of RMIT University has a stream of PjBL subjects from first to final year. The projects are incrementally more complex but have the same goal: to choose a best process design, using management decision making tools to justify their choices. The tools include GEMI Metrics NavigatorTM. This paper reports an evaluation of whether students’ understanding of sustainability is enhanced by undertaking multiple projects, as well as use of sophisticated analysis tools. Student learning outcomes from intermediate and final subjects were compared using ConceptMaps and a focus group. The students’ understanding of sustainability increased substantially from 2nd to final year, similar to results reported in European studies. The spread of results was broad, attributed to range of student ability and differences between student cohorts. Development of understanding of sustainability was attributed to undertaking multiple projects and use of spread-sheeting tools. Use of the GEMI tool was identified as facilitating application of sustainability principles to process design decisions. Concept maps are a useful way to evaluate innovations in teaching sustainable engineering.

  12. A new application of the phase-field method for understanding the mechanisms of nuclear architecture reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Seirin; Tashiro, S; Awazu, A; Kobayashi, R

    2017-01-01

    Specific features of nuclear architecture are important for the functional organization of the nucleus, and chromatin consists of two forms, heterochromatin and euchromatin. Conventional nuclear architecture is observed when heterochromatin is enriched at nuclear periphery, and it represents the primary structure in the majority of eukaryotic cells, including the rod cells of diurnal mammals. In contrast to this, inverted nuclear architecture is observed when the heterochromatin is distributed at the center of the nucleus, which occurs in the rod cells of nocturnal mammals. The inverted architecture found in the rod cells of the adult mouse is formed through the reorganization of conventional architecture during terminal differentiation. Although a previous experimental approach has demonstrated the relationship between these two nuclear architecture types at the molecular level, the mechanisms underlying long-range reorganization processes remain unknown. The details of nuclear structures and their spatial and temporal dynamics remain to be elucidated. Therefore, a comprehensive approach, using mathematical modeling, is required, in order to address these questions. Here, we propose a new mathematical approach to the understanding of nuclear architecture dynamics using the phase-field method. We successfully recreated the process of nuclear architecture reorganization, and showed that it is robustly induced by physical features, independent of a specific genotype. Our study demonstrates the potential of phase-field method application in the life science fields.

  13. Understanding and Managing Process Interaction in IS Development Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2012-01-01

    Software-based information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a major challenge, since business change and the development of software-based information systems usually are performed in separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage...... critical events in the case, what led to the events, and what the consequences are. We discuss the implications for information systems research and in particular we discuss the contribution to project management of iterative and incremental software development.......Software-based information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a major challenge, since business change and the development of software-based information systems usually are performed in separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage...

  14. How does sustainability certification affect the design process? Mapping final design projects at an architectural office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landgren, Mathilde; Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard

    2017-01-01

    , derived from the sustainability certification system itself, and to apply it even in the early design process. This perspective emphasises all phases of the life cycle of a building. The goal of the present study was to map how a Danish architectural office approached sustainability in the projects...... they undertook in the course of a year. All the projects concerned were intended to conform to the German Sustainability Certification System DGNB. We developed a mapping tool to document these case projects and found that different sets of certification criteria were used in each project. This demonstrates...... process and informing the industry of them. This has led to optimised design processes such as Integrated Energy Design, in which many decisions related to energy consumption and indoor climate are made in the early design stages. The current tendency is to use an expanded notion of sustainability...

  15. Understanding Creative Design Processes by Integrating Sketching and CAD Modelling Design Environments: A Preliminary Protocol Result from Architectural Designers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Teng Shih

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a preliminary protocol study of the cognitive behaviour of architectural designers during the design process. The aim is to better understand the similarities and differences in cognitive behaviour using Sequential Mixed Media (SMM and Alternative Mixed Media (AMM approaches, and how switching between media may impact on design processes. Two participants with at least one-year’s professional design experience and a Bachelor of Design degree, and competence in both sketching and computer-aid design (CAD modelling participated in the study. Video recordings of participants working on different projects were coded using the Function-Behaviour-Structure (FBS coding scheme. Participants were also interviewed and their explanations about their switching behaviours were categorised into three types: S→C, S/C↹R and C→S. Preliminary results indicate that switching between media may influence how designers identify problems and develop solutions. In particular, two design issues were identified.  These relate to the FBS coding scheme, where structure (S and behaviour derived from structure (Bs, change to documentation (D after switching from sketching to CAD modelling (S→C. These switches make it possible for designers to integrate both approaches into one design medium and facilitate their design processes in AMM design environments.

  16. Understanding the Meaning of “Project Success”

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhakar, Goparaju Purna

    2016-01-01

    Fortune 500 organizations are executing their tasks using projects. Project management is the area of concentration across the world. Different stakeholders have a different perspective about project success. The meaning of project success had been explained in this article. In addition, the Project Critical Success Factors (CSFs) were mentioned. The research of Standish Group on project success and project success metrics was presented. Earlier research on the meaning of project success and ...

  17. Sense of Place: Understanding Architectural and Landscape Design through a Layering of Visual Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The context-free "object building," the sculptural form, reigned in schools of architecture for decades. As we are finally moving on from 20th century modernism, there is an urgency to re-place buildings within their contexts. All too often, students with a background in the discipline of architecture, struggle to design buildings that…

  18. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  19. ARCHITECTURE DEGREE PROJECT: USE OF 3D TECHNOLOGY, MODELS AND AUGMENTED REALITY EXPERIENCE WITH VISUALLY IMPAIRED USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Navarro Delgado

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Web 3.0 technologies provide effective tools for interpreting architecture and culture in general. Thus, a project may have an emotional impact on people while also having a more widespread effect in society as a whole. This project defines a methodology for evaluating accessibility of architecture for people with visual disabilities and the application of this to visiting emblematic buildings such as the Basilica of the Holly Family in Barcelona, designed by the architect, Antoni Gaudí.

  20. Procurement of Architectural and Engineering Services for Sustainable Buildings: A Guide for Federal Project Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-06-01

    This guide was prepared to be a resource for federal construction project managers and others who want to integrate the principles of sustainable design into the procurement of professional building design and consulting services. To economize on energy costs and improve the safety, comfort, and health of building occupants, building design teams can incorporate daylighting, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and passive solar design into all projects in which these elements are technically and economically feasible. The information presented here will help project leaders begin the process and manage the inclusion of sustainable design in the procurement process. The section on establishing selection criteria contains key elements to consider before selecting an architectural and engineering (A/E) firm. The section on preparing the statement of work discusses the broad spectrum of sustainable design services that an A/E firm can provide. Several helpful checklists are included.

  1. ARCHAEOLOGY, ARCHITECTURE AND CITY: The Enhancement Project of the Archaeological Park of the Baths of Baiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Capozzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the theoretical and disciplinary framing of the elements that substantiate the relationship of archaeology with architecture and the city in light of the transformations of the modern city, the project aims at valorizing the archaeological asset, promoting a knowledge of the ruins from multiple theoretical perspectives. The enhancement project of the Archaeological Park of Baiae experiments with different modalities of knowing that include the knowledge of the relationship between the ruin and the landscape, the philological, typological-constructive knowledge, and the knowledge of the ruin’s own spatial elements. Bringing together the contributions of different disciplines and experts under the coordination of an architect, the theoretical core of the project promotes the enhancement of the Archaeological Park, envisioning it as a means of valorisation of a wider urban environment.

  2. Application and project portfolio valuation using enterprise architecture and business requirements modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartel, Dick; Steen, Maarten W. A.; Lankhorst, Marc M.

    2012-05-01

    This article describes an architecture-based approach to IT valuation. This approach offers organisations an instrument to valuate their application and project portfolios and to make well-balanced decisions about IT investments. The value of a software application is assessed in terms of its contribution to a selection of business goals. Based on such assessments, the value of different applications can be compared, and requirements for innovation, development, maintenance and phasing out can be identified. IT projects are proposed to realise the requirements. The value of each project is assessed in terms of the value it adds to one or more applications. This value can be obtained by relating the 'as-is' application portfolio to the 'to-be' portfolio that is being proposed by the project portfolio. In this way, projects can be ranked according to their added value, given a certain selection of business goals. The approach uses ArchiMate to model the relationship between software applications, business processes, services and products. In addition, two language extensions are used to model the relationship of these elements to business goals and requirements and to projects and project portfolios. The approach is illustrated using the portfolio method of Bedell and has been implemented in BiZZdesign Architect.

  3. Virtual enterprise architecture and methodology - Initial results from the Globeman21 project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterager, Johan; Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Gobbi, Chiara

    1999-01-01

    This paper will focus on presenting the initial results from the IMS project Globeman21 regarding generic models for Extended Enterprise Management (EEM). In particular the paper outlines a proposed architecture for the creation of virtual enterprises, industrial requirements regarding the generic...... models, terminology for describing extended enterprises, and initial considerations regarding a methodology for EEM. Globeman21 see the extended enterprise as a concept covering the totality of different concepts dealing with the expansion or extension of enterprise activities. One way of realising...

  4. Understanding the effect of polylysine architecture on DNA binding using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M; Emrick, Todd; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2011-11-14

    Polycations with varying chemistries and architectures have been synthesized and used in DNA transfection. In this paper we connect poly-L-lysine (PLL) architecture to DNA-binding strength, and in turn transfection efficiency, since experiments have shown that graft-type oligolysine architectures [e.g., poly(cyclooctene-g-oligolysine)] exhibit higher transfection efficiency than linear PLL. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study structural and thermodynamic effects of polycation-DNA binding for linear PLL and grafted oligolysines of varying graft lengths. Structurally, linear PLL binds in a concerted manner, while each oligolysine graft binds independently of its neighbors in the grafted architecture. Additionally, the presence of a hydrophobic backbone in the grafted architecture weakens binding to DNA compared to linear PLL. The binding free energy varies nonmonotonically with the graft length primarily due to entropic contributions. The binding free energy normalized to the number of bound amines is similar between the grafted and linear architectures at the largest (Poly5) and smallest (Poly2) graft length and stronger than the intermediate graft lengths (Poly3 and Poly4). These trends agree with experimental results that show higher transfection efficiency for Poly3 and Poly4 grafted oligolysines than for Poly5, Poly2, and linear PLL.

  5. Understanding the costs and schedule of hydroelectric projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrow, E.W.; Schroeder, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is based on a study conducted for the World Bank which evaluated the feasibility of developing an empirically based ex ante project analysis system for hydroelectric projects. The system would be used to assess: the reasonableness of engineering-based cost and schedule estimates used for project appraisal and preliminary estimates used to select projects for appraisal; and the potential for cost growth and schedule slip. The system would help identify projects early in the project appraisal process that harbor significantly higher than normal risks of overrunning cost and schedule estimates

  6. Understanding the Human Genome Project — A Fact Sheet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Understanding the Human Genome Project — A Fact Sheet Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... body. This concerted, public effort was the Human Genome Project. The Human Genome Project's goal was to provide researchers with ...

  7. Requirements: Towards an understanding on why software projects fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.

    2016-08-01

    Requirement engineering is at the foundation of every successful software project. There are many reasons for software project failures; however, poorly engineered requirements process contributes immensely to the reason why software projects fail. Software project failure is usually costly and risky and could also be life threatening. Projects that undermine requirements engineering suffer or are likely to suffer from failures, challenges and other attending risks. The cost of project failures and overruns when estimated is very huge. Furthermore, software project failures or overruns pose a challenge in today's competitive market environment. It affects the company's image, goodwill, and revenue drive and decreases the perceived satisfaction of customers and clients. In this paper, requirements engineering was discussed. Its role in software projects success was elaborated. The place of software requirements process in relation to software project failure was explored and examined. Also, project success and failure factors were also discussed with emphasis placed on requirements factors as they play a major role in software projects' challenges, successes and failures. The paper relied on secondary data and empirical statistics to explore and examine factors responsible for the successes, challenges and failures of software projects in large, medium and small scaled software companies.

  8. Understanding the Meaning of “Project Success”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goparaju Purna Sudhakar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fortune 500 organizations are executing their tasks using projects. Project management is the area of concentration across the world. Different stakeholders have a different perspective about project success. The meaning of project success had been explained in this article. In addition, the Project Critical Success Factors (CSFs were mentioned. The research of Standish Group on project success and project success metrics was presented. Earlier research on the meaning of project success and project critical success factors was highlighted. The works of Jeffery K. Pinto and Dennis P. Slevin, David and Adam, DeLone and McLean, and The Standish Group Research were discussed in this article. The methodology included secondary research based on literature view of prominent empirical studies and the literature reviews by making note of findings and observations from those studies. The initial literature collected led to further search of articles based on their references. The research findings indicate that the top of the most success factors for many projects include project objective, top management commitment, competent project team, and user involvement.

  9. Understanding Alterations in Cell Nano-architecture during Early Carcinogenesis using Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil

    elucidate the role of chromatin architecture (specifically histone deacetylase2) in determining nanoscale nuclear disorder. Finally, we develop an image-analysis technique to extract native 3-dimensional-mass-density correlation function of biological cells (cheek cells) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) without staining or sectioning. This technique can be used in future to corroborate PWS results. Overall, this work signifies the potential of PWS nanocytology in a clinical setting and establishes it as an important minimally-invasive tool for early cancer detection as well as for better biological understanding of a disease.

  10. The modeling of understanding and sense’s generation processes in different architectural environmental situations of socio-cultural interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Марія Юріївна Блінова

    2015-01-01

    The article is an attempt to modeling of understanding and sense’s generation processes in different architectural environmental situations of socio-cultural interaction. Methodologically interpretation of the subject sociocultural interaction offered to make from the standpoint of modern social theories, the entity that is the social role, understood as a model of human behavior objectively given social position of the individual in the system of social relations

  11. Participatory Methods and UCA Project: understanding technologies as culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Pischetola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the complex and changing context of digital culture, the media become an important space of relation, as they have the crucial role of articulating new cultural logics that lead to disruptions in the school environment. To understand this change, new methods of analysis and research have been created, the so-called Participatory Methodologies. They are action research strategies aimed at intervening in a given social situation. In the analysis proposed here, such methodologies will help us to address the challenge of involving digital technologies in school culture, through the participation of different individuals involved. Two qualitative case studies about the project Um Computador por Aluno – the Brazilian One Laptop per Child -, carried out in 2012 in the schools of Santa Catarina and Bahia, are the first of two phases of the research presented. The results concern a "vertical" form of technology insertion in schools, which led to frustration and de-motivation at several levels. Starting from these considerations, the second stage of research proposes a pedagogical intervention in one of four schools in the field. The methodologies of participatory video and photography are chosen as possibilities of action-reflection-action on the sociocultural reality of students through the experience of sharing. The results show the importance of carrying out creative activities, appropriate to a social conception of learning, as well as the centrality of children and youth as agency and a broader need to redefine the relationship between teacher and student, in a more "horizontal" perspective process of teaching and learning. Keywords: Projeto UCA. Participatory Research Method. Innovative teaching-learning.

  12. Integration of Structural Knowledge in Design Studio Project: Assessment Study of Curriculum In Architecture Course in University Of Malaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural education should advance in parallel with the industrial growth of building technology. Universities as producers of future architects have yet to develop curriculums for building technology to suit the growth of the building industry. This gap between education and industrial growth has been a topic of debate for many researchers who are concerned about architectural pedagogy. Architectural instruction further aggravated the problem whereby in most architectural schools worldwide, teaching is divided between the design studio, where the design projects are taught and lecture classes where the technical parts are taught. The latter should be integrated with design studio to enhance design levels. Students face difficulty integrating and applying the structural knowledge gained from structure classes into their design. One explanation for this deficiency is because the current architectural structure subject's content is borrowed from an engineering syllabus. This study will examine the course content, instruction styles and method of teaching structure subjects and will investigate the learning outcomes of design studio through students' performance and perception in integrating structural knowledge in their design projects. Respondents were students from Year 1 to Year 5 doing their Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Architecture degrees in University of Malaya. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the design studio coordinators and structure lecturers. This study aims to find the ideal course content/method of teaching to facilitate more integration between structure and design studio.

  13. Understanding Enterprise Architecture with Topic Modeling Preliminary Research Based on Journal Articles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardello, Marco; Møller, Charles; Gøtze, John

    2018-01-01

    The next 3 years will be more important than the last 50 due to the digital transformation across industries. Enterprise Architecture (EA), the discipline that should lead enterprise responses to disruptive forces, is far from ready to drive the next wave of change. The state of the art in the di...

  14. Understanding the Value of Enterprise Architecture for Organizations: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiff, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    There is a high rate of information system implementation failures attributed to the lack of alignment between business and information technology strategy. Although enterprise architecture (EA) is a means to correct alignment problems and executives highly rate the importance of EA, it is still not used in most organizations today. Current…

  15. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Understanding dyadic promoter-stakeholder relations in complex projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janita Vos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a Bilateral Double Motive framework of stakeholder cooperation in complex projects. The framework analyses and explains dyadic promoter-stakeholder relationships at a micro level by acknowledging both transactional and relational motives. We demonstrate the framework’s usefulness by illustrating its explanatory power in two instances of cooperation and two of non-cooperation within two health information technology projects. The study contributes to project management theory through its combined focus on transactional and relational motives. Further, the study contributes to practice by providing a tool for planning and evaluating cooperation in health Information Technology projects and similar complex multi-stakeholder environments.

  17. Understanding new product project performance : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, H.R.; Pattikawa, L.H.; Verwaal, E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize the accumulated body of knowledge on the performance of new product projects and provide directions for further research. Design/methodology/approach: Using a refined classification of antecedents of new product project performance the research

  18. Understanding the legal fundamentals of project finance contracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is an international transaction involving long-term, nonrecourse loans for the financing of heavy, cost intensive projects. Because of this peculiar nature, the risk involvement is higher than what is obtainable in other international transactions. Even more risk-laden is project finance in developing countries. Therefore ...

  19. Understanding Megaproject Success beyond the Project Close-Out Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Fahri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Project success has always been an important topic in the project management literature. One of the main discussions is concerned with how a project’s success is evaluated and what factors lead to achieving this success. Traditionally project success has been measured at the point where the project outputs are handed over, after the close out phase. Recently, questions have been raised in the literature as to whether we should be evaluating project success beyond the close out phase, to better account for organizational and societal outcomes.  However, not much has been published about how the long term impacts and outcomes are measured. This is of particular concern in megaprojects as they often attract a high level of public attention and political interest, and have both direct and indirect impacts on the community, environment, and national budgets. In this paper the authors review success factors and criteria that are applicable to projects in general and megaprojects in particular. They identify the significance of evaluating outcomes and impact and propose an ex-post project evaluation (EPPE framework for megaprojects.

  20. Verification of Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures in the GeantV Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G.; et al.

    2017-11-22

    An intensive R&D and programming effort is required to accomplish new challenges posed by future experimental high-energy particle physics (HEP) programs. The GeantV project aims to narrow the gap between the performance of the existing HEP detector simulation software and the ideal performance achievable, exploiting latest advances in computing technology. The project has developed a particle detector simulation prototype capable of transporting in parallel particles in complex geometries exploiting instruction level microparallelism (SIMD and SIMT), task-level parallelism (multithreading) and high-level parallelism (MPI), leveraging both the multi-core and the many-core opportunities. We present preliminary verification results concerning the electromagnetic (EM) physics models developed for parallel computing architectures within the GeantV project. In order to exploit the potential of vectorization and accelerators and to make the physics model effectively parallelizable, advanced sampling techniques have been implemented and tested. In this paper we introduce a set of automated statistical tests in order to verify the vectorized models by checking their consistency with the corresponding Geant4 models and to validate them against experimental data.

  1. Verification of Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures in the GeantV Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Behera, S. P.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Cosmo, G.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Folger, G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Hariri, F.; Jun, S. Y.; Konstantinov, D.; Kumawat, H.; Ivantchenko, V.; Lima, G.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.

    2017-10-01

    An intensive R&D and programming effort is required to accomplish new challenges posed by future experimental high-energy particle physics (HEP) programs. The GeantV project aims to narrow the gap between the performance of the existing HEP detector simulation software and the ideal performance achievable, exploiting latest advances in computing technology. The project has developed a particle detector simulation prototype capable of transporting in parallel particles in complex geometries exploiting instruction level microparallelism (SIMD and SIMT), task-level parallelism (multithreading) and high-level parallelism (MPI), leveraging both the multi-core and the many-core opportunities. We present preliminary verification results concerning the electromagnetic (EM) physics models developed for parallel computing architectures within the GeantV project. In order to exploit the potential of vectorization and accelerators and to make the physics model effectively parallelizable, advanced sampling techniques have been implemented and tested. In this paper we introduce a set of automated statistical tests in order to verify the vectorized models by checking their consistency with the corresponding Geant4 models and to validate them against experimental data.

  2. Understanding lean & safety projects: analysis of case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Crema

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Facing the current socio-economic contingency while guaranteeing a high level of care quality is particularly challenging in the field of healthcare. Through an integrated adoption of emerging managerial solutions, projects that allow organizations to achieve both efficiency and patient safety improvements could be implemented, thereby transposing policy directives towards a safer and more sustainable healthcare system. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the features of Lean & Safety (L&S projects. Three Health Lean Management (HLM projects that had unexpected patient safety results were selected from the same region. Differences and similarities among the cases have been highlighted and interesting points of evidence have been noted. Despite the fact that the projects were pursuing similar objectives and benefiting from comparable support, the obtained changes had direct impact on patient safety enhancement in the cases that involved the front-office processes, and an indirect impact on patient safely for the L&S project that focused on back-office activities. The implementation processes and the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT adoption of the cases are also different.

  3. Understanding Consistency Maintenance in Service Discovery Architectures in Response to Message Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    ServiceDevice or ServiceServiceService Provider (SP) Service AgentRoot DeviceService or Device Proxy Service Manager (SM) User AgentControl...deposited state, but only for a specified length of time, or TTL. To HTTP/TCP and HTTP/UDP Service User Service Manager UPnP Multicast Group Unicast...Links Figure 1. Two-party service-discovery architecture deployed in a six-node topology: five service users (SUs) and one service manager (SM

  4. Towards understanding the value-creation in agile projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakalova, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, iterative and incremental approaches for software development appeared as an alternative to the traditional, waterfall-style development. The reason for this is the large number of software projects in the past that failed to deliver useful products within budget, and struggled with

  5. Towards the understanding the value-creation in agile projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervallen, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, iterative and incremental approaches for software development appeared as an alternative to the traditional, waterfall-style development. The reason for this is the large number of software projects in the past that failed to deliver useful products within budget, and struggled with

  6. Understanding dyadic promoter-stakeholder relations in complex projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Janita F.J.; Boonstra, Albert; Achterkamp, Marjolein C.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a Bilateral Double Motive framework of stakeholder cooperation in complex projects. The framework analyses and explains dyadic promoter-stakeholder relationships at a micro level by acknowledging both transactional and relational motives. We demonstrate the framework’s

  7. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  8. Cloud/Fog Computing System Architecture and Key Technologies for South-North Water Transfer Project Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoling Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the real-time and distributed features of Internet of Things (IoT safety system in water conservancy engineering, this study proposed a new safety system architecture for water conservancy engineering based on cloud/fog computing and put forward a method of data reliability detection for the false alarm caused by false abnormal data from the bottom sensors. Designed for the South-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP, the architecture integrated project safety, water quality safety, and human safety. Using IoT devices, fog computing layer was constructed between cloud server and safety detection devices in water conservancy projects. Technologies such as real-time sensing, intelligent processing, and information interconnection were developed. Therefore, accurate forecasting, accurate positioning, and efficient management were implemented as required by safety prevention of the SNWTP, and safety protection of water conservancy projects was effectively improved, and intelligential water conservancy engineering was developed.

  9. Helping Students Understand Intersectionality: Reflections from a Dialogue Project in Residential Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claros, Sharon Chia; Garcia, Gina A.; Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Mata, Christine

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors share insights from a dialogue project focused on intersectionality within a residential life setting and discuss additional strategies for helping students understand intersectionality.

  10. ANL/Star project: a new architecture for large scale theoretical physics computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rushton, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The project reported consists of two phases, each of which has goals of substantial physics content on its own. In Phase 1, we have selected Star Technologies' ST-100 as the array processor for the prototype coupled system and have installed one on a Vax 11/750 host. Our goals with this system are to institute a substantial program in computational physics at Argonne based on the power provided by this system and thereby to gain experience with both the hardware and software architecture of the ST-100. In Phase II, we propose to build a prototype consisting of two coupled array processors with shared memory to prove that this design can achieve high speed and efficiency in a readily extensible and cost-effective manner. This will implement all of the hardware and software modifications necessary to extend this design to as many as 64 (or more) nodes. In our design, we seek to minimize the changes made in the standard system hardware and software; this drastically reduces the effort required by our group to implement such a design and enables us to more readily incorporate the companies' upgrades to the array processor. It should be emphasized that our design is intended as a special purpose system for theoretical calculations; however it can be efficiently applied to a surprisingly broad class of problems. I shall discuss first the architecture of the ST-100 and then the physics program being currently implemented on a single system. Finally the proposed design of the coupled system is presented.

  11. ANL/Star project: a new architecture for large scale theoretical physics computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushton, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The project reported consists of two phases, each of which has goals of substantial physics content on its own. In Phase 1, we have selected Star Technologies' ST-100 as the array processor for the prototype coupled system and have installed one on a Vax 11/750 host. Our goals with this system are to institute a substantial program in computational physics at Argonne based on the power provided by this system and thereby to gain experience with both the hardware and software architecture of the ST-100. In Phase II, we propose to build a prototype consisting of two coupled array processors with shared memory to prove that this design can achieve high speed and efficiency in a readily extensible and cost-effective manner. This will implement all of the hardware and software modifications necessary to extend this design to as many as 64 (or more) nodes. In our design, we seek to minimize the changes made in the standard system hardware and software; this drastically reduces the effort required by our group to implement such a design and enables us to more readily incorporate the companies' upgrades to the array processor. It should be emphasized that our design is intended as a special purpose system for theoretical calculations; however it can be efficiently applied to a surprisingly broad class of problems. I shall discuss first the architecture of the ST-100 and then the physics program being currently implemented on a single system. Finally the proposed design of the coupled system is presented

  12. Improving Climate Projections by Understanding How Cloud Phase affects Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Gregory; Storelvmo, Trude

    2017-01-01

    Whether a cloud is predominantly water or ice strongly influences interactions between clouds and radiation coming down from the Sun or up from the Earth. Being able to simulate cloud phase transitions accurately in climate models based on observational data sets is critical in order to improve confidence in climate projections, because this uncertainty contributes greatly to the overall uncertainty associated with cloud-climate feedbacks. Ultimately, it translates into uncertainties in Earth's sensitivity to higher CO2 levels. While a lot of effort has recently been made toward constraining cloud phase in climate models, more remains to be done to document the radiative properties of clouds according to their phase. Here we discuss the added value of a new satellite data set that advances the field by providing estimates of the cloud radiative effect as a function of cloud phase and the implications for climate projections.

  13. Virtual Solar System Project: Building Understanding through Model Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barab, Sasha A.; Hay, Kenneth E.; Barnett, Michael; Keating, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Describes an introductory astronomy course for undergraduate students in which students use three-dimensional (3-D) modeling tools to model the solar system and develop rich understandings of astronomical phenomena. Indicates that 3-D modeling can be used effectively in regular undergraduate university courses as a tool to develop understandings…

  14. Method for the Drawing of Newman Projections: Understanding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Visualization of molecules in three dimensions is essential for the study of organic chemistry. Molecular models play an important role in the teaching and understanding of three-dimensional structures. However, many times it is not possible to build molecular models either due to time constraints or due to the non-.

  15. Understanding the genetic and epigenetic architecture in complex network of rice flowering pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changhui; Chen, Dan; Fang, Jun; Wang, Pingrong; Deng, Xiaojian; Chu, Chengcai

    2014-12-01

    Although the molecular basis of flowering time control is well dissected in the long day (LD) plant Arabidopsis, it is still largely unknown in the short day (SD) plant rice. Rice flowering time (heading date) is an important agronomic trait for season adaption and grain yield, which is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. During the last decade, as the nature of florigen was identified, notable progress has been made on exploration how florigen gene expression is genetically controlled. In Arabidopsis expression of certain key flowering integrators such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) are also epigenetically regulated by various chromatin modifications, however, very little is known in rice on this aspect until very recently. This review summarized the advances of both genetic networks and chromatin modifications in rice flowering time control, attempting to give a complete view of the genetic and epigenetic architecture in complex network of rice flowering pathways.

  16. N-body simulations of planet formation: understanding exoplanet system architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gavin; Nelson, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Observations have demonstrated the existence of a significant population of compact systems comprised of super-Earths and Neptune-mass planets, and a population of gas giants that appear to occur primarily in either short-period (100 days) orbits. The broad diversity of system architectures raises the question of whether or not the same formation processes operating in standard disc models can explain these planets, or if different scenarios are required instead to explain the widely differing architectures. To explore this issue, we present the results from a comprehensive suite of N-body simulations of planetary system formation that include the following physical processes: gravitational interactions and collisions between planetary embryos and planetesimals; type I and II migration; gas accretion onto planetary cores; self-consistent viscous disc evolution and disc removal through photo-evaporation. Our results indicate that the formation and survival of compact systems of super-Earths and Neptune-mass planets occur commonly in disc models where a simple prescription for the disc viscosity is assumed, but such models never lead to the formation and survival of gas giant planets due to migration into the star. Inspired in part by the ALMA observations of HL Tau, and by MHD simulations that display the formation of long-lived zonal flows, we have explored the consequences of assuming that the disc viscosity varies in both time and space. We find that the radial structuring of the disc leads to conditions in which systems of giant planets are able to form and survive. Furthermore, these giants generally occupy those regions of the mass-period diagram that are densely populated by the observed gas giants, suggesting that the planet traps generated by radial structuring of protoplanetary discs may be a necessary ingredient for forming giant planets.

  17. Singular Strategic Project on bio climatic architecture and solar cooling (PSE-ARFRISOL); Proyecto Singular Estrategico sobre arquitectura bioclimatica y frio solar (PSE-ARFRISOL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras Celemin, M. R.

    2008-07-01

    The R and D activities for the scientific-technological singular strategic Project on Bio climatic Architecture and Solar Cooling PSE-ARFRISOL are being carried out from November 2005 to December 2010. This project aims to demonstrate that bio climatic architecture and low-temperature solar energy are the appropriate basic elements for climatization of future buildings. (Author) 12 refs.

  18. Accessibility in networks: A useful measure for understanding social insect nest architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Matheus P.; Fourcassié, Vincent; Perna, Andrea; Costa, Luciano da F.; Jost, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Networks and the associated tools from graph theory have now become well-established approaches to study natural as well as human-made systems. While early studies focused on topology and connectivity, the recent literature has acknowledged the importance of the dynamical properties of these networks. Here we focus on such a dynamic measure: accessibility. It characterizes for any given movement dynamics (such as random walks) the average number of nodes that can be reached in exactly h steps (out-accessibility), or the average number of nodes from which a given node can be reached (in-accessibility). This focus on dynamics makes accessibility particularly appropriate to study movement on networks and to detect complementary properties with respect to topology-based measurements such as betweenness centrality. We apply this measure to six nests of Cubitermes termites. Their mushroom-like 3D architectures consist of chambers and connecting tunnels that can be associated to nodes and edges in a communication network. Accessibilities turn out to be particularly low in the bottom part of the nests that link them to their underground tunneling network. We interpret this result in the context of anti-predator (ants) behavior and/or as a side effect of the global nest shape.

  19. Low-Cost Mapping and Publishing Methods for Landscape Architectural Analysis and Design in Slum-Upgrading Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Rekittke

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The research project “Grassroots GIS” focuses on the development of low-cost mapping and publishing methods for slums and slum-upgrading projects in Manila. In this project smartphones, collaborative mapping and 3D visualization applications are systematically employed to support landscape architectural analysis and design work in the context of urban poverty and urban informal settlements. In this paper we focus on the description of the developed methods and present preliminary results of this work-in-progress.

  20. High field superconductor development and understanding project, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.

    2009-07-15

    Over 25 years the Applied Superconductivity Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provided a vital technical resource to the High Energy Physics community covering development in superconducting strand for HEP accelerator magnet development. In particular the work of the group has been to develop the next generation of high field superconductors for high field application. Grad students Mike Naus, Chad Fischer, Arno Godeke and Matt Jewell improved our understanding of the microstructure and microchemistry of Nb3Sn and their impact on the physical and mechanical properties. The success of this work has led to the continued funding of this work at the ASC after it moved to the NHMFL and also to direct funding from BNL for some aspects of Nb3Sn cable evaluation.

  1. The nematode stoma: Homology of cell architecture with improved understanding by confocal microscopy of labeled cell boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay Burr, A H; Baldwin, James G

    2016-09-01

    Nematode stomas vary widely in the cuticular structures evolved for different feeding strategies, yet the arrangement of the epithelial cell classes that form these structures may be conserved. This article addresses several issues that have impeded the full acceptance of this hypothesis including controversies arising from the structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans stoma. We investigated fluorescent antibody labeling of cell boundaries in conjunction with confocal microscopy as an alternative to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using MH27 to label apical junctions in C. elegans and two other species. Accurately spaced optical sections collected by the confocal microscope provide a three-dimensional array of pixels (voxels) that, using image-processing software, can be rotated and sectioned at accurately chosen thicknesses and locations. Ribbons of fluorescence clearly identify cell boundaries along the luminal cuticle in C. elegans and Zeldia punctata and less clearly in Bunonema sp. The patterns render cell classes and their relationships readily identifiable. In the C. elegans stoma they correct a misreading of serial TEMs that was not congruent with architecture in other nematodes-the row of marginal cells is now seen to be continuous as in other nematodes, rather than being interrupted by encircling pm1 cells. Also impeding understanding, the reference to certain cell classes as 'epithelial' and others as "muscle" in the C. elegans literature is at variance with muscle expression in most other taxa. For consistent comparison among species, we propose that these cell class descriptors based on function be replaced by topological terms. With these and other confusing concepts and terminology removed, the homology of the cellular architecture among taxa becomes obvious. We provide a corrected description of the cell architecture of the C. elegans stoma and examples of how it is modified in other taxa with different feeding strategies. J. Morphol. 277

  2. Command and Control Architectures for Autonomous Micro-Robotic Forces - FY-2000 Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean

    2001-04-01

    Advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and micro-technologies will soon give rise to production of large-scale forces of autonomous micro-robots with systems of innate behaviors and with capabilities of self-organization and real world tasking. Such organizations have been compared to schools of fish, flocks of birds, herds of animals, swarms of insects, and military squadrons. While these systems are envisioned as maintaining a high degree of autonomy, it is important to understand the relationship of man with such machines. In moving from research studies to the practical deployment of large-scale numbers of robots, one of critical pieces that must be explored is the command and control architecture for humans to re-task and also inject global knowledge, experience, and intuition into the force. Tele-operation should not be the goal, but rather a level of adjustable autonomy and high-level control. If a herd of sheep is comparable to the collective of robots, then the human element is comparable to the shepherd pulling in strays and guiding the herd in the direction of greener pastures. This report addresses the issues and development of command and control for largescale numbers of autonomous robots deployed as a collective force.

  3. Manifestation Of Postmodernist Ideas In Architectural Competitions And Unrealized Design Projects In Lithuania Of The 1970s And 80s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynas Mankus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The research work analyzes the influence of the post-modernism phenomenon on Lithuanian architecture as observed since the 1970-s. This controversially estimated period in architectural history opposed the modernist tradition by its cultural and aesthetical landmarks. In the Lithuanian context it was distinguished by the raise of its expression partially overlapping with the period of post-soviet socio-cultural fractures. After short introduction of prerequisites of postmodernist idea formation in architecture, the text focuses on the main ideological concepts and characteristic features of architecture related to postmodernism. Besides the evaluation of influence of western postmodernist architecture on the soviet space, the aim of the article is to analyze the objects innovative by their aesthetics, applied symbolism and treatment of their application to the society in the sociocultural context of the time. The text focuses on unrealized projects and competition offers of the 1970-s and 80-s (from the emergence of the first examples to the reestablishment of Lithuanian independence with most brightly reflected postmodern trends: complex composition, eclecticism, historical references and decreasing scale. The examples analyzed in the research are a part of culture of the complicated transformation time, which is underestimated.

  4. A tool framework for deriving the application architecture for global software development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildiz, Bugra Mehmet; Tekinerdogan, B.; Cetin, Semih

    In order to meet the communication, coordination and control requirements of distributed Global Software Development (GSD) teams, it is necessary to define a proper software architecture. Designing a GSD architecture, however, involves a multitude of design decisions that are related in different

  5. Project Ci-Nergy Towards AN Integrated Energy Urban Planning System from a Data Modelling and System Architecture Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agugiaro, G.; Robineau, J.-L.; Rodrigues, P.

    2017-09-01

    Growing urbanisation, its related environmental impacts, and social inequalities in cities are challenges requiring a holistic urban planning perspective that takes into account the different aspects of sustainable development. One crucial point is to reconcile urban planning with environmental targets, which include decreasing energy demand and CO2 emissions, and increasing the share of renewable energy. Within this context, the project CI-NERGY aims to develop urban energy modelling, simulation and optimisation methods and tools to support decision making in urban planning. However, there are several barriers to the implementation of such tools, such as: fragmentation of involved disciplines, different stakeholders, multiplicity of scales in a city and extreme heterogeneity of data regarding all the processes to be addressed. Project CI-NERGY aims, among other goals, at overcoming these barriers, and focuses on two case study cities, Geneva in Switzerland and Vienna in Austria. In particular, project CI-NERGY faces several challenges starting with different cities, heterogeneous data sources and simulation tools, diverse user groups and their individual needs. This paper describes the experiences gathered during the project. After giving a brief overview of the project, the two case study cities, Geneva and Vienna, are briefly presented, and the focus shifts then on overall system architecture of the project, ranging from urban data modelling topics to the implementation of a Service-Oriented Architecture. Some of the challenges faced, the solutions found, as well some plans for future improvements are described and commented.

  6. Architectural technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The booklet offers an overall introduction to the Institute of Architectural Technology and its projects and activities, and an invitation to the reader to contact the institute or the individual researcher for further information. The research, which takes place at the Institute of Architectural...... Technology at the Roayl Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, reflects a spread between strategic, goal-oriented pilot projects, commissioned by a ministry, a fund or a private company, and on the other hand projects which originate from strong personal interests and enthusiasm of individual...

