WorldWideScience

Sample records for understand rate structure

  1. Understanding Interest Rate Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volker, Desi

    with and without stochastic volatility to capture the main stylized features of U.S. interest rates. The third essay, \\Variance Risk Premia in the Interest Rate Swap Market", investigates the time-series and cross-sectional properties of the compensation demanded for holding interest rate variance risk. The essays...... are self-contained and can be read independently. There is however a common thread in the themes covered as all essays focus on the understanding of interest rate volatility, its time-variation and main determinants....

  2. Intuitive Understanding of Base Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Laurel

    Purpose: This study examines whether physicians and other adults intuitively understand that the probability a positive test result is a true positive (positive predictive value, PPV) depends on the base rate of disease in the population tested. In particular, this research seeks to examine...

  3. Structural image and video understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we have discussed how to exploit the structures in several computer vision topics. The five chapters addressed five computer vision topics using the image structures. In chapter 2, we proposed a structural model to jointly predict the age, expression and gender of a face. By modeling

  4. Understanding Content-and-Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, J.; Marx, M.J.; de Rijke, M.; Sigurbjörnsson, B.; Trotman, A.; Lalmas, M.; Fuhr, N.

    2005-01-01

    Document-centric XML is a mixture of text and structure. +With the increased availability of document-centric XML content comes a need for query facilities in which both structural constraints and constraints on the content of the documents can be expressed. This has generated considerable interest

  5. Understanding the Structure of Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... structure of bone is very similar to reinforced concrete that is used to make a building or ... a defective blueprint is produced that tells the cell to produce deformed collagen, resulting in bad collagen ...

  6. Understanding the structure of chocolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, H.; Peschar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallization of cocoa-butter in the β phase from the melt under static conditions is only possible using the memory effect of cocoa-butter. Under all other conditions polymorphs with lower melting temperatures develop, whereas the β phase is the preferred one in chocolate. SAXS experiments proved 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoylglycerol seeds with triple chain-length packing initiate the β-crystallization. Models for the different phases may be based on the crystal structure determinations of triacylglycerols. A new, patented, way of chocolate making is in development in which the traditional tempering process is replaced by another pre-crystallization process. The process is based on the use of seed crystals in the liquid phase and driven by a feedback system

  7. The role of ratings in structured finance: issues and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bank for International Settlements

    2005-01-01

    Introduction In May 2003, the Committee on the Global Financial System (CGFS) decided to establish a Working Group on Ratings in Structured Finance to explore the role of rating agencies in the rapidly evolving markets for structured finance instruments. To facilitate a better understanding of this role and of structured finance markets more broadly, the Working Group was mandated to identify and explain methodological differences that exist between the rating of structured finance instrument...

  8. Understanding structural conservation through materials science:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuster-López, Laura; Krarup Andersen, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    provide both explanation and prediction of failure in materials. It has therefore shown to be an effective method for developing useful solutions to conservation problems. Since materials science and mechanics can help conservators predict the long term consequences of their treatments and provide them......Mechanical properties and the structure of materials are key elements in understanding how structural interventions in conservation treatments affect cultural heritage objects. In this context, engineering mechanics can help determine the strength and stability found in art objects as it can...... with tools to avoid future problems, it should be present in all conservation-restoration training programs to help promote students’ understanding of the degradation mechanisms in cultural materials (and their correlation with chemical and biological degradation) as well as the implications behind...

  9. Investigating Student Understanding of the Universe: Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Virginia; Coble, K.; Nickerson, M.; Cochran, G.; Camarillo, C. T.; Bailey, J. M.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2011-05-01

    Chicago State University (CSU) offers an introductory astronomy course that services students from a variety of majors including pre-service teachers. At CSU, we have been investigating methods and tools that will improve student conceptual understanding in astronomy for this diverse group of students. We have analyzed pre-course surveys, pre-course essays, exams, and interviews in an effort to better understand the ideas and difficulties in understanding that students have in regards to the structure of the universe. Analysis of written essays has revealed that our students do have some knowledge of the objects in the universe, but interviews inform us that their understanding of the structure of the universe is superficial. This project is a part of a larger study; also see our posters on student ideas about dark matter, the age and expansion of the universe, and perceptions of astronomical sizes and distances. This work was supported by NASA ROSES E/PO Grant #NNXlOAC89G, as well as by the Illinois Space Grant Consortium and National Science Foundation CCLI Grant #0632563 at Chicago State University and the Fermi E/PO program at Sonoma State University.

  10. Revising the human mutation rate: implications for understanding human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Aylwyn; Durbin, Richard

    2012-10-01

    It is now possible to make direct measurements of the mutation rate in modern humans using next-generation sequencing. These measurements reveal a value that is approximately half of that previously derived from fossil calibration, and this has implications for our understanding of demographic events in human evolution and other aspects of population genetics. Here, we discuss the implications of a lower-than-expected mutation rate in relation to the timescale of human evolution.

  11. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  12. Understanding Microbial Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    microbial communities: Function, structure and dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to...dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to December 2014. The programme involved over 150...Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, UK, from 19th August 2014 – 19th December 2014

  13. Understanding water's anomalies with locally favoured structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-04-02

    Water is a complex liquid that displays a surprising array of unusual properties, the most famous being the density maximum at about 4 °C. The origin of these anomalies is still a matter of debate, and so far a quantitative description of water's phase behaviour starting from the molecular arrangements is still missing. Here we report a study of the microscopic structural features of water as obtained from computer simulations. We identify locally favoured structures having a high degree of translational order in the second shell, and a two-state model is used to describe the behaviour of liquid water over a wide region of the phase diagram. Furthermore, we show that locally favoured structures not only have translational order in the second shell but also contain five-membered rings of hydrogen-bonded molecules. This suggests their mixed character: the former helps crystallization, whereas the latter causes frustration against crystallization.

  14. Understanding water's anomalies with locally favored structures

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Water is a complex structured liquid of hydrogen-bonded molecules that displays a surprising array of unusual properties, also known as water anomalies, the most famous being the density maximum at about $4^\\circ$C. The origin of these anomalies is still a matter of debate, and so far a quantitative description of water's phase behavior starting from the molecular arrangements is still missing. Here we provide a simple physical description from microscopic data obtained through computer simul...

  15. Structured Open Urban Data: Understanding the Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Luciano; Pham, Kien; Silva, Claudio; Vieira, Marcos R; Freire, Juliana

    2014-09-01

    A growing number of cities are now making urban data freely available to the public. Besides promoting transparency, these data can have a transformative effect in social science research as well as in how citizens participate in governance. These initiatives, however, are fairly recent and the landscape of open urban data is not well known. In this study, we try to shed some light on this through a detailed study of over 9,000 open data sets from 20 cities in North America. We start by presenting general statistics about the content, size, nature, and popularity of the different data sets, and then examine in more detail structured data sets that contain tabular data. Since a key benefit of having a large number of data sets available is the ability to fuse information, we investigate opportunities for data integration. We also study data quality issues and time-related aspects, namely, recency and change frequency. Our findings are encouraging in that most of the data are structured and published in standard formats that are easy to parse; there is ample opportunity to integrate different data sets; and the volume of data is increasing steadily. But they also uncovered a number of challenges that need to be addressed to enable these data to be fully leveraged. We discuss both our findings and issues involved in using open urban data.

  16. The Term Structure of Interest Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Shiller; J. Huston McCulloch

    1987-01-01

    This paper consolidates and interprets the literature on the term structure, as it stands today. Definitions of rates of return, forward rates and holding returns for all time intervals are treated here in a uniform manner and their interrelations, exact or approximate, delineated. The concept of duration is used throughout to simplify mathematical expressions. Continuous compounding is used where possible, to avoid arbitrary distinctions based on compounding assumptions. Both the theoretical...

  17. Structural shell analysis understanding and application

    CERN Document Server

    Blaauwendraad, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical description of the properties of a shell is much more elaborate than those of beam and plate structures. Therefore many engineers and architects are unacquainted with aspects of shell behaviour and design, and are not familiar with sufficiently reliable shell theories for the different shell types as derived in the middle of the 20th century. Rather than contributing to theory development, this university textbook focuses on architectural and civil engineering schools. Of course, practising professionals will profit from it as well. The book deals with thin elastic shells, in particular with cylindrical, conical and spherical types, and with elliptic and hyperbolic paraboloids. The focus is on roofs, chimneys, pressure vessels and storage tanks. Special attention is paid to edge bending disturbance zones, which is indispensable knowledge in FE meshing. A substantial part of the book results from research efforts in the mid 20th century at Delft University of Technology. As such, it is a valua...

  18. Understanding cooperative behavior in structurally disordered populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Zhang, W.; Du, P.; Choi, C. W.; Hui, P. M.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of an inhomogeneous competing environment on the extent of cooperation are studied within the context of a site-diluted evolutionary snowdrift game on a square lattice, with the occupied sites representing the players, both numerically and analytically. The frequency of cooperation ℱ C generally shows a non-monotonic dependence on the fraction of occupied sites ρ, for different values of the payoff parameter r. Slightly diluting a lattice leads to a lower cooperation for small and high values of r. For a range of r, however, dilution leads to an enhanced cooperation. An analytic treatment is developed for ℱC I + ℱC II, with ℱC I emphasizing the importance of the small clusters of players especially for ℱC II from the other players is shown to be inadequate. A local configuration approximation (LCA) that treats the local competing configurations as the variables and amounts to include spatial correlation up to the neighborhood of a player's neighbors is developed. Results of ℱ C ( ρ) and the number of different local configurations from LCA are in good agreement with simulation results. A transparent physical picture of the dynamics stemming from LCA is also presented. The theoretical approach provides a framework that can be readily applied to competing agent-based models in structurally ordered and disordered populations.

  19. Rate-Agnostic (Causal) Structure Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plis, Sergey; Danks, David; Freeman, Cynthia; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-12-01

    Causal structure learning from time series data is a major scientific challenge. Extant algorithms assume that measurements occur sufficiently quickly; more precisely, they assume approximately equal system and measurement timescales. In many domains, however, measurements occur at a significantly slower rate than the underlying system changes, but the size of the timescale mismatch is often unknown. This paper develops three causal structure learning algorithms, each of which discovers all dynamic causal graphs that explain the observed measurement data, perhaps given undersampling. That is, these algorithms all learn causal structure in a "rate-agnostic" manner: they do not assume any particular relation between the measurement and system timescales. We apply these algorithms to data from simulations to gain insight into the challenge of undersampling.

  20. Who's Counted? Who's Counting? Understanding High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, Lyndsay

    2006-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended and funded to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Graduation rates are not just a "bottom line" for schools--they are critical predictors of individual achievement and have undeniable…

  1. Cold Climate Structural Fire Danger Rating System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Monika Metallinou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, fires kill 300,000 people every year. The fire season is usually recognized to be in the warmer periods of the year. Recent research has, however, demonstrated that the colder season also has major challenges regarding severe fires, especially in inhabited (heated wood-based structures in cold-climate areas. Knowledge about the effect of dry cellulose-based materials on fire development, indoor and outdoor, is a motivation for monitoring possible changes in potential fire behavior and associated fire risk. The effect of wind in spreading fires to neighboring structures points towards using weather forecasts as information on potential fire spread behavior. As modern weather forecasts include temperature and relative humidity predictions, there may already be sufficient information available to develop a structural fire danger rating system. Such a system may include the following steps: (1 Record weather forecasts and actual temperature and relative humidity inside and outside selected structures; (2 Develop a meteorology-data-based model to predict indoor relative humidity levels; (3 Perform controlled drying chamber experiments involving typical hygroscopic fire fuel; (4 Compare the results to the recorded values in selected structures; and (5 Develop the risk model involving the results from drying chamber experiments, weather forecasts, and separation between structures. Knowledge about the structures at risk and their use is also important. The benefits of an automated fire danger rating system would be that the society can better plan for potentially severe cold-climate fires and thereby limit the negative impacts of such fires.

  2. Ratings of structured products and issuers' commitments

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga, Carlos; Wystup, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution of the structured products market focusing on the tools available for private investors, on which they rely for the selection process. The selection process is extremely difficult because there is a myriad of products, because of the dynamic nature of the market and market participants' actions, and because of the complexity of many of the products. We consider the existing types of tools, in particular the rating schemes that have been proposed by industry p...

  3. Understanding vaccination rates and attitudes among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Diana S; Ruderman, Eric M; Brown, Tiffany; Lee, Ji Young; Mixon, Amanda; Liss, David T; Baker, David W

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate vaccinations are important for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who are often treated with highly immunosuppressive therapies that increase their risk of infection. However, rates of vaccination among patients with RA are below optimal levels. We conducted a patient survey to assess self-reported vaccination status and to compare that status with electronic health record (EHR) data. We recruited randomly selected patients with RA in an academic practice in 2013. Eligible participants had a diagnosis of RA, at least 1 visit to a rheumatology clinic in each of the previous 2 years, were 18 years or older, and had English listed as their preferred language. The survey included the following domains: a) patient self-reported receipt of influenza, pneumococcal (PNVX), and herpes zoster (HZVX) vaccinations; b) attitudes about these vaccines, including reasons for unvaccinated status, if applicable; and c) provider recommendations about these vaccines. Based on participants' self-report, we found a high vaccination rate for influenza during the previous season (79.4%), a moderate rate of any previous vaccination for pneumococcus (53.9%), and a very low rate of any previous vaccination for herpes zoster (7.8%). If we assume that all self-reports are accurate and we include vaccinations recorded in the EHR that were not reported by patients, the vaccination rates were approximately 8% to 9% higher for PNVX and HZVX. Vaccination rates are low among patients with RA based on self-report data. Further research is needed to investigate system-level barriers to vaccination and the impact of evidence-based, provider-level interventions on vaccination rates.

  4. Tools to Understand Structural Property Relationships for Wood Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Jakes; Daniel J. Yelle; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    Understanding structure-property relationships for wood cell walls has been hindered by the complex polymeric structures comprising these cell walls and the difficulty in assessing meaningful mechanical property measurements of individual cell walls. To help overcome these hindrances, we have developed two experimental methods: 1) two-dimensional solution state nuclear...

  5. Understanding the mechanisms behind coking pressure: Relationship to pore structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; M. Castro Diaz; Colin E. Snape; Karen M. Steel; Merrick R. Mahoney [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-09-15

    Three low volatile coals A, B and C with oven wall pressures of 100 kPa, 60 kPa and 20 kPa respectively were investigated using high-temperature rheometry, {sup 1}H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM, with the primary aim to better understand the mechanisms behind the coking pressure phenomenon. Rheometer plate displacement measurements ({Delta}L) have shown differences in the expansion and contraction behaviour of the three coals, which seem to correlate with changes in rheological properties; while SEM images have shown that the expansion process coincides with development of pore structure. It is considered that the point of maximum plate height ({Delta}L{sub max}) prior to contraction may be indicative of a cell opening or pore network forming process, based on analogies with other foam systems. Such a process may be considered important for coking pressure since it provides a potential mechanism for volatile escape, relieving internal gas pressure and inducing charge contraction. For coal C, which has the highest fluidity {delta}L{sub max} occurs quite early in the softening process and consequently a large degree of contraction is observed; while for the lower fluidity coal B, the process is delayed since pore development and consequently wall thinning progress at a slower rate. When {Delta}L{sub max} is attained, a lower degree of contraction is observed because the event occurs closer to resolidification where the increasing viscosity/elasticity can stabilise the expanded pore structure. For coal A which is relatively high fluidity, but also high coking pressure, a greater degree of swelling is observed prior to cell rupture, which may be due to greater fluid elasticity during the expansion process. This excessive expansion is considered to be a potential reason for its high coking pressure. 58 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  7. Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-12

    Nov 12, 2014 ... Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped graphene nanoribbons upon hydrogen saturation. MICHAEL MANANGHAYA. Department of Chemical Engineering, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, Manila 1004 Philippines e-mail: mikemananghaya@gmail.com. MS received 31 May ...

  8. Understanding and Representing Changing Work Structures and Practices through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Stacey M. B.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: Organizational Communication, Advanced Organizational Communication, Organizing Work, Management/Organizational History. Objectives: This activity will help students to understand major shifts in the organization of work and creatively represent changing work structures and practices. An optional follow-up assignment is included. A…

  9. Liberal Liability. Understanding Students’ Conceptions of Gender Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Murstedt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that teaching gender theories tends to be an educational challenge and elicits student resistance. However, little is known about students’ learning processes in social science. This study aims to explore these learning processes by drawing on feminist pedagogy and conceptual change theory. The results show that when students are asked to perform analysis from a structural gender perspective, they recurrently introduce other explanatory frameworks based on non-structural understandings. The students’ learning processes involve reformulating questions and making interpretations based on liberal understandings of power, freedom of choice and equality. We argue that this process is due to the hegemonic position of the liberal paradigm as well as to the dominant ideas about science. Clarifying the underlying presumptions of a liberal perspective and a structural perspective may help students to recognise applied premises and enable them to distinguish relevant explanations.

  10. Measuring Infiltration Rates in Homes as a Basis for Understanding Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerz, G. G.; Lamb, B. K.; Pressley, S. N.; O'Keeffe, P.; Fuchs, M.; Kirk, M.

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration rates, or the rate of air exchange, of houses are important to understand because ventilation can be a dominate factor in determining indoor air quality. There are chemicals that are emitted from surfaces or point sources inside the home which are harmful to humans; these chemicals come from various objects including furniture, cleaning supplies, building materials, gas stoves, and the surrounding environment. The use of proper ventilation to cycle cleaner outdoor air into the house can be crucial for maintaining healthy living conditions in the home. At the same time, there can also be outdoor pollutants which infiltrate the house and contribute to poor indoor air quality. In either case, it is important to determine infiltration rates as a function of outdoor weather conditions, the house structure properties and indoor heating and cooling systems. In this work, the objective is to measure ventilation rates using periodic releases of a tracer gas and measuring how quickly the tracer concentration decays. CO2 will be used as the tracer gas because it is inert and harmless at low levels. An Arduino timer is connected to a release valve which controls the release of 9.00 SLPM of CO2 into the uptake vent within the test home. CO2 will be released until there is at least a 200 to 300 ppm increase above ambient indoor levels. Computers with CO2 sensors and temperature/pressure sensors attached will be used to record data from different locations within the home which will continuously record data up to a week. The results from these periodic ventilation measurements will be analyzed with respect to outdoor wind and temperature conditions and house structure properties. The data will be used to evaluate an established indoor air quality model.

  11. Understanding the defect structure of solution grown zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, Laura-Lynn; Sankar, Gopinathan; Handoko, Albertus D.; Goh, Gregory K.L.; Kohara, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconducting oxide with many potential applications in various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and field effect transistors (FETs). Much effort has been made to understand the ZnO structure and its defects. However, one major issue in determining whether it is Zn or O deficiency that provides ZnO its unique properties remains. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an ideal, atom specific characterization technique that is able to probe defect structure in many materials, including ZnO. In this paper, comparative studies of bulk and aqueous solution grown (≤90 °C) ZnO powders using XAS and x-ray pair distribution function (XPDF) techniques are described. The XAS Zn–Zn correlation and XPDF results undoubtedly point out that the solution grown ZnO contains Zn deficiency, rather than the O deficiency that were commonly reported. This understanding of ZnO short range order and structure will be invaluable for further development of solid state lighting and other optoelectronic device applications. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: ► ZnO powders have been synthesized through an aqueous solution method. ► Defect structure studied using XAS and XPDF. ► Zn–Zn correlations are less in the ZnO powders synthesized in solution than bulk. ► Zn vacancies are present in the powders synthesized. ► EXAFS and XPDF, when used complementary, are useful characterization techniques.

  12. New protein structures provide an updated understanding of phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Eileen K

    2017-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) and less severe hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) constitute the most common inborn error of amino acid metabolism, and is most often caused by defects in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) function resulting in accumulation of Phe to neurotoxic levels. Despite the success of dietary intervention in preventing permanent neurological damage, individuals living with PKU clamor for additional non-dietary therapies. The bulk of disease-associated mutations are PAH missense variants, which occur throughout the entire 452 amino acid human PAH protein. While some disease-associated mutations affect protein structure (e.g. truncations) and others encode catalytically dead variants, most have been viewed as defective in protein folding/stability. Here we refine this view to address how PKU-associated missense variants can perturb the equilibrium among alternate native PAH structures (resting-state PAH and activated PAH), thus shifting the tipping point of this equilibrium to a neurotoxic Phe concentration. This refined view of PKU introduces opportunities for the design or discovery of therapeutic pharmacological chaperones that can help restore the tipping point to healthy Phe levels and how such a therapeutic might work with or without the inhibitory pharmacological chaperone BH 4 . Dysregulation of an equilibrium of architecturally distinct native PAH structures departs from the concept of "misfolding", provides an updated understanding of PKU, and presents an enhanced foundation for understanding genotype/phenotype relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Royalty Rate Structure in Case of Franchising

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Kotliarov

    2011-01-01

    The present article contains an analysis of differences between licensing and franchising. It is demonstrated that models of royalty rate calculation developed for licensing should not be applied to franchising as benefits received by licensee and franchisee are different. It is proposed to include in the model of royalty calculation the risk reduction generated by franchisor¡¯s effective technologies and managerial support that are given to franchisee. It is demonstrated that franchisee may ...

  14. Understanding the Structural Basis of Adhesion GPCR Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araç, Demet; Sträter, Norbert; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Unlike conventional G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), adhesion GPCRs (aGPCRs) have large extracellular regions that are autoproteolytically cleaved from their membrane-embedded seven-pass transmembrane helices. Autoproteolysis occurs within the conserved GPCR-Autoproteolysis INducing (GAIN) domain that is juxtaposed to the transmembrane domain and cleaves the last beta strand of the GAIN domain. The other domains of the extracellular region are variable and specific to each aGPCR and are likely involved in adhering to various ligands. Emerging evidence suggest that extracellular regions may modulate receptor function and that ligand binding to the extracellular regions may induce receptor activation via multiple mechanisms. Here, we summarize current knowledge about the structural understanding for the extracellular regions of aGPCRs and discuss their possible functional roles that emerge from the available structural information.

  15. Using decision trees to understand structure in missing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Nicholas J; Harden, Fiona A; Harden, Maurice J; Mengersen, Kerrie L

    2015-06-29

    Demonstrate the application of decision trees--classification and regression trees (CARTs), and their cousins, boosted regression trees (BRTs)--to understand structure in missing data. Data taken from employees at 3 different industrial sites in Australia. 7915 observations were included. The approach was evaluated using an occupational health data set comprising results of questionnaires, medical tests and environmental monitoring. Statistical methods included standard statistical tests and the 'rpart' and 'gbm' packages for CART and BRT analyses, respectively, from the statistical software 'R'. A simulation study was conducted to explore the capability of decision tree models in describing data with missingness artificially introduced. CART and BRT models were effective in highlighting a missingness structure in the data, related to the type of data (medical or environmental), the site in which it was collected, the number of visits, and the presence of extreme values. The simulation study revealed that CART models were able to identify variables and values responsible for inducing missingness. There was greater variation in variable importance for unstructured as compared to structured missingness. Both CART and BRT models were effective in describing structural missingness in data. CART models may be preferred over BRT models for exploratory analysis of missing data, and selecting variables important for predicting missingness. BRT models can show how values of other variables influence missingness, which may prove useful for researchers. Researchers are encouraged to use CART and BRT models to explore and understand missing data. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    KAUST Repository

    Pramana, Stevin S.

    2017-03-02

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10−10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10−6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  17. The Term Structure of Interest Rates and Inflation Forecast Targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Schaling, E.; Verhagen, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of the expectations theory of the term structure for the implementation of inflation targeting. We show that the term structure weakens the transmission of short term interest rates to ultimate policy objectives. Therefore, short term interest rates in the

  18. Metrology challenges for high-rate nanomanufacturing of polymer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Joey; Barry, Carol; Busnaina, Ahmed; Isaacs, Jacqueline

    2012-10-01

    The transfer of nanoscience accomplishments into commercial products is hindered by the lack of understanding of barriers to nanoscale manufacturing. We have developed a number of nanomanufacturing processes that leverage available high-rate plastics fabrication technologies. These processes include directed assembly of a variety of nanoelements, such as nanoparticles and nanotubes, which are then transferred onto a polymer substrate for the fabrication of conformal/flexible electronic materials, among other applications. These assembly processes utilize both electric fields and/or chemical functionalization. Conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes have been successfully transferred to a polymer substrate in times less than 5 minutes, which is commercially relevant and can be utilized in a continuous (reel to reel/roll to roll) process. Other processes include continuous high volume mixing of nanoelements (CNTs, etc) into polymers, multi-layer extrusion and 3D injection molding of polymer structures. These nanomanufacturing processes can be used for wide range of applications, including EMI shielding, flexible electronics, structural materials, and novel sensors (specifically for chem/bio detection). Current techniques to characterize the quality and efficacy of the processes are quite slow. Moreover, the instrumentation and metrology needs for these manufacturing processes are varied and challenging. Novel, rapid, in-line metrology to enable the commercialization of these processes is critically needed. This talk will explore the necessary measurement needs for polymer based nanomanufacturing processes for both step and continuous (reel to reel/roll to roll) processes.

  19. Understanding the Disproportionately Low Marriage Rate among African Americans: An Amalgam of Sociological and Psychological Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anthony L.; Kravitz, Aliza

    2011-01-01

    African Americans have the lowest marriage rate of any racial and ethnic group in America. Although the low marriage rate among African Americans has been largely examined through a sociological lens by documenting structural barriers, which has important policy implications, researchers have not sufficiently examined the psychological and…

  20. Understanding recall rates in screening mammography: A conceptual framework review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Norsuddin, N.; Reed, W.; Mello-Thoms, C.; Lewis, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Recall rates are one of the performance measures used to evaluate the effectiveness of mammography screening programs. There is conflicting evidence regarding the link between recall rates and cancer detection rates and a variety of differing recall rates exist between countries and readers. This variability in recall rates may have important clinical and economic implications such as unnecessary follow-up procedures, additional costs to the health care system and psychological effects for the women themselves associated with false-positive mammograms results. In order to reduce the impact of false positive recall rates in screening mammography, it is essential for all multidisciplinary health care providers, especially those in medical imaging, to fully understand the factors that may contribute and affect recall rates. The multifactorial nature of recall rates is explored in this paper through the construction of a conceptual map based on a review of the current literature. - Highlights: • Recall rates vary across countries and readers and for initial and subsequent screens. • Falsely recalling women has important clinical, cost and psycho-social implications. • Imaging technology, readers' expertise and patient presentation affect recall rates. • Higher recall rates do not translate into improved sensitivity at higher thresholds. • Multidisciplinary approaches to reduce recall rates may improve women experiences.

  1. Using Instruments to Understand Argument Structure: Evidence for Gradient Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Lilia; Rawlins, Kyle; Landau, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The arguments of a verb are commonly assumed to correspond to the event participants specified by the verb. That is, drink has two arguments because drink specifies two participants: someone who drinks and something that gets drunk. This correspondence does not appear to hold, however, in the case of instrumental participants, e.g. John drank the soda with a straw. Verbs such as slice and write have been argued to specify an instrumental participant, even though instruments do not pattern like arguments given other criteria. In this paper, we investigated how instrumental verbs are represented, testing the hypothesis that verbs such as slice encode three participants in the same way that dative verbs such as lend encode three participants. In two experiments English-speakers reported their judgments about the number of participants specified by a verb, e.g. that drink specifies two participants. These judgments indicate that slice does not encode three distinct arguments. Nonetheless, some verbs were systematically more likely to elicit the judgment that the instrument is specified by the verb, a pattern that held across individual subjects. To account for these findings, we propose that instruments are not independent verbal arguments but are represented in a gradient away: an instrument may be a more or less salient part of the force exerted by an agent. These results inform our understanding of the relationship between argument structure and event representation, raising questions concerning the role of arguments in language processing and learning. PMID:26057832

  2. Effect of Conceptual Change Approach on Students' Understanding of Reaction Rate Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of conceptual change text oriented instruction compared to traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of reaction rate concepts. 45 students from two classes of the same teacher in a public high school participated in this study. Students in the experimental group…

  3. Teaching structure: student use of software tools for understanding macromolecular structure in an undergraduate biochemistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Sheila S; O'Hara, Patricia B; Williamson, Patrick L; Springer, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of structural representation tools into both laboratory and homework activities. First, early in the course we introduce the use of readily available open-source software for visualizing protein structure, coincident with modules on amino acid and peptide bond properties. Second, we use these same software tools in lectures and incorporate images and other structure representations in homework tasks. Third, we require a capstone project in which teams of students examine a protein-nucleic acid complex and then use the software tools to illustrate for their classmates the salient features of the structure, relating how the structure helps explain biological function. To ensure engagement with a range of software and database features, we generated a detailed template file that can be used to explore any structure, and that guides students through specific applications of many of the software tools. In presentations, students demonstrate that they are successfully interpreting structural information, and using representations to illustrate particular points relevant to function. Thus, over the semester students integrate information about structural features of biological macromolecules into the larger discussion of the chemical basis of function. Together these assignments provide an accessible introduction to structural representation tools, allowing students to add these methods to their biochemical toolboxes early in their scientific development. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Understanding changes over time in workers' compensation claim rates using time series analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ian C; Tompa, Emile

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to better understand the inter-temporal variation in workers' compensation claim rates using time series analytical techniques not commonly used in the occupational health and safety literature. We focus specifically on the role of unemployment rates in explaining claim rate variations. The major components of workers' compensation claim rates are decomposed using data from a Canadian workers' compensation authority for the period 1991-2007. Several techniques are used to undertake the decomposition and assess key factors driving rates: (i) the multitaper spectral estimator, (ii) the harmonic F test, (iii) the Kalman smoother and (iv) ordinary least squares. The largest component of the periodic behaviour in workers' compensation claim rates is seasonal variation. Business cycle fluctuations in workers' compensation claim rates move inversely to unemployment rates. The analysis suggests that workers' compensation claim rates between 1991 and 2008 were driven by (in order of magnitude) a strong negative long term growth trend, periodic seasonal trends and business cycle fluctuations proxied by the Ontario unemployment rate.

  5. 47 CFR 61.40 - Private line rate structure guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... convenience for the carrier and customers, and cost characteristics; a rate element which appears separately... Section 61.40 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... comparable services should be integrated; (2) Rate structures for the same or comparable services should be...

  6. Change in Family Structure and Rates of Violent Juvenile Delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, Jeannie A

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the question: Have the changes in family structure in the U.S. become a catalyst for juvenile delinquency? For this research, I use existing statistics for my three independent variables: divorce rates, rate of working mothers with children under age 18, percent female-headed households. My dependent variable, juvenile violent crime rates, is measured using data from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. My control variables consist of the followin...

  7. Monetary Policy and the Term Structure of Interest Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett T. McCallum

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses a prominent empirical failure of the expectations theory of the term structure of interest rates under the assumption of rational expectations. This failure concerns the magnitude of slope coefficients in regressions of short rate (or long- rate) changes on long-short spreads. It is shown that the anomalous empirical findings can be rationalized with the expectations theory by recognition of an exogenous random (but possibly autoregressive) term premium plus the assumptio...

  8. Understanding Metallic Bonding: Structure, Process and Interaction by Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students'…

  9. Evolutionary rate variation and RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, B.; Andersen, E.S.; Damgaard, C.

    2004-01-01

    Predicting RNA secondary structure using evolutionary history can be carried out by using an alignment of related RNA sequences with conserved structure. Accurately determining evolutionary substitution rates for base pairs and single stranded nucleotides is a concern for methods based on this type...... by applying rates derived from tRNA and rRNA to the prediction of the much more rapidly evolving 5'-region of HIV-1. We find that the HIV-1 prediction is in agreement with experimental data, even though the relative evolutionary rate between A and G is significantly increased, both in stem and loop regions...

  10. Understanding Structural Features of Microbial Lipases–-An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Geraldine Sandana Mala

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural elucidations of microbial lipases have been of prime interest since the 1980s. Knowledge of structural features plays an important role in designing and engineering lipases for specific purposes. Significant structural data have been presented for few microbial lipases, while, there is still a structure-deficit, that is, most lipase structures are yet to be resolved. A search for ‘lipase structure’ in the RCSB Protein Data Bank ( http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/ returns only 93 hits (as of September 2007 and, the NCBI database ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov reports 89 lipase structures as compared to 14719 core nucleotide records. It is therefore worthwhile to consider investigations on the structural analysis of microbial lipases. This review is intended to provide a collection of resources on the instrumental, chemical and bioinformatics approaches for structure analyses. X-ray crystallography is a versatile tool for the structural biochemists and is been exploited till today. The chemical methods of recent interests include molecular modeling and combinatorial designs. Bioinformatics has surged striking interests in protein structural analysis with the advent of innumerable tools. Furthermore, a literature platform of the structural elucidations so far investigated has been presented with detailed descriptions as applicable to microbial lipases. A case study of Candida rugosa lipase (CRL has also been discussed which highlights important structural features also common to most lipases. A general profile of lipase has been vividly described with an overview of lipase research reviewed in the past.

  11. Fundamental challenges in mechanistic enzymology: progress toward understanding the rate enhancements of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschlag, Daniel; Natarajan, Aditya

    2013-03-26

    Enzymes are remarkable catalysts that lie at the heart of biology, accelerating chemical reactions to an astounding extent with extraordinary specificity. Enormous progress in understanding the chemical basis of enzymatic transformations and the basic mechanisms underlying rate enhancements over the past decades is apparent. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to achieve a quantitative understanding of how the underlying mechanisms account for the energetics of catalysis, because of the complexity of enzyme systems and the absence of underlying energetic additivity. We review case studies from our own work that illustrate the power of precisely defined and clearly articulated questions when dealing with such complex and multifaceted systems, and we also use this approach to evaluate our current ability to design enzymes. We close by highlighting a series of questions that help frame some of what remains to be understood, and we encourage the reader to define additional questions and directions that will deepen and broaden our understanding of enzymes and their catalysis.

  12. Understanding Local Structure versus Long-Range Structure: The Case of UO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Lionel; Ma, Yue; Garcia, Philippe; Baldinozzi, Gianguido; Siméone, David; Fischer, Henry E

    2018-02-09

    A recent trend in the development of new optimized materials makes use of crystalline domains having nanometer sizes for which characterization methods at the atomic scale are mandatory. Amongst them is pair-distribution function analysis (PDF-analysis), a diffraction technique that has already shown that a short-range or "local" atomic structure of a given domain, having a lower symmetry than the average long-range structure, often exists in many compounds having valuable properties for industrial applications, such as pyrochlores, spinels, and doped ceria among others. However, the manner by which these domains are arranged to produce the average long-range structure is still an open question. Herein, the first structural model that accounts for both the local structure (inside a given domain) and the long-range structure (averaged over all domains) that is observed in the PDF of uranium dioxide is presented. The structural model describes domain walls in such a way as to preserve the uranium coordination polyhedron and to obey the needed symmetry rules. The proper description of domain walls is an important step in the understanding and the modelling of nanostructured materials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Credit Rating Change and Capital Structure in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Rogers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the impact of imminent reclassification of credit rating on the decision-making regarding capital structure of non-financial corporations listed in Latin America. Despite the importance attributed by the market agents and the existence of empirical evidence of the effect caused by rating in the capital structure of companies in developed countries, this issue is still incipient in Latin-American countries. For this purpose, all the non-financial corporation owners of, at least one corporate rating issued by an international rating agency were taken into account, with the requirement of being listed on a stock exchange in at least one Latin-American country. Through a data panel analysis comprising the period between 2001 and 2010 and by making use of the Generalized Method of Moments (GMM, the main results that were achieved did not indicate that non-financial corporations listed in Latin America, with imminent reclassification of ratings, adopt less debts than those without an imminent reclassification of their ratings. These findings suggest that the imminent reclassifications of credit ratings do not present important information for managers of non-financial corporations in Latin America when making decisions about capital structure.

  14. Understanding Biological Rates and their Temperature Dependence, from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, E.; Arcus, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature responses over various scales in biological systems follow a similar pattern; negative curvature results in an optimum temperature (Topt) for activity/growth/turnover, with decreases in rates on either side of Topt. Previously this downturn in rates at high temperatures has been attributed to enzyme denaturation, where a failing of the basic driving units of metabolism was used to describe curvature at the enzyme and organism level. However, recent developments in our understanding of the factors governing enzyme rates at different temperatures have guided a new understanding of the responses of biological systems. Enzymes catalyse reactions by driving the substrate through a high energy species, which is tightly bound to the enzyme. Macromolecular rate theory (MMRT) has recently been developed to account for the changes in the system brought about by this tight binding, specifically the change in the physical parameter heat capacity (ΔCǂp), and the effect this has on the temperature dependence of enzyme reactions. A negative ΔCǂp imparts the signature negative curvature to rates in the absence of denaturation, and finds that Topt, ΔCǂp and curvature are all correlated, placing constraints on biological systems. The simplest of cells comprise thousands of enzymatically catalysed reactions, functioning in series and in parallel in metabolic pathways to determine the overall growth rate of an organism. Intuitively, the temperature effects of enzymes play a role in determining the overall temperature dependence of an organism, in tandem with cellular level regulatory responses. However, the effect of individual Topt values and curvature on overall pathway behaviour is less apparent. Here, this is investigated in the context of MMRT through the in vitro characterisation of a six-step metabolic pathway to understand the steps in isolation and functioning in series. Pathway behaviour is found to be approximately an average of the properties of the

  15. Understanding the structure of data when planning for analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human beings and other living creatures tend to exist within organisational structures, such as families, schools, and business organisations. In an educational system, for example, students exist within a hierarchical social structure that can include classroom, grade level, school, school district and country. Data obtained ...

  16. Understanding the biological activity of high rate algae ponds through the calculation of oxygen balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Zouhayr; de Godos Crespo, Ignacio; Corona, Enrique Lara; Rogalla, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae culture in high rate algae ponds (HRAP) is an environmentally friendly technology for wastewater treatment. However, for the implementation of these systems, a better understanding of the oxygenation potential and the influence of climate conditions is required. In this work, the rates of oxygen production, consumption, and exchange with the atmosphere were calculated under varying conditions of solar irradiance and dilution rate during six months of operation in a real scale unit. This analysis allowed determining the biological response of these dynamic systems. The rates of oxygen consumption measured were considerably higher than the values calculated based on the organic loading rate. The response to light intensity in terms of oxygen production in the bioreactor was described with one of the models proposed for microalgae culture in dense concentrations. This model is based on the availability of light inside the culture and the specific response of microalgae to this parameter. The specific response to solar radiation intensity showed a reasonable stability in spite of the fluctuations due to meteorological conditions. The methodology developed is a useful tool for optimization and prediction of the performance of these systems.

  17. "Very Good" Ratings in a Survey of Maternity Care: Kindness and Understanding Matter to Australian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Angela L; Ampt, Amanda J; Roberts, Christine L

    2017-03-01

    Surveys have shown that women are highly satisfied with their maternity care. Their satisfaction has been associated with various demographic, personal, and care factors. Isolating the factors that most matter to women about their care can guide quality improvement efforts. This study aimed to identify the most significant factors associated with high ratings of care by women in the three maternity periods (antenatal, birth, and postnatal). A survey was sent to 2,048 women who gave birth at seven public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, exploring their expectations of, and experiences with maternity care. Women's overall ratings of care for the antenatal, birth, and postnatal periods were analyzed, and a number of maternal characteristics and care factors examined as potential predictors of "Very good" ratings of care. Among 886 women with a completed survey, 65 percent assigned a "Very good" rating for antenatal care, 74 percent for birth care, 58 percent for postnatal care, and 44 percent for all three periods. One factor was strongly associated with care ratings in all three maternity periods: women who were "always or almost always" treated with kindness and understanding were 1.8-2.8 times more likely to rate their antenatal, birth, and postnatal care as "Very good." A limited number of other factors were significantly associated with high care ratings for one or two of the maternity periods. Women's perceptions about the quality of their interpersonal interactions with health caregivers have a significant bearing on women's views about their maternity care journey. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myhrer, Fred [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Thomas, Anthony W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  19. [Do online ratings reflect structural differences in healthcare? The example of German physician-rating websites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszmer, Nina; Jaegers, Lena; Schöffski, Oliver; Emmert, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Previous surveys have shown that patient satisfaction varies with the regional supply of physicians. Online ratings on physician-rating websites represent a relatively new instrument to display patient satisfaction results. The aim of this study was (1) to assess the current state of online ratings for two medical disciplines (dermatologists and ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists), and (2) to analyze online derived patient satisfaction results according to the physician density in Germany. We collected online ratings for 420 dermatologists and 450 ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialists on twelve German physician-rating websites. We analyzed the online ratings according to the physician density (low, medium, high physician density). For this purpose, we collected secondary data from both physician-rating websites and the regional associations of statutory health insurance physicians. Data analysis was performed using Median tests and Chi-square tests. In total, 10,239 online ratings for dermatologists and 8,168 online ratings for ENT specialists were analyzed. Almost all dermatologists (99.3 %) and ENT specialists (98.9 %) were listed on one of the physician-rating websites. A total of 93.5 % of all listed dermatologists and 96.9 % of ENT-specialists were rated on at least one of the physician-rating websites. Significant differences were found in the distribution (i.e., percentage of listed or rated physicians) of the ratings according to the regional physician density on only one physician-rating website (ponline ratings were shown to be better in regions with a higher physician density on two physician-rating website. On jameda.de, for example, dermatologist ratings were better in regions with a higher physician density compared to regions with a lower number of physicians (average rating: 2.16 vs. 2.67; pOnline ratings of dermatologists and ENT specialists hardly differ in terms of regional physician density. Physician-rating websites thus do not appear

  20. Fundamental understanding and rational design of high energy structural microbatteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuxing; Li, Qiuyan; Cartmell, Samuel; Li, Huidong; Mendoza, Sarah; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Xiao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Microbatteries play a critical role in determining the lifetime of downsized sensors, wearable devices and medical applications, etc. More often, structural batteries are required from the perspective of aesthetics and space utilization, which is however rarely explored. Herein, we discuss the fundamental issues associated with the rational design of practically usable high energy microbatteries. The tubular shape of the cell further allows the flexible integration of microelectronics. A functioning acoustic micro-transmitter continuously powered by this tubular battery has been successfully demonstrated. Multiple design features adopted to accommodate large mechanical stress during the rolling process are discussed providing new insights in designing the structural microbatteries for emerging technologies.

  1. Factor structure of the Behavior Flexibility Rating Scale (BFRS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pituch, K.A.; Green, V.A.; Sigafoos, J.; Itchon, J.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Behavior Flexibility Rating Scale (BFRS) is designed to assess insistence on sameness or lack of behavioral flexibility, which is often associated with autism and other developmental disabilities. This study was designed to assess the factor structure of this scale for a sample of 968

  2. Structure factors for tunneling ionization rates of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, L.B.; Jensen, F.; Tolstikhin, O.I.

    2013-01-01

    Within the weak-field asymptotic theory, the dependence of the tunneling ionization rate of a molecule in a static electric field on its orientation with respect to the field is determined by the structure factor for the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). An accurate determination of this...

  3. Using a structured morbidity and mortality meeting to understand the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... We report our experience with these meetings. Methods. A structured template was developed for each morbidity and mortality meeting. We used a grid to analyse mortality and classify the death as: (i) death expected/death unexpected; and (ii) death unpreventable/death preventable. Individual cases were ...

  4. Understanding Protein-Protein Interactions Using Local Structural Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Bonet, Jaume; García-García, Javier

    2013-01-01

    of this classification suggests that the balance between favoring and disfavoring structural features determines if a pair of proteins interacts or not. Our results are in agreement with previous works and support the funnel-like intermolecular energy landscape theory that explains PPIs. We have used these features...

  5. Understanding Practices in Mathematics Education: Structure and Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Candia

    2014-01-01

    The practices of mathematics education can be investigated at a wide variety of levels: from the actions of individual students or teachers through classroom interactions, school structures, curriculum specifications and materials, teacher development programmes and local, national or international systems of instruction and assessment. These…

  6. Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Structures and electronic properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with pyridine (3NVZGNR) functionalized by Scandium (Sc) at the edge were studied through quantum chemical calculations in the formalism of density-functional theory (DFT). Pyridine-like nitrogen defects is very crucial for ...

  7. Schools as Racial Spaces: Understanding and Resisting Structural Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing schools as racial spaces can help researchers examine the role of teachers in the perpetuation of structural racism in schools. Based on ethnographic and autoethnographic work, this article offers examples of schools as racial spaces, spaces where whiteness controlled access. It also highlights four teachers who pursued racial equity in…

  8. Understanding and quantifying urban forest structure, functions, and value

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Daniel E. Crane; Jeffrey T. Walton; Daniel B. Twardus; John F. Dwyer

    2002-01-01

    Trees in urban areas can have a significant impact on human health and the environment. Unfortunately, there is relatively little data about the structure, health, functions, and long-term changes in this important resource. In the United States, a number of efforts are underway to assess urban forest attributes at the local to national scales. In addition, tools are...

  9. Using a structured morbidity and mortality meeting to understand the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Several authors have suggested that the traditional surgical morbidity and mortality meeting be developed as a tool to identify surgical errors and turn them into learning opportunities for staff. We report our experience with these meetings. Methods. A structured template was developed for each morbidity and ...

  10. Hydrogen/deuterium substitution methods: understanding water structure in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogen/deuterium substitution method has been used for different applications, such as the short range order between water molecules in a number of different environments (aqueous solutions of organic molecules), or to study the partial structure factors of water at high pressure and temperature. The absolute accuracy that can be obtained remains uncertain, but important qualitative information can be obtained on the local organization of water in aqueous solution. Some recent results with pure water, methanol and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) solutions are presented. It is shown that the short range water structure is not greatly affected by most solutes except at high concentrations and when the solute species has its own distinctive interaction with water (such as a dissolved small ion). 3 figs., 14 refs

  11. Understanding `galaxy groups' as a unique structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; John, R. S.; Gupta, P.; Kumar, H.

    2017-10-01

    'Galaxy groups' have hardly been realized as a separate class of objects with specific characteristics in the structural hierarchy. The presumption that the self-similarity of dark matter structures is a valid prescription for the baryonic universe at all scales has rendered smaller structures undetectable by current observational facilities, leading to lesser dedicated studies on them. Some recent reports that indicate a deviation from LX-T scaling in groups compared to clusters have motivated us to study their physical properties in depth. In this article, we report the extensive study on physical properties of groups in comparison to the clusters through cosmological hydrodynamic plus N-body simulations using enzo 2.2 code. As additional physics, radiative cooling, heating due to supernova and star motions, star formation and stellar feedback have been implemented. We have produced a mock sample of 362 objects with mass ranging from 5 × 1012 M⊙ to 2.5 × 1015 M⊙. Strikingly, we have found that objects with mass below ˜8 × 1013 M⊙ do not follow any of the cluster self-similar laws in hydrostatics, not even in thermal and non-thermal energies. Two distinct scaling laws are observed to be followed with breaks at ˜8 × 1013 M⊙ for mass, ˜1 keV for temperature and ˜1 Mpc for radius. This places groups as a distinct entity in the hierarchical structures, well demarcated from clusters. This study reveals that groups are mostly far away from virialization, suggesting the need for formulating new models for deciphering their physical parameters. They are also shown to have high turbulence and more non-thermal energy stored, indicating better visibility in the non-thermal regime.

  12. Understanding 'Galaxy Groups' as a Unique Structure in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Reju Sam; Paul, Surajit; Gupta, Prateek; Kumar, Harish

    2017-07-01

    'Galaxy groups' have hardly been realized as a separate class of objects with specific characteristics in the structural hierarchy of the universe. The presumption that the self-similarity of dark matter structures is a valid prescription for the baryonic universe also at all scales has rendered smaller structures undetectable by current observational facilities, leading to lesser dedicated studies on them. Some recent reports on deviation of {L_x}-T scaling in groups from that of clusters have motivated us to study their physical properties in depth. In this article, we report the extensive study on physical properties of groups in comparison with clusters through cosmological hydrodynamic plus N-body simulations using ENZO 2.2 code. We have included cooling and heating physics and star formation feedback in the simulation. And produced a mock sample of 362 objects with mass ranging from 5×10^{12} M_{⊙} to 2.5×10^{15} M_{⊙}. Strikingly, we have found that objects with a mass below ˜ 8×10^{13} M_{⊙} do not follow any of the cluster self-similar laws in hydrostatics, not even in thermal and non-thermal regimes. Two distinct scaling laws are observed to be followed with breaks at ˜ 6-8× 10^{13} M_{⊙} for mass, ˜1 keV for temperature and ˜1 Mpc for radius. This places groups as a distinct entity in the hierarchical structures, well demarcated from clusters. This study reveals that groups are mostly far away from virialization, suggesting the need for formulating new models for deciphering their physical parameters. They are also shown to have high turbulence and more non-thermal energy stored, indicating better visibility in the non-thermal regime.

  13. Understanding the structural drivers governing glass-water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone-Weiss, Nicholas; Pierce, Eric M; Youngman, Randall E; Gulbiten, Ozgur; Smith, Nicholas J; Du, Jincheng; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a significant upsurge in the development of borate and borosilicate based resorbable bioactive glasses owing to their faster degradation rate in comparison to their silicate counterparts. However, due to our lack of understanding about the fundamental science governing the aqueous corrosion of these glasses, most of the borate/borosilicate based bioactive glasses reported in the literature have been designed by "trial-and-error" approach. With an ever-increasing demand for their application in treating a broad spectrum of non-skeletal health problems, it is becoming increasingly difficult to design advanced glass formulations using the same conventional approach. Therefore, a paradigm shift from the "trial-and-error" approach to "materials-by-design" approach is required to develop new-generations of bioactive glasses with controlled release of functional ions tailored for specific patients and disease states, whereby material functions and properties can be predicted from first principles. Realizing this goal, however, requires a thorough understanding of the complex sequence of reactions that control the dissolution kinetics of bioactive glasses and the structural drivers that govern them. While there is a considerable amount of literature published on chemical dissolution behavior and apatite-forming ability of potentially bioactive glasses, the majority of this literature has been produced on silicate glass chemistries using different experimental and measurement protocols. It follows that inter-comparison of different datasets reveals inconsistencies between experimental groups. There are also some major experimental challenges or choices that need to be carefully navigated to unearth the mechanisms governing the chemical degradation behavior and kinetics of boron-containing bioactive glasses, and to accurately determine the composition-structure-property relationships. In order to address these challenges, a simplified

  14. Ultrathin (Understanding the processing, structure, and physical and electrical limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. L.; Gusev, E. P.; Degraeve, R.; Garfunkel, E. L.

    2001-09-01

    The outstanding properties of SiO2, which include high resistivity, excellent dielectric strength, a large band gap, a high melting point, and a native, low defect density interface with Si, are in large part responsible for enabling the microelectronics revolution. The Si/SiO2 interface, which forms the heart of the modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor, the building block of the integrated circuit, is arguably the worlds most economically and technologically important materials interface. This article summarizes recent progress and current scientific understanding of ultrathin (understanding of the limits of these gate dielectrics, i.e., how their continuously shrinking thickness, dictated by integrated circuit device scaling, results in physical and electrical property changes that impose limits on their usefulness. We observe, in conclusion, that although Si microelectronic devices will be manufactured with SiO2 and Si-O-N for the foreseeable future, continued scaling of integrated circuit devices, essentially the continued adherence to Moore's law, will necessitate the introduction of an alternate gate dielectric once the SiO2 gate dielectric thickness approaches ˜1.2 nm. It is hoped that this article will prove useful to members of the silicon microelectronics community, newcomers to the gate dielectrics field, practitioners in allied fields, and graduate students. Parts of this article have been adapted from earlier articles by the authors [L. Feldman, E. P. Gusev, and E. Garfunkel, in Fundamental Aspects of Ultrathin Dielectrics on Si-based Devices, edited by E. Garfunkel, E. P. Gusev, and A. Y. Vul' (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1998), p. 1 [Ref. 1]; E. P. Gusev, H. C. Lu, E. Garfunkel, T. Gustafsson, and M. Green, IBM J. Res. Dev. 43, 265 (1999) [Ref. 2]; R. Degraeve, B. Kaczer, and G. Groeseneken, Microelectron. Reliab. 39, 1445 (1999) [Ref. 3].

  15. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  16. From structure of the complex to understanding of the biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmann, Michael G., E-mail: mr@purdue.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Arisaka, Fumio [Graduate School and School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 5249 Nagatsuta-cho, Yokohama 226-8501-B39 (Japan); Battisti, Anthony J.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Chipman, Paul R.; Fokine, Andrei; Hafenstein, Susan [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Kanamaru, Shuji [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Graduate School and School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 5249 Nagatsuta-cho, Yokohama 226-8501-B39 (Japan); Kostyuchenko, Victor A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Shneider, Mikhail M. [Laboratory of Molecular Bioengineering, Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, 16/10 Miklukho-Maklaya Street, Moscow, 117997 (Russian Federation); Morais, Marc C.; Leiman, Petr G. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Palermo, Laura M.; Parrish, Colin R. [James A. Baker Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Xiao, Chuan [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The most extensive structural information on viruses relates to apparently icosahedral virions and is based on X-ray crystallography and on cryo-electron microscopy single-particle reconstructions. This paper concerns itself with the study of the macromolecular complexes that constitute viruses, using structural hybrid techniques. The most extensive structural information on viruses relates to apparently icosahedral virions and is based on X-ray crystallography and on cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle reconstructions. Both techniques lean heavily on imposing icosahedral symmetry, thereby obscuring any deviation from the assumed symmetry. However, tailed bacteriophages have icosahedral or prolate icosahedral heads that have one obvious unique vertex where the genome can enter for DNA packaging and exit when infecting a host cell. The presence of the tail allows cryo-EM reconstructions in which the special vertex is used to orient the head in a unique manner. Some very large dsDNA icosahedral viruses also develop special vertices thought to be required for infecting host cells. Similarly, preliminary cryo-EM data for the small ssDNA canine parvovirus complexed with receptor suggests that these viruses, previously considered to be accurately icosahedral, might have some asymmetric properties that generate one preferred receptor-binding site on the viral surface. Comparisons are made between rhinoviruses that bind receptor molecules uniformly to all 60 equivalent binding sites, canine parvovirus, which appears to have a preferred receptor-binding site, and bacteriophage T4, which gains major biological advantages on account of its unique vertex and tail organelle.

