WorldWideScience

Sample records for understand nuclear spatial

  1. Understanding the nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooradian, A.J.

    1976-06-01

    Nuclear power is presented as a necessary power source for the transition from fossil fuels to a no-growth society of the future. It is already economic and on-stream all over the world. Radiation is a very tractable hazard. New fuel cycles would provide extraordinary increases in our nuclear fuel reserves. (E.C.B.)

  2. Understanding nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    1999-09-01

    In our days technological progress for the benefit of society is slowed down by the fact that common citizens (opinion-forming media reporters, journalists, furthermore elected decision-makers) are underinformed about basic numerical facts concerning harms and benefits of high technology. Here a comparative risk study is presented about smoking, ozone hole, global warming, and ionizing radiation. This approach has turned out to be successful in educating the youth in Hungary; because school-going teenagers do understand numbers. (author)

  3. Understanding nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, G.

    1999-01-01

    In our days technological progress for the benefit of society is slowed down by the fact that common citizens (opinion-forming media reporters, journalists, furthermore elected decision-makers) are underinformed about basic numerical facts concerning harms and benefits of high technology. Here a comparative risk study is presented about smoking, ozone hole, global warming, and ionizing radiation. This approach has turned out to be successful in educating the youth in Hungary; because school-going teenagers do understand numbers. (author)

  4. Spatial Thinking: Precept for Understanding Operational Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    ATP Army Techniques Publication COP Common Operating Picture DOTMLPF Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership and education ...numbers, linguists in vocal tones (words), and artists in images of feeling. To understand spatial thinking is to understand the nature of how humans...how that space impacts our interactions. Like any mode of thinking, be it numerical, artistic , or vocal, spatial thinking requires a medium for

  5. Understanding Spatial Genome Organization: Methods and Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Ramani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The manner by which eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nuclei while maintaining crucial nuclear functions remains one of the fundamental mysteries in biology. Over the last ten years, we have witnessed rapid advances in both microscopic and nucleic acid-based approaches to map genome architecture, and the application of these approaches to the dissection of higher-order chromosomal structures has yielded much new information. It is becoming increasingly clear, for example, that interphase chromosomes form stable, multilevel hierarchical structures. Among them, self-associating domains like so-called topologically associating domains (TADs appear to be building blocks for large-scale genomic organization. This review describes features of these broadly-defined hierarchical structures, insights into the mechanisms underlying their formation, our current understanding of how interactions in the nuclear space are linked to gene regulation, and important future directions for the field.

  6. Survey on understanding on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yoshinobu

    1990-01-01

    Survey on understanding on nuclear energy by first grade students of an university (male 165, female 37) and by a beauty school students (male 26, female 149) have been achieved directly after a lecture on a basic knowledge of nuclear energy. The results showed that 79 % to 73 % of the students accepted nuclear power plant in Japan. But 80 % of male students and 50 % of female had a great fear on Chernobyl plant like accident in Japan. The fact that 22 % of male students and 66 % female had also a great fear on radioactive ray showed female students understanding on nuclear energy was poorer than male, but female students accepted nuclear power plant in Japan more than male students. This suggests more scientific, concrete and easy understandable explanation is important in public acceptance action programs in future. (author)

  7. The right understanding of nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetjer, K.; Begemann, K.; Bleck, J.; Boikat, U.; Carbonell, P.; Helmers, H.; Kirchner, J.; Muschol, E.; Scheer, J.; Schmitz-Feuerhake, I.

    1978-09-01

    As the abstractor found himself unable to point out all the errors of the book, the statement on the back cover is cited in full wording: A boom for nuclear power - in the next 10 years, 40 nuclear power plants will be built in West Germany alone. It is a wellprepared boom: For 20 years, the public has heard about 'cheap, safe, and clean, nuclear power. Yet in spite of this, there is an ever increasing resistance of the public which finds itself threatened, misinformed and lost - left alone also by natural scientists who do not speak in the controversy or against the nuclear propaganda. Here is where this book intends to help. It was written by a group of scientists, students and staff of Bremen university. For three years, they have followed the public discussion of the nuclear problem, often acting as experts on behalf of citizen's groups. In this book, they refer to the propaganda leaflet '66 questions - 66 answers - for a better understanding of nuclear power', which has been distributed in 200,000 copies. To each of the questions and answers they give a detailed reply from the point of view of nuclear power plant opponents. With a summarizing epilogue and a list of explanations of abbreviations and keywards. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Understanding Nuclear Safety Culture: A Systemic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afghan, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    The Fukushima accident was a systemic failure (Report by Director General IAEA on the Fukushima Daiichi Accident). Systemic failure is a failure at system level unlike the currently understood notion which regards it as the failure of component and equipment. Systemic failures are due to the interdependence, complexity and unpredictability within systems and that is why these systems are called complex adaptive systems (CAS), in which “attractors” play an important role. If we want to understand the systemic failures we need to understand CAS and the role of these attractors. The intent of this paper is to identify some typical attractors (including stakeholders) and their role within complex adaptive system. Attractors can be stakeholders, individuals, processes, rules and regulations, SOPs etc., towards which other agents and individuals are attracted. This paper will try to identify attractors in nuclear safety culture and influence of their assumptions on safety culture behavior by taking examples from nuclear industry in Pakistan. For example, if the nuclear regulator is an attractor within nuclear safety culture CAS then how basic assumptions of nuclear plant operators and shift in-charges about “regulator” affect their own safety behavior?

  9. Towards an understanding of the nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The formalism for investigating the anti Qqanti Qq system on the lattice is constructed. We describe how the model may be used to study the nuclear potential, and present some preliminary results on the range of the nuclear force. (orig.)

  10. Understanding Nuclear Forensics in 5 Questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Forensic science, commonly referred to as forensics, is the examination of physical, biological, behavioural and documentary evidence. The goal of forensics is to discover linkages among people, places, things and events. A sub-discipline of forensic science, nuclear forensics is the analysis of intercepted illicit nuclear or radioactive material and any associated material, which can assist in law enforcement investigations as well as assessments of the potential vulnerabilities associated with the use, production and storage of these materials as part of a nuclear security infrastructure. The analysis of nuclear or other radioactive material seeks to identify what the materials are, how, when, and where the materials were made, and what their intended uses were. Nuclear forensics is an important tool in the fight against illicit trafficking in nuclear and radiological material

  11. Understanding and education of nuclear power development issues in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of nuclear power to China; the understanding of nuclear power in China, education of nuclear power among chinese people. Through such efforts of The Chinese Nuclear Association the Chinese people already have the basic knowledge and support the nuclear power in general. But there are about fifty percent of people who do not know the nuclear power stations in China and thirty-six percent who do not know the benefit of nuclear power because of the vast and different education level in some undeveloped rural areas where the education can not reach

  12. Spatial effects on the fluctuations of a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Rodriguez, R.F.; Wio, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spatial inhomogeneities in a nuclear system are studied by using the compounding moments method. In particular, the neutron density and temperature equilibrium correlation functions are explicitly calculated for a realistic linearized nuclear reactor model described in terms of a master equation. (author)

  13. Trust and understanding: vital in nuclear communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    Rather than attempting to defend itself against the anti-nuclear lobby, the author argues that the nuclear industry can only start to regain public trust when it declares honestly that it has the potential for great harm, as well as good. The general public is generally hostile to and distrustful of many large industries including the oil, gas, chemical and automobile industries, yet their demise is not demanded. The author argues that the nuclear industry needs to become perceived as a trustworthy institution which can be relied upon to prevent its most dangerous potential from being realised, by individual companies highlighting their own corporate excellence and identity. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear attitudes and personality: informing our understanding of public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.R.; Donev, J. M.; Ellard, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    What distinguishes the supporter of nuclear power from the antagonist? The influence that public opinions may have on industry success necessitates a greater understanding of the reasons and factors behind public attitudes. The present study identified two psychometric traits, Emotionality and Need for Cognition, which were related to nuclear support even after accounting for gender differences. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for understanding nuclear attitudes and ends by proposing avenues for future research in this area. (author)

  15. Nuclear energy and sustainability: Understanding ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, Karine

    2006-01-01

    Deregulation and new environmental requirements combined with the growing scarcity of fossil resources and the increasing world energy demand lead to a renewal of the debate on tomorrow's energies. Specifically, nuclear energy, which has undeniable assets, faces new constraints. On the one hand, nuclear energy is very competitive and harmless to greenhouse effect. From this point, it seems to be an ideal candidate to reach future objectives of sustainability, availability and acceptability. On the other hand, its technology of production - based on fission - remains imperfect and generates risks for environment and health. In this respect, it is less desirable. Therefore, world researchers turn today towards another type of nuclear technique, fusion, on which the project ITER is founded. This worldwide project is interesting for our analysis because, as a technological revolution, it takes into consideration all the global challenges of nuclear energy for the future, and particularly its capacity to meet the increasing energy needs of developing countries. It is the example par excellence of a successful international scientific collaboration oriented towards very long-run energy ends that involve huge technological, economic and political stakes. Focusing on this project, we thus have to reconsider the future place of nuclear energy in a more and more demanding world. Considering the magnitude of the efforts undertaken to implement ITER, this paper aims at analysing, in a detailed way, its goals, its challenges and its matter

  16. Understanding the nuclear controversy: An application of cultural theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaff, Shashi van de

    2016-01-01

    The need for a secure and sustainable energy future has become firmly entrenched on the global political agenda. Governments worldwide are seeking solutions that will ensure security of their energy supplies, while reducing carbon emissions in the fight against climate change. Advocates of nuclear power have reframed the technology as the most reliable, cost-effective and immediate solution to both of these policy problems, and predicted the emergence of a 'nuclear renaissance’. However, there is little evidence to date that suggests a nuclear renaissance has actually taken place. Public opinion polling demonstrates that many remain unconvinced of the need for nuclear power. This paper uses Cultural Theory as a heuristic to understand why the arguments for a nuclear renaissance have been largely unsuccessful. It argues that the failure of nuclear advocates to engage with a wider cross-section of world-views has prevented the controversy surrounding nuclear power from being resolved, and the nuclear renaissance from becoming a reality. In doing so, this paper builds upon a growing recognition of the contribution that social science research can make to understanding public acceptance of energy policy choices. - Highlights: • There is little evidence of a nuclear renaissance taking place in Western Europe or North America. • Public opinion on nuclear power continues to be deeply divided. • Pro-nuclear arguments are dominated by a particular cultural rationality. • A broader range of cultural perspectives needs to be recognised for the nuclear debate to progress.

  17. Do People Understand Spatial Concepts: The Case of First-Order Primitives

    OpenAIRE

    Golledge, Reginald G.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine whether people in general understand elementary spatial concepts, and to examine whether or not naive spatial knowledge includes the ability to understand important spatial primitives that are built into geographic theory, spatial databases and geographic information systems (GIS). The extent of such understanding is a partial measure of spatial ability. Accurate indicators or measures of spatial ability can be used to explain different types of spatial...

  18. University students' understanding level about words related to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Shinichi; Watabe, Motoki

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of university students' understanding level about words related to nuclear power before and after Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant accident, and analyzed the difference between before and after the accident. The results show that university students' understanding level improved after the accident, especially in the case of reported words by mass media. Understanding level of some nuclear power security words which were not reported so much by mass media also improved. That may be caused by rising of people's concern about nuclear power generation after the accident, and there is a possibility that the accident motivated people to access such words via internet, journals, etc. (author)

  19. Dynamic use of geoscience information to develop scientific understanding for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and safety evaluation of a nuclear waste geologic repository. Scientific understanding dependent upon information from a number of geoscience disciplines is described. A discussion is given on the dynamic use of the information through the different stages. The authors point out the need for abstracting, deriving and updating a quantitative spatial and process model (QSPM) to develop a scientific understanding of site responses as a crucial element in the dynamic procedure

  20. Do nuclear scientists and the media understand one another?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The media's understanding of the role of nuclear science and technology is discussed. Some journalists have endeavoured to present science generally and nuclear science in particular with a sense of sound objectivity. Editors, however, hold entrenched views on the quality and quantity that readers, listeners and viewers should receive about science in general

  1. Necessity of fundamental education on public understanding about nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruna, Kiyoshi; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Itami, Toshio; Yamagishi, Yoichi; Hirata, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    The general public doesn't have fundamental knowledge of radiation and nuclear energy. Therefore, it is not easy to judge nuclear power plants as safe systems. This study is a survey about junior high school, university, and women's junior college students. The results show that junior high school students aren't reluctant to understand radiation. (author)

  2. Spatial kinetics in nuclear reactor systems. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of constructing a low-order linear lumped-parameter model of xenon-induced spatial power oscillations in a large, cylindrical nuclear power reactor to replace an (assumed known) nonlinear distributed parameter model is examined. Model expansion and finite difference methods are used together to provide a successful solution to the problem. (U.K.)

  3. Science Communication for the Public Understanding of Nuclear Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seongkyung

    2006-01-01

    Uncertainty, stigma, risk perception, and value judgment represent characteristics of nuclear issues in the public arena. Nuclear issue, in the public arena, is a kind of risk rather than technology that we are willing to use for good purpose. There are uncertainty, stigma, risk perception, and value judgment as characteristics of nuclear. The notion of the public, here is of active, sensitive, and sensible citizens, with power and influence. The public understands nuclear issues less through direct experience or education than through the filter of mass media. Trust has been a key issue on public understanding of nuclear issues. Trust belongs to human. The public understanding process includes perception, interpretation, and evaluation. Therefore, science communication is needed for public understanding. Unfortunately, science communication is rarely performed well, nowadays, There are three important actors-the public, experts, and media. Effective science communication means finding comprehensible ways of presenting opaque and complex nuclear issues. It makes new and strong demands on experts. In order to meet that requirement, experts should fulfill their duty about developing nuclear technology for good purpose, understand the public before expecting the public to understand nuclear issues, accept the unique culture of the media process, take the responsibility for any consequence which nuclear technologies give rise to, communicate with an access route based on sensibility and rationality, have a flexible angle in the science communication process, get creative leadership for the communication process with deliberation and disagreement, make efficient use of various science technologies for science communication. We should try to proceed with patience, because science communication makes for a more credible society

  4. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-01-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  5. A Handbook for Understanding of Nuclear Cooperation Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. W.; Lee, H. M.; Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Lee, K. S

    2007-12-15

    The objective of this study is to help understanding for revision of existing Nuclear Cooperation Agreements (NCAs) between Korea and the United States (US). To accomplish the objectives, this study: First, explains a basic concept, role and composition of a NCA. Second, analyzes key factors of a NCA including the right of a supplier and the obligation of a recipient; and Lastly, examines a current status of nuclear cooperation between Korea and the US, and revision procedures of a NCA, especially the US.

  6. Understanding local residents of Korea using nuclear effective safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yun Hyung; Lee, Gey Hwi; Hah, Yeonhee; Kim, Beom Jun

    2010-01-01

    The risk perception gap between experts and lay people is based on the use of different concept on risk. It is getting increasingly important for nuclear practitioners to understand the lay people's subjective perception on nuclear safety. We proposed the nuclear effective safety index (NESI) which is based on data of the public survey of local inhabitants. We extracted the four factors for effective safety indicators; communication, trust, plant emergency response capability, and personal emergency coping skills. The latest NESI was 41.54, which was increased from 38.22 but still low. The three-year data of NESI showed the differences between genders and between sites as well as trend. The survey of antecedents of effective safety showed some meaningful events and profound differences between plant employees and local inhabitants. The NESI can be utilized as useful communication tool between the local inhabitants and nuclear practitioners. (authors)

  7. Understanding the reorientations and roles of spatial planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Spatial planning commonly adopts a diversity of functions and logics in contributing to handle growth and development. Being influenced by an array of contextual driving forces that result in specific institutional practices and policy agendas, spatial planning seems to be constantly reoriented...... in terms of its purposes and reasoning. This article sets out to explore the diverse orientations and roles that spatial planning has assumed in Denmark over a 50-year period. In doing so, the article examines the evolution of national planning policy by means of a multi-disciplinary framework comprised...... by analytical concepts drawn from planning theory, state spatial theory and discourse analysis. Based on an in-depth study, the article then attempts to qualify, illustrate and synthesise the diverse roles that spatial planning has taken in Denmark throughout that time frame. The article concludes that spatial...

  8. Nuclear Fusion Research Understanding Plasma-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Robert E.H

    2005-01-01

    It became clear in the early days of fusion research that the effects of the containment vessel (erosion of "impurities") degrade the overall fusion plasma performance. Progress in controlled nuclear fusion research over the last decade has led to magnetically confined plasmas that, in turn, are sufficiently powerful to damage the vessel structures over its lifetime. This book reviews current understanding and concepts to deal with this remaining critical design issue for fusion reactors. It reviews both progress and open questions, largely in terms of available and sought-after plasma-surface interaction data and atomic/molecular data related to these "plasma edge" issues.

  9. Spatial pattern analysis of nuclear migration in remodelled muscles during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleesha; Feng, Lin; Wasser, Martin

    2017-07-10

    Many human muscle wasting diseases are associated with abnormal nuclear localization. During metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster, multi-nucleated larval dorsal abdominal muscles either undergo cell death or are remodeled to temporary adult muscles. Muscle remodeling is associated with anti-polar nuclear migration and atrophy during early pupation followed by polar migration and muscle growth during late pupation. Muscle remodeling is a useful model to study genes involved in myonuclear migration. Previously, we showed that loss of Cathepsin-L inhibited anti-polar movements, while knockdown of autophagy-related genes affected nuclear positioning along the medial axis in late metamorphosis. To compare the phenotypic effects of gene perturbations on nuclear migration more objectively, we developed new descriptors of myonuclear distribution. To obtain nuclear pattern features, we designed an algorithm to detect and track nuclear regions inside live muscles. Nuclear tracks were used to distinguish between fast moving nuclei associated with fragments of dead muscles (sarcolytes) and slow-moving nuclei inside remodelled muscles. Nuclear spatial pattern features, such as longitudinal (lonNS) and lateral nuclear spread (latNS), allowed us to compare nuclear migration during muscle remodelling in different genetic backgrounds. Anti-polar migration leads to a lonNS decrease. As expected, lack of myonuclear migration caused by the loss of Cp1 was correlated with a significantly lower lonNS decrease. Unexpectedly, the decrease in lonNS was significantly enhanced by Atg9, Atg5 and Atg18 silencing, indicating that the loss of autophagy promotes the migration and clustering of nuclei. Loss of autophagy also caused a scattering of nuclei along the lateral axis, leading to a two-row as opposed to single row distribution in control muscles. Increased latNS resulting from knockdown of Atg9 and Atg18 was correlated with increased muscle diameter, suggesting that the wider muscle

  10. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denning, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  11. Dynamic use of geoscience information to develop scientific understanding for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    The development and safety evaluation of a nuclear waste geologic repository require a proper scientific understanding of the site response. Such scientific understanding depends on information from a number of geoscience disciplines, including geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics and hydrogeology. The information comes in four stages: (1) general regional survey data base, (2) surface-based testing, (3) exploratory shaft testing, and (4) repository construction and evaluation. A discussion is given on the dynamic use of the information through the different stages. We point out the need for abstracting, deriving and updating a quantitative spatial and process model (QSPM) to develop a scientific understanding of site responses as a crucial element in the dynamic procedure. 2 figs

  12. Spatial investigation of some uranium minerals using nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valter, Anton A.; Knight, Kim B.; Eremenko, Gelij K.; Magilin, Dmitry V.; Ponomarov, Artem A.; Pisansky, Anatoly I.; Romanenko, Alexander V.; Ponomarev, Alexander G.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, several individual grains of uranium minerals—uraninite with high content of Ca, Ca-rich boltwoodite, growths of uranophane with β-uranophane, and weeksite—from different uranium deposits were studied by a scanning nuclear microprobe. Particle-induced X-ray emission technique provided by the microprobe (µ-PIXE) was carried out to obtain a concentration and 2D distribution of elements in these minerals. In addition, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) provided by a scanning electron microscope was used. The types of minerals were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. Results of this study improved the understanding of trace elemental composition of the uranium minerals depending on their origin. Obtained signatures could be linked then to the sample provenance. Such data are important for nuclear forensics to identify the ore types and even specific ore bodies, when only small samples may be available for analysis. In this study, the µ-PIXE technique was used for obtaining the 2D distribution of trace elements that are not commonly measured by SEM-EDS at the relevant concentrations. The detected levels and precisions of elements determination by µ-PIXE were also defined. Using µ-PIXE, several micro mineral inclusions such as phosphate with high level of V and Si were identified. The age of the uranium minerals was estimated due to a significant content of radiogenic Pb that provides an additional parameter for determination of the main attributive characteristics of the minerals. This work also showed that due to its high elemental sensitivity the nuclear microprobe can be a new analytical tool for creating a nuclear forensic database from the known uranium deposits and a subsequent analysis of the intercepted illicit materials.