  7. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou; Xiangxiang, Gong; Jie, Han

    2016-01-01

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution

  8. Multifunctional light escaping architecture inspired by compound eye surface structures: From understanding to experimental demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Min; Park, Gyeong Cheol; Jang, Sung Jun; Ha, Jong Hoon; Yu, Jae Su; Lee, Yong Tak

    2011-03-14

    We present bioinspired artificial compound eye surface structures that consist of antireflective subwavelength structures (SWSs) on hexagonally patterned microstructures (MSs), for the purpose of efficient light escaping inside light-emitting materials/devices. Theoretical understanding and geometrical optimization of SWSs on MSs are described together with rigorous coupled-wave analysis. As a proof of this concept, AlGaInP red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with SWS/MSs were fabricated, and a light output power enhancement of 72.47% was achieved as compared to that of conventional LEDs. The artificial compound eye structures are not limited to LEDs, and the fabrication process is compatible with most semiconductor device manufacturing processes; hence, this concept opens up new possibilities for improving the optical performance of various optoelectronic device applications.

  9. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); Xiangxiang, Gong [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Jie, Han [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China)

    2016-03-07

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution.

  10. MF-CRA: Multi-Function Cognitive Radio Architecture for Space Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — EpiSys Science, Inc. and University of Arizona propose to develop, implement, and demonstrate Multi-Function Cognitive Radio Architecture (MF-CRA) for Space...

  11. Algorithms and Software Architecture for the Production of Information Products From LIDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Diamond Data Systems (DDS) proposes the development of a new advanced architecture, algorithms and software to support the end-to-end processing of LIDAR data to...

  12. GEOSS Architecture for Remote Sensing Products for Disaster Management and Risk Assessment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Define and facilitate implementation of a ‘system of systems’ architecture for disaster mitigation and risk assessment responsive to GEOSS task DI-06-09...

  13. Understanding and Mitigating Multicore Performance Issues on theAMD Opteron Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, John; Larkin, Jeff; Foster, Martyn; Glenski, Joe; Geissler, Garry; Whalen, Stephen; Waldecker, Brian; Carter, Jonathan; Skinner, David; He, Helen; Wasserman, Harvey; Shalf, John; Shan,Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich

    2007-03-07

    Over the past 15 years, microprocessor performance hasdoubled approximately every 18 months through increased clock rates andprocessing efficiency. In the past few years, clock frequency growth hasstalled, and microprocessor manufacturers such as AMD have moved towardsdoubling the number of cores every 18 months in order to maintainhistorical growth rates in chip performance. This document investigatesthe ramifications of multicore processor technology on the new Cray XT4?systems based on AMD processor technology. We begin by walking throughthe AMD single-core and dual-core and upcoming quad-core processorarchitectures. This is followed by a discussion of methods for collectingperformance counter data to understand code performance on the Cray XT3?and XT4? systems. We then use the performance counter data to analyze theimpact of multicore processors on the performance of microbenchmarks suchas STREAM, application kernels such as the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, andfull application codes that comprise the NERSC-5 SSP benchmark suite. Weexplore compiler options and software optimization techniques that canmitigate the memory bandwidth contention that can reduce computingefficiency on multicore processors. The last section provides a casestudy of applying the dual-core optimizations to the NAS ParallelBenchmarks to dramatically improve their performance.

  14. Fragments of Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Topic 3: “Case studies dealing with the artistic and architectural work of architects worldwide, and the ties between specific artistic and architectural projects, methodologies and products”......Topic 3: “Case studies dealing with the artistic and architectural work of architects worldwide, and the ties between specific artistic and architectural projects, methodologies and products”...

  15. Improving the Understanding of Research Methodology and Self-Regulated Learning Through Blog Project

    OpenAIRE

    Retnawati, Heri

    2017-01-01

    : This classroom action research seeks to improve self-regulated learning (SRL) and understanding of research methodology at the graduate school. Nineteen graduate school students were involved. Using project-based learning (PjBL), students were assigned to create online blogs as the main project. The blog was intended for representing their understanding of research methodology by writing review of research articles and submitting a research proposal. The classroom action research was based ...

  16. Enhancing Intercultural Communication and Understanding: Team Translation Project as a Student Engagement Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on a team translation project on Aboriginal culture designed to enhance university students' intercultural communication competence and understanding through engaging in an interactive team translation project funded by the Australia-China Council. A selected group of Chinese speaking translation students participated in the…

  17. Memorandum of Understanding Completion and Acceptance of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NISHIKAWA, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is written to provide clear direction with respect to roles, responsibilities, obligations, and expectations of each organization identified. It functions as an agreement between the Operations, Construction Projects and Startup Organizations within the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project

  18. UNESCO and the Associated Schools Project: Symbolic Affirmation of World Community, International Understanding, and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David F.; Ramirez, Francisco O.; Koo, Jeong-Woo

    2009-01-01

    The UNESCO Associated Schools Project emphasizes world community, human rights, and international understanding. This article investigates the emergence and global diffusion of the project from 1953 to 2001, estimating the influence of national, regional, and world characteristics on the likelihood of a country adopting a UNESCO school. It also…

  19. Understanding and managing three-dimensional/four-dimensional model implementations at the project team level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Timo; Levitt, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces an extant, theoretical, social-psychological model that explains the sense-making processes of project managers confronted with a new technology to improve our understanding of project-based innovation processes. The model represents the interlinked processes through which

  20. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...

  1. Architecture as Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic…

  2. Affective Architecture. Film as a Sensory Transference Tool and an Intimacy Projection Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Munck; Farsø, Mads

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates how film may offer itself as a tool for both the representation and conception of space that can strengthen an alternative, phenomenological and transcendental position in architecture. The paper underscores that the film camera can work as a kind of amplifier of how we, wit...

  3. Architectural Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2010-01-01

    a functional framework for these concepts, but tries increasingly to endow the main idea of the cultural project with a spatially aesthetic expression - a shift towards “experience architecture.” A great number of these projects typically recycle and reinterpret narratives related to historical buildings......In this essay, I focus on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized as “hybrid cultural projects,” because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play, and learning. This essay...... identifies new rationales related to this development, and it argues that “cultural planning” has increasingly shifted its focus from a cultural institutional approach to a more market-oriented strategy that integrates art and business. The role of architecture has changed, too. It not only provides...

  4. UAS in the NAS Project: Large-Scale Communication Architecture Simulations with NASA GRC Gen5 Radio Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubat, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a description and performance characterization of the large-scale, Relay architecture, UAS communications simulation capability developed for the NASA GRC, UAS in the NAS Project. The system uses a validated model of the GRC Gen5 CNPC, Flight-Test Radio model. Contained in the report is a description of the simulation system and its model components, recent changes made to the system to improve performance, descriptions and objectives of sample simulations used for test and verification, and a sampling and observations of results and performance data.

  5. The influence of Missouri mathematics project on seventh grade students’ mathematical understanding ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezeki, S.; Setyawan, A. A.; Amelia, S.

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical understanding ability is a primary goal of Indonesian national education goals. However, various sources has shown that Indonesian students’ mathematical understanding ability is still relatively low. This study used quasi-experimental research design to examine the effectiveness of the application of Missouri Mathematics Project (MMP) on students’ mathematical understanding ability. The participants of the study were seventh grade students in Pekanbaru, Riau Province, Indonesia. They were selected purposively and represented as high, medium, and low-quality schools. The result of this study indicated that there was a significant effect of MMP on the overall students’ mathematical understanding ability and in all categories, except for low school level.

  6. The practice of Information Architecture in the scope of an Enterprise Content Management (ECM project: a study case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Marangon Duffles Teixeira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the paper describes an ECM project in the scope of a Brazilian power supply company called Cía Energética de Minas Gerais (CEMIG, during the period of construction of new facilities for energy distribution. Such construction involved different teams of CEMIG working along with teams of outsourced companies, which conferred to the endeavor a complex character insofar as the multitude of convoluted activities involving various actors and roles. Objective: in order to manage the informational resources in a centralized way, the project concentrated in controlling deadlines and flows of document´s approval, since the phase of the engineering project design until the conclusion of the construction. Methodology: the methodology was grounded in essentials of Information Architecture (IA discipline, using punctual, categorized and organized surveys, which guide the development of a module of an ECM tool to meet the requirements. Results: the present paper, in addition to describe a study case of the ECM project, attests the relevant role of information professionals as a hallmark in IA based projects. Conclusions: it is clear from our findings the suitability of our methodological and professional choices, in addition to the proper results obtained with the use of the developed ECM tool.

  7. The Development of Mature Capabilities for Understanding and Valuing Technology through School Project Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallies, Michael; Wellensiek, Anneliese; Lembens, Anja

    This paper describes a German project that developed students' capabilities for understanding and valuing biotechnology and genetic engineering, focusing on practical fieldwork with schools by an interdisciplinary team. The paper identifies the characteristics of individual and structural preconditions and their development during active project…

  8. Healing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmer, Mette Blicher; Mullins, Michael; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2012-01-01

    The project examines how architecture and design of space in the intensive unit promotes or hinders interaction between relatives and patients. The primary starting point is the relatives. Relatives’ support and interaction with their loved ones is important in order to promote the patients healing...... process. Therefore knowledge on how space can support interaction is fundamental for the architect, in order to make the best design solutions. Several scientific studies document that the hospital's architecture and design are important for human healing processes, including how the physical environment...... architectural and design solutions in order to improve quality of interaction between relative and patient in the hospital's intensive unit....

  9. QUEST2: Project plan for preliminary analysis/system architecture phase (PA/SA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-01-01

    This Project Management Plan combines the project management deliverables from the P+ methodology that are applicable to this part of the QUEST2 work. This consolidation reflects discussions with WHC QA regarding an appropriate method for ensuring that P+ deliverables fulfill the intent of WHC-CM-3-10 and QR-19

  10. The Palace of the Prince. Ideas and Architectural Projects from Florentine Experimental Academism to Borromini’s Drawings, with Notes on the Album of Giovanni Vincenzo Casale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Tabarrini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The unrealised architectural projects of Borromini for the princely Pamphili and Carpegna palaces in Rome have been relegated to a genre of ideal architecture on account of the grandeur of their conception and for their typological design complexity which anticipated the developments of seventeenth and eighteenth-century architecture. Rather, it can now be demonstrated that as far as questions regarding models for a “Palace of the Prince” in Renaissance practise and theory, Borromini was well aware of this long architectural tradition for high-ranking patrons – a tradition which culminated in the second half of the sixteenth century in the graphic experimentalism of the Florentine Accademia del Disegno. This article analyses two architectural projects for the Palazzo Barberini which can be related to this Florentine academic environment: the first, attributed by Wittkower to Pietro da Cortona, and the second, an allegorical drawing by Orazio Busini, still imbued with a late Renaissance schematic vision. To underline the specific importance of this academic type of architectural design in contrast to the inventiveness of Borromini’s architecture, his design projects for the Palazzo Carpegna are compared to the series of ideal palaces featured in the Album of drawings of Giovanni Vincenzo Casale, secretary to the Accademia del Disegno during the period when he closely followed the models of Montorsoli. From these comparisons it will be argued that the novelty of Borromini’s architectural projects for the Carpegna and the Pamphili palaces derives from the dynamic activation, interpreted in a “Brandian”-baroque meaning, of traditional academic schemes, that, once freed from the rigidly modular academic pattern, reach a harmonious fusion between interior and exterior design.

  11. The Activity-Based Computing Project - A Software Architecture for Pervasive Computing Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    This report describes the results of the Activity-Based Computing (ABC) project granted by the Danish Strategic Re- search Council, grant no. #2106-04-0019. In summary, we conclude that the ABC project has been highly successful. Not only has it meet all of its objectives and expected results....... Special attention should be drawn to publication [25], which gives an overview of the ABC project to the IEEE Pervasive Computing community; the ACM CHI 2006 [19] paper that documents the implementation of the ABC technology; and the ACM ToCHI paper [12], which is the main publication of the project......, documenting all of the project’s four objectives. All of these publication venues are top-tier journals and conferences within computer science. From a business perspective, the project had the objective of incorporating relevant parts of the ABC technology into the products of Medical Insight, which has been...

  12. Knowledge and Architectural Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the specific knowledge residing in architectural practice. It is based on the research of 35 PhD fellows in the ADAPT-r (Architecture, Design and Art Practice Training-research) project. The ADAPT-r project innovates architectural research in combining expertise from academi...

  13. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 Architecture Document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, John F.

    2015-12-01

    This document contains a description of the system architecture for the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project. This is a draft version that primarily provides background information for understanding delivered Use Case Realizations.

  14. Architectural competitions and the issue of the autonomy of architecture: The case of Terazije Terrace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šišović Grozdana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Terazije Terrace in Belgrade and many different architectural projects for this space produced over the last almost 90 years are the subject matter of the analysis. The research is conducted with the aim to recognize and present diverse currents in the development of an architectural scene and shed light on the role of architectural competitions in these complex flows. The 1929-1930 competition won by Nikola Dobrović, as well as the 1968, 1991 and 1998 competitions with the awarded projects are the focal point of the paper as the samples of architectural practice significant for the understanding of the relations between the treatment of “grand architectural themes” and the dominant orientation of a local architectural culture. The theoretical framework refers to contemporary theoretical debate on the autonomy of the discipline (Somol and Whiting, 2002; Aureli, 2008; Hays, 2010; among the others.

  15. Architectural design decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Antonius Gradus Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A software architecture can be considered as the collection of key decisions concerning the design of the software of a system. Knowledge about this design, i.e. architectural knowledge, is key for understanding a software architecture and thus the software itself. Architectural knowledge is mostly

  16. Understanding of Danish Passive Houses based on Pilot Project Comfort Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla

    to teamwork, method and tools? And what barriers and possibilities lie within the approaches? – How do the occupants of the Comfort Houses experience the passive house architecture and the technical service systems? And has their everyday life changed by moving into a passive house? If so, how? – To what...... and understanding of the indoor environment. The investigations have resulted in a list of recommendations that are important when designing future passive houses in Denmark. Firstly, the study indicates that the integrated design process is a beneficial approach for designing passive houses. But some circumstances...... energy houses) is important for this concept to be a success both for the occupant and the environment. The indoor environment is fairly comfortable in the houses, but there is still room for improvement. Especially according to the thermal indoor environment in the summer period and the reverberation...

  17. RATS: Reactive Architectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Marc

    2004-01-01

    This project had two goals: To build an emulation prototype board for a tiled architecture and to demonstrate the utility of a global inter-chip free-space photonic interconnection fabric for polymorphous computer architectures (PCA...

  18. Avionics Architecture for Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the AES Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project is to develop a reference architecture that is based on standards and that can be scaled and...

  19. A MASTER THESIS ON PORTING THE ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE ANALYSIS TOOL TO ECLIPSE MODELING PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    This master thesis is a part of the ongoing research on EAT development project. Its main goal is to research whether Eclipse Modeling Project can be used as an alternative platform to using NetBeans in implementing EAT tool. In order to fulfill this goal, it contains analysis of the current EAT tool version and design research of a new version using EMP. The design addresses most of the issues related to building a new version and eventually recommends porting EAT to EMP.

  20. Changes in alluvial architecture associated with Eocene hyperthermals: Preliminary results from the Bighorn Basin Coring Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acks, R.; Kraus, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was followed by two lesser hyperthermal events: ETM2 and H2 both at ~53.7 Ma. The carbon isotope excursion for ETM2 was approximately half that of the PETM and the H2 excursion even smaller, indicating lower increases in temperature than during the PETM. The paleohydrologic responses to these events are less well understood than the response to PETM warming. Although the ETM2 and H2 events are better known from marine than continental strata, both events have been identified from outcrops of the alluvial Willwood Formation from the Deer Creek and Gilmore Hill areas of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming (Abels et al., 2012). Here, we analyze two cores drilled from stratigraphically equivalent Willwood strata from Gilmore Hill. The cores provide an opportunity to examine the impact of these events on the architecture of fluvial strata. Willwood strata are composed largely of channel sandstones, heterolithic deposits generated by channel avulsion, and paleosols that formed on overbank deposits. The paleosols provide qualitative and quantitative information on changes in soil moisture and precipitation through this interval. The cores also show a distinct change in the stacking of paleosols The core is subdivided into three parts: (1) the lowest ~third has thinner, more densely spaced paleosols, (2) the middle has thicker paleosols that are more widely spaced, and (3) the upper third has thicker and more common channel sandstones interspersed with avulsion deposits and fewer red paleosols; this corresponds to the hyperthermal interval. In particular, a ~20 m thick sandstone complex caps the section and appears to truncate part of the hyperthermal interval. Although vertical variations in alluvial architecture can reflect tectonic or climatic change, the correspondence of the sandstone-rich part of the cores with the hyperthermals suggests climate was the major control on their formation. Thick purple paleosols associated with the

  1. Optimal Architecture for an Asteroid Mining Mission: System Components and Project Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Ken R.

    2007-01-01

    Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) offer potential profits both in the near-term (mining platinum group metals, or PGMs) and long-term (harvesting water, volatiles and ore to provide the economic backbone for lunar, Martian and other space exploration). The abundance of raw materials in NEAs include: water and other volatiles for life-support and power, nickel, iron and other metals for construction and manufacturing; carbonaceous compounds for ceramics and building materials; and PGMs for fuel cells and numerous applications on Earth. An efficient, flexible and cost-effective mission utilizing adaptable and resilient robotic compo-nents is essential to successfully establish NEA mining as a comer-cial enterprise. This paper presents an optimized architecture, detailing necessary engineering components, task integration between them, and methods to address the more likely problems encountered. Candidate NEAs are suggested that could offer optimal PGM resources and that have already been evaluated by rendezvous mapping. Mission delta-V and propellant selection are based upon launch from and return to LEO. On-site equipment includes AI-guided robotics, with human telecontrol from Earth to minimize risk and cost. A command-control-communication (CCC) unit orbits the NEA, and coordinates four small lander-miners (LMs), each of which acquire and process regolith. Two LMs are specialized for water and volatiles, two for PGM and Ni-Fe ore. A solar-powered unit hydrolyzes water from the NEA into H2 and O2 for use as propellant, and a solar-thermal propulsion unit returns additional water, PGMs and Ni-Fe ore to LEO. The pro-posed architecture emphasizes flexibility, redundancy of critical units, and fail-safes to maximize probability of mission success. Potential problems addressed include: failure of components, varying surface conditions and mineralogic content, fluctuating solar exposure (due to asteroid rotation) and its impact on solar power units, extreme temperature changes

  2. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the OCTOPUS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Strubbe, David A; Oliveira, Micael J T; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Louie, Steven G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Rubio, Angel; Marques, Miguel A L

    2012-06-13

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures.

  3. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the octopus project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Strubbe, David A.; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Louie, Steven G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Rubio, Angel; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2012-06-01

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures.

  4. Principles of bioclimatic architecture applied at the project of spa center at Stara Planina mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Igor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of bioclimatic parameters in the design of tourist objects is an important factor for reducing energy consumption and preserving the environment. It represents the response to constant changing of climate conditions. Given the fact that development of tourism has negative consequences on the environment, it is necessary to examine the way design process can affect the reduction of energy and environmental pollution. This paper analyzes the principles of bioclimatic planning and design of the Spa Center at the Balkan Mountain that is one of the most valuable ecosystems in Serbia. Adaptation to the existing climate change was analyzed on two levels. The first level was urban factors that include analysis of local climate and environment that affect the positioning of the object and preliminary form. The second level was architecture factors with technical and technological solutions that can be achieved through the application of climate and energy responsible designing. Final analyses indicate that the bioclimatic approach is necessary in the initial stage of setting preliminary design for the building, because later it would take more effort to install technology that requires time and the whole process makes much more expensive. The work indicates that the energy needs of optimized Spa center like represented, from the very beginning of planning and designing, can be drastically reduced.

  5. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the octopus project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Xavier; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Rubio, Angel; Strubbe, David A; Louie, Steven G; Oliveira, Micael J T; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Marques, Miguel A L

    2012-01-01

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures. (topical review)

  6. Problem-Based Project-Oriented Learning: Educating and evaluating for new disciplines emerging in the interplay between the professions of civil engineering and architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2006-01-01

    University curricula are traditionally based on specialised discipline-specific subjects, which like engineering and architecture approach solutions to design problems with methods suited to their specific view of the issues. Problem-based learning models (PBL) offer a number of potential...... advantages in a search for solutions of which integrate these approaches. The Department of Architecture and Design (A&D) at Aalborg University has been intiated with the explicit aim to educate for new disciplines emerging in the interplay between the professions of civil engineering and architecture......, and uses PBL and project-oriented models for its educational form. There is a distinct difference between engineering and architecture in their evolutionary backgrounds and their varying degree of emphasis on natural science. Both present different forms of problem solving that appeal to different learning...

  7. Interior-exterior connection in architectural design based on the incorporation of spatial in between layers. Study of four architectural projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Hristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different spatial layers in the architectural structure of a building can create particular spatial relations and an architectural space that cannot be defined as an inner space or as an outer space, but one which has the characteristics of both. This space, which can be called “in between space”, appears as the result of a specific design concept in which the architectural composition is created by gradual insertion of volumes one inside another, like a box that is placed inside a box, inside of which is placed another smaller box and so on. The incorporation of various layers in the spatial arrangement of volumes in certain architectural compositions can be conceived as a possible approach in connecting the interior and exterior. This kind of conceptual design distinguishes itself from the common approach by its specific architecture that offers richness, variety, complexity and unique perception of space, thereby increasing its value. The paper investigates this particular concept through the analysis of four residential houses (Villa Le Lac by Le Corbusier, Solar House by Oswald Mathias Ungers, House N by Sou Fujimoto and Guerrero House by Alberto Campo Baeza, and it strives to find out the concept’s use and advantages, all with the aim of opening up new possibilities in the design of buildings and enriching the design process.

  8. Haughton-Mars Project Expedition 2005: Interplanetary Supply Chain Management & Logistics Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    deWeck, Olivier; Simchi-Levi, David

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 expedition to the Haughton-Mars Project (HMP) research station on Devon Island was part of a NASA-funded project on Space Logistics. A team of nine researchers from MIT went to the Canadian Arctic to participate in the annual HMP field campaign from July 8 to August 12, 2005. We investigated the applicability of the HMP research station as an analogue for planetary macro- and micro-logistics to the Moon and Mars, and began collecting data for modeling purposes. We also tested new technologies and procedures to enhance the ability of humans and robots to jointly explore remote environments. The expedition had four main objectives. We briefly summarize our key findings in each of these areas.

  9. Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performing expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have...... expression in the specific housing area. It is the aim of this article to expand the different design strategies which architects can use – to give the individual project attitudes and designs with architectural quality. Through the customized component production it is possible to choose different...... for retrofit design. If we add the question of the installations e.g. ventilation to this systematic thinking of building technique we get a diverse and functional architecture, thereby creating a new and clearer story telling about new and smart system based thinking behind architectural expression....

  10. The Architecture of the Pollen Hoarding Syndrome in Honey Bees: Implications for Understanding Social Evolution, Behavioral Syndromes, and Selective Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueppell, Olav

    2014-05-01

    Social evolution has influenced every aspect of contemporary honey bee biology, but the details are difficult to reconstruct. The reproductive ground plan hypothesis of social evolution proposes that central regulators of the gonotropic cycle of solitary insects have been coopted to coordinate social complexity in honey bees, such as the division of labor among workers. The predicted trait associations between reproductive physiology and social behavior have been identified in the context of the pollen hoarding syndrome, a larger suite of interrelated traits. The genetic architecture of this syndrome is characterized by a partially overlapping genetic architecture with several consistent, pleiotropic QTL. Despite these central QTL and an integrated hormonal regulation, separate aspects of the pollen hoarding syndrome may evolve independently due to peripheral QTL and additionally segregating genetic variance. The characterization of the pollen hoarding syndrome has also demonstrated that this syndrome involves many non-behavioral traits, which may be the case for numerous "behavioral" syndromes. Furthermore, the genetic architecture of the pollen hoarding syndrome has implications for breeding programs for improving honey health and other desirable traits: If these traits are comparable to the pollen hoarding syndrome, consistent pleiotropic QTL will enable marker assisted selection, while sufficient additional genetic variation may permit the dissociation of trade-offs for efficient multiple trait selection.

  11. Crossing the river: Developing a strategy to support understanding of uncertainty within probabilistic climate projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, P.; Lamb, R.

    2010-09-01

    The UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) was established by government in 1997 to support the UK's engagement with becoming better adapted to a changing climate. As the lead organisation in the UK on climate change adaptation, UKCIP oversaw the development of the UK Climate Projections (UKCP09) which were launched in June 2009 providing, for the first time, probabilistic climate projections for the UK. As with previous generations of UKCIP climate scenarios, they were freely accessible and intended for a whole spectrum of users, from technical experts to a lay audience. . Prior to the launch of UKCP09 it was acknowledged that users would need support in understanding key concepts, such as the uncertainty inherent in the projections, to be able to use them appropriately. The user support strategy was therefore developed. It is founded on robust pedagogical principles and draws on the latest thinking on public understanding of science (PUS) that places the user at the centre of the communication process. The adopted approach first identifies profiles of the key users of the climate projections and the ways in which they would use and access the data. Based on these profiles it is possible to identify a range of mechanisms that allow the user to engage with understanding the projections in different ways and situations including lectures, workshops and online learning. Within this blended strategy an exercise was developed specifically to support users' understanding of the concept of uncertainty within the probabilistic climate projections. The ‘Crossing the River' exercise encourages the participants to actively consider the nature of information they are using, and how it could be applied in a specific decision. Reflection and discussion are key elements in supporting the users' understanding of the concept and allowing them to apply the principles in the exercise to their own context. Their reflection is facilitated through a range of mechanisms that provide

  12. Can You Hear Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Taking an off set in the understanding of architectural quality being based on multisensory architecture, the paper aims to discuss the current acoustic discourse in inclusive design and its implications to the integration of inclusive design in architectural discourse and practice as well...... design and architectural quality for people with a hearing disability and a newly conducted qualitative evaluation research in Denmark as well as architectural theories on multisensory aspects of architectural experiences, the paper uses examples of existing Nordic building cases to discuss the role...... of acoustics in both inclusive design and multisensory architecture....

  13. New Energy Architecture. Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    A global transition towards a new energy architecture is under way, driven by countries' need to respond to the changing dynamics of economic growth, environmental sustainability and energy security. The World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Accenture, has created the New Energy Architecture Initiative to address and accelerate this transition. The Initiative supports the development of national strategies and policy frameworks as countries seek to achieve the combined goals of energy security and access, sustainability, and economic growth and development. The World Economic Forum has formed a partnership with the Ministry of Energy of Myanmar to help apply the Initiative's approach to this developing and resource-rich nation. The Asian Development Bank and the World Economic Forum's Project Adviser, Accenture, have collaborated with the Forum on this consultation process, and have been supported by relevant government, industry and civil society stakeholders. The consultation process aims to understand the nation's current energy architecture challenges and provide an overview of a path to a New Energy Architecture through a series of insights. These insights could form the basis for a long-term multistakeholder roadmap to build Myanmar's energy sector in a way that is secure and sustainable, and promotes economic growth as the country makes its democratic transition. While not all recommendations can be implemented in the near term, they do provide options for creating a prioritized roadmap for Myanmar's energy transition. This report is the culmination of a nine-month multistakeholder process investigating Myanmar's energy architecture. Over the course of many visits to the country, the team has conducted numerous interviews, multistakeholder workshops, and learning and data-gathering exercises to ensure a comprehensive range of information and views. The team has also engaged with a variety of stakeholders to better

  14. Project on Social Architecture in Education. Final Report. Part III: Case Studies. Chapter 7: Change and Conflict. Educational Innovation in Community Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Barry A.; Miles, Matthew B.

    This document contains chapter 7 of the final report of the Project on Social Architecture in Education. Chapter 7 is about a new open-space elementary school. The hopes were to create a humanely oriented, flexible program, in which teaching teams would utilize the open space in creative ways, emphasizing individualization. The early planning left…

  15. Project-based learning used for teaching electrical installations and lighting installations in architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Martinez Anton

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper discusses the use of Project-Based Learning (PBL in the subject "Acondicionamiento y Servicios 2", which is taught at the Escuela de Arquitectura at the UPV.Design/methodology/approach: Case study.Findings: The results show that the goals (motivation, improved learning outcomes, independent learning and connection with professional practice, which led to the introduction of this kind of learning, have been achieved.Research limitations/implications: This work has been proved in two groups of a subject. Therefore, conclusions are specifically related to this context and generalization is not proved.Practical implications: Increase motivation, improved learning outcomes, independent learning and connection with professional practice.Originality/value: This work confirms previous studies about the useful of PBL in engineering matters.

  16. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials......Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...

  17. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials...

  18. Oramics to electronica: investigating lay understandings of the history of technology through a participatory project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Tim Boon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Oramics to Electronica was a 2011 Science Museum project designed to put the tools of museum participation in the service of research into public history, taking the history of electronic music as our example. The primary output was a temporary exhibition. Whereas the term ‘public history’ is often used to denote popularisation of academic history, in this inflection we are primarily concerned with how lay people like our visitors think about the past in general, and about the past of science and technology in particular. Taking the opportunities that arose, we worked with two ‘expert’ groups – of original 1960s participants in electronic music and of 12 recruited present-day music enthusiasts. We also enrolled a group of theatre students and another of writers to respond to the themes of the project and, in particular, to the ‘Oramics Machine’ a unique sound synthesizer created by Daphne Oram. In this essay, an account of our practice is bookended with consideration of related practice and reflections on the implications of the project. It is suggested that the project demonstrated the virtues of proceeding by way of engagement with micro-audiences to understand the ‘cognitive exclusion’ of potential visitors who do not see their interests represented in museum displays.

  19. A framework for understanding outcomes of mutual learning situations in IT projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt

    2012-01-01

    How do we analyse and understand design decisions derived from mutual learning (ML) situations and how may practitioners take advantage of these in IT projects? In the following we present a framework of design decisions inferred from ML situations that occurred between end-users and stakeholders...... but not discussed with stakeholders despite the fact that the users had proclaimed that the redesign could have consequences for the stakeholders in the long run. By applying the framework to the ML situations as we define situation "a" and "b" as actionable and situation "c" and "d" as volatile...

  20. Use of biological priors enhances understanding of genetic architecture and genomic prediction of complex traits within and between dairy cattle breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lingzhao; Sahana, Goutam; Ma, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    sequence variants in Holstein (HOL) and Jersey (JER) cattle were analysed. We first carried out a post-GWAS analysis in a HOL training population to assess the degree of enrichment of the association signals in the gene regions defined by each GO term. We then extended the genomic best linear unbiased......BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the genetic architecture underlying complex traits (e.g., the distribution of causal variants and their effects) may aid in the genomic prediction. Here, we hypothesized that the genomic variants of complex traits might be enriched in a subset of genomic...

  1. Semantic eScience for Ecosystem Understanding and Monitoring: The Jefferson Project Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, D. L.; Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Patton, E. W.; Chastain, K.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring and understanding ecosystems such as lakes and their watersheds is becoming increasingly important. Accelerated eutrophication threatens our drinking water sources. Many believe that the use of nutrients (e.g., road salts, fertilizers, etc.) near these sources may have negative impacts on animal and plant populations and water quality although it is unclear how to best balance broad community needs. The Jefferson Project is a joint effort between RPI, IBM and the Fund for Lake George aimed at creating an instrumented water ecosystem along with an appropriate cyberinfrastructure that can serve as a global model for ecosystem monitoring, exploration, understanding, and prediction. One goal is to help communities understand the potential impacts of actions such as road salting strategies so that they can make appropriate informed recommendations that serve broad community needs. Our semantic eScience team is creating a semantic infrastructure to support data integration and analysis to help trained scientists as well as the general public to better understand the lake today, and explore potential future scenarios. We are leveraging our RPI Tetherless World Semantic Web methodology that provides an agile process for describing use cases, identification of appropriate background ontologies and technologies, implementation, and evaluation. IBM is providing a state-of-the-art sensor network infrastructure along with a collection of tools to share, maintain, analyze and visualize the network data. In the context of this sensor infrastructure, we will discuss our semantic approach's contributions in three knowledge representation and reasoning areas: (a) human interventions on the deployment and maintenance of local sensor networks including the scientific knowledge to decide how and where sensors are deployed; (b) integration, interpretation and management of data coming from external sources used to complement the project's models; and (c) knowledge about

  2. Sustainable architecture by example of the project for a corner building between the streets Kralja Milana and Kralja Milutina in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Igor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology development for civil engineering and the application of new and improved materials become ever more present in realization of any kind of construction, starting from buildings for housing, business, as well as for the multifunctional and specialized ones. Sustainable architecture presumes environmental considerations, then the use of passive solar systems protection from the adverse conditions of climate, noise, micro location. This paper presents some of the sustainable architecture principles by example of the project for a corner building between the streets Kralja Milana and Kralja Milutina in Belgrade.

  3. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of biofilms development and dispersal: BIAM (Biofilm Intensity and Architecture Measurement), a new tool for studying biofilms as a function of their architecture and fluorescence intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Marine; Cinquin, Bertrand; Sclavi, Bianca; Pareau, Dominique; Lopes, Filipa

    2017-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is one of the most relevant technologies for studying biofilms in situ. Several tools have been developed to investigate and quantify the architecture of biofilms. However, an approach to quantify correctly the evolution of intensity of a fluorescent signal as a function of the structural parameters of a biofilm is still lacking. Here we present a tool developed in the ImageJ open source software that can be used to extract both structural and fluorescence intensity from CLSM data: BIAM (Biofilm Intensity and Architecture Measurement). This is of utmost significance when studying the fundamental mechanisms of biofilm growth, differentiation and development or when aiming to understand the effect of external molecules on biofilm phenotypes. In order to provide an example of the potential of such a tool in this study we focused on biofilm dispersion. cis-2-Decenoic acid (CDA) is a molecule known to induce biofilm dispersion of multiple bacterial species. The mechanisms by which CDA induces dispersion are still poorly understood. To investigate the effects of CDA on biofilms, we used a reporter strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) that expresses the GFPmut2 protein under control of the rrnBP1 promoter. Experiments were done in flow cells and image acquisition was made with CLSM. Analysis carried out using the new tool, BIAM, indicates that CDA affects the fluorescence intensity of the biofilm structures as well as biofilm architectures. Indeed, our results demonstrate that CDA removes more than 35% of biofilm biovolume and suggest that it results in an increase of the biofilm's mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) by more than 26% compared to the control biofilm in the absence of CDA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The editorial policy of the journal : The Structure in the Architectural Project Produced by the Structures and Physics Department of the Higher Technical College of ARCHITECTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Revista, Editor

    2015-01-01

    Now that the first steps are being taken to publish a journal entitled “La estructura en el proyecto de arquitectura”, together with its English version “The Structure in the Architectural Project”, within the POLIRED environment of the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), this document sets out the general framework of the journal. This includes its profile, aims, lines of working and the basic regulations governing how it functions..

  5. The Use of Computer Tools in the Design Process of Students’ Architectural Projects. Case Studies in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saighi, Ouafa; Salah Zerouala, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    This The paper particularly deals with the way in which computer tools are used by students in their design studio’s projects. Four institutions of architecture education in Algeria are considered as a case study to evaluate the impact of such tools on student design process. This aims to inspect in depth such use, to sort out its advantages and shortcomings in order to suggest some solutions. A field survey was undertaken on a sample of students and their teachers at the same institutions. The analysed results mainly show that computer tools are highly focusing on improving the quality of drawings representation and images seeking observers’ satisfaction hence influencing their decision. Some teachers are not very keen to overuse the computer during the design phase; they prefer the “traditional” approach. This is the present situation that Algerian university is facing which leads to conflict and disagreement between students and teachers. Meanwhile, there was no doubt that computer tools have effectively contributed to improve the competitive level among students.

  6. An Innovative Solution to NASA's NEO Impact Threat Mitigation Grand Challenge and Flight Validation Mission Architecture Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) mission architecture, which blends a hypervelocity kinetic impactor with a subsurface nuclear explosion for optimal...

  7. Planetary Defense Architecture for Mitigating Short-Term Warning Cosmic Threats: READI Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Shrrirup; Hussein, Alaa; Silva-Martinez, Jackelynne; Reinert, Jessica; Gonzalez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Earth is being constantly bombarded by a large variety of celestial bodies and has been since its formation 4.5 billion years ago. Among those bodies, mainly asteroids and comets, there are those that have the potential to create large scale destruction upon impact. The only extinction-level impact recorded to date was 65 million years ago, during the era of dinosaurs. The probability of another extinction-level, or even city-killer, impact may be negligible, but the consequences can be severe for the biosphere and for our species. Therefore it is highly imperative for us to be prepared for such a devastating impact in the near future, especially since humanity is at the threshold of wielding technologies that allow us to do so. Majority of scientists, engineers, and policymakers have focused on long-term strategies and warning periods for Earth orbit crossing Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), and have suggested methods and policies to tackle such problems. However, less attention has been paid to short warning period NEO threats. Such NEOs test current technological and international cooperation capabilities in protecting ourselves, and can create unpredictable devastation ranging from local to global scale. The most recent example is the Chelyabinsk incident in Russia. This event has provided a wakeup call for space agencies and governments around the world towards establishing a Planetary Defense Program. The Roadmap for EArth Defense Initiative (READI) is a project by a team of international, intercultural, and interdisciplinary participants of the International Space University's Space Studies Program 2015 hosted by Ohio University, Athens, OH proposing a roadmap for space agencies, governments, and the general public to tackle NEOs with a short warning before impact. Taking READI as a baseline, this paper presents a technical description of methodologies proposed for detection and impact mitigation of a medium-sized comet (up to 800m across) with a short

  8. Architecture for Mitigating Short-Term Warning Cosmic Threats: READI Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Shrrirup P.; Hussein, Alaa; Silva-Martinez, Jackelynne; Reinert, Jessica; Gonzalez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Earth is being constantly bombarded by a large variety of celestial bodies and has been since its formation 4.5 billion years ago. Among those bodies, mainly asteroids and comets, there are those that have the potential to create large scale destruction upon impact. The only extinction-level impact recorded to date was 65 million years ago, during the era of dinosaurs. The probability of another extinction-level, or even city-killer, impact may be negligible, but the consequences can be severe for the biosphere and for our species. Therefore it is highly imperative for us to be prepared for such a devastating impact in the near future, especially since humanity is at the threshold of wielding technologies that allow us to do so. Majority of scientists, engineers, and policymakers have focused on long-term strategies and warning periods for Earth orbit crossing Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), and have suggested methods and policies to tackle such problems. However, less attention has been paid to short warning period NEO threats. Such NEOs test current technological and international cooperation capabilities in protecting ourselves, and can create unpredictable devastation ranging from local to global scale. The most recent example is the Chelyabinsk incident in Russia. This event has provided a wakeup call for space agencies and governments around the world towards establishing a Planetary Defense Program. The Roadmap for EArth Defense Initiative (READI) is a project by a team of international, intercultural, and interdisciplinary participants of the International Space University's Space Studies Program 2015 hosted by Ohio University, Athens, OH proposing a roadmap for space agencies, governments, and the general public to tackle NEOs with a short warning before impact. Taking READI as a baseline, this paper presents a technical description of methodologies proposed for detection and impact mitigation of a medium-sized comet (up to 800m across) with a short

  9. Game engine architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Jason

    2014-01-01

    ""… this book is the best of its kind, and you're lucky to have found it. It covers the huge field of game engine architecture in a succinct, clear way, and expertly balances the breadth and depth of its coverage, offering enough detail that even a beginner can easily understand the concepts it presents. The author, Jason Gregory, is not only a world expert in his field; he's a working programmer with production-quality knowledge and many shipped game projects under his belt. … Jason is also an experienced educator who has taught in the top-ranked university game program in North America. …

  10. Ready! Set! Go! An Action Research Agenda for Software Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Schougaard, Kari Rye

    2008-01-01

    Software architecture practice is highly complex. Software architects interact with business as well as technical aspects of systems, often embedded in large and changing organizations. We first make an argument that an appropriate research agenda for understanding, describing, and changing...... architectural practice in this context is based on an action research agenda in which researchers use ethnographic techniques to understand practice and engages directly with and in practice when proposing and designing new practices. Secondly, we present an overview of an ongoing project which applies action...... research techniques to understand and potentially change architectural practice in four Danish software companies....