  17. Understanding the structure of nuclei at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktash, C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to briefly review several works on nuclear structure and to enumerate a few of the difficulties encountered in the interpretation of the experimental results. To be brief, comments are confined to the studies in the particle-bound regime, i.e., a temperature range of T ≤ 1 MeV. Among the interesting topics to be addressed in this temperature range are the question of thermal fluctuations, and the variations of the pairing correlations, shape parameters, nuclear collectivity, and rotational damping width with spin and excitation energy

  18. Understanding the Mixing Phenomena - from Structural Stability to Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Ionescu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, computational fluid dynamics (CFD becomes
    more and more mature. In the same time, it becomes more and more difficult to contribute fundamental research to it. Although the software tools in this area are increasing in importance, the way how CFD develops remain unpredictable, and it is part of what makes it an exciting and attractive discipline. The mixing phenomena - and the mixing theory - are using more and more CFD tools. This modern theory issued in the flow kinematics after hundred of years of stability study, has mathematical methods and techniques which are developing a continuous signi¯cant relation between turbulence and chaos. The turbulence is an important feature of dynamic systems with few freedom degrees, the so-called far from equilibrium systems. These are widespread between the models of excitable media. The present paper exhibits some recent results of the turbulent mixing study, based on computational tools of MAPLE11 soft. The data would be statistically analyzed, in order to construct a significant guideline in understanding the transition from stability to
    chaos in these excitable media.

  19. Utility rate structuring. Official transcript of public briefing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    Sam Hughes, Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental and Institutional Relations, DOE, made the introductions at the public briefing on electric rate structuring, February 28, 1978 in Washington, D.C. Ms. Tina Hobson served as moderator. A panel of experts on energy issues responded to questions that consumer and public interest groups raised about energy issues, particularly electric rate structures. DOE panel members were: David Bordin, Charles Curtis, Robert R. Nordhaus, Hazel R. Rollins, and Douglas C. Bauer. Thirty-six questions previously submitted by consumer and public interest groups are listed and the answers prepared by DOE program offices are published in Appendix A. After the briefing, the questions posed at the meeting are re-examined and detailed answers are published by DOE program offices.

  20. A Term Structure Model for Dividends and Interest Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Filipović, Damir; Willems, Sander

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, dividends have become a standalone asset class instead of a mere side product of an equity investment. We introduce a framework based on polynomial jump-diffusions to jointly price the term structures of dividends and interest rates. Prices for dividend futures, bonds, and the dividend paying stock are given in closed form. We present an efficient moment based approximation method for option pricing. In a calibration exercise we show that a parsimonious model specificati...

  1. An Insight towards Conceptual Understanding: Looking into the Molecular Structures of Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyulgan, Melis Arzu; Akkuzu, Nalan

    2016-01-01

    The subject of molecular structures is one of the most important and complex subject in chemistry which a majority of the undergraduate students have difficulties to understand its concepts and characteristics correctly. To comprehend the molecular structures and their characteristics the students need to understand related subjects such as Lewis…

  2. Domain decomposition-based structural condensation of large protein structures for understanding their conformational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae In; Na, Sungsoo; Eom, Kilho

    2011-01-15

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) with coarse-grained model, such as elastic network model (ENM), has allowed the quantitative understanding of protein dynamics. As the protein size is increased, there emerges the expensive computational process to find the dynamically important low-frequency normal modes due to diagonalization of massive Hessian matrix. In this study, we have provided the domain decomposition-based structural condensation method that enables the efficient computations on low-frequency motions. Specifically, our coarse-graining method is established by coupling between model condensation (MC; Eom et al., J Comput Chem 2007, 28, 1400) and component mode synthesis (Kim et al., J Chem Theor Comput 2009, 5, 1931). A protein structure is first decomposed into substructural units, and then each substructural unit is coarse-grained by MC. Once the NMA is implemented to coarse-grained substructural units, normal modes and natural frequencies for each coarse-grained substructural unit are assembled by using geometric constraints to provide the normal modes and natural frequencies for whole protein structure. It is shown that our coarse-graining method enhances the computational efficiency for analysis of large protein complexes. It is clearly suggested that our coarse-graining method provides the B-factors of 100 large proteins, quantitatively comparable with those obtained from original NMA, with computational efficiency. Moreover, the collective behaviors and/or the correlated motions for model proteins are well delineated by our suggested coarse-grained models, quantitatively comparable with those computed from original NMA. It is implied that our coarse-grained method enables the computationally efficient studies on conformational dynamics of large protein complex.

  3. Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

  4. Dynamic structure of stock communities: a comparative study between stock returns and turnover rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Ling; Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Li, Sai-Ping; Zhong, Li-Xin; Ren, Fei

    2017-07-01

    The detection of community structure in stock market is of theoretical and practical significance for the study of financial dynamics and portfolio risk estimation. We here study the community structures in Chinese stock markets from the aspects of both price returns and turnover rates, by using a combination of the PMFG and infomap methods based on a distance matrix. An empirical study using the overall data set shows that for both returns and turnover rates the largest communities are composed of specific industrial or conceptional sectors and the correlation inside a sector is generally larger than the correlation between different sectors. However, the community structure for turnover rates is more complex than that for returns, which indicates that the interactions between stocks revealed by turnover rates may contain more information. This conclusion is further confirmed by the analysis of the changes in the dynamics of community structures over five sub-periods. Sectors like banks, real estate, health care and New Shanghai take turns to comprise a few of the largest communities in different sub-periods, and more interestingly several specific sectors appear in the communities with different rank orders for returns and turnover rates even in the same sub-period. To better understand their differences, a comparison between the evolution of the returns and turnover rates of the stocks from these sectors is conducted. We find that stock prices only had large changes around important events while turnover rates surged after each of these events relevant to specific sectors, which shows strong evidence that the turnover rates are more susceptible to exogenous shocks than returns and its measurement for community detection may contain more useful information about market structure.

  5. Hierarchical Structure of Heart Rate Variability in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X. Z.; Ching, E. S. C.; Lin, D. C.

    2004-03-01

    We show a hierarchical structure (HS) of the She-Leveque form in the beat-to-beat RR intervals of heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. This structure, first found as an empirical law in turbulent fluid flows, implies further details in the HRV multifractal scaling. We tested HS using daytime RRi data from healthy subjects and heart diseased patients with congestive heart failure and found a universal law C(b) where b characterizes the multifractality of HRV and C is related to a co-dimension parameter of the most violent events in the fluctuation. The potential of diagnosis is discussed based on the characteristics of this finding. To model the HRV phenomenology, we propose a local-feedback-global-cascade (LFGC) model based on the She-Waymire (SW) cascade solution to the HS in fluid turbulence. This model extends from the previous work in that it integrates additive law multiplicatively into the cascade structure. It is an attempt to relate to the cardiovascular physiology which consists of numerous feedback controls that function primarily on the principle of additive law. In particular, the model is based on the same philosophy as the SW cascade that its multifractal dynamics consists of a singular and a modulating component. In the LFGC model, we introduce local feedback to model the dynamics of the modulating effect. The novelty of our model is to incorporate the cascade structure in the scheduling for the feedback control. This model also represents an alternative solution to the HS. We will present the simulation results by the LFGC model and discuss its implication in physiology terms.

  6. Rate-based structural health monitoring using permanently installed sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    Permanently installed sensors are becoming increasingly ubiquitous, facilitating very frequent in situ measurements and consequently improved monitoring of `trends' in the observed system behaviour. It is proposed that this newly available data may be used to provide prior warning and forecasting of critical events, particularly system failure. Numerous damage mechanisms are examples of positive feedback; they are `self-accelerating' with an increasing rate of damage towards failure. The positive feedback leads to a common time-response behaviour which may be described by an empirical relation allowing prediction of the time to criticality. This study focuses on Structural Health Monitoring of engineering components; failure times are projected well in advance of failure for fatigue, creep crack growth and volumetric creep damage experiments. The proposed methodology provides a widely applicable framework for using newly available near-continuous data from permanently installed sensors to predict time until failure in a range of application areas including engineering, geophysics and medicine.

  7. What do children know and understand about universal gravitation? Structural and developmental aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frappart, S.; Raijmakers, M.; Frède, V.

    2014-01-01

    Children's understanding of universal gravitation starts at an early age but changes until adulthood, which makes it an interesting topic for studying the development and structure of knowledge. Children's understanding of gravitation was tested for a variety of contexts and across a wide age range

  8. Understanding Racial and Ethnic Disparities in U.S. Infant Mortality Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mortality rates for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), congenital malformations, and unintentional injuries were also substantially higher for ... infant mortality rate. SIDS accounted for 6 percent, congenital malformations 5 percent, and unintentional injuries 4 percent of ...

  9. Combining computational chemistry and crystallography for a better understanding of the structure of cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The approaches in this article seek to enhance understanding of cellulose at the molecular level, independent of the source and the particular crystalline form of cellulose. Four main areas of structure research are reviewed. Initially the molecular shape is inferred from the crystal structures of m...

  10. Understanding Structure-Property Relations of Compressed Glasses through Relaxation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Youngman, Randall E.

    When a glassy material or its liquid state is subjected to sufficiently high pressure, significant changes can take place in the short- and medium-range structure, vibrational density of states, and physical properties. It is crucial to determine and understand the structure-property relations un...

  11. Technological and structural change : Understanding economic growth in countries and regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diodato, D.

    2017-01-01

    The research aims at improving our understanding of the link between economic structure and growth, by tackling a number of open questions. First, it asks whether economic structure – meaning the distribution of production factors among different industries – can significantly explain differences in

  12. On-rate based optimization of structure-kinetic relationship--surfing the kinetic map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Andreas; Dey, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    In the lead discovery process residence time has become an important parameter for the identification and characterization of the most efficacious compounds in vivo. To enable the success of compound optimization by medicinal chemistry toward a desired residence time the understanding of structure-kinetic relationship (SKR) is essential. This article reviews various approaches to monitor SKR and suggests using the on-rate as the key monitoring parameter. The literature is reviewed and examples of compound series with low variability as well as with significant changes in on-rates are highlighted. Furthermore, findings of kinetic on-rate changes are presented and potential underlying rationales are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced understanding on electronic structure of molecular semiconductors and their interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Kouki

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of organic semiconductors and their interfaces is critical to optimizing functionalities for electronics applications, by rational chemical design and appropriate combination of device constituents. The unique electronic structure of a molecular solid is characterized as (i) anisotropic electrostatic fields that originate from molecular quadrupoles, (ii) interfacial energy-level lineup governed by simple electrostatics, and (iii) weak intermolecular interactions that make not only structural order but also energy distributions of the frontier orbitals sensitive to atmosphere and interface growth. This article shows an overview on these features with reference to the improved understanding of the orientation-dependent electronic structure, comprehensive mechanisms of molecular doping, and energy-level alignment. Furthermore, the engineering of ionization energy by the control of the electrostatic fields and work function of practical electrodes by contact-induced doping is briefly described for the purpose of highlighting how the electronic structure impacts the performance of organic devices.

  14. Framing the conversation: use of PRECIS-2 ratings to advance understanding of pragmatic trial design domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Paula Darby; Loudon, Kirsty; Dluzak, Leanora; Moloney, Rachael; Messner, Donna; Stoney, Catherine M

    2017-11-10

    There continues to be debate about what constitutes a pragmatic trial and how it is distinguished from more traditional explanatory trials. The NIH Pragmatic Trials Collaborative Project, which includes five trials and a coordinating unit, has adopted the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary (PRECIS-2) instrument. The purpose of the study was to collect PRECIS-2 ratings at two points in time to assess whether the tool was sensitive to change in trial design, and to explore with investigators the rationale for rating shifts. A mixed-methods design included sequential collection and analysis of quantitative data (PRECIS-2 ratings) and qualitative data. Ratings were collected at two annual, in-person project meetings, and subsequent interviews conducted with investigators were recorded, transcribed, and coded using NVivo 11 Pro for Windows. Rating shifts were coded as either (1) actual change (reflects a change in procedure or protocol), (2) primarily a rating shift reflecting rater variability, or (3) themes that reflect important concepts about the tool and/or pragmatic trial design. Based on PRECIS-2 ratings, each trial was highly pragmatic at the planning phase and remained so 1 year later in the early phases of trial implementation. Over half of the 45 paired ratings for the nine PRECIS-2 domains indicated a rating change from Time 1 to Time 2 (N = 24, 53%). Of the 24 rating changes, only three represented a true change in the design of the trial. Analysis of rationales for rating shifts identified critical themes associated with the tool or pragmatic trial design more generally. Each trial contributed one or more relevant comments, with Eligibility, Flexibility of Adherence, and Follow-up each accounting for more than one. PRECIS-2 has proved useful for "framing the conversation" about trial design among members of the Pragmatic Trials Collaborative Project. Our findings suggest that design elements assessed by the PRECIS-2 tool may represent

  15. Understanding the oil price-exchange rate nexus for the Fiji islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Paresh Kumar [School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business and Law, Deakin University, Melbourne (Australia); Narayan, Seema [School of Economics, Finance and Marketing, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Prasad, Arti [Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University (Australia)

    2008-09-15

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between oil price and the Fiji-US exchange rate using daily data for the period 2000-2006. We use the generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) and exponential GARCH (EGARCH) models to estimate the impact of oil price on the nominal exchange rate. We find that a rise in oil prices leads to an appreciation of the Fijian dollar vis-a-vis the US dollar. (author)

  16. Understanding the oil price-exchange rate nexus for the Fiji islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Paresh Kumar; Narayan, Seema; Prasad, Arti

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between oil price and the Fiji-US exchange rate using daily data for the period 2000-2006. We use the generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) and exponential GARCH (EGARCH) models to estimate the impact of oil price on the nominal exchange rate. We find that a rise in oil prices leads to an appreciation of the Fijian dollar vis-a-vis the US dollar. (author)

  17. Understanding structure of urban traffic network based on spatial-temporal correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfang; Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong; Han, Shixiu; Dong, Honghui

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the structural characteristics of urban traffic network comprehensively can provide references for improving road utilization rate and alleviating traffic congestion. This paper focuses on the spatial-temporal correlations between different pairs of traffic series and proposes a complex network-based method of constructing the urban traffic network. In the network, the nodes represent road segments, and an edge between a pair of nodes is added depending on the result of significance test for the corresponding spatial-temporal correlation. Further, a modified PageRank algorithm, named the geographical weight-based PageRank algorithm (GWPA), is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of important segments in the road network. Finally, experiments are conducted by using three kinds of traffic series collected from the urban road network in Beijing. Experimental results show that the urban traffic networks constructed by three traffic variables all indicate both small-world and scale-free characteristics. Compared with the results of PageRank algorithm, GWPA is proved to be valid in evaluating the importance of segments and identifying the important segments with small degree.

  18. Toward a better understanding of the comparatively high prostate cancer incidence rates in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M; Hilton, Sterling C; Wiggins, Charles L; Sturgeon, Jared D

    2003-04-29

    This study assesses whether comparatively high prostate cancer incidence rates among white men in Utah represent higher rates among members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormons), who comprise about 70% of the state's male population, and considers the potential influence screening has on these rates. Analyses are based on 14,693 histologically confirmed invasive prostate cancer cases among men aged 50 years and older identified through the Utah Cancer Registry between 1985 and 1999. Cancer records were linked to LDS Church membership records to determine LDS status. Poisson regression was used to derive rate ratios of LDS to nonLDS prostate cancer incidence, adjusted for age, disease stage, calendar time, and incidental detection. LDS men had a 31% (95% confidence interval, 26%-36%) higher incidence rate of prostate cancer than nonLDS men during the study period. Rates were consistently higher among LDS men over time (118% in 1985-88, 20% in 1989-92, 15% in 1993-1996, and 13% in 1997-99); age (13% in ages 50-59, 48% in ages 60-69, 28% in ages 70-79, and 16% in ages 80 and older); and stage (36% in local/regional and 17% in unstaged). An age- and stage-shift was observed for both LDS and nonLDS men, although more pronounced among LDS men. Comparatively high prostate cancer incidence rates among LDS men in Utah are explained, at least in part, by more aggressive screening among these men.

  19. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-08

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. The construction of an amino acid network for understanding protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Zhou, Jianhong; Sun, Maomin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) are undirected networks consisting of amino acid residues and their interactions in three-dimensional protein structures. The analysis of AANs provides novel insight into protein science, and several common amino acid network properties have revealed diverse classes of proteins. In this review, we first summarize methods for the construction and characterization of AANs. We then compare software tools for the construction and analysis of AANs. Finally, we review the application of AANs for understanding protein structure and function, including the identification of functional residues, the prediction of protein folding, analyzing protein stability and protein-protein interactions, and for understanding communication within and between proteins.

  1. Social media and rating sites as tools to understanding quality of care: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Lise M; Van de Belt, Tom H; Engelen, Lucien J L P G; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kool, Rudolf B

    2014-02-20

    Insight into the quality of health care is important for any stakeholder including patients, professionals, and governments. In light of a patient-centered approach, it is essential to assess the quality of health care from a patient's perspective, which is commonly done with surveys or focus groups. Unfortunately, these "traditional" methods have significant limitations that include social desirability bias, a time lag between experience and measurement, and difficulty reaching large groups of people. Information on social media could be of value to overcoming these limitations, since these new media are easy to use and are used by the majority of the population. Furthermore, an increasing number of people share health care experiences online or rate the quality of their health care provider on physician rating sites. The question is whether this information is relevant to determining or predicting the quality of health care. The goal of our research was to systematically analyze the relation between information shared on social media and quality of care. We performed a scoping review with the following goals: (1) to map the literature on the association between social media and quality of care, (2) to identify different mechanisms of this relationship, and (3) to determine a more detailed agenda for this relatively new research area. A recognized scoping review methodology was used. We developed a search strategy based on four themes: social media, patient experience, quality, and health care. Four online scientific databases were searched, articles were screened, and data extracted. Results related to the research question were described and categorized according to type of social media. Furthermore, national and international stakeholders were consulted throughout the study, to discuss and interpret results. Twenty-nine articles were included, of which 21 were concerned with health care rating sites. Several studies indicate a relationship between information

  2. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurry, Peter [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Smuth, James [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  3. A structural equation modeling analysis of students' understanding in basic mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktavia, Rini; Arif, Salmawaty; Ferdhiana, Ridha; Yuni, Syarifah Meurah; Ihsan, Mahyus

    2017-11-01

    This research, in general, aims to identify incoming students' understanding and misconceptions of several basic concepts in mathematics. The participants of this study are the 2015 incoming students of Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science of Syiah Kuala University, Indonesia. Using an instrument that were developed based on some anecdotal and empirical evidences on students' misconceptions, a survey involving 325 participants was administered and several quantitative and qualitative analysis of the survey data were conducted. In this article, we discuss the confirmatory factor analysis using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) on factors that determine the new students' overall understanding of basic mathematics. The results showed that students' understanding on algebra, arithmetic, and geometry were significant predictors for their overall understanding of basic mathematics. This result supported that arithmetic and algebra are not the only predictors of students' understanding of basic mathematics.

  4. Teachers' Understanding of Students' Attitudes and Values toward Physical Activity in Physical Education Dropout Rates and Adolescent Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Structured interviews were used to explore 10th grade teachers' understanding of students' attitudes and values toward physical education and physical activity as a variable in students' probability of dropping physical education and adolescent obesity. When asked how school-based physical education could help combat the problem of students…

  5. Return rates from intertidal foraging from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point: Understanding early human economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vynck, Jan C; Anderson, Robert; Atwater, Chloe; Cowling, Richard M; Fisher, Erich C; Marean, Curtis W; Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The south coast of South Africa provides the earliest evidence for Middle Stone Age (MSA) coastal resource exploitation by early Homo sapiens. In coastal archaeology worldwide, there has been a debate over the general productivity of intertidal foraging, leading to studies that directly measure productivity in some regions, but there have been no such studies in South Africa. Here we present energetic return rate estimates for intertidal foraging along the southern coast of South Africa from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point. Foraging experiments were conducted with Khoi-San descendants of the region, and hourly caloric return rates for experienced foragers were measured on 41 days near low tide and through three seasons over two study years. On-site return rates varied as a function of sex, tidal level, marine habitat type and weather conditions. The overall energetic return rate from the entire sample (1492 kcal h(-1)) equals or exceeds intertidal returns reported from other hunter-gatherer studies, as well as measured return rates for activities as diverse as hunting mammals and plant collecting. Returns are projected to be exceptionally high (∼ 3400 kcal h(-1) for men, ∼ 1900 kcal h(-1) for women) under the best combination of conditions. However, because of the monthly tidal cycle, high return foraging is only possible for about 10 days per month and for only 2-3 h on those days. These experiments suggest that while intertidal resources are attractive, women and children could not have subsisted independently, nor met all their protein-lipid needs from marine resources alone, and would have required substantial additional energy and nutrients from plant gathering and/or from males contributing game. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding the physiology of mindfulness: aortic hemodynamics and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ross W; Bamber, Mandy; Seibert, Gregory S; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Leonard, Joseph T; Salsbury, Rebecca A; Fincham, Frank D

    2016-01-01

    Data were collected to examine autonomic and hemodynamic cardiovascular modulation underlying mindfulness from two independent samples. An initial sample (N = 185) underwent laboratory assessments of central aortic blood pressure and myocardial functioning to investigated the association between mindfulness and cardiac functioning. Controlling for religiosity, mindfulness demonstrated a strong negative relationship with myocardial oxygen consumption and left ventricular work but not heart rate or blood pressure. A second sample (N = 124) underwent a brief (15 min) mindfulness inducing intervention to examine the influence of mindfulness on cardiovascular autonomic modulation via blood pressure variability and heart rate variability. The intervention had a strong positive effect on cardiovascular modulation by decreasing cardiac sympathovagal tone, vasomotor tone, vascular resistance and ventricular workload. This research establishes a link between mindfulness and cardiovascular functioning via correlational and experimental methodologies in samples of mostly female undergraduates. Future directions for research are outlined.

  7. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  8. Understanding resident ratings of teaching in the workplace: a multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Feskens, Remco; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel; Laan, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Providing clinical teachers with feedback about their teaching skills is a powerful tool to improve teaching. Evaluations are mostly based on questionnaires completed by residents. We investigated to what extent characteristics of residents, clinical teachers, and the clinical environment influenced these evaluations, and the relation between residents' scores and their teachers' self-scores. The evaluation and feedback for effective clinical teaching questionnaire (EFFECT) was used to (self)assess clinical teachers from 12 disciplines (15 departments, four hospitals). Items were scored on a five-point Likert scale. Main outcome measures were residents' mean overall scores (MOSs), specific scale scores (MSSs), and clinical teachers' self-evaluation scores. Multilevel regression analysis was used to identify predictors. Residents' scores and self-evaluations were compared. Residents filled in 1,013 questionnaires, evaluating 230 clinical teachers. We received 160 self-evaluations. 'Planning Teaching' and 'Personal Support' (4.52, SD .61 and 4.53, SD .59) were rated highest, 'Feedback Content' (CanMEDS related) (4.12, SD .71) was rated lowest. Teachers in affiliated hospitals showed highest MOS and MSS. Medical specialty did not influence MOS. Female clinical teachers were rated higher for most MSS, achieving statistical significance. Residents in year 1-2 were most positive about their teachers. Residents' gender did not affect the mean scores, except for role modeling. At group level, self-evaluations and residents' ratings correlated highly (Kendall's τ 0.859). Resident evaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teacher's gender, year of residency training, type of hospital, and to a lesser extent teachers' gender. Clinical teachers and residents agree on strong and weak points of clinical teaching.

  9. Understanding Rates of Marijuana Use and Consequences Among Adolescents in a Changing Legal Landscape

    OpenAIRE

    D’Amico, Elizabeth J.; Tucker, Joan S.; Pedersen, Eric R.; Shih, Regina A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review There is not one answer to address whether marijuana use has increased, decreased, or stayed the same given changes in state legalization of medical and non-medical marijuana in the USA. Recent Findings Evidence suggests some health benefits for medical marijuana; however, initiation of marijuana use is a risk factor for developing problem cannabis use. Though use rates have remained stable over recent years, about one in three 10th graders report marijuana use, most adolesc...

  10. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  11. Do Students Understand Our Course Structure? Implications for Important Classroom Attitudes and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elicker, Joelle D.; Foust, Michelle Singer; Perry, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of a course's structure may influence how well students understand what is expected of them. Using the foundation of the industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology literature, the authors modified a measure of "Perceived System Knowledge" (Williams & Levy, 1992) for employee performance appraisal to be appropriate for…

  12. Using Concrete & Representational Experiences to Understand the Structure of DNA: A Four-Step Instructional Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Richards, Debbie; Collins, James; Taylor, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    A description of learning experience that uses a four-step instrumentational framework involving concrete and representational experiences to promote conceptual understanding of abstract biological concepts by a series of closely-related activities is presented. The students are introduced to the structure and implications of DNA using four…

  13. Urban ecological stewardship: understanding the structure, function and network of community-based urban land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika s. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based...

  14. Integrating Model-Based Learning and Animations for Enhancing Students' Understanding of Proteins Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Hussein-Farraj, Rania

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the context of chemistry education reforms in Israel. The study examined a new biochemistry learning unit that was developed to promote in-depth understanding of 3D structures and functions of proteins and nucleic acids. Our goal was to examine whether, and to what extent teaching and learning via…

  15. Queueing theoretic analysis of labor and delivery : Understanding management styles and C-section rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombolay, Matthew; Golen, Toni; Shah, Neel; Shah, Julie

    2017-09-04

    Childbirth is a complex clinical service requiring the coordinated support of highly trained healthcare professionals as well as management of a finite set of critical resources (such as staff and beds) to provide safe care. The mode of delivery (vaginal delivery or cesarean section) has a significant effect on labor and delivery resource needs. Further, resource management decisions may impact the amount of time a physician or nurse is able to spend with any given patient. In this work, we employ queueing theory to model one year of transactional patient information at a tertiary care center in Boston, Massachusetts. First, we observe that the M/G/∞ model effectively predicts patient flow in an obstetrics department. This model captures the dynamics of labor and delivery where patients arrive randomly during the day, the duration of their stay is based on their individual acuity, and their labor progresses at some rate irrespective of whether they are given a bed. Second, using our queueing theoretic model, we show that reducing the rate of cesarean section - a current quality improvement goal in American obstetrics - may have important consequences with regard to the resource needs of a hospital. We also estimate the potential financial impact of these resource needs from the hospital perspective. Third, we report that application of our model to an analysis of potential patient coverage strategies supports the adoption of team-based care, in which attending physicians share responsibilities for patients.

  16. Understanding the Functions of Long Non-Coding RNAs through Their Higher-Order Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have been discovered in eukaryotes, very few molecular mechanisms have been characterized due to an insufficient understanding of lncRNA structure. Therefore, investigations of lncRNA structure and subsequent elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms are urgently needed. However, since lncRNA are high molecular weight molecules, which makes their crystallization difficult, obtaining information about their structure is extremely challenging, and the structures of only several lncRNAs have been determined so far. Here, we review the structure–function relationships of the widely studied lncRNAs found in the animal and plant kingdoms, focusing on the principles and applications of both in vitro and in vivo technologies for the study of RNA structures, including dimethyl sulfate-sequencing (DMS-seq, selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension-sequencing (SHAPE-seq, parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS, and fragmentation sequencing (FragSeq. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of lncRNA biological functions by studying them at the structural level.

  17. Effects of Structural Transparency in System Dynamics Simulators on Performance and Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Kopainsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior exploration is an instructional strategy that has improved performance and understanding in system-dynamics-based simulators, but only to a limited degree. This study investigates whether model transparency, that is, showing users the internal structure of models, can extend the prior exploration strategy and improve learning even more. In an experimental study, participants in a web-based simulation learned about and managed a small developing nation. All participants were provided the prior exploration strategy but only half received prior exploration embedded in a structure-behavior diagram intended to make the underlying model’s structure more transparent. Participants provided with the more transparent strategy demonstrated better understanding of the underlying model. Their performance, however, was the equivalent to those in the less transparent condition. Combined with previous studies, our results suggest that while prior exploration is a beneficial strategy for both performance and understanding, making the model structure transparent with structure-behavior diagrams is more limited in its effect.

  18. Using Model Building in Structural Engineering to Enhance Understanding of Construction Principles and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Holmes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new model building exercise in a second year module in the Department of Civil & Structural Engineering in the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT. The activity aimed to improve students’ understanding of structural engineering, construction principles and methods. It allowed students to practically apply lecture material and construct a scaled model giving them an opportunity to study and visualise a real structure and generate their own ideas on how it should be assembled within a constructivist active learning environment. As a result, lectures were found to be more interactive and students more engaged in the discussions and provided a pathway to bridge the gap between theory (presented in lectures and the reality of their professions, which can aid them in their graduate careers. It is hoped that this type of active learning can be used in other engineering programmes to improve student understanding and as an opportunity to better apply lecture material to the real world.

  19. Understanding Rates of Marijuana Use and Consequences Among Adolescents in a Changing Legal Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Tucker, Joan S; Pedersen, Eric R; Shih, Regina A

    2017-01-01

    There is not one answer to address whether marijuana use has increased, decreased, or stayed the same given changes in state legalization of medical and non-medical marijuana in the USA. Evidence suggests some health benefits for medical marijuana; however, initiation of marijuana use is a risk factor for developing problem cannabis use. Though use rates have remained stable over recent years, about one in three 10th graders report marijuana use, most adolescents do not view the drug as harmful, and over 650,000 youth aged 12 to 17 struggle with cannabis use disorder. Although the health benefits of medical marijuana are becoming better understood, more research is needed. Intervention and prevention programs must better address effects of marijuana, acknowledging that while there may be some benefits medically, marijuana use can affect functioning during adolescence when the brain is still developing.

  20. Understanding Response Rates to Surveys About Family Members' Psychological Symptoms After Patients' Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ann C; Downey, Lois; Engelberg, Ruth A; Nielsen, Elizabeth; Ciechanowski, Paul; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-07-01

    Achieving adequate response rates from family members of critically ill patients can be challenging, especially when assessing psychological symptoms. To identify factors associated with completion of surveys about psychological symptoms among family members of critically ill patients. Using data from a randomized trial of an intervention to improve communication between clinicians and families of critically ill patients, we examined patient-level and family-level predictors of the return of usable surveys at baseline, three months, and six months (n = 181, 171, and 155, respectively). Family-level predictors included baseline symptoms of psychological distress, decisional independence preference, and attachment style. We hypothesized that family with fewer symptoms of psychological distress, a preference for less decisional independence, and secure attachment style would be more likely to return questionnaires. We identified several predictors of the return of usable questionnaires. Better self-assessed family member health status was associated with a higher likelihood and stronger agreement with a support-seeking attachment style with a lower likelihood, of obtaining usable baseline surveys. At three months, family-level predictors of return of usable surveys included having usable baseline surveys, status as the patient's legal next of kin, and stronger agreement with a secure attachment style. The only predictor of receipt of surveys at six months was the presence of usable surveys at three months. We identified several predictors of the receipt of surveys assessing psychological symptoms in family of critically ill patients, including family member health status and attachment style. Using these characteristics to inform follow-up mailings and reminders may enhance response rates. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo

  2. Structural determinants of phenotypic diversity and replication rate of human prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri G Safar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infectious pathogen responsible for prion diseases is the misfolded, aggregated form of the prion protein, PrPSc. In contrast to recent progress in studies of laboratory rodent-adapted prions, current understanding of the molecular basis of human prion diseases and, especially, their vast phenotypic diversity is very limited. Here, we have purified proteinase resistant PrPSc aggregates from two major phenotypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, determined their conformational stability and replication tempo in vitro, as well as characterized structural organization using recently emerged approaches based on hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. Our data clearly demonstrate that these phenotypically distant prions differ in a major way with regard to their structural organization, both at the level of the polypeptide backbone (as indicated by backbone amide H/D exchange data as well as the quaternary packing arrangements (as indicated by H/D exchange kinetics for histidine side chains. Furthermore, these data indicate that, in contrast to previous observations on yeast and some murine prion strains, the replication rate of sCJD prions is primarily determined not by conformational stability but by specific structural features that control the growth rate of prion protein aggregates.

  3. Understanding sexual activity and Chlamydia testing rate based on linked national survey and Medicaid claims data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Tao

    Full Text Available Monitoring adherence to national recommendations for annual chlamydia screening of female adolescents and young adult women is important for targeting quality improvement interventions to improve low screening rates. However, accurate measurement of rates may vary depending on the data source used to determine eligible sexually-active women.The 2001-2004 NHANES data linked with Medicaid administrative data by respondent's unique identifier, the 2011-2012 NHANES data, and the 2004 and 2010 Medicaid data were used in this cross-sectional analysis. We defined self-reported sexual activity by self-reported sexual behaviors, claim-identified sexual activity by reproductive-related claims among women who had ≥ one healthcare claim, HEDIS-defined sexual activity by reproductive-related claims among women who were enrolled in Medicaid for ≥330 days and had ≥ one healthcare claim, and chlamydia tests by claims submitted in the 12 months prior to the survey interview.Of Medicaid women aged 18-25 years, 91.5% self-reported to be sexually-active. Of self-reported sexually-active women aged 18-25 years, 92.0% had ≥ one healthcare claim in the 12 months prior to the survey interview; of this subpopulation, only 58.8% were enrolled in Medicaid for ≥ 330 days in the 12 months prior to the survey interview; of this further subpopulation, 74.1% had healthcare claims identifying them as sexually-active in the 12 months prior to the survey interview. Of HEDIS-defined sexually-active women, 42.4% had chlamydia testing.Our study suggests that the number of sexually-active women aged 18-25 years used as the denominator in the chlamydia testing measure could be significantly different, depending upon the definition applied and the data used. Our data highlight the limited representativeness of Medicaid population in the current HEDIS measure on chlamydia testing when a high proportion of women who were enrolled in Medicaid for <330 days had been excluded from

  4. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways--structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Pär

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-01-01

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  6. Toward a Demographic Understanding of Incarceration Disparities: Race, Ethnicity, and Age Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Matt; Porter, Lauren C

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics in the United States are more likely to be incarcerated than non-Hispanic whites. The risk of incarceration also varies with age, and there are striking differences in age distributions across racial/ethnic groups. Guided by these trends, the present study examines the extent to which differences in age structure account for incarceration disparities across racial and ethnic groups. We apply two techniques commonly employed in the field of demography, age-standardization and decomposition, to data provided by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and the 2010 decennial census to assess the contribution of age structure to racial and ethnic disparities in incarceration. The non-Hispanic black and Hispanic incarceration rates in 2010 would have been 13-20 % lower if these groups had age structures identical to that of the non-Hispanic white population. Moreover, age structure accounts for 20 % of the Hispanic/white disparity and 8 % of the black/white disparity. The comparison of crude incarceration rates across racial/ethnic groups may not be ideal because these groups boast strikingly different age structures. Since the risk of imprisonment is tied to age, criminologists should consider adjusting for age structure when comparing rates of incarceration across groups.

  7. Understanding the GPCR biased signaling through G protein and arrestin complex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2017-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets for many human diseases. The determination of the 3-D structure of GPCRs and their signaling complexes has promoted our understanding of GPCR biology and provided templates for structure-based drug discovery. In this review, we focus on the recent structure work on GPCR signaling complexes, the β2-adrenoreceptor-Gs and the rhodopsin-arrestin complexes in particular, and highlight the structural features of GPCR complexes involved in G protein- and arrestin-mediated signal transduction. The crystal structures reveal distinct structural mechanisms by which GPCRs recruit a G protein and an arrestin. A comparison of the two complex structures provides insight into the molecular mechanism of functionally selective GPCR signaling, and a structural basis for the discovery of G protein- and arrestin-biased treatments of human diseases related to GPCR signal transduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A generalized one-factor term structure model and pricing of interest rate derivative securities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, George J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a nonparametric interest rate term structure model and investigate its implications on term structure dynamics and prices of interest rate derivative securities. The nonparametric spot interest rate process is estimated from the observed short-term interest

  9. Integrating Model-Based Learning and Animations for Enhancing Students' Understanding of Proteins Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Hussein-Farraj, Rania

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the context of chemistry education reforms in Israel. The study examined a new biochemistry learning unit that was developed to promote in-depth understanding of 3D structures and functions of proteins and nucleic acids. Our goal was to examine whether, and to what extent teaching and learning via model-based learning and animations of biomolecules affect students' chemical understanding. Applying the mixed methods research paradigm, pre- and post-questionnaires as well as class-observations were employed in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data. The research population included 175 grade twelve students, divided into three research groups: (a) hands-on exploration of animations, (b) teacher's demonstrations of animations, (c) traditional learning using textbooks. Findings indicated that the integration of model-based learning and 3D animations enhanced students' understanding of proteins' structure and function and their ability to transfer across different levels of chemistry understanding. Findings also indicated that teachers' demonstrations of animations may enhance students' `knowledge'—a low order thinking skill; however, in order to enhance higher levels of thinking, students should be able to explore 3D animations on their own. Applying constructivist and interpretative analysis of the data, three themes were raised, corresponding to cognitive, affective, and social aspects of learning while exploring web-based models and animations.

  10. The Pathology of structure of explanations in understanding of literary texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyar Alavi Moghaddam

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional and non-scientific classification shade to educational and research Persian literature and literary education and research haven't grown up. The aim of explanation of text is to rub off difficulties and to lead reader to deep understanding. In semantics studies of understanding and interpretation of text, to familiar with the place of meaning in literary tradition and new approaches of criticism, the acceptance of multi meaning in interpretation texts are necessary. The role of interpreter is very important, because he can relate between the world of text and the world of reader and so between semantic horizon of writer and poet and mental horizon.   We can step in analysing interpretation of Hafez' poem and pathology of this area, because of expanding of research about Hafez and his explanations. There are four difficulties in these explanations: structural, semantic, lexical and figural. In this article, we will pay attention to just structural difficulties. These structural difficulties are unversatility system, incomprehensiveness, nonalaystic of explanations, mistake methods in educating and to ignore relation between Hafez's Verses in semantic texture of Ghazal. Certainly, it is necessary to pay scientific, analytic criticism in Hafez's explanations as one of the areas in understanding of his poems.

  11. Multifunctional light escaping architecture inspired by compound eye surface structures: From understanding to experimental demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Min; Park, Gyeong Cheol; Jang, Sung Jun; Ha, Jong Hoon; Yu, Jae Su; Lee, Yong Tak

    2011-03-14

    We present bioinspired artificial compound eye surface structures that consist of antireflective subwavelength structures (SWSs) on hexagonally patterned microstructures (MSs), for the purpose of efficient light escaping inside light-emitting materials/devices. Theoretical understanding and geometrical optimization of SWSs on MSs are described together with rigorous coupled-wave analysis. As a proof of this concept, AlGaInP red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with SWS/MSs were fabricated, and a light output power enhancement of 72.47% was achieved as compared to that of conventional LEDs. The artificial compound eye structures are not limited to LEDs, and the fabrication process is compatible with most semiconductor device manufacturing processes; hence, this concept opens up new possibilities for improving the optical performance of various optoelectronic device applications.

  12. UNDERSTANDING THE STRUCTURE OF THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN NORMAL EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Liam; Kim, Dong-Woo; Chandra Galaxy Atlas

    2018-01-01

    The hot interstellar medium (ISM) of early-type galaxies (ETG's) provides crucial insight into the understanding of their formation and evolution. Mechanisms such as type Ia supernovae heating, AGN feedback, deepening potential depth through dark matter assembly and ramp-pressure stripping are known to affect the structure of the ISM. By using temperature maps and radial temperature profiles of the hot ISM from ~70 ETG's with archival Chandra data, it is possible to classify the galaxy's ISM into common structural types. This is extended by using 3D fitting of the radial temperature profile in order to provide models that further constrain the structural types. Five structural types are present, negative (temperature decreases with radii), positive (temperature increases with radii), hybrid-dip (temperature decreases at small radii and increases at large radii), hybrid-bump (inverse of hybrid-dip) and quasi-isothermal (temperature is constant at all radii). This work will be continued by 1) determining which mechanisms are present in which galaxies and 2) analysing the model parameters between galaxies within each structural type to determine whether each type can be described by a single set of model parameters, indicating that the same physical processes are responsible for creating that structural type.

  13. Testing General Relativity using the growth rate of structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouri, Athina; Basilakos, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    We place tight constraints on the growth index γ by using the recent growth history results of 2dFGRS, SDSS-LRG, VIMOS-VLT deep Survey (VVDS), and WiggleZ datasets. Utilizing a standard likelihood analysis, we find that the use of the combined growth data provided by the previous mentioned galaxy surveys, puts the most stringent constraints on the value of the growth index. Assuming a constant growth index, we obtain that γ = 0.602±0.055 for the concordance ΛCDM expansion model. Based on the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati gravity model, we find γ = 0.503±0.06 which is lower, and almost 3σ away, from the theoretically predicted value of γ DGP ≊ 11/16 implying that the present growth rate data disfavor the DGP gravity

  14. Understanding human thiol dioxygenase enzymes: structure to function, and biology to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Bibekananda; Kulharia, Mahesh; Mantha, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a significant metabolic activity in humans, especially of sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine (Cys). Cys is cytotoxic and neurotoxic in nature; hence, mammalian cells maintain a constant intracellular level of Cys. Metabolism of Cys is mainly regulated by two thiol dioxygenases: cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and 2-aminoethanethiol dioxygenase (ADO). CDO and ADO are the only human thiol dioxygenases reported with a role in Cys metabolism and localized to mitochondria. This metabolic pathway is important in various human disorders, as it is responsible for the synthesis of antioxidant glutathione and is also for the synthesis of hypotaurine and taurine. CDO is the most extensively studied protein, whose high-resolution crystallographic structures have been solved. As compared to CDO, ADO is less studied, even though it has a key role in cysteamine metabolism. To further understand ADO's structure and function, the three-dimensional structures have been predicted from I-TASSER and SWISS-MODEL servers and validated with PROCHECK software. Structural superimposition approach using iPBA web server further confirmed near-identical structures (including active sites) for the predicted protein models of ADO as compared to CDO. In addition, protein-protein interaction and their association in patho-physiology are crucial in understanding protein functions. Both ADO and CDO interacting partner profiles have been presented using STRING database. In this study, we have predicted a 3D model structure for ADO and summarized the biological roles and the pathological consequences which are associated with the altered expression and functioning of ADO and CDO in case of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  15. Estimation of mortality rates in stage-structured population

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Simon N

    1991-01-01

    The stated aims of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics allow for work that is "unfinished or tentative". This volume is offered in that spirit. The problem addressed is one of the classics of statistical ecology, the estimation of mortality rates from stage-frequency data, but in tackling it we found ourselves making use of ideas and techniques very different from those we expected to use, and in which we had no previous experience. Specifically we drifted towards consideration of some rather specific curve and surface fitting and smoothing techniques. We think we have made some progress (otherwise why publish?), but are acutely aware of the conceptual and statistical clumsiness of parts of the work. Readers with sufficient expertise to be offended should regard the monograph as a challenge to do better. The central theme in this book is a somewhat complex algorithm for mortality estimation (detailed at the end of Chapter 4). Because of its complexity, the job of implementing the method is intimidating. Any r...

  16. Establishing the solubility and local structure(s) of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate (ACC): Toward an understanding of invertebrate biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Ulrich, R. N.; Michel, F. M.; Dove, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution imaging show the widespreadd occurrence of multistep pathways to mineralization in biological and geological settings (De Yoreo et al., 2015, Science). For example, carbonate biomineralization often involves precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) as a reactive intermediate that subsequently transforms to crystalline products with diverse structures. Although current carbonate mineral proxies are based upon the composition of final crystalline products, the final signatures may be recording the properties of the initial amorphous phase. Thus, it is critical to establish the physical properties of ACC and understand the factors that influence its evolution to final products at conditions that approximate biological environments. This disconnect limits our ability to build a process-based understanding of when/how minor and trace elements are recorded in mineral composition proxies. In this experimental study, we quantified the chemical and physical properties of ACC and its evolution to final products. We first determined ACC solubility under controlled chemical conditions using a new type of flow-through reactor developed by our research group (Blue and Dove, 2015, GCA; Blue et al., 2017, GCA). The experimental design varied Mg concentration and total alkalinity while maintaining a mild pH that approximates biological environments. ACC solubility was measured at specific time points during the precipitation (from super- and undersaturated conditions) and during its subsequent evolution. Parallel experiments characterized the structure of the corresponding amorphous products using in situ pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses. The measurements demonstrate at least two types of ACC can be produced by tuning Mg concentration and alkalinity. Each "phase" exhibits distinct short-range ordering that demonstrates structure-specific solubility. We also find temporal changes in the

  17. Investigation of the fluid flow dynamic parameters for Newtonian and non-Newtonian materials: an approach to understanding the fluid flow-like structures within fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H.; Shiomi, Y.; Ma, K.-F.

    2017-11-01

    To understand the fault zone fluid flow-like structure, namely the ductile deformation structure, often observed in the geological field (e.g., Ramsay and Huber The techniques of modern structure geology, vol. 1: strain analysis, Academia Press, London, 1983; Hobbs and Ord Structure geology: the mechanics of deforming metamorphic rocks, Vol. I: principles, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015), we applied a theoretical approach to estimate the rate of deformation, the shear stress and the time to form a streak-line pattern in the boundary layer of viscous fluids. We model the dynamics of streak lines in laminar boundary layers for Newtonian and pseudoplastic fluids and compare the results to those obtained via laboratory experiments. The structure of deformed streak lines obtained using our model is consistent with experimental observations, indicating that our model is appropriate for understanding the shear rate, flow time and shear stress based on the profile of deformed streak lines in the boundary layer in Newtonian and pseudoplastic viscous materials. This study improves our understanding of the transportation processes in fluids and of the transformation processes in fluid-like materials. Further application of this model could facilitate understanding the shear stress and time history of the fluid flow-like structure of fault zones observed in the field.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. 3D lidar imaging for detecting and understanding plant responses and canopy structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omasa, Kenji; Hosoi, Fumiki; Konishi, Atsumi

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and diagnosing plant responses to stress will benefit greatly from three-dimensional (3D) measurement and analysis of plant properties because plant responses are strongly related to their 3D structures. Light detection and ranging (lidar) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct 3D measurement of plant structure. Here the use of 3D lidar imaging to estimate plant properties such as canopy height, canopy structure, carbon stock, and species is demonstrated, and plant growth and shape responses are assessed by reviewing the development of lidar systems and their applications from the leaf level to canopy remote sensing. In addition, the recent creation of accurate 3D lidar images combined with natural colour, chlorophyll fluorescence, photochemical reflectance index, and leaf temperature images is demonstrated, thereby providing information on responses of pigments, photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal opening, and shape to environmental stresses; these data can be integrated with 3D images of the plants using computer graphics techniques. Future lidar applications that provide more accurate dynamic estimation of various plant properties should improve our understanding of plant responses to stress and of interactions between plants and their environment. Moreover, combining 3D lidar with other passive and active imaging techniques will potentially improve the accuracy of airborne and satellite remote sensing, and make it possible to analyse 3D information on ecophysiological responses and levels of various substances in agricultural and ecological applications and in observations of the global biosphere.

  19. From patterns to causal understanding: Structural equation modeling (SEM) in soil ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Powell, Jeff R; Grace, James B.; Bowker, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    In this perspectives paper we highlight a heretofore underused statistical method in soil ecological research, structural equation modeling (SEM). SEM is commonly used in the general ecological literature to develop causal understanding from observational data, but has been more slowly adopted by soil ecologists. We provide some basic information on the many advantages and possibilities associated with using SEM and provide some examples of how SEM can be used by soil ecologists to shift focus from describing patterns to developing causal understanding and inspiring new types of experimental tests. SEM is a promising tool to aid the growth of soil ecology as a discipline, particularly by supporting research that is increasingly hypothesis-driven and interdisciplinary, thus shining light into the black box of interactions belowground.

  20. Association between objective measurement of the speech intelligibility of young people with dysarthria and listener ratings of ease of understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Sophie; Pennington, Lindsay; Miller, Nick; Robson, Sheila; Thompson, Vicki; Steen, Nick

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between listeners' ratings of how much effort it took to understand the speech of young people with cerebral palsy and the percentage of words listeners actually understood. Thirty-one young people with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (16 males, 15 females; mean age = 11 years, SD = 3) were audio recorded repeating single words and producing speech. Objective measures of intelligibility were calculated for multiple familiar and unfamiliar listeners using a forced choice paradigm for single words and verbatim orthographic transcriptions for connected speech. Listeners rated how much effort it took to understand speech in each condition using a 5-point ordinal ease of listening (EOL) scale. Agreement on EOL within rater groups was high (ICC > 0.71). An effect of listener was observed for familiar listeners, but not for unfamiliar listeners. EOL agreement between familiar and unfamiliar listeners was weak-moderate (ICC = 0.46). EOL predicted the percentage of speech actually understood by familiar and unfamiliar listeners (r > 0.56, p < 0.001 for all predictions). Strongest associations between EOL and intelligibility were observed for speakers with mild and profound impairments. The findings of this study demonstrate that listeners can judge how well they have understood dysarthric speech. EOL is associated with listener familiarity, speech task and speech impairment severity. EOL is appropriate for use in clinical practice as a measure of communication activity.

  1. Rating

    OpenAIRE

    Karas, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Charakteristika ratingu. Dělení a druhy ratingu (rating emise × rating emitenta; dlouhodobý rating × krátkodobý rating; mezinárodní rating × lokální rating). Obecné požadavky kladené na rating. Proces tvorby ratingu. Vyžádaný rating. Nevyžádaný rating. Ratingový proces na bázi volně přístupných informací. Uplatňované ratingové systémy. Ratingová kriteria. Využití a interpretace ratingové známky. Funkce ratingu. Rating v souvislosti s BASEL II. Rating v souvislosti s hospodářskými krizemi....

  2. Understanding the Global Structure and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made during the first six months of the second year of the NASA Living with a Star program contract Understanding the global structure and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period November 18, 2003 - May 17,2004. Under this contract SAIC has conducted numerical and data analysis related to fundamental issues concerning the origin, intrinsic properties, global structure, and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind. During this working period we have focused on a quantitative assessment of 5 flux rope fitting techniques. In the following sections we summarize the main aspects of this work and our proposed investigation plan for the next reporting period. Thus far, our investigation has resulted in 6 refereed scientific publications and we have presented the results at a number of scientific meetings and workshops.

  3. A Study to Understand the Potential Vulnerabilities to the Foundations of Historic Structures in Coastal Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. L.; Curran, B.; Jefferson, M.; Routhier, M.; Mulukutla, G. K.

    2011-12-01

    Sea level rise, one of the most important manifestations of climate change is expected to result in increased coastal erosion and storm surge flooding. This work reports on a project undertaken to assess the vulnerability of foundations of historic structures in coastal areas to the potential consequences from climate change resulting from increased storm surge flooding. Foundations of historic buildings are especially vulnerable to the seepage and ground water intrusion. Many historic structures themselves are used to house valuable historic collections making it all the important to preserve and protect these structures. Data collected from a field subsurface geophysical survey, geospatial field survey, and a simulation to understand the hydrological conditions of the site useful to build an understanding of threats to foundations of historic structures located on the coast. The study site chosen for this project is the Strawbery Banke Living History Museum, in Portsmouth, NH. Located very close to the banks of the Piscataqua River at its meeting point with the Atlantic Ocean, it consists of many buildings of historical importance dating as far back as 1690. Upstream of the river is the tidal estuary system, the Great Bay which itself is formed by a confluence of seven major rivers, making it a highly dynamic, tide-dominated body of fresh and saltwater. Strawbery Banke is representative of historic structures, located on the Northeastern coast of the US, that will likely be impacted by climate change. The primary threat to the sub-structures for the site is Puddle Dock; a tidal inlet , that lies at the heart of the facility, that once provided direct river access to Strawbery Banke (and since filled around 1900). Results from the long term deployment of in -situ water level loggers in test wells, temperature and relative humidity sensors, and a ground penetration radar survey of the Puddle Dock, along with the detailed fine-scale elevation survey of the site

  4. Understanding the structure of Exmoor's peatland ecosystems using laser-scanning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscombe, D. J.; Anderson, K.; Wetherelt, A.; Grand-Clement, E.; Le-Feuvre, N.; Smith, D.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    Upland blanket peatlands in the UK are of high conservation value and in an intact state, provide important landscape services, such as carbon sequestration and flood attenuation. The drainage of many such wetlands for agricultural reclamation has resulted in changes to upland blanket mire topography, ecology, hydrological processes and carbon fluxes. There is a need for spatially explicit monitoring approaches at peatland sites in the UK as although there has been a national effort to restore drained peat uplands, baseline and post restoration monitoring of changes to ecosystem structure and function is largely absent. Climate change policy and the emerging carbon markets also necessitate the need for enhanced system understanding to inform carbon targets and understand the impacts of restoration. Exmoor is the focus of this research because many areas of upland peat have, in the past, been extensively drained through government "moorland reclamation" programs. A large restoration project funded by South West Water is currently underway in association with Exmoor National Park, The Environment Agency and Natural England. Exmoor also provides an analogue for other westerly peatlands in the British Isles in terms of its climate, ecology and drainage characteristics. Our approach employed airborne LiDAR data gathered by the Environment Agency Geomatics Group coupled with Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys. LiDAR data were processed to produce digital surface models (DSM) of the peatland surface at a 0.5m resolution. These data were further interrogated to separate vegetation structures and geomorphic features such as man-made drainage channels which have damaged the peatland. Over small extents the LiDAR derived DSM surface was then compared to a TLS derived DSM to examine the ability of these models to describe fine scale vegetation and geomorphic structure, which could then be extrapolated to larger spatial extents. Exploration of the data has shown that

  5. Understanding the genetic diversity and population structure of yam (Dioscorea alata L.) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Gemma; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Mn, Sheela; Chair, Hana; Malapa, Roger; Lebot, Vincent; K, Abraham; Perrier, Xavier; Petro, Dalila; Penet, Laurent; Pavis, Claudie

    2017-01-01

    Yams (Dioscorea sp.) are staple food crops for millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Dioscorea alata, also known as greater yam, is one of the major cultivated species and most widely distributed throughout the tropics. Despite its economic and cultural importance, very little is known about its origin, diversity and genetics. As a consequence, breeding efforts for resistance to its main disease, anthracnose, have been fairly limited. The objective of this study was to contribute to the understanding of D. alata genetic diversity by genotyping 384 accessions from different geographical regions (South Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean), using 24 microsatellite markers. Diversity structuration was assessed via Principal Coordinate Analysis, UPGMA analysis and the Bayesian approach implemented in STRUCTURE. Our results revealed the existence of a wide genetic diversity and a significant structuring associated with geographic origin, ploidy levels and morpho-agronomic characteristics. Seventeen major groups of genetically close cultivars have been identified, including eleven groups of diploid cultivars, four groups of triploids and two groups of tetraploids. STRUCTURE revealed the existence of six populations in the diploid genetic pool and a few admixed cultivars. These results will be very useful for rationalizing D. alata genetic resources in breeding programs across different regions and for improving germplasm conservation methods.