  13. Analogical processes in children's understanding of spatial representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Uttal, David; Gentner, Dedre

    2017-06-01

    We propose that map reading can be construed as a form of analogical mapping. We tested 2 predictions that follow from this claim: First, young children's patterns of performance in map reading tasks should parallel those found in analogical mapping tasks; and, second, children will benefit from guided alignment instructions that help them see the relational correspondences between the map and the space. In 4 experiments, 3-year-olds completed a map reading task in which they were asked to find hidden objects in a miniature room, using a corresponding map. We manipulated the availability of guided alignment (showing children the analogical mapping between maps and spaces; Experiments 1, 2, and 3a), the format of guided alignment (gesture or relational language; Experiment 2), and the iconicity of maps (Experiments 3a and 3b). We found that (a) young children's difficulties in map reading follow from known patterns of analogical development-for example, focusing on object similarity over relational similarity; and (b) guided alignment based on analogical reasoning led to substantially better performance. Results also indicated that children's map reading performance was affected by the format of guided alignment, the iconicity of the maps, and the order of tasks. The results bear on the developmental mechanisms underlying young children's learning of spatial representations and also suggest ways to support this learning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  15. Understanding "Change" through Spatial Thinking Using Google Earth in Secondary Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, X.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding geographic changes has become an indispensable element in geography education. Describing and analyzing changes in space require spatial thinking skills emphasized in geography curriculum but often pose challenges for secondary school students. This school-based research targets a specific strand of spatial thinking skills and…

  16. Spatial Reasoning and Understanding the Particulate Nature of Matter: A Middle School Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Merryn L.

    This dissertation employed a mixed-methods approach to examine the relationship between spatial reasoning ability and understanding of chemistry content for both middle school students and their science teachers. Spatial reasoning has been linked to success in learning STEM subjects (Wai, Lubinski, & Benbow, 2009). Previous studies have shown a correlation between understanding of chemistry content and spatial reasoning ability (e.g., Pribyl & Bodner, 1987; Wu & Shah, 2003: Stieff, 2013), raising the importance of developing the spatial reasoning ability of both teachers and students. Few studies examine middle school students' or in-service middle school teachers' understanding of chemistry concepts or its relation to spatial reasoning ability. The first paper in this dissertation addresses the quantitative relationship between mental rotation, a type of spatial reasoning ability, and understanding a fundamental concept in chemistry, the particulate nature of matter. The data showed a significant, positive correlation between scores on the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test of Rotations (PSVT; Bodner & Guay, 1997) and the Particulate Nature of Matter Assessment (ParNoMA; Yezierski, 2003) for middle school students prior to and after chemistry instruction. A significant difference in spatial ability among students choosing different answer choices on ParNoMA questions was also found. The second paper examined the ways in which students of different spatial abilities talked about matter and chemicals differently. Students with higher spatial ability tended to provide more of an explanation, though not necessarily in an articulate matter. In contrast, lower spatial ability students tended to use any keywords that seemed relevant, but provided little or no explanation. The third paper examined the relationship between mental reasoning and understanding chemistry for middle school science teachers. Similar to their students, a significant, positive correlation between

  17. Understanding nuclear waste management within a global framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.R.; Robinson, M.; Pankratius, W.

    1992-01-01

    Within the past two decades important questions have emerged relative to the increased use of nuclear power worldwide and to the need to store high level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. Because students in today's classrooms will become future decision-makers and caretakers of both nuclear power plants and radioactive waste repositories, they will be faced with these questions. This paper considers the value of nuclear power and radioactive waste management (RWM) as topics for science classrooms. First, nuclear power as a global educational topic is discussed. Second, the results of the first international workshop on education in the field of RWM are presented. Finally, questions for developing school classroom curriculum materials on nuclear power and RWM are considered

  18. Nuclear Power: Understanding the Economic Risks and Uncertainties

    OpenAIRE

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper identifies the fundamental elements and critical research tasks of a comprehensive analysis of the costs and benefits of nuclear power relative to investments in alternative baseload technologies. The proposed framework seeks to: (i) identify the set of expected parameter values under which nuclear power becomes cost competitive relative to alternative generating technologies; (ii) identify the main risk drivers and quantify their impacts on the costs of nuclear power; (iii) estima...

  19. A new application of the phase-field method for understanding the mechanisms of nuclear architecture reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Seirin; Tashiro, S; Awazu, A; Kobayashi, R

    2017-01-01

    Specific features of nuclear architecture are important for the functional organization of the nucleus, and chromatin consists of two forms, heterochromatin and euchromatin. Conventional nuclear architecture is observed when heterochromatin is enriched at nuclear periphery, and it represents the primary structure in the majority of eukaryotic cells, including the rod cells of diurnal mammals. In contrast to this, inverted nuclear architecture is observed when the heterochromatin is distributed at the center of the nucleus, which occurs in the rod cells of nocturnal mammals. The inverted architecture found in the rod cells of the adult mouse is formed through the reorganization of conventional architecture during terminal differentiation. Although a previous experimental approach has demonstrated the relationship between these two nuclear architecture types at the molecular level, the mechanisms underlying long-range reorganization processes remain unknown. The details of nuclear structures and their spatial and temporal dynamics remain to be elucidated. Therefore, a comprehensive approach, using mathematical modeling, is required, in order to address these questions. Here, we propose a new mathematical approach to the understanding of nuclear architecture dynamics using the phase-field method. We successfully recreated the process of nuclear architecture reorganization, and showed that it is robustly induced by physical features, independent of a specific genotype. Our study demonstrates the potential of phase-field method application in the life science fields.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization and optimal control spatial-selective 13C MRI and MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Mads Sloth; Laustsen, Christoffer; Maximov, Ivan I.

    2013-01-01

    Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction. This is ach......Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction....... This is achieved through the development of spatial-selective single-shot spiral-readout MRI and MRS experiments combined with dynamic nuclear polarization hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate on a 4.7T pre-clinical MR scanner. The method stands out from related techniques by facilitating anatomic shaped region...

  1. Nuclear Reactors for Space Power, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, William R.

    The historical development of rocketry and nuclear technology includes a specific description of Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) programs. Solar cells and fuel cells are considered as alternative power supplies for space use. Construction and operation of space power plants must include considerations of the transfer of heat energy to…

  2. Nuclear microprobe measurement of the spatial distribution on non-metals in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The spatial distributions of many non-metallic light elements and isotopes have been measured in metals by nuclear microprobe analysis, particularly through using nuclear reactions. In this paper, typical equipment and analysis techniques are briefly described. Applications are outlined, as is the range of elements that have been determined. Also, the advantages of nuclear microprobe methods are indicated, such as, their ability to discriminate against surface contamination, and their ability to measure isotopes. (orig./RB) [de

  3. Nuclear waste repository characterization: a spatial estimation/identification approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candy, J.V.; Mao, N.

    1981-03-01

    This paper considers the application of spatial estimation techniques to a groundwater aquifer and geological borehole data. It investigates the adequacy of these techniques to reliably develop contour maps from various data sets. The practice of spatial estimation is discussed and the estimator is then applied to a groundwater aquifer system and a deep geological formation. It is shown that the various statistical models must first be identified from the data and evaluated before reasonable results can be expected

  4. Survey of Public Understanding on Energy Resources including Nuclear Energy (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se-Moon; Song, Sun-Ja

    2007-01-01

    Women in Nuclear-Korea (WINK) surveyed the public understanding on various energy resources in early September 2006 to offer the result for establishment of the nuclear communication policy. The reason why this survey includes other energy resources is because the previous works are only limited on nuclear energy, and also aimed to know the public's opinion on the present communication skill of nuclear energy for the public understanding. The present study is purposed of having data how public understands nuclear energy compared to other energies, such as fossil fuels, hydro power, and other sustainable energies. The data obtained from this survey have shown different results according to the responded group; age, gender, residential area, etc. Responded numbers are more than 2,000 of general public and university students. The survey result shows that nuclear understanding is more negative in women than in men, and is more negative in young than older age

  5. Spatial abilities, Earth science conceptual understanding, and psychological gender of university non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Alice A. (Jill)

    Research has shown the presence of many Earth science misconceptions and conceptual difficulties that may impede concept understanding, and has also identified a number of categories of spatial ability. Although spatial ability has been linked to high performance in science, some researchers believe it has been overlooked in traditional education. Evidence exists that spatial ability can be improved. This correlational study investigated the relationship among Earth science conceptual understanding, three types of spatial ability, and psychological gender, a self-classification that reflects socially-accepted personality and gender traits. A test of Earth science concept understanding, the Earth Science Concepts (ESC) test, was developed and field tested from 2001 to 2003 in 15 sections of university classes. Criterion validity was .60, significant at the .01 level. Spearman/Brown reliability was .74 and Kuder/Richardson reliability was .63. The Purdue Visualization of Rotations (PVOR) (mental rotation), the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (spatial perception), the Differential Aptitude Test: Space Relations (DAT) (spatial visualization), and the Bem Inventory (BI) (psychological gender) were administered to 97 non-major university students enrolled in undergraduate science classes. Spearman correlations revealed moderately significant correlations at the .01 level between ESC scores and each of the three spatial ability test scores. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that PVOR scores were the best predictor of ESC scores, and showed that spatial ability scores accounted for 27% of the total variation in ESC scores. Spatial test scores were moderately or weakly correlated with each other. No significant correlations were found among BI scores and other test scores. Scantron difficulty analysis of ESC items produced difficulty ratings ranging from 33.04 to 96.43, indicating the percentage of students who answered incorrectly. Mean score on the ESC was 34

  6. Effects of Representation Sequences and Spatial Ability on Students' Scientific Understandings about the Mechanism of Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Lin, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of representation sequences and spatial ability on students' scientific understandings about the mechanism of breathing in human beings. 130 seventh graders were assigned to two groups with different sequential combinations of static and dynamic representations: SD group (i.e., viewing…

  7. Understanding the spatial pattern of urban crime: a developing country's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Umar, F.; Cheshire, J.; Johnson, S.

    2015-01-01

    Much of the published spatial analysis research of crime to date has been focused on Euro-American cities. This paper attempts to provide an insight on how we can better understand the spatial pattern of crime in a typical developing country’s setting. Data were obtained through extensive field mapping, a block environmental inventory (BEI) and a crime victimization survey to generate a GIS-database of the study area. Grid thematic maps (GTM) for different crime types were produced for visual...

  8. Nuclear planetology: understanding planetary mantle and crust formation in the light of nuclear and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Goetz

    2017-04-01

    The Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram is one of the most important diagrams in astronomy. In a HR diagram, the luminosity of stars and/or stellar remnants (white dwarf stars, WD's), relative to the luminosity of the sun, is plotted versus their surface temperatures (Teff). The Earth shows a striking similarity in size (radius ≈ 6.371 km) and Teff of its outer core surface (Teff ≈ 3800 K at the core-mantle-boundary) with old WD's (radius ≈ 6.300 km) like WD0346+246 (Teff ≈ 3820 K after ≈ 12.7 Ga [1]), which plot in the HR diagram close to the low-mass extension of the stellar population or main sequence. In the light of nuclear planetology [2], Earth-like planets are regarded as old, down-cooled and differentiated black dwarfs (Fe-C BLD's) after massive decompression, the most important nuclear reactions involved being 56Fe(γ,α)52Cr (etc.), possibly responsible for extreme terrestrial glaciations events ("snowball" Earth), together with (γ,n), (γ,p) and fusion reactions like 12C(α,γ)16O. The latter reaction might have caused oxidation of the planet from inside out. Nuclear planetology is a new research field, tightly constrained by a coupled 187Re-232Th-238U systematics [3-5]. By means of nuclear/quantum physics and taking the theory of relativity into account, it aims at understanding the thermal and chemical evolution of Fe-C BLD's after gravitational contraction (e.g. Mercury) or Fermi-pressure controlled collapse (e.g. Earth) events after massive decompression, leading possibly to an r-process event, towards the end of their cooling period [2]. So far and based upon 187Re-232Th-238U nuclear geochronometry, the Fe-C BLD hypothesis can successfully explain the global terrestrial MORB 232Th/238U signature [5]. Thus, it may help to elucidate the DM (depleted mantle), EMI (enriched mantle 1), EMII (enriched mantle 2) or HIMU (high U/Pb) reservoirs [6], and the 187Os/188Os isotopic dichotomy in Archean magmatic rocks and sediments [7]. Here I present a

  9. Understanding Iranian Foreign Policy - The Case of Iranian Nuclear Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Hadzikadunic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the complexity of the Iranian foreign policy through the case of Iranian nuclear program. The paper aims to assess foreign policy orientations and compares actions of the last three Iranian presidents, Mohammad Khatami, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and current Hassan Rouhani in dealing with the international community (IC in pursuing its nuclear program. This assessment would not be complete without reference to the Iranian supreme leader Ali Khamenei who is actual head of the state and the most powerful political authority. This paper also relates Iranian foreign policy expectation to competing theories of international relations to identify the most dominant or the most consistent policy orientation. Its aim is to strengthen realist and power-based explanations that have dominated the discourse on Middle Eastern in general and Iranian foreign policy in particular. In this context, a number of questions will be addressed here. To what extend was Iranian negotiation with the IC over its nuclear program consistent throughout these three presidencies? What has changed, if anything, from Iranian foreign policy perspective and why? Can Iranian foreign policy behavior on this specific topic and in this specific time be explained through any international relations theory? As there are many other questions, so there are many theories to examine and explain true Iranian intentions, those below the surface of declared goals (Hadzikadunic, 2014. The methods employed in answering these questions are largely structured around a chronological account and comparative approach. It is also based on the analysis of foreign policy discourse and the assessment of key decision makers.

  10. Local people's understanding of risk from civil nuclear power in the Chinese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang

    2014-04-01

    This paper analyses how people understand civil nuclear risk in the local context in China. The findings of the paper are based on six months of fieldwork research on a potential inland nuclear power project in Dapu townland in 2007 and 2008. Understanding varies greatly depending on local context, with economic, geographic and social factors influencing the way people view risks and benefits. I argue that when local people do not have enough 'scientific knowledge' to understand risk from nuclear power, they can still use their experience of everyday life to reflect rationally on the risks and benefits that they face. I conclude that when local people trust in nuclear technology and 'the government', and are unaware of nuclear risk it is partly because of their over-dependence on institutions and experts. However, despite their lack of agency, local people rationally calculate risk and benefit in accordance with their social identity and geographical location.

  11. Measuring spatial patterns in floodplains: A step towards understanding the complexity of floodplain ecosystems: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scown, Murray W.; Thoms, Martin C.; DeJager, Nathan R.; Gilvear, David J.; Greenwood, Malcolm T.; Thoms, Martin C.; Wood, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Floodplains can be viewed as complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998) because they are comprised of many different biophysical components, such as morphological features, soil groups and vegetation communities as well as being sites of key biogeochemical processing (Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions and feedbacks among the biophysical components often result in additional phenomena occuring over a range of scales, often in the absence of any controlling factors (sensu Hallet, 1990). This emergence of new biophysical features and rates of processing can lead to alternative stable states which feed back into floodplain adaptive cycles (cf. Hughes, 1997; Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions between different biophysical components, feedbacks, self emergence and scale are all key properties of complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998; Phillips, 2003; Murray et al., 2014) and therefore will influence the manner in which we study and view spatial patterns. Measuring the spatial patterns of floodplain biophysical components is a prerequisite to examining and understanding these ecosystems as complex adaptive systems. Elucidating relationships between pattern and process, which are intrinsically linked within floodplains (Ward et al., 2002), is dependent upon an understanding of spatial pattern. This knowledge can help river scientists determine the major drivers, controllers and responses of floodplain structure and function, as well as the consequences of altering those drivers and controllers (Hughes and Cass, 1997; Whited et al., 2007). Interactions and feedbacks between physical, chemical and biological components of floodplain ecosystems create and maintain a structurally diverse and dynamic template (Stanford et al., 2005). This template influences subsequent interactions between components that consequently affect system trajectories within floodplains (sensu Bak et al., 1988). Constructing and evaluating models used to predict floodplain ecosystem responses to

  12. Three-Dimensional Nuclear Chart--Understanding Nuclear Physics and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nuclear charts were created using toy blocks, which represent the atomic masses per nucleon number and the total half-lives for each nucleus in the entire region of the nuclear mass. The bulk properties of the nuclei can be easily understood by using these charts. Subsequently, these charts were used in outreach activities…

  13. How to understand requirements of nuclear and defense welding contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, O.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a basic requirements control plan for contract documentation and software validation and maintenance for nuclear operation. The objective is designing an integrated configuration control plan of both old, new, large or small, critical and noncritical software programs. There are positive advantages to managing a planned requirements program for product delivery or business operations. A requirements baseline like this is preferable to many iterations of design effort in the maintenance of nonbaselined programs, documentation and software. The plan that applies program requirements needs to address different levels of criticality and define matching program requirements for those levels. The plan needs to describe old vs. new requirements and define scope/responsibility that is needed to support the design, development and completion of these program requirements. Presented are management goals, relative costs, quality assurance goals, and program assessment plans. Outlined is a set of program QA requirements and document/software functional requirements for planning of program; also presented are some criteria for criticality assessment to establish levels of contract documentation or software activity. The paper shows two examples of planning work on this configuration control plan. The integrated configuration control requirements plan can be computer based or paper based for activity. It is designed to cover existing or new requirements and to cover either no documentation or all documentation

  14. Using chemistry and microfluidics to understand the spatial dynamics of complex biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, Christian J; Runyon, Matthew K; Lucchetta, Elena M; Price, Jessica M; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the spatial dynamics of biochemical networks is both fundamentally important for understanding life at the systems level and also has practical implications for medicine, engineering, biology, and chemistry. Studies at the level of individual reactions provide essential information about the function, interactions, and localization of individual molecular species and reactions in a network. However, analyzing the spatial dynamics of complex biochemical networks at this level is difficult. Biochemical networks are nonequilibrium systems containing dozens to hundreds of reactions with nonlinear and time-dependent interactions, and these interactions are influenced by diffusion, flow, and the relative values of state-dependent kinetic parameters. To achieve an overall understanding of the spatial dynamics of a network and the global mechanisms that drive its function, networks must be analyzed as a whole, where all of the components and influential parameters of a network are simultaneously considered. Here, we describe chemical concepts and microfluidic tools developed for network-level investigations of the spatial dynamics of these networks. Modular approaches can be used to simplify these networks by separating them into modules, and simple experimental or computational models can be created by replacing each module with a single reaction. Microfluidics can be used to implement these models as well as to analyze and perturb the complex network itself with spatial control on the micrometer scale. We also describe the application of these network-level approaches to elucidate the mechanisms governing the spatial dynamics of two networkshemostasis (blood clotting) and early patterning of the Drosophila embryo. To investigate the dynamics of the complex network of hemostasis, we simplified the network by using a modular mechanism and created a chemical model based on this mechanism by using microfluidics. Then, we used the mechanism and the model to

  15. Anatomy of Teaching Anatomy: Do Prosected Cross Sections Improve Students Understanding of Spatial and Radiological Anatomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Samarakoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cadaveric dissections and prosections have traditionally been part of undergraduate medical teaching. Materials and Methods. Hundred and fifty-nine first-year students in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, were invited to participate in the above study. Students were randomly allocated to two age and gender matched groups. Both groups were exposed to identical series of lectures regarding anatomy of the abdomen and conventional cadaveric prosections of the abdomen. The test group (n=77, 48.4% was also exposed to cadaveric cross-sectional slices of the abdomen to which the control group (n=82, 51.6% was blinded. At the end of the teaching session both groups were assessed by using their performance in a timed multiple choice question paper as well as ability to identify structures in abdominal CT films. Results. Scores for spatial and radiological anatomy were significantly higher among the test group when compared with the control group (P<0.05, CI 95%. Majority of the students in both control and test groups agreed that cadaveric cross section may be useful for them to understand spatial and radiological anatomy. Conclusion. Introduction of cadaveric cross-sectional prosections may help students to understand spatial and radiological anatomy better.