  11. Crowdfunding for the co-financing of projects to enhance complexes of great historical and architectural value: the case of Torino Esposizioni - pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marinò

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the financing required to restore and reuse the great architecture of the 1900s, in a time in history when public financial resources are becoming increasingly low and difficult to find. The research addresses the possibility of using crowdfunding through the case study of the reuse project of Torino Esposizioni, an architectural work from the '900, partially used, in a state of decay, despite being recognized by international critics as a work of exceptional value. After the Master Plan had been developed by the Turin Polytechnic in collaboration with the City of Turin, the applicability of crowdfunding was analyzed by a survey to evaluate the willingness of the potential users to contribute to the Torino Esposizioni reuse project. In addition to this, the interest of citizens in the historical value of the Torino Esposizioni and the reuse project that would enhance it has been understood. The survey results have highlighted unexpected unwillingness to contribute to the collective funding of the project. Furthermore, they have revealed not only the lack of knowledge of crowdfunding as a means of financing, but also the lack of awareness of the value of Turin’s historical and modern architectural heritage, of which Torino Esposizioni is an outstanding example, although not the only one.

  12. Médiation de l'architecture par l'exposition et sa réception par des visiteurs experts et non experts

    OpenAIRE

    Laberge, Marie Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focusses on the mediation of architecture in the museum setting and on the different tools used to communicate the architectural project in the exhibition. The main goal of this research is to get a better knowledge and understanding of the reception of the different objects used to exhibit the many aspects of architectural projects by visitors (architects and non-architects). There is a general agreement on the fact that it is difficult to communicate architecture through the exh...

  13. Understanding Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development through Functional Correlation of Their Proliferative Status with the Intra-aortic Cluster Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsivari, Antoniana; Rybtsov, Stanislav; Souilhol, Celine; Binagui-Casas, Anahi; Hills, David; Zhao, Suling; Travers, Paul; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2017-06-06

    During development, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region through a process of multi-step maturation and expansion. While proliferation of adult HSCs is implicated in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation, very little is known about the proliferation status of nascent HSCs in the AGM region. Using Fucci reporter mice that enable in vivo visualization of cell-cycle status, we detect increased proliferation during pre-HSC expansion followed by a slowing down of cycling once cells start to acquire a definitive HSC state, similar to fetal liver HSCs. We observe time-specific changes in intra-aortic hematopoietic clusters corresponding to HSC maturation stages. The proliferative architecture of the clusters is maintained in an orderly anatomical manner with slowly cycling cells at the base and more actively proliferating cells at the more apical part of the cluster, which correlates with c-KIT expression levels, thus providing an anatomical basis for the role of SCF in HSC maturation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development through Functional Correlation of Their Proliferative Status with the Intra-aortic Cluster Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniana Batsivari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During development, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region through a process of multi-step maturation and expansion. While proliferation of adult HSCs is implicated in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation, very little is known about the proliferation status of nascent HSCs in the AGM region. Using Fucci reporter mice that enable in vivo visualization of cell-cycle status, we detect increased proliferation during pre-HSC expansion followed by a slowing down of cycling once cells start to acquire a definitive HSC state, similar to fetal liver HSCs. We observe time-specific changes in intra-aortic hematopoietic clusters corresponding to HSC maturation stages. The proliferative architecture of the clusters is maintained in an orderly anatomical manner with slowly cycling cells at the base and more actively proliferating cells at the more apical part of the cluster, which correlates with c-KIT expression levels, thus providing an anatomical basis for the role of SCF in HSC maturation.

  15. AUTONOMY IN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION: A BAHRAINI PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fay Abdulla Al Khalifa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Formal architectural education in Bahrain is relatively young, born only at the beginning of the twentieth century. This paper discusses autonomy in learning architecture, and the effect of using a mixed methods approach combining theoretical and practical assignments on students’ performance and understanding of complex architectural concepts. The study discusses the performance and progress of 81 undergraduate students in the course of Contemporary Architecture. The paper presents the students’ learning process and engagement that occurred throughout the given assignments, theorizing about how students could build on these processes to support their understanding of contemporary architectural and urban issues. The research concludes that both theoretical and practical educations are very helpful in the learning process. Nevertheless, active learning offers distinct advantages to architectural education, especially when combined with group work. The study also shows that while students were able to plan, design and construct spatial installations, they were less capable of reflecting on their projects philosophically. The results indicate the importance of practical experiences in enhancing overall student understanding of architectural phenomena.

  16. Research Through Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peder Pedersen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    Presentation of the PhD research at the Aarhus School of Architecture and selected PhD projects in relation to PhD exhibition at Godsbanen.......Presentation of the PhD research at the Aarhus School of Architecture and selected PhD projects in relation to PhD exhibition at Godsbanen....

  17. High-resolution modeling approaches to understanding changes in extreme precipitation projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, K. M.; Alexander, M. A.; Thompson, G.; Scott, J. D.; Barsugli, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    One of the challenges inherent to understanding the effect of global climate change on precipitation extremes is the mismatch of scale. Climate models simulate large-scale patterns of long-term change, while weather models generally diagnose small-scale weather phenomena such as extreme rainfall. Therefore, understanding the potential effects of global-scale changes on local-scale weather requires new research approaches to connect questions and processes across weather and climate scales. This study represents one such integrated approach by investigating projected changes in warm-season extreme precipitation events using a dynamical downscaling framework that sequentially interfaces climate- and weather-scale data. Focusing on the Colorado Front Range, global simulations are first downscaled to a medium/regional-scale resolution; the resulting simulations are then further downscaled using a high-resolution weather model. The high-resolution model is able to explicitly simulate intense thunderstorms using 1.3-km grid spacing, thus resolving the small-scale physical processes that generate extreme precipitation. Physical process explanations are sought for projected changes in rainfall amount, hail occurrence, and flood risk. Past and future extreme event simulations are compared with respect to environmental drivers such as low-level instability (e.g., CAPE), large-scale forcing, and vertical temperature and moisture profiles. The events are also examined for systematic differences in storm-scale processes such as updraft strength, hail production and hail melting, dry air entrainment, and downdraft formation. Qualitative and quantitative consistency (or the lack thereof) across global, regional, and local-scale simulations is also explored.

  18. Understanding the regional pattern of projected future changes in extreme precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfahl, S.; O'Gorman, P. A.; Fischer, E. M.

    2017-06-01

    Changes in extreme precipitation are among the most impact-relevant consequences of climate warming, yet regional projections remain uncertain due to natural variability and model deficiencies in relevant physical processes. To better understand changes in extreme precipitation, they may be decomposed into contributions from atmospheric thermodynamics and dynamics, but these are typically diagnosed with spatially aggregated data or using a statistical approach that is not valid at all locations. Here we decompose the forced response of daily regional scale extreme precipitation in climate-model simulations into thermodynamic and dynamic contributions using a robust physical diagnostic. We show that thermodynamics alone would lead to a spatially homogeneous fractional increase, which is consistent across models and dominates the sign of the change in most regions. However, the dynamic contribution modifies regional responses, amplifying increases, for instance, in the Asian monsoon region, but weakening them across the Mediterranean, South Africa and Australia. Over subtropical oceans, the dynamic contribution is strong enough to cause robust regional decreases in extreme precipitation, which may partly result from a poleward circulation shift. The dynamic contribution is key to reducing uncertainties in future projections of regional extreme precipitation.

  19. A Pilot Study: Facilitating Cross-Cultural Understanding with Project-Based Collaborative Learning in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadiev, Rustam; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated three aspects: how project-based collaborative learning facilitates cross-cultural understanding; how students perceive project-based collaborative learning implementation in a collaborative cyber community (3C) online environment; and what types of communication among students are used. A qualitative case study approach…

  20. Fiscal year 1997 Memorandum of Understanding for the TWRS characterization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    During fiscal year 1997, the level of success achieved by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) shall be determined by specific performance measures. These measures take the form of significant deliverables, one of which is the completion of Tank Characterization Reports (TCRs). In order to achieve success regarding the TCR performance deliverable, multiple organizations across TWRS must work together. Therefore, the requirements and expectations needed from each of these TWRS organizations were examined in order to gain an understanding of the performance necessary from each organization to achieve the end deliverable. This memorandum of understanding (MOU) documents the results of this review and establishes the performance criteria by which TWRS will assess its progress and success. These criteria have been determined based upon a TWRS Characterization Project budget of $56.8 million for fiscal year 1997; if this budget is changed or the currently identified workscope is modified, this MOU will need to be revised accordingly. This MOU is subdivided into six sections, where sections three through six each identify individual interfaces between TWRS organizations. The specific performance criteria related to each TWRS organizational interface are then delineated in the section, along with any additional goals or issues pertaining to that interface.

  1. Fiscal year 1998 memorandum of understanding for the TWRS characterization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    During fiscal year 1998, the level of success achieved by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) shall be determined by specific performance measures. These measures take the form of significant deliverables, one of which is the completion of Tank Characterization Reports (TCRs). In order to achieve success regarding the TCR performance deliverable, multiple organizations across TWRS must work together. Therefore, the requirements and expectations needed from each of these TWRS organizations were examined in order to gain an understanding of the performance necessary from each organization to achieve the end deliverable. This memorandum of understanding (MOU) documents the results of this review and establishes the performance criteria by which TWRS will assess its progress and success. These criteria have been determined based upon a TWRS Characterization Project budget of $47.5 million for fiscal year 1998; if this budget is changed or the currently identified work scope is modified, this MOU will need to be revised accordingly. This MOU is subdivided into six sections, where sections three through six each identify individual interfaces between TWRS organizations. The specific performance criteria related to each TWRS organizational interface are then delineated in the section, along with any additional goals or issues pertaining to that interface

  2. Fiscal Year 1999 memorandum of understanding for the TWRS characterization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUNT, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    During fiscal year 1999, the level of success achieved by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) shall be determined by specific performance measures. These measures take the form of significant deliverables, one of which is the completion of Tank Characterization Reports (TCRS). In order to achieve success regarding the TCR performance deliverable, multiple organizations across TWRS must work together. Therefore, the requirements and expectations needed from each of these TWRS organizations were examined in order to gain an understanding of the performance necessary from each organization to achieve the end deliverable. This memorandum of understanding (MOU) documents the results of this review and establishes the performance criteria by which TWRS will assess its progress and success. These criteria have been determined based upon a TWRS Characterization Project budget of $42.1 million for fiscal year 1999; if this budget is changed or the currently identified workscope is modified, this MOU will need to be revised accordingly. This MOU is subdivided into six sections, where sections three through six each identify individual interfaces between TWRS organizations. The specific performance criteria related to each TWRS organizational interface are then delineated in the section, along with any additional goals or issues pertaining to that interface

  3. Using the Lens of “Social Construction of Technology” to Understand the Design and Implementation of Aadhaar (UID) Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sivamalai, Lewin

    2013-01-01

    Part 7: Shorter Papers; International audience; Extant Research on e-government projects has shown that multiple stakeholders are at play always, each with their own divergent interests. And many a time, differences in stakeholder expectations from a project has resulted in projects failing or being abandoned after initial usage. Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) studies look at the development history of a technology in order to understand how that particular technology has evolved, b...

  4. Analysis of Architecture Pattern Usage in Legacy System Architecture Documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, Neil B.; Avgeriou, Paris

    2008-01-01

    Architecture patterns are an important tool in architectural design. However, while many architecture patterns have been identified, there is little in-depth understanding of their actual use in software architectures. For instance, there is no overview of how many patterns are used per system or

  5. Investigating Changes in Student Attitudes and Understanding of Science through Participation in Citizen Science Projects in College Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, Carolin; Cobb, Bethany E.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, web-based “citizen science” projects such as the Zooniverse have allowed volunteers and professional scientists to work together for the advancement of science. While much attention has been paid to the benefits to science from these new projects, less attention has been paid to their impact on the participants and, in particular, to the projects’ potential to impact students who might engage in these projects through coursework. We report on a study engaging students in introductory astronomy classes at the George Washington University and Wheelock College in an assignment in which each student individually contributed to a “physics” or “space” citizen science project of their choice, and groups of students worked together to understand and articulate the scientific purpose of a citizen science project to which they all contributed. Over the course of approximately four weeks, the students kept logs of their individual contributions to the project, and recorded a brief reflection on each of their visits (noting, for example, interesting or confusing things they might encounter along the way). The project culminated with each group delivering a creative presentation that demonstrated their understanding of both the science goals of the project and the value of their own contributions to the project. In this talk, we report on the experience of the students with the project and on an assessment of the students’ attitudes toward science and knowledge of the process of science completed before the introduction of the assignment and again at its conclusion.

  6. Understanding and Projecting Climate and Human Impacts on Terrestrial-Coastal Carbon and Nutrient Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrenz, S. E.; Cai, W. J.; Tian, H.; He, R.; Fennel, K.

    2017-12-01

    Changing climate and land use practices have the potential to dramatically alter coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes and associated movement of water, carbon and nutrients through various terrestrial reservoirs into rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters. Consequences of climate- and land use-related changes will be particularly evident in large river basins and their associated coastal outflow regions. Here, we describe a NASA Carbon Monitoring System project that employs an integrated suite of models in conjunction with remotely sensed as well as targeted in situ observations with the objectives of describing processes controlling fluxes on land and their coupling to riverine, estuarine and ocean ecosystems. The nature of our approach, coupling models of terrestrial and ocean ecosystem dynamics and associated carbon processes, allows for assessment of how societal and human-related land use, land use change and forestry and climate-related change affect terrestrial carbon transport as well as export of materials through watersheds to the coastal margins. Our objectives include the following: 1) Provide representation of carbon processes in the terrestrial ecosystem to understand how changes in land use and climatic conditions influence the export of materials to the coastal ocean, 2) Couple the terrestrial exports of carbon, nutrients and freshwater to a coastal biogeochemical model and examine how different climate and land use scenarios influence fluxes across the land-ocean interface, and 3) Project future changes under different scenarios of climate and human impact, and support user needs related to carbon management and other activities (e.g., water quality, hypoxia, ocean acidification). This research is providing information that will contribute to determining an overall carbon balance in North America as well as describing and predicting how human- and climate-related changes impact coastal water quality including possible effects of coastal

  7. Sound in ecclesiastical spaces in Cordoba. Architectural projects incorporating acoustic methodology (El sonido del espacio eclesial en Cordoba. El proyecto arquitectonico como procedimiento acustico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Rafael

    2003-11-01

    This thesis is concerned with the acoustic analysis of ecclesiastical spaces, and the subsequent implementation of acoustic design methodology in architectural renovations. One begins with an adequate architectural design of specific elements (shape, materials, and textures), with the intention of elimination of acoustic deficiencies that are common in such spaces. These are those deficiencies that impair good speech intelligibility and good musical audibility. The investigation is limited to churches in the province of Cordoba and to churches built after the reconquest of Spain (1236) and up until the 18th century. Selected churches are those that have undergone architectural renovations to adapt them to new uses or to make them more suitable for liturgical use. The thesis attempts to summarize the acoustic analyses and the acoustical solutions that have been implemented. The results are presented in a manner that should be useful for the adoption of a model for the functional renovation of ecclesiastical spaces. Such would allow those involved in architectural projects to specify the nature of the sound, even though somewhat intangible, within the ecclesiastical space. Thesis advisors: Jaime Navarro and Juan J. Sendra Copies of this thesis written in Spanish may be obtained by contacting the advisor, Jaime Navarro, E.T.S. de Arquitectura de Sevilla, Dpto. de Construcciones Arquitectonicas I, Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, 41012 Sevilla, Spain. E-mail address: jnavarro@us.es

  8. Hotel architecture from the perspective of sustainability and space hospitality : a study on the application of the concepts of sustainability and hospitality space in hotel projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josildete Pereira Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This present study aims to discuss the concept of both sustainability and hospitality into the context of city contemporary architecture which, in a certain way had been reinterpreted or asked in what is concerned to the concept of environmental sustainability. In this sense, the main goal of the research was to analyze two hotel projects in Santa Catarina, Brazil, been one of them configured as a small sized one and the other as a big hotel, where all the mentioned conditions had been manifested in a tight way and even had not been systematized into one of the hotel architecture samples, as a reference of sustainable and hospitable architecture. The methodology characterized by an initial bibliographic study, as well as documentary study, followed by a field research characterized by an intensive direct observation, as well as a group and systematic one, also considered both observation and questionnaires application (Marconi & Lakatos, 2006 and it tried to rescue the history of hotel architecture in order to identify environmental sustainability contents, as well as hospitality ones, concerned to the constructed spaces, so that it would be possible, in a following moment, to analyze the hotel samples selected, which do manifest all the mentioned conditions. It was realized that considering its realities and sizes, both studied hotels do count with actions and elements that may be considered sustainable, as well as friendly environmental actions, what, doubtless, do provide hospitality in a certain way. Similarly, both hotels still have potentialities to be developed.

  9. Understanding the organizational integration of subcontracted tasks in inter-firm projects

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Scheuner

    2011-01-01

    Project management researchers have recently emphasized the prevalence of inter-firm projects, i.e. projects which are carried out by multiple partners and hence cut across the organizational boundaries of one firm, in today’s business world (Bakker, Knoben, de Vries, & Oerlemanns, in Press). Especially in projects concerned with the delivery of what Hobday (Hobday, 1998) named complex products and systems (CoPS), where a diverse set of technological competences and high project budgets often...

  10. American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000 Awards: Landscape Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School & University, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents photographs and basic information on architectural design, costs, square footage, and principle designers of the award winning school landscaping projects that competed in the American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000. (GR)

  11. An architectural decision modeling framework for service oriented architecture design

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate whether reusable architectural decision models can support Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) design. In the current state of the art, architectural decisions are captured ad hoc and retrospectively on projects; this is a labor-intensive undertaking without immediate benefits. On the contrary, we investigate the role reusable architectural decision models can play during SOA design: We treat recurring architectural decisions as first-class method elements and p...

  12. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper will discuss the challenges faced by architectural education today. It takes as its starting point the double commitment of any school of architecture: on the one hand the task of preserving the particular knowledge that belongs to the discipline of architecture, and on the other hand...... the obligation to prepare students to perform in a profession that is largely defined by forces outside that discipline. It will be proposed that the autonomy of architecture can be understood as a unique kind of information: as architecture’s self-reliance or knowledge-about itself. A knowledge...... that is not scientific or academic but is more like a latent body of data that we find embedded in existing works of architecture. This information, it is argued, is not limited by the historical context of the work. It can be thought of as a virtual capacity – a reservoir of spatial configurations that can...

  13. Toward Measures for Software Architectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chastek, Gary; Ferguson, Robert

    2006-01-01

    .... Defining these architectural measures is very difficult. The software architecture deeply affects subsequent development and project management decisions, such as the breakdown of the coding tasks and the definition of the development increments...

  14. Understanding Stakeholders’ Influence on Project Success with a New SNA Method: A Case Study of the Green Retrofit in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholders strongly influence project success, particularly for complex projects with heterogeneous stakeholders, and hence, understanding their influence is essential for project management and implementation. This paper proposes an original model based on social network analysis (SNA, which first introduces critical success factors (CSFs as intermediate variables between stakeholders and project success. The model can demonstrate the interrelation between stakeholders and CSFs, and the results can reveal how stakeholders influence project success. Green retrofit is a typical type of complex project. The stakeholder relationship in green retrofit projects is more complex than in new projects, since more stakeholders (e.g., tenants and facility managers who have particular interrelations (e.g., lease contract and split incentives between owners and tenants are involved. Therefore, a case study of green retrofit in China was conducted to illustrate how the proposed model works. The results indicated the priorities and similarities of stakeholders in green retrofit. Stakeholders are categorized into five clusters according to their relationship. Based on the results, the important role of stakeholders in green retrofit projects was discussed. The main contribution of this study is providing a novel method to reveal how stakeholders influence the success of complex projects.

  15. Understanding and managing leakage in forest-based greenhouse-gas-mitigation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Reimund; Niles, John O; Olander, Jacob

    2002-08-15

    A major concern about land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is the potential for leakage. Leakage refers to a net increase of greenhouse-gas emissions in an area outside the project resulting from the CDM activity. This paper provides an overview of leakage, its definitions and its causes. It describes ways that LULUCF projects may suffer from leakage and attempts to assess the magnitude of leakage risks for different LULUCF project types. It also summarizes some of the approaches, both in terms of policies and project development, to address LULUCF leakage.

  16. Fabricating architectural volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feringa, Jelle; Søndergaard, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 edition of Fabricate inspired a number of collaborations, this article seeks to highlight three of these. There is a common thread amongst the projects presented: sharing the ambition to close the rift between design and fabrication while incorporating structural design aspects early on....... The development of fabrication techniques in the work presented is considered an inherent part of architectural design and shares the aspiration of developing approaches to manufacturing architecture that are scalable to architectural proportions1 and of practical relevance....

  17. The Changes in Architecture Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Tran

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this research is to inspire a discussion about the changes in architecture terminologywith the revolution in communication and representation forms as a result of digitalisation.The blurred boundary between the virtual and the analogue worlds, the misunderstandings andthe confusion that appear with the interaction of these two worlds nowadays form the major problems facing architectural design, education and research. The researchers in this field arefocused on the interface, the meeting and the transformation point between the digital and analogue worlds in order to prevent those problems and confusions. One of the main reasonsof this ambiguity is the architectural terminology that changes according to the changing status of architectural representation i.e. new forms of representation; new forms of communicationi.e. the new role of the architect and the researcher.Whenever and wherever information and knowledge specialised is created, communicated ortransformed terminology is involved in a way or another. An absence of terminology is combined with an absence of an understanding of concepts. Therefore with the new information and communication technologies; new and developing subject areas the existence of terminology and its update is indispensable. Thus the changing status of the terminology must be analysed. As architecture terminology is essential to improve today’s challenging, multidisciplinary communication in order to clarify the problems of ambiguity and unawareness (as a result of shift of specific architectural vocabulary it is necessary to analyse the changes in the architectural terminology which will form the discussion point of the following paper.As this paper is the beginning step of a research project which started on the occasion of the conference proposed by EAAE/ARCC we will here present only the objectives of this research,its general problematics, the methods that we wish to develop and some provisional

  18. Understanding the Influence of knowledge-sharing in Project Portfolio Management in professional services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mads Lyngsø; Horsager, Betina; Tambo, Torben

    2016-01-01

    A significant challenge in project portfolio management (PPM) is the need for continuously collecting knowledge about pending and ongoing projects to perform project selection and resource allocation. This paper outlines an explorative case study of a small project-based organization, where...... emphasis is put upon the knowledge management processes of individual projects to aggregate to the joint PPM perspective navigable by senior management. Since PPM relies closely on knowledge-sharing, the effectiveness of the organizations knowledge-sharing capabilities is assessed in the perspective...... of their ability to reach the generic portfolio objectives outlined by the literature as: strategic alignment, adaptability to changes, project visibility, portfolio transparency and clarity of deadlines. We found that these objectives can be accomplished by implementing a “pragmatic” information system...

  19. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  20. Project INTEGRATE - a common methodological approach to understand integrated health care in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Cash-Gibson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of case studies in health services research has proven to be an excellent methodology for gaining in-depth understanding of the organisation and delivery of health care. This is particularly relevant when looking at the complexity of integrated healthcare programmes, where multifaceted interactions occur at the different levels of care and often without a clear link between the interventions (new and/or existing and their impact on outcomes (in terms of patients health, both patient and professional satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. Still, integrated care is seen as a core strategy in the sustainability of health and care provision in most societies in Europe and beyond. More specifically, at present, there is neither clear evidence on transferable factors of integrated care success nor a method for determining how to establish these specific success factors. The drawback of case methodology in this case, however, is that the in-depth results or lessons generated are usually highly context-specific and thus brings the challenge of transferability of findings to other settings, as different health care systems and different indications are often not comparable. Project INTEGRATE, a European Commission-funded project, has been designed to overcome these problems; it looks into four chronic conditions in different European settings, under a common methodology framework (taking a mixed-methods approach to try to overcome the issue of context specificity and limited transferability. The common methodological framework described in this paper seeks to bring together the different case study findings in a way that key lessons may be derived and transferred between countries, contexts and patient-groups, where integrated care is delivered in order to provide insight into generalisability and build on existing evidence in this field.Methodology: To compare the different integrated care experiences, a mixed-methods approach has

  1. A Cross-Curricular, Problem-Based Project to Promote Understanding of Poverty in Urban Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Daniel S.; Tuchman, Ellen; Hawkins, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach students about the scope and consequences of urban poverty through an innovative cross-curricular project. We illustrate the process, goals, and tasks of the Community Assessment Project, which incorporates community-level assessment, collection and analysis of public data, and…

  2. Learning network theory : its contribution to our understanding of work-based learning projects and learning climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poell, R.F.; Moorsel, M.A.A.H. van

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the relevance of Van der Krogt's learning network theory (1995) for our understanding of the concepts of work-related learning projects and learning climate in organisations. The main assumptions of the learning network theory are presented and transferred to the level of

  3. Economics-driven software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Mistrik, Ivan; Kazman, Rick; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Economics-driven Software Architecture presents a guide for engineers and architects who need to understand the economic impact of architecture design decisions: the long term and strategic viability, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of applications and systems. Economics-driven software development can increase quality, productivity, and profitability, but comprehensive knowledge is needed to understand the architectural challenges involved in dealing with the development of large, architecturally challenging systems in an economic way. This book covers how to apply economic consider

  4. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    strategies which architects can use - to give the individual project attitudes and designs with architectural quality. Through the customized component production it is possible to choose many different proportions, to organize the process at site choosing either one room components or several rooms...... customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performed expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have in Denmark been focusing a more sustainable and low energy building technique, which also include...

  5. Enhancing Teacher and Student Engagement and Understanding of Marine Science Through Classroom Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    Overview This paper presentation shares findings from a granted funded project that sought to expand teacher content knowledge and pedagogy within the fields of marine science and coastal resource management through the implementation of classroom citizen science projects. A secondary goal was to increase middle and high school student interest and participation in marine science and natural resources research. Background A local science & engineering fair has seen a rapid decline in secondary student participants in the past four years. Research has demonstrated that when students are a part of a system of knowledge production (citizen science) they become much more aware, involved and conscious of scientific concepts compared to traditional school laboratory and nature of science activities. This project's primary objectives were to: (a) enhance teacher content expertise in marine science, (b) enrich teacher professional learning, (c) support citizen science classroom projects and inspire student activism and marine science engagement. Methods Project goals were addressed through classroom and meaningful outdoor educational experiences that put content knowledge into field based practices. Teachers learned to apply thier expanded content knowlege through classroom citizen science projects that focus on marine resource conservation issues such as fisheries management, water quality, turtle nesting and biodiversity of coastal ecosystems. These projects would eventually become potential topics of citizen science research topics for their students to pursue. Upon completion of their professional development, participants were urged to establish student Marine Science clubs with the goal of mentoring student submissions into the local science fair. Supplemental awards were possible for the students of project participants. Findings Based on project measures participants significantly increased their knowledge and awareness of presented material marine science and

  6. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...., object and web technologies). The objective of the Agility project is to develop an open agent grid architecture populated with scalable, deployable, industrial strength agent grid components, targeting the theme 'agents for the masses...

  7. Paper relief architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latka, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents two contemporary projects of paper structures relief architecture designed and built by Shigeru Ban Architects and Voluntary Architect Network. Author of the article took part in design and construction process of one of the projects. The project of Yaan Nursery School, which

  8. Architectural slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context...

  9. Architectures of prototypes and architectural prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Christensen, Michael; Sandvad, Elmer

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports from experience obtained through development of a prototype of a global customer service system in a project involving a large shipping company and a university research group. The research group had no previous knowledge of the complex business of shipping and had never worked...... sessions with users, - evolve over a long period of time to contain more functionality - allow for 6-7 developers working intensively in parallel. Explicit focus on the software architecture and letting the architecture evolve with the prototype played a major role in resolving these conflicting...... constraints. Specifically allowing explicit restructuring phases when the architecture became problematic showed to be crucial.  ...

  10. Architecture, Drawing, Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents contributions of drawing and text along with their many relationalities from ontology to history and vice versa in a range of reflections on architecture, drawing and topology. We hope to thereby indicate the potential of the theme in understanding not only the architecture...

  11. Detail in architecture: Between arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulencin Juraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Architectural detail represents an important part of architecture. Not only can it be used as an identifier of a specific building but at the same time enhances the experience of the realized project. Within it lie the signs of a great architect and clues to understanding his or her way of thinking. It is therefore the central topic of a seminar offered to architecture students at the Brno University of Technology. During the course of the semester-long class the students acquaint themselves with atypical architectural details of domestic and international architects by learning to read them, understand them and subsequently draw them by creating architectural blueprints. In other words, by general analysis of a detail the students learn theoretical thinking of its architect who, depending on the nature of the design, had to incorporate a variety of techniques and crafts. Students apply this analytical part to their own architectural detail design. The methodology of the seminar consists of experiential learning by project management and is complemented by a series of lectures discussing a diversity of details as well as materials and technologies required to implement it. The architectural detail design is also part of students’ bachelors thesis, therefore, the realistic nature of their blueprints can be verified in the production process of its physical counterpart. Based on their own documentation the students choose the most suitable manufacturing process whether it is supplied by a specific technology or a craftsman. Students actively participate in the production and correct their design proposals in real scale with the actual material. A student, as a future architect, stands somewhere between a client and an artisan, materializes his or her idea and adjusts the manufacturing process so that the final detail fulfills aesthetic consistency and is in harmony with its initial concept. One of the very important aspects of the design is its

  12. Understanding the NAO from Iberian and UK paleoclimate records. The NAOSIPUK project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alix, Antonio; Toney, Jaime L.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Slaymark, Charlotte; José Ramos-Román, Maria; Camuera, Jon; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Anderson, R. Scott

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of the NAOSIPUK project was to understand the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) during the Holocene, because the NAO is one major climate mode influencing climate patterns across Europe, and therefore, economy and society (Hurrell, 1995). We analysed several sedimentary records in two regions with opposing NAO responses. Our sedimentary surface survey from numerous lakes and bogs, led to further investigation of four records in the southern Iberian Peninsula and three in the central/northern UK. Past environments of the different sites were analysed using pollen and charcoal analysis, organic and inorganic geochemistry analyses, and sedimentary and geophysical surveys were performed. This work compares general environmental trends in both regions as deduced from the organic matter from bulk sediment to get an idea of the organic matter source, as well as specific organic compounds extracted from the sediment, such as leaf waxes (n-alkanes), algae-related compounds (diols and alkenones), and bacteria-related compounds (hopanes), to specify the sources of the organic matter, environmental temperature ranges, as well as hydrological changes. Our preliminary results show that the palaeoenvironmental indices developed from n-alkanes agree with the variations deduced from the carbon and nitrogen atomic ratios, as well as the carbon isotopic composition from bulk sediments in southern Iberia records. Interestingly, these indices show that some locations display opposite trends from one another, and are used to distinguish regional versus local effects of climate change, human impacts, and aeolian dust inputs. During the late Holocene solar forcing and NAO fluctuations are the main drivers of the environmental evolution in most of the Iberian and UK sites. However, we do detect the influence of the NAO in the temperatures oscillations of the studied sites in southern Iberia. This influence is much more important in the north/central UK sites. The regional

  13. Product Architecture Modularity Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkola, Juliana Hsuan

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to integrate various perspectives on product architecture modularity into a general framework, and also to propose a way to measure the degree of modularization embedded in product architectures. Various trade-offs between modular and integral product architectures...... and how components and interfaces influence the degree of modularization are considered. In order to gain a better understanding of product architecture modularity as a strategy, a theoretical framework and propositions are drawn from various academic literature sources. Based on the literature review...

  14. Elements of Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elements of Architecture explores new ways of engaging architecture in archaeology. It conceives of architecture both as the physical evidence of past societies and as existing beyond the physical environment, considering how people in the past have not just dwelled in buildings but have existed...... and affective impacts, of these material remains. The contributions in this volume investigate the way time, performance and movement, both physically and emotionally, are central aspects of understanding architectural assemblages. It is a book about the constellations of people, places and things that emerge...

  15. AgwA architecture office: Adressing structure in architecture competitions

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbulcke, Benoît; fallon, Harold; Second international conference on structures and architecture

    2013-01-01

    The authors are partners of the Brussels's based architectural firm AgwA. AgwA is involved in a large amount of architecture competitions, mainly for public buildings addressing the community. These competition projects are developed in multidisciplinary teams. In the work of AgwA, structure plays a central role in the architectural designs and their spatiality. The context of an architecture competition has important consequences on the way architects can approach the issue of structure.

  16. Understanding the allure of big infrastructure: Jakarta’s Great Garuda Sea Wall Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Colven

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to severe flooding in Jakarta, a consortium of Dutch firms in collaboration with the Indonesian government has designed the 'Great Garuda Sea Wall' project. The master plan proposes to construct a sea wall to enclose Jakarta Bay. A new waterfront city will be built on over 1000 hectares (ha of reclaimed land in the shape of the Garuda, Indonesia’s national symbol. By redeveloping North Jakarta, the project promises to realise the world-class city aspirations of Indonesia’s political elites. Heavily reliant on hydrological engineering, hard infrastructure and private capital, the project has been presented by proponents as the optimum way to protect the city from flooding. The project retains its allure among political elites despite not directly addressing land subsidence, understood to be a primary cause of flooding. I demonstrate how this project is driven by a techno-political network that brings together political and economic interests, world-class city discourses, engineering expertise, colonial histories, and postcolonial relations between Jakarta and the Netherlands. Due in part to this network, big infrastructure has long constituted the preferred state response to flooding in Jakarta. I thus make a case for provincialising narratives that claim we are witnessing a return to big infrastructure in water management.

  17. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  18. Getting Closer, Empathising and Understanding: Setting the Stage for a Co-design Project with People with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Maldonado Branco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the initial work of a doctoral research project that explores how communication design can enable people with dementia and their social circle to codesign strategies to communicate. The ethnographic exercise in two care institutions and a consequent design intervention are described, and its process deconstructed: approaching institutions and participants, developing empathy and understanding towards configuring participation, and defining next stages of research. This study draws from approaches related to Design Anthropology and Participatory Design, which are intertwined and mutually influential, reinforcing their importance in developing a design project for and with people.

  19. Towards a multidisciplinary understanding of product innovation: the Synopsis network project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2002-01-01

    The product development research area has evolved from the area of engineering design, based upon the recognition that important aspects such as need, market, business, innovation of the company, technology management, etc. fuse together to form a field of competencies, containing its own......, psychology, anthropology, social science and operations management. The group of researchers is formally organised as a research network project, supported and part-funded by the Centre for Industrial Production at Aalborg University. The project, called "Synopsis", has a number of aims and foci...... a set of "images of innovation" which describe the subject from each our viewpoints. The ultimate goals of the network project are to produce: 1. A framework/reference system describing companies´ innovation activities, based upon national and international research findings 2. A vocabulary with which...

  20. Evolving Understanding of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Physics and Ambiguity in Probabilistic Sea-Level Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Robert E.; DeConto, Robert M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Hay, Carling C.; Horton, Radley M.; Kulp, Scott; Oppenheimer, Michael; Pollard, David; Strauss, Benjamin H.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanisms such as ice-shelf hydrofracturing and ice-cliff collapse may rapidly increase discharge from marine-based ice sheets. Here, we link a probabilistic framework for sea-level projections to a small ensemble of Antarctic ice-sheet (AIS) simulations incorporating these physical processes to explore their influence on global-mean sea-level (GMSL) and relative sea-level (RSL). We compare the new projections to past results using expert assessment and structured expert elicitation about AIS changes. Under high greenhouse gas emissions (Representative Concentration Pathway [RCP] 8.5), median projected 21st century GMSL rise increases from 79 to 146 cm. Without protective measures, revised median RSL projections would by 2100 submerge land currently home to 153 million people, an increase of 44 million. The use of a physical model, rather than simple parameterizations assuming constant acceleration of ice loss, increases forcing sensitivity: overlap between the central 90% of simulations for 2100 for RCP 8.5 (93-243 cm) and RCP 2.6 (26-98 cm) is minimal. By 2300, the gap between median GMSL estimates for RCP 8.5 and RCP 2.6 reaches >10 m, with median RSL projections for RCP 8.5 jeopardizing land now occupied by 950 million people (versus 167 million for RCP 2.6). The minimal correlation between the contribution of AIS to GMSL by 2050 and that in 2100 and beyond implies current sea-level observations cannot exclude future extreme outcomes. The sensitivity of post-2050 projections to deeply uncertain physics highlights the need for robust decision and adaptive management frameworks.

  1. Evolving Understanding of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Physics and Ambiguity in Probabilistic Sea-Level Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Robert E.; DeConto, Robert M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Hay, Carling C.; Horton, Radley M.; Kulp, Scott; Oppenheimer, Michael; Pollard, David; Strauss, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms such as ice-shelf hydrofracturing and ice-cliff collapse may rapidly increase discharge from marine-based ice sheets. Here, we link a probabilistic framework for sea-level projections to a small ensemble of Antarctic ice-sheet (AIS) simulations incorporating these physical processes to explore their influence on global-mean sea-level (GMSL) and relative sea-level (RSL). We compare the new projections to past results using expert assessment and structured expert elicitation about AIS changes. Under high greenhouse gas emissions (Representative Concentration Pathway [RCP] 8.5), median projected 21st century GMSL rise increases from 79 to 146 cm. Without protective measures, revised median RSL projections would by 2100 submerge land currently home to 153 million people, an increase of 44 million. The use of a physical model, rather than simple parameterizations assuming constant acceleration of ice loss, increases forcing sensitivity: overlap between the central 90% of simulations for 2100 for RCP 8.5 (93-243 cm) and RCP 2.6 (26-98 cm) is minimal. By 2300, the gap between median GMSL estimates for RCP 8.5 and RCP 2.6 reaches >10 m, with median RSL projections for RCP 8.5 jeopardizing land now occupied by 950 million people (versus 167 million for RCP 2.6). The minimal correlation between the contribution of AIS to GMSL by 2050 and that in 2100 and beyond implies current sea-level observations cannot exclude future extreme outcomes. The sensitivity of post-2050 projections to deeply uncertain physics highlights the need for robust decision and adaptive management frameworks.