  6. Mini-review: Current Understanding of the Correlation of Lignin Structure with Biomass Recalcitrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lignin, a complex aromatic polymer in terrestrial plants, contributes significantly to biomass recalcitrance to microbial and/or enzymatic deconstruction. To reduce biomass recalcitrance, substantial endeavors have been exerted on pretreatment and lignin engineering in the past few decades. Lignin removal and/or alteration of lignin structure have been shown to result in reduced biomass recalcitrance with improved cell wall digestibility. While high lignin content is usually a barrier to a cost-efficient application of bioresource to biofuels, the direct correlation of lignin structure and its concomitant properties with biomass remains unclear due to the complexity of cell wall and lignin structure. Advancement in application of biorefinery to production of biofuels, chemicals, and biomaterials necessitates a fundamental understanding of the relationship of lignin structure and biomass recalcitrance. In this mini-review, we focus on recent investigations on the influence of lignin chemical properties on bioprocessability— pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Specifically, lignin-enzyme interaction and the effects of lignin compositional units, hydroxycinnamates, and lignin functional groups on biomass recalcitrance have been highlighted, which will be useful not only in addressing biomass recalcitrance but also in deploying renewable lignocelluloses efficiently.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of standard metabolic rate of snakes: a new proposal for the understanding of interspecific variation in feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuginski, Daniel Rodrigues; Navas, Carlos Arturo; de Barros, Fábio Cury; Camacho, Agustín; Bicudo, José Eduardo Pereira Wilken; Grego, Kathleen Fernandes; de Carvalho, José Eduardo

    2017-10-06

    The current proposal about the variation of standard metabolic rates (SMR) in snakes predicts that SMR is influenced by the feeding frequency (frequent or infrequent feeders). However, feeding frequency in snakes is poorly studied and hard to quantify under natural conditions. Alternatively, foraging strategy was studied for a large number of species and is usually related to the feeding frequency. In this work, we performed a meta-analysis on the SMR of compiled data from 74 species of snakes obtained from the literature and five more different species of lanceheads (genus Bothrops), after categorization according to the foraging mode (ambush or active foraging) and regarding their phylogenetic history. We tested the hypothesis that foraging mode (FM) is a determinant factor on the interspecific variation of SMR despite the phylogenetic relationship among species. We demonstrated that FM predicted SMR, but there is also a partial phylogenetic structuration of SMR in snakes. We also detected that evolution rates of SMR in active foragers seem to be higher than ambush-hunting snakes. We suggested that foraging mode has a major effect over the evolution of SMR in snakes, which could represent an ecophysiological co-adaptation, since ambush hunters (with low feeding rates) present a lower maintenance energetic cost (SMR) when compared to active foragers. The higher SMR evolution rates for active foraging snakes could be related to a higher heterogeny in the degree of activity during hunting by active foragers when compared to ambush-hunting snakes.

  8. Household structure vs. composition: Understanding gendered effects on educational progress in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Madhavan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Demographers have long been interested in the relationship between living arrangements and gendered outcomes for children in sub-Saharan Africa. Most research conflates household structure with composition and has revealed little about the pathways that link these components to gendered outcomes. Objective: We offer a conceptual approach that differentiates structure from composition with a focus on gendered processes that operate in the household in rural South Africa. Methods: We use data from the 2002 round of the Agincourt Health and Socio-Demographic Surveillance System. Our analytical sample includes 22,997 children aged 6‒18 who were neither parents themselves nor lived with a partner or partner's family. We employ ordinary least squares regression models to examine the effects of structure and composition on educational progress of girls and boys. Results: Non-nuclear structures are associated with similar negative effects for both boys and girls compared to children growing up in nuclear households. However, the presence of other kin in the absence of one or both parents results in gendered effects favouring boys. Conclusions: The absence of any gendered effects when using a household structure typology suggests that secular changes to attitudes about gender equity trump any specific gendered processes stemming from particular configurations. On the other hand, gendered effects that appear when one or both parents are absent show that traditional gender norms and/or resource constraints continue to favour boys. Contribution: We have shown the value of unpacking household structure to better understand how gender norms and gendered resource allocations are linked to an important outcome for children in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. Understanding the effects of alpha self-irradiation on the glass structure by coupling spectroscopic studies and atomistic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, G.

    2008-12-01

    Our objective was to assess irradiation effects on nuclear containment glass in order to guarantee glass performance when subjected to high alpha decay doses. Experimental studies and molecular dynamics modeling provided a better understanding of the impact of cumulative alpha decay on the structural behavior of complex nuclear glass formulations and of simplified glass models. A mechanism typical of sodium borosilicate glass was identified in response to nuclear interactions or ballistic collisions. The glass local order is slightly modified by the conversion of a fraction of the boron atoms from coordination number IV to III, releasing charge-compensating alkali ions that become available as network modifiers, and resulting in a slight increase in the number of non bridging oxygen atoms. The medium-range order shifts toward increasing disorder in the glass as indicated by broadening of the angular, radial, and size distributions. A model of accumulated quasi-thermal quenching is proposed to account for these changes, based on the two steps describing the reaction of the glass to the alpha decay recoil nucleus: a cascade generates a ballistic phase that completely destabilizes the glass structure with no short and medium-range order, resulting in the loss of the initial structure; glass reconstruction is controlled only by the 'quenching rate' in the displacement cascade, i.e. by its thermal history and the corresponding relaxation options. From this standpoint the final glass structure is the consequence of the ballistic changes and the regenerative capacity of the glass structure, resulting in a higher fictive-temperature glass corresponding to the structural changes identified in this study. (author)

  10. Essays on financial econometrics : modeling the term structure of interest rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, Kees Evert

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation bundles five studies in financial econometrics that are related to the theme of modeling the term structure of interest rates. The main contribution of this dissertation is a new arbitrage-free term structure model that is applied in an empirical analysis of the US term structure.

  11. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, L D; Rivas, J; José-Yacamán, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS 2 will be discussed. MoS 2 -based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important

  12. Evaluating wildlife-cattle contact rates to improve the understanding of dynamics of bovine tuberculosis transmission in Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Michael J; Kay, Shannon L; Pepin, Kim M; Grear, Daniel A; Campa, Henry; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2016-12-01

    Direct and indirect contacts among individuals drive transmission of infectious disease. When multiple interacting species are susceptible to the same pathogen, risk assessment must include all potential host species. Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is an example of a disease that can be transmitted among several wildlife species and to cattle, although the potential role of several wildlife species in spillback to cattle remains unclear. To better understand the complex network of contacts and factors driving disease transmission, we fitted proximity logger collars to beef and dairy cattle (n=37), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; n=29), raccoon (Procyon lotor; n=53), and Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana; n=79) for 16 months in Michigan's Lower Peninsula, USA. We determined inter- and intra-species direct and indirect contact rates. Data on indirect contact was calculated when collared animals visited stationary proximity loggers placed at cattle feed and water resources. Most contact between wildlife species and cattle was indirect, with the highest contact rates occurring between raccoons and cattle during summer and fall. Nearly all visits (>99%) to cattle feed and water sources were by cattle, whereas visitation to stored cattle feed was dominated by deer and raccoon (46% and 38%, respectively). Our results suggest that indirect contact resulting from wildlife species visiting cattle-related resources could pose a risk of disease transmission to cattle and deserves continued attention with active mitigation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Political Market Orientation: A Framework for Understanding Relationship Structures in Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.; Savigny, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This article is motivated by the growing need to integrate the current political science and marketing literature in order to provide a deeper understanding of the behaviour of political actors and their relationships with relevant stakeholder groups. In our article, we demonstrate how Ormrod......’s conceptual model of political market orientation complements political science models of party organization by drawing attention to the competing interests of stakeholders in shaping party strategy and organizational structure. We treat parties as a multitude of actors rather than as monolithic entities...... and thus address the dearth of literature on the micro foundations of parties. Whilst the underlying conceptualization of a political market orientation draws on the management-based ‘relationship marketing’ approach, we acknowledge that the commercial and political contexts are not isomorphic, and thus we...

  14. The right friends in the right places: Understanding network structure as a predictor of voluntary turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Gary A; Cross, Rob; Holtom, Brooks C

    2016-04-01

    Research examining the relationship between social networks and employee retention has focused almost exclusively on the number of direct links and generally found that having more ties decreases the likelihood of turnover. The present research moves beyond simple measures of network centrality to investigate the relationship between 2 additional, and theoretically distinct, facets of social capital and voluntary turnover. In 2 organizations, we found consistent evidence of a negative relationship between reputation, as measured by relationships with highly sought-out others (incoming eigenvector centrality) and voluntary turnover. Further, we found that the negative relationship between brokerage (structural holes) and turnover is significant, but only for higher-level employees. The theoretical and practical implications of expanding the suite of social capital measures to understand voluntary turnover are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. The everyday lives of video game developers: Experimentally understanding underlying systems/structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey O'Donnell

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines how tensions between work and play for video game developers shape the worlds they create. The worlds of game developers, whose daily activity is linked to larger systems of experimentation and technoscientific practice, provide insights that transcend video game development work. The essay draws on ethnographic material from over 3 years of fieldwork with video game developers in the United States and India. It develops the notion of creative collaborative practice based on work in the fields of science and technology studies, game studies, and media studies. The importance of, the desire for, or the drive to understand underlying systems and structures has become fundamental to creative collaborative practice. I argue that the daily activity of game development embodies skills fundamental to creative collaborative practice and that these capabilities represent fundamental aspects of critical thought. Simultaneously, numerous interests have begun to intervene in ways that endanger these foundations of creative collaborative practice.

  16. Future Mars geophysical observatories for understanding its internal structure, rotation, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehant, Veronique; Banerdt, Bruce; Lognonné, Philippe; Grott, Matthias; Asmar, Sami; Biele, Jens; Breuer, Doris; Forget, François; Jaumann, Ralf; Johnson, Catherine; Knapmeyer, Martin; Langlais, Benoit; Le Feuvre, Mathieu; Mimoun, David; Mocquet, Antoine; Read, Peter; Rivoldini, Attilio; Romberg, Oliver; Schubert, Gerald; Smrekar, Sue; Spohn, Tilman; Tortora, Paolo; Ulamec, Stephan; Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2012-08-01

    Our fundamental understanding of the interior of the Earth comes from seismology, geodesy, geochemistry, geomagnetism, geothermal studies, and petrology. For the Earth, measurements in those disciplines of geophysics have revealed the basic internal layering of the Earth, its dynamical regime, its thermal structure, its gross compositional stratification, as well as significant lateral variations in these quantities. Planetary interiors not only record evidence of conditions of planetary accretion and differentiation, they exert significant control on surface environments. We present recent advances in possible in-situ investigations of the interior of Mars, experiments and strategies that can provide unique and critical information about the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolution. Such investigations applied on Mars have been ranked as a high priority in virtually every set of European, US and international high-level planetary science recommendations for the past 30 years. New seismological methods and approaches based on the cross-correlation of seismic noise by two seismic stations/landers on the surface of Mars and on joint seismic/orbiter detection of meteorite impacts, as well as the improvement of the performance of Very Broad-Band (VBB) seismometers have made it possible to secure a rich scientific return with only two simultaneously recording stations. In parallel, use of interferometric methods based on two Earth-Mars radio links simultaneously from landers tracked from Earth has increased the precision of radio science experiments by one order of magnitude. Magnetometer and heat flow measurements will complement seismic and geodetic data in order to obtain the best information on the interior of Mars. In addition to studying the present structure and dynamics of Mars, these measurements will provide important constraints for the astrobiology of Mars by helping to understand why Mars failed to sustain a magnetic field, by

  17. Understanding of radiation effect on sink in aluminum base structure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    In case of aluminum, a slightly different approach is needed for the evaluation of radiation damage. Unlikely other structure materials such as zirconium alloy and iron based alloy, aluminum generate not only matrix defect but also much transmutation. Quantitative analysis of radiation damage of aluminum have been done in two research method. First research method is calculation of radiation damage quantity in the matrix. In this research, quantity of transmutation and matrix damage are evaluated by KMC simulation from ENDF database of IAEA. Most recently, radiation damage such as defect and transmutation are calculated in the MNSR reactor environment. The second research method is evaluation of sink morphology change by irradiation, which research method focus on accumulating behavior of radiation defects. Matrix defect and transmutation are clustering or dissolved by thermal diffusion and energy statue. These clustering defect such as dislocation loop, void and bubble directly affect mechanical properties. In this research area, it is hard to using deterministic method because it should describe envious and various reaction module in detail. However, in case of probabilistic method, it could be explained without detail reaction module. Most recently, there was KMC modeling about vacancy and helium cluster. From this cluster modeling, transmutation is quantitatively analyzed. After that cluster effect on swelling are explained. Unfortunately, silicon, which is another transmutation of aluminum, effect are neglected. Also primary cluster, which is generated by cascade, effect are neglected. For the fundamental understanding of radiation effect on aluminum alloy, it is needed that more various parameter such as alloy element and primary cluster effect should be researched. However, until now there was not general modeling which include alloy element and primary cluster effect on aluminum. However, there was not specified KMC platform for the quantitative analysis of

  18. A structural equation modeling approach to understanding pathways that connect socioeconomic status and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sydney A; Beebe, Laura A; Thompson, David M; Wagener, Theodore L; Terrell, Deirdra R; Campbell, Janis E

    2018-01-01

    The inverse association between socioeconomic status and smoking is well established, yet the mechanisms that drive this relationship are unclear. We developed and tested four theoretical models of the pathways that link socioeconomic status to current smoking prevalence using a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. Using data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey, we selected four indicator variables (poverty ratio, personal earnings, educational attainment, and employment status) that we hypothesize underlie a latent variable, socioeconomic status. We measured direct, indirect, and total effects of socioeconomic status on smoking on four pathways through four latent variables representing social cohesion, financial strain, sleep disturbance, and psychological distress. Results of the model indicated that the probability of being a smoker decreased by 26% of a standard deviation for every one standard deviation increase in socioeconomic status. The direct effects of socioeconomic status on smoking accounted for the majority of the total effects, but the overall model also included significant indirect effects. Of the four mediators, sleep disturbance and psychological distress had the largest total effects on current smoking. We explored the use of structural equation modeling in epidemiology to quantify effects of socioeconomic status on smoking through four social and psychological factors to identify potential targets for interventions. A better understanding of the complex relationship between socioeconomic status and smoking is critical as we continue to reduce the burden of tobacco and eliminate health disparities related to smoking.

  19. Do brain image databanks support understanding of normal ageing brain structure? A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickie, David Alexander; Job, Dominic E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Poole, Ian; Ahearn, Trevor S.; Staff, Roger T.; Murray, Alison D.

    2012-01-01

    To document accessible magnetic resonance (MR) brain images, metadata and statistical results from normal older subjects that may be used to improve diagnoses of dementia. We systematically reviewed published brain image databanks (print literature and Internet) concerned with normal ageing brain structure. From nine eligible databanks, there appeared to be 944 normal subjects aged ≥60 years. However, many subjects were in more than one databank and not all were fully representative of normal ageing clinical characteristics. Therefore, there were approximately 343 subjects aged ≥60 years with metadata representative of normal ageing, but only 98 subjects were openly accessible. No databank had the range of MR image sequences, e.g. T2*, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), required to effectively characterise the features of brain ageing. No databank supported random subject retrieval; therefore, manual selection bias and errors may occur in studies that use these subjects as controls. Finally, no databank stored results from statistical analyses of its brain image and metadata that may be validated with analyses of further data. Brain image databanks require open access, more subjects, metadata, MR image sequences, searchability and statistical results to improve understanding of normal ageing brain structure and diagnoses of dementia. (orig.)

  20. A structural equation modeling approach to understanding pathways that connect socioeconomic status and smoking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney A Martinez

    Full Text Available The inverse association between socioeconomic status and smoking is well established, yet the mechanisms that drive this relationship are unclear. We developed and tested four theoretical models of the pathways that link socioeconomic status to current smoking prevalence using a structural equation modeling (SEM approach. Using data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey, we selected four indicator variables (poverty ratio, personal earnings, educational attainment, and employment status that we hypothesize underlie a latent variable, socioeconomic status. We measured direct, indirect, and total effects of socioeconomic status on smoking on four pathways through four latent variables representing social cohesion, financial strain, sleep disturbance, and psychological distress. Results of the model indicated that the probability of being a smoker decreased by 26% of a standard deviation for every one standard deviation increase in socioeconomic status. The direct effects of socioeconomic status on smoking accounted for the majority of the total effects, but the overall model also included significant indirect effects. Of the four mediators, sleep disturbance and psychological distress had the largest total effects on current smoking. We explored the use of structural equation modeling in epidemiology to quantify effects of socioeconomic status on smoking through four social and psychological factors to identify potential targets for interventions. A better understanding of the complex relationship between socioeconomic status and smoking is critical as we continue to reduce the burden of tobacco and eliminate health disparities related to smoking.

  1. Understanding comorbidity among internalizing problems: Integrating latent structural models of psychopathology and risk mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Benjamin L.; Snyder, Hannah R.; Gulley, Lauren D.; Schweizer, Tina H.; Bijttebier, Patricia; Nelis, Sabine; Toh, Gim; Vasey, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that comorbidity is the rule, not the exception, for categorically defined psychiatric disorders, and this is also the case for internalizing disorders of depression and anxiety. This theoretical review paper addresses the ubiquity of comorbidity among internalizing disorders. Our central thesis is that progress in understanding this co-occurrence can be made by employing latent dimensional structural models that organize both psychopathology as well as vulnerabilities and risk mechanisms and by connecting the multiple levels of risk and psychopathology outcomes together. Different vulnerabilities and risk mechanisms are hypothesized to predict different levels of the structural model of psychopathology. We review the present state of knowledge based on concurrent and developmental sequential comorbidity patterns among common discrete psychiatric disorders in youth, and then we advocate for the use of more recent bifactor dimensional models of psychopathology (e.g., p factor, Caspi et al., 2014) that can help to explain the co-occurrence among internalizing symptoms. In support of this relatively novel conceptual perspective, we review six exemplar vulnerabilities and risk mechanisms, including executive function, information processing biases, cognitive vulnerabilities, positive and negative affectivity aspects of temperament, and autonomic dysregulation, along with the developmental occurrence of stressors in different domains, to show how these vulnerabilities can predict the general latent psychopathology factor, a unique latent internalizing dimension, as well as specific symptom syndrome manifestations. PMID:27739389

  2. Probing The Structure North China To Better Understand Its Evolution, Natural Resources, And Seismic Hazards (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, G. R.; Gao, R.; Qu, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, M.

    2010-12-01

    also recorded across the southern portion of this array. This profile crossed a region where the 3 main faults that pose the major hazard to the city are expressed at the surface. Some shots along this profile were also recorded by the 3-D array, and an earthquake occurred along the edge of the array during one of recording windows. Together, these data are producing an improved understanding of the structure of this area and will aid hazard assessments. These efforts are also being used a basis to conduct comparative studies to better understand seismic hazards in the central U.S. and the tectonic evolution of both regions.

  3. EXCHANGE RATE PASS-THROUGH, IMPORT PRICES AND INFLATION UNDER STRUCTURAL BREAKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arintoko Arintoko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This research estimates the exchange rate pass-through (ERPT into import prices by applying an extension of the basic model of ERPT on Indonesia. It estimates models of cointegration and error-correction mechanism (ECM, with and without structural breaks. It uses the techniques of Zivot-Andrews and of Gregory-Hansen to test for structural breaks and cointegration with the structural breaks, respectively. The results show that with the control variables, inflation affects import prices and lower the pass-through for short term, in a condition of free floating exchange rate. In the short term, with the inclusion of structural breaks, significant inflation affects import prices and lowers the ERPT coefficient.  Keywords:    Exchange rate pass-through, inflation, structural breaks, cointegration, error-correction mechanismJEL classification numbers: C22, C32, E31, F41

  4. Predator attack rate evolution in space: the role of ecology mediated by complex emergent spatial structure and self-shading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Susanna M; Ostling, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Predation interactions are an important element of ecological communities. Population spatial structure has been shown to influence predator evolution, resulting in the evolution of a reduced predator attack rate; however, the evolutionary role of traits governing predator and prey ecology is unknown. The evolutionary effect of spatial structure on a predator's attack rate has primarily been explored assuming a fixed metapopulation spatial structure, and understood in terms of group selection. But endogenously generated, emergent spatial structure is common in nature. Furthermore, the evolutionary influence of ecological traits may be mediated through the spatial self-structuring process. Drawing from theory on pathogens, the evolutionary effect of emergent spatial structure can be understood in terms of self-shading, where a voracious predator limits its long-term invasion potential by reducing local prey availability. Here we formalize the effects of self-shading for predators using spatial moment equations. Then, through simulations, we show that in a spatial context self-shading leads to relationships between predator-prey ecology and the predator's attack rate that are not expected in a non-spatial context. Some relationships are analogous to relationships already shown for host-pathogen interactions, but others represent new trait dimensions. Finally, since understanding the effects of ecology using existing self-shading theory requires simplifications of the emergent spatial structure that do not apply well here, we also develop metrics describing the complex spatial structure of the predator and prey populations to help us explain the evolutionary effect of predator and prey ecology in the context of self-shading. The identification of these metrics may provide a step towards expansion of the predictive domain of self-shading theory to more complex spatial dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Making Sense of Abstract Algebra: Exploring Secondary Teachers' Understandings of Inverse Functions in Relation to Its Group Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on semi-structured, task-based interviews to explore secondary teachers' (N = 7) understandings of inverse functions in relation to abstract algebra. In particular, a concept map task is used to understand the degree to which participants, having recently taken an abstract algebra course, situated inverse functions within its…

  6. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  7. On the Information in the Interest Rate Term Structure and Option Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, F.; Driessen, J.; Pelsser, A.

    2004-01-01

    We examine whether the information in cap and swaption prices is consistent with realized movements of the interest rate term structure. To extract an option-implied interest rate covariance matrix from cap and swaption prices, we use Libor market models as a modelling framework. We propose a

  8. The Relationship between Age Structure and Homicide Rates in the United States, 1970 to 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The nature of the temporal association between age structure and homicide rates between 1970 and 1999 is examined using U.S. county data. Specifically, the following questions are asked: (a) does the strong temporal association between the relative size of the young population and homicide rates demonstrated at the U.S. national level hold at a…

  9. Evaluation of soil structure in the framework of an overall soil quality rating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, L; Shepherd, T G; Schindler, U

    2013-01-01

    Soil structure is an important aspect of agricultural soil quality, and its preservation and improvement are key to sustaining soil functions. Methods of overall soil quality assessment which include visual soil structure information can be useful tools for monitoring and managing the global soil...... resource. The aim of the paper is: (i) to demonstrate the role of visual quantification of soil structure within the procedure of the overall soil quality assessment by the Muencheberg Soil Quality Rating (M-SQR), (ii) to quantify the magnitude and variability of soil structure and overall M......-SQR on a number of agricultural research sites and (iii) to analyse the correlations of soil quality rating results with crop yields. We analysed visual soil structure and overall soil quality on a range of 20 experimental sites in seven countries. To assess visual soil structure we utilised the Visual Soil...

  10. A Model of Target Changes and the Term Structure of Interest Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Pierluigi Balduzzi; Giuseppe Bertola; Silverio Foresi

    1993-01-01

    We explore the effects of official targeting policy on the term-structure of nominal interest rates, adapting relevant insights from theoretical work on "peso problems" to account for realistic infrequency of target changes. Our analysis of daily U.S. interest rates and newly available historical targets provides an interpretation for persistent spreads between short-term money-market rates and overnight fed-funds targets, and for the poor performance of expectations-hypothesis tests: it is t...

  11. Urban Ecological Stewardship: Understanding the Structure, Function and Network of Community-based Urban Land Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based urban land managers, an assessment was conducted in 2004 by the research subcommittee of the Urban Ecology Collaborative. The goal of the assessment was to better understand the role of stewardship organizations engaged in urban ecology initiatives in selected major cities in the Northeastern U.S.: Boston, New Haven, New York City, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. A total of 135 active organizations participated in this assessment. Findings include the discovery of a dynamic social network operating within cities, and a reserve of social capital and expertise that could be better utilized. Although often not the primary land owner, stewardship groups take an increasingly significant responsibility for a wide range of land use types including street and riparian corridors, vacant lots, public parks and gardens, green roofs, etc. Responsibilities include the delivery of public programs as well as daily maintenance and fundraising support. While most of the environmental stewardship organizations operate on staffs of zero or fewer than ten, with small cohorts of community volunteers, there is a significant difference in the total amount of program funding. Nearly all respondents agree that committed resources are scarce and insufficient with stewards relying upon and potentially competing for individual donations, local foundations, and municipal support. This makes it a challenge for the groups to grow beyond their current capacity and to develop long-term programs critical to resource management and education. It also fragments groups, making it difficult for planners and

  12. Space and panic : The application of space syntax to understand the relationship between mortality rates and spatial configuration in Banda Aceh during the tsunami 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakhrurrazi, F.; Van Nes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reveal the correlation between mortality rates from the tsunami of 2004 and the spatial structure of Banda Aceh’s street net. Structurally, the city is divided up in several small villages, which consists of a couple of urban blocks. The mortality rates for each of these

  13. Understanding of electrochemical and structural changes of polypyrrole/polyethylene glycol composite films in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirvu, Cristian; Manole, Claudiu Constantin; Stoian, Andrei Bogdan; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Electrochemical monitoring of PPy and PPy-PEG films over immersion time. → Electrochemical and surface analysis showed that PEG improves the stability of PPy films. → Mott-Schottky analysis reveals p-type conductance for both films. → In situ AFM analysis sustains electrochemical behaviour. → A model of PPy and PPy-PEG films behaviour during immersion was elaborated. - Abstract: Electrochemical monitoring of electrical and structural changes of both PPy and PPy-PEG films electrochemical deposited, in order to highlight if the structural stability offered by PEG has an influence on electrical properties and stability in aqueous solution over immersion time was investigated. Electrochemical analysis suggests that PPy-PEG film inserts cations easier than PPy film for a short immersion time probably due to ability of PEG to form complexes with metal cations. The FTIR spectra showed that the PEG incorporation decreases the rate of PPy overoxidation probably by restraining the electron release and by rendering O 2 inaccessible to PPy. Mott-Schottky analysis based on capacitance measurement reveal p-type conductance for both films. The in situ AFM analysis sustains electrochemical behaviour and has permitted elaboration of a model of PPy and PPy-PEG films behaviour during immersion in testing solution.

  14. Understanding social reproduction: The recursive nature of structure and agency within a science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Gale A.

    Schools and science classrooms within schools continue to contribute to social reproduction and to the disenfranchisement of inner city African American students though attempts have been made to remedy the situation through standards, high-stakes testing, and compensatory programs. Such reforms ignore the sociocultural, political, and economic contexts of the individual students in the schools they are impacting. They do not take into account the uniqueness and diversity of the learners in these settings and have not included the voices of the students. Another possibility was studied here; that of starting with the cultural capital of the learner rather than with external standards. In a non-required science course at a local high school two coteachers endeavored to enact a student-emergent curriculum as a way to foster student agency and to counteract the reproductive nature of schools. The class was examined as a field within multiple other fields. The dialectical relationship between structure and agency in the class was used to frame the analysis and the tension between them was examined at several levels through video and audio analysis. Structural and rational choice views of action were abandoned in favor of an understanding hinged upon strategies of action that actors construct from cultural toolkits in and through practice. In this setting the students and teachers co-constructed a class that can be described and characterized in certain ways yet contained many counter-examples and alternative characterizations. A continuum of successes and failures, agency and subjectivity can be found in the trends and counter-trends in the course. The contradictions were examined to portray the complexity of the interactions and the possibilities for agency within them.

  15. Understanding fluxes as media for directed synthesis: in situ local structure of molten potassium polysulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Daniel P; Chung, Duck Young; Mitchell, J F; Bray, Travis H; Soderholm, L; Chupas, Peter J; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-06-06

    Rational exploratory synthesis of new materials requires routes to discover novel phases and systematic methods to tailor their structures and properties. Synthetic reactions in molten fluxes have proven to be an excellent route to new inorganic materials because they promote diffusion and can serve as an additional reactant, but little is known about the mechanisms of compound formation, crystal precipitation, or behavior of fluxes themselves at conditions relevant to synthesis. In this study we examine the properties of a salt flux system that has proven extremely fertile for growth of new materials: the potassium polysulfides spanning K(2)S(3) and K(2)S(5), which melt between 302 and 206 °C. We present in situ Raman spectroscopy of melts between K(2)S(3) and K(2)S(5) and find strong coupling between n in K(2)S(n) and the molten local structure, implying that the S(n)(2-) chains in the crystalline state are mirrored in the melt. In any reactive flux system, K(2)S(n) included, a signature of changing species in the melt implies that their evolution during a reaction can be characterized and eventually controlled for selective formation of compounds. We use in situ X-ray total scattering to obtain the pair distribution function of molten K(2)S(5) and model the length of S(n)(2-) chains in the melt using reverse Monte Carlo simulations. Combining in situ Raman and total scattering provides a path to understanding the behavior of reactive media and should be broadly applied for more informed, targeted synthesis of compounds in a wide variety of inorganic fluxes.

  16. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...... examples to show how reproductive timing Tc and level R0 are shaped by stage dynamics (individual trait changes), selection on the trait, and parent-offspring phenotypic correlation. We also show how population structure can affect dispersion in reproduction among ages and stages. These macroscopic...... features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  17. The Effect of Three-Dimensional Simulations on the Understanding of Chemical Structures and Their Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Nick, Sabine; Schanze, Sascha

    2009-08-01

    In a series of three experimental studies, the effectiveness of three-dimensional computer simulations to aid the understanding of chemical structures and their properties was investigated. Arguments for the usefulness of three-dimensional simulations were derived from Mayer’s generative theory of multimedia learning. Simulations might lead to a decrease in cognitive load and thus support active learning. In our studies, the learning effectiveness of three-dimensional simulations was compared to two-dimensional illustrations by use of different versions of a computer programme concerning the modifications of carbon. The first and third study with freshman students of chemistry and biochemistry show that no more knowledge was acquired when participants learnt with three-dimensional simulations than with two-dimensional figures. In the second study with 16-year old secondary school students, use of simulations facilitated the acquisition of conceptual knowledge. It was concluded that three-dimensional simulations are more effective for younger students who lack the experience of learning with different visual representation formats in chemistry. In all three studies, a significant relationship between spatial ability and conceptual knowledge about the modifications of carbon was detected.

  18. Understanding herding based on a co-evolutionary model for strategy and game structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tao; Huang, Keke; Cheng, Yuan; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •We model herding effect in emergency from perspective of evolutionary game theory. •Rational subpopulation survives only when the game parameter is significantly large. •Herding effect may arise if the relative rewarding for rational agents is small. •Increasing the relative rewarding for rational agents will prevent herding effect. •The evolution result is unstable if the game parameter approaches critical points. -- Abstract: So far, there has been no conclusion on the mechanism for herding, which is often discussed in the academia. Assuming escaping behavior of individuals in emergency is rational rather than out of panic according to recent findings in social psychology, we investigate the behavioral evolution of large crowds from the perspective of evolutionary game theory. Specifically, evolution of the whole population divided into two subpopulations, namely the co-evolution of strategy and game structure, is numerically simulated based on the game theoretical models built and the evolutionary rule designed, and a series of phenomena including extinction of one subpopulation and herding effect are predicted in the proposed framework. Furthermore, if the rewarding for rational agents becomes significantly larger than that for emotional ones, herding effect will disappear. It is exciting that some phase transition points with interesting properties for the system can be found. In addition, our model framework is able to explain the fact that it is difficult for mavericks to prevail in society. The current results of this work will be helpful in understanding and restraining herding effect in real life

  19. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehan Lee

    Full Text Available The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP of estrogen receptor α (ERα allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors.

  20. IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, E; Kolorenc, J; Wehling, T; Hafermann, H; Lichtenstein, A I; Shick, A B; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Landa, A; McMahan, A K

    2010-04-01

    The solid-state properties of most elements are now well understood on the basis of quantum physics - with few exceptions, notably the element number 94, plutonium. Plutonium has six crystalline phases at ambient pressure, some of which are separated by unusual phase transitions with large discontinuities in volume, exhibit negative thermal expansion coefficients, or form exotic low-symmetry structures. The main challenge to explain these anomalous properties is that the characteristic ingredient of actinides, the 5f electronic states, are in the cross-over regime between the localized and delocalized (itinerant) behaviour in Pu. The early part of the actinide series with the 5f states being itinerant, i.e. part of the metallic bond, culminates with Pu; starting with Am (Z = 95), the 5f states are localized, nonbonding, and resemble the 4f states in lanthanides. Both itinerant and localized regimes are well covered by existing theories, but they cannot be simply interpolated due to the importance of dynamical electron-electron correlations. Here we present accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations achieving previously inaccessible resolution. Obtained results demonstrate that interplay of the full Coulomb interaction vertex with spin-orbital coupling is crucial for understanding the experimentally observed spectral properties of plutonium near the Fermi level.

  1. High-resolution genetic map for understanding the effect of genome-wide recombination rate on nucleotide diversity in watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Umesh K; Nimmakayala, Padma; Levi, Amnon; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Tomason, Yan R; Vajja, Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Abburi, Lavanya; Wehner, Todd C; Ronin, Yefim; Karol, Abraham

    2014-09-15

    We used genotyping by sequencing to identify a set of 10,480 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for constructing a high-resolution genetic map of 1096 cM for watermelon. We assessed the genome-wide variation in recombination rate (GWRR) across the map and found an association between GWRR and genome-wide nucleotide diversity. Collinearity between the map and the genome-wide reference sequence for watermelon was studied to identify inconsistency and chromosome rearrangements. We assessed genome-wide nucleotide diversity, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and selective sweep for wild, semi-wild, and domesticated accessions of Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus to track signals of domestication. Principal component analysis combined with chromosome-wide phylogenetic study based on 1563 SNPs obtained after LD pruning with minor allele frequency of 0.05 resolved the differences between semi-wild and wild accessions as well as relationships among worldwide sweet watermelon. Population structure analysis revealed predominant ancestries for wild, semi-wild, and domesticated watermelons as well as admixture of various ancestries that were important for domestication. Sliding window analysis of Tajima's D across various chromosomes was used to resolve selective sweep. LD decay was estimated for various chromosomes. We identified a strong selective sweep on chromosome 3 consisting of important genes that might have had a role in sweet watermelon domestication. Copyright © 2014 Reddy et al.

  2. Testing for long-range dependence in the Brazilian term structure of interest rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical evidence of fractional dynamics in interest rates for different maturities for Brazil. A variation of a newly developed test for long-range dependence, the V/S statistic, with a post-blackening bootstrap is employed. Results suggest that Brazilian interest rates possess strong long-range dependence in volatility, even when considering the structural break in 1999. These findings imply that the development of policy models that give rise to long-range dependence in interest rates' volatility could be very useful. The long-short-term interest rates spread has strong long-range dependence, which suggests that traditional tests of expectation hypothesis of the term structure of interest rates may be misspecified.

  3. Extension, sedimentation and diapirism: understanding evolution of diapiric structures in the Central High Atlas using analogue modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moragas, Mar; Vergés, Jaume; Nalpas, Thierry; Saura, Eduard; Diego Martín-Martín, Juan; Messager, Grégoire; Hunt, David William

    2017-04-01

    Analogue modelling has proven to be an essential tool for the study and analysis of the mechanisms involved in tectonic processes. Applied to salt tectonics, analogue modelling has been used to understand the mechanisms that trigger the onset of diapirs and the evolution of diapiric structures and minibasins. Analogue modelling has also been applied to analyse the impact of the progradation of sedimentary systems above a ductile layer, representing the source of diapirs. However, these models did not consider ongoing tectonic processes during progradation. To analyse how extension and sedimentary progradation influence on the formation of diapiric structures and their geometries, we present models composed of a mildly extension followed by post-extension period. Each model includes a particular sedimentary pattern: homogeneous sedimentation during extension and post-extension, homogeneous sedimentation during extension followed by prograding sedimentation during post-extension and prograding sedimentation during both extension and post-extension. Proximal high sedimentation rates enhance the mobilization of ductile material towards growing diapirs, resulting well-developed passive diapirs. Diapirs from distal domain of the model with post-extension progradation show silicone extrusions, that are caused by the decreased sedimentation rate associated to the progradation. By contrast, reduced sedimentation in the distal part of the model with syn- and post-extension progradation (3.5 times smaller than in the proximal domain) causes a limited migration of the silicone and hampers the transition from reactive diapirs to active and passive diapirs. These models show that the ratio between diapir growth and sedimentation rate, the time of the onset of the progradation and the relative thickness of the sedimentary cover beneath the prograding system have a clear impact on the final diapiric geometries. Additionally, we present two models with increasing amounts of

  4. Comparable contributions of structural-functional constraints and expression level to the rate of protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins show a broad range of evolutionary rates. Understanding the factors that are responsible for the characteristic rate of evolution of a given protein arguably is one of the major goals of evolutionary biology. A long-standing general assumption used to be that the evolution rate is, primarily, determined by the specific functional constraints that affect the given protein. These constrains were traditionally thought to depend both on the specific features of the protein's structure and its biological role. The advent of systems biology brought about new types of data, such as expression level and protein-protein interactions, and unexpectedly, a variety of correlations between protein evolution rate and these variables have been observed. The strongest connections by far were repeatedly seen between protein sequence evolution rate and the expression level of the respective gene. It has been hypothesized that this link is due to the selection for the robustness of the protein structure to mistranslation-induced misfolding that is particularly important for highly expressed proteins and is the dominant determinant of the sequence evolution rate. Results This work is an attempt to assess the relative contributions of protein domain structure and function, on the one hand, and expression level on the other hand, to the rate of sequence evolution. To this end, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the effect of the fusion of a pair of domains in multidomain proteins on the difference in the domain-specific evolutionary rates. The mistranslation-induced misfolding hypothesis would predict that, within multidomain proteins, fused domains, on average, should evolve at substantially closer rates than the same domains in different proteins because, within a mutlidomain protein, all domains are translated at the same rate. We performed a comprehensive comparison of the evolutionary rates of mammalian and plant protein domains

  5. Understanding effects of chemical structure on azo dye decolorization characteristics by Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsueh, Chung-Chuan [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan 260, Taiwan (China); Chen, Bor-Yann, E-mail: bychen@niu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan 260, Taiwan (China); Yen, Chia-Yi [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan 260, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    This novel comparative study tended to disclose how the molecular structures present in seven azo dyes including two types of azo dyes (i.e., naphthol type azo dyes - Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Blue 171 (RB 171), Reactive Green 19 (RG19), Reactive Red 198 (RR198), Reactive Red 141 (RR141) and non-naphthol type azo dyes - Direct Yellow 86 (DY86), Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84)) affected color removal capability of Aeromonas hydrophila. Generally speaking, the decolorization rate of naphthol type azo dye with hydroxyl group at ortho to azo bond was faster than that of non-naphthol type azo dye without hydroxyl group, except of RG19. The azo dyes with electron-withdrawing groups (e.g., sulfo group in RR198, RB5 and RR141) would be easier to be decolorized than the azo dyes with the electron-releasing groups (e.g., -NH-triazine in RB171 and RG19). In addition, the azo dyes containing more electron-withdrawing groups (e.g., RR198, RB5 and RR141) showed significantly faster rate of decolorization. The azo dyes with electron-withdrawing groups (e.g., sulfo group) at para and ortho to azo bond (e.g., RR198, RB5 and RR141) could be more preferred for color removal than those at meta (e.g., DY86 and RY84). The former azo dyes with para and ortho sulfo group provided more effective resonance effects to withdraw electrons from azo bond, causing azo dyes to be highly electrophilic for faster rates of reductive biodecolorization. However, since the ortho substituent caused steric hindrance near azo linkage(s), azo dyes with para substituent could be more favorable (e.g., SO{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}{sup -} in RR198 and RB5) than those with ortho substituent (e.g., sulfo group at RR141) for decolorization. Thus, the ranking of the position for the electron-withdrawing substituent in azo dyes to escalate decolorization was para > ortho > meta. This study suggested that both the positions of substituents on the aromatic ring and the electronic characteristics of

  6. Understanding Large-scale Structure in the SSA22 Protocluster Region Using Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Michael W.; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Naoz, Smadar; Primack, Joel R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the nature and evolution of large-scale structure within the SSA22 protocluster region at z = 3.09 using cosmological simulations. A redshift histogram constructed from current spectroscopic observations of the SSA22 protocluster reveals two separate peaks at z = 3.065 (blue) and z = 3.095 (red). Based on these data, we report updated overdensity and mass calculations for the SSA22 protocluster. We find {δ }b,{gal}=4.8+/- 1.8 and {δ }r,{gal}=9.5+/- 2.0 for the blue and red peaks, respectively, and {δ }t,{gal}=7.6+/- 1.4 for the entire region. These overdensities correspond to masses of {M}b=(0.76+/- 0.17)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ , {M}r=(2.15+/- 0.32)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ , and {M}t=(3.19+/- 0.40)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ for the red, blue, and total peaks, respectively. We use the Small MultiDark Planck (SMDPL) simulation to identify comparably massive z∼ 3 protoclusters, and uncover the underlying structure and ultimate fate of the SSA22 protocluster. For this analysis, we construct mock redshift histograms for each simulated z∼ 3 protocluster, quantitatively comparing them with the observed SSA22 data. We find that the observed double-peaked structure in the SSA22 redshift histogram corresponds not to a single coalescing cluster, but rather the proximity of a ∼ {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ protocluster and at least one > {10}14{h}-1 {M}ȯ cluster progenitor. Such associations in the SMDPL simulation are easily understood within the framework of hierarchical clustering of dark matter halos. We finally find that the opportunity to observe such a phenomenon is incredibly rare, with an occurrence rate of 7.4{h}3 {{{Gpc}}}-3. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Does the structure of wood contribute to understanding the oaks decline phenomenon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Tulik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular cambium is a meristematic tissue which produces wood centriphugaly and phloem centripetaly. In the structure of wood and phloem, data concerning developmental processes taking place in the cambium is recorded. The history of the cambium is encoded in the dimensions, numbers and arrangements of the wood and phloem cells. For investigations, the wood is usually preferred because it is durable and such data could remain unchanged for centuries, whereas in the phloem due to distorted processes, it deranges after a few years. In broadleaves, the wood is composed of vessels, tracheids, fibers and parenchyma cells. The process of the wood formation consists of the cambial cell derivatives expansion, lignification of its walls and programmed cell death. Since the seventies of the nineteenth century, the process of declining oaks taking place in Europe on a regular basis has been observed. Oak decline is a complex process that involves interactions of both biotic and abiotic factors leading to increased trees mortality. The main goal of the studies is the examination of the structure of wood in declining oaks (Quercus robur L. in respect to physiological (conductive role of this tissue. It is known that on the level of the wood structure, water transport efficiency depends on the diameter of vessels - the main elements of the hydraulic conductivity system. Any reduction of the vessels lumen causes the reduction of the water transport to the organs of the trees body and, therefore, influences organisms survival rate. Anatomical analyses were carried out on wood samples (comprising all annual rings formed during the 30-40 years life of the analyzed trees collected at breast height from the main stem of healthy, weakened and dead oaks. The anatomical traits of the wood like as the width of the annual increments, the diameter and density of early wood vessels were measured. The results which are described in the paper by Tulik (2014 revealed that

  8. Influence of social deprivation, overcrowding and family structure on emergency medical admission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, R; Byrne, D; O'Riordan, D; Cournane, S; Coveney, S; Silke, B

    2016-10-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following emergency medical admission. To evaluate the influence of Deprivation Index, overcrowding and family structure on hospital admission rates. Retrospective cohort study. All emergency medical admissions from 2002 to 2013 were evaluated. Based on address, each patient was allocated to an electoral division, whose small area population statistics were available from census data. Patients were categorized by quintile of Deprivation Index, overcrowding and family structure, and these were evaluated against hospital admission rate, calculated as rate/1000 population. Univariate and multivariable risk estimates (Odds Ratios or Incidence Rate Ratios) were calculated, using logistic or zero truncated Poisson regression as appropriate. There were 66 861 admissions in 36 214 patients over the 12-year study period. Deprivation Index quintile independently predicted the admission rate, with rates of Q1 12.0 (95% CI 11.8-12.2), Q2 19.5 (95% CI 19.3-19.6), Q3 33.7 (95% CI 33.3-34.0), Q4 31.4 (95% CI 31.2-31.6) and Q5 38.1 (95% CI 37.7-38.5). Similarly the proportions of families with children overcrowding was only predictive in the univarate model. Deprivation Index and family structure strongly predict emergency medical hospital admission rates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Understanding the Pathophysiology of Spinocerebellar Ataxias through genetics, neurophysiology, structural and functional neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Pal

    2015-12-01

    largely absent with additional activity in contralateral cortices and in thalami in patients with SCA1; increased thalamic function could be one of the causes for disinhibition of the motor cortex contributing to uncoordinated movements.Studies on larger cohort of each subtype of SCAs to validate the above findings, follow-up studies to determine the rate and nature of progression of neurodegeneration and evaluation of pre-symptomatic genetically confirmed SCAs will help understand the pathophysiology of the SCAs.

  10. Understanding the Structure-Function Relationships of Dendrimers in Environmental and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    We are living an era wherein nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in our lives. Dendrimers are special polymeric NPs with unique physiochemical properties, which have been intensely explored for a variety of applications. Current studies on dendrimers are bottlenecked by insufficient understandings of their structure and dynamic behaviors from a molecular level. With primarily computational approaches supplemented by many other experimental technics, this dissertation aims to establish structure-function relationships of dendrimers in environmental and biomedical applications. More specifically, it thoroughly investigates the interactions between dendrimers and different biomolecules including carbon-based NPs, metal-based NPs, and proteins/peptides. Those results not only provide profound knowledge for evaluating the impacts of dendrimers on environmental and biological systems but also facilitate designing next-generation functional polymeric nanomaterials. The dissertation is organized as following. Chapter 1 provides an overview of current progresses on dendrimer studies, where methodology of Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD), my major research tool, is also introduced. Two directions of utilizing dendrimers will be discussed in following chapters. Chapter 2 will focus on environmental applications of dendrimers, where two back-to-back studies are presented. I will start from describing some interesting observations from experiments i.e. dendrimers dispersed model oil molecules. Then, I will reveal why surface chemistries of dendrimers lead to different remediation efficiencies by computational modelings. Finally, I will demonstrate different scenarios of dendrimer-small molecules association. Chapter 3 is centered on dendrimers in the biomedical applications including two subtopics. In the first topic, we will discuss dendrimers as surfactants that modulating the interactions between proteins and NPs. Some fundamental concepts regarding to NPs

  11. Non-negative matrix factorization and term structure of interest rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Hellinton H.; Stern, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) is a technique for dimensionality reduction with a wide variety of applications from text mining to identification of concentrations in chemistry. NNMF deals with non-negative data and results in non-negative factors and factor loadings. Consequently, it is a natural choice when studying the term structure of interest rates. In this paper, NNMF is applied to obtain factors from the term structure of interest rates and the procedure is compared with other very popular techniques: principal component analysis and Nelson-Siegel model. The NNMF approximation for the term structure of interest rates is better in terms of fitting. From a practitioner point of view, the NNMF factors and factor loadings obtained possess straightforward financial interpretations due to their non-negativeness.

  12. Determination of the sterile release rate for stopping growing age-structured populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, Hugh John

    2016-01-01

    A freely-growing age-structured population was modelled for growth and control by sterile male releases. Equilibrium populations yield critical sterile male release rates that would hold the population at equilibrium. It is shown here that these rates may be different from the release rates required to stop a growing population and bring it to an equilibrium. A computer simulation was constructed of this population and a parameter sensitivity analysis graphed the effects on the required sterile male release rate of fertility, mating delay in adult females, net juvenile survivorship, three adult survivorship curves, the time spent in the juvenile stages, and total life span. The adult survivorship curves had the greatest effect on the required sterile release rate for population elimination. The required release rate was also determined for Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) using survivorship and fertility data from a laboratory strain. The concepts of over-flooding ratio and release ratio were discussed and quantified for the cases above. (author)

  13. In pursuit of tax equity: lessons from VAT rate structure adjustment in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Świstak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, in the aftermath of the economic crisis, Poland increased its value added tax rates. Despite an already large VAT policy gap, further rate differentiation was used to address distributional concerns and to protect the most vulnerable households. We find that the changes to the VAT rate structure hardly improved the overall progressivity of the VAT and the tax system as a whole. While providing only minimal relief to the poor, taxation of food products at a super reduced rate greatly subsidized the richer households. With a small change to the income tax structure, the government could have secured more progressivity at a lower cost in terms of revenue foregone.

  14. Big bang nucleosynthesis with a varying fine structure constant and nonstandard expansion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the primordial abundances of light elements produced during big bang nucleosynthesis when the fine structure constant and/or the cosmic expansion rate take nonstandard values. We compare them with the recent values of observed D, 4 He, and 7 Li abundances, which show a slight inconsistency among themselves in the standard big bang nucleosynthesis scenario. This inconsistency is not solved by considering either a varying fine structure constant or a nonstandard expansion rate separately but solutions are found by their simultaneous existence

  15. Calibration of short rate term structure models from bid-ask coupon bond prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Gonçalves, Erika; Gzyl, Henryk; Mayoral, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    In this work we use the method of maximum entropy in the mean to provide a model free, non-parametric methodology that uses only market data to provide the prices of the zero coupon bonds, and then, a term structure of the short rates. The data used consists of the prices of the bid-ask ranges of a few coupon bonds quoted in the market. The prices of the zero coupon bonds obtained in the first stage, are then used as input to solve a recursive set of equations to determine a binomial recombinant model of the short term structure of the interest rates.

  16. Impact of Alternative Rate Structures on Distributed Solar Customer Electricity Bills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, Joyce A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Electric utilities are increasingly proposing changes to residential rate structures, in order to address concerns about their inability to recover fixed system costs from customers with grid connected distributed generation. The most common proposals have been to increase fixed charges, set minimum bills or instigate residential demand charges. This presentation provides results of an analysis to explore how these rate design alternatives impact electricity bills for PV and non-PV customers.

  17. Nonparametric modeling of US interest rate term structure dynamics and implications on the prices of derivative securities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, GJ

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a nonparametric model of interest rate term structure dynamics based an a spot rate process that permits only positive interest rates and a market price of interest rate risk that precludes arbitrage opportunities. Both the spot rate process and the market price of interest rate

  18. Parent and teacher ratings of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms: Factor structure and normative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPaul, George J; Reid, Robert; Anastopoulos, Arthur D; Lambert, Matthew C; Watkins, Marley W; Power, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Comprehensive assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms includes parent and teacher questionnaires. The ADHD Rating Scale-5 was developed to incorporate changes for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). This study examined the fit of a correlated, 2-factor structure of ADHD (i.e., DSM-5 conceptual model) and alternative models; determined whether ADHD symptom ratings varied across teacher and child demographic characteristics; and presented normative data. Two samples were included: (a) 2,079 parents and guardians (1,131 female, 948 male) completed ADHD symptom ratings for children (N = 2,079; 1,037 males, 1,042 females) between 5 and 17 years old (M = 10.68; SD = 3.75) and (b) 1,070 teachers (766 female, 304 male) completed ADHD symptom ratings for students (N = 2,140; 1,070 males, 1,070 females) between 5 and 17 years old (M = 11.53; SD = 3.54) who attended kindergarten through 12th grade. The 2-factor structure was confirmed for both parent and teacher ratings and was invariant across child gender, age, informant, informant gender, and language. In general, boys were higher in symptom frequency than girls; older children were rated lower than younger children, especially for hyperactivity-impulsivity; and non-Hispanic children were rated higher than Hispanic children. Teachers also rated non-Hispanic African American children higher than non-Hispanic White, Asian, and Hispanic children. Non-Hispanic White teachers provided lower hyperactivity-impulsivity ratings than non-Hispanic, African American, and Hispanic teachers. Normative data are reported separately for parent and teacher ratings by child gender and age. The merits of using the ADHD Rating Scale-5 in a multimodal assessment protocol are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Understanding Consumer Confidence in the Safety of Food: Its Two-Dimensional Structure and Determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de J.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Renes, R.J.; Frewer, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of consumer confidence in the safety of food is important if effective risk management and communication are to be developed. In the research reported here, we attempt to understand the roles of consumer trust in actors in the food chain and regulators, consumer

  20. Application of characterization, modelling, and analytics towards understanding process-structure linkages in metallic 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeber, M. A.; Schwalbach, E.; Donegan, S.; Chaput, K.; Butler, T.; Miller, J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents methods for combining process monitoring, thermal modelling and microstructure characterization together to draw process-to-structure relationships in metal additive manufacturing. The paper discusses heterogeneities in the local processing conditions within additively manufactured components and how they affect the resulting material structure. Methods for registering and fusing disparate data sources are presented, and some effort is made to discuss the utility of different data sources for specific microstructural features of interest. It is the intent that this paper will highlight the need for improved understanding of metallic additive manufacturing processes and show that combining experimental data with modelling and advanced data processing and analytics methods will accelerate that understanding.

  1. Exchange rate dynamics, structural breaks, and central bank interventions in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mario Uribe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the effectiveness of the Colombian Central Bank´s interventions in the foreign exchange market during the period 2000 to 2014. We examine the stochastic process that describes the exchange rate, with a focus on the detection of structural breaks or unit roots in the data to determine whether the Central Bank´s interventions were effective. We find that the exchange rate can be described either by a random walk or by a trend-stationary model with multiple breaks. In neither cases do we find any evidence that the exchange rate was affected by the Central Bank interventions.

  2. Central Bank Communication Affects the Term-Structure of Interest Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Chague

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We empirically analyze how the Brazilian Central Bank (BCB communication affects the term structure of future interest rates. Using principal components analysis, we construct a measure of the Monetary Policy Committee Minutes content that reflects policy makers optimism about the economic conditions. We call this measure the Optimism Factor (OF. When policy makers are more optimistic, reflected by increments in the OF, markets expectations respond and long-term future interest rates drop. Furthermore, when policy makers are pessimistic, reflected by a decrease in the OF, volatility on future interest rates increases. Our result indicates that policy maker communication has an effective impact on market expectations.