  16. The Effect of Simulated Interaural Frequency Mismatch on Speech Understanding and Spatial Release From Masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupell, Matthew J; Stoelb, Corey A; Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2018-01-15

    The binaural-hearing system interaurally compares inputs, which underlies the ability to localize sound sources and to better understand speech in complex acoustic environments. Cochlear implants (CIs) are provided in both ears to increase binaural-hearing benefits; however, bilateral CI users continue to struggle with understanding speech in the presence of interfering sounds and do not achieve the same level of spatial release from masking (SRM) as normal-hearing listeners. One reason for diminished SRM in CI users could be that the electrode arrays are inserted at different depths in each ear, which would cause an interaural frequency mismatch. Because interaural frequency mismatch diminishes the salience of interaural differences for relatively simple stimuli, it may also diminish binaural benefits for spectral-temporally complex stimuli like speech. This study evaluated the effect of simulated frequency-to-place mismatch on speech understanding and SRM. Eleven normal-hearing listeners were tested on a speech understanding task. There was a female target talker who spoke five-word sentences from a closed set of words. There were two interfering male talkers who spoke unrelated sentences. Nonindividualized head-related transfer functions were used to simulate a virtual auditory space. The target was presented from the front (0°), and the interfering speech was either presented from the front (colocated) or from 90° to the right (spatially separated). Stimuli were then processed by an eight-channel vocoder with tonal carriers to simulate aspects of listening through a CI. Frequency-to-place mismatch ("shift") was introduced by increasing the center frequency of the synthesis filters compared with the corresponding analysis filters. Speech understanding was measured for different shifts (0, 3, 4.5, and 6 mm) and target-to-masker ratios (TMRs: +10 to -10 dB). SRM was calculated as the difference in the percentage of correct words for the colocated and separated

  17. Old foes, new understandings: nuclear entry of small non-enveloped DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nikta; Panté, Nelly

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear import of viral genomes is an important step of the infectious cycle for viruses that replicate in the nucleus of their host cells. Although most viruses use the cellular nuclear import machinery or some components of this machinery, others have developed sophisticated ways to reach the nucleus. Some of these have been known for some time; however, recent studies have changed our understanding of how some non-enveloped DNA viruses access the nucleus. For example, parvoviruses enter the nucleus through small disruptions of the nuclear membranes and nuclear lamina, and adenovirus tugs at the nuclear pore complex, using kinesin-1, to disassemble their capsids and deliver viral proteins and genomes into the nucleus. Here we review recent findings of the nuclear import strategies of three small non-enveloped DNA viruses, including adenovirus, parvovirus, and the polyomavirus simian virus 40. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear medicine image registration by spatially noncoherent interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, C; Malet, Y; Sirat, G; Grucker, D

    2000-02-01

    This article introduces a technique for obtaining high-resolution body contour data in the same coordinate frame as that of a rotating gamma camera, using a miniature range finder, the conoscope, mounted on the camera gantry. One potential application of the technique is accurate coregistration in longitudinal brain SPECT studies, using the face of the patient (or "mask"), instead of SPECT slices, to coregister subsequent acquisitions involving the brain. Conoscopic holography is an interferometry technique that relies on spatially incoherent light interference in birefringent crystals. In this study, the conoscope was used to measure the absolute distance (Z) between a light source reflected from the skin and its observation plane. This light was emitted by a 0.2-mW laser diode. A scanning system was used to image the face during SPECT acquisition. The system consisted of a motor-driven mirror (Y axis) and the gamma-camera gantry (1 profile was obtained for each rotation step, X axis). The system was calibrated to place the conoscopic measurements and SPECT slices in the same coordinate frame. Through a simple and robust calibration of the system, the SE for measurements performed on geometric shapes was less than 2 mm, i.e., less than the actual pixel size of the SPECT data. Biometric measurements of an anthropomorphic brain phantom were within 3%-5% of actual values. The mask data were used to register images of a brain phantom and of a volunteer's brain, respectively. The rigid transformation that allowed the merging of masks by visual inspection was applied to the 2 sets of SPECT slices to perform the fusion of the data. At the cost of an additional low-cost setup integrated into the gamma-camera gantry, real-time data about the surface of the head were obtained. As in all other surface-based techniques (as opposed to volume-based techniques), this method allows the match of data independently from the dataset of interest and facilitates further registration

  19. Public relations and public understanding in the nuclear industry in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Michel, A. [Belgonucleaire, Brussels (Belgium)

    1995-12-31

    Before talking about public understanding and public relations in the nuclear industry in Europe, a word about the mosaic structure of the European energy policy and public is required because a similar structure will be found in the European public understanding policy. Afterwards, we explain what communications tools are available and how the different European countries apply them.

  20. Aware Computing in Spatial Language Understanding Guided by Cognitively Inspired Knowledge Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Yokota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental image directed semantic theory (MIDST has proposed an omnisensory mental image model and its description language Lmd. This language is designed to represent and compute human intuitive knowledge of space and can provide multimedia expressions with intermediate semantic descriptions in predicate logic. It is hypothesized that such knowledge and semantic descriptions are controlled by human attention toward the world and therefore subjective to each human individual. This paper describes Lmd expression of human subjective knowledge of space and its application to aware computing in cross-media operation between linguistic and pictorial expressions as spatial language understanding.

  1. Applications of Geographical Information Systems in Understanding Spatial Distribution of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rob

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Geographical Information Systems (GIS are becoming useful tools in making strategic decisions when-ever data are found to have spatial distribution. Federal, state, and local governments are using GIS for assessment and planning in such areas as housing, healthcare, land use, natural resources, environmental monitoring and transportation. Companies are also using it to expand and consolidate existing businesses, perform market analysis, and to find optimum delivery routes. In this paper, we illustrate the usefulness of GIS in the analysis and presentation of spatially distributed asthma prevalence among school children (13-17 years in the New York City area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of asthma survey results distributed over the zip codes of a large city. Preliminary results show good correlation between asthma and poverty. They also correlate well with the spatial distribution of asthma hospitalization data. Results reveal an overall asthma prevalence of ~ 16% as compared to the national average of ~12% for a similar age group (5-17 years. When comparing asthma rates among the predominant racial groups of the city - Blacks and Hispanics are found to have a higher prevalence than Whites or Asians. The inner-city population shows a significantly higher asthma prevalence than those in the suburbs. This study shows our understanding of asthma prevalence in a dimension that could not have been possible prior to the availability of GIS. The results will help us making further decisions in planning for asthma research.

  2. Understanding structure of urban traffic network based on spatial-temporal correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfang; Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong; Han, Shixiu; Dong, Honghui

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the structural characteristics of urban traffic network comprehensively can provide references for improving road utilization rate and alleviating traffic congestion. This paper focuses on the spatial-temporal correlations between different pairs of traffic series and proposes a complex network-based method of constructing the urban traffic network. In the network, the nodes represent road segments, and an edge between a pair of nodes is added depending on the result of significance test for the corresponding spatial-temporal correlation. Further, a modified PageRank algorithm, named the geographical weight-based PageRank algorithm (GWPA), is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of important segments in the road network. Finally, experiments are conducted by using three kinds of traffic series collected from the urban road network in Beijing. Experimental results show that the urban traffic networks constructed by three traffic variables all indicate both small-world and scale-free characteristics. Compared with the results of PageRank algorithm, GWPA is proved to be valid in evaluating the importance of segments and identifying the important segments with small degree.

  3. Progress in Understanding the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.W. Thomas; P.A.M. Guichon

    2007-01-03

    At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions.

  4. Nuclear distributions of NUP62 and NUP214 suggest architectural diversity and spatial patterning among nuclear pore complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Kinoshita

    Full Text Available The shape of nuclei in many adherent cultured cells approximates an oblate ellipsoid, with contralateral flattened surfaces facing the culture plate or the medium. Observations of cultured cell nuclei from orthogonal perspectives revealed that nucleoporin p62 (NUP62 and nucleoporin 214 (NUP214 are differentially distributed between nuclear pore complexes on the flattened surfaces and peripheral rim of the nucleus. High resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED immunofluorescence microscopy resolved individual NPCs, and suggested both heterogeneity and microheterogeneity in NUP62 and NUP214 immunolabeling among in NPC populations. Similar to nuclear domains and interphase chromosome territories, architectural diversity and spatial patterning of NPCs may be an intrinsic property of the nucleus that is linked to the functions and organization of underlying chromatin.

  5. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, Peter Donald [Idaho National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization’s nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a “Cyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)” focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  6. Place mapping and the role of spatial scale in understanding landowner views of fire and fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Cacciapaglia; Laurie Yung; Michael E. Patterson

    2011-01-01

    Place mapping is emerging as a way to understand the spatial components of people's relationships with particular locations and how these relate to support for management proposals. But despite the spatial focus of place mapping, scale is rarely explicitly examined in such exercises. This is particularly problematic since scalar definitions and configurations have...

  7. Temporal and spatial variations of radioactive cesium levels in Northeast Japan following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Takaomi

    2016-10-01

    Radioactive emissions into the environment from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident led to global contamination. Radionuclides such as 131 I, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs were further transported to North America and Europe. Thus, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident is a global concern for both human health and the ecosystem because a number of countries ban or impose restrictions the import of Japanese products. In the present study, three-year (May 2011 to May 2014) fluctuations and accumulations of Cs, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs in two salmonid fish, white-spotted char and masu salmon were examined in Northeast Japan. The total Cs, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs levels in the fish gradually decreased throughout the three-year studied period after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident; however, higher levels (more than 100 Bq kg -1 ) were still detected in the Fukushima prefecture and neighboring prefectures in Japan 3 years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Spatial radiocesium levels gradually decreased with increasing distance from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (Fukushima prefecture). The radiocesium levels facing the Pacific Ocean area were generally higher than those facing the Sea of Japan area. These results suggest that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant are still widely distributed and remain in the natural environment in Northeast Japan.

  8. Systematic spatial and stoichiometric screening towards understanding the surface of ultrasmall oxygenated silicon nanocrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niaz, Shanawer, E-mail: shanawersi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Molecular Engineering Laboratory, at the Department of Physics, University of Patras, Patras, GR-26500 (Greece); Zdetsis, Aristides D.; Koukaras, Emmanuel N. [Molecular Engineering Laboratory, at the Department of Physics, University of Patras, Patras, GR-26500 (Greece); Gülseren, Oǧuz [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Sadiq, Imran [Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Understanding surface science of oxygenated silicon nanocrystals by means of their composition, stoichiometry and spatial distribution. • Drastic change observed in binding energy, localization of frontier orbitals and HOMO-LUMO gap up to 1.48 eV. • Might be a safe alternative of size dependent bandgap tunability. - Abstract: In most of the realistic ab initio and model calculations which have appeared on the emission of light from silicon nanocrystals, the role of surface oxygen has been usually ignored, underestimated or completely ruled out. We investigate theoretically, by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) possible modes of oxygen bonding in hydrogen terminated silicon quantum dots using as a representative case of the Si{sub 29} nanocrystal. We have considered Bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Doubly-bonded oxygen (DBO), hydroxyl (OH) and Mix of these oxidizing agents. Due to stoichiometry, all comparisons performed are unbiased with respect to composition whereas spatial distribution of oxygen species pointed out drastic change in electronic and cohesive characteristics of nanocrytals. From an overall perspective of this study, it is shown that bridge bonded oxygenated Si nanocrystals accompanied by Mix have higher binding energies and large electronic gap compared to nanocrystals with doubly bonded oxygen atoms. In addition, it is observed that the presence of OH along with BBO, DBO and mixed configurations further lowers electronic gaps and binding energies but trends in same fashion. It is also demonstrated that within same composition, oxidizing constituent, along with their spatial distribution substantially alters binding energy, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap (up to 1.48 eV) and localization of frontier orbitals.

  9. Systematic spatial and stoichiometric screening towards understanding the surface of ultrasmall oxygenated silicon nanocrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niaz, Shanawer; Zdetsis, Aristides D.; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Gülseren, Oǧuz; Sadiq, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Understanding surface science of oxygenated silicon nanocrystals by means of their composition, stoichiometry and spatial distribution. • Drastic change observed in binding energy, localization of frontier orbitals and HOMO-LUMO gap up to 1.48 eV. • Might be a safe alternative of size dependent bandgap tunability. - Abstract: In most of the realistic ab initio and model calculations which have appeared on the emission of light from silicon nanocrystals, the role of surface oxygen has been usually ignored, underestimated or completely ruled out. We investigate theoretically, by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) possible modes of oxygen bonding in hydrogen terminated silicon quantum dots using as a representative case of the Si 29 nanocrystal. We have considered Bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Doubly-bonded oxygen (DBO), hydroxyl (OH) and Mix of these oxidizing agents. Due to stoichiometry, all comparisons performed are unbiased with respect to composition whereas spatial distribution of oxygen species pointed out drastic change in electronic and cohesive characteristics of nanocrytals. From an overall perspective of this study, it is shown that bridge bonded oxygenated Si nanocrystals accompanied by Mix have higher binding energies and large electronic gap compared to nanocrystals with doubly bonded oxygen atoms. In addition, it is observed that the presence of OH along with BBO, DBO and mixed configurations further lowers electronic gaps and binding energies but trends in same fashion. It is also demonstrated that within same composition, oxidizing constituent, along with their spatial distribution substantially alters binding energy, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap (up to 1.48 eV) and localization of frontier orbitals.

  10. New understanding of rhizosphere processes enabled by advances in molecular and spatially resolved techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the role played by microorganisms within soil systems is challenged by the unique intersection of physics, chemistry, mineralogy and biology in fostering habitat for soil microbial communities. To address these challenges will require observations across multiple spatial and temporal scales to capture the dynamics and emergent behavior from complex and interdependent processes. The heterogeneity and complexity of the rhizosphere require advanced techniques that press the simultaneous frontiers of spatial resolution, analyte sensitivity and specificity, reproducibility, large dynamic range, and high throughput. Fortunately many exciting technical advancements are now available to inform and guide the development of new hypotheses. The aim of this Special issue is to provide a holistic view of the rhizosphere in the perspective of modern molecular biology methodologies that enabled a highly-focused, detailed view on the processes in the rhizosphere, including numerous, strong and complex interactions between plant roots, soil constituents and microorganisms. We discuss the current rhizosphere research challenges and knowledge gaps, as well as perspectives and approaches using newly available state-of-the-art toolboxes. These new approaches and methodologies allow the study of rhizosphere processes and properties, and rhizosphere as a central component of ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles.

  11. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  12. Improving Understanding of Spatial Heterogeneity in Mountain Ecohydrology with Multispectral Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, O.; Molotch, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain regions are a critical component of the hydrologic system. These regions are extremely heterogeneous, with dramatic topographic, climatic, ecologic and hydrologic variations occurring over very short distances. This heterogeneity makes understanding changes in these environments difficult. Commonly used satellite data are often too coarse to resolve processes at appropriate scales and point measurements are typically unrepresentative of the wider region. The rapid rise of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) offers a potential solution to the scale-related inadequacies of satellite and ground-based observing systems. Using UAS, spatially distributed datasets can be collected at high resolution (i.e. cm), on demand, and can therefore facilitate improved understanding of mountain ecohydrology. We deployed a custom built multispectral - visible (RGB), near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) - UAS at a weekly interval over the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research (NWT LTER) saddle catchment at 3500masl in the Colorado Rockies. This system was used to map surface water pathways, land cover and topography, and quantify ecohydrologic variables including, snow depth, vegetation productivity and surface soil moisture at 5-50cm resolution across an 80ha study area. This presentation will discuss the techniques, methods and merits of using UAS derived multispectral data for ecohydrologic research in mountain regions. We will also present preliminary findings from our survey time series at NWT LTER and a discussion of the potential insights that these datasets can provide. Key questions to be addressed are: 1) how does spatial variability in snow depth impact soil moisture and vegetation productivity, 2) how can UAS help us to identify ecohydrologic `hotspots' and `hot moments' across heterogeneous landscapes.

  13. Canadian programs on understanding and managing aging degradation of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadha, J.A.; Pachner, J.