  2. Quantitative Framework to Evaluate Alternative Dispute Resolution Investments in Architecture Engineering and Construction Projects Using Option and Real Option Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menassa, Carol Chukri

    2009-01-01

    A project-specific dispute resolution ladder (DRL) typically consists of multiple alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques that are chosen to assist in mitigating the impact of change orders and claims (CCO) occurring during the project construction phase, and avoid their escalation to protracted disputes that adversely affect a…

  3. Enterprise architecture management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Gøtze, John; Møller, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in enterprise architecture management, researchers and practitioners lack a shared understanding of its applications in organizations. Building on findings from a literature review and eight case studies, we develop a taxonomy that categorizes applications of enterprise...... architecture management based on three classes of enterprise architecture scope. Organizations may adopt enterprise architecture management to help form, plan, and implement IT strategies; help plan and implement business strategies; or to further complement the business strategy-formation process....... The findings challenge the traditional IT-centric view of enterprise architecture management application and suggest enterprise architecture management as an approach that could support the consistent design and evolution of an organization as a whole....

  4. Enterprise architecture management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Gøtze, John; Møller, Charles

    2017-01-01

    architecture management based on three classes of enterprise architecture scope. Organizations may adopt enterprise architecture management to help form, plan, and implement IT strategies; help plan and implement business strategies; or to further complement the business strategy-formation process....... The findings challenge the traditional IT-centric view of enterprise architecture management application and suggest enterprise architecture management as an approach that could support the consistent design and evolution of an organization as a whole.......Despite the growing interest in enterprise architecture management, researchers and practitioners lack a shared understanding of its applications in organizations. Building on findings from a literature review and eight case studies, we develop a taxonomy that categorizes applications of enterprise...

  5. The Notion of “High” and commitment to excellence in contemporary Russian architecture. History and project: looking into future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volchok Yuri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the issue of high-rise buildings (skyscrapers construction in Russia as the dialogue of artistic image and intellectual idea. The study shows that the professional commitment to skyscrapers erection brings to the foreground the comprehension of magnitude of the notion of “contemporary” in terms of time. It is important from methodical point of view to return to the initial meaning of the notions that provide for adding authentic meaning to the words “suprematism”, “commitment”, “excellence”, “new”, “high”, and other determinants of creativity capable of going beyond “flying geese” development pattern in architectural shaping. It is well known that V.G. Shukhov’s patents of 1896 were widely used in contemporary morphology of shaping. The heritage of Russian Avant Garde of 1910-20ies serves as an inspiration from methodological point of view (it is more and more evident from foreign master’s creative experience. This is why it is important to return, first of all, to comprehension of the author’s version of the notion “suprematism” ascending to Malevich - meaning commitment to excellence and not the “emblem” of preferences in style. The article includes the arguments providing for the capture of the 2010ies and, especially, 2015-17ies as the years of critical changes in history. Russian masters of architecture started as equals the stage of cooperative creative work with foreign architects erecting skyscrapers.

  6. The Notion of "High" and commitment to excellence in contemporary Russian architecture. History and project: looking into future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchok, Yuri

    2018-03-01

    The article covers the issue of high-rise buildings (skyscrapers) construction in Russia as the dialogue of artistic image and intellectual idea. The study shows that the professional commitment to skyscrapers erection brings to the foreground the comprehension of magnitude of the notion of "contemporary" in terms of time. It is important from methodical point of view to return to the initial meaning of the notions that provide for adding authentic meaning to the words "suprematism", "commitment", "excellence", "new", "high", and other determinants of creativity capable of going beyond "flying geese" development pattern in architectural shaping. It is well known that V.G. Shukhov's patents of 1896 were widely used in contemporary morphology of shaping. The heritage of Russian Avant Garde of 1910-20ies serves as an inspiration from methodological point of view (it is more and more evident from foreign master's creative experience). This is why it is important to return, first of all, to comprehension of the author's version of the notion "suprematism" ascending to Malevich - meaning commitment to excellence and not the "emblem" of preferences in style. The article includes the arguments providing for the capture of the 2010ies and, especially, 2015-17ies as the years of critical changes in history. Russian masters of architecture started as equals the stage of cooperative creative work with foreign architects erecting skyscrapers.

  7. Greek architecture now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skousbøll, Karin Merete

    2006-01-01

    With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas....

  8. Understanding of Danish Passive Houses based on Pilot Project the Comfort Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The building industry in Denmark and the rest of Europe is facing challenges in fulfilling the EU directive of 2002. New buildings and renovation projects need to improve the energy performance to be able to fulfil the Kyoto agreement from 1998 (Directive 2002). In Denmark it has resulted in new ...

  9. Understanding Participation Rates in Post-16 Mathematics and Physics: Conceptualising and Operationalising the UPMAP Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Michael; Hoyles, Celia; Mujtaba, Tamjid; Riazi-Farzad, Bijan; Rodd, Melissa; Simon, Shirley; Stylianidou, Fani

    2011-01-01

    We report on a project currently in progress that aims to identify through research the range of factors (individual, school and out-of-school, including home) and their interactions that influence post-16 (i.e. post-compulsory) participation in mathematics and physics in the UK and to assess their relative importance among different student…

  10. Organising Sustainable Transition: Understanding the Product, Project and Service Domain of the Built Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Koch-Ørvad, Nina; Maslesa, Esmir

    2016-01-01

    a four years innovation project based on theories on sectorial and business model i nnovation and ten detailed case studies of different types of companies and their experimentation with different management and sustainability concepts. The framework interprets the construction industry as a collection...

  11. Understanding Suicidal Behaviour in Young People Referred to Specialist CAMHS: A Qualitative Psychoanalytic Clinical Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jan; Hurst, Margaret; Marques, Ana; Millar, David; Moya, Sue; Pover, Lesley; Stewart, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative psychoanalytic clinical research project using a post-Kleinian contemporary approach was undertaken by a team of seven qualified and experienced child psychotherapists working in community Tier 3 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). A number of referred young people who deliberately harmed themselves or attempted…

  12. Oramics to electronica: investigating lay understandings of the history of technology through a participatory project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, T.; van der Vaart, M.; Price, K.

    2014-01-01

    Oramics to Electronica was a 2011 Science Museum project designed to put the tools of museum participation in the service of research into public history, taking the history of electronic music as our example. The primary output was a temporary exhibition. Whereas the term ‘public history’ is often

  13. Understanding bioenergy conflicts: Case of a jatropha project inKenya’s Tana Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arevalo, J.; Ochieng, R.M.; Mola-Yudego, B.; Gritten, D.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, conflicts related to tenure, management and utilization of natural resources, in particularbioenergy conflicts, are becoming increasingly common. Many bioenergy conflicts are related to plan-tation projects seeking to capitalize on the opportunity to profit from a combination of

  14. PISA Research Project Portfolio. Towards a new understanding of technological decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the programme of integration of social sciences into nuclear research participates in several research projects. It is the aim to apply transdiciplinary problem-oriented methods in PhD's work, in contract research, in international networking and to take challenging opportunities in conferences

  15. Understanding Youth STEM Interest Pathways within a Single Community: The "Synergies" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, John H.; Staus, Nancy; Dierking, Lynn D.; Penuel, William; Wyld, Jennifer; Bailey, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic decline in youth interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) during adolescence, both in the USA and internationally, has been a phenomenon of societal concern for several decades. The Synergies project was launched to help deal with this issue. In this paper, we report findings from the first two years of our…

  16. Architectural prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights...

  17. Architectural Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights...

  18. Greek architecture now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skousbøll, Karin Merete

    2006-01-01

    With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas.......With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas....

  19. Understanding our Genetic Inheritance: The U.S. Human Genome Project, The First Five Years FY 1991--1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    The Human Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. In parallel with this effort, the DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the comparative information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information generated by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the 21st century and will by of immense benefit to the field of medicine. It will help us to understand and eventually treat many of the more than 4000 genetic diseases that affect mankind, as well as the many multifactorial diseases in which genetic predisposition plays an important role. A centrally coordinated project focused on specific objectives is believed to be the most efficient and least expensive way of obtaining this information. The basic data produced will be collected in electronic databases that will make the information readily accessible on convenient form to all who need it. This report describes the plans for the U.S. human genome project and updates those originally prepared by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988. In the intervening two years, improvements in technology for almost every aspect of genomics research have taken place. As a result, more specific goals can now be set for the project.

  20. Understanding our genetic inheritance: The US Human Genome Project, The first five years FY 1991--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-04-01

    The Human Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. In parallel with this effort, the DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the comparative information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information generated by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the 21st century and will by of immense benefit to the field of medicine. It will help us to understand and eventually treat many of the more than 4000 genetic diseases that affect mankind, as well as the many multifactorial diseases in which genetic predisposition plays an important role. A centrally coordinated project focused on specific objectives is believed to be the most efficient and least expensive way of obtaining this information. The basic data produced will be collected in electronic databases that will make the information readily accessible on convenient form to all who need it. This report describes the plans for the U.S. human genome project and updates those originally prepared by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988. In the intervening two years, improvements in technology for almost every aspect of genomics research have taken place. As a result, more specific goals can now be set for the project.

  1. Architecture, Drawing, Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldgaard, Morten

    This book presents contributions of drawing and text along with their many relationalities from ontology to history and vice versa in a range of reflections on architecture, drawing and topology. We hope to thereby indicate the potential of the theme in understanding not only the architecture...... of today, but – perhaps most importantly – also creating and producing architecture that is contemporaneous and reacts to the radical changes of the physical world which surrounds us in the increasingly artificial measures of new materialities and understandings thereof. The contributions range from...

  2. A Sophisticated Architecture Is Indeed Necessary for the Implementation of Health in All Policies but not Enough Comment on “Understanding the Role of Public Administration in Implementing Action on the Social Determinants of Health and Health Inequities”

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Breton

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, I argue that beyond a sophisticated supportive architecture to facilitate implementation of actions on the social determinants of health (SDOH) and health inequities, the Health in All Policies (HiAP) project faces two main barriers: lack of awareness within policy networks on the social determinants of population health, and a tendency of health actors to neglect investing in other sectors’ complex problems.

  3. A Sophisticated Architecture Is Indeed Necessary for the Implementation of Health in All Policies but not Enough Comment on “Understanding the Role of Public Administration in Implementing Action on the Social Determinants of Health and Health Inequities”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Breton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this commentary, I argue that beyond a sophisticated supportive architecture to facilitate implementation of actions on the social determinants of health (SDOH and health inequities, the Health in All Policies (HiAP project faces two main barriers: lack of awareness within policy networks on the social determinants of population health, and a tendency of health actors to neglect investing in other sectors’ complex problems.

  4. A Sophisticated Architecture Is Indeed Necessary for the Implementation of Health in All Policies but not Enough Comment on "Understanding the Role of Public Administration in Implementing Action on the Social Determinants of Health and Health Inequities".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Eric

    2016-02-29

    In this commentary, I argue that beyond a sophisticated supportive architecture to facilitate implementation of actions on the social determinants of health (SDOH) and health inequities, the Health in All Policies (HiAP) project faces two main barriers: lack of awareness within policy networks on the social determinants of population health, and a tendency of health actors to neglect investing in other sectors' complex problems. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  5. Understanding future projected changes and trends in extreme precipitation and streamflow events in ten Polish catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meresa, Hadush; Romanowicz, Renata; Napiorkoski, Jaroslaw

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate methods of trend detection in hydro-climatic high and low indices using novel and conventional tools, for future climate projections in the periods 2021-2050 and 2071-2100. The climate meteorological projections are obtained from regional climate models or/and global circulation models forced with IPCC SRES A1B, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. The study area includes ten catchments in Poland. The catchments have diverse hydro-climatic conditions. They are covered mostly by forest and are semi-natural. The flood regime of all the catchments is driven either by rainfall and/or snow-melt. Streamflow projections are provided by running the HBV hydrological model, coupled with climate models for the catchments. The trends are analyzed using a conventional Modified Mann Kendall statistical approach, a time frequency approach based on wavelet discrete transform (DWT) and the Dynamic Harmonic Regression (DHR) method. We address the problems of auto-correlation, seasonality and inter-annual variability of the derived indices. A Modified Mann Kendall (MMK) method is applied to cope with the autocorrelation of the time series. The DHR method is based on the unobserved component approach. Together with estimates of the components, the uncertainty of the estimates is also calculated. The results of the DHR analysis (trend) are compared with the calculated MMK and DWT trends. Among other indices we study the temporal patterns of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) and Standardized Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), as well as Maximum Annual Flows and Minimum Annual Flows. The results indicate that changes in the trends of the projected indices are more conservative when DHR methods are applied than conventional trend techniques. The wavelet-based approach is the most subjective and gives the least conservative trend estimates. Trends indicate an increase in the amount of precipitation, followed by

  6. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    In the attempt to improve patient treatment and recovery, researchers focus on applying concepts of hospitality to hospitals. Often these concepts are dominated by hotel-metaphors focusing on host–guest relationships or concierge services. Motivated by a project trying to improve patient treatment...... is known for his writings on theatricality, understood as a holistic design approach emphasizing the contextual, cultural, ritual and social meanings rooted in architecture. Relative hereto, the International Food Design Society recently argued, in a similar holistic manner, that the methodology used...... to provide an aesthetic eating experience includes knowledge on both food and design. Based on a hermeneutic reading of Semper’s theory, our thesis is that this holistic design approach is important when debating concepts of hospitality in hospitals. We use this approach to argue for how ‘food design...

  7. A Tale of Danish Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg Bendsen, Jannie

    2017-01-01

    Danish architecture is often portrayed as being in possession of certain special features that render it possible to speak about a Danish architectural tradition, where a humanistic approach to architecture, paired with a strong link to the development of the welfare society, stands in a central...... position. On this way of understanding, Danish architecture historiography has made a momentous impact. In this article, light will be shed on how a Danish architectural historian has played a role in bringing about a sharply delineated self-understanding and a sense of professional cohesion among Danish...

  8. Assessing student understanding of sound waves and trigonometric reasoning in a technology-rich, project-enhanced environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jennifer Anne

    This case study examined what student content understanding could occur in an inner city Industrial Electronics classroom located at Tree High School where project-based instruction, enhanced with technology, was implemented for the first time. Students participated in a project implementation unit involving sound waves and trigonometric reasoning. The unit was designed to foster common content learning (via benchmark lessons) by all students in the class, and to help students gain a deeper conceptual understanding of a sub-set of the larger content unit (via group project research). The objective goal of the implementation design unit was to have students gain conceptual understanding of sound waves, such as what actually waves in a wave, how waves interfere with one another, and what affects the speed of a wave. This design unit also intended for students to develop trigonometric reasoning associated with sinusoidal curves and superposition of sinusoidal waves. Project criteria within this design included implementation features, such as the need for the student to have a driving research question and focus, the need for benchmark lessons to help foster and scaffold content knowledge and understanding, and the need for project milestones to complete throughout the implementation unit to allow students the time for feedback and revision. The Industrial Electronics class at Tree High School consisted of nine students who met daily during double class periods giving 100 minutes of class time per day. The class teacher had been teaching for 18 years (mathematics, physics, and computer science). He had a background in engineering and experience teaching at the college level. Benchmark activities during implementation were used to scaffold fundamental ideas and terminology needed to investigate characteristics of sound and waves. Students participating in benchmark activities analyzed motion and musical waveforms using probeware, and explored wave phenomena using waves

  9. The DLR project Wirbelschleppe. Detecting, characterizing, controlling, attenuating, understanding, and predicting aircraft wake vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F. (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    This collection of reports presents an excerpt of the investigations that were performed in the framework of the DLR Projekt Wirbelschleppe. A similar sample of reports was presented as part of three dedicated wake vortex sessions accomplished at the 1{sup st} European Air and Space Conference (CEAS 2007) and Deutscher Luft- und Raumfahrtkongress 2007 in Berlin. The Projekt Wirbelschleppe was conducted in two phases in the time frame from 1999 to 2007 with the five contributing DLR Institutes: Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Institute of Flight Systems, Institute of Flight Guidance, Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics and the Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics of the University of Technology Berlin. The project unified a multitude of different aspects and disciplines of wake vortex research which can be characterized by four main themes: - minimization of wake vortices by measures at the aircraft; - development and demonstration of a system for wake vortex prediction and observation; - airborne wake vortex detection and active control; - integration of systems into air traffic control. The Projekt Wirbelschleppe greatly benefited from the European projects AWIATOR, ATC-Wake, Credos, C-Wake, Eurowake, FAR-Wake, FLYSAFE, I-Wake, S-Wake, WakeNet, WakeNet2-Europe, WakeNet3-Europe, and Wavenc. DLR's wake vortex activities will be continued in the Projekt Wetter and Fliegen (2008-2011): Because the current compilation represents only a limited extract of the accomplished work, it is completed by a list of references emerging from the project. (orig.)

  10. [Architecture and movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  11. Using Group Drawings Activities to Facilitate the Understanding of the Systemic Aspects of Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alberto Arantes do Amaral

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present our findings regarding promoting group drawing activities in order to facilitate the learning of systemic aspects of projects. We discuss the approach we used to engage the students and foster learning in our classes. We used group drawing activities in two project management undergraduate courses. The courses, which involved 41 students, took place during the second semester of 2016 in a public university in Brazil. We conducted qualitative research, using qualitative observation and focus group interviews. In order to gauge the effects of the use of this educational technique, we followed the five-phased qualitative analysis method, combined with a systems analysis of the data obtained from observation. Five recurrent themes emerged: 1 Making drawings in groups helps content retention and facilitates connections between the concepts explained by the professor; 2 Making drawings in groups promotes knowledge sharing among team members; 3 Making drawings in group fosters creativity and communication between students; 4 Drawing in groups reduces the students’ boredom, makes the lecture more dynamic and interesting; 5 Drawing in groups reinforces bonds between students. Our systems analysis suggests that group drawing improves student participation in classroom activities, strengthens bonds between students, and enhances learning.

  12. Public regulations towards a tectonic architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due

    2006-01-01

    Public regulations can support tectonic architecture by changes to the tendering system, supporting new organizational structures of the building industry in public building projects and suggesting a focus on innovation through increased research and development activity. The Danish state......'s activities has primarily been to support the optimization of the building process through ‘trimmed building’ and ‘partnering’ that only takes the immediate economic benefits of the changes to the building process into account and as such has no measures for architectural quality. The public initiatives so...... are happening very slowly which is understandable when there is no economic incitement for the industry to change. A change of these public regulations from sticks to carrots could create the economic incitement for the building industry to create tectonic architecture and thereby develop the building industry...

  13. Understanding toxicity at the watershed scale : design of the Syncrude Sandhill Fen watershed research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wytrykush, C.

    2010-01-01

    Fens are peat-accumulating wetlands with a water table consisting of mineral-rich ground or surface water. This study discussed the construction of a fen-type reclaimed wetland constructed in a post-mining oil sands landscape. Syncrude Canada's Sandhill fen watershed project represents the first attempt at constructing a fen wetland in the oil sands region. The wetland and its watershed will be constructed on a soft tailings deposit. The design basis for the fen and watershed was developed by a team of researchers and scientists. The aim of the fen design was to control the salinity caused by tailings consolidation and seepage over time. Methods of mitigating potentially toxic effects from salinity were discussed.

  14. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  15. The Merapi Interactive Project: Offering a Fancy Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Understanding of Merapi Volcano to a Wide Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, J.; Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Merapi volcano is of great interest to a wide audience as it is one of the most dangerous volcanoes worldwide and a beautiful touristic spot. The scientific literature available on that volcano both in Earth and Social sciences is rich but mostly inaccessible to the public because of the scientific jargon and the restricted database access. Merapi Interactive aims at developing clear information and attractive content about Merapi for a wide audience. The project is being produced by the Art and Media Group at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, and it takes the shape of an e-book. It offers a consistent, comprehensive, and jargon-filtered synthesis of the main volcanic-risk related topics about Merapi: volcanic mechanisms, eruptive history, associated hazards and risks, the way inhabitants and scientists deal with it, and what daily life at Merapi looks like. The project provides a background to better understand volcanoes, and it points out some interactions between scientists and society. We propose two levels of interpretation: one that is understandable by 10-year old kids and above and an expert level with deeper presentations of specific topics. Thus, the Merapi Interactive project intends to provide an engaging and comprehensive interactive book that should interest kids, adults, as well as Earth Sciences undergraduates and academics. Merapi Interactive is scheduled for delivery in mid-2016.

  16. Understanding Paleoclimate and Human Evolution Through the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Reed

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of humans and our close relatives is one of the enduring scientific issues of modern times. Since the time of Charles Darwin, scientists have speculated on how and when we evolved and what conditions drove this evolutionary story. The detective work required to address these questions is necessarily interdisciplinary,involving research in anthropology, archaeology, human genetics and genomics, and the earth sciences. In addition to the difficult tasks of finding, describing, and interpreting hominin fossils (the taxonomic tribe which includes Homo sapiens and our close fossil relatives from the last 6 Ma, much of modern geological research associated with paleoanthropology involves understanding the geochronologic and paleoenvironmental context of those fossils. When were they entombed in the sediments? What were the local and regional climatic conditions that early hominins experienced? How did local (watershed scale and regional climate processes combine with regional tectonic boundary conditions to influence hominin food resources, foraging patterns, and demography? How and when did these conditions vary from humid to dry, or cool to warm? Can the history of those conditions (Vrba, 1988; Potts, 1996 be related to the evolution, diversification, stasis, or extinction of hominin species?

  17. Robotic architectures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mtshali, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of mobile robotic systems, a robotic architecture plays a crucial role in interconnecting all the sub-systems and controlling the system. The design of robotic architectures for mobile autonomous robots is a challenging...

  18. Tectonic Thinking in Contemporary Industrialized Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Beim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues for a new critical approach to the ways architectural design strategies are developing. Contemporary construction industry appears to evolve into highly specialized and optimized processes driven by industrialized manufacturing, therefore the role of the architect and the understanding of the architectural design process ought to be revised. The paper is based on the following underlying hypothesis: ‘Tectonic thinking – defined as a central attention towards the nature, the properties, and the application of building materials (construction and how this attention forms a creative force in building constructions, structural features and architectural design (construing – helps to identify and refine technology transfer in contemporary industrialized building construction’. (This definition of tectonic thinking forms part of a large, central research project: Towards a tectonic sustainable building practice, that is presently (2010- 2014 executed in collaboration between; The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts – School of Architecture, Aarhus School of Architecture, and The Danish Building Research Institute.Through various references from the construction industry, business theory and architectural practice the paper offers various analyses, comparisons and concrete design approaches. How architectural design processes and the tectonic design can benefit from Integrated Product Deliveries, mass-customization and Design for Disassembly is examined and discussed. The paper concludes by presenting a series of arguments that call for adaptable systems based on sufficient numbers of industrialized building products of high quality and a great variety of suppliers, and point at the need for optimizing our use of resources in order to reach sustainable solutions in architecture.

  19. VLSI architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randell, B.; Treleaven, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a collection of course papers which discusses the latest (1982) milestone of electronic building blocks and its effect on computer architecture. Contributions range from selecting a VLSI process technology to Japan's Fifth Generation Computer Architecture. Contents, abridged: VLSI and machine architecture. Graphic design aids: HED and FATFREDDY. On the LUCIFER system. Clocking of VLSI circuits. Decentralised computer architectures for VLSI. Index.

  20. Understanding Late Triassic low latitude terrestrial ecosystems: new insights from the Colorado Plateau Coring Project (CPCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmis, R. B.; Olsen, P. E.; Parker, W.; Rasmussen, C.; Mundil, R.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    The Chinle Formation of southwestern North America is a key paleontological archive of low paleolatitude non-marine ecosystems that existed during the Late Triassic hothouse world. These strata were deposited at 5-15°N latitude, and preserve extensive plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate fossil assemblages, including early dinosaurs; these organisms lived in an unpredictably fluctuating semi-arid to arid environment with very high atmospheric pCO2. Despite this well-studied fossil record, a full understanding of these ecosystems and their integration with other fossil assemblages globally has been hindered by a poor understanding of the Chinle Formation's age, duration, and sedimentation rates. Recently, the CPCP recovered a 520m continuous core through this formation from the northern portion of Petrified Forest National Park (PEFO) in northern Arizona, USA. This core has provided a plethora of new radioisotopic and magnetostratigraphic data from fresh, unweathered samples in unambiguous stratigraphic superposition. These constraints confirm that virtually all fossil-bearing horizons in Chinle outcrops in the vicinity of PEFO are Norian in age. Furthermore, they indicate that the palynomorph zone II and Adamanian vertebrate biozone are at least six million years long, whereas the overlying palynomorph zone III and Revueltian vertebrate biozone persisted for at least five million years, with the boundary between 216-214 Ma. This confirms that the rich late Adamanian-early Revueltian vertebrate fossil assemblages, where dinosaurs are exclusively rare, small-bodied carnivorous theropods, are contemporaneous with higher latitude assemblages in Europe, South America, and Africa where large-bodied herbivorous sauropodomorph dinosaurs are common. The age constraints also confirm that several palynomorph biostratigraphic ranges in the Chinle Formation differ from those of the same taxa in eastern North American (Newark Supergroup) and Europe. These data are consistent

  1. Teaching Climate Change Using System Models: An Understanding Global Change Project Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, J. R.; Stuhlsatz, M.; Bracey, Z. B.; Marshall, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Teaching and learning about historical and anthropogenic climate change in the classroom requires integrating instructional resources that address physical, chemical, and biological processes. The Understanding Global Change (UGC) framework and system models developed at the University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP) provide visualizations of the relationships and feedbacks between Earth system processes, and the consequences of anthropogenic activities on global climate. This schema provides a mechanism for developing pedagogic narratives that are known to support comprehension and retention of information and relationships. We designed a nine-day instructional unit for middle and high school students that includes a sequence of hands-on, inquiry-based, data rich activities combined with conceptual modeling exercises intended to foster students' development of systems thinking and their understanding of human influences on Earth system processes. The pilot unit, Sea Level Rise in the San Francisco Bay Area, addresses the human causes and consequences of sea level rise and related Earth system processes (i.e., the water cycle and greenhouse effect). Most of the content is not Bay Area specific, and could be used to explore sea level rise in any coastal region. Students completed pre and post assessments, which included questions about the connectedness of components of the Earth system and probed their attitudes towards participating in environmental stewardship activities. Students sequentially drew models representing the content explored in the activities and wrote short descriptions of their system diagrams that were collected by teachers for analysis. We also randomly assigned classes to engage in a very short additional intervention that asked students to think about the role that humans play in the Earth system and to draw themselves into the models. The study will determine if these students have higher stewardship scores and more frequently

  2. Product Architecture Modularity Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkola, Juliana Hsuan

    2003-01-01

    and how components and interfaces influence the degree of modularization are considered. In order to gain a better understanding of product architecture modularity as a strategy, a theoretical framework and propositions are drawn from various academic literature sources. Based on the literature review......The focus of this paper is to integrate various perspectives on product architecture modularity into a general framework, and also to propose a way to measure the degree of modularization embedded in product architectures. Various trade-offs between modular and integral product architectures......, the following key elements of product architecture are identified: components (standard and new-to-the-firm), interfaces (standardization and specification), degree of coupling, and substitutability. A mathematical function, termed modularization function, is introduced to measure the degree of modularization...

  3. Can architecture be barbaric?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürol, Yonca

    2009-06-01

    The title of this article is adapted from Theodor W. Adorno's famous dictum: 'To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.' After the catastrophic earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey on the 17th of August 1999, in which more than 40,000 people died or were lost, Necdet Teymur, who was then the dean of the Faculty of Architecture of the Middle East Technical University, referred to Adorno in one of his 'earthquake poems' and asked: 'Is architecture possible after 17th of August?' The main objective of this article is to interpret Teymur's question in respect of its connection to Adorno's philosophy with a view to make a contribution to the politics and ethics of architecture in Turkey. Teymur's question helps in providing a new interpretation of a critical approach to architecture and architectural technology through Adorno's philosophy. The paper also presents a discussion of Adorno's dictum, which serves for a better understanding of its universality/particularity.

  4. Long Short-Term Memory Projection Recurrent Neural Network Architectures for Piano’s Continuous Note Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuKang Jia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM is a kind of Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN relating to time series, which has achieved good performance in speech recogniton and image recognition. Long Short-Term Memory Projection (LSTMP is a variant of LSTM to further optimize speed and performance of LSTM by adding a projection layer. As LSTM and LSTMP have performed well in pattern recognition, in this paper, we combine them with Connectionist Temporal Classification (CTC to study piano’s continuous note recognition for robotics. Based on the Beijing Forestry University music library, we conduct experiments to show recognition rates and numbers of iterations of LSTM with a single layer, LSTMP with a single layer, and Deep LSTM (DLSTM, LSTM with multilayers. As a result, the single layer LSTMP proves performing much better than the single layer LSTM in both time and the recognition rate; that is, LSTMP has fewer parameters and therefore reduces the training time, and, moreover, benefiting from the projection layer, LSTMP has better performance, too. The best recognition rate of LSTMP is 99.8%. As for DLSTM, the recognition rate can reach 100% because of the effectiveness of the deep structure, but compared with the single layer LSTMP, DLSTM needs more training time.

  5. The project “understAID” – a platform that helps informal caregivers to understand and aid their demented relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Mojs, Ewa; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    to defi ne the contents and solutions of the CarePlatform based on the knowledge gained from real-case studies. Demented elderlies from each country (n = 40) suffering from different degrees of dementia were evaluated by formal caregivers and dementia professionals. The aim of task 3 is the development......“UnderstAID” is a platform that helps informal caregivers to understand and aid their demented relatives. It is an international project initiated by Denmark, Poland and Spain. The aim of the project is to design, and implement the multimedia platform “understAID” to support informal caregivers...... of the social learning interface. Task 4 focuses on the CarePlatform development and system integration. Finally, task 5 assumes testing and validation of the platform. The platform is devised to be available in two versions, namely the light one for mobile appliance and the premium version. Also different...

  6. Understanding and controlling wind-induced vibrations of bridge cables: Results from the Femern Crossing research project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos T.; Jakobsen, J. B.; Koss, Holger

    Following the successful completion of the Storebælt and Øresund Crossings, the Danish Ministry of Transport appointed Femern A/S to be in charge of preparation, investigations and planning in relation to the establishment of a fixed link across the Fehmarnbelt. To further investigate the causes...... behind the cable vibrations that were observed on the cable-supported bridges forming part of the aforementioned crossings, Femern A/S commissioned a 5-year international collaborative research project, entitled “Understanding and controlling wind-induced vibrations of bridge cables”. The ultimate goal...... of the project has been the establishment of novel vibration mitigation schemes that could be readily, economically, and effectively implemented on a cable-supported bridge that might form part of the fixed link. In support of the proposed research, Femern A/S commissioned a new climatic wind tunnel, designed...

  7. Understanding and controlling wind-induced vibrations of bridge cables: Results from the Femern Crossing research project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos T.; Jakobsen, J. B.; Koss, Holger

    of the project has been the establishment of novel vibration mitigation schemes that could be readily, economically, and effectively implemented on a cable-supported bridge that might form part of the fixed link. In support of the proposed research, Femern A/S commissioned a new climatic wind tunnel, designed......Following the successful completion of the Storebælt and Øresund Crossings, the Danish Ministry of Transport appointed Femern A/S to be in charge of preparation, investigations and planning in relation to the establishment of a fixed link across the Fehmarnbelt. To further investigate the causes...... behind the cable vibrations that were observed on the cable-supported bridges forming part of the aforementioned crossings, Femern A/S commissioned a 5-year international collaborative research project, entitled “Understanding and controlling wind-induced vibrations of bridge cables”. The ultimate goal...

  8. Mexican Influence on Contemporary Art and Architecture of the United States: A Model Lesson for Cross Cultural Understanding at the Secondary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Neal

    In this model lesson, secondary students test the hypothesis that Mexican achievements have widely influenced art and architecture in the United States as a result of the cultural flow and exchange between the two nations. The lesson is designed to be presented in two to three class periods. To determine the validity of the hypothesis, students…

  9. Understanding earthquake hazards in urban areas - Evansville Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Oliver S.

    2012-01-01

    The region surrounding Evansville, Indiana, has experienced minor damage from earthquakes several times in the past 200 years. Because of this history and the proximity of Evansville to the Wabash Valley and New Madrid seismic zones, there is concern among nearby communities about hazards from earthquakes. Earthquakes currently cannot be predicted, but scientists can estimate how strongly the ground is likely to shake as a result of an earthquake and are able to design structures to withstand this estimated ground shaking. Earthquake-hazard maps provide one way of conveying such information and can help the region of Evansville prepare for future earthquakes and reduce earthquake-caused loss of life and financial and structural loss. The Evansville Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project (EAEHMP) has produced three types of hazard maps for the Evansville area: (1) probabilistic seismic-hazard maps show the ground motion that is expected to be exceeded with a given probability within a given period of time; (2) scenario ground-shaking maps show the expected shaking from two specific scenario earthquakes; (3) liquefaction-potential maps show how likely the strong ground shaking from the scenario earthquakes is to produce liquefaction. These maps complement the U.S. Geological Survey's National Seismic Hazard Maps but are more detailed regionally and take into account surficial geology, soil thickness, and soil stiffness; these elements greatly affect ground shaking.

  10. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  11. Urban architecture in urban renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, Steen; Svensson, Ole

    2001-01-01

    of urban architecture be developed? This research project attempts to answer these questions through a discourse on theories and methods and the development of "dialogue methods" by which professionals can learn about residents' perception of the urban architecture of their area, thus achieving a better...... and without obvious architectural value. These issues raise pertinent questions: what urban architectural problems and qualities exist in the complex, inner suburbs? What differences exist between professionals' and residents' perceptions and assessments of urban architecture? How can a shared language...

  12. Architecture in the Experience City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2009-01-01

    narratives related to historical buildings and architectural heritage; another group tries to embed new performative technologies in expressive architectural representation. The article provides a theoretical framework for the analysis of the political rationales of these projects and for the architectural......This article focuses on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized in the article as ‘hybrid cultural projects', because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play and learning....... The article identifies new rationales related to this development, and it argues that ‘cultural planning' has increasingly shifted its focus from a cultural institutional approach to a more market-oriented strategy that combines art and business in a close relationship. The role of architecture has changed...

  13. Architecture and Implementation of the Front-End Electronics of the Time Projection Chambers in the T2K Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, P.; Besin, D.; Calvet, D.; Coquelet, C.; De La Broise, X.; Delagnes, E.; Druillole, F.; Le Coguie, A.; Monmarthe, E.; Zonca, E.

    2010-04-01

    The tracker of the near detector in the T2K neutrino oscillation experiment comprises three time projection chambers based on micro-pattern gaseous detectors. A new readout system is being developed to amplify, condition and acquire in real time the data produced by the 124.000 detector channels. The cornerstone of the system is a 72-channel application specific integrated circuit which is based on a switched capacitor array. Using analog memories combined with deferred digitization enables reducing the initial burstiness of traffic from 50 Tbps to 400 Gbps in a practical manner and with a very low power budget. Modern field programmable gate arrays coupled to commercial digital memories are the next elements in the chain. Multi-gigabit optical links provide 140 Gbps of aggregate bandwidth to carry data outside of the magnet surrounding the detector to concentrator cards that pack data and provide the interface to commercial PCs via a standard Gigabit Ethernet network. We describe the requirements and constraints for this application and justify our technical choices. We detail the design and the performance of several key elements and show the deployment of the front-end electronics on the first time projection chamber where the final tests before installation on-site are being conducted.

  14. Relational Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    The present study of PhD education and its impact on architectural research singles out three layers of relational architecture. A first layer of relationality appears in a graphic model in which an intimate link between PhD education and architectural research is outlined. The model reflects...... in a scholarly institution (element #3), as well as the certified PhD scholar (element #4) and the architectural profession, notably its labour market (element #5). This first layer outlines the contemporary context which allows architectural research to take place in a dynamic relationship to doctoral education....... A second layer of relational architecture is revealed when one examines the conception of architecture generated in selected PhD dissertations. Focusing on six dissertations with which the author of the present article was involved as a supervisor, the analysis lays bare a series of dynamic...

  15. Essential software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Gorton, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Job titles like ""Technical Architect"" and ""Chief Architect"" nowadays abound in software industry, yet many people suspect that ""architecture"" is one of the most overused and least understood terms in professional software development. Gorton's book tries to resolve this dilemma. It concisely describes the essential elements of knowledge and key skills required to be a software architect. The explanations encompass the essentials of architecture thinking, practices, and supporting technologies. They range from a general understanding of structure and quality attributes through technical i

  16. The role of OMICS research in understanding phenotype variation in thalassaemia: the THALAMOSS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gambari

    2014-12-01

    BCL11A contribute to high HbF production. Pharmacogenomic analysis of the effects of hydroxyurea (HU on HbF production in a collection of β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD patients allowed the identification of genomic signatures associated with high HbF. Therefore, it can hypothesized that genomic studies might predict the response of patients to treatments based on hydroxyurea, which is at present the most used HbF inducer in pharmacological therapy of β-thalassaemia. Transcriptomic/proteomic studies allowed to identify the zinc finger transcription factor B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 11A (BCL11A as the major repressor of HbF expression. The field of research on g-globin gene repressors (including BCL11A is of top interest, since several approaches can lead to pharmacologically-mediated inhibition of the expression of g-globin gene repressors, leading to gglobin gene activation. Among these strategies, we underline direct targeting of the transcription factors by aptamers or decoy molecules, as well as inhibition of the mRNA coding g-globin gene repressors with shRNAs, antisense molecules, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and microRNAs. In this respect, the THALAMOSS FP7 Project (THALAssaemia MOdular Stratification System for personalized therapy of β-thalassemia, www.thalamoss.eu aims develop a universal sets of markers and techniques for stratification of β-thalassaemia patients into treatment subgroups for (a onset and frequency of blood transfusions, (b choice of iron chelation, (c induction of fetal hemoglobin, (d prospective efficacy of gene-therapy. The impact of THALAMOSS is the provision of novel biomarkers for distinct treatment subgroups in β-thalassaemia (500–1000 samples from participating medical centres, identified by combined genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and tissue culture assays, the development of new or improved products for the cell isolation, characterization and treatment of β-thalassaemia patients and the establishment of

  17. Software Architecture Reconstruction Method, a Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Zainab Nayyar; Nazish Rafique

    2014-01-01

    Architecture reconstruction belongs to a reverse engineering process, in which we move from code to architecture level for reconstructing architecture. Software architectures are the blue prints of projects which depict the external overview of the software system. Mostly maintenance and testing cause the software to deviate from its original architecture, because sometimes for enhancing the functionality of a system the software deviates from its documented specifications, some new modules a...