  3. Comparison of radiation and quenching rate effects on the structure of a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peuget, Sylvain; Maugeri, Emilio-Andrea; Mendoza, Clement; Fares, Toby; Bouty, Olivier; Jegou, Christophe; Charpentier, Thibault; Moskura, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of quenching rate and irradiation on the structure of a sodium borosilicate glass were compared using 29 Si, 11 B, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. Quenching rate ranging from 0.1 to 3 * 10 4 K min -1 was studied. Various irradiation conditions were performed, i.e. gold-ion irradiation in a multi-energy mode (from 1 to 6.75 MeV), and Kr and Xe ion irradiations with energy of 74 and 92 MeV, respectively. In pile irradiation with thermal neutron flux was performed as well, to study the effect of alpha radiation from the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li. Both irradiation and high quenching rate induce similar local order modification of the glass structure, mainly a decrease of the mean boron coordination and an increase of Q 3 units. Nevertheless, the variations observed under irradiation are more pronounced than the ones induced by the quenching rate. Moreover, some important modifications of the glass medium range order, i.e. the emergence of the D2 band associated to three members silica rings and a modification of the Si-O-Si angle distribution were only noticed after irradiation. These results suggest that the irradiated structure is certainly not exactly the one obtained by a rapidly quenched equilibrated melt, but rather a more disordered structure that was weakly relaxed during the very rapid quenching phase following the energy deposition step. Raman spectroscopy showed a similar irradiated structure whereas the glass evolutions were controlled by the electronic energy loss in the ion track formation regime for Kr-ion irradiation or by the nuclear energy loss for Au and OSIRIS irradiation. The similar irradiated structure despite different irradiation routes, suggests that the final structural state of this sodium borosilicate glass is mainly controlled by the glass reconstruction after the energy deposition step. (authors)

  4. Structural breaks and long memory in US inflation rates: do they matter for forecasting?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Hyung (Namwon); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThere is substantial evidence that several economic time series variables experience occasional structural breaks. At the same time, for some of these variables there is evidence of long memory. In particular, it seems that inflation rates have both features. One cause for this finding

  5. New rate structure of the Dutch natural gas trading company Gasunie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koevoet, H.

    1999-01-01

    Starting January 1, 2000, many of Gasunie's large-scale consumers will have to deal with a new rate structure: the CDS (Dutch abbreviation for Commodity Services System). Unlike in the old zone system, the consumption profile is of great importance in the CDS. Those who must heat large spaces have a particular interest in sizing up the consequences of the CDS

  6. Dynamic Factor Models with Smooth Loadings for Analyzing the Term Structure of Interest Rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Jungbacker (Borus); S.J. Koopman (Siem Jan); M. van der Wel (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new approach to the modelling of the term structure of interest rates. We consider the general dynamic factor model and show how to impose smoothness restrictions on the factor loadings. We further present a statistical procedure based on Wald tests that can be used to find

  7. Optical and electrical properties of structured multilayer with tunable transparency rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bou, Adrien; Torchio, Philippe; Barakel, Damien; Guillou, Aurélie; Thoulon, Pierre-Yves; Ricci, Marc; Ayachi, Boubakeur

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on structured multilayer with tunable transparency rate. In this paper, we present the optical and electrical characterization of an oxide | metal | oxide structured electrode manufactured by e-beam deposition and patterned by a lift-off process. The obtained samples are made of grids with different geometrical parameters that lead to varying surface coverage rate on glass. The electrical and optical parameters of SnO x |Ag|SnO x grids are investigated to determine the efficiency, sustainability and limitations of such structures. A linear relationship between the transmittance of the electrodes and the increase of the surface coverage rate is obtained. Coupled to an optimization process, we are able to define a high transparency in a chosen spectral range. Electrical results show a relative stability of the resistivity from 2.9   ×   10   −  4  Ω.cm for an as-grown electrode to 5.6   ×   10   −  4  Ω.cm for a structured electrode with a surface coverage rate of 59%. (paper)

  8. Stress Wave E-Rating of Structural Timber—Size and Moisture Content Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of cross sectional size and moisture content on stress wave properties of structural timber in various sizes and evaluate the feasibility of using stress wave method to E-rate timber in green conditions. Four different sizes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) square timbers were...

  9. The effect of growth rate, diameter and impurity concentration on structure in Czochralski silicon crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digges, T. G., Jr.; Shima, R.

    1980-01-01

    It is demonstrated that maximum growth rates of up to 80% of the theoretical limit can be attained in Czochralski-grown silicon crystals while maintaining single crystal structure. Attaining the other 20% increase is dependent on design changes in the grower, to reduce the temperature gradient in the liquid while increasing the gradient in the solid. The conclusions of Hopkins et al. (1977) on the effect of diameter on the breakdown of structure at fast growth rates are substantiated. Copper was utilized as the test impurity. At large diameters (greater than 7.5 cm), concentrations of greater than 1 ppm copper were attained in the solid (45,000 ppm in the liquid) without breakdown at maximum growth speeds. For smaller diameter crystals, the sensitivity of impurities is much more apparent. For solar cell applications, impurities will limit cell performance before they cause crystal breakdown for fast growth rates of large diameter crystals.

  10. Revisiting the structure, age, and evolution of the Wharton Basin to better understand subduction under Indonesia.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jacob, J.; Dyment, J.; Yatheesh, V.

    Understanding the subduction processes along the Sunda Trench requires detailed constraints on the subducting lithosphere. We build a detailed tectonic map of the Wharton Basin based on reinterpretation of satellite-derived gravity anomalies...

  11. High-rate activated sludge communities have a distinctly different structure compared to low-rate sludge communities, and are less sensitive towards environmental and operational variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerburg, Francis A; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Roume, Hugo; Seuntjens, Dries; Pieper, Dietmar H; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-01

    High-rate activated sludge processes allow for the recovery of organics and energy from wastewaters. These systems are operated at a short sludge retention time and high sludge-specific loading rates, which results in a higher sludge yield and better digestibility than conventional, low-rate activated sludge. Little is known about the microbial ecology of high-rate systems. In this work, we address the need for a fundamental understanding of how high-rate microbial communities differ from low-rate communities. We investigated the high-rate and low-rate communities in a sewage treatment plant in relation to environmental and operational variables over a period of ten months. We demonstrated that (1) high-rate and low-rate communities are distinctly different in terms of richness, evenness and composition, (2) high-rate community dynamics are more variable and less shaped by deterministic factors compared to low-rate communities, (3) sub-communities of continuously core and transitional members are more shaped by deterministic factors than the continuously rare members, both in high-rate and low-rate communities, and (4) high-rate community members showed a co-occurrence pattern similar to that of low-rate community members, but were less likely to be correlated to environmental and operational variables. These findings provide a basis for further optimization of high-rate systems, in order to facilitate resource recovery from wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The therapeutic effect of clinical trials: understanding placebo response rates in clinical trials – A secondary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walach Harald

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Placebo response rates in clinical trials vary considerably and are observed frequently. For new drugs it can be difficult to prove effectiveness superior to placebo. It is unclear what contributes to improvement in the placebo groups. We wanted to clarify, what elements of clinical trials determine placebo variability. Methods We analysed a representative sample of 141 published long-term trials (randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled; duration > 12 weeks to find out what study characteristics predict placebo response rates in various diseases. Correlational and regression analyses with study characteristics and placebo response rates were carried out. Results We found a high and significant correlation between placebo and treatment response rate across diseases (r = .78; p Conclusion Medication response rates and placebo response rates in clinical trials are highly correlated. Trial characteristics can explain some portion of the variance in placebo healing rates in RCTs. Placebo response in trials is only partially due to methodological artefacts and only partially dependent on the diagnoses treated.

  13. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-07-03

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV

  14. TOWARD AN IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF STRUCTURE AND MAGNETISM IN NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM PHOSPHONATES AND SULFONATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    This grant supported the exploratory synthesis of new actinide materials with all of the actinides from thorium to californium with the exceptions of protactinium and berkelium. We developed detailed structure-property relationships that allowed for the identification of novel materials with selective ion-exchange, selective oxidation, and long-range magnetic ordering. We found novel bonding motifs and identified periodic trends across the actinide series. We identified structural building units that would lead to desired structural features and novel topologies. We also characterized many different spectroscopic trends across the actinide series. The grant support the preparation of approximately 1200 new compounds all of which were structurally characterized.

  15. Scrambling the Nest Egg: How Well Do Teachers Understand Their Pensions, and What Do They Think about Alternative Pension Structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Michael; Goldhaber, Dan

    2010-01-01

    In this article we focus on two questions: How well do teachers understand their current pension plans, and what do they think about alternative plan structures? The data come from administrative records and a 2006 survey of teachers in Washington State. The results suggest that Washington's teachers are fairly knowledgeable about their pensions,…

  16. Appreciating the ties that bind technical communication to culture: A dynamic model to help us understand differences in discourse structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter; Kampf, Constance

    In order to support an explicit understanding of cultural patterns as both dynamic and structured, we will examine Hofstede?s model for stabilization of cultural patterns, and use this model to explore some cultural consequences for patterns of logic and signs that influence the effectiveness of ...

  17. Understanding Recession and Self-Rated Health with the Partial Proportional Odds Model: An Analysis of 26 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Adam; Foster, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Self-rated health is demonstrated to vary substantially by both personal socio-economic status and national economic conditions. However, studies investigating the combined influence of individual and country level economic indicators across several countries in the context of recent global recession are limited. This paper furthers our knowledge of the effect of recession on health at both the individual and national level. Using the Life in Transition II study, which provides data from 19,759 individuals across 26 European nations, we examine the relationship between self-rated health, personal economic experiences, and macro-economic change. Data analyses include, but are not limited to, the partial proportional odds model which permits the effect of predictors to vary across different levels of our dependent variable. Household experiences with recession, especially a loss of staple good consumption, are associated with lower self-rated health. Most individual-level experiences with recession, such as a job loss, have relatively small negative effects on perceived health; the effect of individual or household economic hardship is strongest in high income nations. Our findings also suggest that macroeconomic growth improves self-rated health in low-income nations but has no effect in high-income nations. Individuals with the greatest probability of "good" self-rated health reside in wealthy countries ($23,910 to $50, 870 GNI per capita). Both individual and national economic variables are predictive of self-rated health. Personal and household experiences are most consequential for self-rated health in high income nations, while macroeconomic growth is most consequential in low-income nations.

  18. Rate Dependent Multicontinuum Progressive Failure Analysis of Woven Fabric Composite Structures under Dynamic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine composite materials typically exhibit significant rate dependent response characteristics when subjected to extreme dynamic loading conditions. In this work, a strain-rate dependent continuum damage model is incorporated with multicontinuum technology (MCT to predict damage and failure progression for composite material structures. MCT treats the constituents of a woven fabric composite as separate but linked continua, thereby allowing a designer to extract constituent stress/strain information in a structural analysis. The MCT algorithm and material damage model are numerically implemented with the explicit finite element code LS-DYNA3D via a user-defined material model (umat. The effects of the strain-rate hardening model are demonstrated through both simple single element analyses for woven fabric composites and also structural level impact simulations of a composite panel subjected to various impact conditions. Progressive damage at the constituent level is monitored throughout the loading. The results qualitatively illustrate the value of rate dependent material models for marine composite materials under extreme dynamic loading conditions.

  19. The nature and structure of correlations among Big Five ratings: the halo-alpha-beta model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusic, Ivana; Schimmack, Ulrich; Pinkus, Rebecca T; Lockwood, Penelope

    2009-12-01

    In light of consistently observed correlations among Big Five ratings, the authors developed and tested a model that combined E. L. Thorndike's (1920) general evaluative bias (halo) model and J. M. Digman's (1997) higher order personality factors (alpha and beta) model. With 4 multitrait-multimethod analyses, Study 1 revealed moderate convergent validity for alpha and beta across raters, whereas halo was mainly a unique factor for each rater. In Study 2, the authors showed that the halo factor was highly correlated with a validated measure of evaluative biases in self-ratings. Study 3 showed that halo is more strongly correlated with self-ratings of self-esteem than self-ratings of the Big Five, which suggests that halo is not a mere rating bias but actually reflects overly positive self-evaluations. Finally, Study 4 demonstrated that the halo bias in Big Five ratings is stable over short retest intervals. Taken together, the results suggest that the halo-alpha-beta model integrates the main findings in structural analyses of Big Five correlations. Accordingly, halo bias in self-ratings is a reliable and stable bias in individuals' perceptions of their own attributes. Implications of the present findings for the assessment of Big Five personality traits in monomethod studies are discussed.

  20. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  1. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  2. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV

  3. Understanding Structures and Affordances of Extended Teams in Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Babar, Muhammad; Zahedi, Mansooreh

    2013-01-01

    Growing popularity of Global Software Development (GSD) has resulted in an increasing number of cross-organizational teams that are formed according to Extended Team Model (ETM). There is little known about the structures (work, social, and communication) that may exist in ETM and what affordances...... in the studied team help deal with different GSD challenges, these structures appear to have certain challenges inherent in them and the affordances they provide. We make a few recommendations for improving the current structures to deal with the observed challenges. Our findings are expected to provide insights...

  4. Implementation of 5E Inquiry Incorporated with Analogy Learning Approach to Enhance Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Reaction Rate for Grade 11 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supasorn, Saksri; Promarak, Vinich

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to enhance student understanding of the scientific concepts of chemical reaction rate. Forty-four grade 11 students were the target group. The treatment tools were seven learning plans of 5E inquiry incorporated with an analogy learning approach during 15 hours of class time. In each learning plan, the students…

  5. The influence of sediment transport rate on the development of structure in gravel bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockelford, Annie; Rice, Steve; Powell, Mark; Reid, Ian; Nguyen, Thao; Tate, Nick; Wood, Jo

    2013-04-01

    Although adjustments of surface grain size are known to be strongly influenced by sediment transport rate little work has systematically explored how different transport rates can affect the development of surface structure in gravel bed rivers. Specifically, it has been well established that the transport of mixed sized sediments leads to the development of a coarser surface or armour layer which occurs over larger areas of the gravel bed. Armour layer development is known to moderate overall sediment transport rate as well as being extremely sensitive to changes in applied shear stress. However, during this armouring process a bed is created where, smaller gain scale changes, to the bed surface are also apparent such as the development of pebble clusters and imbricate structures. Although these smaller scale changes affect the overall surface grain size distribution very little their presence has the ability to significantly increase the surface stability and hence alter overall sediment transport rates. Consequently, the interplay between the moderation of transport rate as a function of surface coarsening at a larger scale and moderation of transport rate as a function of the development of structure on the bed surface at the smaller scale is complicated and warrants further investigation. During experiments a unimodal grain size distribution (σg = 1.30, D50 = 8.8mm) was exposed to 3 different levels of constant discharge that produced sediment transport conditions ranging from marginal transport to conditions approaching full mobility of all size fractions. Sediment was re-circulated during the experiments surface grain size distribution bed load and fractional transport rates were measured at a high temporal resolution such that the time evolution of the beds could be fully described. Discussion concentrates on analysing the effects of the evolving bed condition sediment transport rate (capacity) and transported grain size (competence). The outcome of this

  6. Surface Structure of Silver Nanoparticles as a Model for Understanding the Oxidative Dissolution of Silver Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Bastiaan; Hiemstra, Tjisse

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has been related to the release of ionic silver. This process is influenced by a large variety of factors and is poorly understood. The key to understanding Ag+ release by AgNPs is its subvalency. This is a fundamental property of Ag that

  7. A Phenomenographic Study of the Ways of Understanding Conditional and Repetition Structures in Computer Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucks, Gregory Warren

    2010-01-01

    Computers have become an integral part of how engineers complete their work, allowing them to collect and analyze data, model potential solutions and aiding in production through automation and robotics. In addition, computers are essential elements of the products themselves, from tennis shoes to construction materials. An understanding of how…

  8. Overnight weight loss: relationship with sleep structure and heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Moraes; Dalva Poyares; Christian Guilleminault; Agostinho Rosa; Marco Tulio Mello; Adriana Rueda; Sergio Tufik

    2008-01-01

    Background: Weight loss can be caused by a loss of body mass due to metabolism and by water loss as unsensible water loss, sweating, or excretion in feces and urine. Although weight loss during sleep is a well-known phenomenon, it has not yet been studied in relation to sleep structure or autonomic tonus during sleep. Our study is proposed to be a first step in assessing the relationship between overnight weight loss, sleep structure, and HRV (heart rate variability) parameters.Methods: Twent...

  9. Soil-structure interaction studies for understanding the behavior of integral abutment bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Integral Abutment Bridges (IAB) are bridges without any joints within the bridge deck or between the : superstructure and the abutments. An IAB provides many advantages during construction and maintenance of : a bridge. Soil-structure interactions at...

  10. Understanding Sulfide Capacity of Molten Aluminosilicates via Structural Information from 'Raman' and 'NMR' Spectroscopic Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Hyun

    The effect of Ca-Mn substitution on the sulfide capacity of the MnO-CaO-SiO2 (-Al2O3-MgO) melts were explained from the Raman scattering data, from which the structure information for the network modifying role and sulfur stabilizing role of Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions were obtained. The effect of Ce2O3 on the sulfide capacity of the MnO-SiO2-Al2O3-Ce2O3 melts were understood based on the structure data, from which the charge compensating role of Ce3+ and the amphoteric behavior of alumina were obtained. Employing the structure analysis, the thermochemical properties such as capacity of the oxide melts with no thermodynamic data can be understood in terms of `composition-structure-property' relationship.

  11. Understanding nanocellulose chirality and structure-properties relationship at the single fibril level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Ivan; Nyström, Gustav; Adamcik, Jozef; Handschin, Stephan; Schütz, Christina; Fall, Andreas; Bergström, Lennart; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Nanocellulose fibrils are ubiquitous in nature and nanotechnologies but their mesoscopic structural assembly is not yet fully understood. Here we study the structural features of rod-like cellulose nanoparticles on a single particle level, by applying statistical polymer physics concepts on electron and atomic force microscopy images, and we assess their physical properties via quantitative nanomechanical mapping. We show evidence of right-handed chirality, observed on both bundles and on single fibrils. Statistical analysis of contours from microscopy images shows a non-Gaussian kink angle distribution. This is inconsistent with a structure consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline domains along the contour and supports process-induced kink formation. The intrinsic mechanical properties of nanocellulose are extracted from nanoindentation and persistence length method for transversal and longitudinal directions, respectively. The structural analysis is pushed to the level of single cellulose polymer chains, and their smallest associated unit with a proposed 2 × 2 chain-packing arrangement.

  12. Understanding the Effect of Response Rate and Class Size Interaction on Students Evaluation of Teaching in a Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; AlQuraan, Mahmoud; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the interaction between response rate and class size and its effects on students' evaluation of instructors and the courses offered at a higher education Institution in Saudi Arabia. Study Design: A retrospective study design was chosen. Methods: One thousand four hundred and forty four different courses…

  13. Understanding the structural transformation, stability of medium-sized neutral and charged silicon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li Ping; Zhang, Fang Hui; Zhu, Yong Sheng; Lu, Cheng; Kuang, Xiao Yu; Lv, Jian; Shao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties for the global minimum structures of medium-sized neutral, anionic and cationic Sinμ (n = 20–30, μ = 0, −1 and +1) clusters have been studied using an unbiased CALYPSO structure searching method in conjunction with first-principles calculations. A large number of low-lying isomers are optimized at the B3PW91/6-311 + G* level of theory. Harmonic vibrational analysis has been performed to assure that the optimized geometries are stable. The growth behaviors clearly indicate that a structural transition from the prolate to spherical-like geometries occurs at n = 26 for neutral silicon clusters, n = 27 for anions and n = 25 for cations. These results are in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical predicted findings. In addition, no significant structural differences are observed between the neutral and cation charged silicon clusters with n = 20–24, both of them favor prolate structures. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and vertical ionization potential patterns indicate that Si22 is the most chemical stable cluster, and its dynamical stability is deeply discussed by the vibrational spectra calculations. PMID:26526519

  14. Incorporating modeling and simulations in undergraduate biophysical chemistry course to promote understanding of structure-dynamics-function relationships in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and simulations. In particular, modern computational tools are employed to elucidate the relationship between structure, dynamics, and function in proteins. Computer-based laboratory protocols that we introduced in three modules allow students to visualize the secondary, super-secondary, and tertiary structures of proteins, analyze non-covalent interactions in protein-ligand complexes, develop three-dimensional structural models (homology model) for new protein sequences and evaluate their structural qualities, and study proteins' intrinsic dynamics to understand their functions. In the fourth module, students are assigned to an authentic research problem, where they apply their laboratory skills (acquired in modules 1-3) to answer conceptual biophysical questions. Through this process, students gain in-depth understanding of protein dynamics-the missing link between structure and function. Additionally, the requirement of term papers sharpens students' writing and communication skills. Finally, these projects result in new findings that are communicated in peer-reviewed journals. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Understanding the Structure of High-K Gate Oxides - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Andre [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Hafnium Oxide (HfO2) amorphous thin films are being used as gate oxides in transistors because of their high dielectric constant (κ) over Silicon Dioxide. The present study looks to find the atomic structure of HfO2 thin films which hasn’t been done with the technique of this study. In this study, two HfO2 samples were studied. One sample was made with thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) on top of a Chromium and Gold layer on a silicon wafer. The second sample was made with plasma ALD on top of a Chromium and Gold layer on a Silicon wafer. Both films were deposited at a thickness of 50nm. To obtain atomic structure information, Grazing Incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was carried out on the HfO2 samples. Because of this, absorption, footprint, polarization, and dead time corrections were applied to the scattering intensity data collected. The scattering curves displayed a difference in structure between the ALD processes. The plasma ALD sample showed the broad peak characteristic of an amorphous structure whereas the thermal ALD sample showed an amorphous structure with characteristics of crystalline materials. This appears to suggest that the thermal process results in a mostly amorphous material with crystallites within. Further, the scattering intensity data was used to calculate a pair distribution function (PDF) to show more atomic structure. The PDF showed atom distances in the plasma ALD sample had structure up to 10 Å, while the thermal ALD sample showed the same structure below 10 Å. This structure that shows up below 10 Å matches the bond distances of HfO2 published in literature. The PDF for the thermal ALD sample also showed peaks up to 20 Å, suggesting repeating atomic spacing outside the HfO2 molecule in the sample. This appears to suggest that there is some crystalline structure within the thermal ALD sample.

  16. Modelling the Dependence Structure of MUR/USD and MUR/INR Exchange Rates using Copula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandna Jowaheer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available American Dollar (USD and Indian Rupee (INR play an important role in Mauritian economy. It is important to model the pattern of dependence in their co-movement with respect to Mauritian Rupee (MUR, as this may indicate the export-import behavior in Mauritius. However, it is known that distributions of exchange rates are usually non-normal and the use of linear correlation as a dependence measure is inappropriate. Moreover it is quite difficult to obtain the joint distribution of such random variables in order to specify the complete covariance matrix to measure their dependence structure. In this paper, we first identify the marginal distributions of the exchange rates of MUR against USD and INR and then select the best fitting copula model for the bivariate series. It is concluded that both the series are asymmetric and fat-tailed following hyperbolic distribution. Their dependence structure is appropriately modeled by t copula.

  17. Modeling the Interest Rate Term Structure: Derivatives Contracts Dynamics and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L. Valls Pereira

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a model for the term structure of interest rates and the valuation of derivative contracts directly dependent on it. The work is of a theoretical nature and deals, exclusively, with continuous time models, making ample use of stochastic calculus results and presents original contributions that we consider relevant to the development of the fixed income market modeling. We develop a new multifactorial model of the term structure of interest rates. The model is based on the decomposition of the yield curve into the factors level, slope, curvature, and the treatment of their collective dynamics. We show that this model may be applied to serve various objectives: analysis of bond price dynamics, valuation of derivative contracts and also market risk management and formulation of operational strategies which is presented in another article.

  18. Stationary solutions to a system of size-structured populations with nonlinear growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We study stationary solutions to a system of size-structured population models with nonlinear growth rate. Several characterizations of stationary solutions are provided. It is shown that the steady-state problem can be converted into different problems such as two types of eigenvalue problems and a fixed-point problem. In the two-species case, we give an existence result of nonzero stationary solutions by using the fixed-point problem.

  19. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F.; D`Onofrio, A. [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy)]|[INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy)]|[Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V.; Romano, M. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  20. Understanding regional scale structural uncertainty: The onshore Gulf of Corinth Rift as a hydrocarbon exploration analogue

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, AM; Paton, DA; Collier, REL; O'Connor, V

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge when exploring for hydrocarbons in frontier areas is a lack of data coverage. Data may be restricted to regional scale 2D seismic lines, from which assumptions of the 3D geometric configuration are drawn. Understanding the limitations and uncertainties when extrapolating 2D data into 3D space is crucial when assessing the requirements for acquiring additional data such as 3D seismic or exploration wells, and of assigning geologically reasonable uncertainty ranges. The Onshor...

  1. Understanding NOx SCR Mechanism and Activity on Cu/Chabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Fabio; Delgass, Nick; Gounder, Rajmani; Schneider, William F.; Miller, Jeff; Yezerets, Aleksey; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken

    2014-12-09

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) compounds contribute to acid rain and photochemical smog and have been linked to respiratory ailments. NOx emissions regulations continue to tighten, driving the need for high performance, robust control strategies. The goal of this project is to develop a deep, molecular level understanding of the function of Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SAPO-34 materials that catalyze the SCR of NOx with NH3.

  2. Red states, blue states, and divorce: understanding the impact of conservative Protestantism on regional variation in divorce rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jennifer; Levchak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Why do states with larger proportions of religious conservatives have higher divorce rates than states with lower proportions of religious conservatives? This project examines whether earlier transitions to marriage and parenthood among conservative Protestants (known risk factors for divorce) contribute to this paradox while attending to other plausible explanations. County-level demographic information from all 50 states is combined from a variety of public data sources and merged with individual records from the National Surveys of Family Growth to estimate both aggregated county and multilevel individual models of divorce. Results show that individual religious conservatism is positively related to individual divorce risk, solely through the earlier transitions to adulthood and lower incomes of conservative Protestants. However, the proportion of conservative Protestants in a county is also independently and positively associated with both the divorce rate in that county and an individual's likelihood of divorcing. The earlier family formation and lower levels of educational attainment and income in counties with a higher proportion of conservative Protestants can explain a substantial portion of this association. Little support is found for alternative explanations of the association between religious conservatism and divorce rates, including the relative popularity of marriage versus cohabitation across counties.

  3. Measuring the Growth Rate of Structure with Type IA Supernovae from LSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Cullan; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Lagos, Claudia D. P.; Kim, Alex G.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the peculiar motions of galaxies up to z = 0.5 using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and predict the subsequent constraints on the growth rate of structure. We consider two cases. Our first is based on measurements of the volumetric SNe Ia rate and assumes we can obtain spectroscopic redshifts and light curves for varying fractions of objects that are detected pre-peak luminosity by LSST (some of which may be obtained by LSST itself, and others that would require additional follow-up observations). We find that these measurements could produce growth rate constraints at zIa rate as a function of stellar mass and star-formation rate to predict the number of LSST SNe IA whose host redshifts may already have been obtained with the Taipan+WALLABY surveys or with a future multi-object spectroscopic survey. We find ˜18,000 and ˜160,000 SNe Ia with host redshifts for these cases, respectively. While this is only a fraction of the total LSST-detected SNe Ia, they could be used to significantly augment and improve the growth rate constraints compared to only RSD. Ultimately, we find that combining LSST SNe Ia with large numbers of galaxy redshifts will provide the most powerful probe of large-scale gravity in the z< 0.5 regime over the coming decades.

  4. Capital accumulation, structural change and real exchange rate in a Keynesian-Structuralist growth model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreiro José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show at theoretical level that maintaining a competitive real exchange rate positively affects the economic growth of developing countries by means of a Keynesian-Structuralist model that combines elements of Kaleckian growth models with the balance of payments constrained growth models pioneered developed by Thirlwall. In this setting, the level of real exchange rate is capable, due to its effect over capital accumulation, to induce a structural change in the economy, making endogenous income elasticities of exports and imports. For reasonable parameter values it is shown that in steady-state growth there is two long-run equilibrium values for real exchange rate, one that corresponds to an under-valued currency and another that corresponds to an over-valued currency. If monetary authorities run exchange rate policy in order to target a competitive level for real exchange rate, than under-valued equilibrium is stable and the economy will show a high growth rate in the long-run.

  5. Impact on breeding rate of different Molten Salt reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiwei; Mei Longwei; Cai Xiangzhou; Chen Jingen; Guo Wei; Jiang Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has several advantages over the other Generation IV reactor. Referred to the French CNRS research and compared to the fast reactor, super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor type is slightly lower and beading rate reaches 1.002. Purpose: The aim is to explore the best conversion zone layout scheme in the super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor. This study can make nuclear fuel as one way to solve the energy problems of mankind in future. Methods: Firstly, SCALE program is used for molten salt reactor graphite channel, molten salt core structure, control rods, graphite reflector and layer cladding structure. And the SMART modules are used to record the important actinides isotopes and their related reaction values of each reaction channel. Secondly, the thorium-uranium conversion rate is calculated. Finally, the better molten salt reactor core optimum layout scheme is studied comparing with various beading rates. Results: Breading zone layout scheme has an important influence on the breading rate of MSR. Central graphite channels in the core can get higher neutron flux irradiation. And more 233 Th can convert to 233 Pa, which then undergoes beta decay to become 233 U. The graphite in the breading zone gets much lower neutron flux irradiation, so the life span of this graphite can be much longer than that of others. Because neutron flux irradiation in the uranium molten salt graphite has nearly 10 times higher than the graphite in the breading zone, it has great impact on the thorium-uranium conversion rates. For the super epithermal neutron spectrum molten salt reactors, double salt design cannot get higher thorium-uranium conversion rates. The single molten salt can get the same thorium-uranium conversion rate, meanwhile it can greatly extend the life of graphite in the core. Conclusions: From the analysis of calculation results, Blanket breeding area in different locations in the core can change the breeding rates of thorium

  6. Combining Dual Scaling with Semi-Structured Interviews to Interpret Rating Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Childs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dual scaling, a variation of multidimensional scaling, can reveal the dimensions underlying scores, such as raters' judgments. This study illustrates the use of a dual scaling analysis with semi-structured interviews of raters to investigate the differences among the raters as captured by the dimensions. Thirty applications to a one-year post-Bachelor's degree teacher education program were rated by nine teacher educators. Eight of the raters were subsequently interviewed about how they rated the responses. A three-dimensional model was found to explain most of the variance in the ratings for two of the questions and a two-dimensional model was most interpretable for the third question. The interviews suggested that the dimensions reflected, in addition to differences in raters' stringency, differences in their beliefs about their roles as raters and about the types of insights that were required of applicants.

  7. Understanding the mechanism of nanotube synthesis for controlled production of specific (n,m) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-02-11

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  8. Effect of pyrolysis pressure and heating rate on radiata pine char structure and apparent gasification reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Cetin; R. Gupta; B. Moghtaderi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Discipline of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The knowledge of biomass char gasification kinetics has considerable importance in the design of advanced biomass gasifiers, some of which operate at high pressure. The char gasification kinetics themselves are influenced by char structure. In this study, the effects of pyrolysis pressure and heating rate on the char structure were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, digital cinematography, and surface area analysis. Char samples were prepared at pressures between 1 and 20 bar, temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000{degree}C, and heating rates between 20 and 500{degree}C/s. Our results indicate that pyrolysis conditions have a notable impact on the biomass char morphology. Pyrolysis pressure, in particular, was found to influence the size and the shape of char particles while high heating rates led to plastic deformation of particles (i.e. melting) resulting in smooth surfaces and large cavities. The global gasification reactivities of char samples were also determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) technique. Char reactivities were found to increase with increasing pyrolysis heating rates and decreasing pyrolysis pressure. 22 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Understanding the Impact of Trauma Exposure on Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xing-Li; Shi, Jian-Nong

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of trauma exposure on the posttraumatic stress symptomatology (PTSS) of children who resided near the epicenter of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The mechanisms of this impact were explored via structural equation models with self-esteem and coping strategies included as mediators. The…

  10. Understanding the Phenotypic Structure of Adult Retrospective ADHD Symptoms during Childhood in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranby, Krista W.; Boynton, Marcella H.; Kollins, Scott H.; McClernon, F. Joseph; Yang, Chongming; Fuemmeler, Bernard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder, and the phenotypic structure comprising inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive type symptoms has been the focus of a growing body of recent research. Methodological studies are needed to better characterize phenotypes to advance research as well as clinical…

  11. Towards the understanding of structure formation and dynamics in bio-nano systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a number of key structure formation processes involving the well known biomolecular and nano objects such as fullerenes, nanotubes, polypeptides, proteins and DNA molecules. We formulate the problems, describe the main experimental observations and theoretical...

  12. Implementation of Structured Inquiry Based Model Learning toward Students' Understanding of Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Kalbin; Tiawa, Dayang Hjh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is implementation of a structured inquiry learning model in instruction of geometry. The model used is a model with a quasi-experimental study amounted to two classes of samples selected from the population of the ten classes with cluster random sampling technique. Data collection tool consists of a test item…

  13. Interactive tool that empowers structural understanding and enables FEM analysis in a parametric design environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Thøger; Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an interactive tool developed to integrate structural analysis in the architectural design environment from the early conceptual design stage. The tool improves exchange of data between the design environment of Rhino Grasshopper and the FEM analysis of Autodesk Robot...

  14. Energy--Structure--Life. A Learning System for Understanding Science, Book Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixby, Louis W.; And Others

    This learning guide contains materials for the second year of Energy/Structure/ Life, a two year high school program in integrated science. The guide is programed to permit the student to proceed on his own at a self-determined pace. The two year course is a sequence of physics, chemistry, and biology with the chemical (continued from the first…

  15. Energy--Structure--Life, A Learning System for Understanding Science. A Potpourri of Miscellany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixby, Louis W.; And Others

    A discussion of the philosophy and rationale of Energy - Structure - Life, a two year high school sequence in integrated science, is contained in the introductory section of this manual. The student's copy of the laboratory activities and the quizzes for the first year of the program constitute the major portion of this volume. The two year course…

  16. Institutional Racist Melancholia: A Structural Understanding of Grief and Power in Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Sabina E.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, Sabina Vaught undertakes the theoretical and analytical project of conceptually integrating "Whiteness as property", a key structural framework of Critical Race Theory (CRT), and "melancholia", a framework originally emerging from psychoanalysis. Specifically, Vaught engages "Whiteness as property" as…

  17. Structural Violence: Moving beyond ethnicity towards and understanding of electoral violence in kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owiso, Michael Omondi

    2018-01-01

    , but at the same time expose the disconnect in electoral violence studies. The study is based on desk research and digs into books, journals, memoirs, newspapers and official government documents to unearth the underlying structure of Kenya (the actors, institutions, cultural hegemony, history and ideologies...

  18. Structural growth trajectories and rates of change in the first 3 months of infant brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Dominic; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Curran, Megan; Buchthal, Steven D; Alicata, Daniel; Skranes, Jon; Johansen, Heather; Hernandez, Antonette; Yamakawa, Robyn; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2014-10-01

    The very early postnatal period witnesses extraordinary rates of growth, but structural brain development in this period has largely not been explored longitudinally. Such assessment may be key in detecting and treating the earliest signs of neurodevelopmental disorders. To assess structural growth trajectories and rates of change in the whole brain and regions of interest in infants during the first 3 months after birth. Serial structural T1-weighted and/or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained for 211 time points from 87 healthy term-born or term-equivalent preterm-born infants, aged 2 to 90 days, between October 5, 2007, and June 12, 2013. We segmented whole-brain and multiple subcortical regions of interest using a novel application of Bayesian-based methods. We modeled growth and rate of growth trajectories nonparametrically and assessed left-right asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms. Whole-brain volume at birth was approximately one-third of healthy elderly brain volume, and did not differ significantly between male and female infants (347 388 mm3 and 335 509 mm3, respectively, P = .12). The growth rate was approximately 1%/d, slowing to 0.4%/d by the end of the first 3 months, when the brain reached just more than half of elderly adult brain volume. Overall growth in the first 90 days was 64%. There was a significant age-by-sex effect leading to widening separation in brain sizes with age between male and female infants (with male infants growing faster than females by 200.4 mm3/d, SE = 67.2, P = .003). Longer gestation was associated with larger brain size (2215 mm3/d, SE = 284, P = 4×10-13). The expected brain size of an infant born one week earlier than average was 5% smaller than average; at 90 days it will not have caught up, being 2% smaller than average. The cerebellum grew at the highest rate, more than doubling in 90 days, and the hippocampus grew at the slowest rate, increasing by 47% in 90 days. There was left

  19. Proceedings of the 14th Summer School - Understanding the Structure of Hadrons - Prague - Czech Republic, July 9-13, 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Jiří; Bydžovský, Petr; Mareš, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, Suppl.2 (2002), B3 ISSN 0011-4626. [Proceedings of the 14th Summer School - Understanding the Structury of Hadrons. Prague, 09.07.2001-13.07.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : structure * hadrons Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  20. Effects of storage temperature on bacterial growth rates and community structure in fresh retail sushi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoel, S; Jakobsen, A N; Vadstein, O

    2017-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effects of different storage temperatures (4-20°C), on bacterial concentrations, growth rates and community structure in fresh retail sushi, a popular retail product with a claimed shelf life of 2-3 days. The maximum specific growth rate based on aerobic plate count (APC) at 4°C was 0·06 h -1 and displayed a sixfold increase (0·37 h -1 ) at 20°C. Refrigeration resulted in no growth of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S)-producing bacteria, but this group had the strongest temperature response. The bacterial community structure was determined by PCR/DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Multivariate analysis based on Bray-Curtis similarities demonstrated that temperature alone was not the major determinant for the bacterial community structure. The total concentration of aerobic bacteria was the variable that most successfully explained the differences between the communities. The dominating organisms, detected by sequencing of DNA bands excised from the DGGE gel, were Brochothrix thermosphacta and genera of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The relationship between growth rates and storage temperatures clearly demonstrates that these products are sensitive to deviations from optimal storage temperature, possibly resulting in loss of quality during shelf life. Regardless of the storage temperature, the bacterial communities converged towards a similar structure and density, but the storage temperature determined how fast the community reached its carrying capacity. Little information is available on the microbial composition of ready-to-eat food that are prepared with raw fish, subjected to contamination during handling, and susceptible to microbial growth during cold storage. Moreover, the data are a good first possibility to simulate growth of APC, H 2 S-producing bacteria and LAB under different temperature scenarios that might occur during production, distribution or storage. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Flame Propagation and Blowout in Hydrocarbon Jets: Experiments to Understand the Stability and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-29

    Wilson and Kevin M. Lyons. On Diluted-Fuel Combustion Issues in Burning Biogas Surrogates, ASME-JERT, (12 2009): . doi: 2010/01/07 10:47:38 2 TOTAL...blowout velocities. For each flow configuration, the coflow velocity is divided by the liftoff and blowout velocities to produce a dimensionless ratio...rate of the methane and the nitrogen were regulated with separate rotameters such that the amounts of methane and nitrogen issuing from the fuel pipe

  2. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  3. Understanding the structure and role of academics' ego-networks on social networking sites

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Katy

    2017-01-01

    Academic social networking sites (SNS) seek to bring the benefits of online networking to an academic audience. Currently, the two largest sites are Academia.edu and ResearchGate. The ability to make connections to others is a defining affordance of SNS, but what are the characteristics of the network structures being facilitated by academic SNS, and how does this relate to their professional use by academics?\\ud \\ud This study addressed this question through mixed methods social network anal...

  4. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  5. THE Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron R.

    2009-05-01

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role in supernovae (SNe) evolution from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of stellar systems. We consider the simpler idealized problem of an interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a central blast wave. Where valid, the existence of unified solutions suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end, we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models that include effects of divergence and compressibility. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth model. Loss of memory of initial conditions (ICs) can occur in the model, but requires pre-explosion mode numbers higher than predicted for Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low modes dominate, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, the structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes exist in the ICs, the contribution from the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is significant compared to RT. Such RM growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in Tycho. Laser-driven laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making connections to their astrophysical counterparts.

  6. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  7. Understanding structure-stability relationships of Candida antartica lipase B in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego, Teresa; Lozano, Pedro; Gmouh, Said; Vaultier, Michel; Iborra, José L

    2005-01-01

    Two different water-immiscible ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidizolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and butyltrimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, were used for butyl butyrate synthesis from vinyl butyrate catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) at 2% (v/v) water content and 50 degrees C. Both the synthetic activity and stability of the enzyme in these ILs were enhanced as compared to those in hexane. Circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have been used over a period of 4 days to determine structural changes in the enzyme associated with differences in its stability for each assayed medium. CALB showed a loss in residual activity higher than 75% after 4 days of incubation in both water and hexane media at 50 degrees C, being related to great changes in both alpha-helix and beta-strand secondary structures. The stabilization of CALB, which was observed in the two ILs studied, was associated with both the maintenance of the 50% of initial alpha-helix content and the enhancement of beta-strands. Furthermore, intrinsic fluorescence studies clearly showed how a classical enzyme unfolding was occurring with time in both water and hexane media. However, the structural changes associated with the incubation of the enzyme in both ILs might be attributed to a compact and active enzyme conformation, resulting in an enhancement of the stability in these nonaqueous environments.

  8. Histological investigation of the supra-glottal structures in humans for understanding abnormal phonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Miwako; Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Chan, Roger; Niimi, Seijii; Tayama, Niro

    2002-11-01

    Phonation is the vocal fold vibration on normal voice. But sometimes we can observe the other phonation styles like as the pressed voice or some throat singings like as ''kargyraa'' or ''drone'' in Khoomei in Mongolian music. Also, clinically, we know that some patients who have the wide glottal slit in phonation because of the recurrence nerve palsy or after partial laryngectomy, could make the ''supra-glottal phonation.'' The ''supra-glottal phonation'' would be made from the vibration of ''supra-glottal structures'' such as the false vocal folds, the arytenoids and the epiglottis, etc. Endoscopic examination suggests the existence of some contractile functions in supra-glottal space. However, these phonation systems have not been clear to explain their neuromuscular mechanism in histology. This study aimed to find the basis for making the supra-glottal phonation from the points of view of the histological structures. We tried to investigate if there were any muscles that could contract the supra-glottal structures. The samples are the excised larynx of human beings. They were fixed by formalin after excision. We observed their macroscopic anatomy, and also with the microscopic observation their histological preparations after the process of the embedding in paraffin, slicing for the preparation and HE (hematoxylin-eosin) staining.

  9. Understanding the effect of secondary structure on molecular interactions of poly-L-lysine with different substrates by SFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binazadeh, Mojtaba; Faghihnejad, Ali; Unsworth, Larry D; Zeng, Hongbo

    2013-10-14

    Nonspecific adsorption of proteins on biomaterial surfaces challenges the widespread application of engineered materials, and understanding the impact of secondary structure of proteins and peptides on their adsorption process is of both fundamental and practical importance in bioengineering. In this work, poly-L-lysine (PLL)-based α-helices and β-sheets were chosen as a model system to investigate the effect of secondary structure on peptide interactions with substrates of various surface chemistries. Circular dichroism (CD) was used to confirm the presence of both α-helix and β-sheet structured PLL in aqueous solutions and upon adsorption to quartz, where these secondary structures seemed to be preserved. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging showed different surface patterns for adsorbed α-helix and β-sheet PLL. Interactions between PLL of different secondary structures and various substrates (i.e., PLL, Au, mica, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)) were directly measured using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). It was found that β-sheet PLL films showed higher adsorbed layer thicknesses in general. Adhesion energies of β-sheet versus Au and β-sheet versus β-sheet were considerably higher than that of α-helix versus Au and α-helix versus α-helix systems, respectively. Au and β-sheet PLL interactions seemed to be more dependent on the salt concentration than that of α-helix, while the presence of a grafted PEG layer greatly diminished any attraction with either PLL structure. The molecular interaction mechanism of peptide in different secondary structures is discussed in terms of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, Alexander-de Gennes (AdG) steric model and hydrogen bonding, which provides important insight into the fundamental understanding of the interaction mechanism between proteins and biomaterials.

  10. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite: Implications for surface dynamics and dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2014-02-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200 h of dissolution. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in surface area, surface reactivity and dissolution rates. All surfaces studied present fast changes in topography during the initial 200 h of dissolution. The controlling factors that cause the development of topography are the stability of the step edges forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces continue to present significant changes in topography, while for others the topography tends to remain approximately constant. The observed variation of dissolution rates are attributed to a decrease of the density of step edges on the surface and the continuous increase in exposure of more stable surfaces. Calculations of dissolution rates, which assume that dissolution rates are directly proportional to surface area, are not valid for the type of surfaces studied. Instead, to develop accurate kinetic dissolution models and more realistic stochastic dissolution simulations the surface reactivity, determined by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure.

  11. Understanding the structure, dynamics, and mass transport properties of self assembling peptide hydrogels for injectable, drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Monica Cristina

    hydrogels as a function of peptide sequence and concentration. Changes in nanoscale dynamics and structure inherently lead to substantial differences in bulk properties, such as the elastic modulus and network mesh size. Learning how the material properties of the gels influence the transport rate of therapeutics through the hydrogel is essential to the development of delivery vehicles. The remainder of the thesis focuses on correlating the mesh sizes of MAX1 and MAX8 gels to the diffusion and mass transport properties of model dextran and protein probes. Here, work is centered on how peptide charge and concentration, as well as probe structure, in particular hydrodynamic diameter and charge, dictate the temporal release of model probes from the peptide hydrogels. Experiments include self diffusion studies and bulk release experiments with model dextrans and proteins from gels before and after syringe delivery. Overall, this thesis will demonstrate the importance of understanding material properties from the nanoscale up to the macroscale for application based design. With this approach, better and specific development of self-assembling peptide materials can be achieved, allowing for the rational engineering of peptide sequences to form hydrogels appropriate for specific drug delivery applications.

  12. Understanding the internal structures of X(4140), X(4274), X(4500) and X(4700)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Cui, Er-Liang [Beihang University, School of Physics and Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials and Physics, Beijing (China); Chen, Wei [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    We investigate the newly observed X(4500) and X(4700) based on the diquark-antidiquark configuration within the framework of QCD sum rules. Both of them may be interpreted as the D-wave cs anti c anti s tetraquark states of J{sup P} = 0{sup +}, but with opposite color structures, which is remarkably similar to the result obtained in Chen and Zhu (Phys Rev D 83:034010, 2011) that X(4140) and X(4274) can be both interpreted as the S-wave cs anti c anti s tetraquark states of J{sup P} = 1{sup +}, also with opposite color structures. However, the extracted masses and these suggested assignments to these X states do depend on these running quark masses where m{sub s}(2 GeV) = 95 ± 5 MeV and m{sub c}(m{sub c}) = 1.23 ± 0.09 GeV. As a byproduct, the masses of the hidden-bottom partner states of X(4500) and X(4700) are extracted to be both around 10.64 GeV, which can be searched for in the Υφ invariant mass distribution. (orig.)

  13. Understanding the structure and performance of self-assembled triblock terpolymer membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, MaryTheresa M.

    2013-10-01

    Nanoporous membranes represent a possible route towards more precise particle and macromolecular separations, which are of interest across many industries. Here, we explored membranes with vertically-aligned nanopores formed from a poly(isoprene-. b-styrene-. b-4 vinyl pyridine) (ISV) triblock terpolymer via a hybrid self-assembly/nonsolvent induced phase separation process (S-NIPS). ISV concentration, solvent composition, and evaporation time in the S-NIPS process were varied to tailor ordering of the selective layer and produce enhanced water permeability. Here, water permeability was doubled over previous versions of ISV membranes. This was achieved by increasing volatile solvent concentration, thereby decreasing the evaporation period required for self-assembly. Fine-tuning was required, however, since overly-rapid evaporation did not yield the desired pore structure. Transport models, used to relate the in-. situ structure to the performance of these materials, revealed narrowing of pores and blocking by the dense region below. It was shown that these vertically aligned nanoporous membranes compare favorably with commercial ultrafiltration membranes formed by NIPS and track-etching processes, which suggests that there is practical value in further developing and optimizing these materials for specific industrial separations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Understanding structural changes in NMC Li-ion cells by in situ neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolotko, O.; Senyshyn, A.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Nikolowski, K.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2014-06-01

    Commercial NMC cells of 18650-type based on a Lix(Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2)O2 cathode and a graphitic anode were studied in situ using a combination of high-resolution monochromatic neutron powder diffraction and electrochemical analysis. The structural changes of the electrode materials during cell charge/discharge have been determined using Rietveld refinement and single profile decomposition techniques. A transformation of the graphitic anode to LiC12 and LiC6 through the formation of higher ordered lithium intercalated carbons was observed. A different behavior of electrochemically-driven lattice distortion was observed for NMC material in comparison to LixCoO2 and its influence on the overall cell performance has been discussed in brief. Detailed analysis of the structural changes in the Lix(Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2)O2 cathode material revealed reversible Li/Ni cation mixing (5.6(8)%), which is state-of-charge independent below 1600 mAh and vanishing above 1800 mAh (∼0.8Qmax).

  15. A Capability Approach to Understanding Sport for Social Inclusion: Agency, Structure and Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Suzuki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the global diffusion of the term social inclusion, as well as the use of sport to promote it, questions have been raised regarding the extent to which sport is able to contribute to transforming the exclusive nature of the social structure. The lack of analytical clarity of the concept has not helped to address these questions. This article proposes a conceptual framework based on Amartya Sen’s capability approach, considering social exclusion as the denial of social relations that leads to serious deprivation of important capabilities. A person’s capabilities could potentially be improved through micro-, meso-, and macro-level social processes. At the micro level, sport-based social inclusion programmes could offer such social relations to varying degrees, though sport’s values are only relative to other leisure activities. The scale of impact depends primarily on the meso-level processes, in which the size and quality of each programme can be improved through organisational learning, and secondarily on the macro-level processes whereby the organisational population is institutionalised. It is argued that more research needs to be done on the meso and macro levels, as they are concerned with the ultimate potential of sport to facilitate structural transformation towards more socially inclusive society.

  16. Unraveling Structural Infrasound: understanding the science for persistent remote monitoring of critical infrastructure (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, S. M.; Diaz-Alvarez, H.; McComas, S.; Costley, D.; Whitlow, R. D.; Jordan, A. M.; Taylor, O.

    2013-12-01

    In 2006, the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) began a program designed to meet the capability gap associated with remote assessment of critical infrastructure. This program addresses issues arising from the use of geophysical techniques to solve engineering problems through persistent monitoring of critical infrastructure using infrasound. In the original 2006-2009 study of a railroad bridge in Ft. Leonard Wood, MO, the fundamental modes of motion of the structure were detected at up to 30 km away, with atmospheric excitation deemed to be the source driver. Follow-on research focused on the mechanically driven modes excited by traffic, with directional acoustic emanations. The success of the Ft. Wood ambient excitation study resulted in several subsequent programs to push the boundaries of this new technique for standoff assessment, discussed herein. Detection of scour and river system health monitoring are serious problems for monitoring civil infrastructure, from both civilian and military perspectives. Knowledge of overall system behavior over time is crucial for assessment of bridge foundations and barge navigation. This research focuses on the same steel-truss bridge from the Ft. Wood study, and analyzes 3D and 2D substructure models coupled with the superstructure reaction loads to assess the modal deformations within the infrasound bandwidth and the correlation to scour of embedment material. The Urban infrasound program is infrasound modeling, data analysis, and sensor research leading to the detection, classification and localization of threat activities in complex propagation environments. Three seismo-acoustic arrays were deployed on rooftops across the Southern Methodist University campus in Dallas, Texas, to characterize the urban infrasound environment. Structural sources within 15 km of the arrays have been identified through signal processing and confirmed through acoustical models. Infrasound is also being studied as a means of

  17. Forensic comparison and matching of fingerprints: using quantitative image measures for estimating error rates through understanding and predicting difficulty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Kellman

    Full Text Available Latent fingerprint examination is a complex task that, despite advances in image processing, still fundamentally depends on the visual judgments of highly trained human examiners. Fingerprints collected from crime scenes typically contain less information than fingerprints collected under controlled conditions. Specifically, they are often noisy and distorted and may contain only a portion of the total fingerprint area. Expertise in fingerprint comparison, like other forms of perceptual expertise, such as face recognition or aircraft identification, depends on perceptual learning processes that lead to the discovery of features and relations that matter in comparing prints. Relatively little is known about the perceptual processes involved in making comparisons, and even less is known about what characteristics of fingerprint pairs make particular comparisons easy or difficult. We measured expert examiner performance and judgments of difficulty and confidence on a new fingerprint database. We developed a number of quantitative measures of image characteristics and used multiple regression techniques to discover objective predictors of error as well as perceived difficulty and confidence. A number of useful predictors emerged, and these included variables related to image quality metrics, such as intensity and contrast information, as well as measures of information quantity, such as the total fingerprint area. Also included were configural features that fingerprint experts have noted, such as the presence and clarity of global features and fingerprint ridges. Within the constraints of the overall low error rates of experts, a regression model incorporating the derived predictors demonstrated reasonable success in predicting objective difficulty for print pairs, as shown both in goodness of fit measures to the original data set and in a cross validation test. The results indicate the plausibility of using objective image metrics to predict expert

  18. Using a balloon-borne accelerometer to improve understanding of the turbulent structure of the atmosphere for aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, Graeme; Harrison, Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Williams, Paul

    2017-04-01

    This work describes the instrument development, characterisation and data analysis from 51 radiosondes specially equipped with accelerometers to measure atmospheric turbulence. Turbulence is hazardous to aircraft as it cannot be observed in advance. It is estimated that turbulence costs the airline industry millions of US dollars a year through damage to aircraft and injuries to passengers and crew. To avoid turbulence pilots and passengers rely on Clear Air Turbulence forecasts, which have limited skill. One limitation in this area is lack of quantitative unbiased observations. The main source of turbulence observations is from commercial airline pilot reports, which are subjective, biased by the size of aircraft and pilot experience. This work seeks to improve understanding of turbulence through a standardised method of turbulence observations amenable throughout the troposphere. A sensing package has been developed to measure the acceleration of the radiosonde as it swings in response to turbulent agitation of its carrier balloon. The accelerometer radiosonde has been compared against multiple turbulence remote sensing methods to characterise its measurements including calibration with Doppler lidar eddy dissipation rate in the boundary layer. A further relationship has been found by comparison with the spectral width of a Mesospheric, Stratospheric and Tropospheric (MST) radar. From the full dataset of accelerometer sonde ascents a standard deviation of 5 m s-2 is defined as a threshold for significant turbulence. The dataset spans turbulence generated in meteorological phenomena such as jet streams, clouds and in the presence of convection. The analysis revealed that 77% of observed turbulence could be explained by the aforementioned phenomena. In jet streams, turbulence generation was often caused by horizontal processes such as deformation. In convection, turbulence is found to form when CAPE >150 J kg-1. Deeper clouds were found to be more turbulent due to

  19. A Matérn model of the spatial covariance structure of point rain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2014-07-15

    It is challenging to model a precipitation field due to its intermittent and highly scale-dependent nature. Many models of point rain rates or areal rainfall observations have been proposed and studied for different time scales. Among them, the spectral model based on a stochastic dynamical equation for the instantaneous point rain rate field is attractive, since it naturally leads to a consistent space–time model. In this paper, we note that the spatial covariance structure of the spectral model is equivalent to the well-known Matérn covariance model. Using high-quality rain gauge data, we estimate the parameters of the Matérn model for different time scales and demonstrate that the Matérn model is superior to an exponential model, particularly at short time scales.