    1989-06-01

    Maintaining adequate safety and reliability of nuclear power plants and nuclear power plant life assurance and life extension are growing in importance as nuclear plants get older. Age-related degradation of plant components is complex and not fully understood. This paper provides an overview of the Canadian approach and the main activities and their results towards understanding and managing age-related degradation of nuclear power plant components, structures and systems. A number of pro-active programs have been initiated to anticipate, detect and mitigate potential aging degradation at an early stage before any serious impact on plant safety and reliability. These programs include Operational Safety Management Program, Nuclear Plant Life Assurance Program, systematic plant condition assessment, refurbishment and upgrading, post-service examination and testing, equipment qualification, research and development, and participation in the IAEA programs on safety aspects of nuclear power plant aging and life extension. A regulatory policy on nuclear power plants is under development and will be based on the domestic as well as foreign and international studies and experience

  14. Memorandum of Understanding Completion and Acceptance of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NISHIKAWA, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is written to provide clear direction with respect to roles, responsibilities, obligations, and expectations of each organization identified. It functions as an agreement between the Operations, Construction Projects and Startup Organizations within the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project

  15. Education and communication to increase public understanding of nuclear technology peaceful uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S.; Passos, Igor S., E-mail: denise@omiccron.com.br [Omiccron Programacao Grafica, Atibaia, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear technology helps to improve the quality of our everyday life. Nevertheless, there is still great misinformation and the issue divides public opinion. Several surveys were conducted over the past years to study public acceptance of Nuclear Technology in Brazil and worldwide. GlobeScan (2005), for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Eurobarometers (2010), published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD), report similar socio-demographic trends: the higher the education level, the more favorable is public opinion towards nuclear power. Taking into account education and communication are crucial to increase public knowledge and understanding of the benefits of Nuclear Technology and that Internet access has increased strongly all over the country, this educational project aims to take advantage of the potential of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to disseminate the peaceful use of nuclear technology and its benefits, informing children and teenagers, as well as parents and teachers, who are most often unaware of the matter. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly for both public and private schools all over the country, this web-based educational project, entitled Radioatividades (Radioactivities), provides short courses, curiosities and interactive activities covering topics related to Nuclear Technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry, art and electric power generation. The project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. Our target is the dissemination of information, promoting the benefits of Nuclear Technology for new generations, contributing to public acceptance of Nuclear Technology, combating misinformation in our society, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating

  16. Education and communication to increase public understanding of nuclear technology peaceful uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.; Passos, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear technology helps to improve the quality of our everyday life. Nevertheless, there is still great misinformation and the issue divides public opinion. Several surveys were conducted over the past years to study public acceptance of Nuclear Technology in Brazil and worldwide. GlobeScan (2005), for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Eurobarometers (2010), published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD), report similar socio-demographic trends: the higher the education level, the more favorable is public opinion towards nuclear power. Taking into account education and communication are crucial to increase public knowledge and understanding of the benefits of Nuclear Technology and that Internet access has increased strongly all over the country, this educational project aims to take advantage of the potential of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to disseminate the peaceful use of nuclear technology and its benefits, informing children and teenagers, as well as parents and teachers, who are most often unaware of the matter. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly for both public and private schools all over the country, this web-based educational project, entitled Radioatividades (Radioactivities), provides short courses, curiosities and interactive activities covering topics related to Nuclear Technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry, art and electric power generation. The project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. Our target is the dissemination of information, promoting the benefits of Nuclear Technology for new generations, contributing to public acceptance of Nuclear Technology, combating misinformation in our society, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating

  17. Spatial profiling of nuclear receptor transcription patterns over the course of Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Ronit; Hu, Jack; Krause, Henry M

    2013-07-08

    Previous work has shown that many of the 18 family members of Drosophila nuclear receptor transcription factors function in a temporal hierarchy to coordinate developmental progression and growth with the rate limiting process of metabolism. To gain further insight into these interactions and processes, we have undertaken a whole-family analysis of nuclear receptor mRNA spatial expression patterns over the entire process of embryogenesis, as well as the 3rd instar wandering larva stage, by using high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, the patterns of expression are remarkably consistent with previously mapped spatial activity profiles documented during the same time points, with similar hot spots and temporal profiles in endocrine and metabolically important tissues. Among the more remarkable of the findings is that the majority of mRNA expression patterns observed show striking subcellular distributions, indicating potentially critical roles in the control of protein synthesis and subsequent subcellular distributions. These patterns will serve as a useful reference for future studies on the tissue-specific roles and interactions of nuclear receptor proteins, partners, cofactors and ligands.

  18. Partitioning nuclear and chloroplast variation at multiple spatial scales in the neotropical epiphytic orchid, Laelia rubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapnell, Dorset W; Hamrick, J L

    2004-09-01

    Insights into processes that lead to the distribution of genetic variation within plant species require recognition of the importance of both pollen and seed movement. Here we investigate the contributions of pollen and seed movement to overall gene flow in the Central American epiphytic orchid, Laelia rubescens. Genetic diversity and structure were examined at multiple spatial scales in the tropical dry forest of Costa Rica using nuclear (allozymes) and chloroplast restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers, which were found to be diverse (allozymes, P = 73.3%; HE = 0.174; cpDNA, HE = 0.741). Nuclear genetic structure (FSTn) was low at every spatial scale (0.005-0.091). Chloroplast markers displayed more structure (0.073-0.254) but relatively similar patterns. Neither genome displayed significant isolation-by-distance. Pollen and seed dispersal rates did not differ significantly from one another (mp/ms = 1.40) at the broadest geographical scale, among sites throughout Costa Rica. However, relative contributions of pollen and seeds to gene flow were scale-dependent, with different mechanisms determining the dominant mode of gene flow at different spatial scales. Much seed dispersal is highly localized within the maternal population, while some seeds enter the air column and are dispersed over considerable distances. At the intermediate scale (10s to 100s of metres) pollinators are responsible for substantial pollen flow. This species appears capable of distributing its genes across the anthropogenically altered landscape that now characterizes its Costa Rican dry forest habitat.

  19. Understanding the Performance of Automotive Catalysts via Spatial Resolution of Reactions inside Honeycomb Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge Jr, William P. [ORNL; Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL

    2017-11-01

    By directly resolving spatial and temporal species distributions within operating honeycomb monolith catalysts, spatially resolved capillary inlet mass spectrometry (SpaciMS) provides a uniquely enabling perspective for advancing automotive catalysis. Specifically, the ability to follow the spatiotemporal evolution of reactions throughout the catalyst is a significant advantage over inlet-and-effluent-limited analysis. Intracatalyst resolution elucidates numerous catalyst details including the network and sequence of reactions, clarifying reaction pathways; the relative rates of different reactions and impacts of operating conditions and catalyst state; and reaction dynamics and intermediate species that exist only within the catalyst. These details provide a better understanding of how the catalyst functions and have basic and practical benefits; e.g., catalyst system design; strategies for on-road catalyst state assessment, control, and on-board diagnostics; and creating robust and accurate predictive catalyst models. Moreover, such spatiotemporally distributed data provide for critical model assessment, and identification of improvement opportunities that might not be apparent from effluent assessment; i.e., while an incorrectly formulated model may provide correct effluent predictions, one that can accurately predict the spatiotemporal evolution of reactions along the catalyst channels will be more robust, accurate, and reliable. In such ways, intracatalyst diagnostics comprehensively enable improved design and development tools, and faster and lower-cost development of more efficient and durable automotive catalyst systems. Beyond these direct contributions, SpaciMS has spawned and been applied to enable other analytical techniques for resolving transient distributed intracatalyst performance. This chapter focuses on SpaciMS applications and associated catalyst insights and improvements, with specific sections related to lean NOx traps, selective catalytic

  20. The Abilities of Understanding Spatial Relations, Spatial Orientation, and Spatial Visualization Affect 3D Product Design Performance: Using Carton Box Design as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kun-Hsi

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) product design is an essential ability that students of subjects related to product design must acquire. The factors that affect designers' performance in 3D design are numerous, one of which is spatial abilities. Studies have reported that spatial abilities can be used to effectively predict people's performance in…

  1. Progress in understanding the nuclear equation of state at the quark level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Guichon, P.A.M. [SPhN-DAPNlA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-12-15

    At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions. (Author)

  2. Mozambican Student-Teachers' Perceptions of Developing Their Understanding of Teaching Spatially Dependent Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis da Costa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article presents student-teachers' perceptions of spatial 3D-descriptive geometry education in Mozambique. To interpret a 3D object through 2D projections and vice-versa requires spatial abilities that are deemed crucial for learning in any spatially dependent discipline such as 3D-descriptive geometry, engineering and technical-vocational…

  3. Status and Application of Spatial Information Technology as a Nuclear Verification Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Seong Youn; Shin, Jang Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation And Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The spatial information like satellite imagery and GIS data has been widely used for site development planning and monitoring in the area where the access is not allowed with any reason. The IAEA adopts this new method of analysis for enhancing its verification capability and is utilizing to search if there is any undeclared nuclear activities in the nuclear facilities worldwide. The ROK entered the group of the leading countries in the field of space technology with the successful launching of the KompSat I and II, and holds its high position in the IT technology which can draw useful analytic results from the satellite imagery. It implies that the ROK has some potential and related infra required for using the satellite imagery for the purpose of nuclear safeguards. However, we are in the very early stage to apply these advanced techniques to nuclear verification, because we don't have enough work forces enough to deal with these useful tools. It is necessary to review some previous examples about establishing satellite imagery analysis system like the IAEA. In this report, the IAEA's activities related verification using satellite imagery is reviewed and some examples on safeguards application is presented. A way to use satellite images for national inspection also is suggested

  4. Challenging effective public outreach activities for increasing mutual understanding of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunji, Ikuko

    2006-01-01

    An outreach activity is two-way communication for communicating information. The public outreach activities of USA and Japan for increasing mutual understanding of nuclear energy, and the effective outreach activities are stated. On USA, many communicators in the member of ANS (American Nuclear Society) play an active part in the outreach activities for the policy makers, educators, students, and stakeholders. NEI (Nuclear Energy Institute, USA) provides people with useful information such as benefits and safety control system of nuclear energy, and it has carried out an attitude survey. FPL (Florida Power and Light Company) selected the communicators by ten evaluation items and they made a group and a clear grasp of the goal, needs, and plans and then communicated residents, and sent out questionnaires. Some examples of the special education program for training the communicators in USA are described. In Japan, JAEA gave lessons of nuclear energy, radiation and disaster prevention at the primary, junior high and high schools, friendly talks with local residents, preparing the teaching materials with residents and training of communicators. (S.Y.)

  5. Reduced order methods: applications to nuclear reactor core spatial dynamics - 15566

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.; Cammi, A.; Luzzi, L.; Ricotti, M.E.; Rozza, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the capabilities of reduced order methods, with application to nuclear reactor core spatial dynamics, are presented. The potential of reduced order methods with respect to the classical Modal Method approach is firstly addressed. In particular, two modelling approaches based on a Modal Method and on the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition technique, for developing a control-oriented model of nuclear reactor spatial kinetics, are compared. Subsequently, the Reduced Basis method for simulating, in a rapid and reliable way, the movement of control rods is addressed, solving parametrized multi-group neutron diffusion equations both in the time-dependent and stationary formulations. For the latter case, a different sampling technique, within the Reduced Basis framework, has been employed, namely, the centroidal Voronoi tessellation, which allows for a hierarchical parameters space exploration, without relying on an a posteriori error estimation. In this way, the Offline computational time might be sensibly reduced. Finally, a preliminary multi-physics reduced order model of a Lead Fast Reactor single-channel is proposed as proof of concept in order to highlight the potential of reduced order methods in a many-query context. (authors)

  6. Bow tie methodology: a tool to enhance the visibility and understanding of nuclear safety cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannerem, Marc

    2013-01-01

    There is much common ground between the nuclear industry and other major hazard industries such as those subject to the Seveso II regulations, e.g. oil, gas and chemicals. They are all subject to legal requirements to identify and control hazards, and to demonstrate that all necessary measures have been taken to minimise risks posed by the site with regard to people and the environment. This places a requirement on the Operators of major hazard installations, whether nuclear or conventional, to understand and identify the hazards of their operations, the initiating events, the consequences, the prevention and mitigation measures. However, in the UK, nuclear and 'Seveso' type facilities seem to adopt a different approach to the presentation of their safety cases. Given the magnitude of the hazards, safety cases developed for nuclear fuel cycle facilities are rigorous, detailed and complex, which can have the effect of reducing the visibility of the key hazards and corresponding protective measures. In contrast, on installations in the oil and gas and chemical industries, a real attempt has been made over recent years to improve the visibility and accessibility of the safety case to all operating personnel, through the use of visual aids / diagrams. In particular, many Operators are choosing to use 'bow tie methodology', in which very simple overview diagrams are produced to illustrate, in a form understandable by all: - what the key hazards are; - the initiating events; - the consequences of an incident; - the barriers or 'Layers of Protection' which prevent an initiating event from developing into an incident; - the barriers or 'Layers of Defence' which mitigate the consequences of an incident, i.e. which prevent the incident from escalating into major consequences. The bow tie method is one of a number of methodologies that can be used to make safety cases more accessible. It is used in this paper to illustrate ways to

  7. Understanding the Spatial and Temporal Variations in Hormone Transport within the Stream Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallakpour, I.; Ward, A. S.; Basu, N. B.

    2012-12-01

    Agricultural, urban, and industrial activities, including land application of manures and discharge of municipal and industrial wastewater, act as point and nonpoint sources for steroid hormones in soils, water, and sediments. Hormones are endocrine disruptors, and their occurrence in stream ecosystems has been implicated in the decline of certain species and change of sex in fish. Laboratory studies indicate that steroid hormones tend to have moderately large sorption coefficients and relatively short half-lives, from a few hours to a few days, suggesting that their persistence and subsequent leaching from soils will be limited. However, these chemicals continue to be detected in streams, indicating that laboratory studies may not capture the coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical dynamics occurring at the field or stream-reach scale. Understanding the spatial and temporal persistence of these chemicals downstream of a confined animal feeding operation (CAFO) or wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) requires a coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical model that takes into account multiple interacting species, sediment processes, and different aerobic and anaerobic reaction pathways and rates. In this study, we focus on two hormones, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), with redox dynamics controlling the conversion between E1 and E2. A 1D stream-reach model with a main-channel and a hyporheic zone was developed similar to the commonly used OTIS model. Processes such as photolysis, decay, and sorption to sediments were included in the model framework. The inclusion of coupled reactions, with specific reaction rates and pathways driven by different reaction pathway, that in turn can be dynamic during a storm event (for example, increasing discharge might lead to more aerobic conditions), was the novelty of the approach. The modeling framework was then used to quantify the relative importance of the different reaction pathways under varying flow conditions, and evaluate the

  8. Understanding the spatial distribution of factors controlling topsoil organic carbon content in European soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, M; Martínez Cortizas, A; Rodríguez-Lado, L

    2017-12-31

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) constitutes the largest terrestrial carbon pool. The understanding of its dynamics and the environmental factors that influence its behaviour as sink or source of atmospheric CO 2 is crucial to quantify the carbon budget at the global scale. At the European scale, most of the existing studies to account for SOC stocks are centred in the fitting of predictive model to ascertain the distribution of SOC. However, the development of methodologies for monitoring and identifying the environmental factors that control SOC storage in Europe remains a key research challenge. Here we present a modelling procedure for mapping and monitoring SOC contents that uses Visible-Near Infrared (VNIR) spectroscopic measurements and a series of environmental covariates to ascertain the key environmental processes that have a major contribution into SOC sequestration processes. Our results show that it follows a geographically non-stationary process in which the influencing environmental factors have different weights depending on the spatial location. This implies that SOC stock modelling should not rely on a single model but on a combination of different statistical models depending on the environmental characteristics of each area. A cluster classification of European soils in relation to those factors resulted in the determination of four groups for which specific models have been obtained. Differences in climate, soil pH, content of coarse fragments or land cover type are the main factors explaining the differences in SOC in topsoil from Europe. We found that climatic conditions are the main driver of SOC storage at the continental scale, but we also found that parameters like land cover type influence SOC content found at the local scales in certain areas. Our methodology developed at continental scale could be used in future research aimed to improve the predictive performance of SOC assessments at European scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Understanding meteorological influences on PM2.5 concentrations across China: a temporal and spatial perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With frequent air pollution episodes in China, growing research emphasis has been put on quantifying meteorological influences on PM2.5 concentrations. However, these studies mainly focus on isolated cities, whilst meteorological influences on PM2.5 concentrations at the national scale have not yet been examined comprehensively. This research employs the CCM (convergent cross-mapping method to understand the influence of individual meteorological factors on local PM2.5 concentrations in 188 monitoring cities across China. Results indicate that meteorological influences on PM2.5 concentrations have notable seasonal and regional variations. For the heavily polluted North China region, when PM2.5 concentrations are high, meteorological influences on PM2.5 concentrations are strong. The dominant meteorological influence for PM2.5 concentrations varies across locations and demonstrates regional similarities. For the most polluted winter, the dominant meteorological driver for local PM2.5 concentrations is mainly the wind within the North China region, whilst precipitation is the dominant meteorological influence for most coastal regions. At the national scale, the influence of temperature, humidity and wind on PM2.5 concentrations is much larger than that of other meteorological factors. Amongst eight factors, temperature exerts the strongest and most stable influence on national PM2.5 concentrations in all seasons. Due to notable temporal and spatial differences in meteorological influences on local PM2.5 concentrations, this research suggests pertinent environmental projects for air quality improvement should be designed accordingly for specific regions.

  10. Understanding urban segregation in Cairo : The social and spatial logic of a fragmented city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed, A.A.; Van Nes, A.; Salheen, M.A.; Khalifa, M.A.; Hamhaber, J.

    2014-01-01

    As it turns out, social factors are significantly correlated with the spatial structure of the street grid on a metropolitan scale level. On a local scale, disadvantaged areas have a high locally integrated spatial structure, but lack accessibility to the surrounding areas and the whole city.