  18. Towards the creation of a US national heritage: documentation and survey for the understanding and safeguard of the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella La Mantia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon that led in recent decades to the safeguard and enhancement of significant historic buildings in the US territory starts from afar: at the beginning of the last century, in fact, the Federal State considered it appropriate to adopt a number of institutions for the protection of natural sites and architectural achievements. It dates back to 1935 the drafting, by the National Park Service, of the first list of buildings,monuments and districts of historical interest of the US. In December 1933 was instead founded the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS, the federal institution which represented for a long time one of the main references in the study of US architecture, thanks to a massive intervention of photographic, graphic and historic documentation of architectural works spread throughout the nation. This paper aims to illustrate the historical and cultural path which has led to the development of this phenomenon of protection of American historic buildings, emphasizing the role of graphic and photographic documentation in the restorations of the main works of Frank Lloyd Wright.

  19. Architecture for the senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Accommodating sensory disabilities in architectural design requires specific design considerations. These are different from the ones included by the existing design concept 'accessibility', which primarily accommodates physical disabilites. Hence a new design concept 'sensory accessbility......' is presented as a parallel and complementary concept to the existing one. Sensory accessiblity accommodates sensory disabilities and describes architectural design requirements needed to ensure access to to the sensory experiences and architectural quality of a given space. The article is based on research...... findings from the PhD thesis 'A House for the Senses' by the author, a study of architectural requirements in housing design implied by a sensory impairment. The empirical research project is based on qualitative interviews and 1:1 testing in existing housing with participants who were either blind, deaf...

  20. Understanding hydro-climatic drivers of infectious diarrheal diseases in South Asia and their projected risks from regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. A.; Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    Diarrheal diseases remain a major threat to global public health and are the second largest cause of death for children under the age of five. Cholera and Rotavirus diarrhea together comprise more than two-thirds of the diarrheal morbidity in South Asia. Recent studies have shown strong influences of hydrologic processes and climatic variabilities on the onset, intensity, and seasonality of the outbreaks of these diseases. However, our understanding of the propagation and manifestation of these diseases in a changing climate in vulnerable regions of the world are still limited. In this study, we build on our understanding of the role of the hydro-climatic drivers of diarrheal diseases in South Asia in recent decades to project the probable risks of the diseases in this century using the climate projection scenarios from dynamically downscaled climate models. To build the current model, we conducted a multivariate logistic regression assessment using 34 climate indices to examine the role of temperature and rainfall extremes over the seasonality of rotavirus and cholera over a South Asian country, Bangladesh. We utilize the availability of long and reliable time-series of cholera and rotavirus from Bangladesh and conducted a temporal and spatial analysis derived from both ground and satellite observations. For projecting the future risks of the diseases, we used five bias-corrected Regional Climate Model (RCM) results of the CMIP5 series under the RCP 4.5 scenario. Cholera risk shows a significantly higher rate of increase compared to Rotavirus in Bangladesh in the 21st century. As the disease is significantly influenced by extreme rainfall, majority projections showed a significant increase in flood-driven cholera risk. Most RCMs suggest a warmer winter in future years, suggesting reduced risk for Rotavirus. However, as the dryness of the climate is also highly correlated with rotavirus epidemics, the incremental risk of the disease due to drier winters would

  1. Minimalism in architecture: Architecture as a language of its identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilski Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Every architectural work is created on the principle that includes the meaning, and then this work is read like an artifact of the particular meaning. Resources by which the meaning is built primarily, susceptible to transformation, as well as routing of understanding (decoding messages carried by a work of architecture, are subject of semiotics and communication theories, which have played significant role for the architecture and the architect. Minimalism in architecture, as a paradigm of the XXI century architecture, means searching for essence located in the irreducible minimum. Inspired use of architectural units (archetypical elements, trough the fatasm of simplicity, assumes the primary responsibility for providing the object identity, because it participates in language formation and therefore in its reading. Volume is form by clean language that builds the expression of the fluid areas liberated of recharge needs. Reduced architectural language is appropriating to the age marked by electronic communications.

  2. The HL7-OMG Healthcare Services Specification Project: motivation, methodology, and deliverables for enabling a semantically interoperable service-oriented architecture for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Honey, Alan; Rubin, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The healthcare industry could achieve significant benefits through the adoption of a service-oriented architecture (SOA). The specification and adoption of standard software service interfaces will be critical to achieving these benefits. To develop a replicable, collaborative framework for standardizing the interfaces of software services important to healthcare. Iterative, peer-reviewed development of a framework for generating interoperable service specifications that build on existing and ongoing standardization efforts. The framework was created under the auspices of the Healthcare Services Specification Project (HSSP), which was initiated in 2005 as a joint initiative between Health Level7 (HL7) and the Object Management Group (OMG). In this framework, known as the HSSP Service Specification Framework, HL7 identifies candidates for service standardization and defines normative Service Functional Models (SFMs) that specify the capabilities and conformance criteria for these services. OMG then uses these SFMs to generate technical service specifications as well as reference implementations. The ability of the framework to support the creation of multiple, interoperable service specifications useful for healthcare. Functional specifications have been defined through HL7 for four services: the Decision Support Service; the Entity Identification Service; the Clinical Research Filtered Query Service; and the Retrieve, Locate, and Update Service. Technical specifications and commercial implementations have been developed for two of these services within OMG. Furthermore, three additional functional specifications are being developed through HL7. The HSSP Service Specification Framework provides a replicable and collaborative approach to defining standardized service specifications for healthcare.

  3. Monumentality vs. everyday life: architecture's public role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Manoel Guedes Sobrinho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Conference held in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, on March 18, 2006. Thoughts about architecture and the nation." Architecture is everything dealing with construction." (ARGAN, c. 1992. An object's cultural and ethical value is measured by how well it addresses demand, which in turn is related to the planet Earth, to scarce resources, and to people's survival. Architecture, its craft, and its teaching are studied from the perspective of the act, which is the art of building, to meet social, public and private demands through historical processes of power games, at a given place and time. Architecture is reduced to its essence to unveil the roots of its emergence and understand the architect's responsibilities in the new mass society, when we enter this" new popular period in history" (SANTOS; SOUZA, c1998. We suggest the following sequence of procedures as a path of knowledge and to support the free development of invention: 1 Initially assess the prospective problem to choose and study the location and the tasks of the architect, the client, society, and government; 2 identify and understand building plans for that location; 3 study the activities, flows, quantity, quality and combination of spaces resulting from the conflicting yearnings of people, in line with social needs and translated into private and public building plans; 4 graphically analyze the sectorial subsystems of areas associated according to affinities, considering their arrangement and organization in the site; 5 work on the rigorous construction of architecture, which in final analysis is matter and form; It should be pointed out that it is necessary to: 6 expand the supply of information on specific architectural problems to be addressed, and to organize the actual and effective involvement of people in the discussion of projects and works of their interest, unlike assembly and participative meetings; 7 expand opportunities to allow a greater number of architects to take part

  4. The GLOBE Carbon Cycle Project: Using a systems approach to understand carbon and the Earth's climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, S. K.; Ollinger, S. V.; Martin, M. E.; Gengarelly, L. M.; Schloss, A. L.; Bourgeault, J. L.; Randolph, G.; Albrechtova, J.

    2009-12-01

    National Science Content Standards identify systems as an important unifying concept across the K-12 curriculum. While this standard exists, there is a recognized gap in the ability of students to use a systems thinking approach in their learning. In a similar vein, both popular media as well as some educational curricula move quickly through climate topics to carbon footprint analyses without ever addressing the nature of carbon or the carbon cycle. If students do not gain a concrete understanding of carbon’s role in climate and energy they will not be able to successfully tackle global problems and develop innovative solutions. By participating in the GLOBE Carbon Cycle project, students learn to use a systems thinking approach, while at the same time, gaining a foundation in the carbon cycle and it's relation to climate and energy. Here we present the GLOBE Carbon Cycle project and materials, which incorporate a diverse set of activities geared toward upper middle and high school students with a variety of learning styles. A global carbon cycle adventure story and game let students see the carbon cycle as a complete system, while introducing them to systems thinking concepts including reservoirs, fluxes and equilibrium. Classroom photosynthesis experiments and field measurements of schoolyard vegetation brings the global view to the local level. And the use of computer models at varying levels of complexity (effects on photosynthesis, biomass and carbon storage in global biomes, global carbon cycle) not only reinforces systems concepts and carbon content, but also introduces students to an important scientific tool necessary for understanding climate change.

  5. CLOUD ARCHITECTURE FOR LOGISTIC SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Korczak; Piotr Lipiñski

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns organization of the local cloud computing environment at the Wroclaw University of Economics, developed in the framework of the LOGICAL research project. In particular the architecture of the environment, the implementation of main components of the environment are described as well as their references to the global cloud computing environment and the general architecture of the VMWare platform.

  6. Cartography of Architectural Controversies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    that goes beyond the narrow understanding of a linear progression and development of an abstract idea into its concretisation in well-defined phases. On a more specific level, it also calls for understandings of architectural agency that transcends perceptions of a practice confined to the studio...... or the office. The paper consists of investigations into such a stance. It is based on empiric studies, readings in architectural theory and applied actor-network theory. Furthermore the paper draws on recent examples of teaching practices pursuing this theme at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School...

  7. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the K m changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhancing the Reuse of Digital Resources for Integrated Systems to Represent, Understand and Dynamize Complex Interactions in Architectural Cultural Heritage Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F. J.; Martinez, R.; Finat, J.; Martinez, J.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we develop a multiply interconnected system which involves objects, agents and interactions between them from the use of ICT applied to open repositories, users communities and web services. Our approach is applied to Architectural Cultural Heritage Environments (ACHE). It includes components relative to digital accessibility (to augmented ACHE repositories), contents management (ontologies for the semantic web), semiautomatic recognition (to ease the reuse of materials) and serious videogames (for interaction in urban environments). Their combination provides a support for local real/remote virtual tourism (including some tools for low-level RT display of rendering in portable devices), mobile-based smart interactions (with a special regard to monitored environments) and CH related games (as extended web services). Main contributions to AR models on usual GIS applied to architectural environments, concern to an interactive support performed directly on digital files which allows to access to CH contents which are referred to GIS of urban districts (involving facades, historical or preindustrial buildings) and/or CH repositories in a ludic and transversal way to acquire cognitive, medial and social abilities in collaborative environments.

  9. [Architecture, budget and dignity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on its dynamic strengths, a psychiatric unit develops various projects and care techniques. In this framework, the institute director must make a number of choices with regard to architecture. Why renovate the psychiatry building? What financial investments are required? What criteria should be followed? What if the major argument was based on the respect of the patient's dignity?

  10. The Architecture of Metabolism. Inventing a Culture of Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Schalk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolist movement, with its radical and visionary urban and architectural schemes, drew the attention of an international architecture community to Japan in the 1960s and 1970s. Seen from a contemporary perspective, the movement’s foremost concern was cultural resilience as a notion of national identity. Metabolism responded to the human and environmental catastrophe that followed the atomic bombing of Japan and vulnerability to natural disasters such as earthquakes, with architecture envisioning the complete transformation of Japan as a system of political, social, and physical structures into resilient spatial and organizational patterns adaptable to change. Projecting a utopia of resilience, Metabolism employed biological metaphors and recalled technoscientific images which, together with the vernacular, evoked the notion of a genetic architecture able to be recreated again and again. A specific concern was to mediate between an urbanism of large, technical and institutional infrastructures and the freedom of the individual. My aim is to critically examine the notion of sustainable architecture by rereading Metabolist theories and products, such as terms, models, projects, and buildings. For a better understanding of the present discourse, this text searches for a possible history of sustainable architecture, a subject mostly presented ahistorically.

  11. Architectural Contestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merle, J.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the reductive reading of Georges Bataille's work done within the field of architectural criticism and theory which tends to set aside the fundamental ‘broken’ totality of Bataille's oeuvre and also to narrowly interpret it as a mere critique of architectural form,

  12. Advances in flash floods understanding and modelling derived from the FloodScale project in South-East France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braud Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean area is prone to intense rainfall events triggering flash floods, characterized by very short response times that sometimes lead to dramatic consequences in terms of casualties and damages. These events can affect large territories, but their impact may be very local in catchments that are generally ungauged. These events remain difficult to predict and the processes leading to their generation still need to be clarified. The HyMeX initiative (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment, 2010-2020 aims at increasing our understanding of the water cycle in the Mediterranean basin, in particular in terms of extreme events. In order to better understand processes leading to flash floods, a four-year experiment (2012-2015 was conducted in the Cévennes region (South-East France as part of the FloodScale project. Both continuous and opportunistic measurements during floods were conducted in two large catchments (Ardèche and Gard rivers with nested instrumentation from the hillslopes to catchments of about 1, 10, 100 to 1000 km2 covering contrasted geology and land use. Continuous measurements include distributed rainfall, stream water level, discharge, water temperature and conductivity and soil moisture measurements. Opportunistic measurements include surface soil moisture and geochemistry sampling during events and gauging of floods using non-contact methods: portable radars to measure surface water velocity or image sequence analysis using LS-PIV (Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry. During the period 2012-2014, and in particular during autumn 2014, several intense events affected the catchments and provided very rich data sets. Data collection was complemented with modelling activity aiming at simulating observed processes. The modelling strategy was setup through a wide range of scales, in order to test hypotheses about physical processes at the smallest scales, and aggregated functioning hypothesis at the largest

  13. How architecture students gain and apply knowledge of sustainable architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Holder, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This paper will reflect on understandings of architectural pedagogy and the integration of sustainability into architectural design education. This is framed within an understanding of the construction industry’s role in the production of waste. Despite the complexity of global environmental crises......, architectural educators have the opportunity to do more to address this. We begin with a discussion of contemporary literature and policy concerning education for sustainability in architecture, articulating the particular approaches in development within higher education. This is then compared with critical...... understandings of how architects synthesise different types of knowledge while designing, raising questions about the ‘match’ between educational experiences and subsequent behaviours in practice. Taking an example from Denmark, we outline the approach of Aarhus School of Architecture, where sustainability...

  14. Parallel Architectures and Bioinspired Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, José; Lanchares, Juan

    2012-01-01

    This monograph presents examples of best practices when combining bioinspired algorithms with parallel architectures. The book includes recent work by leading researchers in the field and offers a map with the main paths already explored and new ways towards the future. Parallel Architectures and Bioinspired Algorithms will be of value to both specialists in Bioinspired Algorithms, Parallel and Distributed Computing, as well as computer science students trying to understand the present and the future of Parallel Architectures and Bioinspired Algorithms.

  15. Systemic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poletto, Marco; Pasquero, Claudia

    This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational...... design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization. Collecting together nearly a decade of design experiments by the authors and their practice, ecoLogicStudio, the book discusses key disciplinary definitions such as ecologic urbanism, algorithmic architecture, bottom......-up or tactical design, behavioural space and the boundary of the natural and the artificial realms within the city and architecture. A new kind of "real-time world-city" is illustrated in the form of an operational design manual for the assemblage of proto-architectures, the incubation of proto...

  16. Drawing the Map: Siting Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bordeleau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Architects increasingly favour mapping as a means of documentation. Through maps, they question and define the boundaries of their architectural intervention, the premise being that if they can adequately delaminate and map the site's found conditions, they may achieve a more complex understanding of the said site.If maps can successfully represent sets of complex interactions in an effective manner, they also have an objectifying tendency and are often criticized for being tools of domination as well for their propensity to stabilize space-time. Further, architectural mapping is often associated with the possibility to index the 'designer's syntactical code', a possibility coupled with the idea that 'none of the notations take precedence over any other', so as to encourage 'more plural, open-ended "performances" of the project-in-time'.These positions involve if not a pure scientific objectivity, at least the assumption that one may somehow sidestep the projection of the author's intentionality. Bringing these issues to light, the paper explores whether mapping could address temporality with an assumed depth that would re-responsibilize the architect mapmaker while still remaining open to the users' multiple readings in time.Our contention is that rather than relying on rules, syntax and sequences of transformations, architects may approach mapping as a creative act that is open to different temporalities, involving both a willingness to listen and a readiness to act, allowing stories to emerge all the while stepping up as the narrator. Focusing on the phenomenological dimension of drawing and the epistemological bearings of mapping, the paper reveals some of the ways in which architects can question the relation between architecture and time through their graphic representation. 

  17. Evaluation of Enterprise Architecture Interoperability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jamison, Theresa A; Niska, Brice T; Layman, Phillip A; Whitney, Steven P

    2005-01-01

    ...), which describes these architectures. The purpose of this project, suggested by Air Force Space Command, was to examine the value of existing analytical tools in making an interoperability assessment of individual enterprises, as well...

  18. Horizons of place in Utzon's Bayview Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Asgaard

    In this paper, the horizons of place are discussed in relation to the work of danish architect Jørn Utzon. As one of the most significant personalities of nordic architecture in the second half of the twentieth century, Utzon created a body of work that deals with place in profound and unexpected...... understandings of his work. In doing so, the paper aims at approaching architecture and phenomenology through tensional relationships in the places of Utzon's Bayview project....

  19. Architecture, Drawing, Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents contributions of drawing and text along with their many relationalities from ontology to history and vice versa in a range of reflections on architecture, drawing and topology. We hope to thereby indicate the potential of the theme in understanding not only the architecture...... of today, but – perhaps most importantly – also creating and producing architecture that is contemporaneous and reacts to the radical changes of the physical world which surrounds us in the increasingly artificial measures of new materialities and understandings thereof. The contributions range from...... the intricate issues of the imagination and the moving ratio in the topological culture, over urban topology, diagrammatisation, mediality and dynamics of transduction in the contemporary artificial environment....

  20. Architectural Competition and BIM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nils Lykke; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Øien, Turid Borgestrand

    2015-01-01

    on architecturalcompetitions, a series of interviews was conducted with building clients as well as architects, focusing on the impact of the above-mentioned changes within the building sector on architectural competitions as an institution. In the interviews, ICT and notleast BIM was a recurring theme that both parties saw...... as having a positive impact on competitions. But when looking closely into the answers, these revealed diverse understandings of how and why the impact of BIM on competitions could be said to be positive. The paper sheds light on the interaction between the actors (building clients, architects and client...... consultants) and the applied technologies (competition forms, ICT tools, directives) in architectural competitions in a theoretical actor-network perspective. The diverging understandings of the role of BIM are demonstrating one of many negotiations in progress in the network of architectural competitions...

  1. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    This PhD thesis is motived by a personal interest in the theoretical, practical and creative qualities of architecture. But also a wonder and curiosity about the cultural and social relations architecture represents through its occupation with both the sciences and the arts. Inspired by present i...... with the material appearance of objects, but also the imaginary world of dreams and memories which are concealed with the communicative significance of intentions when designing the future super hospitals....... initiatives in Aalborg Hospital to overcome patient undernutrition by refurbishing eating environments, this thesis engages in an investigation of the interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. The relevance for this holistic perspective, synthesizing health, food and architecture......, is the current building of a series of Danish ‘super hospitals’ and an increased focus among architectural practices on research-based knowledge produced with the architectural sub-disciplines Healing Architecture and Evidence-Based Design. The problem is that this research does not focus on patient eating...

  2. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task B. Understanding and characterizing the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ). Phase 2 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John A. (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Rock Engineering Consultants (United Kingdom); Lanru Jing (ed.) [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Antikainen, Juha [Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Backers, Tobias [GeoFrames GmbH, (Germany); Baeckstroem, Ann [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Bergbyggkonsult AB (Sweden); Koyama, Tomofumi [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Xiating Feng; Pengzhi Pan [Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Kobayashi, Akira [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Rinne, Mikael; Baotang Shen [Fracom Ltd. (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report summarizes the work contributed to Phase 2 of Task B of the project, which took place during the period of March 2004 to May 2006. The Phase 2 work incorporated the use of a wide range of numerical models to simulate the failure of a number of intact rock core samples, from the APSE tunnel at Aespoe HRL, as tested in uniaxial compression and other loading conditions with the intention of establishing the common and code-specific features of the models. The core samples of the Aespoe diorite were treated with different initial mechanical and chemical conditions as dry samples, saturated with distilled water, formation water and saline water, with different durations of submersion, respectively, in order to observe the mechanical effects of saturation by different chemical fluids on the mechanical properties of the intact core

  3. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task B. Understanding and characterizing the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ). Phase 2 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, John A.; Lanru Jing; Antikainen, Juha; Backers, Tobias; Baeckstroem, Ann; Koyama, Tomofumi; Xiating Feng; Pengzhi Pan; Kobayashi, Akira; Rinne, Mikael; Baotang Shen

    2007-02-01

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report summarizes the work contributed to Phase 2 of Task B of the project, which took place during the period of March 2004 to May 2006. The Phase 2 work incorporated the use of a wide range of numerical models to simulate the failure of a number of intact rock core samples, from the APSE tunnel at Aespoe HRL, as tested in uniaxial compression and other loading conditions with the intention of establishing the common and code-specific features of the models. The core samples of the Aespoe diorite were treated with different initial mechanical and chemical conditions as dry samples, saturated with distilled water, formation water and saline water, with different durations of submersion, respectively, in order to observe the mechanical effects of saturation by different chemical fluids on the mechanical properties of the intact core

  4. Activate: Social Action in landscape Architecture Design Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Mclean

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a reflection on the teaching approach adopted in two landscape architecture design studios where students were engaged in developing design projects and campaign strategies informed by personal understandings of action and advocacy for and with communities. The approach was a deliberate application of principles from advocacy theory enmeshed in an educational philosophy of learner-centeredness and the intent was for students to develop strong individual senses of awareness and empowerment in an environment that value personal interests and learning. An evaluation of the approach as an attempt to position landscape architecture as social practice is provided.

  5. Hypoxia monitoring activities within the FP7 EU-project HYPOX: diverse approaches to understand a complex phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, F.; Waldmann, C.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxic conditions in aquatic systems and the occurrence of 'dead zones' increase worldwide due to man-made eutrophication and global warming with consequences for biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services such as fisheries, aquaculture and tourism. Monitoring of hypoxia and its consequences has to (1) account for the appropriate temporal and spatial scales, (2) separate anthropogenic from natural drivers and long-term trends from natural variations, (3) assess ecosystem response, (4) use modeling tools for generalization and prediction, and (5) share data and obtained knowledge. In 2009 the EU FP7 project HYPOX (www.hypox.net) started out as a pioneering attempt to improve and integrate hypoxia observation capacities addressing these requirements. Target ecosystems selected for HYPOX cover a broad range of settings (e.g., hydrography, oxygenation status, biological activity, anthropogenic impact) and differ in their sensitivity towards change. Semi-enclosed basins with permanent anoxia (Black Sea, Baltic Sea), are included as well as seasonally or locally hypoxic land-locked systems (fjords, lagoons, lakes) and open ocean systems with high sensitivity to global warming (North Atlantic - Arctic transition). Adopted monitoring approaches involve autonomous, cabled, and shipboard instruments and include static and profiling moorings, benthic observatories, drifters, as well as classical CTD surveys. In order to improve observatory performance, project activities encompass developments of oxygen sensors as well as calibration procedures and technologies to reduce biofouling. Modeling and data assimilation are used to synthesize findings, to obtain an in-depth understanding of hypoxia causes and consequences, and to improve forecasting capacities. For integration of the collected information into a global oxygen observing system, results are disseminated through the HYPOX portal following GEOSS data sharing principles. This presentation will give an overview of

  6. MIV project: Architectural Design Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisch, Manlio; Paulsen, Thomas Eide; Neefs, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a reference mission scenario was defined. This report describes the structure of the software produced within the contract...

  7. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  8. Ontology-based Software Architecture Documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, K.A.; Tang, A.; Liang, P.; van Vliet, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    A common approach to software architecture documentation in industry projects is the use of file-based documents. This approach offers a single-dimensional perspective on the architectural knowledge contained. Knowledge retrieval from file-based architecture documentation is efficient if the

  9. Detail in architecture: Between arts & crafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulencin, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    Architectural detail represents an important part of architecture. Not only can it be used as an identifier of a specific building but at the same time enhances the experience of the realized project. Within it lie the signs of a great architect and clues to understanding his or her way of thinking. It is therefore the central topic of a seminar offered to architecture students at the Brno University of Technology. During the course of the semester-long class the students acquaint themselves with atypical architectural details of domestic and international architects by learning to read them, understand them and subsequently draw them by creating architectural blueprints. In other words, by general analysis of a detail the students learn theoretical thinking of its architect who, depending on the nature of the design, had to incorporate a variety of techniques and crafts. Students apply this analytical part to their own architectural detail design. The methodology of the seminar consists of experiential learning by project management and is complemented by a series of lectures discussing a diversity of details as well as materials and technologies required to implement it. The architectural detail design is also part of students' bachelors thesis, therefore, the realistic nature of their blueprints can be verified in the production process of its physical counterpart. Based on their own documentation the students choose the most suitable manufacturing process whether it is supplied by a specific technology or a craftsman. Students actively participate in the production and correct their design proposals in real scale with the actual material. A student, as a future architect, stands somewhere between a client and an artisan, materializes his or her idea and adjusts the manufacturing process so that the final detail fulfills aesthetic consistency and is in harmony with its initial concept. One of the very important aspects of the design is its economic cost, an

  10. Architecture Studio Learning: Strategy to Achieve Architects Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifudin Mutaqi Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In most Schools of Architecture, Architecture Studio is at the core of the architectural learning process. In the process, students are trained to have the skills of architectonic spaces design based on the study of the site, its function, and its aesthetics. Students are also trained to have awareness and understanding about the impact of their design on the surrounding environment, both physically and socially. Also, students are trained to present their designs in various forms such as visual graphics, verbal narratives, and three dimensional model animations. Indonesian Association of School of Architecture (APTARI Asosiasi Perguruan Tinggi Arsitektur Indonesia and Indonesian Institute of Architects (IAI - Ikatan Arsitek Indonesia has formulated an education Standards, Curriculum, and Achievements of Architect Professional Program to be referred by Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education (KEMENRISTEKDIKTI – Kementerian Riset, Teknologi, danPerguruanTinggi as the guidance for the implementation of Architect Professional Program (PPA - Pendidikan Profesi Arsitek in Indonesia. One of the eight recommendations is the PPA Content Standard which contains the learning for the achievement of IAI Architect Competencies through the recommended study materials. However, the recommended study materials did not indicate the activity of the Architecture Studio learning model (Final Report of APTARI Part II and IAI. Will architect’s competence be achieved if the learning process withoutarchitectural studio learning model? The formulation of the curriculum that is developed independently by the IAI recommends the learning of Architectural Studio as Professional Studio. The size of the SKS is large enough to enable someone who follows the lesson to intensively gain experience in designing the building as a real architectural work. This Architecture Studio learning model is interpreted by PPAr organizer universities with various forms

  11. Cartography of architectural controversies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Katrine

    2009-01-01

    that employing the visualising methods of the recent development of Actor-Network-Theory called ‘Cartography of Controversies' might contribute to trans-disciplinary efforts to develop analytic understanding of the conflicting human purposes and power-struggles at stake in the be-coming of architecture....

  12. Service Modularity and Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brax, Saara A.; Bask, Anu; Hsuan, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Services are highly important in a world economy which has increasingly become service driven. There is a growing need to better understand the possibilities for, and requirements of, designing modular service architectures. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the roots of the e......Purpose: Services are highly important in a world economy which has increasingly become service driven. There is a growing need to better understand the possibilities for, and requirements of, designing modular service architectures. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the roots...... of the emerging research stream on service modularity, provide a concise overview of existing work on the subject, and outline an agenda for future research on service modularity and architecture. The articles in the special issue offer four diverse sets of research on service modularity and architecture. Design....../methodology/approach: The paper is built on a literature review mapping the current body of literature on the topic and developing future research directions in service modularity and architecture. Findings: The growing focus on services has triggered needs to investigate the suitability and implementation of physical...

  13. Understanding surface-water availability in the Central Valley as a means to projecting future groundwater storage with climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Cayan, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    California's Central Valley (CV) relies heavily on diverted surface water and groundwater pumping to supply irrigated agriculture. However, understanding the spatiotemporal character of water availability in the CV is difficult because of the number of individual farms and local, state, and federal agencies involved in using and managing water. Here we use the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), developed by the USGS, to understand the relationships between climatic variability, surface water inputs, and resulting groundwater use over the historical period 1970-2013. We analyzed monthly surface water diversion data from >500 CV locations. Principle components analyses were applied to drivers constructed from meteorological data, surface reservoir storage, ET, land use cover, and upstream inflows, to feed multiple regressions and identify factors most important in predicting surface water diversions. Two thirds of the diversion locations ( 80% of total diverted water) can be predicted to within 15%. Along with monthly inputs, representations of cumulative precipitation over the previous 3 to 36 months can explain an additional 10% of variance, depending on location, compared to results that excluded this information. Diversions in the southern CV are highly sensitive to inter-annual variability in precipitation (R2 = 0.8), whereby more surface water is used during wet years. Until recently, this was not the case in the northern and mid-CV, where diversions were relatively constant annually, suggesting relative insensitivity to drought. In contrast, this has important implications for drought response in southern regions (eg. Tulare Basin) where extended dry conditions can severely limit surface water supplies and lead to excess groundwater pumping, storage loss, and subsidence. In addition to fueling our understanding of spatiotemporal variability in diversions, our ability to predict these water balance components allows us to update CVHM predictions before

  14. Architectured Nanomembranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [Former ORNL postdoc; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

    2017-07-01

    This paper has reviewed the frontier field of “architectured membranes” that contains anisotropic oriented porous nanostructures of inorganic materials. Three example types of architectured membranes were discussed with some relevant results from our own research: (1) anodized thin-layer titania membranes on porous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates of different pore sizes, (2) porous glass membranes on alumina substrate, and (3) guest-host membranes based on infiltration of yttrium-stabilized zirconia inside the pore channels of AAO matrices.

  15. Integration of image/video understanding engine into 4D/RCS architecture for intelligent perception-based behavior of robots in real-world environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2004-10-01

    To be completely successful, robots need to have reliable perceptual systems that are similar to human vision. It is hard to use geometric operations for processing of natural images. Instead, the brain builds a relational network-symbolic structure of visual scene, using different clues to set up the relational order of surfaces and objects with respect to the observer and to each other. Feature, symbol, and predicate are equivalent in the biologically inspired Network-Symbolic systems. A linking mechanism binds these features/symbols into coherent structures, and image converts from a "raster" into a "vector" representation. View-based object recognition is a hard problem for traditional algorithms that directly match a primary view of an object to a model. In Network-Symbolic Models, the derived structure, not the primary view, is a subject for recognition. Such recognition is not affected by local changes and appearances of the object as seen from a set of similar views. Once built, the model of visual scene changes slower then local information in the visual buffer. It allows for disambiguating visual information and effective control of actions and navigation via incremental relational changes in visual buffer. Network-Symbolic models can be seamlessly integrated into the NIST 4D/RCS architecture and better interpret images/video for situation awareness, target recognition, navigation and actions.

  16. High-frequency HYDRO-geophysical observations for an advanced understanding of clayey landSLIDES: the HYDROSLIDE research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, Jean-Philippe; Supper, Robert; Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Gautier, Stéphanie; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of change in hydrological cycles and the increase of exposed goods, the risk of landslides is globally growing all over the world. As a consequence, short-time landslide prediction is a fundamental tool for risk mitigation. To this aim, real-time monitoring and interpretation methods aiming at a full exploitation of the available landslide information are needed, including further development of sensor technology and use of advanced numerical modeling. The most commonly used warning parameters are direct measurements of slope displacement and pore-water pressures. However, recent research on landslide controlled by slope hydrology has shown that other parameters (e.g. soil moisture) can be used and other methods (e.g. electrical resistivity tomography, electrical spontaneous potential) are available, which might give indications on triggering even before an actual displacement is measureable and thus could possibly be used as physical precursors for short-term warning. The CNRS - Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre (EOST) and the Geological Survey of Austria - Geophysical Division (GBA) started successfully to evaluate time-lapse resistivity measurements for monitoring changes in water content/flows in landslides at different monitoring sites. At the same period, CNRS also started to establish the French Observatory on Landslides (OMIV: omiv.unistra.fr), which task is the long term monitoring and data sharing of landslide parameters (geodesy, hydrology, seismic). Results from these projects proved that electrical resistivity monitoring can be successfully applied to detect changes in water storage and to understand water circulation in complex landslide bodies. However, especially for clayey landslides, this method is only applicable with limitation, since the resistivity of clays shows almost the same values as the resistivity of the saturated soil (15-20 O.m). Consequently, the change in water content expressed in the electrical

  17. Scenario Based Education as a Framework for Understanding Students Engagement and Learning in a Project Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I describe how students use a project management simulation game based on an attack-defense mechanism where two teams of players compete by challenging each other's projects. The project management simulation game is intended to be played by pre-service construction workers and engineers. The gameplay has two parts: a planning part,…

  18. Understanding quality requirements engineering in contract-based projects from the perspective of software architects: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maya; Herrmann, Andrea; Buglione, Luigi; Mistrik, Ivan; Bahsoon, Rami; Eeles, Peter; Roshandel, Roshanak; Stal, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how software architects from 21 European project organizations cope with quality requirements (QRs) in large, contract-based systems delivery projects. It reports on the roles that architects played in QRs engineering, their interactions with other project roles, the specific

  19. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture. Inge Vestergaard, Associate Professor, Cand. Arch. Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark Noerreport 20, 8000 Aarhus C Telephone +45 89 36 0000 E-mai l inge.vestergaard@aarch.dk Based on the repetitive architecture from the "building boom" 1960...... customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performed expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have in Denmark been focusing a more sustainable and low energy building technique, which also include...... to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light weight elements basically made of wooden structures, faced with different suitable materials meant for individual expression for the specific housing area. It is the purpose of this article to widen up the different design...

  20. Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Based on the repetitive architecture from the “building boom” from 1960 to 1973, it is discussed how architects can handle these Danish element and montage buildings through the transformation to upgraded aesthetical, functional and energy efficient architecture. The method used is analysis...... of cases, parallels to literature studies and client and producer interviews. The analysis compares best practice in Denmark and best practice in Austria. Modern architects accepted the fact that industrialized architecture told the storey of repetition and monotony as basic condition. This article aims...... to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through customization, telling exactly the revitalized storey about the change to a contemporary sustainable and better performing expression in direct relation to the given context. Through the last couple of years we have...

  1. PICNIC Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranummi, Niilo

    2005-01-01

    The PICNIC architecture aims at supporting inter-enterprise integration and the facilitation of collaboration between healthcare organisations. The concept of a Regional Health Economy (RHE) is introduced to illustrate the varying nature of inter-enterprise collaboration between healthcare organisations collaborating in providing health services to citizens and patients in a regional setting. The PICNIC architecture comprises a number of PICNIC IT Services, the interfaces between them and presents a way to assemble these into a functioning Regional Health Care Network meeting the needs and concerns of its stakeholders. The PICNIC architecture is presented through a number of views relevant to different stakeholder groups. The stakeholders of the first view are national and regional health authorities and policy makers. The view describes how the architecture enables the implementation of national and regional health policies, strategies and organisational structures. The stakeholders of the second view, the service viewpoint, are the care providers, health professionals, patients and citizens. The view describes how the architecture supports and enables regional care delivery and process management including continuity of care (shared care) and citizen-centred health services. The stakeholders of the third view, the engineering view, are those that design, build and implement the RHCN. The view comprises four sub views: software engineering, IT services engineering, security and data. The proposed architecture is founded into the main stream of how distributed computing environments are evolving. The architecture is realised using the web services approach. A number of well established technology platforms and generic standards exist that can be used to implement the software components. The software components that are specified in PICNIC are implemented in Open Source.

  2. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light weight elements basically made of wooden structures, faced with different suitable materials meant for individual expression for the specific housing area. It is the purpose of this article to widen up the different design...... to this systematic thinking of the building technique we get a diverse and functional architecture. Creating a new and clearer story telling about new and smart system based thinking behind the architectural expression....

  3. Scenario Based Education as a Framework for Understanding Students Engagement and Learning in a Project Management Simulation Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I describe s how students use a project management simulation game based on an attack‑defense mechanism where two teams of players compete by challenging each other⠒s projects. The project management simulation game is intended to be playe d by pre‑service construction workers...... opponent⠒s building project for weak spots. The intention of the project management simulation game, is to provide students with an increased sensitivity towards the relation between planning and reality in complex construction projects. The project management simulation game can be interpreted both...... as a competitive game and as a simulation. Both of these views are meaningful and can be seen as supporting learnin g. Emphasizing the simulation aspect let us explain how students learn by being immersed into a simulated world, where the players identify with specific roles, live out specific situations...

  4. Healthy Architecture! Can environments evoke emotional responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2012-06-05

    We find environmental psychology at the intersection between architecture and psychology. This article discusses the ways in which individuals are affected by architecture, departing from an early source on the psychology of architecture and taking three architectural examples as illustrations: a public place in Berlin, a health environment in Sweden, and a fitness centre in Denmark. Each of these architectural examples creates what might be called its own psychological emotions, and these are analysed and discussed using a psychodynamic and existential attempt to understand the interrelationship between individuals and spatial reality. A health oriented existential approach is used as a methodological basis to conceptualise the psychological effects of various forms of architecture.