  20. Nucleus structure and dust morphology: Post-Rosetta understanding and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Bentley, Mark; Ciarletti, Valérie; Kofman, Woldek; Lasue, Jeremie; Mannel, Thurid; Herique, Alain

    2017-10-01

    The structure of cometary nuclei and the morphology of dust particles they eject have long been unknowns in cometary science. The combination of these two subjects, as revealed by the Rosetta mission at 67P/C-G, is currently providing an unprecedented insight about Solar System formation and early evolution.Rosetta has established that the bulk porosity of 67P/C-G nucleus is high, in the 70% to 85% range, both from the determination of its density and from permittivity measurements with CONSERT bistatic radar experiment [1-2]. CONSERT, through operations after Philae landing on 12-13 November 2014, has also allowed us to estimate that i) the porosity is likely to be higher inside the nucleus than on its subsurface, ii) a major component of the nucleus is refractory carbonaceous compounds, and iii) the small lobe is homogeneous at a scale of a few wavelengths (i.e., about 10 m), while heterogeneities in the 3-m range (similar to the rounded nodules noticed on walls of large pits) cannot be ruled out [2-4].Rosetta has also established, through its 26 months rendezvous with 67P/C-G, the aggregated structure of dust particles within a wide range of sizes in the inner cometary coma. The MIDAS atomic force microscope experiment has given us evidence (from 3D topographic images with nano- to micrometer resolution) for i) a hierarchical structure of aggregated dust particles, down to tens of nm-sized grains, ii) one extremely porous dust particle, with a fractal dimension of (1.7 ± 0.1) [5-6]. The accuracy of comparisons between cometary dust particles and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere (including CP-IDPs) could thus be improved.Such results should further refine the main processes (e.g., low velocity aggregation) that allowed the formation of comets in the early Solar System, and the implications of a possible late heavy bombardment on the interplanetary dust clouds and on telluric planets.References. 1. Pätzold et al. Nature 530 63 2016. 2

  1. Correlation structures in short-term variabilities of stock indices and exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomomichi; Small, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Financial data usually show irregular fluctuations and some trends. We investigate whether there are correlation structures in short-term variabilities (irregular fluctuations) among financial data from the viewpoint of deterministic dynamical systems. Our method is based on the small-shuffle surrogate method. The data we use are daily closing price of Standard & Poor's 500 and the volume, and daily foreign exchange rates, Euro/US Dollar (USD), British Pound/USD and Japanese Yen/USD. We found that these data are not independent.

  2. Chemical structure influence on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Mark C.; Tick, Geoffrey R.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Burke, William R.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of chemical structure on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux was examined. The variability of measured and UNIFAC modeled NAPL activity coefficients as a function of mole fraction was compared for two NAPL mixtures containing structurally-different contaminants of concern including toluene (TOL) or trichloroethene (TCE) within a hexadecane (HEXDEC) matrix. The results showed that dissolution from the NAPL mixtures transitioned from ideality for mole fractions > 0.05 to nonideality as mole fractions decreased. In particular, the TCE generally exhibited more ideal dissolution behavior except at lower mole fractions, and may indicate greater structural/polarity similarity between the two compounds. Raoult's Law and UNIFAC generally under-predicted the batch experiment results for TOL:HEXDEC mixtures especially for mole fractions ≤ 0.05. The dissolution rate coefficients were similar for both TOL and TCE over all mole fractions tested. Mass flux reduction (MFR) analysis showed that more efficient removal behavior occurred for TOL and TCE with larger mole fractions compared to the lower initial mole fraction mixtures (i.e. < 0.2). However, compared to TOL, TCE generally exhibited more efficient removal behavior over all mole fractions tested and may have been the result of structural and molecular property differences between the compounds. Activity coefficient variability as a function of mole fraction was quantified through regression analysis and incorporated into dissolution modeling analyses for the dynamic flushing experiments. TOL elution concentrations were modeled (predicted) reasonable well using ideal and equilibrium assumptions, but the TCE elution concentrations could not be predicted using the ideal model. Rather, the dissolution modeling demonstrated that TCE elution was better described by the nonideal model whereby NAPL-phase activity coefficient varied as a function of COC mole

  3. Interest Rates with Long Memory: A Generalized Affine Term-Structure Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osterrieder, Daniela

    We propose a model for the term structure of interest rates that is a generalization of the discrete-time, Gaussian, affine yield-curve model. Compared to standard affine models, our model allows for general linear dynamics in the vector of state variables. In an application to real yields of U...... by a level, a slope, and a curvature factor that arise naturally from the co-fractional modeling framework. We show that implied yields match the level and the variability of yields well over time. Studying the out-of-sample forecasting accuracy of our model, we find that our model results in good yield...

  4. Future Mars geophysical observatories for understanding its internal structure, rotation, and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehant, Veronique; Banerdt, Bruce; Lognonné, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    thermal structure, its gross compositional stratification, as well as significant lateral variations in these quantities. Planetary interiors not only record evidence of conditions of planetary accretion and differentiation, they exert significant control on surface environments.We present recent advances...... in possible in-situ investigations of the interior of Mars, experiments and strategies that can provide unique and critical information about the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolution. Such investigations applied on Mars have been ranked as a high priority in virtually every set......, as well as the improvement of the performance of Very Broad-Band (VBB) seismometers have made it possible to secure a rich scientific return with only two simultaneously recording stations. In parallel, use of interferometric methods based on two Earth–Mars radio links simultaneously from landers tracked...

  5. Understanding barotrauma in fish passing hydro structures: a global strategy for sustainable development of water resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Boys, Craig A.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Silva, Luiz G.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Phonekhampeng, Oudom; Thorncraft, Garry; Singhanouvong, Douangkham

    2014-03-24

    Freshwater fishes are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates and species declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic influences. This is alarming as the diversity and stability of populations are at risk. In addition, freshwater fish serve as important protein sources, particularly in developing countries. One of the focal activities thought to influence freshwater fish population declines is water resource development, which is anticipated to increase over the next several decades. For fish encountering hydro structures, such as passing through hydroturbines, there may be a rapid decrease in pressure which can lead to injuries commonly referred to as barotraumas. The authors summarize the research to date that has examined the effects of rapid pressure changes on fish and outline the most important factors to consider (i.e., swim bladder morphology, depth of acclimation, migration pattern and life stage) when examining the susceptibility of barotraumas for fish of interest.

  6. Nuclear structure effects in quasifission – understanding the formation of the heaviest elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasifission is an important process suppressing the fusion of two heavy nuclei in reactions used to create superheavy elements. Quasifission results in rapid separation of the dinuclear system initially formed at contact. Achieving reliable a priori prediction of quasifission probabilities is a very diffcult problem. Through measurements with projectiles from C to Ni, the Australian National University’s Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer have been used to map out mass-angle distributions (MAD - the fission mass-ratio as a function of centre-of-mass angle. These provide information on quasifission dynamics in the least modeldependent way. Average quasifission time-scales have been extracted, and compared with TDHF calculations of the collisions, with good agreement being found. With the baseline information from the survey of experimental MAD, strong influences of the nuclear structure of the projectile and target nuclei can be clearly determined.

  7. Understanding the subsurface thermal structure of deep sedimentary basins in Denmark - measurements and modelling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, N.; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Bording, Thue Sylvester

    2015-01-01

    Most of the Danish area is characterized by deep sedimentary basins with a great potential for exploitation of geothermal energy. Geothermal reservoirs are present at various depths and temperatures. Currently, three geothermal plants are operating producing warm water for district heating purposes...... of different conductivity. Mean geothermal gradients from surface to depths of 1000 to 3000 m are generally between 20 and 35 °C/km. The subsurface thermal structure is clearly dominated by conduction. Advection by groundwater migration is generally insignificant. Heat flow increases significantly with depth...... due to perturbation from long-term palaeoclimatic surface temperature variations. Examples of modelled temperature distribution for selected geothermal reservoir are shown. In the Gassum Formation, which is present in most of the Danish area, temperatures are largely between 35 and 90 °C for depths...

  8. Understanding Nomophobia: Structural Equation Modeling and Semantic Network Analysis of Smartphone Separation Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee; Kim, Ki Joon; Kim, Jang Hyun

    2017-07-01

    This study explicates nomophobia by developing a research model that identifies several determinants of smartphone separation anxiety and by conducting semantic network analyses on smartphone users' verbal descriptions of the meaning of their smartphones. Structural equation modeling of the proposed model indicates that personal memories evoked by smartphones encourage users to extend their identity onto their devices. When users perceive smartphones as their extended selves, they are more likely to get attached to the devices, which, in turn, leads to nomophobia by heightening the phone proximity-seeking tendency. This finding is also supplemented by the results of the semantic network analyses revealing that the words related to memory, self, and proximity-seeking are indeed more frequently used in the high, compared with low, nomophobia group.

  9. Understanding and Curing Structural Defects in Colloidal GaAs Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vishwas [Department of Chemistry; Liu, Wenyong [Department of Chemistry; Janke, Eric M. [Department of Chemistry; Kamysbayev, Vladislav [Department of Chemistry; Filatov, Alexander S. [Department of Chemistry; Sun, Cheng-Jun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Lee, Byeongdu [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Rajh, Tijana [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Schaller, Richard D. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Department of; Talapin, Dmitri V. [Department of Chemistry; Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2017-02-22

    Nearly three decades since the first report on the synthesis of colloidal GaAs nanocrystals (NCs), the preparation and properties of this material remain highly controversial. Traditional synthetic routes either fail to produce the GaAs phase or result in materials that do not show expected optical properties such as excitonic transitions. In this work, we demonstrate a variety of synthetic routes toward crystalline GaAs NCs. By using a combination of Raman, EXAFS and transient absorption spectroscopies, we conclude that unusual optical properties of 2 colloidal GaAs NCs can be related to the presence of vacancies and lattice disorder. We introduce novel molten salt based annealing approach to alleviate these structural defects and show the emergence of size-dependent excitonic transitions in colloidal GaAs quantum dots.

  10. Fine-structure energy levels and radiative rates in Si-like chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. P.; Tayal, Vikas; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Excitation energies and radiative rates for electric dipole (E1) transitions among the 86 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations (1 s 22 s 22 p 6)3 s 23 p 2, 3 s3 p 3, 3 s 23 p3 d, 3 p 4, 3 s 23 p4 s, 3 s 23 p4 p, 3 s3 p 2(2 S)4 s, 3 s3 p 2(2 P)4 s, 3 s3 p 2(4 P)4 s, 3 s3 p 2(2 D)4 s, 3 s 23 p4 d and 3 s 23 p4 f of Cl IV are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions obtained with the CIV3 computer code of Hibbert. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep the calculated energy splittings close to the energy values of the National Institute for Standards and Technology, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated energy levels, including their orderings, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST values. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. From our radiative rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. Significant differences between our calculated lifetimes and those from a sophisticated calculation for a few low lying levels are noted and discussed. In this calculation, we also predict new data for several fine-structure levels where no other theoretical and/or experimental results are available.

  11. Sharpening the edges of understanding the structure/function of the LPA1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Mandi; Nguyen, Giang; Radhakrishna, Harish; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-01-01

    Since the molecular cloning of the vzg-1/Edg-2/LPA1 gene, studies have attempted to characterize LPA1 receptor functionality into a single categorical role, different from the other Edg-family LPA receptors. The desire to categorize LPA1 function has highlighted its complexity and demonstrated that the LPA1 receptor does not have one absolute function throughout every system. The central nervous system is highly enriched in the LPA1 receptor, suggesting an integral role in neuronal processes. Metastatic and invasive breast cancer also appears to have LPA-mediated LPA1 receptor functions that enhance phenotypes associated with tumorigenesis. LPA1 possesses a number of motifs conserved among G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): a DRY-like motif, a PDZ domain, Ser/Thr predicted sites of phosphorylation, a dileucine motif, double cysteines in the tail and conserved residues that stabilize structure and determine ligand binding. The third intracellular loop of the LPA1 receptor may be the crux of receptor signaling and attenuation with phosphorylation of Thr-236 potentially a key determinant of basal LPA1 signaling. Mutagenesis data supports the notion that Thr-236 regulates this process since mutating Thr-236 to Ala-236 increased basal and LPA-mediated serum response factor (SRF) signaling activity and Lys-236 further increased this basal signaling. Here we describe progress on defining the major functions of the LPA1 receptor, discuss a context dependent dualistic role as both a negative regulator in cancer and a proto-oncogene, outline its structural components at the molecular amino-acid level and present mutagenesis data on the third intracellular loop of the receptor. PMID:18501205

  12. Baroque Tower on a Gothic Base: A Lakatosian Reconstruction of Students' and Teachers' Understanding of Structure of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Rafael; Niaz, Mansoor

    The main objective of this study is a reconstruction of students' and teachers' understanding of structure of the atom based on the following framework: a) history of science can be conceived as that of competing rival research programs; b) some of the greatest scientific research programs progressed on inconsistent foundations; c) in actual scientific practice, counter-examples would be considered as mere anomalies; d) work of Thomson, Rutherford and Bohr led to the postulation of atomic models based on competing frameworks of understanding. This study is based on 171 freshman students enrolled in General Chemistry I and 7 chemistry teachers at the Instituto Universitario de Tecnología, El Tigre, Venezuela. All the students and teachers were asked to respond to a 11 item questionnaire and explain their responses. The questionnaire was administered about a month after the students/teachers had finished the topic of atomic structure. Students' and teachers' responses were classified in the following categories: Positivist/inductivist, Transitional and Lakatosian. Results obtained show that students and teachers: a) have a very similar positivist understanding of the progress of science; b) are inconsistent in their responses by switching from a positivist response on one item to a Lakatosian on an another; c) also showed some consistent response patterns by resisting changes in some of their core beliefs by invoking "auxiliary hypotheses"; and d) consider that observable hard experimental facts give science its objective status, whereas the interpretations being subjective perhaps go beyond the fold of science.

  13. A contribution to the understanding of the high burn-up structure formation in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonnet, J.

    2007-01-01

    An increase of the discharge burn-up of UO 2 nuclear fuels in the light water reactors results in the appearance of a change of microscopic structure, called HBS. Although well characterised experimentally, important points on the mechanisms of its formation remain to be cleared up. In order to answer these questions, a study of the contribution of the dislocation-type defects was conducted. In a first part, a calculation method of the stress field associated with periodic configurations of dislocations was developed. The method was applied to the cases of edge dislocation pile-up and wall, for which an explicit expression of the internal stress potential was obtained. Through the study of other examples of dislocation configurations, it was highlighted that this method also allows the calculation of any periodic dislocation configuration. In a second part, the evolution of interstitial-type dislocation loops was studied in UO 2 fuel samples doped with 10% in mass of alpha emitters. The experimental loop size distributions were obtained for these samples stored during 4 and 7 years at room temperature. Kinetic equations are proposed in order to study the influence of the resolution process of interstitials from a loop back to the matrix due to an impact with the recoil atom 234 U, as well as the coalescence of two interstitial loops that can diffuse by a volume mechanism. The application of the model shows that the two processes must be considered in the study of the evolution of radiation damage. (author)

  14. Toward an understanding of the Middle Pleistocene Transition as a structural change in climate stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditlevsen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Middle Pleistocene transition signifies a change approximately 1 Myr ago from a period with 40 kyr glacial cycles to a period of approximately 100 kyr cycles in response to the orbital forcing. This change from the "40 kyr world" to the "100 kyr world" is not reflected in noticeable changes in the forcing. To explain this we present a low order conceptual model for the oscillatory dynamics of the ice sheets in terms of a relaxation oscillator with multiple levels subject to the Milankovitch forcing. The model exhibits smooth transitions between three different climate states; an interglacial (i), a mild glacial (g) and a deep glacial (G) as proposed by Paillard (1998). The model suggests a dynamical explanation in terms of the structure of a slow manifold for the observed allowed and ``forbidden'' transitions between the three climate states. With the model, the pacing of the climate oscillations by the astronomical forcing is through the mechanism of phase-resetting of relaxation oscillations in which the internal phase of the oscillation is affected by the forcing.

  15. Isolated catalyst sites on amorphous supports: A systematic algorithm for understanding heterogeneities in structure and reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Bryan R.; Sanderson, Evan D.; Bean, Daniel; Peters, Baron

    2013-05-01

    Methods for modeling catalytic sites on amorphous supports lag far behind methods for modeling catalytic sites on metal surfaces, zeolites, and other crystalline materials. One typical strategy for amorphous supports uses cluster models with arbitrarily chosen constraints to model the rigid amorphous support, but these constraints arbitrarily influence catalyst site activity. An alternative strategy is to use no constraints, but this results in catalytic sites with unrealistic flexibility. We present a systematic ab initio method to model isolated active sites on insulating amorphous supports using small cluster models. A sequential quadratic programming framework helps us relate chemical properties, such as the activation energy, to active site structure. The algorithm is first illustrated on an empirical valence bond model energy landscape. We then use the algorithm to model an off-pathway kinetic trap in olefin metathesis by isolated Mo sites on amorphous SiO2. The cluster models were terminated with basis set deficient fluorine atoms to mimic the properties of an extended silica framework. We also discuss limitations of the current algorithm formulation and future directions for improvement.

  16. Toward understanding the evolution of griseofulvin crystal structure to a mesophase after cryogenic milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Bates, Simon; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2009-02-09

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the response of crystalline griseofulvin to mechanically induced stress through cryogenic milling. Crystalline griseofulvin was subjected to cryogenic milling for two different lengths of time. Following cryo-milling, the samples were immediately analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The DSC thermograms of cryo-milled griseofulvin showed a complex exothermic event at around 65 degrees C for the 30min cryo-milled sample and around 75 degrees C for the 60min cryo-milled sample. A glass transition event was not observed for the cryo-milled samples. This is in direct contrast to the X-ray amorphous griseofulvin sample prepared through the quench melt method The XRPD patterns of cryo-milled griseofulvin show a loss of the crystalline Bragg peaks and a corresponding increase in diffuse scattering (halos). The disordered griseofulvin material produced through cryo-milling appears X-ray amorphous, yet different from the amorphous phase produced using the quench melt method. Both X-ray amorphous materials have distinctive DSC thermograms and X-ray powder patterns. These findings suggest that the evolution of the griseofulvin crystal structure during cryo-milling is not simply a crystal-to-amorphous transition but a transition to an intermediate mesophase.

  17. PROTEIN STRUCTURE: A OBSTACLE TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Menezes

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry underlays many subjects taught in high school but most teacherslack enough biochemical bases to explore them properly. To investigate their alternativeconceptions we have applied the distance course Biochemistry of Drugs to public schoolteachers, with class load of 30 hours and six modules: Statistics and basic concepts;Marijuana; Tobacco; Inhalants; Alcohol; Legalization vs Criminalization. The conceptionswere analyzed through the course records and the most important was the lack ofknowledge on the protein chemical structure, which impaired the comprehension ofproposed molecular mechanisms (involving receptors, neurotransmitters, enzymeinhibition, etc.. Several interventions promoted the overcoming of many misconceptionsas detected by written tests on chemical nature of involved compounds; neurotransmissionmechanism and the role of drugs in neurotransmission. Among 63 questions only 10 hadless than 50% correct answers. The teachers’ performances were impaired by readingdifficulties and poor scientific background that difficult their distinction of facts and scientificmodels from common sense or personal opinion. The teachers’ and the course staffevaluations were highly positive. Most of them declared that their knowledge was amplifiedand that they would recommend this course to colleagues. They also were favorablysurprised with the deep level of the topics, the demanded dedication and the fact that thecourse was addressed to themselves instead of to their students.

  18. Alveoli, teeth, and tooth loss: Understanding the homology of internal mandibular structures in mysticete cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Peredo

    Full Text Available The evolution of filter feeding in baleen whales (Mysticeti facilitated a wide range of ecological diversity and extreme gigantism. The innovation of filter feeding evolved in a shift from a mineralized upper and lower dentition in stem mysticetes to keratinous baleen plates that hang only from the roof of the mouth in extant species, which are all edentulous as adults. While all extant mysticetes are born with a mandible lacking a specialized feeding structure (i.e., baleen, the bony surface retains small foramina with elongated sulci that often merge together in what has been termed the alveolar gutter. Because mysticete embryos develop tooth buds that resorb in utero, these foramina have been interpreted as homologous to tooth alveoli in other mammals. Here, we test this homology by creating 3D models of the internal mandibular morphology from terrestrial artiodactyls and fossil and extant cetaceans, including stem cetaceans, odontocetes and mysticetes. We demonstrate that dorsal foramina on the mandible communicate with the mandibular canal via smaller canals, which we explain within the context of known mechanical models of bone resorption. We suggest that these dorsal foramina represent distinct branches of the inferior alveolar nerve (or artery, rather than alveoli homologous with those of other mammals. As a functional explanation, we propose that these branches provide sensation to the dorsal margin of the mandible to facilitate placement and occlusion of the baleen plates during filer feeding.

  19. Understanding characteristics in multivariate traffic flow time series from complex network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Shen; Tang, Jinjun; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-07-01

    Discovering dynamic characteristics in traffic flow is the significant step to design effective traffic managing and controlling strategy for relieving traffic congestion in urban cities. A new method based on complex network theory is proposed to study multivariate traffic flow time series. The data were collected from loop detectors on freeway during a year. In order to construct complex network from original traffic flow, a weighted Froenius norm is adopt to estimate similarity between multivariate time series, and Principal Component Analysis is implemented to determine the weights. We discuss how to select optimal critical threshold for networks at different hour in term of cumulative probability distribution of degree. Furthermore, two statistical properties of networks: normalized network structure entropy and cumulative probability of degree, are utilized to explore hourly variation in traffic flow. The results demonstrate these two statistical quantities express similar pattern to traffic flow parameters with morning and evening peak hours. Accordingly, we detect three traffic states: trough, peak and transitional hours, according to the correlation between two aforementioned properties. The classifying results of states can actually represent hourly fluctuation in traffic flow by analyzing annual average hourly values of traffic volume, occupancy and speed in corresponding hours.

  20. Understanding influential factors on implementing green supply chain management practices: An interpretive structural modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agi, Maher A N; Nishant, Rohit

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we establish a set of 19 influential factors on the implementation of Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM) practices and analyse the interaction between these factors and their effect on the implementation of GSCM practices using the Interpretive Structural Modelling (ISM) method and the "Matrice d'Impacts Croisés Multiplication Appliquée à un Classement" (MICMAC) analysis on data compiled from interviews with supply chain (SC) executives based in the Gulf countries (Middle East region). The study reveals a strong influence and driving power of the nature of the relationships between SC partners on the implementation of GSCM practices. We especially found that dependence, trust, and durability of the relationship with SC partners have a very high influence. In addition, the size of the company, the top management commitment, the implementation of quality management and the employees training and education exert a critical influence on the implementation of GSCM practices. Contextual elements such as the industry sector and region and their effect on the prominence of specific factors are also highlighted through our study. Finally, implications for research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of cooking methods and starch structures on starch hydrolysis rates of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael O; Ai, Yongfeng; Leutcher, Josh L; Jane, Jay-lin

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to understand effects of different cooking methods, including steamed, pilaf, and traditional stir-fried, on starch hydrolysis rates of rice. Rice grains of 3 varieties, japonica, indica, and waxy, were used for the study. Rice starch was isolated from the grain and characterized. Amylose contents of starches from japonica, indica, and waxy rice were 13.5%, 18.0%, and 0.9%, respectively. The onset gelatinization temperature of indica starch (71.6 °C) was higher than that of the japonica and waxy starch (56.0 and 56.8 °C, respectively). The difference was attributed to longer amylopectin branch chains of the indica starch. Starch hydrolysis rates and resistant starch (RS) contents of the rice varieties differed after they were cooked using different methods. Stir-fried rice displayed the least starch hydrolysis rate followed by pilaf rice and steamed rice for each rice variety. RS contents of freshly steamed japonica, indica, and waxy rice were 0.7%, 6.6%, and 1.3%, respectively; those of rice pilaf were 12.1%, 13.2%, and 3.4%, respectively; and the stir-fried rice displayed the largest RS contents of 15.8%, 16.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. Mechanisms of the large RS contents of the stir-fried rice were studied. With the least starch hydrolysis rate and the largest RS content, stir-fried rice would be a desirable way of preparing rice for food to reduce postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses and to improve colon health of humans. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Robust Pitaya-Structured Pyrite as High Energy Density Cathode for High-Rate Lithium Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xijun; Liu, Jun; Liu, Zhengbo; Shen, Jiadong; Hu, Renzong; Liu, Jiangwen; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Min

    2017-09-26

    To solve the serious problems (the agglomeration of nano-Fe 0 , dissolution of polysulfide, and low electronic conductivity of Li 2 S) of earth-abundant pyrite (FeS 2 ) cathodes for lithium batteries, a simple in situ encapsulation and transformation route has been successfully developed to synthesis pitaya-structured porous carbon embedded with FeS 2 nanoparticles. Due to such a hierarchical architecture design, this cathode of pitaya-structured FeS 2 @C can effectively avoid the serious agglomeration and coarsening of small Fe nanoparticles, reduce the dissolution of polysulfide, and provide superior kinetics toward lithium storage, resulting in enhanced reversibility and rate capability. Cycling in the voltage region of 1.0-3.0 V at 0.3 A g -1 , the current conversion-based FeS 2 @C cathode displays a high and stable energy density (about 1100 Wh kg -1 ), ultrahigh rate capability (a reversible capability of 660, 609, 554, 499, 449, and 400 mA h g -1 at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10 A g -1 , respectively), and stable cycling performance.

  3. Comparison between continuous and localized methods to evaluate the flow rate through containment concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason, L., E-mail: ludovic.jason@cea.fr [Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), DEN, DANS, DM2S, SEMT, Mechanics and System Simulation Laboratory (LM2S), F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); LaMSID, UMR CNRS-EDF-CEA 8193, F-92141 Clamart (France); Masson, B. [Electricité de France (EDF), SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • The contribution focuses on the gas transfer through reinforced concrete structures. • A continuous approach with a damage–permeability law is investigated. • It is significant, for this case, only when the damage variable crosses the section. • In this case, two localized approaches are compared. • It helps at evaluating a “reference” crack opening for engineering laws. - Abstract: In this contribution, different techniques are compared to evaluate the gas flow rate through a representative section of a reinforced and prestressed concrete containment structure. A continuous approach is first applied which is based on the evaluation of the gas permeability as a function of the damage variable. The calculations show that the flow rate becomes significant only when the damage variable crosses the section. But in this situation, the continuous approach is no longer fully valid. That is why localized approaches, based on a fine description of the crack openings, are then investigated. A comparison between classical simplified laws (Poiseuille flow) and a more refined model which takes into account the evolution of the crack opening in the depth of the section enables to define the validity domain of the simplified laws and especially the definition of the associated “reference opening”.

  4. Discovering and measuring a layered Earth: A foundational laboratory for developing students' understanding of Earth's interior structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Braile, L. W.; Olds, S. E.; Taber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysics research is continuously revealing new insights about Earth’s interior structure. Before students can grasp theses new complexities, they first must internalize the 1st order layered structure of Earth and comprehend how seismology contributes to the development of such models. Earth structure is of course covered in most introductory geoscience courses, though all too often instruction of this content is limited to didactic methods that make little effort to inspire or engage the minds of students. In the process, students are expected to blindly accept our understanding of the unseen and abstract. Thus, it is not surprising then that many students can draw a layered Earth diagram, yet not know that knowledge of Earth’s interior is based on information from earthquakes. Cognitive learning theory would suggest that what has been missing from instruction of Earth structure is a feasible method to present students with seismic evidence in a manner that allows students to become minds-on with the content; discovering or dispelling the presence of a layered Earth for themselves. Recent advances in serving seismic data to a non-seismologist audience have made the development of such laboratory investigations possible. In this exercise students use an inquiry approach to examine seismic evidence and determine that the Earth cannot have a homogeneous composition. Further they use the data to estimate the dimensions of Earth’s outer core. To reach these conclusions, students are divided into two teams, theoreticians and seismologists, to test the simplest hypothesis for Earth's internal structure; a homogeneous Earth. The theoreticians create a scale model of a homogeneous Earth and predict when seismic waves should arrive at various points on the model. Simultaneously, seismologists interpret a seismic record section from a recent earthquake noting when seismic waves arrive at various points around Earth. The two groups of students then compare the

  5. Fundamental Understanding of Ambient and High-Temperature Plasticity Phenomena in Structural Materials in Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, Chaitanya; Zhu, Ting; McDowell, David

    2013-11-17

    The goal of this research project is to develop the methods and tools necessary to link unit processes analyzed using atomistic simulations involving interaction of vacancies and interstitials with dislocations, as well as dislocation mediation at sessile junctions and interfaces as affected by radiation, with cooperative influence on higher-length scale behavior of polycrystals. These tools and methods are necessary to design and enhance radiation-induced damage-tolerant alloys. The project will achieve this goal by applying atomistic simulations to characterize unit processes of: 1. Dislocation nucleation, absorption, and desorption at interfaces 2. Vacancy production, radiation-induced segregation of substitutional Cr at defect clusters (point defect sinks) in BCC Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels 3. Investigation of interaction of interstitials and vacancies with impurities (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Al, Si, P, S) 4. Time evolution of swelling (cluster growth) phenomena of irradiated materials 5. Energetics and kinetics of dislocation bypass of defects formed by interstitial clustering and formation of prismatic loops, informing statistical models of continuum character with regard to processes of dislocation glide, vacancy agglomeration and swelling, climb and cross slip This project will consider the Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic material system, accounting for magnetism by choosing appropriate interatomic potentials and validating with first principles calculations. For these alloys, the rate of swelling and creep enhancement is considerably lower than that of face-centered cubic (FCC) alloys and of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. The team will confirm mechanisms, validate simulations at various time and length scales, and improve the veracity of computational models. The proposed research?s feasibility is supported by recent modeling of radiation effects in metals and alloys, interfacial dislocation transfer reactions in nano-twinned copper, and dislocation

  6. Understanding relationships between morphology and ecosystem structure in a shallow tidal basins of Venice lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Taramelli, Andrea; Valentini, Emiliana; Filipponi, Federico; Meisina, Claudia; Zucca, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Coastal wetlands represent complex ecosystems prone to continue fluctuation of their internal equilibrium. They are valuable natural resources characterized by the continue interactions between geomorphological and biological components. Their adaptation to changing conditions is highly dependent on the rate and extent of spatial and temporal processes and their responses are still poorly understood. According to this, the vulnerability assessment to natural and human made hazard have became fundamental to analyse the resilience of these areas, their ability to cope with the impacts from externally driven forces or the efforts needed to minimize the impacts (Gitay et al., 2011). The objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive and replicable method through the application of Multi-Source data analysis, based on the integration of Earth Observation data and field survey, to analyse a shallow tidal basin of salt marshes, located in the northern part of the Venice lagoon. The study site is characterised by relatively elevated areas colonized by halophytic vegetation, and tidal flats, with not vegetated areas, characterized by lower elevations. Sub-pixel processing techniques (Spectral Mixing Analysis - SMA) were used to analyse the spatial distribution of both vegetation and sediments typology. Furthermore the classifications were assayed in terms of spatial (Power law) and temporal (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) patterns, in order to find the main characteristics of the aforementioned spatial trends and their variation over time. The principal aim is to study the spatio-temporal evolution of this coastal wetland area, in order to indentify tipping points, namely thresholds, beyond which the system reaches critical state and the main climatic, hydrodynamic and morphological variables that may influence and increase this behaviour. This research represents a new approach to study the geomorphological processes and to improve the management and

  7. A contribution to understanding the structure of amphivasal secondary bundles in monocotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jura-Morawiec

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Secondary growth of monocotyledonous plants is connected with the activity of the monocot cambium that accumulates most of the derivatives inner to the cambial cylinder. These derivatives differentiate into (a secondary bundles with the amphivasal arrangement, i.e. xylem composed of tracheids surrounds the phloem cells and (b the parenchymatous secondary conjunctive tissue in which the bundles are embedded. The amphivasal secondary bundles differ in the arrangement of xylem cells as visible on single cross sections through the secondary body of the monocots. Apart from the bundles with typical ring of tracheids also the bundles where tracheids do not quite surround the phloem are present. We aimed to elucidate the cross sectional anatomy of the amphivasal secondary bundles with the use of the serial sectioning method which allowed us to follow very precisely the bundle structure along its length. The studies were carried out with the samples of secondary tissues collected from the stem of Dracaena draco L. growing in the greenhouses of the Polish Academy of Sciences Botanical Garden – CBDC in Powsin and the Adam Mickiewicz University Botanical Garden. The material was fixed in a mixture of glycerol and ethanol (1:1; v/v, dehydrated stepwise with graded ethanol series and finally embedded in epon resin. Afterwards, the material was sectioned with microtome into continuous series of thin (3 μm sections, stained with PAS/toluidine blue and examined under the light microscope. The results, described in details in Jura‑Morawiec & Wiland-Szymańska (2014, revealed novel facts about tracheids arrangement. Each amphivasal bundle is composed of sectors where tracheids form a ring as well as of such where tracheids are separated by vascular parenchyma cells. We hypothesize that strands of vascular parenchyma cells locally separating the tracheids enable radial transport of assimilates from sieve elements of the bundle towards the sink tissues, e

  8. Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrassin, J.-B.; Hindell, M.; Rintoul, S. R.; Roquet, F.; Sokolov, S.; Biuw, M.; Costa, D.; Boehme, L.; Lovell, P.; Coleman, R.; Timmermann, R.; Meijers, A.; Meredith, M.; Park, Y.-H.; Bailleul, F.; Goebel, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Bost, C.-A.; McMahon, C. R.; Field, I. C.; Fedak, M. A.; Guinet, C.

    2008-01-01

    Polar regions are particularly sensitive to climate change, with the potential for significant feedbacks between ocean circulation, sea ice, and the ocean carbon cycle. However, the difficulty in obtaining in situ data means that our ability to detect and interpret change is very limited, especially in the Southern Ocean, where the ocean beneath the sea ice remains almost entirely unobserved and the rate of sea-ice formation is poorly known. Here, we show that southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) equipped with oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure and water mass changes in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. In particular, seals provided a 30-fold increase in hydrographic profiles from the sea-ice zone, allowing the major fronts to be mapped south of 60°S and sea-ice formation rates to be inferred from changes in upper ocean salinity. Sea-ice production rates peaked in early winter (April–May) during the rapid northward expansion of the pack ice and declined by a factor of 2 to 3 between May and August, in agreement with a three-dimensional coupled ocean–sea-ice model. By measuring the high-latitude ocean during winter, elephant seals fill a “blind spot” in our sampling coverage, enabling the establishment of a truly global ocean-observing system. PMID:18695241

  9. Effects of sieving, drying and rewetting upon soil bacterial community structure and respiration rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Bruce C; Ostle, Nick J; McNamara, Niall P; Whiteley, Andrew S; Griffiths, Robert I

    2010-10-01

    Soil microcosm studies often require some form of soil homogenisation, such as sieving, to provide a representative sample. Frequently, soils are also homogenised following drying and are then rewetted, yet little research has been done to understand how these methods impact upon microbial communities. Here we compared the molecular diversity and functional responses of intact cores from a Scottish grassland soil with homogenised samples prepared by drying, sieving and rewetting or freshly sieving wet soils. Results showed that there was no significant difference in total soil CO(2)-C efflux between the freshly sieved and intact core treatments, however, respiration was significantly higher in the dried and rewetted microcosms. Molecular fingerprinting (T-RFLP) of bacterial communities at two different time-points showed that both homogenisation methods significantly altered bacterial community structure with the largest differences being observed after drying and rewetting. Assessments of responsive taxa in each treatment showed that intact cores were dominated by Acidobacterial peaks whereas an increased relative abundance of Alphaproteobacterial terminal restriction fragments were apparent in both homogenised treatments. However, the shift in community structure was not as large in the freshly sieved soil. Our findings suggest that if soil homogenisation must be performed, then fresh sieving of wet soil is preferable to drying and rewetting in approximating the bacterial diversity and functioning of intact cores. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Alternative Conformational Model of a Seed Protein DeK1 for Better Understanding of Structure-Function Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Bhushan Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the cell development and differentiation processes in plant seeds in general is poor. One gene, among others, that predominantly regulates the aleurone cell formation, differentiation and specification in seeds is called defective kernel (DeK1 and several cell biology and genetic experiments have unequivocally established this fact. However, the mechanism behind such processes is still unclear and understanding the protein functionality of DeK1 is vital to elucidating its role in endosperm cell development. Only preliminary investigations have been performed for just one domain of the protein in vitro and its functional implications have been highlighted lately. An initial attempt at in silico modeling of the protein has shown promise and necessitated thorough investigation of the protein to help understand structure-function relationship in details thus corroborating experimental findings and laying foundation for further studies. DeK1 sequences in public databases were used as raw material for elaborate computational analysis of the protein. DeK1 is a multi-pass membrane protein with interesting structural features and the present analysis provides an alternative model for DeK1 structure that can help pan both in vitro and in vivo studies. The transmembrane helices were shown to have a number of conserved charged and polar residues that can form salt bridges and help in ligand binding or transmitting an external signal in addition to maintaining structural integrity. The protein possesses a big loop of about 280-300 amino acid residues on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. It has a number of putative phosphorylation sites, multiple cysteine residues and a high density of charged residues, all of which could be important for protein-protein interaction and signaling pathways. The loop has a nuclear localization propensity as well. The long C-terminal tail of DeK1 with homology to calpain domain may be activated by the big

  11. Microenvironmental Stiffness of 3D Polymeric Structures to Study Invasive Rates of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Enrico Domenico; Spagnolo, Barbara; Rizzi, Francesco; Corvaglia, Stefania; Pisanello, Marco; De Vittorio, Massimo; Pisanello, Ferruccio

    2017-11-01

    Cells are highly dynamic elements, continuously interacting with the extracellular environment. Mechanical forces sensed and applied by cells are responsible for cellular adhesion, motility, and deformation, and are heavily involved in determining cancer spreading and metastasis formation. Cell/extracellular matrix interactions are commonly analyzed with the use of hydrogels and 3D microfabricated scaffolds. However, currently available techniques have a limited control over the stiffness of microscaffolds and do not allow for separating environmental properties from biological processes in driving cell mechanical behavior, including nuclear deformability and cell invasiveness. Herein, a new approach is presented to study tumor cell invasiveness by exploiting an innovative class of polymeric scaffolds based on two-photon lithography to control the stiffness of deterministic microenvironments in 3D. This is obtained by fine-tuning of the laser power during the lithography, thus locally modifying both structural and mechanical properties in the same fabrication process. Cage-like structures and cylindric stent-like microscaffolds are fabricated with different Young's modulus and stiffness gradients, allowing obtaining new insights on the mechanical interplay between tumor cells and the surrounding environments. In particular, cell invasion is mostly driven by softer architectures, and the introduction of 3D stiffness "weak spots" is shown to boost the rate at which cancer cells invade the scaffolds. The possibility to modulate structural compliance also allowed estimating the force distribution exerted by a single cell on the scaffold, revealing that both pushing and pulling forces are involved in the cell-structure interaction. Overall, exploiting this method to obtain a wide range of 3D architectures with locally engineered stiffness can pave the way for unique applications to study tumor cell dynamics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Development of Solid State NMR Methods for the Structural Characterization of Membrane Proteins: Applications to Understand Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Tran, A T; Ulloa, J; Maxwell, R S

    2003-03-04

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a relapsing-remitting disorder of the central nervous system that results in the loss of the myelin sheaths insulating nerve fibers (axons). Strong evidence suggests that MS is an autoimmune disease mediated by T-cell and antibody responses against myelin antigens. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a 26 kD to 28 kD an integral membrane protein of the central nervous system implicated as a target for autoaggressive antibodies in MS. To date, the conformation of MOG in association with the myelin membrane is unknown and the exact nature of the interactions between this protein and disease-inducing immune responses have not been determined. Since membrane associated proteins are typically characterized by decreased correlation times, solution state NMR methodologies are often impracticable. Membrane proteins are also often difficult to crystallize for X-ray diffraction studies, Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new structure characterization tools for this important class of biomolecules. The research described here overviews the initial stages of our effort to develop an integrated, NMR based approach to structural studies of MOG over the many structural domains it is postulated to posses. The structural knowledge gained about this important MS antigen in its native environment will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function in vivo. This project will also aid in the development of therapeutics to inhibit the antigedantibody interaction and thus prevent demyelination in MS patients.

  13. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael Wv

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients.

  14. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael WV

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Discussion Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. Conclusion It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients. PMID:22693481

  15. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. Measuring the growth rate of structure around cosmic voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, A. J.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; de la Torre, S.; Garilli, B.; Bolzonella, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Percival, W. J.

    2017-11-01

    We aim to develop a novel methodology for measuring thegrowth rate of structure around cosmic voids. We identified voids in the completed VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), using an algorithm based on searching for empty spheres. We measured the cross-correlation between the centres of voids and the complete galaxy catalogue. The cross-correlation function exhibits a clear anisotropy in both VIPERS fields (W1 and W4), which is characteristic of linear redshift space distortions. By measuring the projected cross-correlation and then de-projecting it we are able to estimate the un-distorted cross-correlation function. We propose that given a sufficiently well-measured cross-correlation function one should be able to measure the linear growth rate of structure by applying a simple linear Gaussian streaming model for the redshift space distortions (RSD). Our study of voids in 306 mock galaxy catalogues mimicking the VIPERS fields suggests that VIPERS is capable of measuring β, the ratio of the linear growth rate to the bias, with an error of around 25%. Applying our method to the VIPERS data, we find a value for the redshift space distortion parameter, β = 0.423-0.108+0.104 which, given the bias of the galaxy population we use, gives a linear growth rate of f σ8 = 0.296-0.078+0.075 at z = 0.727. These results are consistent with values observed in parallel VIPERS analyses that use standard techniques. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in

  16. US Monetary Policy Announcements and the Term Structure of Interest Rate Differentials: Evidence from Hong Kong and Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Valente

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of US monetary policy announcements on the term structure of US interest rate differentials with Hong Kong and Singapore. US monetary policy surprises on domestic and international interest rates are measured by using data from short-term interest rate futures markets in all three countries around the FOMC meetings dates. Our results, based on careful treatment of interest rate endogeneity and time-varying risk premia in the futures markets, document that US...

  17. Heterogeneous Information about the Term Structure of Interest rates, Least-Squares Learning and Optimal Interest Rate Rules for Inflation Forecast Targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaling, E.; Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Tesfaselassie, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we incorporate the term structure of interest rates in a standard inflation forecast targeting framework.Learning about the transmission process of monetary policy is introduced by having heterogeneous agents - i.e. the central bank and private agents - who have different information

  18. Structural evolution of biomass char and its effect on the gasification rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatehi, Hesameddin; Bai, Xue Song

    2017-01-01

    during the entire conversion process. This model is used to analyze the steam gasification process of biomass char of centimeter sizes. The results from the present multi-pore model are in better agreement with experimental data than those from a corresponding single pore model. Since the multi......-pore model accommodates the detailed intra-particle transport, it is a useful basis toward developing a more predictive model for biomass char gasification....... with different radii. The model is valid for biomass chars produced under relatively low heating rates, when the original beehive structure of the biomass is not destroyed during the pyrolysis stage. The contribution of different pores with different radius is taken into account using an effectiveness factor...

  19. Factor Structure of Scores from the Conners’ Rating Scales–Revised Among Nepali Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Laura L.; Vandiver, Beverly J.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Murray-Kolb, Laura M.; Christian, Parul

    2014-01-01

    This study used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the structures of scores from the Conners’ Teacher and Parent Rating Scales–Revised (CTRS-R and CPRS-R, respectively; Conners, 1997). The scales were administered to 1,835 parents and 1,387 teachers of children in Nepal's Sarlahi district – a region where no other measures of child psychopathology have been studied. With a Nepali sample, the findings indicate that reduced two factor models for the Conners’ scales are superior to the models identified in the scale development research. The hyperactivity and inattention factors were comparable to what has been identified in prior research, while other factors (e.g., social problems) differed substantially. Implications for use of the Conners’ scales in Nepal and cross cultural issues in the assessment of ADHD symptoms are discussed. PMID:25574454

  20. Simulation modeling to understand how selective foraging by beaver can drive the structure and function of a willow community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinetti, H.R.; Baker, B.W.; Coughenour, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Beaver-willow (Castor-Salix) communities are a unique and vital component of healthy wetlands throughout the Holarctic region. Beaver selectively forage willow to provide fresh food, stored winter food, and construction material. The effects of this complex foraging behavior on the structure and function of willow communities is poorly understood. Simulation modeling may help ecologists understand these complex interactions. In this study, a modified version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model was developed to better understand how beaver foraging affects the structure and function of a willow community in a simulated riparian ecosystem in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado (RMNP). The model represents willow in terms of plant and stem dynamics and beaver foraging in terms of the quantity and quality of stems cut to meet the energetic and life history requirements of beaver. Given a site where all stems were equally available, the model suggested a simulated beaver family of 2 adults, 2 yearlings, and 2 kits required a minimum of 4 ha of willow (containing about10 stems m-2) to persist in a steady-state condition. Beaver created a willow community where the annual net primary productivity (ANPP) was 2 times higher and plant architecture was more diverse than the willow community without beaver. Beaver foraging created a plant architecture dominated by medium size willow plants, which likely explains how beaver can increase ANPP. Long-term simulations suggested that woody biomass stabilized at similar values even though availability differed greatly at initial condition. Simulations also suggested that willow ANPP increased across a range of beaver densities until beaver became food limited. Thus, selective foraging by beaver increased productivity, decreased biomass, and increased structural heterogeneity in a simulated willow community.

  1. Asymmetry and Risk Premia in the Brazilian Term Structure of Interest Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ganem

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The risk premium in the Brazilian term structure of interest rates is partially driven by some specific defensive behavior following past monetary decisions. Until 2008, the Brazilian Central Bank has primarily dealt with domestic and external crises by raising the short term rate to restrain capital outflows, generating a well-known asymmetry in the market’s response functions to risk aversion. Therefore, the traditional parameterization of risk based on mean and variance estimators fails to capture the market price of risk eventually assigned to higher order moments of bond returns across several maturities. In this paper we propose an arbitrage-free, discrete-time model that provides the form for a lagged endogenous regression which tests the significance and magnitude of the market price of asymmetry in the Brazilian fixed income market. The results are analyzed from a historical perspective, comparing the evolution of the price of asymmetry, the improvement of Brazil’s sovereign risk and the monetary policy conduction from 2003 to 2009.

  2. [Could you please reduce your seclusion rates? To structure patient care by the methodical work approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumans, C E; Egger, J I M; Hutschemaekers, G J M

    2016-01-01

    Creating a safe treatment environment with a minimum use of seclusion at a ward for intensive psychiatric care is a complex process involving many actors. Although s/he is accountable for the use of seclusion, the psychiatrist's influence on actual seclusion practices is limited. The methodical work approach (MWA) to patient care is designed to improve multidisciplinary care delivery. To investigate ways in which the psychiatrist can structure the treatment and reduce seclusion rates by introducing the MWA. We performed a quantitative analysis of the effects that the implementation of the MWA on an intervention ward had on the use of seclusion, comparing the intervention ward to control wards. We also conducted a qualitative analysis of the changes that occurred in the work process and in the roles of the various professionals involved. The use of seclusion had reduced significantly more at the intervention ward than it had at the control wards. The reduced seclusion rates were associated with an increase in interdisciplinary collaboration and professionalisation. By helping to limit the use of seclusion, possibly due to enhanced interdisciplinary collaboration and professionalisation, the MWA offers new horizons for mental health care professionals and their patients.

  3. Infant mortality rates and structure in a town near a nuclear power enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, F.D.; Voronina, Z.I.; Voronin, P.F.; Demin, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of the rates and structure of mortality of infants aged under 1 in a town, situated near a nuclear power enterprise (NPE). Altogether 38124 infants born in 1950-1978, were investigated. The dead infants (1160) were divided into 3 groups with relation to their parents' place of work: 1 - infants whose parents worked in the NPE; 2 - infants whose parents worked in town factories and offices; 3 - all infants in the town. The total doses of γ-irradiation for mothers were 10-400 cSv, those for fathers - 30-520 cSv, intrauterine irradiation of a fetus was 0.5-0.55 cSv. The individual effective equivalent dose of irradiation of the residents of the town was 17.3 cSv over 40 years. Occupational γ-irradiation of the parents at doses exceeding the maximum permissible ones in the first 10 years of work at the NPE made no effect on the mortality rates in infants of the first generation

  4. The influence of model structure on groundwater recharge rates in climate-change impact studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Christian; Brunner, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Numerous modeling approaches are available to provide insight into the relationship between climate change and groundwater recharge. However, several aspects of how hydrological model choice and structure affect recharge predictions have not been fully explored, unlike the well-established variability of climate model chains—combination of global climate models (GCM) and regional climate models (RCM). Furthermore, the influence on predictions related to subsoil parameterization and the variability of observation data employed during calibration remain unclear. This paper compares and quantifies these different sources of uncertainty in a systematic way. The described numerical experiment is based on a heterogeneous two-dimensional reference model. Four simpler models were calibrated against the output of the reference model, and recharge predictions of both reference and simpler models were compared to evaluate the effect of model structure on climate-change impact studies. The results highlight that model simplification leads to different recharge rates under climate change, especially under extreme conditions, although the different models performed similarly under historical climate conditions. Extreme weather conditions lead to model bias in the predictions and therefore must be considered. Consequently, the chosen calibration strategy is important and, if possible, the calibration data set should include climatic extremes in order to minimise model bias introduced by the calibration. The results strongly suggest that ensembles of climate projections should be coupled with ensembles of hydrogeological models to produce credible predictions of future recharge and with the associated uncertainties.

  5. Factor structure of Bech's version of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.S. Crippa

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the factor structure of Bech's version of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, translated into Portuguese. The BPRS was administered to a heterogeneous group of psychiatric inpatients (N = 98 and outpatients (N = 62 in a University Hospital. Each patient was evaluated from one to eight times. The interval between consecutive interviews was one week for the inpatients and one month for the outpatients. The results were submitted to factorial analysis. The internal consistency of the total scale and of each factor was also estimated. Factorial analysis followed by normalized orthogonal rotation (Varimax yielded four factors: Withdrawal-Retardation, Thinking Disorder, Anxious-Depression and Activation. Internal consistency measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranged from 0.766 to 0.879. The data show that the factor structure of the present instrument is similar to that of the American version of the BPRS which contains 18 items, except for the absence of the fifth factor of the latter scale, Hostile-Suspiciousness.

  6. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    motif structural framework. Thus, we propose here that the ARTT motif represents an experimentally testable general recognition motif region for many ADP-ribosyltransferases and thereby potentially provides a unified structural understanding of substrate recognition in ADP-ribosylation processes.

  7. The age structures and marital status differences of married and not married male suicide rates: 12 developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Phillips; Stack, Steven; Fernquist, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Male suicide rates, circa 1960, specific to age and marital status for 12 developed countries show married men with lower suicide rates than not married men. This results in differences in the age structures of married and not married suicide rates. We test three explanations of lower married than not married suicide rates: 1) Gibbs and Martin's (1964) marital status integration hypothesis; 2) marital status differences in norms regarding the acceptability of suicide; and 3) Durkheim's societal integration theory. All three explanations are supported by multivariate regressions. The strongest support is for societal integration. The models explain over 80% of the variance in both married and not married male age-specific suicide rates. These regression equations generate predicted suicide rates and these predicted rates are then used to see if they account for the observed age structures of married and not married men. They do in 19 of 24 tests.

  8. Understanding Data Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    Data Division. Ibis task has hrrn left to the sub-schema processor as defined by the DBTG. A Frame (a sot of format logical rules) defines the DMLP...C^nclo h,\\r hrrn p.onrratet) to (lctrrniif>e tfie valuPS, relative to ACTl’itl, of ill MMM m the ITMS U’A NEXTLEVnUT««(lTMS) (■<,.|.. I ,K. \\i

  9. EVALUATION OF THE STRUCTURAL FUNDS ABSORPTION RATE BY MEANS OF THE HERMIN MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opritescu Elena Madalina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to highlight the main method that could quantify the impact of the structural funds on the Gross Domestic Product. I also presented the regional disparities situation and the European funds absorption rate. The HERMIN model has been designed considering the evolution of macro-variables throughout transition and pre-accession process, as well as out of the need to analyze the gradual alignment of Romania’s economic policies to those of EU. The fact that, initially, the HERMIN model was designed for the European Union’s less developed economies represented the cornerstone in choosing it, as it was the case for Romania, too. However, the quantitative evaluation must always be accompanied by a qualitative evaluation, in order to comprise factors which cannot be measured by the econometrical modeling. For this purpose, when the results of econometrical model based evaluation are used, it is important to be aware of the fact that models simplify reality, no matter the impressive mathematical calculations they employ. Also, we must not omit the fact that Romania’s major development needs and the current economic context imperatively demand a high as possible level of structural funds absorption, as well as their efficient use, meant to generate a significant impact at a national, regional and local level. One of the main instruments employed to sustain economic growth, while also reducing disparities between regions is represented by the structural funds. These funds, consisting in financial contributions of the member states, according to their level of development, are redistributed in compliance with an extremely complex regulating and procedural frame, to those EU states of regions which are fallen behind from a social and economical development perspective Nevertheless, when absorption capacity of a member state is evaluated, the used percentage from the allocated funds is not the only

  10. Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis as tools to understand the structure and function of membrane microdomains in plasmodesmata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIADNA eGONZÁLEZ-SOLÍS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodesmata –intercellular channels that communicate adjacent cells– possess complex membranous structures. Recent evidences indicate that plasmodesmata contain membrane microdomains. In order to understand how these submembrane regions collaborate to plasmodesmata function, it is necessary to characterize their size, composition and dynamics. An approach that can shed light on these microdomain features is based on the use of Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are canonical components of microdomains together with sterols and some glycerolipids. Moreover, sphingolipids are transducers in pathways that display programmed cell death as a defense mechanism against pathogens. The study of Arabidopsis mutants would allow determining which structural features of the sphingolipids are important for the formation and stability of microdomains, and if defense signaling networks using sphingoid bases as second messengers are associated to plasmodesmata operation. Such studies need to be complemented by analysis of the ultrastructure and the use of protein probes for plasmodesmata microdomains and may constitute a very valuable source of information to analyze these membrane structures.