  11. A Study on Improvement of Export Control law's understanding for nuclear control items' exporters in Rep. of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Sun Do; Yang, Seung Hyo

    2011-01-01

    According to export of UAE commercial reactor and JRTR(Jordan Research and Training Reactor) in 2009, Korea's international prestige has enhanced and it has been more important for researcher in charge of export control to understand and carry out duties on export control by obeying Nuclear Suppliers Group(NSG) Guidelines. Currently, the NSG tries to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons by harmonising export control systems of participating countries in relation to trade with nuclear commodities and nuclear-related dual-use materials, equipment, software and technology. In addition, through the implementation of two sets of Guidelines for nuclear exports and nuclear-related exports, the NSG aims to ensure that nuclear trade for peaceful purposes does not contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, and that international trade and cooperation in the nuclear field is not hindered unjustly in the process. However, there is still not a little confusion of export businesses owing to lack of understanding of nuclear items in Korea. Therefore, by correctly understanding export control systems, permits and licenses, ITT and persistingly communicating with export businesses, Researchers in charge of export control are able to eliminate confusion of production businesses regarding export and establish a export control culture

  12. The application of nuclear science technology to understanding and solving environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has for many years been involved in applying nuclear science-based and related technologies to the understanding of environmental processes and to the development and implementation of practical and effective solutions to site specific problems, for a broad spectrum of industry, government regulatory agencies, and other organisations in Australia, Europe, North and South America and South East Asia. ANSTO's environmental science program arose out of the need for research to predict, measure, evaluate and monitor the environmental impacts associated with : uranium mining and processing in Australia; the operation of the research reactor at Lucas Heights; and the safe treatment and disposal of radioactive and conventional wastes associated with these activities. The expertise developed in these activities, has found application to a much broader range of environmental concerns. This paper will present an overview of ANSTO's application of nuclear science-based techniques to, inter alia: coastal and marine studies; minesite rehabilitation; transport and geochemical modelling of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic chemicals in the geosphere; the application of naturally-occurring radionuclides and radioactive tracers to corrosion and sedimentation studies in the coastal environment; dating sediments, fish corals and archaeological samples; the understanding of the kinetics and the physiological responses of aquatic organisms to radionuclides and metals in the environment: and the use of aquatic organism as archival and 'realtime' monitors of pollutants

  13. Xenon spatial oscillation in nuclear power reactors:an analytical approach through non linear modal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2005-01-01

    It was proponed recently to apply an extension of Lyapunov's first method to the non-linear regime, known as non-linear modal analysis (NMA), to the study of space-time problems in nuclear reactor kinetics, nuclear power plant dynamics and nuclear power plant instrumentation and control(1). The present communication shows how to apply NMA to the study of Xenon spatial oscillations in large nuclear reactors. The set of non-linear modal equations derived by J. Lewins(2) for neutron flux, Xenon concentration and Iodine concentration are discussed, and a modified version of these equations is taken as a starting point. Using the methods of singular perturbation theory a slow manifold is constructed in the space of mode amplitudes. This allows the reduction of the original high dimensional dynamics to a low dimensional one. It is shown how the amplitudes of the first mode for neutron flux field, temperature field and concentrations of Xenon and Iodine fields can have a stable steady state value while the corresponding amplitudes of the second mode oscillates in a stable limit cycle. The extrapolated dimensions of the reactor's core are used as bifurcation parameters. Approximate analytical formulae are obtained for the critical values of this parameters( below which the onset of oscillations is produced), for the period and for the amplitudes of the above mentioned oscillations. These results are applied to the discussion of neutron flux and temperature excursions in critical locations of the reactor's core. The results of NMA can be validated from the results obtained applying suitable computer codes, using homogenization theory(3) to link the complex heterogeneous model of the codes with the simplified mathematical model used for NMA

  14. Research on the status of acceptance of Fukushima nuclear power accidents and the understanding of knowledge for college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yilong; Liao Li; He Xu

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the connection between the understanding of basic knowledge of nuclear power and whether to accept the changes in attitude with Fukushima nuclear accidents for college students who were education in public. Methods 3000 questionnaires were distributed for college students by anonymity before and after the accident in the Fukushima nuclear power plant, respectively. Results the results of investigation showed that Fukushima nuclear accidents have influenced on the mental of college students, there significant differences between the two investigations. Conclusion college students have a little knowledge of nuclear power, it is necessary to strengthen publicity and education efforts for college students. (authors)

  15. Extending Spatial Interaction Models with Agents for Understanding Relationships in a Dynamic Retail Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Birkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, effective model-based representations of the dynamics and evolution of urban spatial structure have proved elusive. While some progress has been made through the deployment of spatial interaction models, these approaches have been limited by the difficulty of representing behavioural mechanisms and processes. In this paper, it is demonstrated that evolutionary models grounded in the principles of spatial interaction are compatible with the more novel approaches of agent-based modelling. The incorporation of agents provides a much more flexible means for the representation of behavioural mechanisms. The paper illustrates the way in which three more complicated situations can be handled through the fusion of spatial interaction and agent modelling perspectives. These situations comprise discontinuous evolution (in which structural adjustment takes place in discrete steps, and not as a continuously smooth process; nonequilibrium dynamics (in which the underlying system parameters continue to evolve through time; the incorporation of new decision variables (which we illustrate through the addition of land rents into the model. The conclusion of the paper is that the combination of spatial interaction and agent-based modelling methods provides encouraging prospects for the social simulation of real urban systems.

  16. Spatial distribution of radionuclides in Lake Michigan biota near the Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, M.A.; Yaguchi, E.M.; Nelson, D.M.; Marshall, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    A survey was made of four groups of biota in the vicinity of the Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant near Charlevoix, Michigan, to determine their usefulness in locating possible sources of plutonium and other radionuclides to Lake Michigan. This 70 MW boiling-water reactor, located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, was chosen because its fuel contains recycled plutonium, and because it routinely discharges very low-level radioactive wastes into the lake. Samples of crayfish (Orconectes sp.), green algae (Chara sp. and Cladophora sp.), and an aquatic macrophyte (Potamogeton sp.) were collected in August 1973, at varying distances from the discharge and analyzed for 239 240 Pu, 90 Sr, and five gamma-emitting radionuclides. Comparison samples of reactor waste solution have also been analyzed for these radionuclides. Comparisons of the spatial distributions of the extremely low radionuclide concentrations in biota clearly indicated that 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 65 Zn, and 60 Co were released from the reactor; their concentrations decreased exponentially with increasing distance from the discharge. Conversely, concentrations of 239 240 Pu, 95 Zr, and 90 Sr showed no correlation with distance, suggesting any input from Big Rock was insignificant with respect to the atmospheric origin of these isotopes. The significance of these results is discussed, particularly with respect to current public debate over the possibility of local environmental hazards associated with the use of plutonium as a nuclear fuel. (U.S.)

  17. Impact hazard mitigation: understanding the effects of nuclear explosive outputs on comets and asteroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Ralph R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conlon, Leann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The NASA 2007 white paper ''Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Analysis of Alternatives'' affirms deflection as the safest and most effective means of potentially hazardous object (PHO) impact prevention. It also calls for further studies of object deflection. In principle, deflection of a PHO may be accomplished by using kinetic impactors, chemical explosives, gravity tractors, solar sails, or nuclear munitions. Of the sudden impulse options, nuclear munitions are by far the most efficient in terms of yield-per-unit-mass launched and are technically mature. However, there are still significant questions about the response of a comet or asteroid to a nuclear burst. Recent and ongoing observational and experimental work is revolutionizing our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of these bodies (e.g ., Ryan (2000) Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). The combination of this improved understanding of small solar-system bodies combined with current state-of-the-art modeling and simulation capabilities, which have also improved dramatically in recent years, allow for a science-based, comprehensive study of PHO mitigation techniques. Here we present an examination of the effects of radiation from a nuclear explosion on potentially hazardous asteroids and comets through Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) simulation techniques. MCNP is a general-purpose particle transport code commonly used to model neutron, photon, and electron transport for medical physics reactor design and safety, accelerator target and detector design, and a variety of other applications including modeling the propagation of epithermal neutrons through the Martian regolith (Prettyman 2002). It is a massively parallel code that can conduct simulations in 1-3 dimensions, complicated geometries, and with extremely powerful variance reduction techniques. It uses current nuclear cross section data, where available, and fills in the gaps with

  18. Understanding the Complexity of Temperature Dynamics in Xinjiang, China, from Multitemporal Scale and Spatial Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the observed data from 51 meteorological stations during the period from 1958 to 2012 in Xinjiang, China, we investigated the complexity of temperature dynamics from the temporal and spatial perspectives by using a comprehensive approach including the correlation dimension (CD, classical statistics, and geostatistics. The main conclusions are as follows (1 The integer CD values indicate that the temperature dynamics are a complex and chaotic system, which is sensitive to the initial conditions. (2 The complexity of temperature dynamics decreases along with the increase of temporal scale. To describe the temperature dynamics, at least 3 independent variables are needed at daily scale, whereas at least 2 independent variables are needed at monthly, seasonal, and annual scales. (3 The spatial patterns of CD values at different temporal scales indicate that the complex temperature dynamics are derived from the complex landform.

  19. Understanding Earthquake Processes in the Central and Eastern US and Implications for Nuclear Reactor Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, D.; Tabatabai, S.

    2012-12-01

    All of the early site permits and new reactor licensing applications, which have been submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC), are located in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). Furthermore, among the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) already licensed to operate in the US, 96 are located in the CEUS. While there are many considerations in siting commercial NPPs, the perceived lower seismic hazard in the CEUS compared to the Western United States is one of the reasons why the majority of operating and potential future nuclear reactors are located in the CEUS. However, one important criterion used in the licensing and safe operation of a nuclear power plant is its seismic design basis, which establishes the plant's ability to withstand ground motions produced by moderate- to large-sized earthquakes without suffering any damage to its critical safety related structures, systems, and components. The seismic design basis for a NPP is site specific and determined using up-to-date knowledge and information about seismic sources surrounding the site and seismic wave propagation characteristics. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the processes generating earthquakes (tectonic or man-made) and the seismic wave propagation characteristics in the CEUS is crucial. The U.S. NRC's seismic review process for evaluating new reactor siting applications heavily relies upon up-to-date scientific knowledge of seismic sources within at least 320 km of a proposed site. However, the availability of up-to-date knowledge and information about potential seismic sources in low-seismicity regions is limited and relevant data are sparse. Recently, the NRC participated in a joint effort to develop new seismic source models to be used in the CEUS seismic hazard studies for nuclear facilities. In addition, efforts are underway to better understand the seismic potential of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone. While very large and successful scientific

  20. Understanding the Temporal and Spatial Variability of New Generation Gridded TMYs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Anthony

    2017-04-26

    Presentation at ASHRAE about the spatial and temporal variability of gridded TMYs, discussing advanced GIS and Web services that allow for direct access to data, surface-based observations for thousands of stations, climate reanalysis data, and products derived from satellite data; new developments in NREL's solar databases based on both observed data and satellite-derived gridded data, status of TMY3 weather files, and NREL's plans for the next-generation TMY weather files; and also covers what is new and different in the Climatic Design Conditions Table in the 2013 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals.

  1. Understanding mechanisms of solid-state phase transformations by probing nuclear materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Srikumar; Donthula, Harish

    2018-04-01

    In this review a few examples will be cited to illustrate that a study on a specific nuclear material sometimes lead to a better understanding of scientific phenomena of broader interests. Zirconium alloys offer some unique opportunities in addressing fundamental issues such as (i) distinctive features between displacive and diffusional transformations, (ii) characteristics of shuffle and shear dominated displacive transformations and (iii) nature of mixed-mode transformations. Whether a transformation is of first or higher order?" is often raised while classifying it. There are rare examples, such as Ni-Mo alloys, in which during early stages of ordering the system experiences tendencies for both first order and second order transitions. Studies on the order-disorder transitions under a radiation environment have established the pathway for the evolution of ordering. These studies have also identified the temperature range over which the chemically ordered state remains stable in steady state under radiation.

  2. Spatial biases in understanding descriptions of static scenes: the role of reading and writing direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Antonio; El Fathi, Abderrahman; Santiago, Julio

    2013-05-01

    Prior studies on reasoning tasks have shown lateral spatial biases on mental model construction, which converge with known spatial biases in the mental representation of number, time, and events. The latter have been shown to be related to habitual reading and writing direction. The present study bridges and extends both research strands by looking at the processes of mental model construction in language comprehension and examining how they are influenced by reading and writing direction. Sentences like "the table is between the lamp and the TV" were auditorily presented to groups of mono- and bidirectional readers in languages with left-to-right or right-to-left scripts, and participants were asked to draw the described scene. There was a clear preference for deploying the lateral objects in the direction marked by the script of the input language and some hints of a much smaller effect of the degree of practice with the script. These lateral biases occurred in the context of universal strategies for working memory management.

  3. Understanding the Role of Built Environment in Reducing Vehicle Miles Traveled Accounting for Spatial Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing concerns over climate change and transportation energy consumption have sparked research into the influences of urban form and land use patterns on motorized travel, notably vehicle miles traveled (VMT. However, empirical studies provide mixed evidence of the influence of the built environment on travel. In particular, the role of density after controlling for the confounding factors (e.g., land use mix, average block size, and distance from CBD still remains unclear. The object of this study is twofold. First, this research provides additional insights into the effects of built environment factors on the work-related VMT, considering urban form measurements at both the home location and workplace simultaneously. Second, a cross-classified multilevel model using Bayesian approach is applied to account for the spatial heterogeneity across spatial units. Using Washington DC as our study area, the home-based work tour in the AM peak hours is used as the analysis unit. Estimation results confirmed the important role that the built environment at both home and workplace plays in affecting work-related VMT. In particular, the results reveal that densities at the workplace have more important roles than that at home location. These findings confirm that urban planning and city design should be part of the solution in stabilizing global climate and energy consumption.

  4. Understanding the spatial and temporal patterns of copper in-use stocks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Jiameng; Cai, Zhijian; Yuan, Zengwei

    2015-06-02

    Two approaches are adopted to characterize the comprehensive pattern of the copper in-use stocks in China. The top-down results indicate that both the total amount and the per capita quantity of the stocks have exhibited a significant and increasing trend for the past 60 years, especially since 2000. The top-down results show that the copper stocks increased from a negligible level of less than 1 kg/capita in 1952 to 44 kg/capita in 2012. The total stocks in 2012 are estimated to be 60 Mt by a top-down approach or 48 Mt by a bottom-up calculation. The bottom-up method determines that the largest reservoir is the infrastructure sector, which accounts for approximately 58% of the total stocks. The spatial pattern indicates that the copper in-use stocks are predominately spatially distributed in the eastern regions of China, a feature that is obviously different from the geographical distribution of the primary resources. Analysis on the prospects of stocks shows both the total magnitude and per capita value will continuously increase in the following decade, and enter a relatively stable stage in around 2030, with a maximum value of 106 kg/capita. The results improve the knowledge about closing copper cycles.

  5. Systematic spatial and stoichiometric screening towards understanding the surface of ultrasmall oxygenated silicon nanocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Shanawer; Zdetsis, Aristides D.; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Gülseren, Oǧuz; Sadiq, Imran

    2016-11-01

    In most of the realistic ab initio and model calculations which have appeared on the emission of light from silicon nanocrystals, the role of surface oxygen has been usually ignored, underestimated or completely ruled out. We investigate theoretically, by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) possible modes of oxygen bonding in hydrogen terminated silicon quantum dots using as a representative case of the Si29 nanocrystal. We have considered Bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Doubly-bonded oxygen (DBO), hydroxyl (OH) and Mix of these oxidizing agents. Due to stoichiometry, all comparisons performed are unbiased with respect to composition whereas spatial distribution of oxygen species pointed out drastic change in electronic and cohesive characteristics of nanocrytals. From an overall perspective of this study, it is shown that bridge bonded oxygenated Si nanocrystals accompanied by Mix have higher binding energies and large electronic gap compared to nanocrystals with doubly bonded oxygen atoms. In addition, it is observed that the presence of OH along with BBO, DBO and mixed configurations further lowers electronic gaps and binding energies but trends in same fashion. It is also demonstrated that within same composition, oxidizing constituent, along with their spatial distribution substantially alters binding energy, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap (up to 1.48 eV) and localization of frontier orbitals.

  6. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  7. Resilience: ecological and socio-spatial models evolve while understanding the equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Ionuţ Petrişor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to review the main models used in systems ecology, and applied to urban and territorial development, in tight connection with the developing understanding of equilibrium and stability. Initially, resilience was perceived as a component of stability (along with resistance, persistence, and variability, and later as a self-standing concept. As the understanding of equilibrium moves from homeostasis to homeoerhesis and practically to the carrying capacity, and stability finds different interpretations, ranging from constancy to dynamic equilibrium, the dynamics of ecological systems is modeled using adaptive instead of succession cycles. The new model is currently applied to other sciences, and also adapted to the man-dominated systems, including the urban ones. In this case, the understanding of resilience is even more divided among specialists, with particular interpretations resulting from partial or sectoral viewpoints. The analysis shows that more research is not a promising solution, but conceptual refinement is required instead.

  8. Quantification of the spatial organization of the nuclear lamina as a tool for cell classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Righolt, C.H.; Zatreanu, D.A.; Raz, V.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope that plays multiple regulatory roles in chromatin organization and gene expression as well as a structural role in nuclear stability. The lamina proteins, also referred to as lamins, determine nuclear lamina organization and

  9. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, L A; Knight, K B; Matzel, J E; Prussin, S G; Zimmer, M M; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F J; Hutcheon, I D

    2015-10-01

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U ((238)U/(235)U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the (235)U/(238)U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U, and (236)U/(238)U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding spatial differences in African elephant densities and occurrence, a continent-wide analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.F.; Langevelde, van F.; Prins, H.H.T.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Blanc, J.; Vis, M.J.P.; Gaston, K.J.; Douglas Hamilton, I.

    2013-01-01

    The densities and survival of many wild animals are presently at risk. Crucial for improving conservation actions is an understanding on a large scale of the relative importance of human and ecological factors in determining the distribution and densities of species. However, even for such

  11. The collection of symposium reports for people to understand nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    It deals with the symposium reports which gives people public information on nuclear power. It introduces the programs on public information and measures in France, Japan, Canada, Korea. It reports the presentations of the result which are the education programs for children and people about safety of nuclear power, nuclear power plant and environmental disruption, safety insurance of nuclear power and the present condition of operating nuclear power plant.

  12. Using multilevel spatial models to understand salamander site occupancy patterns after wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelgren, Nathan; Adams, Michael J.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Bury, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the distribution of elusive forest wildlife have suffered from the confounding of true presence with the uncertainty of detection. Occupancy modeling, which incorporates probabilities of species detection conditional on presence, is an emerging approach for reducing observation bias. However, the current likelihood modeling framework is restrictive for handling unexplained sources of variation in the response that may occur when there are dependence structures such as smaller sampling units that are nested within larger sampling units. We used multilevel Bayesian occupancy modeling to handle dependence structures and to partition sources of variation in occupancy of sites by terrestrial salamanders (family Plethodontidae) within and surrounding an earlier wildfire in western Oregon, USA. Comparison of model fit favored a spatial N-mixture model that accounted for variation in salamander abundance over models that were based on binary detection/non-detection data. Though catch per unit effort was higher in burned areas than unburned, there was strong support that this pattern was due to a higher probability of capture for individuals in burned plots. Within the burn, the odds of capturing an individual given it was present were 2.06 times the odds outside the burn, reflecting reduced complexity of ground cover in the burn. There was weak support that true occupancy was lower within the burned area. While the odds of occupancy in the burn were 0.49 times the odds outside the burn among the five species, the magnitude of variation attributed to the burn was small in comparison to variation attributed to other landscape variables and to unexplained, spatially autocorrelated random variation. While ordinary occupancy models may separate the biological pattern of interest from variation in detection probability when all sources of variation are known, the addition of random effects structures for unexplained sources of variation in occupancy and detection

  13. Understanding the Spatial Scale of Genetic Connectivity at Sea: Unique Insights from a Land Fish and a Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina M Cooke

    Full Text Available Quantifying the spatial scale of population connectivity is important for understanding the evolutionary potential of ecologically divergent populations and for designing conservation strategies to preserve those populations. For marine organisms like fish, the spatial scale of connectivity is generally set by a pelagic larval phase. This has complicated past estimates of connectivity because detailed information on larval movements are difficult to obtain. Genetic approaches provide a tractable alternative and have the added benefit of estimating directly the reproductive isolation of populations. In this study, we leveraged empirical estimates of genetic differentiation among populations with simulations and a meta-analysis to provide a general estimate of the spatial scale of genetic connectivity in marine environments. We used neutral genetic markers to first quantify the genetic differentiation of ecologically-isolated adult populations of a land dwelling fish, the Pacific leaping blenny (Alticus arnoldorum, where marine larval dispersal is the only probable means of connectivity among populations. We then compared these estimates to simulations of a range of marine dispersal scenarios and to collated FST and distance data from the literature for marine fish across diverse spatial scales. We found genetic connectivity at sea was extensive among marine populations and in the case of A. arnoldorum, apparently little affected by the presence of ecological barriers. We estimated that ~5000 km (with broad confidence intervals ranging from 810-11,692 km was the spatial scale at which evolutionarily meaningful barriers to gene flow start to occur at sea, although substantially shorter distances are also possible for some taxa. In general, however, such a large estimate of connectivity has important implications for the evolutionary and conservation potential of many marine fish communities.