  5. Observational research study around tropical Western Pacific: PALAU (Pacific Area Long-term Atmospheric observation for Understanding climate change) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirooka, Ryuichi

    2017-04-01

    The warm water pool region in the tropical Western Pacific is a key area for global climate systems, as strong atmospheric convective activity in this area is the driving engine of the atmosphere. However, there are many processes between meso-scale convective activities and the global-scale climate, and these are not fully understood yet. To understand the mechanism of clouds-precipitation processes and air-sea interactions over the warm pool in the tropics, there are in need of further investigation on the Western Pacific monsoon and the tropical-extratropical interactions. Toward these objectives, we have continued a long-term observational project named PALAU (Pacific Area Long-term Atmospheric observation for Understanding climate change) around the tropical Western Pacific near the Republic of Palau. The main target of this project is to describe multi-scale interactions of cloud systems to intra-seasonal oscillations affected by monsoon activities. To elucidate the structure of tropical cyclones, which occur over a monsoon trough near Palau, is also a major interest. Since November 2000, we have been continuously operating a surface weather observation site in Palau. We also have conducted several intensive field campaigns targeted for various phenomena. PALAU2013, one of the intensive campaign, was carried out to focus on the formation mechanism of tropical cyclones and their relation to intra-seasonal oscillations and monsoon activity over the tropical Western Pacific. During the campaign, R/V Mirai was placed near Palau and conducted atmospheric and oceanic observations using Doppler radar, radiosonde, CTD and so on. Daily profiling Argo-floats were deployed for analyzing air-sea interactions. To capture the monsoon activity with wide area, we constructed intensified sounding network from Philippines, Palau, and Yap to Guam. Three X-band radars were utilized to obtain the internal structure of cloud systems. Dual-polarization parameters also can be

  6. Understanding the Reach of Agricultural Impacts from Climate Extremes in the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has been working since 2010 to build a modeling framework capable of representing the complexities of agriculture, its dependence on climate, and the many elements of society that depend on food systems. AgMIP's 30+ activities explore the interconnected nature of climate, crop, livestock, economics, food security, and nutrition, using common protocols to systematically evaluate the components of agricultural assessment and allow multi-model, multi-scale, and multi-method analysis of intertwining changes in socioeconomic development, environmental change, and technological adaptation. AgMIP is now launching Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) with a particular focus on unforeseen consequences of development strategies, interactions between global and local systems, and the resilience of agricultural systems to extreme climate events. Climate extremes shock the agricultural system through local, direct impacts (e.g., droughts, heat waves, floods, severe storms) and also through teleconnections propagated through international trade. As the climate changes, the nature of climate extremes affecting agriculture is also likely to change, leading to shifting intensity, duration, frequency, and geographic extents of extremes. AgMIP researchers are developing new scenario methodologies to represent near-term extreme droughts in a probabilistic manner, field experiments that impose heat wave conditions on crops, increased resolution to differentiate sub-national drought impacts, new behavioral functions that mimic the response of market actors faced with production shortfalls, analysis of impacts from simultaneous failures of multiple breadbasket regions, and more detailed mapping of food and socioeconomic indicators into food security and nutrition metrics that describe the human impact in diverse populations. Agricultural models illustrate the challenges facing agriculture, allowing

  7. Thermal Space in Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mads Dines

    Present research is revolving around the design process and the use of digital applications to support the design process among architects. This work is made in relation to the current discussions about sustainable architecture and the increased focus on energy consumption and the comfort in our...... buildings. However at the bottom of this lies an understanding of how we inhabit the space in our buildings and how we historically have adapted to the changing conditions of the seasons in our buildings. Through an increased understanding of this adaptability of and to our buildings, our work with spaces...... and understanding of spaces in buildings can change significantly and instead of the creation of frozen geometrical spaces, thermal spaces can be created as it is suggested in meteorological architecture where functions are distributed in relation to temperature gradients. This creates an interesting contrast...

  8. Comparing root architectural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  9. Architectural Engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Premer

    engineering is addresses from two perspectives – as an educational response and an occupational constellation. Architecture and engineering are two of the traditional design professions and they frequently meet in the occupational setting, but at educational institutions they remain largely estranged....... The paper builds on a multi-sited study of an architectural engineering program at the Technical University of Denmark and an architectural engineering team within an international engineering consultancy based on Denmark. They are both responding to new tendencies within the building industry where...... the role of engineers and architects increasingly overlap during the design process, but their approaches reflect different perceptions of the consequences. The paper discusses some of the challenges that design education, not only within engineering, is facing today: young designers must be equipped...

  10. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    anthropology. On the one hand, there are obviously good reasons for developing architecture based on anthropological insights in local contexts and anthropologically inspired techniques for ‘collaborative formation of issues’. Houses and built environments are huge investments, their life expectancy...... and other spaces that architects are preoccupied with. On the other hand, the distinction between architecture and design is not merely one of scale. Design and architecture represent – at least in Denmark – also quite different disciplinary traditions and methods. Where designers develop prototypes......, architects tend to work with models and plans that are not easily understood by lay people. Further, many architects are themselves sceptical towards notions of user-involvement and collaborative design. They fear that the imagination of citizens and users is restricted to what they are already familiar with...

  11. Reframing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2013-01-01

    I would like to thank Prof. Stephen Read (2011) and Prof. Andrew Benjamin (2011) for both giving inspiring and elaborate comments on my article “Dwelling in-between walls: the architectural surround”. As I will try to demonstrate below, their two different responses not only supplement my article...... focuses on how the absence of an initial distinction might threaten the endeavour of my paper. In my reply to Read and Benjamin, I will discuss their suggestions and arguments, while at the same time hopefully clarifying the postphenomenological approach to architecture....

  12. DEPUTY: analysing architectural structures and checking style

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, D.; Kochelev, S.; Kotegov, S.; Pavlov, I.; Pravilnikov, V.; Wellisch, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The DepUty (dependencies utility) can be classified as a project and process management tool. The main goal of DepUty is to assist by means of source code analysis and graphical representation using UML, in understanding dependencies of sub-systems and packages in CMS Object Oriented software, to understand architectural structure, and to schedule code release in modularised integration. It also allows a new-comer to more easily understand the global structure of CMS software, and to void circular dependencies up-front or re-factor the code, in case it was already too close to the edge of non-maintainability. The authors will discuss the various views DepUty provides to analyse package dependencies, and illustrate both the metrics and style checking facilities it provides

  13. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    of green architecture. The paper argues that this greenification of facades is insufficient. The green is only a skin cladding the exterior envelope without having a spatial significance. Through the paper it is proposed to flip the order of words from green architecture to architectural green...... that describes the architectural exclusivity of this particular architecture genre. The adjective green expresses architectural qualities differentiating green architecture from none-green architecture. Currently, adding trees and vegetation to the building’s facade is the main architectural characteristics...

  14. Urban architecture in urban renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, Steen; Svensson, Ole

    2001-01-01

    In Denmark new issues in urban renewal are being introduced. Legislation on urban renewal now demands that residents be invited to take an active part in the development of their urban area. And urban renewal is increasingly taking place in inner suburbs which are recently built, complex...... and without obvious architectural value. These issues raise pertinent questions: what urban architectural problems and qualities exist in the complex, inner suburbs? What differences exist between professionals' and residents' perceptions and assessments of urban architecture? How can a shared language...... of urban architecture be developed? This research project attempts to answer these questions through a discourse on theories and methods and the development of "dialogue methods" by which professionals can learn about residents' perception of the urban architecture of their area, thus achieving a better...

  15. Performative Architecture and Urban Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The workshop model includes an open workshop where a handful of international architects are invited to spend five days with local architects, engineers and scholars contributing to a work of architectural vision and quality. The workshop includes presentations and discussions and development of projects......  3 Workshops one exibition   Three conceptual architectural workshops took take place in parallel from August 16th - 22nd 2008. Each workshop carried a specific methodology and the goal is to come up with conceptual proposals that could be further developed for selected sites in the city....... The Exibition follow the content of tree workshops Workshop 1: Digital architecture - Copenhagen Group This workshop focus on digital methods and representation of architecture and urban environments. On the basis of selected parameters it developed a new transparent spaces of interaction and new architectural...

  16. Norms and Interfirm Governance in Client-Architectural Firm Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2001-01-01

    This article seeks to establish connections between governance structures, norms, and relationship types in architectural firm-client relationships. Due to the complex, intangible, knowledge intensive, and artistic nature of these professional services, both individual architectural project orders...... and relationships to clients are achieved by making credible promises (Løwendahl, 2000). This, in turn, requires profound understanding of existing norms and norms dynamics in architectural fields. An analytical framework of possible governance structures, possible relationship types, and norms is built...... conditions influence interfirm governance. Finally eight general hypothesis concerning the relationship between governance structures, norms, and relationship types in the professional services are presented on the basis of the analysis and related to existing theoretical contributions....

  17. 23 CFR 940.9 - Regional ITS architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regional ITS architecture. 940.9 Section 940.9 Highways... INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE AND STANDARDS § 940.9 Regional ITS architecture. (a) A regional ITS architecture shall be developed to guide the development of ITS projects and programs and be...

  18. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Klamath Mountains study unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George Luther; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Klamath Mountains (KLAM) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in Del Norte, Humboldt, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Trinity Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a spatially unbiased, statistically robust assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality data and explanatory factors for groundwater samples collected in 2010 by the USGS from 39 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) water-quality database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH water-quality database for the KLAM study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study included two types of assessments: (1) a status assessment, which characterized the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements, and (2) an understanding assessment, which evaluated the natural and human factors potentially affecting the groundwater quality. The assessments were intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the KLAM study unit, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations

  19. Understanding Leisure-related Program Effects by Using Process Data in the HealthWise South Africa Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Linda L; Younker, Anita S; Wegner, Lisa; Patrick, Megan E; Vergnani, Tania; Smith, Edward A; Flisher, Alan J

    2008-01-01

    As the push for evidence-based programming gathers momentum, many human services programs and interventions are under increased scrutiny to justify their effectiveness across different conditions and populations. Government agencies and the public want to be assured that their resources are being put to good use on programs that are effective and efficient (Guskey, 2000). Thus, programs are increasingly based on theory and evaluated through randomized control trials using longitudinal data. Despite this progress, hypothesized outcomes are often not detected and/or their effect sizes are small (Gingiss, Roberts-Gray, Boerm, 2006). Moreover, findings may go against intuition or "gut feelings" on the part of project staff. Given the need to understand how program implementation issues relate to outcomes, this study focuses on whether process measures that focus on program implementation and fidelity can shed light on associated outcomes. In particular, we linked the process evaluation of the HealthWise motivation lesson with outcomes across four waves of data collection. We hypothesized that HealthWise would increase learners' intrinsic and identified forms of motivation, and decrease amotivation and extrinsic motivation. We did not hypothesize a direction of effects on introjected motivation due to its conceptual ambiguity. Data came from youth in four intervention schools (n = 902, 41.1%) and five control schools (n = 1291, 58.9%) who were participating in a multi-cohort, longitudinal study. The schools were in a township near Cape Town, South Africa. For each cohort, baseline data are collected on learners as they begin Grade 8. We currently have four waves of data collected on the first cohort, which is the focus of this paper. The mean age of the sample at Wave 3 was 15.0 years (SD = .86) and 51% of students were female. Results suggested that there was evidence of an overall program effect of the curriculum on amotivation regardless of fidelity of implementation

  20. 'From fragmented to interdisciplinary understanding of integrated antenatal and postnatal care'-an interprofessional project between public health nursing students and midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, Ingvild; Olufsen, Vibeke

    2014-03-01

    in Norway, it is expected that public health nurses and midwives will collaborate in providing integrated antenatal and postnatal care. In practice, however, the extent of formal and informal collaboration between these two groups of health professionals appears limited. In this context, an interprofessional project was initiated, bringing together student public health nurses and midwives in a four-step programme. The objective was to develop the students' understanding of interdisciplinary collaboration in antenatal and postnatal care. to gain knowledge of the students' experiences of the interprofessional project and their interdisciplinary understanding of integrated antenatal and postnatal care. the students wrote reflective notes on their experiences, and this qualitative material was analysed through systematic text condensation. the students gained awareness about each professional group's competence and responsibilities. They developed an interdisciplinary understanding, which is essential for continuity in antenatal and postnatal care. Changes in knowledge and attitudes during the project helped to develop the students' positive attitude towards future interdisciplinary collaborative practice. the success of this project was due to the students' experiences during the four-step programme. They developed an interdisciplinary understanding in which loyalty to the family was more important than interprofessional disputes and boundaries. To enhance collaboration between the two professions it is essential that this programme is emphasised by the management and is integrated into the curriculum for both educational programmes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Importance of Ecology-Based Nature Education Project in Terms of Nature Integration and Understanding the Human-Ecosystem Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydan, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this project is to define the importance of 12-day ecology-based education training upon integration with nature and understanding the human-ecosystem relationship. In accordance with this purpose, there has been collected some survey data interviewing with the participants of "Lake Beysehir National Park and Ecology-based Nature…

  2. From Brand Image Research to Teaching Assessment: Using a Projective Technique Borrowed from Marketing Research to Aid an Understanding of Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, Clive Roland

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes how a simple qualitative market research technique using a projective device called a bubble drawing can be used as a useful feedback device to gain an understanding of students' views of the teaching effectiveness of a market research lecture. Comparisons are made with feedback gained from teaching observations and insights…

  3. ULtimateCO2 : A FP7 European project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audigane, P.; Brown, S.; Dimier, A.; Frykman, P.; Gherardi, F.; Gallo, Y.L.; Maurand, N.; Cremer, H.; Pearce, J.; Rütters, H.; Spiers, C.; Yalamas, T.

    2013-01-01

    ULTimateCO2 will assess the long-term CO2 storage behaviour in terms of efficiency and security. The project is dedicated to studying the main physical processes needed to develop a better, quantitative understanding of the longterm geological storage of CO2, namely: (i) reservoir trapping, (ii)

  4. Architecture Descriptions. A Contribution to Modeling of Production System Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Allan Dam; Hvam, Lars

    a proper understanding of the architecture phenomenon and the ability to describe it in a manner that allow the architecture to be communicated to and handled by stakeholders throughout the company. Despite the existence of several design philosophies in production system design such as Lean, that focus......The subject of this PhD dissertation is architecture-centric design and the description of production system architecture. Companies are facing demands for the development and production of new products at an ever increasing rate, as the market life of products decreases and the rate at which...... customers demand new product features and performance accelerates. Many of these companies are seeking to keep pace with market demands and the pressures of low cost production in other countries by adopting an architecture-centric or platform based approach to the design of their production systems...

  5. Architecture Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacob, Maria-Eugenia; Jonkers, Henk; van der Torre, Leon; de Boer, Frank S.; Bonsangue, Marcello; Stam, Andries W.; Lankhorst, Marc M.; Quartel, Dick A.C.; Aldea, Adina; Lankhorst, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This chapter also explains what the added value of enterprise architecture analysis techniques is in addition to existing, more detailed, and domain-specific ones for business processes or software, for example. Analogous to the idea of using the ArchiMate enterprise modelling language to integrate

  6. Metabolistic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Textile Spaces presents different approaches to using textile as a spatial definer and artistic medium. The publication collages images and text, art and architecture, science, philosophy and literature, process and product, past, present and future. It forms an insight into soft materials...

  7. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  8. SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE AND ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE: A JUXTA POSITION?#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Benade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: A systems approach to creating a system is discussed. The system engineering process, and specifically the system architecture process, is formulated and applied to a typical (physical system, enterprise, and project. These lead to the concepts of system architecture (SA, enterprise architecture (EA, and project architecture (PA respectively. Similarities and inter-relationships among these architectures and related methodologies are investigated, seeking better interaction among them. ‘Work’ is proposed as an important conceptual building-block of these architectures, properly defined as activity with associated inputs, outputs, governances, and mechanisms. Techniques such as functional analysis, process modelling, and task analysis are used to demonstrate the inter-relationships among these apparently unrelated organisational perspectives of product, process, and project.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING ’n Stelselbenadering tot die daarstelling van ’n stelsel word bespreek. Die stelselingenieurs-wese,en spesifiek die stelselargitektuurproses, word geformuleer en toegepas op ’n tipiese (fisiese stelsel, onderneming, en projek. Dit lei tot die konsepte van stelselargitektuur (SA, ondernemingsargitektuur (OA, en projekargitektuur (PA. Ooreenkomste en verwant-skappe tussen hierdie argitekture word ontleed om beter onderlinge interaksie te bewerkstellig. ’n Belangrike konseptuele bousteen van hierdie argitekture word voorgestel as ‘werk’, behoorlik gedefinieer as aktiwiteit met gepaardgaande insette, uitsette, kontroles, en meganismes. Tegnieke soos funksionele analise, prosesmodellering, en taakanalise word gebruik om die onderlinge verbande tussen hierdie skynbaar onverwante organisatoriese perspektiewe van produk, projek, en proses, te demonstreer.

  9. Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    the retrofitting of the existing concrete element blocks from the period. Related to the actual demands to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light-weight elements basically made of wooden structures and faced with different suitable materials meant for individual...... for retrofit design. If we add the question of the installations e.g. ventilation to this systematic thinking of building technique we get a diverse and functional architecture, thereby creating a new and clearer story telling about new and smart system based thinking behind architectural expression....

  10. CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.; Kennedy, K.; Howard, R.; Whitmore, M.; Martin, C.; Garate, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In preparation for human exploration to Mars, there is a need to define the development and test program that will validate deep space operations and systems. In that context, a Proving Grounds CisLunar habitat spacecraft is being defined as the next step towards this goal. This spacecraft will operate differently from the ISS or other spacecraft in human history. The performance envelope of this spacecraft (mass, volume, power, specifications, etc.) is being defined by the Future Capabilities Study Team. This team has recognized the need for a human-centered approach for the internal architecture of this spacecraft and has commissioned a CisLunar Phase-1 Habitat Internal Architecture Study Team to develop a NASA reference configuration, providing the Agency with a "smart buyer" approach for future acquisition. THE CISLUNAR HABITAT INTERNAL ARCHITECTURE STUDY: Overall, the CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture study will address the most significant questions and risks in the current CisLunar architecture, habitation, and operations concept development. This effort is achieved through definition of design criteria, evaluation criteria and process, design of the CisLunar Habitat Phase-1 internal architecture, and the development and fabrication of internal architecture concepts combined with rigorous and methodical Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) evaluations and testing of the conceptual innovations in a controlled test environment. The vision of the CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture Study is to design, build, and test a CisLunar Phase-1 Habitat Internal Architecture that will be used for habitation (e.g. habitability and human factors) evaluations. The evaluations will mature CisLunar habitat evaluation tools, guidelines, and standards, and will interface with other projects such as the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program integrated Power, Avionics, Software (iPAS), and Logistics for integrated human-in-the-loop testing. The mission of the Cis

  11. Beyond the typological discourse : The creation of the architectural language and the type as a project in the western modern city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marzot, N.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis considers the city and its architecture the extreme condition under which the endless discussion around the human being way of thinking takes place. More precisely, the research assumes the city as the place where the displacement of mindset principles, categories and catalogue of

  12. Transparency and Movement in Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Estremadoyro, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    This project investigates transparency and movement as the main measured elements that defi ne space. These elements seek to articulate distinct and memorable places throughout the building, acknowledging its unique setting along the Potomac River in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Architecture and nature as opposite elements combine here to defi ne a building in which water, light and views become the main architectural agents set in dialog with the natural surroundings. An existi...

  13. Architectural Technology and Technological Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Giallocosta

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At least three fundamental aspects of the many singular technological approaches to architectural planning are currently evolving significantly and are ripe for potential development. The first relates to enhanced opportunities for defining the ex-ante characteristics and performance of building products and components, but particularly concerns potential leadership assumptions in planning and the ‘reification’ of architecture through ‘collective’ behaviours. The second relates to the tendency to try and overcome the connotation of architectural projects, inclusive of their entire life cycle. The third relates to current evolutionary developments (either potential or simply implicit in performance approach.

  14. Sociology of Professions: The Evolution of Landscape Architecture in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Timothy Baird

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In mid- to late-nineteenth-century American history, there was a fairly uniform evolution of 'occupations' that developed into specialised 'professions'; the process of which has long been an area of study for sociologists. Acknowledged professions such as law and medicine were beneficiaries of this transition - being cited today as consummate authorities in their respective knowledge bases. Yet, landscape architecture, to date, has not achieved the same level of public understanding and approbation even in comparison to sister professions of planning and architecture. This paper uses the theoretical framework of the sociology of professions to understand the comparatively latent development of the profession of landscape architecture in achieving public recognition. Based on these theoretical standards, the findings of this study include possible reasons for landscape architecture's slower evolution in public recognition and acceptance, as well as a projection of its future through a review of recent accomplishments and events that indicate how public approbation and understanding of landscape architecture might be expanded. The paper concludes with reasons for optimism towards the future of the profession and discipline. The research goal of this undertaking was to trace landscape architecture's trajectory from occupation to profession, beginning in the late nineteenth century, and to compare that path with other disciplines, such as planning and architecture, in order to determine the reasons for landscape architecture's slower journey toward public recognition and understanding. This article frames the professional evolution of landscape architecture in the United States through a sociological lens of professional development. The study begins with a survey of the development of professions as a sociological phenomenon, and is placed in context by a literature review of scholarly journals, professional trade magazines and various studies of

  15. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Madera, Chowchilla Study Unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 860-square-mile Madera and Chowchilla Subbasins (Madera-Chowchilla study unit) of the San Joaquin Valley Basin was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in California's Central Valley region in parts of Madera, Merced, and Fresno Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in California. The primary aquifer system within each study unit is defined by the depth of the perforated or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifer system; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Madera-Chowchilla study unit were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 35 wells during April-May 2008 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of natural factors and human activities affecting groundwater quality. The primary aquifer system is represented by the grid wells, of which 90 percent (%) had depths that ranged from about 200 to 800 feet (ft) below land surface and had depths to the top of perforations that ranged from about 140 to 400 ft below land surface. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for

  16. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, 2007-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Montrella, Joseph; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit contains eight groundwater basins located in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties and is within the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2007 by the USGS from 42 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined as that part of the aquifer system corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Santa Clara River Valley study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in shallow or deep water-bearing zones; for example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. Eleven additional wells were sampled by the USGS to improve understanding of factors affecting water quality.The status assessment of the quality of the groundwater used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the Santa Clara River Valley study unit

  17. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  18. Advancing Our Understanding of the Impacts of Historic and Projected Land Use in the Earth System: The Land Use Model Intercomparison Project (LUMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, D. M.; Hurtt, G. C.; Brovkin, V.; Calvin, K. V.; de Noblet-Ducoudre, N.; Jones, C.; Pongratz, J.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Shevliakova, E.

    2014-12-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) are including increasingly comprehensive treatments of land use and land management, representing not only land cover change, but also land use in the form of prognostic crop and pasture models, irrigation, fertilization, wood harvest, and urbanization. The Land Use Model Intercomparison Project (LUMIP) is a new (proposed) satellite-MIP within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) that is designed to address the following main science questions: (1) What are the effects of land use and land-use change on climate (past-future)? (2) What are the effects of climate change on land-use and land-use change? (3) Are there regional land management strategies with promise to help mitigate and adapt to climate change? LUMIP will coordinate across existing land use change projects such as LUCID, AgMIP, GSWP3, Trendy, and LUC4C. LUMIP encompasses three major activities: (1) input and output data harmonization and standardization, (2) development of model metrics to assess ESM performance with respect to the impact of land use on climate and carbon cycling, and (3) design and execution of a concise set of land model and ESM experiments for assessment of the impacts of historic and projected land use on the climate system and to separate effects of fossil fuel vs. land use, biogeochemical vs biogeophysical processes, and land cover vs land management. Preliminary results from idealized model experiments will be presented.

  19. MUF architecture /art London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen Kajita, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Om MUF architecture samt interview med Liza Fior og Katherine Clarke, partnere i muf architecture/art......Om MUF architecture samt interview med Liza Fior og Katherine Clarke, partnere i muf architecture/art...

  20. God Save Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pnina Avidar; Beatriz Ramo; dr. Marc Glaudemans

    2011-01-01

    First year students of architecture studied contemporary architectural discourse and develop critical standpoints against the macho-style heroic interpretation of architecture's power to transform the world. The disproportionate focus on iconographic architecture is being criticized. The book is a

  1. Focal and Ambient Processing of Built Environments: Intellectual and Atmospheric Experiences of Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Kevin K.; Condia, Robert J.; Loschky, Lester C.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience has well established that human vision divides into the central and peripheral fields of view. Central vision extends from the point of gaze (where we are looking) out to about 5° of visual angle (the width of one’s fist at arm’s length), while peripheral vision is the vast remainder of the visual field. These visual fields project to the parvo and magno ganglion cells, which process distinctly different types of information from the world around us and project that information to the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively. Building on the dorsal/ventral stream dichotomy, we can further distinguish between focal processing of central vision, and ambient processing of peripheral vision. Thus, our visual processing of and attention to objects and scenes depends on how and where these stimuli fall on the retina. The built environment is no exception to these dependencies, specifically in terms of how focal object perception and ambient spatial perception create different types of experiences we have with built environments. We argue that these foundational mechanisms of the eye and the visual stream are limiting parameters of architectural experience. We hypothesize that people experience architecture in two basic ways based on these visual limitations; by intellectually assessing architecture consciously through focal object processing and assessing architecture in terms of atmosphere through pre-conscious ambient spatial processing. Furthermore, these separate ways of processing architectural stimuli operate in parallel throughout the visual perceptual system. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of architecture must take into account that built environments are stimuli that are treated differently by focal and ambient vision, which enable intellectual analysis of architectural experience versus the experience of architectural atmosphere, respectively. We offer this theoretical model to help advance a more precise understanding of the

  2. Architectural Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai

    2018-01-01

    without being able to visualize it in drawing. Architectural design, in other words, to a large extent happens through drawing. Hence, to neglect drawing skills is to neglect an important capacity to create architectural design. While the current-day argument for the depreciation of drawing skills...... is that computers can represent graphic ideas both faster and better than most medium-skilled draftsmen, drawing in design is not only about representing final designs. In fact, several steps involving the capacity to draw lie before the representation of a final design. Not only is drawing skills an important...... prerequisite for learning about the nature of existing objects and spaces, and thus to build a vocabulary of design. It is also a prerequisite for both reflecting and communicating about design ideas. In this paper, a taxonomy of notation, reflection, communication and presentation drawing is presented...

  3. Kosmos = architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Kurent

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The old Greek word "kosmos" means not only "cosmos", but also "the beautiful order", "the way of building", "building", "scenography", "mankind", and, in the time of the New Testament, also "pagans". The word "arhitekton", meaning first the "master of theatrical scenography", acquired the meaning of "builder", when the words "kosmos" and ~kosmetes" became pejorative. The fear that architecture was not considered one of the arts before Renaissance, since none of the Muses supervised the art of building, results from the misunderstanding of the word "kosmos". Urania was the Goddes of the activity implied in the verb "kosmein", meaning "to put in the beautiful order" - everything, from the universe to the man-made space, i. e. the architecture.

  4. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins, 2005-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,000 square mile (2,590 km2) Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins (MS) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in central California in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and San Luis Obispo Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA MS study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers). The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 97 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the MS study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the MS study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal and (or) California regulatory or

  5. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the South Coast Interior groundwater basins, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 653-square-mile (1,691-square-kilometer) South Coast Interior Basins (SCI) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The South Coast Interior Basins study unit contains eight priority groundwater basins grouped into three study areas, Livermore, Gilroy, and Cuyama, in the Southern Coast Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA South Coast Interior Basins study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated (raw) groundwater quality within the primary aquifer system, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality between basins. The assessment was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 50 wells in 2008 and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the SCI study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as trace elements and minor ions. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system of the SCI study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration

  6. Transformation of artistic ideas of visual art into architectural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enyutina Ekaterina Dmitrievna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of a two-dimensional composition into a volumetric and spatial solution is based on the abstract art painting. Theoretical part of the style of the twenties laid the basic groundwork for this solution. The group "Unovis" under the supervision of Malevich aimed to create the "Suprematic Utilitarian World": the development of a new architecture, a new ornament and new forms of furniture, as well as a new type of a modern book. The theory of P. Mondrian and the group "Style" had a tremendous effect on the architecture of the twentieth century, and first of all due to the “Bauhaus” school of design, that clearly represented the rationalistic principles of architecture. Originated in art a new understanding of the material world was reflected in architecture in the most striking and decisive manner. It can be illustrated by the example of modern prominent architects who also use the methods created by artists of the early twentieth century. For example, a designer and architect Zaha Hadid uses this method in many of her projects. When modeling her future projects she designs a volumetric and spatial conceptual model - composition of desired architectural space, using suprematic composition as a basis. Modeling method makes it possible to solve a range of problems competently and methodically interesting. Their solution is necessary for the architectural practice, conceptual design and training. Among the tasks lying "on the surface" of architectural creativity we can emphasize the following: 1. Abstracting. The aim is to design a volumetric and spatial conceptual model - a composition of desired architectural space, which will reflect reality from a new angle. 2. Conceptualization allows to reveal the main idea, the basic concept, the design principle in artistic activity, to investigate the conditions of functioning and aesthetic perception of architectural work in general. 3. Defining the structure and variability in the modular

  7. ARCOMEM Crawling Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Plachouras

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The World Wide Web is the largest information repository available today. However, this information is very volatile and Web archiving is essential to preserve it for the future. Existing approaches to Web archiving are based on simple definitions of the scope of Web pages to crawl and are limited to basic interactions with Web servers. The aim of the ARCOMEM project is to overcome these limitations and to provide flexible, adaptive and intelligent content acquisition, relying on social media to create topical Web archives. In this article, we focus on ARCOMEM’s crawling architecture. We introduce the overall architecture and we describe its modules, such as the online analysis module, which computes a priority for the Web pages to be crawled, and the Application-Aware Helper which takes into account the type of Web sites and applications to extract structure from crawled content. We also describe a large-scale distributed crawler that has been developed, as well as the modifications we have implemented to adapt Heritrix, an open source crawler, to the needs of the project. Our experimental results from real crawls show that ARCOMEM’s crawling architecture is effective in acquiring focused information about a topic and leveraging the information from social media.

  8. Northern-hemispheric differential warming is the key to understanding the discrepancies in the projected Sahel rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Bader, Jürgen; Matei, Daniela

    2015-01-21

    Future projections of the Sahel rainfall are highly uncertain, with different climate models showing widely differing rainfall trends. Moreover, the twentieth-century cross-model consensus linking Sahel rainfall to tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) is no longer applicable in the twenty-first century. Here we show that the diverse future Northern Hemisphere differential warming between extratropical and tropical SSTs can explain the discrepancy in the projected Sahel rainfall. The relationship between SST and Sahel rainfall that holds for the twentieth-century persists into the twenty-first century when the differential SST warming is taken into account. A suite of SST-sensitivity experiments confirms that strong Northern Hemisphere extratropical warming induces a significant increase in Sahel rainfall, which can predominate over the drying impact of tropical SST warming. These results indicate that a trustworthy projection of Sahel rainfall requires the estimation of the most likely future Northern-hemispheric differential warming.

  9. Future of information architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Baofu, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Future of Information Architecture examines issues surrounding why information is processed, stored and applied in the way that it has, since time immemorial. Contrary to the conventional wisdom held by many scholars in human history, the recurrent debate on the explanation of the most basic categories of information (eg space, time causation, quality, quantity) has been misconstrued, to the effect that there exists some deeper categories and principles behind these categories of information - with enormous implications for our understanding of reality in general. To understand this, the b

  10. Do Performance-Based Codes Support Universal Design in Architecture?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grangaard, Sidse; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2016-01-01

    The research project ‘An analysis of the accessibility requirements’ studies how Danish architectural firms experience the accessibility requirements of the Danish Building Regulations and it examines their opinions on how future regulative models can support innovative and inclusive design...... understanding of accessibility and UD is directly related to buildings like hospitals and care centers. When the objective is both innovative and inclusive architecture, the request of a performance-based model should be followed up by a knowledge enhancement effort in the building sector. Bloom´s taxonomy...... of educational objectives is suggested as a tool for such a boost. The research project has been financed by the Danish Transport and Construction Agency....

  11. An architectural approach to level design

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Explore Level Design through the Lens of Architectural and Spatial Experience TheoryWritten by a game developer and professor trained in architecture, An Architectural Approach to Level Design is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. It explores the principles of level design through the context and history of architecture, providing information useful to both academics and game development professionals.Understand Spatial Design Principles for Game Levels in 2D, 3D, and Multiplayer ApplicationsThe book presents architectura

  12. Basic design in architectural education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makaklı Elif Süyük

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Creative activity is one of the most significant parts of architectural education. In the architectural curriculum organisation ‘design studio’ is the unique and preeminent subject. Freshman students encounter ‘design’ first in basic design course, before they know what designing incorporates. The Basic Design is the starting point of initiating creativity in architecture education. It helps each student to understand architecture as a creative and innovative practice in the first year of education. This study analyzes the characteristics of basic design course, the topics of the course contents and its significance in the architectural curriculum in Turkey as well.

  13. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the central-eastside San Joaquin Basin, 2006: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,695-square-mile Central Eastside San Joaquin Basin (Central Eastside) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Central Eastside study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. During March through June 2006, samples were collected from 78 wells in Stanislaus and Merced Counties, 58 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 20 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along groundwater-flow paths (understanding wells). Water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database also were used for the assessment.An assessment of the current status of the groundwater quality included collecting samples from wells for analysis of anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring constituents such as major ions and trace elements. The assessment of status is intended to characterize the quality of untreated-groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The primary aquifer system (hereinafter, primary aquifer) is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Central Eastside study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or

  14. What Is Our Current Understanding of One-to-One Computer Projects: A Systematic Narrative Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review cross-disciplinary accumulated empirical research on one-to-one computer projects in school settings as published in peer-reviewed journals between 2005 and 2010, particularly the results of teacher- and pupil-oriented studies. Six hundred and five research articles were screened at the abstract and title…

  15. Change and innovation in secondary education: «Integrated Projects» to build a shared understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena HERNÁNDEZ DE LA TORRE

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available «Integrated Projects» are a new optional subject following the Decree 231/2007 of July 31th, establishing management and lessons for compulsory secondary education in Andalusia (boja, n.º 156, August 8th 2007, Orden of August 10th (boja n.º 171, August 30th 2007. These Integrated Projects are based on the idea that students will attend an elective practical and related to the maturity and personal development of students. In this work, we present a proposal to design and plan integrated projects to learn the necessary skills to carry out planning for this area where students have to use a practical knowledge of different subjects taught in their curriculum such as physics, mathematics, economics, language, etc. Students with this subject should be taught to different content courses taken to date to develop new knowledge. To give an adequate response to the students in the construction of new knowledge, we facilitate these connections through Projects to link the foreground and encourage their practical functionality. Teachers must plan for student learning, using teaching and organizational strategies to develop content in a practical way, regardless of knowledge tight plots and promote the development of interdisciplinary knowledge from their level of competence curriculum.

  16. The Architectural Review: A Study of Ritual, Acculturation and Reproduction in Architectural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Helena

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of an ethnographic research project that looked at architectural students' experiences of disciplinary acculturation. The research focused on the architectural review: a pedagogic event used for the assessment of students' design projects and commonly understood as a liberal celebration of student creativity. The…

  17. The integrated project AquaTerra of the EU sixth framework lays foundations for better understanding of river-sediment-soil-groundwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzabek, M H; Barceló, D; Bellin, A; Rijnaarts, H H M; Slob, A; Darmendrail, D; Fowler, H J; Négrel, Ph; Frank, E; Grathwohl, P; Kuntz, D; Barth, J A C

    2007-07-01

    The integrated project "AquaTerra" with the full title "integrated modeling of the river-sediment-soil-groundwater system; advanced tools for the management of catchment areas and river basins in the context of global change" is among the first environmental projects within the sixth Framework Program of the European Union. Commencing in June 2004, it brought together a multidisciplinary team of 45 partner organizations from 12 EU countries, Romania, Switzerland, Serbia and Montenegro. AquaTerra is an ambitious project with the primary objective of laying the foundations for a better understanding of the behavior of environmental pollutants and their fluxes in the soil-sediment-water system with respect to climate and land use changes. The project performs research as well as modeling on river-sediment-soil-groundwater systems through quantification of deposition, sorption and turnover rates and the development of numerical models to reveal fluxes and trends in soil and sediment functioning. Scales ranging from the laboratory to river basins are addressed with the potential to provide improved river basin management, enhanced soil and groundwater monitoring as well as the early identification and forecasting of impacts on water quantity and quality. Study areas are the catchments of the Ebro, Meuse, Elbe and Danube Rivers and the Brévilles Spring. Here we outline the general structure of the project and the activities conducted within eleven existing sub-projects of AquaTerra.

  18. Photovoltaic Wire Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  19. Development of enterprise architecture management methodology for teaching purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Kudryavtsev

    2017-01-01

    the main methods and technologies of the enterprise architecture in practice. The requirements for the simplified methodology were defined.These requirements were taken into account during methodology development and can be used when applying the methodology – it will be possible to understand the goals that can be achieved with its help, the assumptions made and the existing limitations. The proposed methodology defines the layers, aspects and objects of the enterprise architecture, describes the tasks of managing enterprise architecture and the artifacts created (lists, matrices, diagrams.The proposed methodology can be used to conduct training projects in which methods and tools of enterprise architecture management are used to optimize the company’s work based on the capabilities of information technology. Such projects will help not only to develop students’ skills, but also to establish a dialogue between universities and industry – the provider of problems and tasks for solving within students’ projects.The proposed simplified methodology for managing the architecture of the enterprise is tested and used by the authors when conducting courses in the leading universities of the Russian Federation: Graduate School of Management (St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg State University, Finance University under the Government of the Russian Federation, Higher School of Economics and BonchBruevich Saint-Petersburg State University of Telecommunications.

  20. Architectural fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    the photographs as a starting point for a series of paintings. This way of creating representations of something that already exists is for me to see a way forward in the "decoding" of my own models into other depictions. The models are analyzed through a series of representations in different types of drawings....... I try to invent the ways of drawing the models - that decode and unfold them into architectural fragments- into future buildings or constructions in the landscape. [1] Luigi Moretti: Italian architect, 1907 - 1973 [2] Man Ray: American artist, 1890 - 1976. in 2015, I saw the wonderful exhibition...

  1. The signs of life in architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Petra

    2008-06-01

    Engineers, designers and architects often look to nature for inspiration. The research on 'natural constructions' is aiming at innovation and the improvement of architectural quality. The introduction of life sciences terminology in the context of architecture delivers new perspectives towards innovation in architecture and design. The investigation is focused on the analogies between nature and architecture. Apart from other principles that are found in living nature, an interpretation of the so-called 'signs of life', which characterize living systems, in architecture is presented. Selected architectural projects that have applied specific characteristics of life, whether on purpose or not, will show the state of development in this field and open up future challenges. The survey will include famous built architecture as well as students' design programs, which were carried out under supervision of the author at the Department of Design and Building Construction at the Vienna University of Technology.

  2. Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) - an organization dedicated to presenting the latest physics discoveries in an understandable and colorful style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Since 1986, The Contemporary Physics Education Project has been creating colorful posters and materials that describe s physics. Its mission is to provide information so that the public easily can access current physics knowledge. Our publications summarize the latest discoveries and describe areas of current research. We have created materials in Particle Physics, Fusion Science, Nuclear Physics, and Cosmology. All of these materials are carefully vetted for scientific accuracy. CPEP presents them at workshops and distributes the materials widely so that teachers and students can use them in their classrooms. In this talk, I will describe what CPEP has created, including its most recent project that features the recent discovery of gravitational waves. To further our mission, our organization is actively seeking physicists and teachers to extend our outreach.