  11. Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis as tools to understand the structure and function of membrane microdomains in plasmodesmata

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Solís, Ariadna; Cano-Ramírez, Dora L.; Morales-Cedillo, Francisco; Tapia de Aquino, Cinthya; Gavilanes-Ruiz, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata—intercellular channels that communicate adjacent cells—possess complex membranous structures. Recent evidences indicate that plasmodesmata contain membrane microdomains. In order to understand how these submembrane regions collaborate to plasmodesmata function, it is necessary to characterize their size, composition and dynamics. An approach that can shed light on these microdomain features is based on the use of Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are canonical components of microdomains together with sterols and some glycerolipids. Moreover, sphingolipids are transducers in pathways that display programmed cell death as a defense mechanism against pathogens. The study of Arabidopsis mutants would allow determining which structural features of the sphingolipids are important for the formation and stability of microdomains, and if defense signaling networks using sphingoid bases as second messengers are associated to plasmodesmata operation. Such studies need to be complemented by analysis of the ultrastructure and the use of protein probes for plasmodesmata microdomains and may constitute a very valuable source of information to analyze these membrane structures. PMID:24478783

  12. Pre-operational proof and leakage rate testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This Standard provides the requirements for pre-operational proof tests and leakage rate tests of concrete containment structures of a containment system designed as Class Containment components. 1 fig

  13. Analisa Korelasi Inflasi, Economic Growth, Economic Structure, Dan Tax Rate Terhadap Tax Revenue Di Negara-negara ASEAN

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Richard; Toly, Agus Arianto

    2013-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui korelasi dari inflasi, economic growth, economic structure serta tax rate terhadap tax revenue di negara-negara Asean. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian kuantitatif dan penelitian ini menggunakan data sekunder mengenai inflasi, economic growth, economic structure, tax rate, serta tax revenue yang diperoleh melalui website world bank yaitu http://data.worldbank.org. Sampel yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah negara-negara Asean tahun 2002 sampai ...

  14. Applications of condensed matter understanding to medical tissues and disease progression: Elemental analysis and structural integrity of tissue scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.u [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, School of Community and Health Sciences, City University, London (United Kingdom); Gundogdu, O. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Al-Ebraheem, Alia [Department of Radiography, School of Community and Health Sciences, City University, London (United Kingdom); Che Ismail, Elna [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kaabar, W., E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.u [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, F. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Falkenberg, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bailey, M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The investigations reported herein link tissue structure and elemental presence with issues of environmental health and disease, exemplified by uptake and storage of potentially toxic elements in the body, the osteoarthritic condition and malignancy in the breast and other soft tissues. Focus is placed on application of state-of-the-art ionizing radiation techniques, including, micro-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (mu-SXRF) and particle-induced X-ray emission/Rutherford backscattering mapping (mu-PIXE/RBS), coherent small-angle X-ray scattering (cSAXS) and X-ray phase-contrast imaging, providing information on elemental make-up, the large-scale organisation of collagen and anatomical features of moderate and low atomic number media. For the particular situations under investigation, use of such facilities is allowing information to be obtained at an unprecedented level of detail, yielding new understanding of the affected tissues and the progression of disease.

  15. Erosion rates as a potential bottom-up control of forest structural characteristics in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milodowski, David T; Mudd, Simon M; Mitchard, Edward T A

    2015-01-01

    The physical characteristics of landscapes place fundamental constraints on vegetation growth and ecosystem function. In actively eroding landscapes, many of these characteristics are controlled by long-term erosion rates: increased erosion rates generate steeper topography and reduce the depth and extent of weathering, limiting moisture storage capacity and impacting nutrient availability. Despite the potentially important bottom-up control that erosion rates place on substrate characteristics, the relationship between the two is largely unexplored. We investigate spatial variations in aboveground biomass (AGB) across a structurally diverse mixed coniferous/deciduous forest with an order of magnitude erosion-rate gradient in the Northern Californian Sierra Nevada, USA, using high resolution LiDAR data and field plots. Mean basin slope, a proxy for erosion rate, accounts for 32% of variance in AGB within our field area (P erosion rate as a potentially important, but hitherto unappreciated, control on AGB and forest structure.

  16. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa eGuerriero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-hour day/night cycle.Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks.Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less studied.

  17. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Maria L.; Akman, Ozgur E.; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian) rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-h day/night cycle. Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks. Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less well studied. PMID:25374576

  18. Children with Autism Understand Indirect Speech Acts: Evidence from a Semi-Structured Act-Out Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissine, Mikhail; Cano-Chervel, Julie; Carlier, Sophie; De Brabanter, Philippe; Ducenne, Lesley; Pairon, Marie-Charlotte; Deconinck, Nicolas; Delvenne, Véronique; Leybaert, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are often said to present a global pragmatic impairment. However, there is some observational evidence that context-based comprehension of indirect requests may be preserved in autism. In order to provide experimental confirmation to this hypothesis, indirect speech act comprehension was tested in a group of 15 children with autism between 7 and 12 years and a group of 20 typically developing children between 2:7 and 3:6 years. The aim of the study was to determine whether children with autism can display genuinely contextual understanding of indirect requests. The experiment consisted of a three-pronged semi-structured task involving Mr Potato Head. In the first phase a declarative sentence was uttered by one adult as an instruction to put a garment on a Mr Potato Head toy; in the second the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by another speaker; in the third phase the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by the first speaker. Children with autism complied with the indirect request in the first phase and demonstrated the capacity to inhibit the directive interpretation in phases 2 and 3. TD children had some difficulty in understanding the indirect instruction in phase 1. These results call for a more nuanced view of pragmatic dysfunction in autism.

  19. Understanding the Low Photosynthetic Rates of Sun and Shade Coffee Leaves: Bridging the Gap on the Relative Roles of Hydraulic, Diffusive and Biochemical Constraints to Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Samuel C. V.; Galmés, Jeroni; Cavatte, Paulo C.; Pereira, Lucas F.; Ventrella, Marília C.; DaMatta, Fábio M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been held that the low photosynthetic rates (A) of coffee leaves are largely associated with diffusive constraints to photosynthesis. However, the relative limitations of the stomata and mesophyll to the overall diffusional constraints to photosynthesis, as well as the coordination of leaf hydraulics with photosynthetic limitations, remain to be fully elucidated in coffee. Whether the low actual A under ambient CO2 concentrations is associated with the kinetic properties of Rubisco and high (photo)respiration rates also remains elusive. Here, we provide a holistic analysis to understand the causes associated with low A by measuring a variety of key anatomical/hydraulic and photosynthetic traits in sun- and shade-grown coffee plants. We demonstrate that leaf hydraulic architecture imposes a major constraint on the maximisation of the photosynthetic gas exchange of coffee leaves. Regardless of the light treatments, A was mainly limited by stomatal factors followed by similar limitations associated with the mesophyll and biochemical constraints. No evidence of an inefficient Rubisco was found; rather, we propose that coffee Rubisco is well tuned for operating at low chloroplastic CO2 concentrations. Finally, we contend that large diffusive resistance should lead to large CO2 drawdown from the intercellular airspaces to the sites of carboxylation, thus favouring the occurrence of relatively high photorespiration rates, which ultimately leads to further limitations to A. PMID:24743509

  20. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  1. Formation of hydrogen bonds precedes the rate-limiting formation of persistent structure in the folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J

    2000-01-01

    of eight conserved hydrophobic residues at the interface between the two N and C-terminal helices. Previous mutation studies have shown that the formation of this structure is rate limiting for the final folding of ACBP. The burst phase structures observed in ACBP are different from the previously reported...

  2. A structured public health approach to increasing rates and duration of breastfeeding in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Anne Baber; Brînzaniuc, Alexandra; Oprescu, Florin; Cherecheş, Răzvan M; Mureşan, Marta; Dungy, Claibourne I

    2011-12-01

    Studies indicate that since 1990, rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in Eastern Europe, including Romania, have decreased. Most breastfeeding promotion efforts in Romania have focused on in-hospital care, with an emphasis on training clinicians. Prior studies report that about 88% of Romanian mothers initiate breastfeeding in the hospital; however, these same studies report limited breastfeeding duration. We posit that an important problem is lack of support and education in the weeks and months following the birth. The nature of this problem suggests the need for an integrated and structured public health solution. Based on our independent research, the results of an international maternal and child health (MCH) conference, and consultation with Romanian and American experts, we propose use of the public health problem-solving paradigm to support breastfeeding in Romania. This article presents a conceptual model showing the integration of input, output, and process components and a logic model explicating possible interventions (or needs) and barriers to breastfeeding. We propose a public health solution that begins with a new MCH within the public health training structure at a major Romanian university and a summer course bringing together Romanian and American students to study MCH, including breastfeeding. We believe that these two courses will promote enthusiasm and generate ideas to develop community-based interventions as well as policy recommendations to increase breastfeeding duration in Romania. We suggest that this public health problem-solving approach provides an integrated way of maintaining and increasing breastfeeding; furthermore, this approach could be broadly used in Eastern Europe.

  3. Understanding the atmospheric pressure ionization of petroleum components: The effects of size, structure, and presence of heteroatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huba, Anna Katarina; Huba, Kristina [Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, 3000 NE 151 Street, Biscayne Bay Campus, North Miami, Florida 33181 (United States); Gardinali, Piero R. [Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, 3000 NE 151 Street, Biscayne Bay Campus, North Miami, Florida 33181 (United States); Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC), Florida International University, 3000 NE 151 Street, Biscayne Bay Campus, North Miami, Florida 33181 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Understanding the composition of crude oil and its changes with weathering is essential when assessing its provenience, fate, and toxicity. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) has provided the opportunity to address the complexity of crude oil by assigning molecular formulae, and sorting compounds into “classes” based on heteroatom content. However, factors such as suppression effects and discrimination towards certain components severely limit a truly comprehensive mass spectrometric characterization, and, despite the availability of increasingly better mass spectrometers, a complete characterization of oil still represents a major challenge. In order to fully comprehend the significance of class abundances, as well as the nature and identity of compounds detected, a good understanding of the ionization efficiency of the various compound classes is indispensable. The current study, therefore, analyzed model compounds typically found in crude oils by high-resolution mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and electrospray ionization (ESI), in order to provide a better understanding of benefits and drawbacks of each source. The findings indicate that, overall, APPI provides the best results, being able to ionize the broadest range of compounds, providing the best results with respect to ionization efficiencies, and exhibiting the least suppression effects. However, just like in the other two sources, in APPI several factors have shown to affect the ionization efficiency of petroleum model compounds. The main such factor is the presence or absence of functional groups that can be easily protonated/deprotonated, in addition to other factors such as size, methylation level, presence of heteroatoms, and ring structure. Overall, this study evidences the intrinsic limitations and benefits of each of the three sources, and should provide the fundamental knowledge required to expand the

  4. Synthesizing the Use of Carbon Isotope (14C and 13C) Approaches to Understand Rates and Pathways for Permafrost C Mobilization and Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estop-Aragones, C.; Olefeldt, D.; Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the permafrost carbon (C) feedback it is important to synthesize our current knowledge, and knowledge gaps, of how permafrost thaw can cause in situ mineralization or downstream mobilization of aged soil organic carbon (SOC) and the rate of this release. This potential loss of old SOC may occur via gaseous flux of CO2 and CH4 exchanged between soil and the atmosphere and via waterborne flux as DOC, POC (and their subsequent decomposition and release to the atmosphere). Carbon isotope (14C and 13C) approaches have been used to estimate both rates and pathways for permafrost C mobilization and mineralization. Radiocarbon (14C) has been used to estimate the contribution of aged C to overall respiration or waterborne C export. We aim to contrast results from radiocarbon studies, in order to assess differences between ecosystems (contrasting wet and dry ecosystems), thaw histories (active layer deepening or thermokarst landforms), greenhouse gas considered (CO2 and CH4) and seasons. We propose to also contrast methodologies used for assessing the contribution of aged C to overall C balance, and include studies using 13C data. Biological fractionation of 13C during both uptake and decomposition has been taken advantage of both in order to aid the interpretation of 14C data and on its own to assess sources and mineralization pathways. For example, 13C data has been used to differentiate between CH4 production pathways, and the relative contribution of anaerobic CO2 production to overall respiration. Overall, carbon isotope research is proving highly valuable for our understanding of permafrost C dynamics following thaw, and there is a current need to synthesize the available literature.

  5. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  6. Embodied understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Western culture has inherited a view of understanding as an intellectual cognitive operation of grasping of concepts and their relations. However, cognitive science research has shown that this received intellectualist conception is substantially out of touch with how humans actually make and experience meaning. The view emerging from the mind sciences recognizes that understanding is profoundly embodied, insofar as our conceptualization and reasoning recruit sensory, motor, and affective patterns and processes to structure our understanding of, and engagement with, our world. A psychologically realistic account of understanding must begin with the patterns of ongoing interaction between an organism and its physical and cultural environments and must include both our emotional responses to changes in our body and environment, and also the actions by which we continuously transform our experience. Consequently, embodied understanding is not merely a conceptual/propositional activity of thought, but rather constitutes our most basic way of being in, and engaging with, our surroundings in a deep visceral manner.

  7. A cross-sectional study assessing the association between online ratings and structural and quality of care measures: results from two German physician rating websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Martin; Adelhardt, Thomas; Sander, Uwe; Wambach, Veit; Lindenthal, Jörg

    2015-09-24

    Even though physician rating websites (PRWs) have been gaining in importance in both practice and research, little evidence is available on the association of patients' online ratings with the quality of care of physicians. It thus remains unclear whether patients should rely on these ratings when selecting a physician. The objective of this study was to measure the association between online ratings and structural and quality of care measures for 65 physician practices from the German Integrated Health Care Network "Quality and Efficiency" (QuE). Online reviews from two German PRWs were included which covered a three-year period (2011 to 2013) and included 1179 and 991 ratings, respectively. Information for 65 QuE practices was obtained for the year 2012 and included 21 measures related to structural information (N = 6), process quality (N = 10), intermediate outcomes (N = 2), patient satisfaction (N = 1), and costs (N = 2). The Spearman rank coefficient of correlation was applied to measure the association between ratings and practice-related information. Patient satisfaction results from offline surveys and the patients per doctor ratio in a practice were shown to be significantly associated with online ratings on both PRWs. For one PRW, additional significant associations could be shown between online ratings and cost-related measures for medication, preventative examinations, and one diabetes type 2-related intermediate outcome measure. There again, results from the second PRW showed significant associations with the age of the physicians and the number of patients per practice, four process-related quality measures for diabetes type 2 and asthma, and one cost-related measure for medication. Several significant associations were found which varied between the PRWs. Patients interested in the satisfaction of other patients with a physician might select a physician on the basis of online ratings. Even though our results indicate associations

  8. The type I error rate for in vivo Comet assay data when the hierarchical structure is disregarded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær; Kulahci, Murat

    the type I error rate is greater than the nominal _ at 0.05. Closed-form expressions based on scaled F-distributions using the Welch-Satterthwaite approximation are provided to show how the type I error rate is aUected. With this study we hope to motivate researchers to be more precise regarding......, and this imposes considerable impact on the type I error rate. This study aims to demonstrate the implications that result from disregarding the hierarchical structure. DiUerent combinations of the factor levels as they appear in a literature study give type I error rates up to 0.51 and for all combinations...

  9. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  10. The effects of market linkages and the natural rate of discoveries on market structure

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Nuno

    2005-01-01

    The traditional approach makes investment in innovation constrained by market structure. This paper explores the causality from innovation to market structure. Omitting this causality direction on empirical models may explain empirical problems and contradictions on these models.

  11. Fundamental understanding of oxygen reduction and reaction behavior and developing high performance and stable hetero-structured cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-11-14

    New unique hetero-structured cathode has been developed in this project. La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as a surface catalyst with interstitial oxygen defects was introduced onto the state-of-the-art (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode to enhance the surface-limited ORR kinetics on SOFC cathode. Furthermore, the hetero-structured cathode surface maintains high activity under electrode polarization with much less negative effects from surface cation segregation of Sr, which is known to cause degradation issues for conventional LSCF and LSC cathodes, thus improving the cathode long-term stability. The interface chemistry distribution and oxygen transport properties have been studied to prove the enhancement of power out and stability of LNO-infiltrated LSCF cathode. The further investigation demonstrates that CeO2 & La2-xNiO4+δ (x=0-0.2) co-infiltration is a simple and cost-effective method to improve both performance and stability of LSCF cathode by limiting nano-particles growth/delamination and further improve the surface stability. For the first time, a physical model is proposed to illustrate how unique interstitial species on hetero-structured cathode surface work to regulate the exchange rate of the incorporation reaction. Meanwhile, fundamental investigation of the surface oxygen exchange and bulk oxygen transport properties under over-potential conditions across cathode materials have been carried out in this project, which were discussed and compared to the Nernst equation that is generally applied to treat any oxide electrodes under equilibrium.

  12. A Forward-looking Model of the Term Structure of Interest Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, Albert Lee

    This article proposes a framework that facilitates the inclusion of a generalized structure of observable, forward-looking factors into a dynamic term structure model. We illustrate our framework using multi-horizon survey forecasts of inflation, output growth and monetary policy where the dynamics......-horizon structure of market expectations, including those imputed to forward guidance, on the yield curve....

  13. Applying a Computational Fluid Dynamics model to understand flow structures in a large river: the Rio Paraná

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbach, S. D.; Hardy, R. J.; Lane, S. N.; Ashworth, P. J.; Parsons, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of large rivers is limited due to the difficulties in obtaining field data at these large scales. Data rich results may be obtained using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models permitting the investigation of detailed flow patterns that would otherwise not be available. However, the application of these models to large rivers is not without its own complications and has yet to be fully developed. This is the result of two limiting factors, our inability; i) to design numerically stable meshes for complex topographies at these spatial resolutions; and; ii) to collect high resolution data appropriate for the boundary conditions of the numerical scheme. Here, we demonstrate a five-term mass-flux scaling algorithm (MFSA) for including bed topography in a very large river, where the discretised form of the mass and momentum equations are modified using a numerical blockage. Converged solutions were obtained using the Reynolds-averaged Navier stokes (RANS) equations modelling turbulence with a κ-ɛ RNG turbulence model. The boundary conditions were supplied from a field investigation of the Rio Paraná upstream of the Paraguay-Paraná confluence. A 38 km long reach was investigated where topographic and velocity data was collected using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) and a single beam echo sounder. The model was validated against the aDcp data and in general showed good agreement. The model was then used to explore the impacts of roughness height upon key characteristics of the 3D flow field in large rivers. The results demonstrate the importance of topographic forcing on determining flow structures including the detection of large helical flow structures.

  14. Ferenczi's concept of identification with the aggressor: understanding dissociative structure with interacting victim and abuser self-states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Elizabeth F

    2014-03-01

    No one has described more passionately than Ferenczi the traumatic induction of dissociative trance with its resulting fragmentation of the personality. Ferenczi introduced the concept and term, identification with the aggressor in his seminal "Confusion of Tongues" paper, in which he described how the abused child becomes transfixed and robbed of his senses. Having been traumatically overwhelmed, the child becomes hypnotically transfixed by the aggressor's wishes and behavior, automatically identifying by mimicry rather than by a purposeful identification with the aggressor's role. To expand upon Ferenczi's observations, identification with the aggressor can be understood as a two-stage process. The first stage is automatic and initiated by trauma, but the second stage is defensive and purposeful. While identification with the aggressor begins as an automatic organismic process, with repeated activation and use, gradually it becomes a defensive process. Broadly, as a dissociative defense, it has two enacted relational parts, the part of the victim and the part of the aggressor. This paper describes the intrapersonal aspects (how aggressor and victim self-states interrelate in the internal world), as well as the interpersonal aspects (how these become enacted in the external). This formulation has relevance to understanding the broad spectrum of the dissociative structure of mind, borderline personality disorder, and dissociative identity disorder.

  15. Understanding the structured processes followed by organisations prior to engaging in agile processes: A South African Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimrod Noruwana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There appears to be a lack of knowledge on the phases South African (SA organisations go through while adopting agile methods. As a means to address this gap, this study uncovered empirical evidence on the phases SA organisations go through whilst adopting agile methods as well as the disparities between agile prescriptions and the way SA organisations actually implement agile methods. The data collected using a case study approach was analysed through the lens of Actor-Network Theory (ANT. The results reveal that there is no structured process for adopting agile methods and organisations go through various phases in their attempts to adopt agile methods. During the various phases, organisations face challenges which are culture as well as people related. Through this study South African practitioners could now be aware that before adopting an agile methodology, there has to be a common understanding of the problems at hand and the envisioned solution. The findings also inform aspiring adopters in South Africa that adoption of the methods does not have to be as prescribed. They are free to adopt only those aspects the organisations need most.

  16. Novel targeted approach to better understand how natural structural barriers govern carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility in vegetable-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Lemmens, Lien; Ribas-Agustí, Albert; Sosa, Carola; Met, Kristof; de Dieu Umutoni, Jean; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2013-12-01

    An experimental approach, allowing us to understand the effect of natural structural barriers (cell walls, chromoplast substructures) on carotenoid bioaccessibility, was developed. Different fractions with different levels of carotenoid bio-encapsulation (carotenoid-enriched oil, chromoplasts, small cell clusters, and large cell clusters) were isolated from different types of carrots and tomatoes. An in vitro method was used to determine carotenoid bioaccessibility. In the present work, a significant decrease in carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility could be observed with an increasing level of bio-encapsulation. Differences in cell wall material and chromoplast substructure between matrices influenced carotenoid release and inclusion in micelles. For carrots, cell walls and chromoplast substructure were important barriers for carotenoid bioaccessibility while, in tomatoes, the chromoplast substructure represented the most important barrier governing bioaccessibility. The highest increase in carotenoid bioaccessibility, for all matrices, was obtained after transferring carotenoids into the oil phase, a system lacking cell walls and chromoplast substructures that could hamper carotenoid release. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Insights in understanding aggregate formation and dissociation in cation exchange chromatography for a structurally unstable Fc-fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Chao; Chennamsetty, Naresh; Xu, Xuankuo; Li, Zheng Jian

    2016-08-19

    surface properties and charged ligand type. Experimental data was correlated semi-quantitatively with theoretical protein charge and hydrophobicity calculations using homology modeling within the BIOVIA Discovery Studio software. Finally, an arginine-sulphopropyl (Arg-SP) agarose resin immobilized with multi-functional ligands was prepared to verify the proposed hypothesis and to eliminate the aggregate formation. The findings of this work provide general insights in understanding aggregate formation and dissociation for structurally unstable proteins in the CEX step. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differences in proleptic and epicormic shoot structures in relation to water deficit and growth rate in almond trees (Prunus dulcis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón, Claudia; Contador, Loreto; Lampinen, Bruce D; Metcalf, Samuel G; Guédon, Yann; Costes, Evelyne; DeJong, Theodore M

    2014-02-01

    Shoot characteristics differ depending on the meristem tissue that they originate from and environmental conditions during their development. This study focused on the effects of plant water status on axillary meristem fate and flowering patterns along proleptic and epicormic shoots, as well as on shoot growth rates on 'Nonpareil' almond trees (Prunus dulcis). The aims were (1) to characterize the structural differences between proleptic and epicormic shoots, (2) to determine whether water deficits modify shoot structures differently depending on shoot type, and (3) to determine whether shoot structures are related to shoot growth rates. A hidden semi-Markov model of the axillary meristem fate and number of flower buds per node was built for two shoot types growing on trees exposed to three plant water status treatments. The models segmented observed shoots into successive homogeneous zones, which were compared between treatments. Shoot growth rates were calculated from shoot extension measurements made during the growing season. Proleptic shoots had seven successive homogeneous zones while epicormic shoots had five zones. Shoot structures were associated with changes in growth rate over the season. Water deficit (1) affected the occurrence and lengths of the first zones of proleptic shoots, but only the occurrence of the third zone was reduced in epicormic shoots; (2) had a minor effect on zone flowering patterns and did not modify shoot or zone composition of axillary meristem fates; and (3) reduced growth rates, although patterns over the season were similar among treatments. Two meristem types, with different latency durations, produced shoots with different growth rates and distinct structures. Differences between shoot type structure responses to water deficit appeared to reflect their ontogenetic characteristics and/or resource availability for their development. Tree water deficit appeared to stimulate a more rapid progression through ontogenetic states.

  19. The relationship of recombination rate, genome structure, and patterns of molecular evolution across angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, George P; Burleigh, J Gordon; Burleigh, Gordon

    2015-09-16

    Although homologous recombination affects the efficacy of selection in populations, the pattern of recombination rate evolution and its effects on genome evolution across plants are largely unknown. Recombination can reduce genome size by enabling the removal of LTR retrotransposons, alter codon usage by GC biased gene conversion, contribute to complex histories of gene duplication and loss through tandem duplication, and enhance purifying selection on genes. Therefore, variation in recombination rate across species may explain some of the variation in genomic architecture as well as rates of molecular evolution. We used phylogenetic comparative methods to investigate the evolution of global meiotic recombination rate in angiosperms and its effects on genome architecture and selection at the molecular level using genetic maps and genome sequences from thirty angiosperm species. Recombination rate is negatively correlated with genome size, which is likely caused by the removal of LTR retrotransposons. After correcting recombination rates for euchromatin content, we also found an association between global recombination rate and average gene family size. This suggests a role for recombination in the preservation of duplicate genes or expansion of gene families. An analysis of the correlation between the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) and recombination rate in 3748 genes indicates that higher recombination rates are associated with an increased efficacy of purifying selection, suggesting that global recombination rates affect variation in rates of molecular evolution across distantly related angiosperm species, not just between populations. We also identified shifts in dN/dS for recombination proteins that are associated with shifts in global recombination rate across our sample of angiosperms. Although our analyses only reveal correlations, not mechanisms, and do not include potential covariates of recombination rate, like effective

  20. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHANGES EVALUATED BY ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Saad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate heart rate variability (HRV in patients with systemic sclerosis (SS and to investigate their relationship to echocardiographic structural and functional changes in the heart.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 125 patients with SS and 50 gender- and age-matched apparently healthy individuals who made up a control group. In addition to clinical examinations, 73 patients underwent HRV assessment from 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram (ECG monitoring results and 121 patients had echocardiography (EchoCG. 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring was carried out in all control individuals.Results and discussion. Examination of the main parameters of time-domain HRV in patients with SS revealed a significant decline in all temporal and spectral indices, except for the mean R–R interval duration (meanNN, as compared with the control group. EchoCG detected a variety of changes, primarily the induration and calcification of aortic and mitral valves in most patients. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was encountered in almost half of the patients with SS. Eight patients had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, which was <55%. Studying the association of HRV values with separate EchoCG parameters revealed significant inverse correlations of the mean standard deviation of R–R intervals in 5-minute recording segments during 24 hours with the thickness of the interventricular septum (r = -0.18; p < 0.05 and with the induration of the aortic valve (r = -0.18; p < 0.05; the square root mean squared of successive differences (RMSSD, ms for R–R intervals and the percentage of adjacent R–R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms (pNN50 correlated with the induration of the aortic valve (r = -0.23; p<0.05 and r = -0.25; p < 0.05, respectively, with the presence of pericarditis (r = -0.24; p < 0.05 and r = -0,27; p < 0.05, respectively, and with the level of pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = -0

  1. Developing strong concurrent multiphysics multiscale coupling to understand the impact of microstructural mechanisms on the structural scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulk, James W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alleman, Coleman N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mota, Alejandro [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bergel, Guy Leshem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Popova, Evdokia [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Montes de Oca Zapiain, David [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Kalidindi, Suryanarayana Raju [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Ernst, Corey [Elemental Technologies, Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The heterogeneity in mechanical fields introduced by microstructure plays a critical role in the localization of deformation. To resolve this incipient stage of failure, it is therefore necessary to incorporate microstructure with sufficient resolution. On the other hand, computational limitations make it infeasible to represent the microstructure in the entire domain at the component scale. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of concurrent multi- scale modeling to incorporate explicit, finely resolved microstructure in a critical region while resolving the smoother mechanical fields outside this region with a coarser discretization to limit computational cost. The microstructural physics is modeled with a high-fidelity model that incorporates anisotropic crystal elasticity and rate-dependent crystal plasticity to simulate the behavior of a stainless steel alloy. The component-scale material behavior is treated with a lower fidelity model incorporating isotropic linear elasticity and rate-independent J 2 plas- ticity. The microstructural and component scale subdomains are modeled concurrently, with coupling via the Schwarz alternating method, which solves boundary-value problems in each subdomain separately and transfers solution information between subdomains via Dirichlet boundary conditions. Beyond cases studies in concurrent multiscale, we explore progress in crystal plastic- ity through modular designs, solution methodologies, model verification, and extensions to Sierra/SM and manycore applications. Advances in conformal microstructures having both hexahedral and tetrahedral workflows in Sculpt and Cubit are highlighted. A structure-property case study in two-phase metallic composites applies the Materials Knowledge System to local metrics for void evolution. Discussion includes lessons learned, future work, and a summary of funded efforts and proposed work. Finally, an appendix illustrates the need for two-way coupling through a single degree of

  2. Structure analysis of tax revenue and inflation rate in Banda Aceh using vector error correction model with multiple alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Hizir; Maulia, Eva; Miftahuddin

    2017-11-01

    A country has several important parameters to achieve economic prosperity, such as tax revenue and inflation rate. One of the largest revenues of the State Budget in Indonesia comes from the tax sector. Meanwhile, the rate of inflation occurring in a country can be used as an indicator, to measure the good and bad economic problems faced by the country. Given the importance of tax revenue and inflation rate control in achieving economic prosperity, it is necessary to analyze the structure of tax revenue relations and inflation rate. This study aims to produce the best VECM (Vector Error Correction Model) with optimal lag using various alpha and perform structural analysis using the Impulse Response Function (IRF) of the VECM models to examine the relationship of tax revenue, and inflation in Banda Aceh. The results showed that the best model for the data of tax revenue and inflation rate in Banda Aceh City using alpha 0.01 is VECM with optimal lag 2, while the best model for data of tax revenue and inflation rate in Banda Aceh City using alpha 0.05 and 0,1 VECM with optimal lag 3. However, the VECM model with alpha 0.01 yielded four significant models of income tax model, inflation rate of Banda Aceh, inflation rate of health and inflation rate of education in Banda Aceh. While the VECM model with alpha 0.05 and 0.1 yielded one significant model that is income tax model. Based on the VECM models, then there are two structural analysis IRF which is formed to look at the relationship of tax revenue, and inflation in Banda Aceh, the IRF with VECM (2) and IRF with VECM (3).

  3. Structural Covariates of Homicide Rates : A European City Cross-National Comparative Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCall, Patricia L.; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Most previous empirical comparative studies of homicide examine homicide rates across nations or subnational units within a single country. This study is the first in which a European cross-national city comparison is made. The article aims to provide insight into the extent that the homicide rates

  4. A Forward-looking Model of the Term Structure of Interest Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, Albert Lee

    This article proposes a framework that facilitates the inclusion of a generalized structure of observable, forward-looking factors into a dynamic term structure model. We illustrate our framework using multi-horizon survey forecasts of inflation, output growth and monetary policy where the dynamics...

  5. Effect of Deposition Rate on Structure and Surface Morphology of Thin Evaporated Al Films on Dielectrics and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, K.; Rubahn, H. G.

    2012-01-01

    . The structure and surface morphology of the as-deposited Al films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM imaging of the films showed that the mean grain size of thin Al films on all of the substrates increased from 20 nm - 30 nm to 50 nm - 70 nm...... with increase of the deposition rate. Quantitative AFM characterization showed that for all substrates the root mean square surface roughness increases monotonically with increasing the deposition rate from 0.1 nm/s to 2 nm/s. The observed effects of the deposition rate on the grain size and surface roughness...

  6. Using structural equation modeling to understand prescription stimulant misuse: a test of the Theory of Triadic Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarian, Niloofar; Flay, Brian R; Ketcham, Patricia L; Smit, Ellen; Kodama, Cathy; Martin, Melissa; Saltz, Robert F

    2014-05-01

    To test a theory-driven model of health behavior to predict the illicit use of prescription stimulants (IUPS) among college students. A probability sample of 554 students from one university located in California (response rate=90.52%). Students completed a paper-based survey developed with guidance from the Theory of Triadic Influence. We first assessed normality of measures and checked for multicollinearity. A single structural equation model of frequency of IUPS in college was then tested using constructs from the theory's three streams of influence (i.e., intrapersonal, social situation/context, and sociocultural environment) and four levels of causation (i.e., ultimate causes, distal influences, proximal predictors, and immediate precursors). Approximately 18% of students reported engaging in IUPS during college, with frequency of use ranging from never to 40 or more times per academic term. The model tested had strong fit and the majority of paths specified within and across streams were significant at the p<0.01 level. Additionally, 46% of the variance in IUPS frequency was explained by the tested model. Results suggest the utility of the TTI as an integrative model of health behavior, specifically in predicting IUPS, and provide insight on the need for multifaceted prevention and intervention efforts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrologic Synthesis Across the Critical Zone Observatory Network: A Step Towards Understanding the Coevolution of Critical Zone Function and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlostowski, A. N.; Harman, C. J.; Molotch, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    generation). Storage-discharge relationships vary widely across the Network, and may be associated with inter-site differences in sub-surface architecture. Moving forward, we seek to reconcile top-down analysis results against the bottom-up understanding of critical zone structure and hydrologic function at each CZO site.

  8. Impact of Deposition Rate on the Structural and Magnetic Properties of Sputtered Ni/Cu Multilayer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuz, Ali; Colmekci, Salih; Kockar, Hakan; Kuru, Hilal; Uckun, Mehmet

    2017-12-01

    The structural and corresponding magnetic properties of Ni/Cu films sputtered at low and high deposition rates were investigated as there is a limited number of related studies in this field. 5[Ni(10 nm)/Cu(30 nm)] multilayer thin films were deposited using two DC sputtering sources at low (0.02 nm/s) and high (0.10 nm/s) deposition rates of Ni layers. A face centered cubic phase was detected for both films. The surface of the film sputtered at the low deposition rate has a lot of micro-grains distributed uniformly and with sizes from 0.1 to 0.4 μm. Also, it has a vertical acicular morphology. At high deposition rate, the number of micro-grains considerably decreased, and some of their sizes increased up to 1 μm. The surface of the Ni/Cu multilayer deposited at the low rate has a relatively more grainy and rugged structure, whereas the surface of the film deposited at the high rate has a relatively larger lateral size of surface grains with a relatively fine morphology. Saturation magnetisation, Ms, values were 90 and 138 emu/cm3 for deposition rates of 0.02 and 0.10 nm/s, respectively. Remanence, Mr, values were also found to be 48 and 71 emu/cm3 for the low and high deposition rates, respectively. The coercivity, Hc, values were 46 and 65 Oe for the low and high Ni deposition rates, respectively. The changes in the film surfaces provoked the changes in the Hc values. The Ms, Mr, and Hc values of the 5[Ni(10 nm)/Cu(30 nm)] films can be adjusted considering the surface morphologies and film contents caused by the different Ni deposition rates.

  9. Measurement and Structural Invariance of Parent Ratings of ADHD and ODD Symptoms across Gender for American and Malaysian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G. Leonard; Walsh, James A.; Gomez, Rapson; Hafetz, Nina

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement (configural, metric, scalar, and residual) and structural (factor variance, factor covariance, and factor means) invariance of parent ratings of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-inattention (ADHD-IN), ADHD-hyperactivity/impulsivity (ADHD-HI), and oppositional defiant disorder…

  10. Adapting the Structural Family Systems Rating to Assess the Patterns of Interaction in Families of Dementia Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; Feaster, Daniel J.; McCabe, Brian E.; Czaja, Sara J.; Szapocznik, Jose

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study adapted the Structural Family Systems Ratings (SFSR), an observational measure of family interactions, for dementia caregivers. This article presents the development of the SFSR-Dementia Caregiver adaptation (SFSR-DC) and examines relationships between specific family-interaction patterns and caregiver distress. Design and…

  11. Integrating topography, hydrology and rock structure in weathering rate models of spring watersheds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, F.A.L.; Weijden, C.H. van der

    2012-01-01

    Weathering rate models designed for watersheds combine chemical data of discharging waters with morphologic and hydrologic parameters of the catchments. At the spring watershed scale, evaluation of morphologic parameters is subjective due to difficulties in conceiving the catchment geometry.

  12. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  13. Understanding unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Rocheteau

    2006-01-01

    Modern economists have built models of the labor market, which isolate the market’s key drivers and describe the way these interact to produce particular levels of unemployment. One of the most popular models used by macroeconomists today is the search-matching model of equilibrium unemployment. We explain this model, and show how it can be applied to understand the way various policies, such as unemployment benefits, taxes, or technological changes, can affect the unemployment rate.

  14. Use of the Primitive Unit Cell in Understanding Subtle Features of the Cubic Closest-Packed Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John A.; Rittenhouse, Jeffrey L.; Soper, Linda M.; Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important crystal structures adopted by metals is characterized by the "abcabc"...stacking of close-packed layers. This structure is commonly referred to in textbooks as the cubic close-packed (ccp) or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, since the entire lattice can be generated by replication of a face-centered cubic unit cell…

  15. Understanding health care provider barriers to hospital affiliated medical fitness center facility referral: a questionnaire survey and semi structured interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Carissa; Alemagno, Sonia

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study is to understand health care provider barriers to referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities within an affiliated teaching hospital system using referral of diabetic services as an example. The aims of this study include: (1) to assess health care providers' awareness and use of facilities, (2) to determine barriers to referring patients to facilities, (3) identify current and needed resources and/or changes to increase referral to facilities. A 20-item electronic survey and requests for semi-structured interviews were administered to hospital system directors and managers (n = 51). Directors and managers instructed physicians and staff to complete the survey and interviews as applicable. Perceived barriers, knowledge, utilization, and referral of patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities were collected and examined. Descriptive statistics were generated regarding practice characteristics, provider characteristics, and referral. Of the health care providers surveyed and interviewed (n = 25) 40% indicated verbally suggesting use of facilities, 24% provided a flyer about the facilities. No respondents indicated that they directly referred patients to the facilities. However, 16% referred patients to other locations for physical activity - including their own department's management and prevention services. 20% do not refer to Medical Fitness Center Facilities or any other lifestyle programs/locations. Lack of time (92%) and lack of standard guidelines and operating procedures (88%) are barriers to referral. All respondents indicated a strong ability to refer patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities if given education about referral programs available as well as standard clinical guidelines and protocol for delivery. The results of this study indicate that, although few healthcare providers are currently referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities, health care providers with an affiliated Medical Fitness

  16. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  17. Impact of dose-rate on rheology, structure and wear of irradiated UHMWPE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Mikešová, Jana; Fencl, J.; Stará, Hana; Baldrian, Josef; Horák, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2009), s. 587-603 ISSN 0022-2348 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/1118; GA MŠk 2B06096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : joint replacement * radiation dose rate * rheology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2009

  18. Metazooplankton community structure, feeding rate estimates, and hydrography in a meltwater-influenced Greenlandic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, K.W.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Munk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    2008, and estimated feeding rates for some of the larger species groups. Within the 4 regional domains that were covered in the study (continental slope, continental shelf, outer sill region, and main fjord basin), salty coastal water and glacial runoff mixed to various extents, and 7 water masses...

  19. Estimation of Overtopping Rates on Slopes in Wave Power Devices and Other Low Crested Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by questions raised by developers of wave energy devices based on wave overtopping concepts, model tests have been performed to study overtopping of structures with limited draught, low crest freeboards and slope geometries designed to increase overtopping and thereby also the captured ...

  20. Unbounded-rate Markov decision processes : structural properties via a parametrisation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, H.

    2016-01-01

    This research is interested in optimal control of Markov decision processes (MDPs). Herein a key role is played by structural properties. Properties such as monotonicity and convexity help in finding the optimal policy. Value iteration is a tool to derive such properties in discrete time processes.

  1. The influence of condensed tannin structure on rate of microbial mineralization and reactivity to chemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte E; Preston, Caroline M; Hogg, Karen E; Titus, Brian D

    2011-03-01

    We examined how tannin structure influences reactivity in tannin assays and carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Condensed tannins from the foliage of ten tree and shrub species and from pecan shells (Carya illinoensis) had different proportions of: (a) epicatechin (cis) and catechin (trans) isomers, (b) procyanidin (PC) and prodelphinidin (PD) monomers, and (c) different chain lengths. The response of each tannin to several widely used tannin assays was determined. Although there was some variation in response to proanthocyanidin (butanol/HCl) and Folin Ciocalteu assays, we did not deduce any predictable relationship between tannin structure and response to either assay. There was little variation in protein precipitation among the different tannins. To assess biological activity, six of the tannins were incubated with forest humus for 22 days. We determined that, while PC-based tannins remained at least partly extractable for the duration of the incubation, tannins with a high proportion of PD subunits rapidly became unextractable from soil. There was a positive correlation between net nitrogen mineralization and cis chemical structure. Carbon mineralization was enhanced initially by the addition of tannins to humus, but after 22 days, a negative correlation between the proportion of cis subunits and respiration was determined. Overall, we were not able to demonstrate consistent effects of structure on either microbial mineralization or reactivity to chemical assays; such relationships remain elusive.

  2. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Frequency and Intensity Ratings Are Associated with Factor Structure Differences in Military Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhai, Jon D.; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Biehn, Tracey L.; Frueh, B. Christopher; Magruder, Kathryn M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined possible differences in the factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the basis of whether frequency or intensity symptom response formats were used to assess PTSD. Participants included 669 veterans recruited from an epidemiological study of four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers' primary care clinics in the…

  3. Structure and growth rates of the high-latitude coral: Plesiastrea versipora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, S. N.; McCulloch, M. T.; Mortimer, G. E.; Ward, T. M.

    2009-12-01

    The high-latitude coral species Plesiastrea versipora was investigated to identify growth rates in colonies over 1 m in diameter. Six colonies from two temperate gulfs (latitudes of 33°-35°S) in Southern Australia were examined using X-ray, luminescence and 238U/230Th dating techniques. Annual density bands were present in each coral but varied in width and definition, suggesting different linear extension and calcification rates. Differences in density band width were observed at the local scale (amongst colonies on the same reef) and regional scales (between the two gulfs). Extension rates of the P. versipora colonies examined in this study varied between 1.2 and 7 mm per year, which are amongst the slowest growth rates reported for hermatypic corals. As only one of the six P. versipora colonies had obvious luminescent banding, we conclude that luminescent banding is not an accurate chronological marker in this species of temperate water coral. Coral age estimates derived from counting density bands in X-radiographs ranged from 90 to 320 years for the six colonies studied. U-Th ages from the same colonies determined by high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer established radiometric ages between 105 and 381 years. The chronological variation in absolute ages between the two techniques varied between 2 and 19% in different colonies, with the lowest growth rates (~1 mm) displaying the greatest variation between density band age and radiometric U-Th age. This result implies that the age of P. versipora and other slow-growing corals cannot be determined accurately from density bands alone. The outcome of this research demonstrates that P. versipora may be useful as a paleoclimate archive, recording several centuries in a single colony in high-latitude environments (corals found in latitudes greater than 30° in either hemisphere), where other well-established coral climate archives, such as Porites, do not occur.

  4. The Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ): latent structure, normative data and discrepancy analysis for proxy-ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John R; Henry, Julie D; Ward, Aileen L; Blake, John

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the proxy-rating version of the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ) and provide norms and methods for score interpretation. Cross-sectional and correlational. The PRMQ was administered to a large sample drawn from the general adult population (N=570). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test competing models of its latent structure. Various psychometric methods were applied to provide clinicians with tools for score interpretation. The CFA model with optimal fit specified a general memory factor together with additional prospective and retrospective factors. The reliabilities of the PRMQ were acceptable (.83 to .92), and demographic variables did not influence ratings. Tables are presented for conversion of raw scores on the Total scale and Prospective and Retrospective scales to T scores. In addition, tables are provided to allow users to assess the reliability and abnormality of differences between proxy ratings on the Prospective and Retrospective scales. Finally, tables are also provided to compare proxy-ratings with self-ratings (using data from the present sample and self-rating data from a previous study). The proxy-rating version of the PRMQ provides a useful measure of everyday memory for use in clinical research and practice.

  5. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10 3 atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their application

  6. Female song rate and structure predict reproductive success in a socially monogamous bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Heather Brunton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bird song is commonly regarded as a male trait that has evolved through sexual selection. However, recent research has prompted a re-evaluation of this view by demonstrating that female song is an ancestral and phylogenetically widespread trait. Species with female song provide opportunities to study selective pressures and mechanisms specific to females within the wider context of social competition. We investigated the relationship between reproductive success and female song performance in the New Zealand bellbird (Anthornis melanura, a passerine resident year round in New Zealand temperate forests. We monitored breeding behavior and song over three years on Tiritiri Matangi Island. Female bellbirds contributed significantly more towards parental care than males (solely incubating young and provisioning chicks at more than twice the rate of males. Female song rate in the vicinity of the nest was higher than that of males during incubation and chick-rearing stages but similar during early-nesting and post-breeding stages. Using GLMs, we found that female song rates during both incubation and chick-rearing stages strongly predicted the number of fledged chicks. However, male song rate and male and female chick provisioning rates had no effect on fledging success. Two measures of female song complexity (number of syllable types and the number of transitions between different syllable types were also good predictors of breeding success (GLM on PC scores. In contrast, song duration, the total number of syllables, and the number of ‘stutter’ syllables per song were not correlated with fledging success. It is unclear why male song rate was not associated with reproductive success and we speculate that extra-pair paternity might play a role. While we have previously demonstrated that female bellbird song is important in intrasexual interactions, we clearly demonstrate here that female song predicts reproductive success. These results, with others

  7. Comparison of Structuring the Interest Rates on Micro Loans in Serbia and Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Zelenović

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is development of comparative analysis of the microcredit sector in Serbia and Montenegro, as well as to carry out identification and analysis of the components that influence the determination of interest rates on microloans in Serbia and Montenegro. Within the comparative study, there will be an analysis of the correlation between the total amount of granted microcredits in these countries and their gross domestic product, by using the Pearson correlation coefficient.

  8. An empirical method for determining average soil infiltration rates and runoff, Powder River structural basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankl, James G.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a method to estimate infiltration rates of soils for use in estimating runoff from small basins. Average rainfall intensity is plotted against storm duration on log-log paper. All rainfall events are designated as having either runoff or nonrunoff. A power-decay-type curve is visually fitted to separate the two types of rainfall events. This separation curve is an incipient-ponding curve and its equation describes infiltration parameters for a soil. For basins with more than one soil complex, only the incipient-ponding curve for the soil complex with the lowest infiltration rate can be defined using the separation technique. Incipient-ponding curves for soils with infiltration rates greater than the lowest curve are defined by ranking the soils according to their relative permeabilities and optimizing the curve position. A comparison of results for six basins produced computed total runoff for all events used ranging from 16.6 percent less to 2.3 percent more than measured total runoff. (USGS)

  9. Leak rates and structural integrity tests for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant primary containment. Regulatory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani Alegria, Yuri Raul; Salgado Gonzalez, Julio Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    In the Appendix A General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants of the US Code of Federal Regulations title 10 part 50 (10CFR50) is established the Criterion 1 Quality standards and records which requires that structures, systems and components important to safety should be tested to quality standards according with the importance of the safety function to be performed. This regulation has been adopted by the Mexican Regulatory Body (CNSNS) for their nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. Performance of Arch-Style Road Crossing Structures from Relative Movement Rates of Large Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Andis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, an increasing number of highway construction and reconstruction projects have included mitigation measures aimed at reducing wildlife-vehicle collisions and maintaining habitat connectivity for wildlife. The most effective and robust measures include wildlife fences combined with wildlife underpasses and overpasses. The 39 wildlife crossing structures included along a 90 km stretch of US Highway 93 on the Flathead Indian Reservation in western Montana represent one of the most extensive of such projects. We measured movements of large mammal species at 15 elliptical arch-style wildlife underpasses and adjacent habitat between April and November 2015. We investigated if the movements of large mammals through the underpasses were similar to large mammal movements in the adjacent habitat. Across all structures, large mammals (all species combined were more likely to move through the structures than pass at a random location in the surrounding habitat. At the species level, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus and mule deer (O. hemionus used the underpasses significantly more than could be expected based on their movement through the surrounding habitat. However, carnivorous species such as, black bear (Ursus americanus and coyote (Canis latrans moved through the underpasses in similar numbers compared to the surrounding habitat.

  11. Effect of cooling rate and forced convection on as-cast structure of 2205 duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To forecast the as-cast structure and ferrite-austenite phase ratio of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS, the effects of cooling rate and forced convection were observed in a high-vacuum resistance furnace in which the forced convection was created by the rotation of the crucible. The as-cast structure of all 2205 DSS samples is full equiaxed grains, and the microstructure consists of a great amount of desirable intra-granular austenite inside the continuous ferrite grain matrix, besides Widmanstatten austenite and grain boundary austenite. The ferrite grain size decreases gradually with the increase in the cooling rates (20 to 60 ìC·min-1 or the forced convection, while the ferrite grains of the samples solidified with a strong convection are barely changed when the cooling rate is below 50 ìC·min-1. Moreover, a small grain size is beneficial for the austenite formation but the influence is not very obvious under the cooling rates in the range of 5 to 50 ìC·min-1. Compared with grain size, the cooling rate has a greater influence on the final ferrite content. A model based on the experimental results is established to predict the ferrite content, which could be approximated by ヤ(%=20.5·exp(c/80.0+0.34d+34.1, where c is the cooling rate in ìC·min-1 and d is the grain size in mm. By using this model, the dependence of the final ferrite content on cooling rate and grain size is well described.