  14. Communication activity for residents to understand radiation after the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Kiyoshi; Tagawa, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Tomoyo

    2015-01-01

    'Question-and-Answer Session on Radiation and Health' ('Kotaeru-kai' in Japanese) has started in July 2011 in Fukushima Prefecture, which was influenced by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011. The purpose of the Session is to have mainly parents and teachers (kindergartens, schools etc.) understand correctly about radiation and its influence on health. At the requests of the teachers in Fukushima Prefecture, about 4 staff members made a team, and visited Fukushima. The members of the team were selected from 500 JAEA staffs nominated beforehand. The members explained about radiation and its influence on health by using illustrations and metaphors. After the lecture, they answered the questions asked in advance at schools. Also they answered the questions asked in the Session. In the Session, the members placed much value on the communication with participants. Until the end of December 2014, the Question-and-Answer Sessions on Radiation and Health have been held 241 times for about twenty thousand participants. According to 7,613 participants' questionnaires, which were collected from July 2011 to the end of 2012, it seems that participants were able to understand well about radiation and its influence on health. Besides parents and teachers, some of the junior high schools requested to explain for students. JAEA will continue this communication activity in order to meet these expectations and requirements. (author)

  15. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  16. Challenges to understanding spatial patterns of disease: philosophical alternatives to logical positivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, J D

    1992-08-01

    Most studies of disease distribution, in medical geography and other related disciplines, have been empirical in nature and rooted in the assumptions of logical positivism. However, some of the more newly articulated philosophies of the social sciences, and of social theory, have much to add in the understanding of the processes and mechanisms underlying disease distribution. This paper represents a plea for creative synthesis between logical positivism and realism or structuration, and uses specific examples to suggest how disease distribution, as a surface phenomenon, can be explained using deeper analysis.

  17. Understanding and Managing Aging of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Facility Components in Wet Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Storage of nuclear fuel after it has been discharged from reactors has become the leading spent fuel management option. Many storage facilities are being required to operate longer than originally anticipated. Aging is a term that has emerged to focus attention on the consequences of extended operation on systems, structures, and components that comprise the storage facilities. The key to mitigation of age-related degradation in storage facilities is to implement effective strategies to understand and manage aging of the facility materials. A systematic approach to preclude serious effects of age-related degradation is addressed in this paper, directed principally to smaller facilities (test and research reactors). The first need is to assess the materials that comprise the facility and the environments that they are subject to. Access to historical data on facility design, fabrication, and operation can facilitate assessment of expected materials performance. Methods to assess the current condition of facility materials are summarized in the paper. Each facility needs an aging management plan to define the scope of the management program, involving identification of the materials that need specific actions to manage age-related degradation. For each material identified, one or more aging management programs are developed and become part of the plan Several national and international organizations have invested in development of comprehensive and systematic approaches to aging management. A method developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommended as a concise template to organize measures to effectively manage age-related degradation of storage facility materials, including the scope of inspection, surveillance, and maintenance that is needed to assure successful operation of the facility over its required life. Important to effective aging management is a staff that is alert for evidence of materials degradation and committed to carry out the aging

  18. Nuclear Security Summit and Workshop 2015: Preventing, Understanding and Recovering from Nuclear Accidents lessons learned from Chernobyl and Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    impact on wasteform evolution and radionuclide mobility. Recent work on the molecular ecology of a range of nuclear facilities will be presented, and...near nuclear power plants. His research is concerned with the ecology and evolution of animals and plants with a special interest in how...relations. BIOGRAPHY Since August 2000, Dr. Reynolds, a career civil servant, has served as Deputy and chief of staff for the Office of the Science and

  19. Understanding the Acceptance of Local Public Officers on Computer-based Urban Spatial Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isti Andini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Information technology is developed to assist people in minimizing processing time, reducing errors, increasing the accuracy and simplifying the overall process. The process of recording, retrieving and displaying data and information can thus be easily and accurately undertaken. Information technology in its initial development, however, tends to be too costly and complicated to make a real particularly for people in developing countries. Fortunately, universities as the centers of innovation, can be a game changer for the adoption of the innovative processes, for the benefits of the community at large. In all Indonesian universities, this role is associated with a, so called Tri Dharma Perguruan Tinggi (Three Devotions of Higher Education, TDHE. This paper examines the acceptance of the collaborating officials and the obstacles i.e. internal and environmental factors. We proposed the use of GIS-based technology to coordinate the administrative units of local government at all levels, particularly the Kelurahan as the lowest hierarchy of the administrative unit in local government system. The Kelurahan will then be the spearhead in a local government system in Indonesia in promoting administrative services to all Citizens. We undertook an integrated training and tutorial for select official staff of the Kelurahan on the system. Evaluation of shows that the information system can be used to simplify the collaborators’ activities. The evaluation was done through in-depth interview to the collaborating officials. The collaborators interested in learning more about the system as an innovative way in providing service to the community as well as spatial data input to support urban planning and management.

  20. Nuclear power in China after Fukushima: understanding public knowledge, attitudes, and trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Mol, A.P.J.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for energy, the past decade has seen the revitalization of nuclear power technologies and many countries adopting nuclear power as a priority strategy in their energy policy. However, Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis, following the tsunami on 11 March 2011, challenged

  1. Understanding Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control: A Guide to the Issues. New Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Teena

    Intended for secondary and college level students and teachers, this guide discusses the nuclear arms control issue. There are four sections. Section I discusses U.S. nuclear strategy from 1945 to the present, strategic nuclear weapons competition between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), U.S.…

  2. Preserving prairies: Understanding temporal and spatial patterns of invasive annual bromes in the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Isabel; Symstad, Amy J.; Davis, Christopher; Swanson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Two Eurasian invasive annual brome grasses, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus), are well known for their impact in steppe ecosystems of the western United States where these grasses have altered fire regimes, reduced native plant diversity and abundance, and degraded wildlife habitat. Annual bromes are also abundant in the grasslands of the Northern Great Plains (NGP), but their impact and ecology are not as well studied. It is unclear whether the lessons learned from the steppe will translate to the mixed-grass prairie where native plant species are adapted to frequent fires and grazing. Developing a successful annual brome management strategy for National Park Service units and other NGP grasslands requires better understanding of (1) the impact of annual bromes on grassland condition; (2) the dynamics of these species through space and time; and (3) the relative importance of environmental factors within and outside managers' control for these spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we use vegetation monitoring data collected from 1998 to 2015 in 295 sites to relate spatiotemporal variability of annual brome grasses to grassland composition, weather, physical environmental characteristics, and ecological processes (grazing and fire). Concern about the impact of these species in NGP grasslands is warranted, as we found a decline in native species richness with increasing annual brome cover. Annual brome cover generally increased over the time of monitoring but also displayed a 3- to 5-yr cycle of reduction and resurgence. Relative cover of annual bromes in the monitored areas was best predicted by park unit, weather, extant plant community, slope grade, soil composition, and fire history. We found no evidence that grazing reduced annual brome cover, but this may be due to the relatively low grazing pressure in our study. By understanding the consequences and patterns of annual brome invasion, we will be better able to preserve and restore

  3. The study on spatial distribution features of radiological plume discharged from Nuclear Power Plant based on C4ISRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunfeng; Shen, Yue; Feng, Bairun; Yang, Fan; Li, Qiangqiang; Du, Boying; Bian, Yushan; Hu, Qiongqong; Wang, Qi; Hu, Xiaomin; Yin, Hang

    2018-02-01

    When the nuclear emergency accident occurs, it is very important to estimate three-dimensional space feature of the radioactive plume discharged from the source term for the emergency organization, as well as for better understanding of atmospheric dispersion processes. So, taking the Hongyanhe Nuclear Power Plant for example, the study for three-dimensional space feature of the radioactive plume is accomplished by applying atmospheric transport model (coupling of WRF–HYSPLIT) driven by FNL meteorological data of NCEP (04/01/2014-04/02/2014) based on the C4ISRE (Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance, Environmental Impact Assessment).The results show that the whole shape of three-dimensional plume was about irregular cloth influenced by wind; In the spatial domain (height > 16000m),the distribution of radiological plume, which looked more like horseshoe-shaped, presented irregular polygons of which the total length was 2258.7km, where covered the area of 39151km2; In the airspace from 4000m to 16000m, the plume, covered the area of 116269 km2, showed a triangle and the perimeter of that was 2280.4km; The shape of the plume was more like irregular quadrilateral, its perimeter was 2941.8km and coverage area of the plume was 131534km2;The overall distribution of the wind field showed a rectangular shape; Within the area along the horizontal direction 400m from origin to east and under height (lower than 2000m),the closer the distance coordinate (0,0), the denser the plume particles; Within the area of horizontal distance(500m-1000m) and height (4000m- 16000m), the particle density were relatively sparse and the spread extent of the plume particles from west to East was relatively large and the plume particles were mainly in the suspended state without obvious dry sedimentation; Within the area of horizontal distance (800m-1100m) and height (>16000m), there were relatively gentle horizontal diffusion of plume particles

  4. Locating sensors for detecting source-to-target patterns of special nuclear material smuggling: a spatial information theoretic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyla, Jay; Taylor, Jeffrey; Zhou, Xuesong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a spatial information-theoretic model is proposed to locate sensors for detecting source-to-target patterns of special nuclear material (SNM) smuggling. In order to ship the nuclear materials from a source location with SNM production to a target city, the smugglers must employ global and domestic logistics systems. This paper focuses on locating a limited set of fixed and mobile radiation sensors in a transportation network, with the intent to maximize the expected information gain and minimize the estimation error for the subsequent nuclear material detection stage. A Kalman filtering-based framework is adapted to assist the decision-maker in quantifying the network-wide information gain and SNM flow estimation accuracy.

  5. Locating Sensors for Detecting Source-to-Target Patterns of Special Nuclear Material Smuggling: A Spatial Information Theoretic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Zhou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a spatial information-theoretic model is proposed to locate sensors for detecting source-to-target patterns of special nuclear material (SNM smuggling. In order to ship the nuclear materials from a source location with SNM production to a target city, the smugglers must employ global and domestic logistics systems. This paper focuses on locating a limited set of fixed and mobile radiation sensors in a transportation network, with the intent to maximize the expected information gain and minimize the estimation error for the subsequent nuclear material detection stage. A Kalman filtering-based framework is adapted to assist the decision-maker in quantifying the network-wide information gain and SNM flow estimation accuracy.

  6. Laymen's demand on an understandable safety analysis for a nuclear waste repository. A communication challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, T.L.; Thunberg, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a summary in English of some impressions from a seminar 'Safety Analysis of the Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste. An issue for specialists only or for all of us?' The seminar was held in Swedish and was arranged by KASAM in Nykoeping, Sweden in November 1997. A report in Swedish from the seminar has been published. The seminar was arranged in response to a request from representatives from some of the municipalities concerned by the feasibility studies, which are part of the siting process. They had noticed that it is very hard for people without specialist competence to get an understanding of the safety issues based on the available information. There is a need for a presentation of the safety analysis, which is adopted not only for the need of the safety authorities, which have their own expertise, but also for the need of laymen who are involved in issues about the design, siting and safety of a final repository. Therefore, the seminar was mainly intended for representatives for the citizens (i.e. politicians) from the municipalities involved in the ongoing feasibility studies in Sweden. Some representatives from different environmental organisations opposing final disposal were also invited as well as representatives from the nuclear industry and from the concerned Swedish authorities. The seminar was structured in four sessions The handling of risk in the modern society - risk assessment and risk comparisons; The safety analysis and its role for the citizens; What can actually happen - in our own time and in the future?; Group discussions. In order to give a realistic picture of the intense debate, which at least in some of the municipalities had been very apparent, the organisers had chosen to make SKB and Greenpeace main actors at the seminar, such as they appeared in connection with campaign before the referendum at Malaa. Parts of the seminar were arranged like a hearing, led by a science journalist. The intention with this paper is not to

  7. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  8. Understanding renal nuclear protein accumulation: an in vitro approach to explain an in vivo phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Lisanne; Maier, Marcia Y; Sacchi, Silvia; Pollegioni, Loredano; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2017-11-01

    Proper subcellular trafficking is essential to prevent protein mislocalization and aggregation. Transport of the peroxisomal enzyme D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) appears dysregulated by specific pharmaceuticals, e.g., the anti-overactive bladder drug propiverine or a norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor (NSRI), resulting in massive cytosolic and nuclear accumulations in rat kidney. To assess the underlying molecular mechanism of the latter, we aimed to characterize the nature of peroxisomal and cyto-nuclear shuttling of human and rat DAAO overexpressed in three cell lines using confocal microscopy. Indeed, interference with peroxisomal transport via deletion of the PTS1 signal or PEX5 knockdown resulted in induced nuclear DAAO localization. Having demonstrated the absence of active nuclear import and employing variably sized mCherry- and/or EYFP-fusion proteins of DAAO and catalase, we showed that peroxisomal proteins ≤134 kDa can passively diffuse into mammalian cell nuclei-thereby contradicting the often-cited 40 kDa diffusion limit. Moreover, their inherent nuclear presence and nuclear accumulation subsequent to proteasome inhibition or abrogated peroxisomal transport suggests that nuclear localization is a characteristic in the lifecycle of peroxisomal proteins. Based on this molecular trafficking analysis, we suggest that pharmaceuticals like propiverine or an NSRI may interfere with peroxisomal protein targeting and import, consequently resulting in massive nuclear protein accumulation in vivo.

  9. Development of a spatial nuclear electric system: RESPA sub-project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Y.

    1989-04-01

    Basic design and characteristics of a nuclear-electric system selected for future applications in the Brazilian space program is summarized. Technological difficulties are discussed and a preliminary program of research and development at IEAv is presented. (author)

  10. Biological effect of radiation. Basis for understanding the risk of Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The radionuclide release in the Fukushima Nuclear Accident has induced a tremendous anxiety on possible health effects of low dose radiation. When radiation hits a cell in an organism, it may induce DNA damages which, if not repaired properly, lead to either cell death or genetic mutation. If function of the tissue is lost as a result of cell death, various tissue responses including dysfunction of hematopoietic tissues, sterility and skin responses may occur; these responses are not manifested if the radiation dose is low enough. Genetic mutation is considered to occur, albeit at a low frequency, even if the radiation dose is very small. Cancer is a result of genetic mutation and its probability is considered to rise, albeit slightly, if radiation induces a small amount of additional mutations. These assumptions lead to a notion that there is no 'safety dose' below which radiation does not cause any cancer. On the other hand, the study of atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki provides the most reliable quantitative information on the relationship between radiation dose and accompanying increase in cancer risk. The analysis so far indicates that cancer risk increases by 0.5-fold, compared to a background level, if a human body is exposed to 1 sievert of radiation; at lower doses, the risk is proportional to the dose, but it is impossible to detect cancer risk associated with 100 milli sievert of exposure because of statistical limitations. Although exposure to atomic bomb radiation occurred in a very little instance, the current situation poses a prolonged (i.e., low dose rate) exposure, probably resulting in still lower cancer risk. Still, since current radiation exposure has no benefit, unlike that in medical situations, it is important to reduce it to a level as low as reasonably achievable. I will explain the biological effect of radiation, including its mechanistic basis and effects on the human body, and wish to help the audience to

  11. Historical spatial range expansion and a very recent bottleneck of Cinnamomum kanehirae Hay. (Lauraceae) in Taiwan inferred from nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Chun; Kuo, Dai-Chang; Lin, Chia-Chia; Ho, Kuo-Chieh; Lin, Tsan-Piao; Hwang, Shih-Ying

    2010-04-30

    Species in the varied geographic topology of Taiwan underwent obvious demographic changes during glacial periods. Cinnamomum kanehirae has been exploited for timber and to obtain medicinal fungi for the past 100 years. Understanding anthropogenic factors influencing the demography of this species after the last glacial maximum (LGM) is critically important for the conservation of this species. Populations of C. kanehirae were classified into four geographic regions: northwestern (NW), west-central (WC), southwestern (SW), and southeastern (SE). In total, 113 individuals from 19 localities were sampled, and variations in the chalcone synthase gene (Chs) intron and leafy (Lfy) intron-2 sequences of nuclear DNA were examined in order to assess phylogeographic patterns, the timescales of demographic and evolutionary events, and recent anthropogenic effects. In total, 210 Chs and 170 Lfy sequences, which respectively constituted 36 and 35 haplotypes, were used for the analyses. Estimates of the migration rate (M) through time revealed a pattern of frequent gene flow during previous and the present interglacials. The isolation-by-distance test showed that there generally was no significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The level of among-region genetic differentiation was significant when comparing eastern to western populations. However, no significant among-region genetic differentiation was found in comparisons among the four geographic regions. Moreover, essentially no genetic structuring was found for the three regions west of the CMR. A fit of spatial range expansion was found for pooled and regional samples according to the non-significant values of the sum of squared deviations. Using the Bayesian skyline plot (BSP) method, a recent bottleneck after the LGM expansion was detected in both regional and pooled samples. Common haplotype distributions among geographic regions and the relatively shallow genetic structuring displayed are the

  12. Historical spatial range expansion and a very recent bottleneck of Cinnamomum kanehirae Hay. (Lauraceae in Taiwan inferred from nuclear genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Kuo-Chieh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species in the varied geographic topology of Taiwan underwent obvious demographic changes during glacial periods. Cinnamomum kanehirae has been exploited for timber and to obtain medicinal fungi for the past 100 years. Understanding anthropogenic factors influencing the demography of this species after the last glacial maximum (LGM is critically important for the conservation of this species. Results Populations of C. kanehirae were classified into four geographic regions: northwestern (NW, west-central (WC, southwestern (SW, and southeastern (SE. In total, 113 individuals from 19 localities were sampled, and variations in the chalcone synthase gene (Chs intron and leafy (Lfy intron-2 sequences of nuclear DNA were examined in order to assess phylogeographic patterns, the timescales of demographic and evolutionary events, and recent anthropogenic effects. In total, 210 Chs and 170 Lfy sequences, which respectively constituted 36 and 35 haplotypes, were used for the analyses. Estimates of the migration rate (M through time revealed a pattern of frequent gene flow during previous and the present interglacials. The isolation-by-distance test showed that there generally was no significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The level of among-region genetic differentiation was significant when comparing eastern to western populations. However, no significant among-region genetic differentiation was found in comparisons among the four geographic regions. Moreover, essentially no genetic structuring was found for the three regions west of the CMR. A fit of spatial range expansion was found for pooled and regional samples according to the non-significant values of the sum of squared deviations. Using the Bayesian skyline plot (BSP method, a recent bottleneck after the LGM expansion was detected in both regional and pooled samples. Conclusions Common haplotype distributions among geographic regions and the relatively

  13. Memorandum of understanding between the Federal Minister for the Environment, nature conservation and nuclear safety of the Federal Republic of Germany and the atomic energy control board of Canada on cooperation and exchange of information respecting nuclear safety and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding on co-operation and exchange of information respecting nuclear safety and radiation protection covers the period 23 May 1991 to 1 June 1996. The Parties may exchange information on any matter concerning the civil uses of nuclear energy within the other Party's jurisdiction and, in particular information on: nuclear installations, their siting, construction, operation and decommissioning; uranium mining and milling; nuclear fuel production; radioactive waste treatment, storage and disposal; transport of nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; radiation protection; legislation, regulations, standards. All information received and the results of activities carried out under this Memorandum of Understanding will be used exclusively for peaceful purposes [fr

  14. Design and Development Computer-Based E-Learning Teaching Material for Improving Mathematical Understanding Ability and Spatial Sense of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjanah; Dahlan, J. A.; Wibisono, Y.