  3. Connecting Architecture and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchgeher, Georg; Weinreich, Rainer

    Software architectures are still typically defined and described independently from implementation. To avoid architectural erosion and drift, architectural representation needs to be continuously updated and synchronized with system implementation. Existing approaches for architecture representation like informal architecture documentation, UML diagrams, and Architecture Description Languages (ADLs) provide only limited support for connecting architecture descriptions and implementations. Architecture management tools like Lattix, SonarJ, and Sotoarc and UML-tools tackle this problem by extracting architecture information directly from code. This approach works for low-level architectural abstractions like classes and interfaces in object-oriented systems but fails to support architectural abstractions not found in programming languages. In this paper we present an approach for linking and continuously synchronizing a formalized architecture representation to an implementation. The approach is a synthesis of functionality provided by code-centric architecture management and UML tools and higher-level architecture analysis approaches like ADLs.

  4. Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, Kyle [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Bordia, Rajendra [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Reifsnider, Kenneth [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Chiu, Wilson [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Amoroso, Jake [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-28

    This project fabricated model multiphase ceramic waste forms with processing-controlled microstructures followed by advanced characterization with synchrotron and electron microscopy-based 3D tomography to provide elemental and chemical state-specific information resulting in compositional phase maps of ceramic composites. Details of 3D microstructural features were incorporated into computer-based simulations using durability data for individual constituent phases as inputs in order to predict the performance of multiphase waste forms with varying microstructure and phase connectivity.

  5. Image Understanding Architecture Prototype Evaluation and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    2n. We have developed an algorithm (the MGRA discussed below), based on wormhole routing, that has routed a large number of communication patterns...inference and manipulation of object models are run in the SPA. To support distributed artificial intelligence processing, powerful processors are needed... artificial intelligence. A typical scenario with video input I might require that an interpretation of a changing scene be updated as video frames arrive

  6. An Architectural Model of Visual Motion Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    Gizzi, and William T. Newsome, "The Analysis of Moving Visual Patterns," In C. Chagas R. Gattass C. Gross. editor, Experimental Brain Research...Issue on Vi- sual Motion," IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 11(5):449-450, May 1989. [Tiana et al.. 1989] Carlo Tiana

  7. The Virtual Solar System Project: Developing Conceptual Understanding of Astronomical Concepts through Building Three-Dimensional Computational Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Thomas; Barnett, Michael; Barab, Sasha A.; Hay, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virtual Solar System (VSS) course which is one of the first attempts to integrate three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling as a central component of introductory undergraduate education. Assesses changes in student understanding of astronomy concepts as a result of participating in an experimental introductory astronomy course in…

  8. Towards a Theoretical Framework for Understanding PGCE Student Teacher Learning in the Wild Coast Rural Schools' Partnership Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennefather, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on a theoretical model that I am developing in order to understand student teacher learning in a rural context and the enabling conditions that can support this learning. The question of whether a supervised teaching practice in a rural context can contribute to the development of student teacher professional learning and…

  9. Changing Arctic ecosystems--research to understand and project changes in marine and terrestrial ecosystems of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiselman, Joy; DeGange, Anthony R.; Oakley, Karen; Derksen, Dirk; Whalen, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystems and their wildlife communities are not static; they change and evolve over time due to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic factors. A period of rapid change is occurring in the Arctic for which our current understanding of potential ecosystem and wildlife responses is limited. Changes to the physical environment include warming temperatures, diminishing sea ice, increasing coastal erosion, deteriorating permafrost, and changing water regimes. These changes influence biological communities and the ways in which human communities interact with them. Through the new initiative Changing Arctic Ecosystems (CAE) the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strives to (1) understand the potential suite of wildlife population responses to these physical changes to inform key resource management decisions such as those related to the Endangered Species Act, and (2) provide unique insights into how Arctic ecosystems are responding under new stressors. Our studies examine how and why changes in the ice-dominated ecosystems of the Arctic are affecting wildlife and will provide a better foundation for understanding the degree and manner in which wildlife species respond and adapt to rapid environmental change. Changes to Arctic ecosystems will be felt broadly because the Arctic is a production zone for hundreds of species that migrate south for the winter. The CAE initiative includes three major research themes that span Arctic ice-dominated ecosystems and that are structured to identify and understand the linkages between physical processes, ecosystems, and wildlife populations. The USGS is applying knowledge-based modeling structures such as Bayesian Networks to integrate the work.

  10. Affective Education in Greece: The Self Understanding of Pre-school Children, as Projected with Puppets. A Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoyianni, Alkistis

    1997-01-01

    Based on their expression with puppets, examined how Greek preschool children perceive their personal identity and self understanding, and if these features are physical, active, social, or psychological. Found concurrence with previous research indicating that children identify themselves in all the above ways, but that identification with…

  11. The Impact of a School-University Multicultural Read-Aloud Project on Pre-Service Teachers' Pedagogical Understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohfink, Gayla

    2014-01-01

    This school-university partnership research explored how multicultural literature read-alouds impacted the pedagogical understandings of elementary pre-service teachers. The study explores the intersection of multicultural education, Professional Development School standards, and the achievement gaps of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD)…

  12. Remote sensing change detection tools for natural resource managers: Understanding concepts and tradeoffs in the design of landscape monitoring projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Kennedy; Philip A. Townsend; John E. Gross; Warren B. Cohen; Paul Bolstad; Wang Y. Q.; Phyllis Adams

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing provides a broad view of landscapes and can be consistent through time, making it an important tool for monitoring and managing protected areas. An impediment to broader use of remote sensing science for monitoring has been the need for resource managers to understand the specialized capabilities of an ever-expanding array of image sources and analysis...

  13. Successful Architectural Knowledge Sharing: Beware of Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poort, Eltjo R.; Pramono, Agung; Perdeck, Michiel; Clerc, Viktor; van Vliet, Hans

    This chapter presents the analysis and key findings of a survey on architectural knowledge sharing. The responses of 97 architects working in the Dutch IT Industry were analyzed by correlating practices and challenges with project size and success. Impact mechanisms between project size, project success, and architectural knowledge sharing practices and challenges were deduced based on reasoning, experience and literature. We find that architects run into numerous and diverse challenges sharing architectural knowledge, but that the only challenges that have a significant impact are the emotional challenges related to interpersonal relationships. Thus, architects should be careful when dealing with emotions in knowledge sharing.

  14. Major Findings of the IAEA/INPRO Collaborative Project on Global Architectures of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems with Thermal and Fast Reactors and a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Fesenko, G.; Kriachko, M.; Dixon, B.; Hayashi, H.; Usanov, V.

    2013-01-01

    GAINS objectives: Rationale: • Increasing interest in MSs in joint modelling of global and regional trends in nuclear power taking into account technical innovations and multilateral cooperation; • Modelling of the kind requires agreed methodological platform to analyse transition strategies from the present to future nuclear energy system (NES). Overall objectives: Address technical & institutional issues of developing a global architecture for the sustainable NES in the 21st century: • develop a framework (common methodological platform, databases, assumptions & boundary conditions); • perform sample studies; • indicate potential areas for application of GAINS framework

  15. Architecture and communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Hudnik

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents effects of technology, science and capital strategies on changes in traditional forms and definitions of space, architecture and bodies. It confronts us with new processes of thinking and living that are constantly being transformed into new dynamic time and spatial contexts. Space is becoming the information filter, communication network. A cross-section of three landscapes: landscape of megastructures, nomadic landscapes and psychedelic landscapes, theory contributes to understanding of media and space-age technology, information technology and electronical language. It offers designs of various megastructures, media surfaces and envelopes of contemporary information society: the anthropological module, hyper- and infra-bodies, bio-electronical bodies and population genetics bodies. It presents the architecture of communication.

  16. The architectural design of networks of protein domain architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Kuo; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2013-08-23

    Protein domain architectures (PDAs), in which single domains are linked to form multiple-domain proteins, are a major molecular form used by evolution for the diversification of protein functions. However, the design principles of PDAs remain largely uninvestigated. In this study, we constructed networks to connect domain architectures that had grown out from the same single domain for every single domain in the Pfam-A database and found that there are three main distinctive types of these networks, which suggests that evolution can exploit PDAs in three different ways. Further analysis showed that these three different types of PDA networks are each adopted by different types of protein domains, although many networks exhibit the characteristics of more than one of the three types. Our results shed light on nature's blueprint for protein architecture and provide a framework for understanding architectural design from a network perspective.

  17. Program Understanding: A Reengineering Case for the Transformation Tool Contest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassilo Horn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In Software Reengineering, one of the central artifacts is the source code of the legacy system in question. In fact, in most cases it is the only definitive artifact, because over the time the code has diverged from the original architecture and design documents. The first task of any reengineering project is to gather an understanding of the system's architecture. Therefore, a common approach is to use parsers to translate the source code into a model conforming to the abstract syntax of the programming language the system is implemented in which can then be subject to querying. Despite querying, transformations can be used to generate more abstract views on the system's architecture. This transformation case deals with the creation of a state machine model out of a Java syntax graph. It is derived from a task that originates from a real reengineering project.

  18. On understanding projective identification in the treatment of psychotic states of mind: the publishing cohort of H. Rosenfeld, H. Segal and W. Bion (1946-1957).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    A publishing cohort of Kleinian analysts - Rosenfeld, Segal and Bion - implemented Klein's (1946) notions of projective identification and the 'paranoid ' and 'schizoid ' positions in the understanding of a group of psychotic disorders. The author differentiates Klein's (1946)Notes on some schizoid mechanisms paper from its revised version of 1952, maintaining that it was Rosenfeld's clinical work during this period that helped to centralize Klein's redefinition of projective identification. The stage was set for Segal 's contribution in terms of 'symbolic equations,' where the psychotic's attack on the breast left him incarcerated in internal torment and persecution, where things-in-themselves were confused with what they symbolically represented. Segal in turn linked psychotic to normal, paranoid-schizoid to depressive positions, where by means of projective identification and symbolic imagination, the patient could arouse feelings in the analyst related to sadness, guilt and loss. Bion assumed that psychotic pathology reflected disordered thinking, when the severely disturbed used language as a mode of action. The psychotic was profoundly confused between the use of thought and action in the natural world - where thought was required, he preferred action and vice versa. Bion also drew upon projective identification in a new, broader way, so that analysis could now become more of an intersubjective, bi-directional field of projective and communicational influence between patient and analyst. The paper concludes with the impact of the work of Rosenfeld, Segal and Bion and variations on the technique of analyzing psychotic states in terms of the patient's early history, transference and countertransference.

  19. Using Software Architectures for Designing Distributed Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    In this paper, we outline an on-going project of designing distributed embedded systems for closed-loop process control. The project is a joint effort between software architecture researchers and developers from two companies that produce commercial embedded process control systems. The project...... has a strong emphasis on software architectural issues and terminology in order to envision, design and analyze design alternatives. We present two results. First, we outline how focusing on software architecture, architectural issues and qualities are beneficial in designing distributed, embedded......, systems. Second, we present two different architectures for closed-loop process control and discuss benefits and reliabilities....

  20. The VULCAN Project: Toward a better understanding of the vulnerability of soil organic matter to climate change in permafrost ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, C.; Schuur, E.; Maestre, F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Despite much recent research, high uncertainty persists concerning the extent to which global warming influences the rate of permafrost soil organic matter loss and how this affects the functioning of permafrost ecosystems and the net transfer of C to the atmosphere. This uncertainty continues, at least in part, because the processes that protect soil organic matter from decomposition and stabilize fresh plant-derived organic materials entering the soil are largely unknown. The objective of the VULCAN (VULnerability of soil organic CArboN to climate change in permafrost and dryland ecosystems) project is to gain a deeper insight into these processes, especially at the molecular level, and to explore potential implications in terms of permafrost ecosystem functioning and feedback to climate change. We will capitalize on a globally unique ecosystem warming experiment in Alaska, the C in Permafrost Experimental Heating Research (CiPEHR) project, which is monitoring soil temperature and moisture, thaw depth, water table depth, plant productivity, phenology, and nutrient status, and soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes. Soil samples have been collected from the CiPEHR experiment from strategic depths, depending on thaw depth, and allow us to examine effects related to freeze/thaw, waterlogging, and organic matter relocation along the soil profile. We will use physical fractionation methods to separate soil organic matter pools characterized by different preservation mechanisms of aggregation and mineral interaction. We will determine organic C and total N content, transformation rates, turnovers, ages, and structural composition of soil organic matter fractions by elemental analysis, stable and radioactive isotope techniques, and nuclear magnetic resonance tools. Acknowledgements: This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654132. Web site: http://vulcan.comule.com

  1. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges study unit, 2009: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 633-square-mile (1,639-square-kilometer) Northern Coast Ranges (NOCO) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The study unit is composed of two study areas (Interior Basins and Coastal Basins) and is located in northern California in Napa, Sonoma, Lake, Colusa, Mendocino, Glenn, Humboldt, and Del Norte Counties. The GAMA-PBP is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the USGS and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. Discrete optimization in architecture architectural & urban layout

    CERN Document Server

    Zawidzki, Machi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents three projects that demonstrate the fundamental problems of architectural design and urban composition – the layout design, evaluation and optimization. Part I describes the functional layout design of a residential building, and an evaluation of the quality of a town square (plaza). The algorithm for the functional layout design is based on backtracking using a constraint satisfaction approach combined with coarse grid discretization. The algorithm for the town square evaluation is based on geometrical properties derived directly from its plan. Part II introduces a crowd-simulation application for the analysis of escape routes on floor plans, and optimization of a floor plan for smooth crowd flow. The algorithms presented employ agent-based modeling and cellular automata.

  3. Hijazi Architectural Object Library (haol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, A.; Boehm, J.

    2017-02-01

    As with many historical buildings around the world, building façades are of special interest; moreover, the details of such windows, stonework, and ornaments give each historic building its individual character. Each object of these buildings must be classified in an architectural object library. Recently, a number of researches have been focusing on this topic in Europe and Canada. From this standpoint, the Hijazi Architectural Objects Library (HAOL) has reproduced Hijazi elements as 3D computer models, which are modelled using a Revit Family (RFA). The HAOL will be dependent on the image survey and point cloud data. The Hijazi Object such as Roshan and Mashrabiyah, become as vocabulary of many Islamic cities in the Hijazi region such as Jeddah in Saudi Arabia, and even for a number of Islamic historic cities such as Istanbul and Cairo. These architectural vocabularies are the main cause of the beauty of these heritage. However, there is a big gap in both the Islamic architectural library and the Hijazi architectural library to provide these unique elements. Besides, both Islamic and Hijazi architecture contains a huge amount of information which has not yet been digitally classified according to period and styles. Due to this issue, this paper will be focusing on developing of Heritage BIM (HBIM) standards and the HAOL library to reduce the cost and the delivering time for heritage and new projects that involve in Hijazi architectural styles. Through this paper, the fundamentals of Hijazi architecture informatics will be provided via developing framework for HBIM models and standards. This framework will provide schema and critical information, for example, classifying the different shapes, models, and forms of structure, construction, and ornamentation of Hijazi architecture in order to digitalize parametric building identity.

  4. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    of green architecture. The paper argues that this greenification of facades is insufficient. The green is only a skin cladding the exterior envelope without having a spatial significance. Through the paper it is proposed to flip the order of words from green architecture to architectural green....... Architectural green could signify green architecture with inclusive interrelations between green and space, built and unbuilt, inside and outside. The aim of the term is to reflect a new focus in green architecture – its architectural performance. Ecological issues are not underestimated or ignored, but so far...... they have overshadowed the architectural potential of green architecture. The paper questions how a green space should perform, look like and function. Two examples are chosen to demonstrate thorough integrations between green and space. The examples are public buildings categorized as pavilions. One...

  5. Ecosystem services driven by the diversity of soil biota - understanding and management in agriculture - The Biodiversa SoilMan-Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Martin; Pérès, Guénola; Taylor, Astrid; Schrader, Stefan; Landa, Blanca; Nicolai, Annegret; Sandor, Mignon; Öptik, Maarja; Gema, Guzmán; Bergmann, Holger; Cluzeau, Daniel; Banse, Martin; Bengtsson, Jan; Guernion, Muriel; Zaller, Johann; Roslin, Tomas; Scheu, Stefan; Gómez Calero, José Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Soil biota diversity is ensuring primary production in terrestrial ecosystems and agricultural productivity. Water and nutrient cycling, soil formation and aggregation, decomposition and carbon sequestration as well as control of pest organisms are important functions in soil that are driven by biota and biota interactions. In agricultural systems these functions support and regulate ecosystem services directed to agricultural production and agricultural sustainability. A main goal of future cropping systems will be to maintain or raise agricultural productivity while keeping production sustainable in spite of increasing food demands and ongoing soil degradation caused by inappropriate soil management practices. Farm based tools that farmers use to engineer soils for plant production depend as soil management factors on decisions by farmers, which are triggered by regional traditions, knowledge and also by agriculture policies as a governance impact. However, biological impacts on soil fertility and soil health are often neglected or overseen when planning and shaping soil management in annual cropping systems or perennial systems like vineyards. In order to get progress in conservation farming and in agricultural sustainability not only knowledge creation is in need, but also a clash of perspectives has to be overcome within the societies (generals public, farmers associations, NGOs) The talk will present the conception of the recently startet SoilMan-project and summaries selected results from current and recent European research projects.

  6. Access control and service-oriented architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leune, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Access Control and Service-Oriented Architectures" investigates in which way logical access control can be achieved effectively, in particular in highly dynamic environments such as service-oriented architectures (SOA's). The author combines state-of-the-art best-practice and projects these onto the

  7. Architecture political art in breathlessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Braghieri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, architectural design is unfortunately not called upon for its problem solving potential. With a completely different system of understanding, it has become impossible to understand what urbanism and city design were in the past. If architecture in Italy had had its proper role, I think it would be, in fact possible to optimally manage all urban phenomena. I believe that the aim of training an architect is to mentally and culturally prepare a designer, then later, the road to specific skills and fields, is built individually through personal insights, interests and finally, through the various experiences young people face while completing their degree.

  8. The EPOS ICT Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Keith; Harrison, Matt; Bailo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The EPOS-PP Project 2010-2014 proposed an architecture and demonstrated feasibility with a prototype. Requirements based on use cases were collected and an inventory of assets (e.g. datasets, software, users, computing resources, equipment/detectors, laboratory services) (RIDE) was developed. The architecture evolved through three stages of refinement with much consultation both with the EPOS community representing EPOS users and participants in geoscience and with the overall ICT community especially those working on research such as the RDA (Research Data Alliance) community. The architecture consists of a central ICS (Integrated Core Services) consisting of a portal and catalog, the latter providing to end-users a 'map' of all EPOS resources (datasets, software, users, computing, equipment/detectors etc.). ICS is extended to ICS-d (distributed ICS) for certain services (such as visualisation software services or Cloud computing resources) and CES (Computational Earth Science) for specific simulation or analytical processing. ICS also communicates with TCS (Thematic Core Services) which represent European-wide portals to national and local assets, resources and services in the various specific domains (e.g. seismology, volcanology, geodesy) of EPOS. The EPOS-IP project 2015-2019 started October 2015. Two work-packages cover the ICT aspects; WP6 involves interaction with the TCS while WP7 concentrates on ICS including interoperation with ICS-d and CES offerings: in short the ICT architecture. Based on the experience and results of EPOS-PP the ICT team held a pre-meeting in July 2015 and set out a project plan. The first major activity involved requirements (re-)collection with use cases and also updating the inventory of assets held by the various TCS in EPOS. The RIDE database of assets is currently being converted to CERIF (Common European Research Information Format - an EU Recommendation to Member States) to provide the basis for the EPOS-IP ICS Catalog. In

  9. Architecture and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida de Almeida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the links between architecture design and restoration, considering the blurry frontier that distinguishes this actions. The study holds in two contemporary architects performance: Lina Bo Bardi (1914-1992 and Aldo Rossi (1931-1997. The analyses of the concrete production, presented here by a work of each architecture – Sesc Pompeia and the Teatro Del Mondo – is based on the ability of reflection on the role of the memory in architecture: not only the memory in the buildings and urban fabrics materiality, but also the memory as an active instrument inside the mental processes adopted by the projects authors. Resorting to architects writings as well as authors who analyses this interventions, they seek to reconstitute the design development path, recognizing the strategy that reinterprets past experiences in order to overcome the traditional contraposition between “old” and “new”, tutorship and innovation.

  10. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-26

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, socalled panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects. © 2010 ACM.

  11. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-25

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, so-called panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects.

  12. Final DOE-ASR Report for the Project “Advancing our Understanding and the Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, David [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Erfani, Ehsan [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Garnier, Anne [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Lawson, Paul [SPEC, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Morrison, Hugh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Avery, Melody [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2016-12-29

    This project has evolved during its execution, and what follows are the key project findings. This project has arguably provided the first global view of how cirrus cloud (defined as having cloud base temperature T < 235 K) nucleation physics (evaluated through satellite retrievals of ice particle number concentration Ni, effective diameter De and ice water content IWC) evolves with the seasons for a given temperature, latitude zone and surface type (e.g. ocean vs. land), based on a new satellite remote sensing method developed for this project. The retrieval method is unique in that it is very sensitive to the small ice crystals that govern the number concentration Ni, allowing Ni to be retrieved. The method currently samples single-layer cirrus clouds having visible optical depth ranging from about 0.3 to 3.0, using co-located observations from the Infrared Imaging Radiometer (IIR) and from the CALIOP (Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) polar orbiting satellite, employing IIR channels at 10.6 μm and 12.05 μm. Retrievals of Ni are primarily used to estimate the cirrus cloud formation mechanism; that is, either homo- or heterogeneous ice nucleation (henceforth hom and het). This is possible since, in general, hom produces more than an order of magnitude more ice crystals than does het. Thus the retrievals provide insight on how these mechanisms change with the seasons for a given latitude zone or region, based on the years 2008 and 2013. Using a conservative criterion for hom cirrus, on average, the sampled cirrus clouds formed through hom occur about 43% of the time in the Arctic and 50% of the time in the Antarctic, and during winter at mid-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, hom cirrus occur 37% of the time. Elsewhere (and during other seasons in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes), this hom cirrus fraction is lower, and it is lowest in the

  13. DESIGN AND “RESTORATION”: THE ROOTS OF ARCHITECTURE PORJECT FOR THE BUILT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Campanella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is absolutely essential now to prepare a project of pre-critical understanding of the building which will be the object of action, free from preconceived notions of value, fully committed to the implementation of a variety of useful and indispensable to determine that operating margin and freedom that each architecture has not being linked uniquely to the precise original function. This is the margin that you can leverage to implement the architectural project for the built that mutuerà inside knowledge, conservation and innovation at the same time. The binomials in the lead paragraph as all sides of the same coin that merge into one integrated design process that takes charge of design including those different styles of drafting of survey (in all aspects of an existing architecture.

  14. Trends of Sustainable Residential Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Narvydas, A

    2014-01-01

    The article is based on Master’s research conducted during Scottish Housing Expo 2010. The aim of the research was to determine the prevailing trends in sustainable residential architecture. Each trend can be described by features detected during visual and technical observation of project data. Based on that architects may predict possible problems related to a specific trend.

  15. Exploring Enterprise Architecture Evaluation Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Carugati, Andrea; Grue Sørensen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    using empirical and practical studies. This paper presents the findings from a case study exploring how enterprise architecture (EA) evaluation takes place in practice. The aim of the case study is to explore EA evaluation from the practical view of primarily enterprise architects and project managers...

  16. Dutch Architecture with Landscape Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrami, F.; Bijster, J.; Bitarafan, N.; Cao, Z.; Cui, Y.; Liu, Y.; Ruan, L.; Maas, M.; Mayr, R.; Rozenmuller, M.; Toriano, L.; Yoshitake, M.; Jauslin, D.

    2009-01-01

    14 Project Documentations and Analysis of Dutch Architecture with Landscape Methods. MVRDV Villa VPRO, Powerhouse Company Villa 1, Herman Herzberger Coda Museum, NL Architects Basket Ba, SeARCH Posbank Pavillion, Wiel Arets Hedge House, OMA Kunsthal and Educatorium, Maaskant Johnson Wax, Diller &

  17. Retreat from superficiality in architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Serafin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim is to present academic two-level method of design, called “theoretical modeling architecture” (TMA. It means the syllabus of design teaching that is strongly supported by the theory of architecture. The elaborated method results the higher number of students’ projects, that are related to the cultural heritage.

  18. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Sierra Nevada Regional study unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Sierra Nevada Regional (SNR) study unit was investigated as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program Priority Basin Project. The study was designed to provide statistically unbiased assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater within the primary aquifer system of the Sierra Nevada. The primary aquifer system for the SNR study unit was delineated by the depth intervals over which wells in the State of California’s database of public drinking-water supply wells are open or screened. Two types of assessments were made: (1) a status assessment that described the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) an evaluation of relations between groundwater quality and potential explanatory factors that represent characteristics of the primary aquifer system. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, rather than the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water distributors.

  19. The ERATO project and its contribution to our understanding of the acoustics of ancient Greek and Roman theatres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Nielsen, Martin Lisa

    2006-01-01

    the acoustics of the open air theatres and compare to the smaller, originally roofed theatres, also called odea (from Greek: Odeion, a hall for song and declamation with music). The method has been to make computer models of the spaces, first as the exist today, and adjust the acoustical data for surface......The ancient Greek and Roman theatres are famous for the excellent acoustics. However, it is not generally well known that different kinds of theatres were built, for different purposes and with different acoustical conditions. One of the aims in the ERATO project has been to investigate...... materials by comparison to acoustical measurements from some of the best preserved examples, namely the Aspendos theatre in Turkey and the South theatre in Jerash, Jordan. Next step was to complete the computer models in accordance with archaeological information, to make virtual reconstructions...

  20. VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE: AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE TO LEARN ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Desai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available “The object in view of both my predecessors in office and by myself has been rather to bring out the reasoning powers of individual students, so that they may understand the inner meaning of the old forms and their original function and may develop and modernize and gradually produce an architecture, Indian in character, but at the same time as suited to present day India as the old styles were to their own times and environment.” Claude Batley-1940; Lang, Desai, Desai, 1997 (p.143. The article introduces teaching philosophy, content and method of Basic Design I and II for first year students of architecture at the Faculty of Architecture, Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT University, Ahmedabad, India. It is framed within the Indian perspective of architectural education from the British colonial times. Commencing with important academic literature and biases of the initial colonial period, it quickly traces architectural education in CEPT, the sixteenth school of post-independent India, set up in 1962, discussing the foundation year teaching imparted. The school was Modernist and avant-garde. The author introduced these two courses against the back drop of the Universalist Modernist credo of architecture and education. In the courses, the primary philosophy behind learning design emerges from heuristic method. The aim of the first course is seen as infusing interest in visual world, development of manual skills and dexterity through the dictum of ‘Look-feel-reason out-evaluate’ and ‘observe-record-interpret-synthesize transform express’. Due to the lack of architectural orientation in Indian schooling; the second course assumes vernacular architecture as a reasonable tool for a novice to understand the triangular relationship of society, architecture and physical context and its impact on design. The students are analytically exposed to the regional variety of architectures logically stemming from the geo

  1. Interpreting biomarker data from the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES twin projects: Using external exposure data to understand biomarker differences among countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolders, R., E-mail: roel.smolders@vito.be [Flemish Institute of Technological Research (VITO), Environmental Risks and Health Unit, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Den Hond, E.; Koppen, G.; Govarts, E.; Willems, H. [Flemish Institute of Technological Research (VITO), Environmental Risks and Health Unit, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Casteleyn, L. [KU LEUVEN (Belgium); Kolossa-Gehring, M.; Fiddicke, U. [Federal Environment Agency (UBA) (Germany); Castaño, A. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Koch, H.M.; Angerer, J. [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance - Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (IPA) (Germany); Esteban, M. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Sepai, O.; Exley, K. [Public Health England (United Kingdom); Bloemen, L. [Environmental Health Sciences International (Netherlands); Horvat, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Knudsen, L.E. [University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Joas, A.; Joas, R. [BiPRO (Germany); Biot, P. [FPS Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment (Belgium); and others

    2015-08-15

    In 2011 and 2012, the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES twin projects performed the first ever harmonized human biomonitoring survey in 17 European countries. In more than 1800 mother–child pairs, individual lifestyle data were collected and cadmium, cotinine and certain phthalate metabolites were measured in urine. Total mercury was determined in hair samples. While the main goal of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES twin projects was to develop and test harmonized protocols and procedures, the goal of the current paper is to investigate whether the observed differences in biomarker values among the countries implementing DEMOCOPHES can be interpreted using information from external databases on environmental quality and lifestyle. In general, 13 countries having implemented DEMOCOPHES provided high-quality data from external sources that were relevant for interpretation purposes. However, some data were not available for reporting or were not in line with predefined specifications. Therefore, only part of the external information could be included in the statistical analyses. Nonetheless, there was a highly significant correlation between national levels of fish consumption and mercury in hair, the strength of antismoking legislation was significantly related to urinary cotinine levels, and we were able to show indications that also urinary cadmium levels were associated with environmental quality and food quality. These results again show the potential of biomonitoring data to provide added value for (the evaluation of) evidence-informed policy making. - Highlights: • External data was collected to interpret HBM data from DEMOCOPHES. • Hg in hair could be related to fish consumption across different countries. • Urinary cotinine was related to strictness of anti-smoking legislation. • Urinary Cd was borderline significantly related to air and food quality. • Lack of comparable data among countries hampered the analysis.

  2. Interpreting biomarker data from the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES twin projects: Using external exposure data to understand biomarker differences among countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolders, R.; Den Hond, E.; Koppen, G.; Govarts, E.; Willems, H.; Casteleyn, L.; Kolossa-Gehring, M.; Fiddicke, U.; Castaño, A.; Koch, H.M.; Angerer, J.; Esteban, M.; Sepai, O.; Exley, K.; Bloemen, L.; Horvat, M.; Knudsen, L.E.; Joas, A.; Joas, R.; Biot, P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011 and 2012, the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES twin projects performed the first ever harmonized human biomonitoring survey in 17 European countries. In more than 1800 mother–child pairs, individual lifestyle data were collected and cadmium, cotinine and certain phthalate metabolites were measured in urine. Total mercury was determined in hair samples. While the main goal of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES twin projects was to develop and test harmonized protocols and procedures, the goal of the current paper is to investigate whether the observed differences in biomarker values among the countries implementing DEMOCOPHES can be interpreted using information from external databases on environmental quality and lifestyle. In general, 13 countries having implemented DEMOCOPHES provided high-quality data from external sources that were relevant for interpretation purposes. However, some data were not available for reporting or were not in line with predefined specifications. Therefore, only part of the external information could be included in the statistical analyses. Nonetheless, there was a highly significant correlation between national levels of fish consumption and mercury in hair, the strength of antismoking legislation was significantly related to urinary cotinine levels, and we were able to show indications that also urinary cadmium levels were associated with environmental quality and food quality. These results again show the potential of biomonitoring data to provide added value for (the evaluation of) evidence-informed policy making. - Highlights: • External data was collected to interpret HBM data from DEMOCOPHES. • Hg in hair could be related to fish consumption across different countries. • Urinary cotinine was related to strictness of anti-smoking legislation. • Urinary Cd was borderline significantly related to air and food quality. • Lack of comparable data among countries hampered the analysis

  3. Understanding Climate Change Impacts in a Cholera Endemic Megacity: Disease Trends, Hydroclimatic Indicators and Near Future-Term Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanda, A. S. S.; Hasan, M. A.; Serman, E. A.; Jutla, A.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The last three decades of surveillance data shows a drastic increase of cholera prevalence in the largest cholera-endemic city in the world - Dhaka, Bangladesh. While an endemic trend is getting stronger in the dry season, the post-monsoon season shows increased variability and is epidemic in nature. The pre-monsoon dry season is becoming the dominant cholera season of the year, followed by monsoon flood related propagation in later months of the year. Although the heavily populated and rapidly urbanizing Dhaka region has experienced noticeable shifts in pre monsoon temperature and precipitation patterns and subsequent monsoon variations, to date, there has not been any systematic study on linking the long-term disease trends with observed changes in hydroclimatic indicators. Here, we focus on the past 30-year dynamics of urban cholera prevalence in Dhaka with changes in climatic or anthropogenic forcings to develop projections for the next 30-year period. We focus on the dry and the wet season indicators individually, and develop trends of maximum rainfall intensity, lowest rainfall totals in the pre-monsoon period, number of consecutive dry days, number of wet days, and number of rainy days with greater than 500mm rainfall using a recently developed gridded data product - and compare with regional hydrology, flooding, water usage, changes in distribution systems, population growth and density in urban settlements, and frequency of natural disasters. We then use a bias correction method to develop the next 30 years projections of CMIP5 Regional Climate Model outputs and impacts on cholera prevalence using a probabilistic forecasting approach.

  4. Real World Cognitive Multi-Tasking and Problem Solving: A Large Scale Cognitive Architecture Simulation Through High Performance Computing-Project Casie

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, Jr., Eugene; McEvoy, Kiley; Abu-Ghazaleh, Nael; Kolar, Vinay; Zhang, Mark; Guo, Zhen

    2008-01-01

    In its grandest sense, Project CASIE explored the development of a computational system capable of high level perception and problem solving that reflects the cognitive processes of the human brain...

  5. Remote sensing and climate data as a key for understanding fasciolosis transmission in the Andes: review and update of an ongoing interdisciplinary project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Màrius V. Fuentes

    2006-11-01

    incorporated into these GIS projects, which should be considered the key in understanding fasciolosis transmission in the Andes.

  6. Conflict, Space and Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schoonderbeek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Footprint 19 focuses on the more recent roles of architecture in the contemporary spaces of conflict. Departing from a spatial understanding of geopolitical, climatological and economical conflicts, the various contributions highlight the large scale and phenomenal transitions in the physical world and in society by extrapolating, through examples, the abundance of relations that can be traced between conflict, territory and architecture. Conflict areas often prove to be fertile grounds for innovation and for the emergence of new spatial forms. The issue reports on the state of perpetual global unrest in architecture through a series of articles and case studies that highlight the consequences of conflicts in the places and spaces that we inhabit. In the introduction, these are discussed as an interlinked global reality rather than as isolated incidents. In doing so, the contemporary spaces of conflict are positioned in the context of emerging global trends, conditions, and discourses in the attempt to address their indicative symptoms while reflecting on their underlying causes.

  7. Impact of Cognitive Load on Family Decision Makers' Recall and Understanding of Donation Requests for the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminoff, Laura A; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Barker, Laura; Trgina, Jennifer; Traino, Heather M; Nathan, Howard M; Hasz, Richard D; Walters, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Genomic research projects that collect tissues from deceased organ and tissue donors must obtain the authorization of family decision makers under difficult circumstances that may affect the authorization process. Using a quasi-experimental design, the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues (ELSI) substudy of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project compared the recall and understanding of the donation authorization process of two groups: family members who had authorized donation of tissues to the GTEx project (the comparison group) and family members who had authorized organ and tissue donations in years previous, who subsequently participated in two different mock-authorization processes that mimicked the GTEx authorization process (the intervention groups). Participants in the comparison and intervention groups were matched on key demographic characteristics. We found that participants in the intervention groups who experienced a mock-authorization process demonstrated better recall of the tissue donation request than members of the comparison group. Our data indicate that the stress associated with the loss of a loved one limited the ability of family members to recall details about the GTEx project. However, we found a similar lack of knowledge in both the comparison and the intervention group participants, suggesting lack of knowledge may be due to the complexity and unfamiliarity of the information presented to them during the authorization process. We discuss these findings in the context of everyday clinical decision making in cognitively challenging conditions. Copyright 2018 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  8. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. VII. Understanding the Ultraviolet Anomaly in NGC 5548 with X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, S.; Pogge, R. W.; Adams, S. M.; Beatty, T. G.; Bisogni, S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gupta, A. [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Page, K.; Goad, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Krongold, Y. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuidad de Mexico (Mexico); Anderson, M. D.; Bazhaw, C.; Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Suite 605, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Arévalo, P. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretana N 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso (Chile); Barth, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bigley, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Borman, G. A. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 298409 (Russian Federation); Boroson, T. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Bottorff, M. C. [Fountainwood Observatory, Department of Physics FJS 149, Southwestern University, 1011 East University Avenue, Georgetown, TX 78626 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Eberly College of Science, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Breeveld, A. A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-09-01

    During the Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project observations of NGC 5548, the continuum and emission-line variability became decorrelated during the second half of the six-month-long observing campaign. Here we present Swift and Chandra X-ray spectra of NGC 5548 obtained as part of the campaign. The Swift spectra show that excess flux (relative to a power-law continuum) in the soft X-ray band appears before the start of the anomalous emission-line behavior, peaks during the period of the anomaly, and then declines. This is a model-independent result suggesting that the soft excess is related to the anomaly. We divide the Swift data into on- and off-anomaly spectra to characterize the soft excess via spectral fitting. The cause of the spectral differences is likely due to a change in the intrinsic spectrum rather than to variable obscuration or partial covering. The Chandra spectra have lower signal-to-noise ratios, but are consistent with the Swift data. Our preferred model of the soft excess is emission from an optically thick, warm Comptonizing corona, the effective optical depth of which increases during the anomaly. This model simultaneously explains all three observations: the UV emission-line flux decrease, the soft-excess increase, and the emission-line anomaly.

  9. How a good understanding of the physical oceanography of your offshore renewables site can drive down project costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J.

    2016-02-01

    For an offshore renewables plant to be viable it must be safe and cost effective to build and maintain (i.e. the conditions mustn't be too harsh to excessively impede operations at the site), it must also have an energetic enough resource to make the project attractive to investors. In order to strike the correct balance between cost and resource reliable datasets describing the meteorological and oceanographic (metocean) environment needs to be collected, analysed and its findings correctly applied . This presentation will use three real world examples from Iberdrola`s portfolio of offshore windfarms in Europe to demonstrate the economic benefits of good quality metocean data and robust analysis. The three examples are: 1) Moving from traditional frequency domain persistence statistics to time domain installation schedules driven by reliable metocean data reduces uncertainty and allows the developer to have better handle on weather risk during contract negotiations. 2) By comparing the planned installation schedules from a well validated metocean dataset with a coarser low cost unvalidated metocean dataset we can show that each Euro invested in the quality of metocean data can reduce the uncertainty in installation schedules by four Euros. 3) Careful consideration of co-varying wave and tidal parameters can justify lower cost designs, such as lower platform levels leading to shorter and cheaper offshore wind turbine foundations. By considering the above examples we will prove the case for investing in analysis of well validated metocean models as a basis for sound financial planning of offshore renewables installations.

  10. SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE : WHAT ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS THINK

    OpenAIRE

    SATWIKO, PRASASTO

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable architecture has become a hot issue lately as the impacts of climate change become more intense. Architecture educations have responded by integrating knowledge of sustainable design in their curriculum. However, in the real life, new buildings keep coming with designs that completely ignore sustainable principles. This paper discusses the results of two national competitions on sustainable architecture targeted for architecture students (conducted in 2012 and 2013). The results a...