  12. Scrambling the Nest Egg: How Well Do Teachers Understand Their Pensions, and What Do They Think about Alternative Pension Structures? Working Paper 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Michael; Goldhaber, Dan

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses two questions: How well do teachers understand their current pension plans? And, what do they think about alternative plan structures? The data come from administrative records and a 2006 survey of teachers in Washington State. The results suggest Washington's teachers are fairly knowledgeable about their pensions, though new…

  13. The Effect of Logical Thinking and Two Cognitive Styles on Understanding the Structure of Matter: An Analysis with the Random Walk Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Tsitsipis, Georgios; Papageorgiou, George

    2010-01-01

    This work uses the concepts and tools of complexity theory to examine the effect of logical thinking and two cognitive styles, such as, the degree of field dependence/independence and the convergent/divergent thinking on students' understanding of the structure of matter. Students were categorized according to the model they adopted for the…

  14. Cooling rate effects on thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of bio-hydroxyapatite obtained from bovine bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F; Palechor-Ocampo, Anderzon F; Londoño-Restrepo, Sandra M; Millán-Malo, Beatriz M; Rodriguez-García, Mario E

    2016-02-01

    This article is focused on the study of cooling rate effects on the thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) obtained from bovine bone. A three-step process was used to obtain BIO-HAp: hydrothermal, calcinations, and cooling. Calcined samples in a furnace and cooling in air (HAp-CAir), water (HAp-CW), and liquid nitrogen (HAp-CN2), as well as an air cooled sample inside the furnace (HAp-CFAir), were studied. According to this study, the low cooling rate that was achieved for air cooled samples inside the furnace produce single crystal BIO-HAp with better crystalline quality; other samples exhibited polycrystalline structures forming micron and submicron grains. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Understanding differences in conception and abortion rates among under-20 year olds in Britain and France: Examining the contribution of social disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Rachel H; Bajos, Nathalie; Slaymaker, Emma; Wellings, Kaye; Mercer, Catherine H

    2017-01-01

    Socioeconomic status has been shown to be associated with sexual activity, contraceptive-use, pregnancy and abortion among young people. Less is known about whether the strength of the association differs for each outcome, between men and women, or cross-nationally. We investigate this using contemporaneous national probability survey data from Britain and France. Data were analysed for 17-29 year-olds in Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3, n = 5959) undertaken 2010-2012, and the 2010 French Fertility, Contraception and Sexual Dysfunction survey (FECOND, n = 3027). For each country, we estimated the gender-specific prevalence of sex before-16, contraceptive-use, conception before-20, and abortion in the event of conception, and used logistic regression to examine associations between two measures of socioeconomic status-educational-level and parental socioeconomic-group-and each outcome. We tested for interactions between socioeconomic characteristics and country, and socioeconomic characteristics and gender, for each outcome. For each outcome, Britain and France differed with regard to prevalence but associations with socioeconomic characteristics were similar. Respondents of higher educational level, and, less consistently, with parents from higher socioeconomic-groups, were less likely to report sex before-16 (Britain, men: adjusted OR (aOR) 0.5, women: aOR 0.5; France, men: aOR 0.5, women: aOR 0.5), no contraception at first sex (Britain, men: aOR 0.4, women: aOR 0.6; France, men: aOR 0.4, women: aOR 0.4), pregnancy before-20 (Britain: aOR 0.3; France: aOR 0.1), and in Britain, a birth rather than an abortion in the event of conception (Britain: aOR 3.1). We found no strong evidence of variation in the magnitude of the associations with socioeconomic characteristics by country or gender. Population level differences in conception and abortion rates between the two countries may partly be driven by the larger proportion

  16. Understanding differences in conception and abortion rates among under-20 year olds in Britain and France: Examining the contribution of social disadvantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel H Scott

    Full Text Available Socioeconomic status has been shown to be associated with sexual activity, contraceptive-use, pregnancy and abortion among young people. Less is known about whether the strength of the association differs for each outcome, between men and women, or cross-nationally. We investigate this using contemporaneous national probability survey data from Britain and France.Data were analysed for 17-29 year-olds in Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3, n = 5959 undertaken 2010-2012, and the 2010 French Fertility, Contraception and Sexual Dysfunction survey (FECOND, n = 3027. For each country, we estimated the gender-specific prevalence of sex before-16, contraceptive-use, conception before-20, and abortion in the event of conception, and used logistic regression to examine associations between two measures of socioeconomic status-educational-level and parental socioeconomic-group-and each outcome. We tested for interactions between socioeconomic characteristics and country, and socioeconomic characteristics and gender, for each outcome.For each outcome, Britain and France differed with regard to prevalence but associations with socioeconomic characteristics were similar. Respondents of higher educational level, and, less consistently, with parents from higher socioeconomic-groups, were less likely to report sex before-16 (Britain, men: adjusted OR (aOR 0.5, women: aOR 0.5; France, men: aOR 0.5, women: aOR 0.5, no contraception at first sex (Britain, men: aOR 0.4, women: aOR 0.6; France, men: aOR 0.4, women: aOR 0.4, pregnancy before-20 (Britain: aOR 0.3; France: aOR 0.1, and in Britain, a birth rather than an abortion in the event of conception (Britain: aOR 3.1. We found no strong evidence of variation in the magnitude of the associations with socioeconomic characteristics by country or gender.Population level differences in conception and abortion rates between the two countries may partly be driven by the larger

  17. The Effect of Teaching Games of Understanding as a Coaching Instruction had on Adjust, Cover and Heart Rate among Malaysian and Indian Junior Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmuga Nathan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The field hockey coaching process across both Malaysia and India favours a traditional, coach-centred approach of mastering technical skills in terms of game play parameters, fitness, intensity, and load training, whereas a tactical- and player-centred pedagogical approach still takes a backseat. On the other hand, the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU model offers tactical-cognitive instruction and is gaining international recognition for its ability to produce intelligent players via a problem-solving approach in game play. Therefore, the purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the effect of TGfU compared to skill mastery instruction, termed as Skill Drill Technical (SDT, among Malaysian and Indian elite junior hockey players in term of the game play attributes of adjust and cover in 5 vs. 5 small-sided game play and game play intensity via heart rate (HR at different points of game play. A total of n = 60 players with an average age of 15 ± 1.03 was selected via simple random sampling from both countries involved in this study and assigned equally to groups, with 15 per group for TGfU and for SDT across Malaysia and India. Gathered data were analysed using the ANOVA and ANCOVA techniques. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences for adjust in 5 vs. 5 game play between TGfU and SDT across Malaysia and India after the intervention. For cover, there was significant improvement for Malaysian players using the TGfU model compared to SDT. In contrast, there was no significant difference between these two models among the Indian players after the intervention. There was significant difference between these two models in terms of warm-up HR across the two countries, and HR was higher via TGfU. For HR immediately after the 5 vs. 5 game play intervention and HR after three minutes’ recovery, Indian players with TGfU recorded a higher and significant difference compared to SDT. However, findings indicated

  18. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) - A Systematic Review of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students’ communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Results Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Discussion Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed

  19. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)--A Systematic Review of Rating Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students' communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed in order to yield psychometrically

  20. Dose rate distribution calculation of elaborate head phantom for BNCT based on repeated structure card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohua; Yu Tao; Xue Qing

    2009-01-01

    Because of cursory character of the head geometry phantom which adopted in BNCT for glioma cure, filling the head by using Universe card and Fill card of MCNP code is performed, and subtle description of head phantom is accomplished in this paper. Then, dose distribution calculation in head injected with boron and without boron is implemented with fast, super-thermal and thermal neutrons respectively. Finally, the curve of dose rate and depth in head is acquired. The calculation result is consistent with the related reference report, which proves that elaborate head phantom constructed in this paper is correct. (authors)

  1. Flow rate effect on the structure and morphology of molybdenum oxide nanoparticles deposited by atmospheric-pressure microplasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, Arumugam Chandra; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Mariotti, Davide; Sasaki, Takeshi; Terashima, Kazuo; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    Nanoparticles of crystalline molybdenum oxide were prepared by changing the flow rate of plasma gas (2% oxygen balanced by Ar) using an atmospheric-pressure microplasma technique. The morphology and crystalline structure of the nanoparticles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FESEM results revealed that the shape of the deposited nanoparticles depended on the plasma gas flow rate. The TEM results supported the FESEM observations. The transmission electron diffraction (TED) pattern revealed that the obtained nanoparticles changed from MoO 2 to MoO 3 with the flow-rate increase, and correspondingly the nanoparticle size drastically decreased. A process mechanism is proposed from the observations of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) during the process and consumed wire surface analysis from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FESEM studies

  2. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior of Vanadium Microalloyed Cryogenic Fine Grain Structural Steel Pipe at High Strain Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S. S.; Liu, X. Q.; Liu, Z. L.; Hou, Z. G.; Tian, Q. C.

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior of a vanadium microalloyed steel pipe was systematically investigated at temperatures range of 850-1,200 °C and a strain rate of 5 s-1 on a Gleeble-3800 thermo-simulation machine. Constitutive equation was obtained by characteristic points of DRX which derived from the strain hardening rate and stress curves. DRX kinetics model was established for determining the recrystallization volume fraction (X). Effect of dynamic precipitation of V(C, N) imposed on DRX at temperatures from 850-1,000 °C was analyzed. Results show that true stress-strain curves exhibited no clearly defined stress peaks with typical dynamic recovery behavior. X increased from 43.9 % to 100 % with increasing deformation temperature, which was in reasonable agreement with the observation of microstructure. Moreover, the calculation pinning force of V(C, N) precipitates was weaker than the recrystallization driving force, revealing that V(C, N) precipitates could effectively retard rather than prevent the progress of DRX.

  3. Composition of structural fragments and the mineralization rate of organic matter in zonal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.; Kvitkina, A. K.; Kaganov, V. V.; Kudeyarov, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Comparative analysis of the climatic characteristics and the recalcitrance against decomposition of organic matter in the zonal soil series of European Russia, from peat surface-gley tundra soil to brown semidesert soil, has assessed the relationships between the period of biological activity, the content of chemically stable functional groups, and the mineralization of humus. The stability of organic matter has been determined from the ratio of functional groups using the solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of soil samples and the direct measurements of organic matter mineralization from CO2 emission. A statistically significant correlation has been found between the period of biological activity and the humification indices: the CHA/CFA ratio, the aromaticity, and the alkyl/ O-alkyl ratio in organic matter. The closest correlation has been observed between the period of biological activity and the alkyl/ O-alkyl ratio; therefore, this parameter can be an important indicator of the soil humus status. A poor correlation between the mineralization rate and the content of chemically stable functional groups in soil organic matter has been revealed for the studied soil series. At the same time, the lowest rate of carbon mineralization has been observed in southern chernozem characterized by the maximum content of aromatic groups (21% Corg) and surface-gley peat tundra soil, where an extremely high content of unsubstituted CH2 and CH3 alkyl groups (41% Corg) has been noted.

  4. Structured health care for subjects with diabetic foot ulcers results in a reduction of major amputation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective We tested the effects of structured health care for the diabetic foot in one region in Germany aiming to reduce the number of major amputations. Research design and methods In a prospective study we investigated patients with diabetic foot in a structured system of outpatient, in-patient and rehabilitative treatment. Subjects were recruited between January 1st, 2000 and December 31, 2007. All participants underwent a two-year follow-up. The modified University of Texas Wound Classification System (UT) was the basis for documentation and data analysis. We evaluated numbers of major amputations, rates of ulcer healing and mortality. In order to compare the effect of the structured health care program with usual care in patients with diabetic foot we evaluated the same parameters at another regional hospital without interdisciplinary care of diabetic foot (controls). Results 684 patients with diabetic foot and 508 controls were investigated. At discharge from hospital 28.3% (structured health care program, SHC) vs. 23.0% (controls) of all ulcers had healed completely. 51.5% (SHC) vs. 49.8% (controls) were in UT grade 1. Major amputations were performed in 32 subjects of the structured health care program group (4.7%) vs. 110 (21.7%) in controls (p<0.0001). Mortality during hospitalization was 2.5% (SHC) vs. 9.4% in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions With the structured health care program we achieved a significant reduction of major amputation rates by more than 75% as compared to standard care. PMID:23497152

  5. Understanding the photoluminescence characteristics of Eu{sup 3+}-doped double-perovskite by electronic structure calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Binita [St. Paul’s Cathedral Mission College, 33/1Raja Rammohan Roy Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Halder, Saswata; Sinha, T. P. [Department of Physics, Bose Institute, 93/1 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Das, Sayantani [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Europium-doped luminescent barium samarium tantalum oxide Ba{sub 2}SmTaO{sub 6} (BST) has been investigated by first-principles calculation, and the crystal structure, electronic structure, and optical properties of pure BST and Eu-doped BST have been examined and compared. Based on the calculated results, the luminescence properties and mechanism of Eu-doped BST has been discussed. In the case of Eu-doped BST, there is an impurity energy band at the Fermi level, which is formed by seven spin up energy levels of Eu and act as the luminescent centre, which is evident from the band structure calculations.

  6. Charging rates of metal-dielectric structures. [with implications for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, C. K.; Staskus, J. V.; Roche, J. C.; Berkopec, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Metal plates partially covered by 0.01-centimeter-thick fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon were charged in the Lewis Research Center's geomagnetic substorm simulation facility using 5-, 8-, 10-, and 12-kilovolt electron beams. Surface voltage as a function of time was measured for various initial conditions (Teflon discharged or precharged) with the metal plate grounded or floating. Results indicate that both the charging rates and the levels to which the samples become charged are influenced by the geometry and initial charge state of the insulating surfaces. The experiments are described and the results are presented and discussed. NASA charging analyzer program (NASCAP) models of the experiments have been generated, and the predictions obtained are described. Implications of the study results for spacecraft are discussed.

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction Effects on Mass Flow Rates in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-02

    accomplished with the finite element solver  ABAQUS ™.   ABAQUS ™ is able to utilize linear elastic models as well as various non‐linear and viscoelastic...structural model utilizing the commercially available  code  ABAQUS ™ version 6.14.     A static analysis was used to determine the deformation of grain B...default  convergence  criterion was used  in  ABAQUS ™  version 6.14,  specifically that the ratio of the largest residual to the corresponding average flux

  8. Structuring Assignments to Improve Understanding and Presentation Skills: Experiential Learning in the Capstone Strategic Management Team Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    In the strategic management course, students select, analyze, and present viable future alternatives based on information provided in cases or computer simulations. Rather than understanding the entire process, the student's focus is on the final presentation. Chickering's (1977) research on active learning suggests students learn more effectively…

  9. Understanding Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the ability to adapt successfully in the face of stress and adversity. Stressful life events, trauma and chronic adversity can have a substantial impact on brain function and structure, and can result in the development of PTSD, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, most individuals do not develop such illnesses after experiencing stressful life events, and are thus thought to be resilient. Resilience as successful adaptation relies on effective responses to environmental challenges and ultimate resistance to the deleterious effects of stress, therefore a greater understanding of the factors that promote such effects is of great relevance. This review focuses on recent findings regarding genetic, epigenetic, developmental, psychosocial and neurochemical factors that are considered essential contributors to the development of resilience. Neural circuits and pathways involved in mediating resilience are also discussed. The growing understanding of resilience factors will hopefully lead to the development of new pharmacological and psychological interventions for enhancing resilience and mitigating the untoward consequences.

  10. Creation and implementation of department-wide structured reports: an analysis of the impact on error rate in radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C Matthew; Hall, Seth; Zhang, Bin; Towbin, Alexander J

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare textual error rates and subtypes in radiology reports before and after implementation of department-wide structured reports. Randomly selected radiology reports that were generated following the implementation of department-wide structured reports were evaluated for textual errors by two radiologists. For each report, the text was compared to the corresponding audio file. Errors in each report were tabulated and classified. Error rates were compared to results from a prior study performed prior to implementation of structured reports. Calculated error rates included the average number of errors per report, average number of nongrammatical errors per report, the percentage of reports with an error, and the percentage of reports with a nongrammatical error. Identical versions of voice-recognition software were used for both studies. A total of 644 radiology reports were randomly evaluated as part of this study. There was a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of reports with nongrammatical errors (33 to 26%; p = 0.024). The likelihood of at least one missense omission error (omission errors that changed the meaning of a phrase or sentence) occurring in a report was significantly reduced from 3.5 to 1.2% (p = 0.0175). A statistically significant reduction in the likelihood of at least one comission error (retained statements from a standardized report that contradict the dictated findings or impression) occurring in a report was also observed (3.9 to 0.8%; p = 0.0007). Carefully constructed structured reports can help to reduce certain error types in radiology reports.

  11. Optimizing the data acquisition rate for a remotely controllable structural monitoring system with parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Wenjuan; Guo, Aihuang; Liu, Yang; Azmi, Asrul Izam; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel technique that optimizes the real-time remote monitoring and control of dispersed civil infrastructures. The monitoring system is based on fiber Bragg gating (FBG) sensors, and transfers data via Ethernet. This technique combines parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling to increase the data acquisition rate in remote controllable structural monitoring systems. The compact parallel operation mode is highly efficient at achieving the highest possible data acquisition rate for the FBG sensor based local data acquisition system. Self-adaptive sampling is introduced to continuously coordinate local acquisition and remote control for data acquisition rate optimization. Key issues which impact the operation of the whole system, such as the real-time data acquisition rate, data processing capability, and buffer usage, are investigated. The results show that, by introducing parallel operation and self-adaptive sampling, the data acquisition rate can be increased by several times without affecting the system operating performance on both local data acquisition and remote process control

  12. Testing the Expectations Hypothesis of the Term Structure of Interest Rates in BRICS Countries: A Multivariate Co-integration Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Francois Muzindutsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The BRICS is a group of major emerging economies in the world which have combined financial resources to form the New Development Bank in an effort to address economic challenges faced by these countries. Thus, the flow of funds among the BRICS countries are expected to increase and this has implication on interest rates changes in these countries. Employing monthly short and long term interest rates from June 2005 to June 2015, this study used a multivariate cointegration approach to test for the validity of the expectations hypothesis (EH of the term structure of interest rates in BRICS countries. The results of the co-integration analysis revealed that the EH only holds in three of the five countries, namely China, India, and South Africa. Short and long term interest rates for these three countries converge to the long-run equilibrium at different speed, where the convergence was found to be quick in South Africa and slow in China. This study found no evidence of EH in Brazil and Russia. Findings of this study are relevant to current developments within BRICS financial markets and provide valuable information that can be used to forecast future changes in interest rates in BRICS countries.

  13. Cationic amino acids specific biomimetic silicification in ionic liquid: a quest to understand the formation of 3-D structures in diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ramanathan

    Full Text Available The intricate, hierarchical, highly reproducible, and exquisite biosilica structures formed by diatoms have generated great interest to understand biosilicification processes in nature. This curiosity is driven by the quest of researchers to understand nature's complexity, which might enable reproducing these elegant natural diatomaceous structures in our laboratories via biomimetics, which is currently beyond the capabilities of material scientists. To this end, significant understanding of the biomolecules involved in biosilicification has been gained, wherein cationic peptides and proteins are found to play a key role in the formation of these exquisite structures. Although biochemical factors responsible for silica formation in diatoms have been studied for decades, the challenge to mimic biosilica structures similar to those synthesized by diatoms in their natural habitats has not hitherto been successful. This has led to an increasingly interesting debate that physico-chemical environment surrounding diatoms might play an additional critical role towards the control of diatom morphologies. The current study demonstrates this proof of concept by using cationic amino acids as catalyst/template/scaffold towards attaining diatom-like silica morphologies under biomimetic conditions in ionic liquids.

  14. Effects of organic loading rate on biogas production from macroalgae: Performance and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Xiao-Xian; Fu, Shan-Fei; He, Shuai; Manasa, M R K; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2017-07-01

    Macroalgae biomass has been considered as a promising feedstock for biogas production. In order to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion (AD) of macroalgae, semi-continuous fermentation was conducted to examine the effects of organic loading rate (OLR) on biogas production from Macrocystis pyrifer. Results showed that, under OLRs of 1.37, 2.74, 4.12 and 6.85kgVS substrate /(m 3 ·d), the average unit biogas yields were 438.9, 477.3, 480.1 and 188.7mL/(gVS substrate d), respectively. It indicated that biogas production was promoted by the increased OLR in an appropriate range while inhibited by the OLR beyond the appropriate range. The investigation on physical-chemical parameters revealed that unfavorable VFAs concentration, pH and salinity might be the main causes for system failure due to the overrange OLR, while the total phenols failed to reach the inhibitory concentration. Microbial community analysis demonstrated that several bacterial and archaeal phyla altered with increase in OLR apparently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural and functional social support in elderly objective and subjective health ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iglesias-Parro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the causes that explain the discrepancies between the effects of social relationships on health and wellness of the elderly people. Several disciplines of health sciences have developed different theories to explain the evidence that confirm the positive effects of social relations. Furthermore, there is acumuative evidence confirming most of the predictions derived from its principles. However, the empirical evidence has not always confirmed these beneficial relationships and sometimes these evidences contradict some of the theoretical predictions. Even, it is not difficult to find reversed effects. In this paper we follow some of the approaches developed from Social Psychology which analyze the different effects of social relationships on the health of older people. Two types of aspects of social relations have served to this purpose. First, the structural aspects (i.e., frequency of intercourse. Second, qualitative-functional aspects of great tradition in estudies of quality of life and wellbeing of older people (i.e. social support. Following the Convoy Model, we measured perceived social support and frecuency of relationships in 168 spaniards, men and women (aged 62 years old and more. We analyze these discrepancies in the light of the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000°C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525°C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  17. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopic analysis of structure and dissolution rates of silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; WindischJr., Charles F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Burton, Sarah D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Bovaird, Chase C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing studies to evaluate relationships between structure and rates of dissolution of silicate glasses in aqueous media, sodium borosilicate glasses of composition Na2O xB2O3 (3 x)SiO2, with x 1 (Na2O/B2O3 ratio 1), were analyzed using deep-UV Raman spectroscopy. Results were quantified in terms of the fraction of SiO4 tetrahedra with one non-bridging oxygen (Q3) and then correlated with Na2O and B2O3 content. The Q3 fractionwas found to increase with increasing Na2O content, in agreement with studies on related glasses, and, as long as the value of x was not too high, this contributed to higher rates of dissolution in single pass flow-through testing. In contrast, dissolution rates were less strongly determined by the Q3 fraction when the value of x was near unity, and appeared to grow larger upon further reduction of the Q3 fraction. Results were interpreted to indicate the increasingly important role of network hydrolysis in the glass dissolution mechanism as the BO4 tetrahedron replaces the Q3 unit as the charge-compensating structure for Na+ ions. Finally, the use of deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was found to be advantageous in studying finely powdered glasses in cases where visible Raman spectroscopy suffered from weak Raman scattering and fluorescence interference.

  18. STRUCTURAL BREAKS AND BILATERAL EXCHANGE RATE PASS-THROUGH: AN EMPIRICAL CASE OF INDONESIA–UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arintoko Arintoko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the exchange rate pass-through into domestic prices in Indonesia in the two-stage approach. The study focuses on first step pass-through, i.e. ERPT into import prices and second step pass-through, i.e. into consumer prices, using cointegration and error-correction mechanism (ECM model. This research uses a Zivot-Andrews technique to test for structural breaks and Gregory-Hansen models to tests. The results show that the long run ERPT to import prices with structural breaks is relatively low compared to the results without them. The absolut error correction term values resulted from cointegration are decreased and the error-correction models need period lagged longer than one-period if the estimation included the estimated structural breaks. The main finding is that allowing for possible breaks around the crises in Indonesia, and a shift of the exchange rate management from managed to free floating in 1997 helps to restore a long run cointegration relationship estimation.

  19. Incorporating Modeling and Simulations in Undergraduate Biophysical Chemistry Course to Promote Understanding of Structure-Dynamics-Function Relationships in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and…

  20. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopic analysis of structure and dissolution rates of silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Pierce, Eric M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2011-03-24

    As part of ongoing studies to evaluate the relationships between structural variations in silicate glasses and rates of glass dissolution in aqueous media, molecular structures present in sodium borosilicate glasses of composition Na2O.xB2O3.(3-x)SiO2, with x 1 (Na2O/B2O3 ratio 1), were analyzed using deep-UV Raman spectroscopy. The results were quantified in terms of the fraction of SiO4 tetrahedra with one non-bridging oxygen (Q3) and then correlated with Na2O and B2O3 content. Increasing Na2O was found to raise the fraction of Q3 units in the glasses systematically, in agreement with studies on related glasses, and, as long as the value of x was not too high, contribute to higher rates of dissolution in single pass flow-through testing. The finding was obtained across more than one series of silica-rich glasses prepared for independent dissolution studies. In contrast, dissolution rates were less strongly determined by the Q3 fraction when the value of x was near unity and appeared to grow larger upon further reduction of the Q3 fraction. The results were interpreted to indicate the increasingly important role of network hydrolysis in the glass dissolution mechanism as the BO4 tetrahedron replaces the Q3 unit as the charge-compensating structure for Na+ ions. Finally, the use of deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was found to be advantageous in studying finely powdered glasses in cases where visible Raman spectroscopy suffered from weak Raman scattering and fluorescence interference.

  1. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfiffner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

  2. Understanding the relationship between the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital Compare star rating, surgical case volume, and short-term outcomes after major cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Deborah R; Norton, Edward C; Ellimoottil, Chad; Ye, Zaojun; Dupree, James M; Herrel, Lindsey A; Miller, David C

    2017-11-01

    Both the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Hospital Compare star rating and surgical case volume have been publicized as metrics that can help patients to identify high-quality hospitals for complex care such as cancer surgery. The current study evaluates the relationship between the CMS' star rating, surgical volume, and short-term outcomes after major cancer surgery. National Medicare data were used to evaluate the relationship between hospital star ratings and cancer surgery volume quintiles. Then, multilevel logistic regression models were fit to examine the association between cancer surgery outcomes and both star rankings and surgical volumes. Lastly, a graphical approach was used to compare how well star ratings and surgical volume predicted cancer surgery outcomes. This study identified 365,752 patients undergoing major cancer surgery for 1 of 9 cancer types at 2,550 hospitals. Star rating was not associated with surgical volume (P cancer surgery outcomes (mortality, complication rate, readmissions, and prolonged length of stay). The adjusted predicted probabilities for 5- and 1-star hospitals were 2.3% and 4.5% for mortality, 39% and 48% for complications, 10% and 15% for readmissions, and 8% and 16% for a prolonged length of stay, respectively. The adjusted predicted probabilities for hospitals with the highest and lowest quintile cancer surgery volumes were 2.7% and 5.8% for mortality, 41% and 55% for complications, 12.2% and 11.6% for readmissions, and 9.4% and 13% for a prolonged length of stay, respectively. Furthermore, surgical volume and the star rating were similarly associated with mortality and complications, whereas the star rating was more highly associated with readmissions and prolonged length of stay. In the absence of other information, these findings suggest that the star rating may be useful to patients when they are selecting a hospital for major cancer surgery. However, more research is needed before these ratings can

  3. Measuring self-rated productivity: factor structure and variance component analysis of the Health and Work Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Sjöberg, Anders; Hasson, Henna; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    To test the factor structure and variance components of the productivity subscales of the Health and Work Questionnaire (HWQ). A total of 272 individuals from one company answered the HWQ scale, including three dimensions (efficiency, quality, and quantity) that the respondent rated from three perspectives: their own, their supervisor's, and their coworkers'. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed, and common and unique variance components evaluated. A common factor explained 81% of the variance (reliability 0.95). All dimensions and rater perspectives contributed with unique variance. The final model provided a perfect fit to the data. Efficiency, quality, and quantity and three rater perspectives are valid parts of the self-rated productivity measurement model, but with a large common factor. Thus, the HWQ can be analyzed either as one factor or by extracting the unique variance for each subdimension.

  4. Effects of gas flow rate on the structure and elemental composition of tin oxide thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansoori, Muntaser; Al-Shaibani, Sahar; Al-Jaeedi, Ahlam; Lee, Jisung; Choi, Daniel; Hasoon, Falah S.

    2017-12-01

    Photovoltaic technology is one of the key answers for a better sustainable future. An important layer in the structure of common photovoltaic cells is the transparent conductive oxide. A widely applied transparent conductive oxide is tin oxide (SnO2). The advantage of using tin oxide comes from its high stability and low cost in processing. In our study, we investigate effects of working gas flow rate and oxygen content in radio frequency (RF)-sputtering system on the growth of intrinsic SnO2 (i-SnO2) layers. X-ray diffraction results showed that amorphous-like with nano-crystallite structure, and the surface roughness varied from 1.715 to 3.936 nm. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed different types of point defects, such as tin interstitials and oxygen vacancies, in deposited i-SnO2 films.

  5. Effects of gas flow rate on the structure and elemental composition of tin oxide thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntaser Al-Mansoori

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic technology is one of the key answers for a better sustainable future. An important layer in the structure of common photovoltaic cells is the transparent conductive oxide. A widely applied transparent conductive oxide is tin oxide (SnO2. The advantage of using tin oxide comes from its high stability and low cost in processing. In our study, we investigate effects of working gas flow rate and oxygen content in radio frequency (RF-sputtering system on the growth of intrinsic SnO2 (i-SnO2 layers. X-ray diffraction results showed that amorphous-like with nano-crystallite structure, and the surface roughness varied from 1.715 to 3.936 nm. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed different types of point defects, such as tin interstitials and oxygen vacancies, in deposited i-SnO2 films.

  6. Assessing the Effects of Periodic Flooding on the Population Structure and Recruitment Rates of Riparian Tree Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Berthelot

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Riparian forest stands are subjected to a variety of hydrological stresses as a result of annual fluctuations in water levels during the growing season. Spring floods create additional water-related stress as a result of a major inflow of water that floods riverside land. This exploratory study assesses the impacts of successive floods on tree dynamics and regeneration in an active sedimentation area, while determining the age of the stands using the recruitment rates, tree structure and tree rings based on dendrochronological analysis. Environmental data were also recorded for each vegetation quadrat. In total, 2633 tree stems were tallied throughout the quadrats (200 m2, and tree specimens were analyzed based on the various flood zones. A total of 720 specimens were counted (100 m2 strip to measure natural regeneration. Higher recruitment rates are noted for the no-flood zones and lower rates in active floodplains. During the period of the establishment of tree species, the survival rates are comparable between the flood zones and the no-flood zones. Tree diameter distribution reveals a strong predominance of young trees in flooded areas. Different factors appear to come into play in the dynamics of riparian forest stands, including the disruptions associated with successive flooding.

  7. Dose rate effect on internal friction and structural transformations in electron-irradiated carbon-armored composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaikin, Yu.A. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a Tole bi, 480012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)]. E-mail: DrZaykin@mail.ru; Aimuratov, D.B. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a Tole bi, 480012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Al-Sheikhly, M. [University of Maryland, College Park (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Temperature dependence of internal friction and specific electric resistance of multi-layer carbon-armored epoxy-based composites is experimentally studied in the temperature range of 20-300 deg. C before and after irradiation with 2 MeV electrons. It is shown that carbon penetration into the polymer matrix causes intense polymer cross-linking in the basic layers of the composite even at low irradiation doses. The strong effect of dose rate on radiation-induced structural transformations was observed.

  8. An efficient and accurate method for computation of energy release rates in beam structures with longitudinal cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Bitsche, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel, efficient, and accurate framework for fracture analysis of beam structures with longitudinal cracks. The three-dimensional local stress field is determined using a high-fidelity beam model incorporating a finite element based cross section analysis tool. The Virtual...... Crack Closure Technique is used for computation of strain energy release rates. The devised framework was employed for analysis of cracks in beams with different cross section geometries. The results show that the accuracy of the proposed method is comparable to that of conventional three...

  9. CH3-ReO3 on gamma-Al2O3: understanding its structure, initiation,and reactivity in olefin metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh, Alain; Joubert, Jerome; Baudouin, Anne; Lukens, Wayne; Delbecq, Francoise; Sautet, Philippe; Basset, Jean Marie; Coperet,Christophe

    2007-01-20

    Me-ReO3 on gamma-alumina: understanding the structure, theinitiation and thereactivity of a highly active olefin metathesiscatalyst Heterolytic splitting of the C-H bond of the methyl group ofCH3ReO3 on AlsO reactive sites of alumina as a way to generate the activesite of CH3ReO3 supported on gamma-Al203.

  10. Influence of osmolytes on protein and water structure: a step to understanding the mechanism of protein stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruździak, Piotr; Panuszko, Aneta; Stangret, Janusz

    2013-10-03

    Results concerning the thermostability of hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solutions with stabilizing osmolytes, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine (Gly), and its N-methyl derivatives, N-methylglycine (NMG), N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), and N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine, TMG), have been presented. The combination of spectroscopic (IR) and calorimetric (DSC) data allowed us to establish a link between osmolytes' influence on water structure and their ability to thermally stabilize protein molecule. Structural and energetic characteristics of stabilizing osmolytes' and lysozyme's hydration water appear to be very similar. The osmolytes increase lysozyme stabilization in the order bulk water molecules affected by osmolytes in their surrounding. Obtained results verified the hypothesis concerning the role of water molecules in protein stabilization, explained the osmophobic effect, and finally helped to bring us nearer to the exact mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes.

  11. Understanding the evolutionary structural variability and target specificity of tick salivary Kunitz peptides using next generation transcriptome data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Kopecký, Jan; Valdés, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, JAN 2014 (2014), s. 4 ISSN 1471-2148 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP302/11/P798; GA MŠk LH12002; GA ČR GAP302/12/2208; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Red Queen hypothesis * tick saliva * Kunitz-domain proteins * cysteine motif * structural bioinformatics Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2014

  12. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase–Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Arun John; Vetrivel Umashankar; A. Samdani; Manoharan Sangeetha; Subramanian Krishnakumar; Perinkulam Ravi Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as ?-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, ?-ketoac...

  13. Progress in Understanding the Impacts of 3-D Cloud Structure on MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Werner, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Andrew; DiGirolamo, Larry; Meyer, Kerry; Marshak, Alexander; Wind, Galina; Zhao, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Theory: A novel framework based on 2-D Tayler expansion for quantifying the uncertainty in MODIS retrievals caused by sub-pixel reflectance inhomogeneity. (Zhang et al. 2016). How cloud vertical structure influences MODIS LWP retrievals. (Miller et al. 2016). Observation: Analysis of failed MODIS cloud property retrievals. (Cho et al. 2015). Cloud property retrievals from 15m resolution ASTER observations. (Werner et al. 2016). Modeling: LES-Satellite observation simulator (Zhang et al. 2012, Miller et al. 2016).

  14. Toward understanding phosphoseryl-tRNACys formation: the crystal structure of Methanococcus maripaludis phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtekar, Satwik; Hohn, Michael J; Park, Hee-Sung; Schnitzbauer, Michael; Sauerwald, Anselm; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A

    2007-02-20

    A number of archaeal organisms generate Cys-tRNA(Cys) in a two-step pathway, first charging phosphoserine (Sep) onto tRNA(Cys) and subsequently converting it to Cys-tRNA(Cys). We have determined, at 3.2-A resolution, the structure of the Methanococcus maripaludis phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase (SepRS), which catalyzes the first step of this pathway. The structure shows that SepRS is a class II, alpha(4) synthetase whose quaternary structure arrangement of subunits closely resembles that of the heterotetrameric (alphabeta)(2) phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Homology modeling of a tRNA complex indicates that, in contrast to PheRS, a single monomer in the SepRS tetramer may recognize both the acceptor terminus and anticodon of a tRNA substrate. Using a complex with tungstate as a marker for the position of the phosphate moiety of Sep, we suggest that SepRS and PheRS bind their respective amino acid substrates in dissimilar orientations by using different residues.

  15. Toward Understanding Phosphoseryl-tRNA Cys Formation: The Crystal Structure of Methanococcus maripaludis Phosphoseryl-tRNA Synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamtekar ,S.; Hohn, M.; Park, h.; Schnitzbauer, M.; Sauerwald, A.; Soll, D.; Steitz, T.

    2007-01-01

    A number of archaeal organisms generate Cys-tRNA{sup Cys} in a two-step pathway, first charging phosphoserine (Sep) onto tRNA{sup Cys} and subsequently converting it to Cys-tRNA{sup Cys}. We have determined, at 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, the structure of the Methanococcus maripaludis phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase (SepRS), which catalyzes the first step of this pathway. The structure shows that SepRS is a class II, {alpha}{sub 4} synthetase whose quaternary structure arrangement of subunits closely resembles that of the heterotetrameric ({alpha}{beta}){sub 2} phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Homology modeling of a tRNA complex indicates that, in contrast to PheRS, a single monomer in the SepRS tetramer may recognize both the acceptor terminus and anticodon of a tRNA substrate. Using a complex with tungstate as a marker for the position of the phosphate moiety of Sep, we suggest that SepRS and PheRS bind their respective amino acid substrates in dissimilar orientations by using different residues.

  16. WHAT DO WE UNDERSTAND FROM THE TERMS DEEP STRUCTURE AND SURFACE STRUCTURE? DERİN YAPI VE YÜZEY YAPI KAVRAMLARINDAN NE ANLIYORUZ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerim DEMİRCİ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory developed mostly by Port Royal school in the 17th century and later on formulated by Noam Chomsky, each sentence in a language has two levels of representation: a deep structure and a surface structure. The deep or underlying structure represents the semantic foundations of a sentence. Meanwhile the surface structure is the actual form of a sentence which essentially occurs in speech (the phonetic form or writing. While the speaker or the writer is on the side of deep structure as he/she is the one supposed to know the semantic layer of the sentence, the listener or the reader is passively exposed to the surface structure of a sentence. The surface structure of a sentence may have empty categories and traces that are normally full and existing in the deep layer of representation. In this study we will examine the language-internal and cross-linguistic versions of deep and surface structures. Başlangıçta 17. yüzyılda Port Royal Okulu tarafından ortaya atılan sonra Noam Chomsky tarafından formüle edilen teoriye göre her cümlenin derin yapı ve yüzey yapı olmak üzere iki katmanı vardır. Derin yapı adı verilen katman cümlenin anlambilimsel temelini oluşturur. Öte yandan yüzey yapı ise özellikle cümlenin en son söylenmiş veya yazılmış halini, yani gerçekte üretilmiş biçimini temsil eder. Cümlenin anlamına vakıf olan konuşur veya yazar dilbilimsel olarak derin yapı tarafında iken, dinleyici veya okuyucu yüzey yapı tarafındadır zira dinleyici veya okuyucu cümleye maruz kalan taraftır. Bir cümlenin yüzey yapısı boşluklarla ve izlerle dolu iken derin yapısı doluluk ve tamlık arz eder. Bu çalışmada derin ve yüzey yapı kavramlarının hem dil içi hem de diller arası türleri incelenecektir.

  17. Influence of riparian vegetation on near-bank flow structure and erosion rates on a large meandering river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsoer, K. M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Langendoen, E. J.; Johnson, K.; Ursic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rates of meander migration are dependent upon dynamic interactions between planform geometry, three-dimensional flow structure, sediment transport, and the erodibility and geotechnical properties of the channel banks and floodplains. Riparian vegetation can greatly reduce the rate of migration through root-reinforcement and increased flow resistance near the bank. In particular, forested riverbanks can also provide large woody debris (LWD) to the channel, and if located near the outer bank, can act to amour the bank by disrupting three-dimensional flow patterns and redirecting flow away from the bank-toe, the locus of erosion in meandering rivers. In this paper, three-dimensional flow patterns and migration rates are compared for two meander bends, one forested and one non-forested, on the Wabash River, near Grayville, Illinois. Flow data were obtained using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for two large flow events in May and June 2011. LWD was mapped using a terrestrial LiDAR survey, and residence times for the LWD were estimated by comparing the survey data to time-series aerial photography. Rates of migration and planform evolution were determined through time-series analysis of aerial photography from 1938-2011. Results from this study show that near-bank LWD can have a significant influence on flow patterns through a meander bend and can disrupt helical flow near the outer bank, thereby reducing the effect of the high velocity core on the toe of the bank. Additionally, these effects influence migration rates and the planform evolution of meandering rivers.

  18. Nonperturbative multiphoton detachment rates of H{sup -} and their relation to the electronic structure of the initial state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A. [Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens (Greece); Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation 48, Vas. Constantinou Ave., 116/35 Athens (Greece). E-mail: can at eie.gr; Haritos, Costas [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation 48, Vas. Constantinou Ave., 116/35 Athens (Greece); Mercouris, Theodorus [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation 48, Vas. Constantinou Ave., 116/35 Athens (Greece). E-mail: thmerc at eie.gr

    2000-07-28

    By implementing the many-electron, many-photon theory, a series of ab initio nonperturbative calculations have produced multiphoton electron detachment rates (MPEDRs) for H{sup -} interacting with linearly polarized light of frequency in the range 0.136-0.326 eV and intensity in the range 2.5x10{sup 10}-10x10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}. For these laser parameters, detachment takes place by three, four, five, six and seven photons. For detachment by four and six photons, the rate exhibits structure which is due to field-induced interference between the {sup 1}S and the {sup 1}D channels. Analysis of the relation between the MPEDRs and initial state electronic structure reveals the type and the degree of direct and indirect self-consistent influence of radial and angular correlation at the configurational and at the orbital level. It is shown that the magnitude of the MPEDRs is proportional to the magnitude of the 1s orbital for large values of the coordinate r. By using a numerical multiconfigurational Hartee-Fock (MCHF) wavefunction with only the 1s{sup 2}, 2s{sup 2} and 2p{sup 2} configurations, the large-r behaviour of the 1s orbital is already very close to that determined from the use of a ten-term MCHF wavefunction, which we believe is sufficient to secure accurate results. (author)

  19. Reaction Rates in Chemically Heterogeneous Rock: Coupled Impact of Structure and Flow Properties Studied by X-ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khulaifi, Yousef; Lin, Qingyang; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2017-04-04

    We study dissolution in a chemically heterogeneous medium consisting of two minerals with contrasting initial structure and transport properties. We perform a reactive transport experiment using CO 2 -saturated brine at reservoir conditions in a millimeter-scale composite core composed of Silurian dolomite and Ketton limestone (calcite) arranged in series. We repeatedly image the composite core using X-ray microtomography (XMT) and collect effluent to assess the individual mineral dissolution. The mineral dissolution from image analysis was comparable to that measured from effluent analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We find that the ratio of the effective reaction rate of calcite to that of dolomite decreases with time, indicating the influence of dynamic transport effects originating from changes in pore structure coupled with differences in intrinsic reaction rates. Moreover, evolving flow and transport heterogeneity in the initially heterogeneous dolomite is a key determinant in producing a two-stage dissolution in the calcite. The first stage is characterized by a uniform dissolution of the pore space, while the second stage follows a single-channel growth regime. This implies that spatial memory effects in the medium with a heterogeneous flow characteristic (dolomite) can change the dissolution patterns in the medium with a homogeneous flow characteristic (calcite).

  20. Toward Understanding the 3D Structure and Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes in an Extremely Long Duration Eruptive Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we analyze the initial eruptive process of an extremely long duration C7.7-class flare that occurred on 2011 June 21. The flare had a 2 hr long rise time in soft X-ray emission, which is much longer than the rise time of most solar flares, including both impulsive and gradual ones. Combining the facts that the flare occurred near the disk center as seen by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) but near the limb as seen by two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft, we are able to track the evolution of the eruption in 3D in a rare slow-motion manner. The time sequence of the observed large-scale EUV hot channel structure in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) high-temperature passbands of 94 and 131 Å clearly shows the process of how the sigmoid structure prior to the eruption was transformed into a near-potential post-eruption loop arcade. We believe that the observed sigmoid represents the structure of a twisted magnetic flux rope (MFR), which has reached a height of about 60 Mm at the onset of the eruption. We argue that the onset of the flare precursor phase is likely triggered by the loss of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of a preexisting MFR, which leads to the slow rise of the flux rope. The rising motion of the flux rope leads to the formation of a vertical current sheet underneath, triggering the fast magnetic reconnection that in turn leads to the main phase of the flare and fast acceleration of the flux rope.

  1. A contribution to better understanding of structural characteristics and tectonic phases of the Boč region, Periadriatic Fault Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Žibret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine properties of the tectonic contact between Permian/Mesozoic limestones and less competent Miocene clastites on the northeastern foothill of the Boč Mt. Because fault planes signifiantly mark the relief, this contact was studied by a detailed structural mapping, which showed that the Boč Mt. is limited by subvertical faults in its northeastern part. To ensure that mapped subvertical contact is compatible with regional geodynamics of the area, additionally paleostress analysis of fault-slip data was performed. Four individual paleostress tensor groups were documented in a wider Boč area and compared by published structural data from the border zone between Alps, Dinarides and Pannonian Basin. The oldest paleostress tensor group (Phase 1 is likely of Lower and Middle Miocene age and indicates SW-NE extension accommodated by W-E to WNW-ESE striking normal faults. Phase 2 can be correlated with Middle to Late Miocene NW-SE to WNWESE directed extension accommodated by NNE-SSW striking normal faults. Phase 3 is correlated with Late Miocene W-E directed contraction accommodated by N-S striking sinistral faults and NNE-SSW to NE-SW striking dextral faults. The youngest paleostress tensor group (Phase 4 fis well with Pliocene to Quaternary NNW-SSE to N-S directed contraction accommodated by NW-SE to W-E striking dextral faults and NE-SW striking reverse faults. Since the documented paleostress phases fis well with the geodynamic processes of the Alps-Dinarides-Carpathians territory the subvertical border in the northeastern part of Boč Mt. seems to be an acceptable structural solution. The study is important because the study area is located at interaction zone between two major Alpine fault systems: the Periadriatic and the Lavanttal faults.

  2. The architecture of visual narrative comprehension: the interaction of narrative structure and page layout in understanding comics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Neil

    2014-01-01

    How do people make sense of the sequential images in visual narratives like comics? A growing literature of recent research has suggested that this comprehension involves the interaction of multiple systems: The creation of meaning across sequential images relies on a "narrative grammar" that packages conceptual information into categorical roles organized in hierarchic constituents. These images are encapsulated into panels arranged in the layout of a physical page. Finally, how panels frame information can impact both the narrative structure and page layout. Altogether, these systems operate in parallel to construct the Gestalt whole of comprehension of this visual language found in comics.

  3. Understanding Associations between Information Seeking and Scanning and Health Risk Behaviors: An Early Test of the Structural Influence Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigsby, Elisabeth; Hovick, Shelly R

    2018-03-01

    This study examined proposed direct and mediating relationships in the Structural Influence Model (SIM) of Communication within the chronic disease context. Using data from the Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (N = 14,472), we tested the potential mediating roles of information seeking, information scanning, and social capital between social determinants of health and four chronic disease risk behaviors: exercise level, fruit and vegetable intake, cigarette smoking, and excessive alcohol use. Information seeking, information scanning, and social capital received support as potential mediators. Our results are largely consistent with predictions of the SIM and highlight the important role of communication in reducing health risks and increasing healthy behaviors.

  4. The architecture of visual narrative comprehension: The interaction of narrative structure and page layout in understanding comics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eCohn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How do people make sense of the sequential images in visual narratives like comics? A growing literature of recent research has suggested that this comprehension involves the interaction of multiple systems: The creation of meaning across sequential images relies on a narrative grammar that packages conceptual information into categorical roles organized in hierarchic constituents. These images units are encapsulated into panels arranged in the layout of a physical page. Finally, how panels frame information can impact both the narrative structure and page layout. Altogether, these systems operate in parallel to construct the gestalt whole of comprehension of this visual language found in comics.

  5. A comparative study of the biomass properties of Erianthus and sugarcane: lignocellulose structure, alkaline delignification rate, and enzymatic saccharification efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takuji; Yamamura, Masaomi; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Kojima, Miho; Takabe, Keiji; Terajima, Yoshifumi; Mihashi, Asako; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Umezawa, Toshiaki

    2018-03-20

    A comprehensive understanding of the structure and properties of gramineous lignocelluloses is needed to facilitate their uses in biorefinery. In this study, lignocelluloses from fractionated internode tissues of two taxonomically close species, Erianthus arundinaceus and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.), were characterized. Our analyses determined that syringyl (S) lignins were predominant over guaiacyl (G) or p-hydroxyphenyl (H) lignins in sugarcane tissues; on the other hand, S lignin levels were similar to those of G lignin in Erianthus tissues. In addition, tricin units were detected in sugarcane tissues, but not in Erianthus tissues. Distributions of lignin inter-monomeric linkage types were also different in Erianthus and sugarcane tissues. Alkaline treatment removed lignins from sugarcane tissues more efficiently than Erianthus tissues, resulting in a higher enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane tissues compared with Erianthus tissues. Our data indicate that Erianthus biomass displayed resistance to alkaline delignification and enzymatic digestion.

  6. A Better Understanding of Protein Structure and Function by the Synthesis and Incorporation of Selenium- and Tellurium Containing Tryptophan Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmey, Sherif Samir [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Belmont Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Rice, Ambrose Eugene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Belmont Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Hatch, Duane Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Belmont Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Silks, Louis A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division

    2016-08-17

    Unnatural heavy metal-containing amino acid analogs have shown to be very important in the analysis of protein structure, using methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis and incorporation of selenium-containing methionine analogs has already been shown in the literature however with some drawbacks due to toxicity to host organisms. Thus synthesis of heavy metal tryptophan analogs should prove to be more effective since the amino acid tryptophan is naturally less abundant in many proteins. For example, bioincorporation of β-seleno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([4,5]SeTrp) and β-selenolo[2,3-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([6,7]SeTrp) has been shown in the following proteins without structural or catalytic perturbations: human annexin V, barstar, and dihydrofolate reductase. The reported synthesis of these Se-containing analogs is currently not efficient for commercial purposes. Thus a more efficient, concise, high-yield synthesis of selenotryptophan, as well as the corresponding, tellurotryptophan, will be necessary for wide spread use of these unnatural amino acid analogs. This research will highlight our progress towards a synthetic route of both [6,7]SeTrp and [6,7]TeTrp, which ultimately will be used to study the effect on the catalytic activity of Lignin Peroxidase (LiP).

  7. Development of a novel starch with a three-dimensional ordered macroporous structure for improving the dissolution rate of felodipine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yanna; Wu, Chao, E-mail: wuchao27@126.com; Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Jie; Qiu, Yang; Jiang, Jie; Yu, Tong; Ma, Chunyu; Zhou, Buyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, silica nanospheres with different particle sizes were used as hard template for synthesis of a starch with a novel three-dimensional ordered macroporous structure (3DOMTS). As a pharmaceutical adjuvant, 3DOMTS was used to improve the dissolution rate and oral relative bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Felodipine (FDP) was chosen as a model drug and was loaded into the 3DOMTS by solvent evaporation. FDP loading into 3DOMTS with different pore sizes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), powder X-ray diffractometer (PXRD) and Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR). The results obtained showed that FDP was present in the pores in an amorphic or microcrystalline state. The in vitro dissolution results showed that 3DOMTS could effectively improve the dissolution rate of FDP in comparison with commercial common tablets. Pharmacokinetic results indicated that the oral relative bioavailability of self-made FDP–3DOMTS tablets were 184%, showing that 3DOMTS produced a significantly increased oral absorption of FDP. In conclusion, 3DOMTS exhibits the dual potential of improving the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs and the novel filler produced by direct compression technology confirming that 3DOMTS will be useful for many applications in the field of pharmaceutics. - Highlights: • We successfully prepared a starch with a novel three-dimensional ordered macroporous structure (3DOMTS). • 3DOMTS can suppress the crystallinity of the drug to maintain it at amorphous state. • In vivo and in vitro experiments proved that 3DOMTS can improve the solubility and bioavailability of felodipine.

  8. Oil prices, inflation and interest rates in a structural cointegrated VAR model for the G-7 countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cologni, Alessandro; Manera, Matteo

    2008-01-01

    Sharp increases in the price of oil are generally seen as a major contributor to business cycle asymmetries. Moreover, the very recent highs registered in the world oil market are causing concern about possible slowdowns in the economic performance of the most developed countries. In this paper a structural cointegrated VAR model has been considered for the G-7 countries in order to study the direct effects of oil price shocks on output and prices, and the reaction of monetary variables to external shocks. Our results can be summarized as follows: i) a stationary money demand, as suggested by the classic theory of money, can be identified for most countries; ii) according to the estimated coefficients of the structural part of the model, for all countries except Japan and U.K. the null hypothesis of an influence of oil prices on the inflation rate cannot be rejected. Inflation rate shocks are transmitted to the real economy by increasing interest rates; iii) impulse response analysis suggests, for most countries, the existence of an instantaneous, temporary effect of oil price innovations on prices; iv) impulse response functions indicate different monetary policy reactions to inflationary and growth shocks; v) the simulation exercises directed to estimate the total impact of the 1990 oil price shock indicate that for some countries (U.S.) a significant part of the effects of the oil price shock is due to the monetary policy reaction function. For other countries (Canada, France and Italy), however, the total impact is offset, at least in part, by an easing of monetary conditions. (author)

  9. The effects of disordered structure on the solubility and dissolution rates of some hydrophilic, sparingly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, M; Sebhatu, T; Nyström, C

    1999-01-15

    The effects of experimental design on the apparent solubility of two sparingly soluble hydrophilic compounds (barium sulphate and calcium carbonate) were studied in this paper. The apparent solubility appeared to be primarily dependent on the amount of solute added to the solvent in each experiment, increasing with increased amounts. This effect seems to be due to the existence of a peripheral disordered layer. However physico-chemical methods used in the present study were not able to unambiguously verify the existence of any disorder in the solid state structure of the drugs. At higher proportions of solute to solvent, the solubility reached a plateau corresponding to the solubility of the disordered or amorphous molecular form of the material. Milling the powders caused the plateau to be reached at lower proportions of solute to solvent, since this further disordered the surface of the drug particles. It was also found that the apparent solubility of the drugs tested decreased after storage at high relative humidities. A model for describing the effects of a disordered surface layer of varying thickness and continuity on the solubility of a substance is presented. This model may be used as a method for detection of minute amount of disorder, where no other technique is capable of detecting the disordered structure. It is suggested that recrystallisation of the material occurs via slow solid-state transition at the surface of the drug particle; this would slowly reduce the apparent solubility of the substance at the plateau level to the thermodynamically stable value. A biphasic dissolution rate profile was obtained. The solubility of the disordered surface of the particles appeared to be the rate-determining factor during the initial dissolution phase, while the solubility of the crystalline core was the rate-determining factor during the final slower phase.

  10. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Miconi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space. Several existing models of attention suggest that these effects arise from selective modulation of neural inputs. However, anatomical and physiological observations suggest that attentional modulation targets higher levels of the visual system (such as V4 or MT rather than input areas (such as V1. Here we propose a simple mechanism that explains how a top-down attentional modulation, falling on higher visual areas, can produce the observed effects of attention on neural responses. Our model requires only the existence of modulatory feedback connections between areas, and short-range lateral inhibition within each area. Feedback connections redistribute the top-down modulation to lower areas, which in turn alters the inputs of other higher-area cells, including those that did not receive the initial modulation. This produces firing rate modulations and receptive field shifts. Simultaneously, short-range lateral inhibition between neighboring cells produce competitive effects that are automatically scaled to receptive field size in any given area. Our model reproduces the observed attentional effects on response rates (response gain, input gain, biased competition automatically scaled to receptive field size and receptive field structure (shifts and resizing of receptive fields both spatially and in complex feature space, without modifying model parameters. Our model also makes the novel prediction that attentional effects on response curves should shift from response gain to contrast gain as the spatial focus of attention drifts away from the studied cell.

  11. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miconi, Thomas; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-02-01

    Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space. Several existing models of attention suggest that these effects arise from selective modulation of neural inputs. However, anatomical and physiological observations suggest that attentional modulation targets higher levels of the visual system (such as V4 or MT) rather than input areas (such as V1). Here we propose a simple mechanism that explains how a top-down attentional modulation, falling on higher visual areas, can produce the observed effects of attention on neural responses. Our model requires only the existence of modulatory feedback connections between areas, and short-range lateral inhibition within each area. Feedback connections redistribute the top-down modulation to lower areas, which in turn alters the inputs of other higher-area cells, including those that did not receive the initial modulation. This produces firing rate modulations and receptive field shifts. Simultaneously, short-range lateral inhibition between neighboring cells produce competitive effects that are automatically scaled to receptive field size in any given area. Our model reproduces the observed attentional effects on response rates (response gain, input gain, biased competition automatically scaled to receptive field size) and receptive field structure (shifts and resizing of receptive fields both spatially and in complex feature space), without modifying model parameters. Our model also makes the novel prediction that attentional effects on response curves should shift from response gain to contrast gain as the spatial focus of attention drifts away from the studied cell.

  12. Influence of changing particle structure on the rate of gas-solid gasification reactions. Final report, July 1981-March 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-04

    The objetive of this work is to determine the changes in the particle structure of coal as it undergoes the carbon/carbon dioxide reaction (C + CO/sub 2/ ..-->.. 2CO). Char was produced by heating the coal at a rate of 25/sup 0/C/min to the reaction temperatures of 800/sup 0/C, 900/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/C and 1100/sup 0/C. The changes in surface area and effective diffusivity as a result of devolitization were determined. Changes in effective diffusivity and surface area as a function of conversion have been measured for reactions conducted at 800, 900, 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C for Wyodak coal char. The surface areas exhibit a maximum as a function of conversion in all cases. For the reaction at 1000/sup 0/C the maximum in surface area is greater than the maxima determined at all other reaction temperatures. Thermogravimetric rate data were obtained for five coal chars; Wyodak, Wilcox, Cimmeron, Illinois number 6 and Pittsburgh number 6 over the temperature range 800-1100/sup 0/C. All coal chars exhibit a maximum in reaction rate. Five different models for gas-solid reactions were evaluated. The Bhatia/Perlmutter model seems to best represent the data. 129 references, 67 figures, 37 tables.