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to make a design and development computer-based e-learning teaching material for improving mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students. Furthermore, the particular aims are (1) getting teaching material design, evaluation model, and intrument to measure mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (2) conducting trials computer-based e-learning teaching material model, asessment, and instrument to develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (3) completing teaching material models of computer-based e-learning, assessment, and develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (4) resulting research product is teaching materials of computer-based e-learning. Furthermore, the product is an interactive learning disc. The research method is used of this study is developmental research which is conducted by thought experiment and instruction experiment. The result showed that teaching materials could be used very well. This is based on the validation of computer-based e-learning teaching materials, which is validated by 5 multimedia experts. The judgement result of face and content validity of 5 validator shows that the same judgement result to the face and content validity of each item test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense. The reliability test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense are 0,929 and 0,939. This reliability test is very high. While the validity of both tests have a high and very high criteria.

  15. Understanding human error and aiding human diagnostic behavior in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Rouse, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    This essay deals with the vulnerability of nuclear plant operators to human error. The various ways in which they can err, and how machine errors differ from human errors are discussed. Diagnosis of system failure utilizing computers is offered as a possible solution

  16. The spatial and urban planning concerns related to nuclear facilities locations: Case study of the Vinča Institute location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Nebojša D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and urban planning is one of the key instruments for the planned formation and development of locations for nuclear facilities, especially in terms of meeting the strict spatial conditionality, as well as in terms of the formation of protection zones in their surroundings. This paper systemizes the international criteria and requirements for the locations of nuclear facilities and analyses the spatial distribution of nuclear facilities in the surrounding countries of the Republic of Serbia. The research was conducted on the example of the location of the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, within which the fulfilment of spatial requirements, treatment of the location in the existing spatial and urban plans and relationship between other functions in the surrounding area were analysed. The paper proves the starting hypothesis that the general requirements related to both the spatial development of nuclear facilities locations and the protection from radiation have not been met in the Vinča location and its surroundings. It was determined that the spatial and urban plans encompassing the area of Vinča do not contain sufficiently specific planning solutions and that, as such, they do not provide a sufficient planning basis for meeting the necessary requirements and obligations regarding the protection from radiation. The paper also gives recommendations for further spatial development and protection of the Vinča location and its surroundings. The research condcted in this paper indicates the importance and priority of further research so that the necessary planning solutions for further development of the complex in Vinča and for the formation of protection zones could be defined through creating a new planning documentation. In addition, the paper particularly highlights the need for conducting a research to identify a location for permanent disposal of radioactive waste. It also indicates the necessity of considering the aspects

  17. A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.T.; Ewing, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    There are two compelling reasons for understanding source term and near-field processes in a radioactive waste geologic repository. First, almost all of the radioactivity is initially in the waste form, mainly in the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear waste glass. Second, over long periods, after the engineered barriers are degraded, the waste form is a primary control on the release of radioactivity. Thus, it is essential to know the physical and chemical state of the waste form after hundreds of thousands of years. The United States Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Repository Program has initiated a long-term program to develop a basic understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of radionuclide release and a quantification of the release as repository conditions evolve over time. Specifically, the research program addresses four critical areas: a) SNF dissolution mechanisms and rates; b) formation and properties of U 6+ - secondary phases; c) waste form-waste package interactions in the near-field; and d) integration of in-package chemical and physical processes. The ultimate goal is to integrate the scientific results into a larger scale model of source term and near-field processes. This integrated model will be used to provide a basis for understanding the behavior of the source term over long time periods (greater than 10 5 years). Such a fundamental and integrated experimental and modeling approach to source term processes can also be readily applied to development of advanced waste forms as part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Specifically, a fundamental understanding of candidate waste form materials stability in high temperature/high radiation environments and near-field geochemical/hydrologic processes could enable development of advanced waste forms 'tailored' to specific geologic settings. (authors)

  18. A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.T. Peters; R.C. Ewing

    2006-01-01

    There are two compelling reasons for understanding source term and near-field processes in a radioactive waste geologic repository. First, almost all of the radioactivity is initially in the waste form, mainly in the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear waste glass. Second, over long periods, after the engineered barriers are degraded, the waste form is a primary control on the release of radioactivity. Thus, it is essential to know the physical and chemical state of the waste form after hundreds of thousands of years. The United States Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Repository Program has initiated a long-term program to develop a basic understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of radionuclide release and a quantification of the release as repository conditions evolve over time. Specifically, the research program addresses four critical areas: (a) SNF dissolution mechanisms and rates; (b) formation and properties of U 6+ -secondary phases; (c) waste form-waste package interactions in the near-field; and (d) integration of in-package chemical and physical processes. The ultimate goal is to integrate the scientific results into a larger scale model of source term and near-field processes. This integrated model will be used to provide a basis for understanding the behavior of the source term over long time periods (greater than 10 5 years). Such a fundamental and integrated experimental and modeling approach to source term processes can also be readily applied to development of advanced waste forms as part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Specifically, a fundamental understanding of candidate waste form materials stability in high temperature/high radiation environments and near-field geochemical/hydrologic processes could enable development of advanced waste forms ''tailored'' to specific geologic settings

  19. Furthering better communication and understanding of nuclear issues through public education: a public school teacher's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danfelser, M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports of national commissions and study groups have pointed out that the American educational system is not meeting the needs of its students. Uniformly, the reports call for a new instructional focus designed to achieve the goal of ''universal scientific and technological literacy for citizenship.'' The population's inability to deal with numerous controversial science-related social issues forms the basis for this call for educational reform. Foremost on the list of science-related social issues are nuclear issues in general and the storage of nuclear waste in particular. The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) 1983 publication ''Guidelines for Teaching Science Related Social Issues'' was designed to encourage stronger instructional emphasis on science-related social issues, and to provide social studies teachers with a rational and structure for the presentation of the issues. This paper discusses the dilemmas faced by educators who attempt to deal with science-related social issues. Also, it addresses the need for instructional materials in order to effectively address nuclear issues in the classroom

  20. The Role of Farm Management Characteristics in Understanding the Spatial Distribution of Landscape Elements: A Case Study in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Tobias Hauser

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Western Europe the fate of biodiversity is intimately linked to agricultural land use. A driving force behind biodiversity decline is the gradual conversion of Europe’s traditional integrated rural landscapes of nature and agriculture into monofunctional units of production. With these developments, semi-natural landscape elements have increasingly disappeared from agricultural landscapes. A growing body of research, however, underlines the importance of semi-natural habitats in agricultural landscapes for biodiversity conservation, habitat connectivity, and ecosystem services. On the local scale, considerable variation between the relative area of landscape elements on individual farms can be observed. Farm management decisions are presumed to be important determinants for the composition of agricultural landscapes and the services provided to society.  By bringing together data from farmer interviews and aerial photographic imagery, this paper analyzes the predictive validity of farm management characteristics to understand the distribution of landscape elements on farmland parcels. The farm management parameters included in the study are relevant to current dominant trends in the Dutch agricultural sector; intensification, scale enlargement, diversification, and gradual termination of farming activities. Scale enlargement and migratory processes are found to be important predictors. The results of the Dutch case study provide insights in the threats and opportunities for the conservation of semi-natural habitat in agricultural landscapes. The findings present an empirical contribution to the debate on sustainable management of agriculture’s green infrastructure and, in broader perspective, the objective to reconcile agricultural production with the urging need of biodiversity conservation in Europe’s spatially contested countryside.

  1. Understanding Gaps in Research Networks: Using "Spatial Reasoning" as a Window into the Importance of Networked Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Catherine D.; Davis, Brent; Sinclair, Nathalie; McGarvey, Lynn; Hallowell, David; Drefs, Michelle; Francis, Krista; Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Mulligan, Joanne; Okamoto, Yukari; Whiteley, Walter; Woolcott, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    This paper finds its origins in a multidisciplinary research group's efforts to assemble a review of research in order to better appreciate how "spatial reasoning" is understood and investigated across academic disciplines. We first collaborated to create a historical map of the development of spatial reasoning across key disciplines…

  2. Closed-loop digital control of nuclear reactors characterized by spatial dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E.

    1991-03-01

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both simulation and, to a lesser degree, experiment of a digital method for the closed-loop control of power and temperature in reactors characterized by spatial dynamics. The major conclusions of the research are that (1) the sophistication of advanced reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic nodal methods is now such that accurate, real-time models of spatially-dependent, heterogeneous reactor cores can be run on present-generation minicomputers; (2) operation of both present-day commercial reactors as well as the multi-modular reactors now being considered for construction in the United States could be significantly improved by incorporating model-generated information on in-core conditions in a digital controller; and (3) digital controllers for spatially-dependent reactors should have a hierarchical or multi-tiered structure consisting of supervisory algorithms that preclude challenges to the safety system, global control laws designed to provide an optimal response to temperature and power perturbations, and local control laws that maintain parameters such as the margin to departure from nucleate boiling within specification. The technology described is appropriate to present-day pressurized water reactors and to the proposed multi-modular designs. The end-product of this research was a (near) real-time analytic plant-estimation code that was given the acronym POPSICLE for POwer Plant SImulator and ControlLEr. POPSICLE's core neutronics model is based on a quasi-static transient solution of the analytic nodal diffusion equations. 126 refs., 159 figs., 17 tabs

  3. Closed-loop digital control of nuclear reactors characterized by spatial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both simulation and, to a lesser degree, experiment of a digital method for the closed-loop control of power and temperature in reactors characterized by spatial dynamics. The major conclusions of the research are that (1) the sophistication of advanced reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic nodal methods is now such that accurate, real-time models of spatially-dependent, heterogeneous reactor cores can be run on present-generation minicomputers; (2) operation of both present-day commercial reactors as well as the multi-modular reactors now being considered for construction in the United States could be significantly improved by incorporating model-generated information on in-core conditions in a digital controller; and (3) digital controllers for spatially-dependent reactors should have a hierarchical or multi-tiered structure consisting of supervisory algorithms that preclude challenges to the safety system, global control laws designed to provide an optimal response to temperature and power perturbations, and local control laws that maintain parameters such as the margin to departure from nucleate boiling within specification. The technology described is appropriate to present-day pressurized water reactors and to the proposed multi-modular designs. The end-product of this research was a (near) real-time analytic plant-estimation code that was given the acronym POPSICLE for POwer Plant SImulator and ControlLEr. POPSICLE's core neutronics model is based on a quasi-static transient solution of the analytic nodal diffusion equations. 126 refs., 159 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Public understanding of nuclear energy: it's not (just) about the science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this series of slides the author analyses why the safest large-scale energy source is regarded as the most dangerous by significant numbers of people. A detailed analysis is made about the perception of risks, the myth of the irrational fear of radiation and what public information should be. Recommendations are given and the most relevant ones are first a better communication that does not bang on so much about safety and secondly to stop considering nuclear power and radiation as if they are vastly more dangerous than they actually are

  5. First principles calculations of nucleon and pion form factors: understanding the building blocks of nuclear matter from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantia Alexandrou; Bojan Bistrovic; Robert Edwards; P de Forcrand; George Fleming; Philipp Haegler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers; Antonios Tsapalis

    2005-01-01

    Lattice QCD is an essential complement to the current and anticipated DOE-supported experimental program in hadronic physics. In this poster we address several key questions central to our understanding of the building blocks of nuclear matter, nucleons and pions. Firstly, we describe progress at computing the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, describing the distribution of charge and current, before considering the role played by the strange quarks. We then describe the study of transition form factors to the Delta resonance. Finally, we present recent work to determine the pion form factor, complementary to the current JLab experimental determination and providing insight into the approach to asymptotic freedom

  6. First principles calculations of nucleon and pion form factors: understanding the building blocks of nuclear matter from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantia Alexandrou; Bojan Bistrovic; Robert Edwards; P de Forcrand; George Fleming; Philipp Haegler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers; Antonios Tsapalis

    2005-10-01

    Lattice QCD is an essential complement to the current and anticipated DOE-supported experimental program in hadronic physics. In this poster we address several key questions central to our understanding of the building blocks of nuclear matter, nucleons and pions. Firstly, we describe progress at computing the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, describing the distribution of charge and current, before considering the role played by the strange quarks. We then describe the study of transition form factors to the Delta resonance. Finally, we present recent work to determine the pion form factor, complementary to the current JLab experimental determination and providing insight into the approach to asymptotic freedom.

  7. While the eagle slumbers - A new approach to public understanding of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltar, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    A new book has been prepared to build public trust in the United States by reducing individual fears regarding nuclear energy. Previous attempts have been largely unsuccessful because of one or more of the following handicaps: A. They are written to the scientist, rather than the lay public; B. They tend to intimidate; C. They don't come to grips with underlying fears and emotions; D. They rely too much on facts, ignoring images and analogies; E. They are too expensive for mass sales. The criteria selected for this project were as follows: A. Use eighth grade non-technical language (to the extent possible); B. Treat the reader as an intelligent person seeking to learn; C. Get in touch with the gut issues, and address them sensitively; D. Lighten up (include cartoons and user-friendly graphics); E. Publish paperback edition to induce low price 'impulse buying'. This book is aimed at the 80% of Americans who recognize that nuclear energy must be a significant part of their future, but who are not at all comfortable with that reality. It is targeted for high school and college level supplemental reading, as well as for the general public, the media, and community to better equip their interactions with the public

  8. Neogene paleogeography provides context for understanding the origin and spatial distribution of cryptic diversity in a widespread Balkan freshwater amphipod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Grabowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The Balkans are a major worldwide biodiversity and endemism hotspot. Among the freshwater biota, amphipods are known for their high cryptic diversity. However, little is known about the temporal and paleogeographic aspects of their evolutionary history. We used paleogeography as a framework for understanding the onset of diversification in Gammarus roeselii: (1 we hypothesised that, given the high number of isolated waterbodies in the Balkans, the species is characterised by high level of cryptic diversity, even on a local scale; (2 the long geological history of the region might promote pre-Pleistocene divergence between lineages; (3 given that G. roeselii thrives both in lakes and rivers, its evolutionary history could be linked to the Balkan Neogene paleolake system; (4 we inspected whether the Pleistocene decline of hydrological networks could have any impact on the diversification of G. roeselii. Material and Methods DNA was extracted from 177 individuals collected from 26 sites all over Balkans. All individuals were amplified for ca. 650 bp long fragment of the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI. After defining molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTU based on COI, 50 individuals were amplified for ca. 900 bp long fragment of the nuclear 28S rDNA. Molecular diversity, divergence, differentiation and historical demography based on COI sequences were estimated for each MOTU. The relative frequency, geographic distribution and molecular divergence between COI haplotypes were presented as a median-joining network. COI was used also to reconstruct time-calibrated phylogeny with Bayesian inference. Probabilities of ancestors’ occurrence in riverine or lacustrine habitats, as well their possible geographic locations, were estimated with the Bayesian method. A Neighbour Joining tree was constructed to illustrate the phylogenetic relationships between 28S rDNA haplotypes. Results We revealed that G. roeselii includes at least

  9. Analysis of syntactic and semantic features for fine-grained event-spatial understanding in outbreak news reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanlekha Hutchatai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that epidemiological reasoning needs a fine-grained modelling of events, especially their spatial and temporal attributes. While the temporal analysis of events has been intensively studied, far less attention has been paid to their spatial analysis. This article aims at filling the gap concerning automatic event-spatial attribute analysis in order to support health surveillance and epidemiological reasoning. Results In this work, we propose a methodology that provides a detailed analysis on each event reported in news articles to recover the most specific locations where it occurs. Various features for recognizing spatial attributes of the events were studied and incorporated into the models which were trained by several machine learning techniques. The best performance for spatial attribute recognition is very promising; 85.9% F-score (86.75% precision/85.1% recall. Conclusions We extended our work on event-spatial attribute recognition by focusing on machine learning techniques, which are CRF, SVM, and Decision tree. Our approach avoided the costly development of an external knowledge base by employing the feature sources that can be acquired locally from the analyzed document. The results showed that the CRF model performed the best. Our study indicated that the nearest location and previous event location are the most important features for the CRF and SVM model, while the location extracted from the verb's subject is the most important to the Decision tree model.

  10. Mechanistic understanding of irradiation-induced corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants: Stimuli, status, and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Ishigure, K.; Nechaev, A.F.; Reznichenko, E.A.; Cox, B.; Lemaignan, C.; Petrik, N.G.

    1990-05-01

    Failures in the basic materials used in nuclear power plants continue to be costly and insidious, despite increasing industry vigilance to catch failures before they degrade safety. For instance, the overall costs to the US industry from materials problems could amount to as much as $10 billion annually. Moreover, estimates indicate that the cost of a pipe failure in a nuclear plant is one hundred times greater than the cost of a similar failure in a coal-fired plant. There are important practical stimuli and much scope for further understanding of the effects of irradiation on Zr-alloys (and other materials used in nuclear installations) by careful experimentation. Moreover, these studies need to address the effect of irradiation on all components of heterogeneous systems: the metal, the oxide and the environment, and especially those processes recurring at the interphases between these components. The present paper is aimed at providing specialists with some systematic information on the subject and with important considerations on the key items for further experimentation.

  11. Nuclear, biological, and chemical terrorism: understanding the threat and designing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J D

    1999-01-01

    Today nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) terrorism is a serious issue. The threat of terrorist or rogue states acquiring and using NBC weapons has ushered in a new age of terrorism; an age that is far more dangerous than any previous period. It is an age of terrorism with which no one yet knows how to deal. This article reviews recent trends in terrorism, and identifies groups that have both the potential and the motive to use weapons of mass destruction. In addition, it discusses the design and implemention of effective measures to meet this threat, as well as the role of CISM teams in preparation for, and in the aftermath of, an incident involving NBC weapons.

  12. Nuclear structure effects in quasifission – understanding the formation of the heaviest elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasifission is an important process suppressing the fusion of two heavy nuclei in reactions used to create superheavy elements. Quasifission results in rapid separation of the dinuclear system initially formed at contact. Achieving reliable a priori prediction of quasifission probabilities is a very diffcult problem. Through measurements with projectiles from C to Ni, the Australian National University’s Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer have been used to map out mass-angle distributions (MAD - the fission mass-ratio as a function of centre-of-mass angle. These provide information on quasifission dynamics in the least modeldependent way. Average quasifission time-scales have been extracted, and compared with TDHF calculations of the collisions, with good agreement being found. With the baseline information from the survey of experimental MAD, strong influences of the nuclear structure of the projectile and target nuclei can be clearly determined.

  13. Imaging of spatially extended hot spots with coded apertures for intra-operative nuclear medicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Potiriadis, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging transcends planar imaging with conventional collimators in efficiency and Field of View (FOV). We present experimental results for the detection of 141 keV and 122 keV γ-photons emitted by uniformly extended 99mTc and 57Co hot-spots along with simulations of uniformly and normally extended 99mTc hot-spots. These results prove that the method can be used for intra-operative imaging of radio-traced sentinel nodes and thyroid remnants. The study is performed using a setup of two gamma cameras, each consisting of a coded-aperture (or mask) of Modified Uniformly Redundant Array (MURA) of rank 19 positioned on top of a CdTe detector. The detector pixel pitch is 350 μm and its active area is 4.4 × 4.4 cm2, while the mask element size is 1.7 mm. The detectable photon energy ranges from 15 keV up to 200 keV with an energy resolution of 3-4 keV FWHM. Triangulation is exploited to estimate the 3D spatial coordinates of the radioactive spots within the system FOV. Two extended sources, with uniform distributed activity (11 and 24 mm in diameter, respectively), positioned at 16 cm from the system and with 3 cm distance between their centers, can be resolved and localized with accuracy better than 5%. The results indicate that the estimated positions of spatially extended sources lay within their volume size and that neighboring sources, even with a low level of radioactivity, such as 30 MBq, can be clearly distinguished with an acquisition time about 3 seconds.