  11. Bernard Tschumi Draws Architecture!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevork Hartoonian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Tschumi’s delineation prepared for the Museu de Arte Contemporânea provides the starting point for this essay, which discusses the historicity of drawing and highlights the horizontality and the verticality that structure architecture’s contrast with the pictorial realm. Juxtaposing a freehand sketch with the digital image of the same project, Tschumi moves to address the paradox concerning the position of the body and drawing. This drawing also speaks for the reversal in the position of the body brought about by digital reproductivity.The reversal alludes to Tschumi’s theorization of architecture in terms of space and event. These, I will argue, are anticipated in The Manhattan Transcripts (1981 where a set of freehand drawings is used to evoke a filmic mood wherein the image is projected parallel to the spectator’s seated position. The essay goes further, suggesting that the theatricality permeating the present architecture is part of the shift from horizontality to the painterly, and yet the phenomenon is not merely a technical issue. Rather, it alludes to architecture’s dialogical rapport with painting at work since the Renaissance.

  12. A Technology Investigation Supporting Software Architecture and Analysis for Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garlan, David

    2001-01-01

    In this report we summarize the approaches and result of the project "A Technology Investigation Supporting Software Architecture and Analysis for Evolution," carried out at Carnegie Mellon University...

  13. A Benefit Analysis of Infusing Wireless into Aircraft and Fleet Operations - Report to Seedling Project Efficient Reconfigurable Cockpit Design and Fleet Operations Using Software Intensive, Network Enabled, Wireless Architecture (ECON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Natalia; Holmes, Bruce J.; Hahn, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on an examination of potential benefits of infusing wireless technologies into various areas of aircraft and airspace operations. The analysis is done in support of a NASA seedling project Efficient Reconfigurable Cockpit Design and Fleet Operations Using Software Intensive, Network Enabled Wireless Architecture (ECON). The study has two objectives. First, we investigate one of the main benefit hypotheses of the ECON proposal: that the replacement of wired technologies with wireless would lead to significant weight reductions on an aircraft, among other benefits. Second, we advance a list of wireless technology applications and discuss their system benefits. With regard to the primary hypothesis, we conclude that the promise of weight reduction is premature. Specificity of the system domain and aircraft, criticality of components, reliability of wireless technologies, the weight of replacement or augmentation equipment, and the cost of infusion must all be taken into account among other considerations, to produce a reliable estimate of weight savings or increase.

  14. Lightweight enterprise architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Theuerkorn, Fenix

    2004-01-01

    STATE OF ARCHITECTUREArchitectural ChaosRelation of Technology and Architecture The Many Faces of Architecture The Scope of Enterprise Architecture The Need for Enterprise ArchitectureThe History of Architecture The Current Environment Standardization Barriers The Need for Lightweight Architecture in the EnterpriseThe Cost of TechnologyThe Benefits of Enterprise Architecture The Domains of Architecture The Gap between Business and ITWhere Does LEA Fit? LEA's FrameworkFrameworks, Methodologies, and Approaches The Framework of LEATypes of Methodologies Types of ApproachesActual System Environmen

  15. Software architecture 1

    CERN Document Server

    Oussalah , Mourad Chabane

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, software architectures have significantly contributed to the development of complex and distributed systems. Nowadays, it is recognized that one of the critical problems in the design and development of any complex software system is its architecture, i.e. the organization of its architectural elements. Software Architecture presents the software architecture paradigms based on objects, components, services and models, as well as the various architectural techniques and methods, the analysis of architectural qualities, models of representation of architectural template

  16. Software architecture 2

    CERN Document Server

    Oussalah, Mourad Chabanne

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, software architectures have significantly contributed to the development of complex and distributed systems. Nowadays, it is recognized that one of the critical problems in the design and development of any complex software system is its architecture, i.e. the organization of its architectural elements. Software Architecture presents the software architecture paradigms based on objects, components, services and models, as well as the various architectural techniques and methods, the analysis of architectural qualities, models of representation of architectural templa

  17. Modeling Architectural Patterns Using Architectural Primitives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zdun, Uwe; Avgeriou, Paris

    2005-01-01

    Architectural patterns are a key point in architectural documentation. Regrettably, there is poor support for modeling architectural patterns, because the pattern elements are not directly matched by elements in modeling languages, and, at the same time, patterns support an inherent variability that

  18. Towards a greater understanding of the illicit tobacco trade in Europe: a review of the PMI funded 'Project Star' report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Anna B; Rowell, Andy; Gallus, Silvano; Lugo, Alessandra; Joossens, Luk; Sims, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Following a legal agreement with the European Union (EU), Philip Morris International (PMI) commissions a yearly report ('Project Star', PS) on the European illicit cigarette trade from KPMG, the global accountancy firm. Review of PS 2010 report. Comparison with data from independent sources including a 2010 pan-European survey (N=18,056). Within PS, data covering all 27 EU countries are entered into a model. While the model itself seems appropriate, concerns are identified with the methodologies underlying the data inputs and thus their quality: there is little transparency over methodologies; interview data underestimate legal non-domestic product partly by failing to account for legal cross-border sales; illicit cigarette estimates rely on tobacco industry empty pack surveys which may overestimate illicit; and there is an over-reliance on data supplied by PMI with inadequate external validation. Thus, PMI sales data are validated using PMI smoking prevalence estimates, yet PMI is unable to provide sales (shipment) data for the Greek islands and its prevalence estimates differ grossly from independent data. Consequently, comparisons with independent data suggest PS will tend to overestimate illicit cigarette levels particularly where cross-border shopping is frequent (Austria, Finland, France) and in Western compared with Eastern European countries. The model also provides data on the nature of the illicit cigarette market independent of seizure data suggesting that almost a quarter of the illicit cigarette market in 2010 comprised PMI's own brands compared with just 5% counterfeited PMI brands; a finding hidden in PMI's public representation of the data. PS overestimates illicit cigarette levels in some European countries and suggests PMI's supply chain control is inadequate. Its publication serves the interests of PMI over those of the EU and its member states. PS requires greater transparency, external scrutiny and use of independent data. Published by the BMJ

  19. Handling Multiple Ecologies in Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Katrine; Sattrup, Peter Andreas

    2014-01-01

    , able to accommodate change over time is a necessary development in architectural conceptualization, what are the barriers and problems inherent in the present design culture, and how may these be overcome? In an educational experiment, architecture and architectural engineering students were asked......In light of the many challenges of resource scarcity, climate change, rapid urbanization and changing social patterns facing societies today, main stream architecture remains remarkably 'resilient' to conceptual innovation regarding its nature and role in society. If the idea of open architecture...... to imagine that their recent housing projects had been built and occupied for 25+ years. The students were given the task to transform each other's projects according to new social programs, increased urban density and strict energy and resources use paradigms, using a design methodological framework...

  20. Rethinking the architectural design concept in the digital culture (in architecture's practice perspective)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawata, Albertus Galih

    2017-11-01

    The architectural design stages in architectural practices or in architectural design studio consist of many aspects. One of them is during the early phases of the design process, where the architects or designers try to interpret the project brief into the design concept. This paper is a report of the procedure of digital tools in the early design process in an architectural practice in Jakarta. It targets principally the use of BIM and digital modeling to generate information and transform them into conceptual forms, which is not very common in Indonesian architectural practices. Traditionally, the project brief is transformed into conceptual forms by using sketches, drawings, and physical model. The new method using digital tools shows that it is possible to do the same thing during the initial stage of the design process to create early architectural design forms. Architect's traditional tools and methods begin to be replaced effectively by digital tools, which would drive bigger opportunities for innovation.

  1. Genetic Regulation of Shoot Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Smith, Steven M; Li, Jiayang

    2018-03-19

    Shoot architecture is determined by the organization and activities of apical, axillary, intercalary, secondary, and inflorescence meristems and by the subsequent development of stems, leaves, shoot branches, and inflorescences. In this review, we discuss the unifying principles of hormonal and genetic control of shoot architecture including advances in our understanding of lateral branch outgrowth; control of stem elongation, thickness, and angle; and regulation of inflorescence development. We focus on recent progress made mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, pea, maize, and tomato, including the identification of new genes and mechanisms controlling shoot architecture. Key advances include elucidation of mechanisms by which strigolactones, auxins, and genes such as IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 and TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 control shoot architecture. Knowledge now available provides a foundation for rational approaches to crop breeding and the generation of ideotypes with defined architectural features to improve performance and productivity. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Plant Biology Volume 69 is April 29, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. 38 CFR 39.22 - Architectural design standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Architectural design...-16-10) Standards and Requirements for Project § 39.22 Architectural design standards. The..., Ontario, CA 91761-2816. (a) Architectural and structural requirements—(1) Life Safety Code. Standards must...

  3. Future Architectures for NREN infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessing, Henrik; Bozorgebrahimi, Kurosh; Belter, Bartosz

    This study identifies key requirements for NRENs towards future network architectures that become apparent as users become moremobile and have increased expectations in terms of availability of data. In addition, cost saving requirements call for federated use of, inparticular, the optical spectral...... resources. In this work, the key findings from related projects are integrated to provide the building blocks forefficient use and sharing of spectrum. A new network architecture is derived to support exactly the service orchestration and the federated useof resources. It comprises four layers from...

  4. EL COLEGIO DE HUÉRFANOS DE FERROVIARIOS DE TORREMOLINOS. UN EJEMPLO DE INNOVACIÓN DOCENTE DESDE EL PROYECTO ARQUITECTÓNICO / THE TORREMOLINOS SCHOOL FOR ORPHANS OF RAILWAY WORKERS. AN EXAMPLE OF EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION AS ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Loren-Méndez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN El antiguo Colegio de Huérfanos de Ferroviarios de Torremolinos (Málaga (1933/1935 es una obra ampliamente reconocida en publicaciones, así como en registros y legislación patrimonial, siendo declarado en 1990 Bien de Interés Cultural en su categoría de máxima protección como monumento. Sin embargo, no se ha realizado hasta el momento un estudio monográfico desde el proyecto arquitectónico, que trascienda el relato educativo o la descripción formal del edificio. Este artículo estudia por vez primera esta arquitectura híbrida socio-educativa en su contexto histórico y en el marco de la obra de Francisco Alonso Martos, autor de todos los proyectos de la red de Colegios de Huérfanos de Ferroviarios (CHF, presentando el CHF de Torremolinos como la propuesta de referencia. Comenzando con una presentación de la asociación CHF y del autor, el colegio de Torremolinos se analiza desde una triple entrada: la búsqueda desde el proyecto en el marco del debate tipológico, la formalización de las corrientes de innovación pedagógica y una modernidad de base técnica, concluyendo con la revisión crítica de su caracterización patrimonial actual. SUMMARY The former Torremolinos School for Orphans of Railway Workers in the province of Malaga in Spain (1933/1935 is a work of architecture that has been widely referenced in publications, registers and heritage legislation, declared an Asset of Cultural Interest, and awarded maximum protection as a monument. However, to date, no monographic study based on an architectural assessment of the project has been carried out, moving beyond educational or formal descriptions of the building. The article presents this type of hybrid socio-educational architecture in its historical context for the first time, focusing on the work of Francisco Alonso Martos, the architect behind all the projects that comprise a network of Schools for Orphans of Railway Workers (SORs. A general overview of the SOR

  5. ARQUITECTURAS INVISIBLES / Invisible Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Montero Fernández

    2012-11-01

    questions that go beyond quality. Political or commercial interests tend to confuse the opportunity for promotion with the merit of the project. It would be possible to number many competitions which have supposed a significant advance in architecture in the last century; a certain nostalgia for those times of debate which, together with other similar formulas such as entries in biennials, triennials or exhibitions, were capable of making empirical research from direct practice. On the contrary, today the policy framework of the architectural project is often defined in a manner foreign to real architecture, administratively dominated by a process that prioritizes legal and technical compliance over the quality of the project itself, confusing the means with the end. Criticism always aims at the author; it forgets the notable procedures which armed a jury gratuitously exonerated of responsibility or that legal framework that asphyxiates both architecture and the spirit of inquiry which should always prevail.This issue of the journal considers the assimilation of the competition into a research process parallel to an architecture united with quality and progress, an advanced architecture.

  6. Lean Architecture for Agile Software Development

    CERN Document Server

    Coplien, James O

    2010-01-01

    More and more Agile projects are seeking architectural roots as they struggle with complexity and scale - and they're seeking lightweight ways to do it: Still seeking? In this book the authors help you to find your own path; Taking cues from Lean development, they can help steer your project toward practices with longstanding track records; Up-front architecture? Sure. You can deliver an architecture as code that compiles and that concretely guides development without bogging it down in a mass of documents and guesses about the implementation; Documentation? Even a whiteboard diagram, or a CRC

  7. Service-Oriented Architectures and Project Optimization for a Special Cost Management Problem Creating Synergies for Informed Change between Qualitative and Quantitative Strategic Management Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Strategic Management Processes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...Optimization for a Special Cost Management Problem Creating Synergies for Informed Change between Qualitative and Quantitative Strategic Management Processes

  8. Conflict, Space and Architecture : Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderbeek, M.G.H.; Shoshan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Footprint 19 focuses on the more recent roles of architecture in the contemporary spaces of conflict. Departing from a spatial understanding of geopolitical, climatological and economical conflicts, the various contributions highlight the large scale and phenomenal transitions in the physical world

  9. Control Architecture for Future Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai

    . The introduction of close-to-real-time markets is envisioned to enable fast distributed resource allocation while guaranteeing system stability. Electric vehicles will be studied as a means of distributed reversible energy storage and a flexible power electronic interface, with application to the case......This project looks at control of future electric power grids with a high proportion of wind power and a large number of decentralized power generation, consumption and storage units participating to form a reliable supply of electrical energy. The first objective is developing a method...... for assessment of control architecture of electric power systems with a means-ends perspective. Given this purpose-oriented understanding of a power system, the increasingly stochastic nature of this problem shall be addressed and approaches for robust, distributed control will be proposed and analyzed...

  10. Understanding the acquisition and regulation mechanisms of the water chemistry in a clay formation: the CEC/ANDRA Archimede-argile project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merceron, T.; Mossmann, J.R.; Neerdael, B.; Canniere, P. de; Beaucaire, C.; Toulhoat, P.; Daumas, S.; Bianchi, A.; Christen, R.

    1993-01-01

    Clay formations are candidate host environments to high level radioactive waste repository. The radioelements could be partially released from the waste into the host geological formation after a very long time. Understanding behaviour of the natural chemical species is considered as a fundamental prerequisite before the disturbed system will be studied. Additional laboratory studies are also essential in order to forecast, by analogy, the behaviour of radioelements released from the radioactive waste repository. The ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE project has two main goals. The first is to gain an understanding of the mechanisms of acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay environment. This step is essential to predict both the behaviour and the migration in solution of artificial elements which are initially absent in the clay formation. The second is to test and validate in clay the measured physico chemical parameters which are the basis for the geochemical modelling of the behaviour of the natural and artificial radioelements. The paper presents the main results previously obtained on granitic waters and the research strategy established for the ARCHIMEDE project. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs

  11. System understanding as a basis for sustainable decision-making. A science - school collaboration within the Sparkling Science project "Traisen w3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Michaela; Böck, Kerstin; Loach, Andreas; Scheikl, Sigrid; Zitek, Andreas; Heidenreich, Andrea; Kurz-Aigner, Roman; Schrittwieser, Martin; Muhar, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Equipping young people with the skills to participate successfully in increasingly complex environments and societies is a central issue of policy makers around the world. Only the understanding of complex socio-environmental systems establishes a basis for making decisions leading to sustainable development. However, OECD Pisa studies indicated, that only a low percentage of 15-year-old students was able to solve straightforward problems. Additionally, students get less interested in natural science education. In Austria "Sparkling Science" projects funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy in Austria target at integrating science with school learning by involving young people into scientific research for the purpose of developing new and engaging forms of interactive, meaningful learning. Within the Sparkling Science Project "Traisen.w3" scientists work together with 15 to 18-year-old students of an Austrian Secondary School over two years to identify and evaluate ecosystem services within the catchment of the river Traisen. One of the aims of the project is to foster system understanding of the youths by multi-modal school activities. To support the development of causal systems thinking, students developed qualitative causal models on processes in the catchment of the river Traisen with an interactive, hierarchically structured learning environment that was developed within the EU-FP7 project "DynaLearn" (http://www.dynalearn.eu) based on qualitative reasoning. Students worked in small groups and were encouraged to interlink entities, processes and simulate the results of the proposed interactions of hydrological, biological, ecological, spatial and societal elements. Within this setting collaborative problem solving competency through sharing knowledge, understanding and different perspectives was developed. Additionally, in several school workshops the ecosystem services concept was used as communication tool to show the

  12. Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Cole, Daniel L [University of Pittsburgh; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

  13. Implementation and assessment of a yeast orphan gene research project: involving undergraduates in authentic research experiences and progressing our understanding of uncharacterized open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany V; Schultheis, Patrick J; Strome, Erin D

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first eukaryotic organism to be sequenced; however, little progress has been made in recent years in furthering our understanding of all open reading frames (ORFs). From October 2012 to May 2015 the number of verified ORFs had only risen from 75.31% to 78%, while the number of uncharacterized ORFs had decreased from 12.8% to 11% (representing > 700 genes still left in this category; http://www.yeastgenome.org/genomesnapshot). Course-based research has been shown to increase student learning while providing experience with real scientific investigation; however, implementation in large, multi-section courses presents many challenges. This study sought to test the feasibility and effectiveness of incorporating authentic research into a core genetics course, with multiple instructors, to increase student learning and progress our understanding of uncharacterized ORFs. We generated a module-based annotation toolkit and utilized easily accessible bioinformatics tools to predict gene function for uncharacterized ORFs within the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). Students were each assigned an uncharacterized ORF, which they annotated using contemporary comparative genomics methodologies, including multiple sequence alignment, conserved domain identification, signal peptide prediction and cellular localization algorithms. Student learning outcomes were measured by quizzes, project reports and presentations, as well as a post-project questionnaire. Our results indicate that the authentic research experience had positive impacts on students' perception of their learning and their confidence to conduct future research. Furthermore, we believe that creation of an online repository and adoption and/or adaptation of this project across multiple researchers and institutions could speed the process of gene function prediction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Implementation and assessment of a yeast orphan gene research project; involving undergraduates in authentic research experiences and progressing our understanding of uncharacterized open reading frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany V.; Schultheis, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first eukaryotic organism to be sequenced, however little progress has been made in recent years in furthering our understanding of all open reading frames (ORFs). From October 2012 to May 2015 the number of verified ORFs has only risen from 75.31% to 78% while the number of uncharacterized ORFs have decreased from 12.8% to 11% (representing more than 700 genes still left in this category) [http://www.yeastgenome.org/genomesnapshot]. Course-based research has been shown to increase student learning while providing experience with real scientific investigation; however, implementation in large, multi-section courses presents many challenges. This study sought to test the feasibility and effectiveness of incorporating authentic research into a core genetics course with multiple instructors to increase student learning and progress our understanding of uncharacterized ORFs. We generated a module-based annotation toolkit and utilized easily accessible bioinformatics tools to predict gene function for uncharacterized ORFs within the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). Students were each assigned an uncharacterized ORF which they annotated using contemporary comparative genomics methodologies including multiple sequence alignment, conserved domain identification, signal peptide prediction and cellular localization algorithms. Student learning outcomes were measured by quizzes, project reports and presentations, as well as a post-project questionnaire. Our results indicate the authentic research experience had positive impacts on student's perception of their learning and their confidence to conduct future research. Furthermore we believe that creation of an online repository and adoption and/or adaptation of this project across multiple researchers and institutions could speed the process of gene function prediction. PMID:26460164

  15. Architecture from quantity to quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Gibello

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Having surpassed the problem of quantity, it is necessary to now address the problem of widespread quality where we have ensured, that all land surface areas be defined by an architecture project, or rather in a holistic, integrated and multidisciplinary approach. The objective then, is know how to intervene in the scope of transformation, revitalization, reconversion and reuse in urban design. Architecture must know the ‘catalogs’ that provide best practice for design processes and products, yet know to avoid the populist tendencies of certain participatory design processes and know how to take into account the requests of users. Doing so, architecture can exercise the ability to reason critically, which is the most valuable skill designer should have.

  16. Catalyst Architecture:New York Copenhagen Tokyo Rio de Janeiro

    OpenAIRE

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in?Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for:sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructureappro...

  17. Studying landscape architecture in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie; Hare, Richard Andrew

    2010-01-01

    s demanded large numbers of landscape architects. Today landscape architecture education addresses current challenges of climate change and the need for sustainable development where an understanding of natural systems is seen as essential for future urbanisation processes in evermore innovative......Landscape architecture is a well-established profession in Denmark. From the early 20th Century the profession developed steadily. However, it was 1960 before a separate education was established. This proved timely as the immense physical development of the Danish welfare state of the 1970s and 80...

  18. Studying landscape architecture in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie; Hare, Richard Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Landscape architecture is a well-established profession in Denmark. From the early 20th Century the profession developed steadily. However, it was 1960 before a separate education was established. This proved timely as the immense physical development of the Danish welfare state of the 1970s and 80......s demanded large numbers of landscape architects. Today landscape architecture education addresses current challenges of climate change and the need for sustainable development where an understanding of natural systems is seen as essential for future urbanisation processes in evermore innovative...

  19. The Value of Style in Architectural Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornberger, Martin; Kreiner, Kristian; Clegg, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    To date, organization theory’s attempts to understand architecture firms have focused by and large on debates about increasing managerialization and economization of the profession. This paper suggests an alternative approach by conceptualizing architecture as practice that does not adhere only...... to a narrow economic logic of value creation but also focuses on the production of aesthetic value. We will introduce the concept of style to understand how architecture practice routinely breaks routines and follows the rule of rule breaking. We will analyze architecture practice as a form of organized...... heresy – a hegemonic engine for the production of difference. In order to illustrate our points we will draw on qualitative empirical fieldwork with an architecture firm....

  20. Sculpture Versus Architecture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rappaport

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Many critics consider Richard Serra the leading sculptor of the 20th century. He is famous not only for inventing something new in sculpture (abstract sculpture compositions existed before him, having been opened by constructivist vanguard of the beginning of the 20th century. Material selections by Vladimir Tatlin and sculptures by Osip Tsadkin, as well as compositions by Henry Moor appeared before Serra. Serra is famous for transferring his works' accent from the works as they are, which could be installed in any place, to their environment. That is he saw in the sculpture a key to understanding the urban space. His crude metal sheets and profiles, rectangular and curvilinear, exceeding regular scale of sculpture, come closer to architecture. Richard Serra places them near architectural constructions as checkpoints of intermediate scale category of space located between so-called «street furniture» – lamp posts, stalls, fountains and benches – and buildings, especially huge modern ones.But the matter is not only in the scale. Serra's sculptures are not only abstract compositions that harmoniously add to the space with their spacious scale. They have some mystery, some implicit sense appearing before a pedestrian as an enigma. Their mystique opposes both street furniture and architecture. But first of all it opposes the historical sculpture with its enigma always overshadowed by historical or biographical topic. Krylov's sculpture in the Summer Garden or Minin and Pozharsky's monument on the Red Square do not strike us, because we know that those monuments are erected IN COMMEMORATION of prominent people, as fellow citizens' tribute to their great contribution to the national history. But the crude metal sheets welded at different angles – what are they for? Who needs them?As an art critic, Edward Goldman, said, fame came to Richard Serra in 1989, when the sculpture composition Tilted Arc erected eight years before it was demolished by

  1. Operational Automatic Remote Sensing Image Understanding Systems: Beyond Geographic Object-Based and Object-Oriented Image Analysis (GEOBIA/GEOOIA. Part 2: Novel system Architecture, Information/Knowledge Representation, Algorithm Design and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Boschetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available According to literature and despite their commercial success, state-of-the-art two-stage non-iterative geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA systems and three-stage iterative geographic object-oriented image analysis (GEOOIA systems, where GEOOIA/GEOBIA, remain affected by a lack of productivity, general consensus and research. To outperform the Quality Indexes of Operativeness (OQIs of existing GEOBIA/GEOOIA systems in compliance with the Quality Assurance Framework for Earth Observation (QA4EO guidelines, this methodological work is split into two parts. Based on an original multi-disciplinary Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT analysis of the GEOBIA/GEOOIA approaches, the first part of this work promotes a shift of learning paradigm in the pre-attentive vision first stage of a remote sensing (RS image understanding system (RS-IUS, from sub-symbolic statistical model-based (inductive image segmentation to symbolic physical model-based (deductive image preliminary classification capable of accomplishing image sub-symbolic segmentation and image symbolic pre-classification simultaneously. In the present second part of this work, a novel hybrid (combined deductive and inductive RS-IUS architecture featuring a symbolic deductive pre-attentive vision first stage is proposed and discussed in terms of: (a computational theory (system design, (b information/knowledge representation, (c algorithm design and (d implementation. As proof-of-concept of symbolic physical model-based pre-attentive vision first stage, the spectral knowledge-based, operational, near real-time, multi-sensor, multi-resolution, application-independent Satellite Image Automatic Mapper™ (SIAM™ is selected from existing literature. To the best of these authors’ knowledge, this is the first time a symbolic syntactic inference system, like SIAM™, is made available to the RS community for operational use in a RS-IUS pre-attentive vision first stage

  2. ESA: Enterprise Service Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The Service oriented perspective is emerging as an important view both for business architecture and IT architecture in the overall context of enterprise architectures. Many existing enterprise architecture frameworks like DODAF, MODAF and NAF have lately been extended with service-oriented views. The UPDM UML Profile and Metamodel for DODAF and MODAF has thus included various service-oriented views. This thesis proposes a new enterprise architecture framework ESA Enterprise Service Arch...

  3. Documenting after the fact : Recovering architectural design decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Anton; Bosch, Jan; Avgeriou, Paris

    Software architecture documentation helps people in understanding the software architecture of a system. In practice, software architectures are often documented after the fact, i.e. they are maintained or created after most of the design decisions have been made and implemented. To keep the

  4. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture, Tutorial Part 2 - Detailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The STRS architecture detail presentation presents each requirement in the STRS Architecture Standard with some examples and supporting information. The purpose is to give a platform provider, application provider, or application integrator a better, more detailed understanding of the STRS Architecture Standard and its use.

  5. The architecture of a modern military health information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Raj J; Egyhazy, Csaba J

    2004-06-01

    This article describes a melding of a government-sponsored architecture for complex systems with open systems engineering architecture developed by the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Our experience in using these two architectures in building a complex healthcare system is described in this paper. The work described shows that it is possible to combine these two architectural frameworks in describing the systems, operational, and technical views of a complex automation system. The advantage in combining the two architectural frameworks lies in the simplicity of implementation and ease of understanding of automation system architectural elements by medical professionals.

  6. Space and Architecture's Current Line of Research? A Lunar Architecture Workshop With An Architectural Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, D.; van Dijk, A.

    The "2002 ESA Lunar Architecture Workshop" (June 3-16) ESTEC, Noordwijk, NL and V2_Lab, Rotterdam, NL) is the first-of-its-kind workshop for exploring the design of extra-terrestrial (infra) structures for human exploration of the Moon and Earth-like planets introducing 'architecture's current line of research', and adopting an architec- tural criteria. The workshop intends to inspire, engage and challenge 30-40 European masters students from the fields of aerospace engineering, civil engineering, archi- tecture, and art to design, validate and build models of (infra) structures for Lunar exploration. The workshop also aims to open up new physical and conceptual terrain for an architectural agenda within the field of space exploration. A sound introduc- tion to the issues, conditions, resources, technologies, and architectural strategies will initiate the workshop participants into the context of lunar architecture scenarios. In my paper and presentation about the development of the ideology behind this work- shop, I will comment on the following questions: * Can the contemporary architectural agenda offer solutions that affect the scope of space exploration? It certainly has had an impression on urbanization and colonization of previously sparsely populated parts of Earth. * Does the current line of research in architecture offer any useful strategies for com- bining scientific interests, commercial opportunity, and public space? What can be learned from 'state of the art' architecture that blends commercial and public pro- grammes within one location? * Should commercial 'colonisation' projects in space be required to provide public space in a location where all humans present are likely to be there in a commercial context? Is the wave in Koolhaas' new Prada flagship store just a gesture to public space, or does this new concept in architecture and shopping evolve the public space? * What can we learn about designing (infra-) structures on the Moon or any other

  7. A Generalized DRM Architectural Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIU, V. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Online digital goods distribution environment lead to the need for a system to protect digital intellectual property. Digital Rights Management (DRM is the system born to protect and control distribution and use of those digital assets. The present paper is a review of the current state of DRM, focusing on architectural design, security technologies, and important DRM deployments. The paper primarily synthesizes DRM architectures within a general framework. We also present DRM ecosystem as providing a better understanding of what is currently happening to content rights management from a technological point of view. This paper includes conclusions of several DRM initiative studies, related to rights management systems with the purpose of identifying and describing the most significant DRM architectural models. The basic functions and processes of the DRM solutions are identified.

  8. Deconstruction as concept of architectural practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Milan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper inquires into the relationship between philosophical concept of deconstruction and its practical application in the interpretation of the concept of architectural creativity. Deconstruction is not only understood as a formal metaphor, but as a critical process that examines common approaches to architectural design and approach to the treatment of architectural space. Through a comparison with philosophy, this procedure highlights the architectural approach seen as a decomposition of normal and usual way of thinking about architecture and therefore associated treatment of the architectural concept in creative practice. By case study method, analyzed the formal concept of building 'Zepter Palace' in Belgrade, which is interpreted as a deconstruction of the concept of architectural practice. In this example, in comparison with the well-known interpretation of deconstruction on project of La Villette Park in Paris, derived a key contribution of the philosophical deconstruction to the concept of architectural practice - approach that establishes and promotes a method for creating and widening of architectural diversity, seen as a new space sensuality of aesthetic experience of space.

  9. Relating Business Goals to Architecturally Significant Requirements for Software Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Related Work: TOGAF Business Scenarios 15 3.2 Related Work: Goal-Oriented Requirements Engineering 16 3.3 Business Goal Scenarios 17 3.4 A General...Project (Portfolio) Context 42 A.13 Project Types Influence Business Goals 43 A.14 Enterprise Architecture and TOGAF 45 ii | CMU/SEI-2010-TN-018 A...Architectural Decisions, or Lead to Non-Architectural Solutions. 3 Figure 3: Partington’s Three Levels of Strategy [Partington 2000] 10 Figure 4: TOGAF

  10. Tehran Water Museum with the Performance-Oriented Approach to Bionic Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeghe Farokhizad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Form and function of architecture in nature, is a process that is perceived as instinctive as the development of internal growth and creation. The most basic level of commitment to life that reveals itself in the form of materials. Architecture form and shape to the beat and rhythm of the invisible life, in fact, it is a process which gives the project structure and the structure of the plan. Every living organism is driven by unchangeable force. Trying to become more efficient form and function. In the natural area is very important that "performance" is defined as the process and relationship and "form" is defined as a result of this process. Forms of interaction with nature that takes shape and naturally goes in the direction of performance to match its relationship with the wider environment and in the surrounding territory. Methods and new ideas can be learned from nature. Generally architecture is defined as to imagine, design, understanding and build according to circumstances. These problems may in itself was fully functional and to varying degrees, reflecting the economic, political and social project. In any case, it seems that the status quo is not simply satisfying. For this reason, we seek a new agreement that they "answer the question" is called. Therefore, in this study, based on architectural features permit, trying to establish a performance-oriented architecture, nature-based design and natural patterns to be defined by Vitruvius

  11. Science partnership between U.S. Geological Survey and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe—Understanding the Elwha River Dam Removal Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Jeffrey J.; Beirne, Matt M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2018-04-16

    After nearly a century of producing power, two large hydroelectric dams on the Elwha River in Washington State were removed during 2011 to 2014 to restore the river ecosystem and recover imperiled salmon populations. Roughly two-thirds of the 21 million cubic meters of sediment—enough to fill nearly 2 million dump trucks—contained behind the dams was released downstream, which restored natural processes and initiated important changes to the river, estuarine, and marine ecosystems. A multidisciplinary team of scientists from the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, academia, non-governmental organizations, Federal and state agencies, and the U.S. Geological Survey collected key data before, during, and after dam removal to understand the outcomes of this historic project on the Elwha River ecosystem.

  12. A Model for the Development of Architectural Psychology Formation in Architectural Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Sema UZUNOĞLU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the purpose, method, and outcomes of an “Architectural Psychology” program, developed to introduce new architecture students to the subject. A combination of the architectural concepts of Social Psychology, Environmental Psychology and Psychology of Perception were used in the program. Psychology of Architecture will be taught simultaneously with the Introduction to Architecture program in a student-based educational system to help students understand psychology with its definitions, and implement it throughout their architecture education. This method was implemented in one class of 140 students of interior design, and another of 80 students of architecture. In this article, the latter is explained. The duration of the program was fourteen weeks and, in total, nine activities and a final study were assigned. The outcomes of the assigned activities indicated that the “Architectural Psychology” program enhanced the architecture curriculum by adding the elements lacking in the “architecture – psychology relationship” and its usage in architectural design. Therefore, it is concluded that the addition of the program to the curriculum was apt and beneficial.

  13. Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshe, Andrea; Sutton, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    The Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture project was established to meet the certification requirements of the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) V2.0 Federal Enterprise Architecture Certification (FEAC) Institute program and to provide added value to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Application Portfolio Management process. The MARS Architecture aims to: (1) address the NASA MSFC Chief Information Officer (CIO) strategic initiative to improve Application Portfolio Management (APM) by optimizing investments and improving portfolio performance, and (2) develop a decision-aiding capability by which applications registered within the MSFC application portfolio can be analyzed and considered for retirement or decommission. The MARS Architecture describes a to-be target capability that supports application portfolio analysis against scoring measures (based on value) and overall portfolio performance objectives (based on enterprise needs and policies). This scoring and decision-aiding capability supports the process by which MSFC application investments are realigned or retired from the application portfolio. The MARS Architecture is a multi-phase effort to: (1) conduct strategic architecture planning and knowledge development based on the DoDAF V2.0 six-step methodology, (2) describe one architecture through multiple viewpoints, (3) conduct portfolio analyses based on a defined operational concept, and (4) enable a new capability to support the MSFC enterprise IT management mission, vision, and goals. This report documents Phase 1 (Strategy and Design), which includes discovery, planning, and development of initial architecture viewpoints. Phase 2 will move forward the process of building the architecture, widening the scope to include application realignment (in addition to application retirement), and validating the underlying architecture logic before moving into Phase 3. The MARS Architecture key stakeholders are most

  14. Software architecture evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barais, Olivier; Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Duchien, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Software architectures must frequently evolve to cope with changing requirements, and this evolution often implies integrating new concerns. Unfortunately, when the new concerns are crosscutting, existing architecture description languages provide little or no support for this kind of evolution...... one particular framework named Tran SAT, which addresses the above problems of software architecture evolution. Tran SAT provides a new element in the software architecture descriptions language, called an architectural aspect, for describing new concerns and their integration into an existing...... architecture. Following the early aspect paradigm, Tran SAT allows the software architect to design a software architecture stepwise in terms of aspects at the design stage. It realises the evolution as the weaving of new architectural aspects into an existing software architecture....

  15. System architecture with XML

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, Berthold

    2002-01-01

    XML is bringing together some fairly disparate groups into a new cultural clash: document developers trying to understand what a transaction is, database analysts getting upset because the relational model doesn''t fit anymore, and web designers having to deal with schemata and rule based transformations. The key to rising above the confusion is to understand the different semantic structures that lie beneath the standards of XML, and how to model the semantics to achieve the goals of the organization. A pure architecture of XML doesn''t exist yet, and it may never exist as the underlying technologies are so diverse. Still, the key to understanding how to build the new web infrastructure for electronic business lies in understanding the landscape of these new standards.If your background is in document processing, this book will show how you can use conceptual modeling to model business scenarios consisting of business objects, relationships, processes, and transactions in a document-centric way. Database des...

  16. First Step to Understand Intergroup Bias and Cohesion from the One World Experiment: A Pilot Project to Evaluate the Effect of the 'Pale Blue Dot' Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K.; Venugopal, R.

    2018-02-01

    The One World Experiment was carried out as a pilot effort in Cape Town, South Africa, to test whether exposure to an astronomy intervention affects empathy and altruism in children. The intervention focused on introducing children to knowledge around the Earth's position in the Universe and collecting data to assess the effect. This paper presents the project background as well as the methodology and results from the project's first phase, designed to understand the possible difference in empathetic response between a child and other 'ingroup' and 'outgroup' children; for any child, an 'ingroup' child is one belonging to their own social group (in this case, nationality), and an 'outgroup' child is one belonging to a social group other than their own. It is found that the students across the study have a strong cohesion to those of the same nationality but that there is no nationality bias in their feelings towards how other children share their joy with them. Full analysis of the data, which will compare the control group and experimental group results and focuses on the impact of astronomy intervention, is underway for future publication.

  17. Information Architecture: The Data Warehouse Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    Colleges and universities are initiating data warehouse projects to provide integrated information for planning and reporting purposes. A survey of 40 institutions with active data warehouse projects reveals the kinds of tools, contents, data cycles, and access currently used. Essential elements of an integrated information architecture are…

  18. Adaptive Architecture - a Spatial Objective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2011-01-01

    New challenges of a fast changing society with new social phenomena as well as growing environmental problems ask for rethinking our habitats on all scales and reflecting our design methods to produce them. Many Megacities prepare with big projects against dramatic environmental threats (New York...... detail in itself, does not create humanity: We have today enough of superficial and rather bad architecture which is modern.´ There is nothing to add on....

  19. Chinas architectural heritage conservation movement

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Guangya

    2017-01-01

    Chinas civilization is ancient. The countrys architectural heritage conservation activity is an integral part of the world conservation movement. This paper gives a general introduction of the movement in China from four aspects: (1) history, (2) important conservation projects assessments, (3) new ideas and principles being debated and discussed, and (4) issues facing the movement. The present paper summarizes the essential character of the movement in China and highlights the importance of ...

  20. PLM support to architecture based development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Peter Lomholt

    Designers doing product architecture based development look to convert desired behaviour to solutions for a portfolio of products, and through modularisation pursue commonality among different variants without increasing the internal task proportional to handling variety. To develop product...... architectures for a portfolio of products that support the right balance between commonality and variety is today a foremost part of most large companies’ development operations. A challenge is that product architectures are influencing external and internal performance of markets, production, technology......, organisation, processes, etc. To identify, evaluate, and align aspects of these domains are necessary for developing the optimal layout of product architectures. It is stated in this thesis that architectures describe building principles for products, product families, and product programs, where this project...