  13. Heart beats rate indicators and structure of elite football referees’ and their assistants’ motor functioning in competition period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Chopilko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze structure of motor functioning and heart beats rate indicators in elite football referees’ and their assistants’ competition activity. Material: in the research 15 referees and referees’ assistants of Ukrainian Prime League, 30 referees and referees’ assistants of first and second professional leagues of Ukraine participated. Observations over referees’ movements in 21 professional matches of Ukrainian professional leagues were fulfilled. Distance, passed by a referee in one match was determined. Results: It was found that during one match referee (depending on his functions - referee or referee’s assistant passes distance from 6000 to 12 000 meters. This scope of motor functioning depends also on motor activity of players and qualification level of teams-participants in the match. Motor actions of referees’ assistants change every 5 seconds during a match. During one match referee’s assistants fulfill about 20 sprints and 74 accelerations. A high temp of match total distance makes 1.2 km. Conclusions: Referees’ and referee assistants’ motor functioning and heart beats rate indicators can vary from aerobic-restoration to anaerobic-glycolytic zone. This fact shall be considered when planning program on special physical training. It should be noted that with heart beats rate of more than 180 bpm concentration of attention significantly weakens as well as ability to take prompt and correct decisions. In such cases probability of mistakes significantly increases.

  14. The Term Structure of Interest Rates and its Impact on the Liability Adequacy Test for Insurance Companies in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Aurelio Duarte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian regulation for applying the Liability Adequacy Test (LAT to technical provisions in insurance companies requires that the current estimate is discounted by a term structure of interest rates (hereafter TSIR. This article aims to analyze the LAT results, derived from the use of various models to build the TSIR: the cubic spline interpolation technique, Svensson's model (adopted by the regulator and Vasicek's model. In order to achieve the objective proposed, the exchange rates of BM&FBOVESPA trading days were used to model the ETTJ and, consequently, to discount the cash flow of the insurance company. The results indicate that: (i LAT is sensitive to the choice of the model used to build the TSIR; (ii this sensitivity increases with cash flow longevity; (iii the adoption of an ultimate forward rate (UFR for the Brazilian insurance market should be evaluated by the regulator, in order to stabilize the trajectory of the yield curve at longer maturities. The technical provision is among the main solvency items of insurance companies and the LAT result is a significant indicator of the quality of this provision, as this evaluates its sufficiency or insufficiency. Thus, this article bridges a gap in the Brazilian actuarial literature, introducing the main methodologies available for modeling the yield curve and a practical application to analyze the impact of its choice on LAT.

  15. Understanding how lake populations of arctic char are structured and function with special consideration of the potential effects of climate change: a multi-faceted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budy, Phaedra; Luecke, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Size dimorphism in fish populations, both its causes and consequences, has been an area of considerable focus; however, uncertainty remains whether size dimorphism is dynamic or stabilizing and about the role of exogenous factors. Here, we explored patterns among empirical vital rates, population structure, abundance and trend, and predicted the effects of climate change on populations of arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) in two lakes. Both populations cycle dramatically between dominance by small (≤300 mm) and large (>300 mm) char. Apparent survival (Φ) and specific growth rates (SGR) were relatively high (40-96%; SGR range 0.03-1.5%) and comparable to those of conspecifics at lower latitudes. Climate change scenarios mimicked observed patterns of warming and resulted in temperatures closer to optimal for char growth (15.15 °C) and a longer growing season. An increase in consumption rates (28-34%) under climate change scenarios led to much greater growth rates (23-34%). Higher growth rates predicted under climate change resulted in an even greater predicted amplitude of cycles in population structure as well as an increase in reproductive output (Ro) and decrease in generation time (Go). Collectively, these results indicate arctic char populations (not just individuals) are extremely sensitive to small changes in the number of ice-free days. We hypothesize years with a longer growing season, predicted to occur more often under climate change, produce elevated growth rates of small char and act in a manner similar to a "resource pulse," allowing a sub-set of small char to "break through," thus setting the cycle in population structure.

  16. Understanding the Patterns and Causes of Variability in Distribution, Habitat Use, Abundance, Survival and Reproductive Rates of Three Species of Cetacean in the Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    covers 18 years. Data on human activities (e.g. fisheries, maritime traffic) are also needed to explore how they interact with the environmental...the presence of an immigrant group that interacted during 3 years with the local bottlenose dolphins of Almería. 5.1.3 Reproductive rates The...in relation to variation in the physical and biological environment and human activities, based on 18 years of data. The study species, bottlenose

  17. Tenax TA extraction to understand the rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Teng, Ying; Christie, Peter; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of many bioremediation systems for PAH-contaminated soil may be constrained by low contaminant bioaccessibility due to limited aqueous solubility or large sorption capacity. Information on the extent to which PAHs can be readily biodegraded is of vital importance in the decision whether or not to remediate a contaminated soil. In the present study the rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD)-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil were evaluated. MCD amendment at 10 % (w/w) combined with inoculation with the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 produced maximum removal of total PAHs of up to 35 %. The desorption of PAHs from contaminated soil was determined before and after 32 weeks of bioremediation. 10 % (w/w) MCD amendment (M2) increased the Tenax extraction of total PAHs from 12 to 30 % and promoted degradation by up to 26 % compared to 6 % in the control. However, the percentage of Tenax extraction for total PAHs was much larger than that of degradation. Thus, in the control and M2 treatment it is likely that during the initial phase the bioaccessibility of PAHs is high and biodegradation rates may be limited by microbial processes. On the other hand, when the soil was inoculated with the PAH-degrading bacterium (CKB and MB2), the slowly and very slowly desorbing fractions (F sl and F vl ) became larger and the rate constants of slow and very slow desorption (k sl and k vl ) became extremely small after bioremediation, suggesting that desorption is likely rate limiting during the second, slow phase of biotransformation. These results have practical implications for site risk assessment and cleanup strategies.

  18. Making meaningful improvements to direct care worker training through informed policy: Understanding how care setting structure and culture matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, M Elizabeth; Mabry, J Beth

    2017-01-01

    Well-intentioned policy governing the training of direct care workers (DCWs) who serve older persons, in practice, may become merely a compliance issue for organizations rather than a meaningful way to improve quality of care. This study investigates the relationships between best practices in DCW training and the structure and culture of long term support service (LTSS) organizations. Using a mixed-methods approach to analyzing data from 328 licensed LTSS organizations in Pennsylvania, the findings suggest that public policy should address methods of training, not just content, and consider organizational variations in size, training evaluation practices, DCW integration, and DCW input into care planning. Effective training also incorporates support for organizations and supervisors as key aspects of DCWs' learning and working environment.

  19. Taking the ruler to the jungle: single-molecule FRET for understanding biomolecular structure and dynamics in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustarsic, Marko; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2015-10-01

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) serves as a molecular ruler that is ideally posed to study static and dynamic heterogeneity in living cells. Observing smFRET in cells requires appropriately integrated labeling, internalization and imaging strategies, and significant progress has been made towards that goal. Pioneering studies have demonstrated smFRET detection in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, using both wide-field and confocal microscopies, and have started to answer exciting biological questions. We anticipate that future technical developments will open the door to smFRET for the study of structure, conformational changes and kinetics of biomolecules in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro.

  1. A method to quantify quinone reaction rates with wine relevant nucleophiles: a key to the understanding of oxidative loss of varietal thiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2012-08-29

    Quinones are key reactive electrophilic oxidation intermediates in wine. To address this question, the model 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone was prepared to study how it reacts with wine nucleophiles. Those investigated included the varietal volatile thiols 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (4MSP), 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SH), and 2-furanmethanethiol (2FMT); hydrogen sulfide (H2S); glutathione (GSH); sulfur dioxide; ascorbic acid (AA); and the amino acids methionine (Met) and phenylalanine (Phe) in the first kinetic study of these reactions. Products were observed in fair to quantitative yields, but yields were negligible for the amino acids. The reaction rates of 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone toward the nucleophiles were quantified by UV-vis spectrometry monitoring the loss of the quinone chromophore. The observed reaction rates spanned three orders of magnitude, from the unreactive amino acids (Met and Phe) (KNu = 0.0002 s(-1)) to the most reactive nucleophile, hydrogen sulfide (KH2S = 0.4188 s(-1)). Analysis of the kinetic data showed three categories. The first group consisted of the amino acids (Met and Phe) having rates of essentially zero. Next, phloroglucinol has a low rate (KPhl = 0.0064 s(-1)). The next group of compounds includes the volatile thiols having increasing reactions rates K as steric inhibition declined (K4MSP = 0.0060 s(-1), K3SH = 0.0578 s(-1), and K2FMT = 0.0837 s(-1)). These volatile thiols (4MSP, 3SH, 2FMT), important for varietal aromas, showed lower K values than those of the third group, the wine antioxidant compounds (SO2, GSH, AA) and H2S (KNu = 0.3343-0.4188 s(-1)). The characterization of the reaction products between the nucleophiles and 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone was performed by using HPLC with high-resolution MS analysis. This study presents the first evidence that the antioxidant compounds, H2S, and wine flavanols could react preferentially with oxidation-induced quinones under specific conditions, providing insight into a mechanism for

  2. Probing and improving student's understanding of protein α-helix structure using targeted assessment and classroom interventions in collaboration with a faculty community of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Villafañe, Sachel M; Lewis, Jennifer E; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of concept inventories and other assessment tools in the molecular life sciences provides instructors with myriad avenues to probe student understanding. For example, although molecular visualization is central to the study of biochemistry, a growing body of evidence suggests that students have substantial limitations in their ability to recognize and interpret basic features of biological macromolecules. In this study, a pre/posttest administered to students at diverse institutions nationwide revealed a robust incorrect idea about the location of the amino acid side chains in the protein α-helix structure. Because this incorrect idea was present even after a semester of biochemistry instruction at a range of institutions, an intervention was necessary. A community of expert biochemistry instructors collaborated to design two active learning classroom activities that systematically examine α-helix structure and function. Several participating faculty used one or both of the activities in their classrooms and some improvement of student understanding of this concept was observed. This study provides a model of how a community of instructors can work together using assessment data to inform targeted changes in instruction with the goal of improving student understanding of fundamental concepts. Copyright © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Understanding the implementation and adoption of an information technology intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care: qualitative study using strong structuration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Mark; Phipps, Denham; Howard, Rachel L; Avery, Anthony; Rodgers, Sarah; Ashcroft, Darren

    2017-05-10

    Using strong structuration theory, we aimed to understand the adoption and implementation of an electronic clinical audit and feedback tool to support medicine optimisation for patients in primary care. This is a qualitative study informed by strong structuration theory. The analysis was thematic, using a template approach. An a priori set of thematic codes, based on strong structuration theory, was developed from the literature and applied to the transcripts. The coding template was then modified through successive readings of the data. Clinical commissioning group in the south of England. Four focus groups and five semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 participants purposively sampled from a range of stakeholder groups (general practitioners, pharmacists, patients and commissioners). Using the system could lead to improved medication safety, but use was determined by broad institutional contexts; by the perceptions, dispositions and skills of users; and by the structures embedded within the technology. These included perceptions of the system as new and requiring technical competence and skill; the adoption of the system for information gathering; and interactions and relationships that involved individual, shared or collective use. The dynamics between these external, internal and technological structures affected the adoption and implementation of the system. Successful implementation of information technology interventions for medicine optimisation will depend on a combination of the infrastructure within primary care, social structures embedded in the technology and the conventions, norms and dispositions of those utilising it. Future interventions, using electronic audit and feedback tools to improve medication safety, should consider the complexity of the social and organisational contexts and how internal and external structures can affect the use of the technology in order to support effective implementation. © Article author(s) (or their

  4. Using Paired In Situ High Frequency Nitrate Measurements to Better Understand Controls on Nitrate Concentrations and Estimate Nitrification Rates in a Wastewater-Impacted River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T. E. C.; O'Donnell, K.; Downing, B. D.; Burau, J. R.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2017-10-01

    We used paired continuous nitrate (NO3-) measurements along a tidally affected river receiving wastewater discharge rich in ammonium (NH4+) to quantify rates of change in NO3- concentration (RΔNO3) and estimate nitrification rates. NO3- sensors were deployed 30 km apart in the Sacramento River, California (USA), with the upstream station located immediately above the regional wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We used a travel time model to track water transit between the stations and estimated RΔNO3 every 15 min (October 2013 to September 2014). Changes in NO3- concentration were strongly related to water temperature. In the presence of wastewater, RΔNO3 was generally positive, ranging from about 7 µM d-1 in the summer to near zero in the winter. Numerous periods when the WWTP halted discharge allowed the RΔNO3 to be estimated under no-effluent conditions and revealed that in the absence of effluent, net gains in NO3- were substantially lower but still positive in the summer and negative (net sink) in the winter. Nitrification rates of effluent-derived NH4 (RNitrific_E) were estimated from the difference between RΔNO3 measured in the presence versus absence of effluent and ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 µM d-1, which is within literature values but tenfold greater than recently reported for this region. RNitrific_E was generally lower in winter (˜2 µM d-1) than summer (˜3 µM d-1). This in situ, high frequency approach provides advantages over traditional discrete sampling, incubation, and tracer methods and allows measurements to be made over broad areas for extended periods of time. Incorporating this approach into environmental monitoring programs can facilitate our ability to protect and manage aquatic systems.

  5. Using paired in situ high frequency nitrate measurements to better understand controls on nitrate concentrations and estimate nitrification rates in a wastewater-impacted river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Tamara; O'Donnell, Katy; Downing, Bryan D.; Burau, Jon R.; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2017-01-01

    We used paired continuous nitrate ( ) measurements along a tidally affected river receiving wastewater discharge rich in ammonium ( ) to quantify rates of change in  concentration ( ) and estimate nitrification rates.  sensors were deployed 30 km apart in the Sacramento River, California (USA), with the upstream station located immediately above the regional wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We used a travel time model to track water transit between the stations and estimated  every 15 min (October 2013 to September 2014). Changes in concentration were strongly related to water temperature. In the presence of wastewater, was generally positive, ranging from about 7 µM d−1 in the summer to near zero in the winter. Numerous periods when the WWTP halted discharge allowed the  to be estimated under no-effluent conditions and revealed that in the absence of effluent, net gains in  were substantially lower but still positive in the summer and negative (net sink) in the winter. Nitrification rates of effluent-derived NH4 ( ) were estimated from the difference between  measured in the presence versus absence of effluent and ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 µM d−1, which is within literature values but tenfold greater than recently reported for this region.  was generally lower in winter (∼2 µM d−1) than summer (∼3 µM d−1). This in situ, high frequency approach provides advantages over traditional discrete sampling, incubation, and tracer methods and allows measurements to be made over broad areas for extended periods of time. Incorporating this approach into environmental monitoring programs can facilitate our ability to protect and manage aquatic systems.

  6. Understanding the Relationships Between Lightning, Cloud Microphysics, and Airborne Radar-derived Storm Structure During Hurricane Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Brad; Fuelberg, Henry; Blakeslee, Richard; Mach, Douglas; Heymsfield, Andrew; Bansemer, Aaron; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone; Heymsfield, Gerald; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    This study explores relationships between lightning, cloud microphysics, and tropical cyclone (TC) storm structure in Hurricane Karl (16 September 2010) using data collected by the NASA DC-8 and Global Hawk (GH) aircraft during NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment. The research capitalizes on the unique opportunity provided by GRIP to synthesize multiple datasets from two aircraft and analyze the microphysical and kinematic properties of an electrified TC. Five coordinated flight legs through Karl by the DC-8 and GH are investigated, focusing on the inner-core region (within 50km of the storm center) where the lightning was concentrated and the aircraft were well coordinated. GRIP datasets are used to compare properties of electrified and nonelectrified inner-core regions that are related to the noninductive charging mechanism, which is widely accepted to explain the observed electric fields within thunderstorms. Three common characteristics of Karl's electrified regions are identified: 1) strong updrafts of 10-20ms21, 2) deep mixed-phase layers indicated by reflectivities.30 dBZ extending several kilometers above the freezing level, and 3) microphysical environments consisting of graupel, very small ice particles, and the inferred presence of supercooled water. These characteristics describe an environment favorable for in situ noninductive charging and, hence, TC electrification. The electrified regions in Karl's inner core are attributable to a microphysical environment that was conducive to electrification because of occasional, strong convective updrafts in the eyewall.

  7. Understanding the Influence of Psychological and Socioeconomic Factors on Diabetes Self-Care Using Structured Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J.; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Egede, Leonard E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and test latent variables of the social determinants of health that influence diabetes self-care. Methods 615 adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) identified the latent factors underlying socioeconomic determinants, psychosocial determinants, and self-care (diet, exercise, foot care, glucose testing, and medication adherence). Structured equation modeling (SEM) investigated the relationship between determinants and self-care. Results Latent variables were created for diabetes self-care, psychological distress, self-efficacy, social support and social status. The initial model (chi2(254)=388.04, pself-care. Social status was not significantly related to self-care (r=0.003, p=0.952). In the trimmed model (chi2(189)=211.40, p=0.126, RMSEA=0.01, CFI=0.99) lower psychological distress (r=-0.13, p=0.016), higher social support (r=0.15, p=0.007), and higher self-efficacy (r=0.47, pself-care. Conclusion Based on theoretical relationships, three latent factors that measure social determinants of health (psychological distress, social support and self-efficacy) are strongly associated with diabetes self-care. Practice Implications This suggests that social determinants should be taken into account when developing patient self-care goals. PMID:25455793

  8. On understanding the relationship between structure in the potential surface and observables in classical dynamics: A functional sensitivity analysis approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Rabitz, H.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between structure in the potential surface and classical mechanical observables is examined by means of functional sensitivity analysis. Functional sensitivities provide maps of the potential surface, highlighting those regions that play the greatest role in determining the behavior of observables. A set of differential equations for the sensitivities of the trajectory components are derived. These are then solved using a Green's function method. It is found that the sensitivities become singular at the trajectory turning points with the singularities going as eta -3 /sup // 2 , with eta being the distance from the nearest turning point. The sensitivities are zero outside of the energetically and dynamically allowed region of phase space. A second set of equations is derived from which the sensitivities of observables can be directly calculated. An adjoint Green's function technique is employed, providing an efficient method for numerically calculating these quantities. Sensitivity maps are presented for a simple collinear atom--diatom inelastic scattering problem and for two Henon--Heiles type Hamiltonians modeling

  9. Understanding the complex determinants of height and adiposity in disadvantaged daycare preschoolers in Salvador, NE Brazil through structural equation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Rebecca L; Williams, Sheila M; Costa-Ribeiro, Hugo; Mattos, Angela P; Barreto, Danile L; Houghton, Lisa A; Bailey, Karl B; Lander, Alastair G; Gibson, Rosalind S

    2015-10-23

    Earlier we reported on growth and adiposity in a cross-sectional study of disadvantaged Brazilian preschoolers. Here we extend the work on these children, using structural equation modelling (SEM) to gather information on the complex relationships between the variables influencing height and adiposity. We hope this information will help improve the design and effectiveness of future interventions for preschoolers. In 376 preschoolers aged 3-6 years attending seven philanthropic daycares in Salvador, we used SEM to examine direct and indirect relationships among biological (sex, ethnicity, birth order, maternal height and weight), socio-economic, micronutrient (haemoglobin, serum selenium and zinc), and environmental (helminths, de-worming) variables on height and adiposity, as reflected by Z-scores for height-for-age (HAZ) and body mass index (BMIZ). Of the children, 11 % had HAZ  1. Of their mothers, 8 % had short stature, and 50 % were overweight or obese. Based on standardized regression coefficients, significant direct effects (p children.

  10. Unique structure and regulation of the nematode detoxification gene regulator SKN-1: implications to understanding and controlling drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Keith P.; Leung, Chi K.; Miyamoto, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes parasitize an alarming number of people and agricultural animals globally and cause debilitating morbidity and mortality. Anthelmintics have been the primary tools used to control parasitic nematodes for the past several decades, but drug resistance is becoming a major obstacle. Xenobiotic detoxification pathways defend against drugs and other foreign chemicals in diverse organisms, and evidence is accumulating that they play a role in mediating resistance to anthelmintics in nematodes. Related anti-oxidation pathways may also provide filarial parasites protection against host free radical-mediated immune responses. Upstream regulatory pathways have received almost no attention in nematode parasites despite their potential to co-regulate multiple detoxification and anti-oxidation genes. The NRF2 transcription factor mediates inducible detoxification and anti-oxidation defenses in mammals and recent studies have demonstrated that it promotes multidrug resistance in some human tumors. Recent studies in the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have defined the homologous transcription factor SKN-1 as a master regulator of detoxification and anti-oxidation genes. Despite similar functions, SKN-1 and NRF2 have important differences in structure and regulatory pathways. Protein alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these differences are shared among many nematodes making SKN-1 a candidate for specifically targeting nematode detoxification and anti-oxidation. PMID:22656429

  11. Lagrangian Flow Network: a new tool to evaluate connectivity and understand the structural complexity of marine populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, V.; Dubois, M.; Ser-Giacomi, E.; Monroy, P.; Lopez, C.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the spatial structure and dynamics of marine populations is still a major challenge for ecologists. The necessity to manage marine resources from a large-scale perspective and considering the whole ecosystem is now recognized but the absence of appropriate tools to address these objectives limits the implementation of globally pertinent conservation planning. Inspired from Network Theory, we present a new methodological framework called Lagrangian Flow Network which allows a systematic characterization of multi-scale dispersal and connectivity of early life history stages of marine organisms. The network is constructed by subdividing the basin into an ensemble of equal-area subregions which are interconnected through the transport of propagules by ocean currents. The present version allows the identification of hydrodynamical provinces and the computation of various connectivity proxies measuring retention and exchange of larvae. Due to our spatial discretization and subsequent network representation, as well as our Lagrangian approach, further methodological improvements are handily accessible. These future developments include a parametrization of habitat patchiness, the implementation of realistic larval traits and the consideration of abiotic variables (e.g. temperature, salinity, planktonic resources...) and their effects on larval production and survival. While the model is potentially tunable to any species whose biological traits and ecological preferences are precisely known, it can also be used in a more generic configuration by efficient computing and analysis of a large number of experiments with relevant ecological parameters. It permits a better characterization of population connectivity at multiple scales and it informs its ecological and managerial interpretations.

  12. Application of 210Pb-derived sedimentation rates and dinoflagellate cyst analyses in understanding Pyrodinium bahamense harmful algal blooms in Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombrito, E Z; Bulos, A dM; Sta Maria, E J; Honrado, M C V; Azanza, Rhodora V; Furio, Elsa F

    2004-01-01

    The number of areas affected by toxic harmful algal bloom (HAB) in the Philippines has been increasing since its first recorded occurrence in 1983. Thus far, HAB has been reported in about 20 areas in the Philippines including major fishery production areas. The HAB-causing organism (Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum) produces a cyst during its life cycle. Pyrodinium cysts which are deposited in the sediment column may play a role in initiating a toxic bloom. 210Pb-derived sedimentation rate studies in the two important fishing grounds of Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Palawan have shown that Pyrodinium cysts may have been present in the sediment even before the first recorded toxic algal bloom in these areas. High sedimentation rates (approximately 1 cm/year) have been observed in the northern and western parts of Manila Bay. The results indicate that the sedimentation processes occurring in these bays would require subsurface cyst concentration analysis in evaluating the potential of an area to act as seed bed.

  13. Application of 210Pb-derived sedimentation rates and dinoflagellate cyst analyses in understanding Pyrodinium bahamense harmful algal blooms in Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombrito, E.Z.; Bulos, A.M.; Sta Maria, E.J.; Honrado, M.C.V.; Azanza, Rhodora V.; Furio, Elsa F.

    2004-01-01

    The number of areas affected by toxic harmful algal bloom (HAB) in the Philippines has been increasing since its first recorded occurrence in 1983. Thus far, HAB has been reported in about 20 areas in the Philippines including major fishery production areas. The HAB-causing organism (Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum) produces a cyst during its life cycle. Pyrodinium cysts which are deposited in the sediment column may play a role in initiating a toxic bloom. 210 Pb-derived sedimentation rate studies in the two important fishing grounds of Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Palawan have shown that Pyrodinium cysts may have been present in the sediment even before the first recorded toxic algal bloom in these areas. High sedimentation rates (approximately 1 cm/year) have been observed in the Northern and Western parts of Manila Bay. The results indicate that the sedimentation processes occurring in these bays would require subsurface cyst concentration analysis in evaluating the potential of an area to act as sea bed

  14. Application of {sup 210}Pb-derived sedimentation rates and dinoflagellate cyst analyses in understanding Pyrodinium bahamense harmful algal blooms in Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sombrito, E.Z. E-mail: ezsombrito@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Bulos, A.M.; Sta Maria, E.J.; Honrado, M.C.V.; Azanza, Rhodora V.; Furio, Elsa F

    2004-07-01

    The number of areas affected by toxic harmful algal bloom (HAB) in the Philippines has been increasing since its first recorded occurrence in 1983. Thus far, HAB has been reported in about 20 areas in the Philippines including major fishery production areas. The HAB-causing organism (Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum) produces a cyst during its life cycle. Pyrodinium cysts which are deposited in the sediment column may play a role in initiating a toxic bloom. {sup 210}Pb-derived sedimentation rate studies in the two important fishing grounds of Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Palawan have shown that Pyrodinium cysts may have been present in the sediment even before the first recorded toxic algal bloom in these areas. High sedimentation rates (approximately 1 cm/year) have been observed in the Northern and Western parts of Manila Bay. The results indicate that the sedimentation processes occurring in these bays would require subsurface cyst concentration analysis in evaluating the potential of an area to act as sea bed.

  15. Predicting and understanding Korean high school students' science-track choice: Testing the theory of reasoned action by structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeong, Jeon-Ok; Crawley, Frank E.

    The theory of reasoned action (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) was used to predict and understand Korean high school students' track choice for college entrance. First-year high school students (N = 665) from four representative regions of Korea participated in the study. The survey instruments were questionnaires developed according to the guidelines of the TRA. The target behavior of interest in this study was Korean students' choice of the science track when they completed the track application forms during the first year of high school. Predictors included TRA model and external variables. Multiple regression and the structural equation modeling with LISREL (Jöreskog & Sörbom, 1986) were used to analyze the data. The TRA was found to be applicable for understanding and predicting track choice, with minor modifications. Subjective norm was found to exert a direct influence on personal beliefs and the target behavior.

  16. 3D structure of macropore networks within natural and de-embarked estuary saltmarsh sediments: towards an improved understanding of network structural control over hydrologic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate; James, Tempest; Lucy, Diggens

    2015-04-01

    Saltmarshes are globally important environments which, though occupying pollution resulting in degradation. To compensate for this habitat loss many coastal restoration projects have been implemented over the last few decades, largely driven by legislative requirements for improved biodiversity e.g. the EU Habitats Directive and Birds Directive. However, there is growing evidence that restored saltmarshes, recreated through the return to tidal inundation of previously drained and defended low-lying coastal land, do not have the same species composition even after 100 years and while environmental enhancement has been achieved, there may be consequences for ecosystem functioning This study presents the findings of a comparative analysis of detailed sediment structure and hydrological functioning of equivalent natural and de-embanked saltmarsh sediments at Orplands Farm, Essex, UK. 3D x-ray CT scanning of triplicate undisturbed sediment cores recovered in 2013 have been used to derive detailed volumetric reconstructions of macropore structure and networks, and to infer differences in bulk microporosity between natural and de-embanked saltmarshes. These volumes have been further visualised for qualitative analysis of the main sediment components, and extraction of key macropore space parameters for quantified analysis including total porosity and connectivity, as well as structure, organisation and efficiency (tortuosity) of macropore networks. Although total porosity was significantly greater within the de-embanked saltmarsh sediments, pore networks in these samples were less organised and more tortuous, and were also inferred to have significantly lower micro-porosity than those of the natural saltmarsh. These datasets are applied to explain significant differences in the hydraulic behaviour and functioning observed between natural and de-embarked saltmarsh at Orplands. Piezometer wells and pressure transducers recorded fluctuations in water level at 15 minute

  17. Structural safety of coolant channel components under excessively high pressure tube diametral expansion rate at garter spring location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravind, M. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sinha, S.K., E-mail: sunilks@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Structural safety of coolant channel assembly in the event of high diametral expansion of pressure tube in a 220 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor was investigated using axisymmetric and 3-D finite element models. The axisymmetric analyses were performed and stresses were evaluated for pressure tube, girdle wire and calandria tube at different point of time for diametral expansion rates of 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.3% per year of the pressure tube inside diameter. The results of this study indicated that for the case of 0.3% per year of diametral expansion rate (worst case scenario), occurrence of complete circumferential interference of garter spring with calandria tube at the location of maximum expansion would take place much earlier at around 14 years or 4.2% of the total expansion of pressure tube as opposed to its anticipated design life (30 years). This fact was further corroborated by 3-D finite element analysis performed for the actual assembly configuration under actual loadings. The latter analysis revealed that net section yielding of calandria tube occurs in just 1 year after the occurrence of total circumferential interference between calandria tube and garter spring spacer. It has also been observed that the maximum stress intensity in girdle wire does not increase beyond the ultimate tensile strength even when maximum stress intensity in calandria tube reaches its yield strength. These analyses also revealed that the structural as well as functional integrity of pressure tube and the garter spring is not affected as result of this interference.

  18. Structural safety of coolant channel components under excessively high pressure tube diametral expansion rate at garter spring location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, M.; Sinha, S. K.

    2013-08-01

    Structural safety of coolant channel assembly in the event of high diametral expansion of pressure tube in a 220 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor was investigated using axisymmetric and 3-D finite element models. The axisymmetric analyses were performed and stresses were evaluated for pressure tube, girdle wire and calandria tube at different point of time for diametral expansion rates of 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.3% per year of the pressure tube inside diameter. The results of this study indicated that for the case of 0.3% per year of diametral expansion rate (worst case scenario), occurrence of complete circumferential interference of garter spring with calandria tube at the location of maximum expansion would take place much earlier at around 14 years or 4.2% of the total expansion of pressure tube as opposed to its anticipated design life (30 years). This fact was further corroborated by 3-D finite element analysis performed for the actual assembly configuration under actual loadings. The latter analysis revealed that net section yielding of calandria tube occurs in just 1 year after the occurrence of total circumferential interference between calandria tube and garter spring spacer. It has also been observed that the maximum stress intensity in girdle wire does not increase beyond the ultimate tensile strength even when maximum stress intensity in calandria tube reaches its yield strength. These analyses also revealed that the structural as well as functional integrity of pressure tube and the garter spring is not affected as result of this interference.

  19. Cell wall structures leading to cultivar differences in softening rates develop early during apple (Malus x domestica) fruit growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Schröder, Roswitha; Sutherland, Paul W; Hallett, Ian C; Hall, Miriam I; Prakash, Roneel; Smith, Bronwen G; Melton, Laurence D; Johnston, Jason W

    2013-11-19

    There is a paucity of information regarding development of fruit tissue microstructure and changes in the cell walls during fruit growth, and how these developmental processes differ between cultivars with contrasting softening behaviour. In this study we compare two apple cultivars that show different softening rates during fruit development and ripening. We investigate whether these different softening behaviours manifest themselves late during ethylene-induced softening in the ripening phase, or early during fruit expansion and maturation. 'Scifresh' (slow softening) and 'Royal Gala' (rapid softening) apples show differences in cortical microstructure and cell adhesion as early as the cell expansion phase. 'Scifresh' apples showed reduced loss of firmness and greater dry matter accumulation compared with 'Royal Gala' during early fruit development, suggesting differences in resource allocation that influence tissue structural properties. Tricellular junctions in 'Scifresh' were rich in highly-esterified pectin, contributing to stronger cell adhesion and an increased resistance to the development of large airspaces during cell expansion. Consequently, mature fruit of 'Scifresh' showed larger, more angular shaped cells than 'Royal Gala', with less airspaces and denser tissue. Stronger cell adhesion in ripe 'Scifresh' resulted in tissue fracture by cell rupture rather than by cell-to-cell-separation as seen in 'Royal Gala'. CDTA-soluble pectin differed in both cultivars during development, implicating its involvement in cell adhesion. Low pectin methylesterase activity during early stages of fruit development coupled with the lack of immuno-detectable PG was associated with increased cell adhesion in 'Scifresh'. Our results indicate that cell wall structures leading to differences in softening rates of apple fruit develop early during fruit growth and well before the induction of the ripening process.

  20. High-speed imaging and small-scale explosive characterization techniques to understand effects of primary blast-induced injury on nerve cell structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, T.; Banton, R.; Zander, N.; Duckworth, J.; Benjamin, R.; Sparks, R.

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often associated with blast exposure. Even in the absence of penetrating injury or evidence of tissue injury on imaging, blast TBI may trigger a series of neural/glial cellular and functional changes. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and proper treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) caused by explosive blast is challenging, as it is not easy to clinically distinguish blast from non-blast TBI on the basis of patient symptoms. Damage to brain tissue, cell, and subcellular structures continues to occur slowly and in a manner undetectable by conventional imaging techniques. The threshold shock impulse levels required to induce damage and the cumulative effects upon multiple exposures are not well characterized. Understanding how functional and structural damage from realistic blast impact at cellular and tissue levels at variable timescales after mTBI events may be vital for understanding this injury phenomenon and for linking mechanically induced structural changes with measurable effects on the nervous system. Our working hypothesis is that there is some transient physiological dysfunction occurring at cellular and subcellular levels within the central nervous system due to primary blast exposure. We have developed a novel in vitro indoor experimental system that uses real military explosive charges to more accurately represent military blast exposure and to probe the effects of primary explosive blast on dissociated neurons. We believe this system offers a controlled experimental method to analyze and characterize primary explosive blast-induced cellular injury and to understand threshold injury phenomenon. This paper will also focus on the modeling aspect of our work and how it relates to the experimental work.

  1. The contribution of spatial analysis to understanding HIV/TB mortality in children: a structural equation modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eustasius Musenge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa accounts for more than a sixth of the global population of people infected with HIV and TB, ranking her highest in HIV/TB co-infection worldwide. Remote areas often bear the greatest burden of morbidity and mortality, yet there are spatial differences within rural settings. Objectives: The primary aim was to investigate HIV/TB mortality determinants and their spatial distribution in the rural Agincourt sub-district for children aged 1–5 years in 2004. Our secondary aim was to model how the associated factors were interrelated as either underlying or proximate factors of child mortality using pathway analysis based on a Mosley-Chen conceptual framework. Methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on cross-sectional data collected in 2004 from the Agincourt sub-district in rural northeast South Africa. Child HIV/TB death was the outcome measure derived from physician assessed verbal autopsy. Modelling used multiple logit regression models with and without spatial household random effects. Structural equation models were used in modelling the complex relationships between multiple exposures and the outcome (child HIV/TB mortality as relayed on a conceptual framework. Results: Fifty-four of 6,692 children aged 1–5 years died of HIV/TB, from a total of 5,084 households. Maternal death had the greatest effect on child HIV/TB mortality (adjusted odds ratio=4.00; 95% confidence interval=1.01–15.80. A protective effect was found in households with better socio-economic status and when the child was older. Spatial models disclosed that the areas which experienced the greatest child HIV/TB mortality were those without any health facility. Conclusion: Low socio-economic status and maternal deaths impacted indirectly and directly on child mortality, respectively. These factors are major concerns locally and should be used in formulating interventions to reduce child mortality. Spatial prediction maps can guide policy

  2. Report on Understanding and Predicting Effects of Thermal Aging on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Grade 91 Steel for Structural Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Weiying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on understanding and predicting the effects of long-term thermal aging on microstructure and tensile properties of G91 to corroborate the ASME Code rules in strength reduction due to elevated temperature service. The research is to support the design and long-term operation of G91 structural components in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY17 (M2AT-17AN1602017), under the Work Package AT-17AN160201, “SFR Materials Testing” performed by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  3. Study of variations in structural, optical parameters and bulk etch rate of CR-39 polymer due to electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Joshi, D. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, electron induced modifications on the bulk etch rate, structural and optical parameters of CR-39 polymer were studied using gravimetric, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV–vis (Ultraviolet–Visible) techniques, respectively. CR-39 samples were irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam for different durations to have the absorbed doses of 1, 10, 550, 5500, 16 500, and 55 000 kGy. From the FTIR analysis, the peak intensities at different bands were found to be changing with electron dose. A few peaks were observed to shift at high electron doses. From the UV-vis analysis, the optical band gaps for both direct and indirect transitions were found to be decreasing with the increase in electron dose whereas the opacity, number of carbon atoms in conjugation length, and the number of carbon atoms per cluster were found to be increasing. The bulk etch rate was observed to be increasing with the electron dose. The primary objective of this investigation was to study the response of CR-39 to high electron doses and to determine a suitable pre-irradiation condition. The results indicated that, the CR-39 pre-irradiated with electrons can have better sensitivity and thus can be potentially applied for neutron dosimetry.

  4. A Composite Structure of Cu3Ge/Ge/C Anode Promise Better Rate Property for Lithium Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianwen; Li, Xiaona; Hou, Zhiguo; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Wanqun; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-11-01

    Much effort has been made to search for high energy and high power density electrode materials for lithium ion batteries. Here, a composite structure among Ge, C and Cu3Ge in Cu3Ge/Ge/C materials with a high rate performance of lithium batteries has been reported. Such Cu3Ge/Ge/C composite is synthesized through the in-situ formation of Ge, C and Cu3Ge by one-pot reaction. Density function theory (DFT) calculations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggest a higher electron mobility of the hibrid Cu3Ge/Ge/C composites through the in-situ preparation. As a result, remarkable charge rate over 300 C (fast delithiated capability) and outstanding cycling stability (≈0.02% capacity decay per cycle for 500 cycles at 0.5 C) are achieved for the Cu3Ge/Ge/C composites anode. These Cu3Ge/Ge/C composites demonstrate another perspective to explore the energy storage materials and should provide a new pathway for the design of advanced electrode materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  6. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion.

  7. A Study on the radiation effects for the function and structure of rabbit blood platelets in various dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Kohichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Mature peripheral platelets in rabbits were irradiated with a total 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co-{gamma} rays at the average dose rates of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 1.7 Gy/min. The effects was evaluated from the functional aspect by determining the ability of platelets to aggregate and replease, and the metabolic aspect by examining the kinetics of prostaglandin in platelets. In addition, platelet structure was compared using an electron microscope. The ability of platelets to aggregate and release was accelerated in all irradiated groups, compared with a non-irradiated group, especially in groups with average dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min. The amount of MDA, a final product of prostaglandin in platelets, increased in all irradiated groups in comparison with the non-irradiated group, especially in the 0.5 Gy/min, 1.0 Gy/min and 1.5 Gy/min groups. Observation with a scanning electron microscope revealed a clear rock-like appearance of the surface of aggregates of platelets and a larger number of pseudopodia with longer projections in the 1.0 Gy/min group than in the non-irradiated group. Moreover, the surfaces of the aggregates in the 1.7 Gy/min group, but the adhension between psudopodia of the platelet aggregates was weaker than that of 1.0 Gy/min group. In observation with a transmission electron microscope, dense bodies that released their contents were noticed in platelet aggregates, and a stenopeic appearance between psudopodia and between platelets, and density aggregated platelets were observed in the 1.0 Gy/min irradiated group. Vacuolation of granules in platelets was more marked in aggregates of 1.7 Gy/min group than in that of the non-irradiated group, and large numbers of platelets with uneven surfaces were observed. Therefore, the effects of dose rates were found to be closely related to changes in structures, as well as to the inner function of platelets. (author).

  8. The impact of the linkage between grade distribution and petrofabric on the understanding of structurally controlled mineral deposits: Ouro Fino Gold Mine, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, R. N.; Fyfe, W. S.; Chemale, F.

    2004-06-01

    Ore deposit structural analysis, using a combination of structural geology and geostatistics, has direct application in the mining industry. Its main goal is to integrate structural measurements and assay data to create a method in which structurally controlled deposits are modeled numerically. This provides guidance to grade control and pit optimization during mining, improves prediction of orebody geometry and orientation, and provides more effective exploration strategies for surrounding areas. The method leads to a better understanding of how mineralized fluids percolated and were focused at the Ouro Fino Mine, a shear zone-hosted gold deposit in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. In this mine, gold is distributed along permeability pathways within rock fabrics that were produced or modified during the Brasiliano orogeny, when the Espinhaço-Araçuaı´ sequence was inverted towards the São Francisco craton during a basement-involved fold-and-thrust regime. The resulting permeable zones are conformable with the C surface, within which two other clusters of fabric elements control the large-scale features of the mineralization: (1) a cluster of fabric elements (mineral, stretching and intersection lineations) that plunges SE; and (2) a sub-horizontal cluster along folds and intersection lineations and the strike of the shear zone.

  9. ESTIMATION OF HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER AND PHOSPHATE ESTER COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY SPARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid ester and phosphate ester compounds in aqueous non- aqueous and systems strictly from molecular structure. The energy diffe...

  10. Internal Homogeneity, Descriptiveness, and Halo: Resurrecting Some Answers and Questions About the Structure of Job Performance Rating Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William H.

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effects of two rating category attributes on halo in job performance ratings. Results suggested reducing halo by using rating categories that do not force raters to rely on their overall evaluation of the ratee, or use the same salient observations for rating job performance on multiple categories. (JAC)

  11. Neural stem cells and neuro/gliogenesis in the central nervous system: understanding the structural and functional plasticity of the developing, mature, and diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Seki, Tatsunori; Imayoshi, Itaru; Tamamaki, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Neurons and glia in the central nervous system (CNS) originate from neural stem cells (NSCs). Knowledge of the mechanisms of neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs is fundamental to our understanding of how complex brain architecture and function develop. NSCs are present not only in the developing brain but also in the mature brain in adults. Adult neurogenesis likely provides remarkable plasticity to the mature brain. In addition, recent progress in basic research in mental disorders suggests an etiological link with impaired neuro/gliogenesis in particular brain regions. Here, we review the recent progress and discuss future directions in stem cell and neuro/gliogenesis biology by introducing several topics presented at a joint meeting of the Japanese Association of Anatomists and the Physiological Society of Japan in 2015. Collectively, these topics indicated that neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs is a common event occurring in many brain regions at various ages in animals. Given that significant structural and functional changes in cells and neural networks are accompanied by neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs and the integration of newly generated cells into the network, stem cell and neuro/gliogenesis biology provides a good platform from which to develop an integrated understanding of the structural and functional plasticity that underlies the development of the CNS, its remodeling in adulthood, and the recovery from diseases that affect it.

  12. Light-induced structural changes in a short light, oxygen, voltage (LOV protein revealed by molecular dynamics simulations – implications for the understanding of LOV photoactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eBocola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The modularity of light, oxygen, voltage (LOV blue-light photoreceptors has recently been exploited for the design of LOV-based optogenetic tools, which allow the light-dependent control of biological functions. For the understanding of LOV sensory function and hence the optimal design of LOV-based optogentic tools it is essential to gain an in depth atomic-level understanding of the underlying photoactivation and intramolecular signal-relay mechanisms. To address this question we performed molecular dynamics simulations on both the dark- and light-adapted state of PpSB1-LOV, a short dimeric bacterial LOV-photoreceptor protein, recently crystallized under constant illumination. While LOV dimers remained globally stable during the light-state simulation with regard to the Jα coiled-coil, distinct conformational changes for a glutamine in the vicinity of the FMN chromophore are observed. In contrast, multiple Jα-helix conformations are sampled in the dark-state. These changes coincide with a displacement of the Iβ and Hβ strands relative to the light-state structure and result in a correlated rotation of both LOV core domains in the dimer. These global changes are most likely initiated by the reorientation of the conserved glutamine Q116, whose side chain flips between the Aβ (dark state and Hβ strand (light state, while maintaining two potential hydrogen bonds to FMN-N5 and FMN-O4, respectively. This local Q116-FMN reorientation impacts on an inter-subunit salt-bridge (K117-E96, which is stabilized in the light state, hence accounting for the observed decreased mobility. Based on these findings we propose an alternative mechanism for dimeric LOV photoactivation and intramolecular signal-relay, assigning a distinct structural role for the conserved flipping glutamine. The proposed mechanism is discussed in light of universal applicability and its implications for the understanding of LOV-based optogenetic tools.

  13. Understanding of catalysis on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through exploration of surface structure and chemistry during catalysis using in-situ approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Franklin [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-09-14

    Two main categories of heterogeneous catalysts are metal and metal oxide which catalyze 80% chemical reactions at solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces. Metal oxide catalysts are much more complicated than metal catalysts. The reason is that the cations of the metal atoms could exhibit a few different oxidation states on surface of the same catalyst particle such as Co3O4 or change of their oxidation states under different reactive environments. For a metal catalyst, there is only one oxidation state typically. In addition, surface of a metal oxide can be terminated with multiple surface functionalities including O atoms with different binding configurations and OH group. For metal, only metal atoms are exposed typically. Obviously, the complication of surface chemistry and structure of a metal oxide makes studies of surface of an oxide catalyst very challenging. Due to the complication of surface of a meal oxide, the electronic and geometric structures of surface of a metal oxide and the exposed species have received enormous attention since oxide catalysts catalyze at least 1/3 chemical reactions in chemical and energy industries. Understanding of catalytic reactions on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts is fundamentally intriguing and of great practical interest in energy- and environment-related catalysis. Exploration of surface chemistry of oxide-based catalysts at molecular level during catalysis has remained challenging though it is critical in deeply understanding catalysis on oxide-based catalysts and developing oxide-based catalysts with high activity and selectivity. Thus, the overall objective of this project is to explore surface chemistry and structure of early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through in-situ characterization of surface of catalysts, measurements of catalytic performances, and then build an intrinsic correlation of surface chemistry and structure with their catalytic performances in a few

  14. A large scale study of the assessment of the social environment of middle and secondary schools: the validity and utility of teachers' ratings of school climate, cultural pluralism, and safety problems for understanding school effects and school improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Stephen; Felner, Robert D; Seitsinger, Anne; Burns, Amy; Bolton, Natalie

    2008-10-01

    Due to changes in state and federal policies, as well as logistical and fiscal limitations, researchers must increasingly rely on teachers' reports of school climate dimensions in order to investigate the developmental impact of these dimensions, and to evaluate efforts to enhance the impact of school environments on the development of young adolescents. Teachers' climate ratings exhibited a robust dimensional structure, high levels of internal consistency, and moderate levels of stability over 1-and 2-year time spans. Teachers' climate ratings were also found to be related consistently with students' ratings. In three large-scale samples of schools, teachers' climate ratings were associated significantly and consistently with students' performance on standardized tests of academic achievement, and with indexes of their academic, behavioral, and socio-emotional adjustment.

  15. Left ventricular mechanics in humans with high aerobic fitness: adaptation independent of structural remodelling, arterial haemodynamics and heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Eric J; McDonnell, Barry; Thompson, Jane; Stone, Keeron; Bull, Tom; Houston, Rory; Cockcroft, John; Shave, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with high aerobic fitness have lower systolic left ventricular strain, rotation and twist (‘left ventricular (LV) mechanics’) at rest, suggesting a beneficial reduction in LV myofibre stress and more efficient systolic function. However, the mechanisms responsible for this functional adaptation are not known and the influence of aerobic fitness on LV mechanics during dynamic exercise has never been studied. We assessed LV mechanics, LV wall thickness and dimensions, central augmentation index (AIx), aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), blood pressure and heart rate in 28 males (age: 21 ± 2 years SD) with a consistent physical activity level (no change >6 months). Individuals were examined at rest and during exercise (40% peak exercise capacity) and separated post hoc into a moderate and high aerobic fitness group (: 49 ± 5 and 63 ± 7 ml kg−1 min−1, respectively, P 0.05). However, for the same AIx, the high group had significantly lower LV apical rotation (P = 0.002) and LV twist (P = 0.003) while basal rotation and strain indices did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). We conclude that young males with high aerobic fitness have lower LV apical rotation at rest and during submaximal exercise that can occur without changes in gross LV structure, arterial haemodynamics or heart rate. The findings suggest a previously unknown type of physiological adaptation of the left ventricle that may have important implications for exercise training in older individuals and patient populations in which exercise training has previously failed to show clear benefits for LV function. PMID:22431336

  16. Impact of aerosol intrusions on sea-ice melting rates and the structure Arctic boundary layer clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, W.; Carrio, G.; Jiang, H.

    2003-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory sea-ice model (LANL CICE) was implemented into the real-time and research versions of the Colorado State University-Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS@CSU). The original version of CICE was modified in its structure to allow module communication in an interactive multigrid framework. In addition, some improvements have been made in the routines involved in the coupling, among them, the inclusion of iterative methods that consider variable roughness lengths for snow-covered ice thickness categories. This version of the model also includes more complex microphysics that considers the nucleation of cloud droplets, allowing the prediction of mixing ratios and number concentrations for all condensed water species. The real-time version of RAMS@CSU automatically processes the NASA Team SSMI F13 25km sea-ice coverage data; the data are objectively analyzed and mapped to the model grid configuration. We performed two types of cloud resolving simulations to assess the impact of the entrainment of aerosols from above the inversion on Arctic boundary layer clouds. The first series of numerical experiments corresponds to a case observed on May 4 1998 during the FIRE-ACE/SHEBA field experiment. Results indicate a significant impact on the microstructure of the simulated clouds. When assuming polluted initial profiles above the inversion, the liquid water fraction of the cloud monotonically decreases, the total condensate paths increases and downward IR tends to increase due to a significant increase in the ice water path. The second set of cloud resolving simulations focused on the evaluation of the potential effect of aerosol concentration above the inversion on melting rates during spring-summer period. For these multi-month simulations, the IFN and CCN profiles were also initialized assuming the 4 May profiles as benchmarks. Results suggest that increasing the aerosol concentrations above the boundary layer increases sea-ice melting

  17. Effects of structure and oxygen flow rate on the photo-response of amorphous IGZO-based photodetector devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Ko, Daehyun; Choi, Sungju; Kang, Hara; Kim, Jae-Young; Yu, Hye Ri; Ahn, Geumho; Jung, Haesun; Rhee, Jihyun; Lee, Heesung; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigated how the structure and oxygen flow rate (OFR) during the sputter-deposition affects the photo-responses of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO)-based photodetector devices. As the result of comparing three types of device structures with one another, which are a global Schottky diode, local Schottky diode, and thin-film transistor (TFT), the IGZO TFT with the gate pulse technique suppressing the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) is the most promising photodetector in terms of a high photo-sensitivity and uniform sensing characteristic. In order to analyze the IGZO TFT-based photodetectors more quantitatively, the time-evolution of sub-gap density-of-states (DOS) was directly observed under photo-illumination and consecutively during the PPC-compensating period with applying the gate pulse. It shows that the increased ionized oxygen vacancy (VO2+) defects under photo-illumination was fully recovered by the positive gate pulse and even overcompensated by additional electron trapping. Based on experimentally extracted sub-gap DOS, the origin on PPC was successfully decomposed into the hole trapping and the VO ionization. Although the VO ionization is enhanced in lower OFR (O-poor) device, the PPC becomes more severe in high OFR (O-rich) device because the hole trapping dominates the PPC in IGZO TFT under photo-illumination rather than the VO ionization and more abundant holes are trapped into gate insulator and/or interface in O-rich TFTs. Similarly, the electron trapping during the PPC-compensating period with applying the positive gate pulse becomes more prominent in O-rich TFTs. It is attributed to more hole/electron traps in the gate insulator and/or interface, which is associated with oxygen interstitials, or originates from the ion bombardment-related lower quality gate oxide in O-rich devices.

  18. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  19. Influence of muscle-tendon unit structure on rate of force development during the squat, countermovement, and drop jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E; Kraemer, William J; Cormie, Prue; Volek, Jeffery S; Maresh, Carl M; Joseph, Michael; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of muscle and tendon structure to stretch shortening cycle performance. However, the relationships between muscle and tendon structure to performance are highly dependent on the speed and intensity of the movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle and tendon structure is associated with the rate of force development (RFD) throughout static squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ; 30-cm height). Twenty-five strength- and power-trained men participated in the study. Using ultrasonography, vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) pennation (PEN) and fascicle length (FL), and Achilles tendon (AT) thickness and length were measured. Subjects then performed SJ, CMJ, and DJ, during which RFD was calculated over time 5 distinct time intervals. During CMJs, early RFD could be predicted between 0 and 10 milliseconds by both GAS-FL (r² = 0.213, β = 0.461) and AT-length (r² = 0.191, β = 20.438). Between 10 and 30 milliseconds GAS-FL was a significant predictor of CMJ-RFD (r² = 0.218, β = 0.476). During DJ, initial RFD (0-10 milliseconds) could be significantly predicted by GAS-FL (r² = 0.185, β = 20.434), VL-PEN (r² = 0.189, β = 0.435), and GAS-PEN (r² = 0.188, β = 0.434). These findings suggest that longer ATs may have increased elasticity, which can decrease initial RFD during CMJ; thus, their use in talent identification is not recommended. The GAS fascicle length had an intensity-dependent relationship with RFD, serving to positively predict RFD during early CMJs and an inverse predictor during early DJs. During DDJs, subjects with greater PEN were better able to redirected initial impact forces. Although both strength and plyometric training have been shown to increase FL, only heavy strength training has been shown to increase PEN. Thus, when a high eccentric load or multiple jumps are required, heavy strength training might be used to elicit muscular adaptations

  20. Electronic Structure, Optical and Transport Properties of Double Perovskite La2NbMnO6: A Theoretical Understanding from DFT Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrey, Khursheed Ahmad; Khandy, Shakeel Ahmad; Islam, Ishtihadah; Laref, Amel; Gupta, Dinesh C.; Niazi, Asad; Aziz, Anver; Ansari, S. G.; Khenata, R.; Rubab, Seemin

    2018-03-01

    Double perovskite La2NbMnO6 was systematically studied using the first-principles calculations. The structural, electronic, optical and transport properties of this compound were calculated. Spin resolved band structure predicted this material as a half-metal with an energy gap of 3.75 eV in spin down state. The optical coefficients including optical conductivity, reflectivity and electron energy loss are calculated for photon energy up to 30.00 eV to understand the optical response of this perovskite. The strong absorption of all the ultraviolet and infrared frequencies of the spectrum by this material may suggest the potential application of this material for the optoelectronic devices in ultraviolet and infra-red region. Also, the thermoelectric properties with a speculation from the half-metallic electronic structure are reported. Subsequently, the Seebeck coefficient, electrical and thermal conductivity coefficients are calculated to predict the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT), the maximum of which is found out to be 0.14 at 800 K.