  14. More than A to B: Understanding and managing visitor spatial behaviour in urban forests using public participation GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpilo, Silviya; Virtanen, Tarmo; Saukkonen, Tiina; Lehvävirta, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    Planning and management needs up-to-date, easily-obtainable and accurate information on the spatial and social aspects of visitor behaviour in order to balance human use and impacts, and protection of natural resources in public parks. We used a web-based public participation GIS (PPGIS) approach to gather citizen data on visitor behaviour in Helsinki's Central Park in order to aid collaborative spatial decision-making. The study combined smartphone GPS tracking, route drawing and a questionnaire to examine differences between user groups in their use of formal trails, off-trail behaviour and the motivations that affect it. In our sample (n = 233), different activity types were associated with distinctive spatial patterns and potential extent of impacts. The density mapping and statistical analyses indicated three types of behaviour: predominantly on or close to formal trails (runners and cyclists), spatially concentrated off-trail behaviour confined to a few informal paths (mountain bikers), and dispersed off-trail use pattern (walkers and dog walkers). Across all user groups, off-trail behaviour was mainly motivated by positive attraction towards the environment such as scenic view, exploration, and viewing flora and fauna. Study findings lead to several management recommendations that were presented to city officials. These include reducing dispersion and the spatial extent of trampling impacts by encouraging use of a limited number of well-established informal paths away from sensitive vegetation and protected habitats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A contribution to the understanding of the high burn-up structure formation in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonnet, J.

    2007-01-01

    An increase of the discharge burn-up of UO 2 nuclear fuels in the light water reactors results in the appearance of a change of microscopic structure, called HBS. Although well characterised experimentally, important points on the mechanisms of its formation remain to be cleared up. In order to answer these questions, a study of the contribution of the dislocation-type defects was conducted. In a first part, a calculation method of the stress field associated with periodic configurations of dislocations was developed. The method was applied to the cases of edge dislocation pile-up and wall, for which an explicit expression of the internal stress potential was obtained. Through the study of other examples of dislocation configurations, it was highlighted that this method also allows the calculation of any periodic dislocation configuration. In a second part, the evolution of interstitial-type dislocation loops was studied in UO 2 fuel samples doped with 10% in mass of alpha emitters. The experimental loop size distributions were obtained for these samples stored during 4 and 7 years at room temperature. Kinetic equations are proposed in order to study the influence of the resolution process of interstitials from a loop back to the matrix due to an impact with the recoil atom 234 U, as well as the coalescence of two interstitial loops that can diffuse by a volume mechanism. The application of the model shows that the two processes must be considered in the study of the evolution of radiation damage. (author)

  16. A spatial analysis of evacuation intentions at the Shoreham nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.H. Jr.; Zeigler, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The evidence presented in this chapter suggests that decisions regarding the most appropriate actions to take during a radiological emergency are likely to be made at the individual household level and cannot be imposed on the population by governmental fiat. In light of this fact, two strategies are likely to enhance evacuation planning for radiological emergencies. First, federal, state and local emergency response planners should (1) accept the fact that human behavior cannot be controlled; (2) try to determine how the population is likely to react, and (3) capitalize on these behaviors by building them into the emergency response plans. Results of the Shoreham Evacuation Survey suggest, for example, that the ten mile (16 km) EPZ currently required by the NRC and FEMA should be extended to 25 miles (40 km) at the SNPS, in part accommodate the likely high degree of ''spontaneous evacuation,'' and in part to ensure that public exposure to radiation is minimal, in case of a radiological emergency at the plant. Second, emergency response planners also need to educate people about the importance of following directions in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. In the case of the SNPS, for example, the education program should be aimed not only at the zip code zones further from and west of the plant in which families (primarily young and with children) are likely to spontaneously evacuate (over-reactors), and also at those zones closer to and east of the plant in which the residents (primarily older and without children) may be included to ignore official orders to evacuate (under-reactors). These are the groups that either endanger society by congesting travel arteries (over-reactors) or themselves by remaining in place (under-reactors)

  17. Spatially Resolved Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of NGC 1068: The Nature and Distribution of the Nuclear Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. E.; Geballe, T. R.; Packham, C.; Levenson, N. A.; Elitzur, M.; Fisher, R. S.; Perlman, E.

    2006-04-01

    We present spatially resolved, near-diffraction-limited 10 μm spectra of the nucleus of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, obtained with Michelle, the mid-IR imager and spectrometer on the 8.1 m Gemini North Telescope. The spectra cover the nucleus and the central 6.0"×0.4" of the ionization cones at a spatial resolution of approximately 0.4" (~30 pc). The spectra extracted in 0.4" steps along the slit reveal striking variations in continuum slope, silicate feature profile and depth, and fine-structure line fluxes on subarcsecond scales, illustrating in unprecedented detail the complexity of the circumnuclear regions of NGC 1068 at mid-IR wavelengths. A comparison of photometry in various apertures reveals two distinct components: a compact (radiusdust in the ionization cones. While the torus emission dominates the flux observed in the near-IR, the mid-IR flux measured with apertures larger than about 1" is dominated instead by emission from the ionization cones; despite its higher brightness, the torus contributes contamination from the extended emission. The observed spectrum of the compact source is compared with clumpy torus models. The models require most of the clouds to be located within a few parsecs of the central engine, in agreement with recent mid-IR interferometric observations. We also present a UKIRT/CGS4 5 μm spectrum covering the R(0)-R(4) lines of the fundamental vibration-rotation band of 12CO. None of these lines was detected, and we discuss these nondetections in terms of the filling factor and composition of the nuclear clouds.

  18. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  19. Predicting major subsurface transport pathways as a key to understand spatial dynamics of reactive nitrogen in stream water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, P.; Dalgaard, Tommy; Schelde, Kirsten

    Process based modelling of nitrogen turnover and transport is mainly focused on the plot and field scale. However, scaling up to the landscape level with sufficient topographic gradient and conductivities, Nr is relocated in the landscape through surface runoff, interflow as well as lateral groun...... due to the hydrogeological conditions is likely and indicated by spatially differing concentrations of Nr in the stream water under comparable land use practices....

  20. Conceptual and Experimental Tools to Understand Spatial Effects and Transport Phenomena in Nonlinear Biochemical Networks Illustrated with Patchy Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompano, Rebecca R; Chiang, Andrew H; Kastrup, Christian J; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2017-06-20

    Many biochemical systems are spatially heterogeneous and exhibit nonlinear behaviors, such as state switching in response to small changes in the local concentration of diffusible molecules. Systems as varied as blood clotting, intracellular calcium signaling, and tissue inflammation are all heavily influenced by the balance of rates of reaction and mass transport phenomena including flow and diffusion. Transport of signaling molecules is also affected by geometry and chemoselective confinement via matrix binding. In this review, we use a phenomenon referred to as patchy switching to illustrate the interplay of nonlinearities, transport phenomena, and spatial effects. Patchy switching describes a change in the state of a network when the local concentration of a diffusible molecule surpasses a critical threshold. Using patchy switching as an example, we describe conceptual tools from nonlinear dynamics and chemical engineering that make testable predictions and provide a unifying description of the myriad possible experimental observations. We describe experimental microfluidic and biochemical tools emerging to test conceptual predictions by controlling transport phenomena and spatial distribution of diffusible signals, and we highlight the unmet need for in vivo tools.

  1. 76 FR 31997 - Final Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    .... Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on Chemical Facility Anti... Branch, Division of Security Policy, Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response, U.S. Nuclear..., Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response. [FR Doc. 2011-13676 Filed 6-1-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

  2. The contribution of spatial analysis to understanding HIV/TB mortality in children: a structural equation modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eustasius Musenge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa accounts for more than a sixth of the global population of people infected with HIV and TB, ranking her highest in HIV/TB co-infection worldwide. Remote areas often bear the greatest burden of morbidity and mortality, yet there are spatial differences within rural settings. Objectives: The primary aim was to investigate HIV/TB mortality determinants and their spatial distribution in the rural Agincourt sub-district for children aged 1–5 years in 2004. Our secondary aim was to model how the associated factors were interrelated as either underlying or proximate factors of child mortality using pathway analysis based on a Mosley-Chen conceptual framework. Methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on cross-sectional data collected in 2004 from the Agincourt sub-district in rural northeast South Africa. Child HIV/TB death was the outcome measure derived from physician assessed verbal autopsy. Modelling used multiple logit regression models with and without spatial household random effects. Structural equation models were used in modelling the complex relationships between multiple exposures and the outcome (child HIV/TB mortality as relayed on a conceptual framework. Results: Fifty-four of 6,692 children aged 1–5 years died of HIV/TB, from a total of 5,084 households. Maternal death had the greatest effect on child HIV/TB mortality (adjusted odds ratio=4.00; 95% confidence interval=1.01–15.80. A protective effect was found in households with better socio-economic status and when the child was older. Spatial models disclosed that the areas which experienced the greatest child HIV/TB mortality were those without any health facility. Conclusion: Low socio-economic status and maternal deaths impacted indirectly and directly on child mortality, respectively. These factors are major concerns locally and should be used in formulating interventions to reduce child mortality. Spatial prediction maps can guide policy

  3. Spatial and temporal dynamics of commercial reef-fish fisheries on the West Florida Shelf: Understanding drivers of fleet behavior and the implications for future management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, M.; Murawski, S. A.; Sanchirico, J. N.; O'Farrell, S.; Strelcheck, A.

    2016-02-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of fishing activity have historically been described over relatively coarse scales or with limited datasets. However, new and innovative approaches for fisheries management will require an understanding of both species population dynamics and fleet behavior at finer spatial and temporal resolution. In this study we describe the spatial and temporal patterns of commercial reef-fish fisheries on the West Florida Shelf (WFS) from 2006-14, using a combination of on-board observer, catch logbook, and vessel satellite tracking data. The satellite tracking data is both high resolution (ie, records from each vessel at least once every hour for the duration of a trip), and required of all federally-permitted reef fish vessels in the Gulf of Mexico, making this a uniquely rich and powerful dataset. Along with spatial and temporal fishery dynamics, we quantified concomitant patterns in fishery economics and catch metrics, such as total landings and catch composition. Fishery patterns were correlated to a number of variables across the vessel, trip, and whole fleet scales, including vessel size, distance from home port, number of days at sea, and days available to fish. Notably, changes in management structure during the years examined (eg, establishment of a seasonal closed area in 2009 and implementation of an individual fishing quota system for Grouper-Tilefish in 2010), as well as emergency spatial closures during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, enabled us to examine the impacts of specific management frameworks on the WFS reef-fish fishery. This research highlights the need to better understand the biological, economic, and social impacts within fisheries when managing for conservation and fisheries sustainability. We discuss our results in the context of a changing policy and management landscape for marine and coastal resources in the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Third conference on energy and nuclear power in Africa: A forum for advancing the understanding and development of safe and secure nuclear energy in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-04-01

    Availability, accessibility and affordability of energy continue to be the main challenges for the majority of African countries. Energy accessibility varies widely in Africa. Concerns over energy security, climate change and environmental impacts are compounding the situation. Several African countries have therefore begun to reconsider the nuclear option with a view to establishing long-term sustainable energy supplies. Nuclear was one of the most reliable technologies for electricity generation in the world today, able to generate large amounts of energy with minimal environmental impacts. The high cost of electricity for example in Kenya continued to be a challenge and the country was spending large amounts on the fuel cost adjustment associated with the use of thermal plants. Access to reliable energy sources was a critical component of all facets of socio-economic growth.The IAEA assisted member states in developing their national energy strategies through technical cooperation programmes, the primary means by which the IAEA provided assistance to member states.The aim of the 3. Conference on Energy and Nuclear Power in Africa was to provide a forum to discuss priorities and concerns related to energy and nuclear power, and further strengthen coordination with interested and relevant regional bodies/organizations in introducing nuclear power in Africa. The conference also aimed at offering a networking opportunity for countries considering the introduction of the nuclear option in their energy strategy. The major thematic areas for consideration were: Challenges of sustainable energy development in Africa; National and regional energy planning for nuclear power development; Legal and nuclear safety and security considerations; Leadership and management of a nuclear power programme; Funding and financing of a nuclear power programme in its early stages; and Regional networking for nuclear power programme development.

  5. Understanding spatial distributions: negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijleveld, Allert I; MacCurdy, Robert B; Chan, Ying-Chi; Penning, Emma; Gabrielson, Rich M; Cluderay, John; Spaulding, Eric L; Dekinga, Anne; Holthuijsen, Sander; ten Horn, Job; Brugge, Maarten; van Gils, Jan A; Winkler, David W; Piersma, Theunis

    2016-04-13

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The 'functional response' couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases asymptotically with prey density; this predicts the highest predator densities at the highest prey densities. In one of the most stringent tests of this generality to date, we measured density and quality of bivalve prey (edible cockles Cerastoderma edule) across 50 km² of mudflat, and simultaneously, with a novel time-of-arrival methodology, tracked their avian predators (red knots Calidris canutus). Because of negative density-dependence in the individual quality of cockles, the predicted energy intake rates of red knots declined at high prey densities (a type IV, rather than a type II functional response). Resource-selection modelling revealed that red knots indeed selected areas of intermediate cockle densities where energy intake rates were maximized given their phenotype-specific digestive constraints (as indicated by gizzard mass). Because negative density-dependence is common, we question the current consensus and suggest that predators commonly maximize their energy intake rates at intermediate prey densities. Prey density alone may thus poorly predict intake rates, carrying capacity and spatial distributions of predators. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Understanding spatial and temporal patterning of astrocyte calcium transients via interactions between network transport and extracellular diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtrahman, E.; Maruyama, D.; Olariu, E.; Fink, C. G.; Zochowski, M.

    2017-02-01

    Astrocytes form interconnected networks in the brain and communicate via calcium signaling. We investigate how modes of coupling between astrocytes influence the spatio-temporal patterns of calcium signaling within astrocyte networks and specifically how these network interactions promote coordination within this group of cells. To investigate these complex phenomena, we study reduced cultured networks of astrocytes and neurons. We image the spatial temporal patterns of astrocyte calcium activity and quantify how perturbing the coupling between astrocytes influences astrocyte activity patterns. To gain insight into the pattern formation observed in these cultured networks, we compare the experimentally observed calcium activity patterns to the patterns produced by a reduced computational model, where we represent astrocytes as simple units that integrate input through two mechanisms: gap junction coupling (network transport) and chemical release (extracellular diffusion). We examine the activity patterns in the simulated astrocyte network and their dependence upon these two coupling mechanisms. We find that gap junctions and extracellular chemical release interact in astrocyte networks to modulate the spatiotemporal patterns of their calcium dynamics. We show agreement between the computational and experimental findings, which suggests that the complex global patterns can be understood as a result of simple local coupling mechanisms.

  7. Groundwater-fed irrigation impacts spatially distributed temporal scaling behavior of the natural system: a spatio-temporal framework for understanding water management impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Laura E.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-03-01

    Regional scale water management analysis increasingly relies on integrated modeling tools. Much recent work has focused on groundwater-surface water interactions and feedbacks. However, to our knowledge, no study has explicitly considered impacts of management operations on the temporal dynamics of the natural system. Here, we simulate twenty years of hourly moisture dependent, groundwater-fed irrigation using a three-dimensional, fully integrated, hydrologic model (ParFlow-CLM). Results highlight interconnections between irrigation demand, groundwater oscillation frequency and latent heat flux variability not previously demonstrated. Additionally, the three-dimensional model used allows for novel consideration of spatial patterns in temporal dynamics. Latent heat flux and water table depth both display spatial organization in temporal scaling, an important finding given the spatial homogeneity and weak scaling observed in atmospheric forcings. Pumping and irrigation amplify high frequency (sub-annual) variability while attenuating low frequency (inter-annual) variability. Irrigation also intensifies scaling within irrigated areas, essentially increasing temporal memory in both the surface and the subsurface. These findings demonstrate management impacts that extend beyond traditional water balance considerations to the fundamental behavior of the system itself. This is an important step to better understanding groundwater’s role as a buffer for natural variability and the impact that water management has on this capacity.

  8. Groundwater-fed irrigation impacts spatially distributed temporal scaling behavior of the natural system: a spatio-temporal framework for understanding water management impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condon, Laura E; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-01-01

    Regional scale water management analysis increasingly relies on integrated modeling tools. Much recent work has focused on groundwater–surface water interactions and feedbacks. However, to our knowledge, no study has explicitly considered impacts of management operations on the temporal dynamics of the natural system. Here, we simulate twenty years of hourly moisture dependent, groundwater-fed irrigation using a three-dimensional, fully integrated, hydrologic model (ParFlow-CLM). Results highlight interconnections between irrigation demand, groundwater oscillation frequency and latent heat flux variability not previously demonstrated. Additionally, the three-dimensional model used allows for novel consideration of spatial patterns in temporal dynamics. Latent heat flux and water table depth both display spatial organization in temporal scaling, an important finding given the spatial homogeneity and weak scaling observed in atmospheric forcings. Pumping and irrigation amplify high frequency (sub-annual) variability while attenuating low frequency (inter-annual) variability. Irrigation also intensifies scaling within irrigated areas, essentially increasing temporal memory in both the surface and the subsurface. These findings demonstrate management impacts that extend beyond traditional water balance considerations to the fundamental behavior of the system itself. This is an important step to better understanding groundwater’s role as a buffer for natural variability and the impact that water management has on this capacity. (paper)

  9. Laymen's demand on an understandable safety analysis for a nuclear waste repository. A communication challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, T.L.; Thunberg, A.M. [KASAM - Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This paper is a summary in English of some impressions from a seminar 'Safety Analysis of the Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste. An issue for specialists only or for all of us?' The seminar was held in Swedish and was arranged by KASAM in Nykoeping, Sweden in November 1997. A report in Swedish from the seminar has been published. The seminar was arranged in response to a request from representatives from some of the municipalities concerned by the feasibility studies, which are part of the siting process. They had noticed that it is very hard for people without specialist competence to get an understanding of the safety issues based on the available information. There is a need for a presentation of the safety analysis, which is adopted not only for the need of the safety authorities, which have their own expertise, but also for the need of laymen who are involved in issues about the design, siting and safety of a final repository. Therefore, the seminar was mainly intended for representatives for the citizens (i.e. politicians) from the municipalities involved in the ongoing feasibility studies in Sweden. Some representatives from different environmental organisations opposing final disposal were also invited as well as representatives from the nuclear industry and from the concerned Swedish authorities. The seminar was structured in four sessions The handling of risk in the modern society - risk assessment and risk comparisons; The safety analysis and its role for the citizens; What can actually happen - in our own time and in the future?; Group discussions. In order to give a realistic picture of the intense debate, which at least in some of the municipalities had been very apparent, the organisers had chosen to make SKB and Greenpeace main actors at the seminar, such as they appeared in connection with campaign before the referendum at Malaa. Parts of the seminar were arranged like a hearing, led by a science journalist. The intention with this paper is

  10. Towards understanding temporal and spatial dynamics of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) infestations using decade-long agrometeorological time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Susanna; Guidotti, Diego; Ricciolini, Massimo; Petacchi, Ruggero

    2016-11-01

    Insect dynamics depend on temperature patterns, and therefore, global warming may lead to increasing frequencies and intensities of insect outbreaks. The aim of this work was to analyze the dynamics of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), in Tuscany (Italy). We profited from long-term records of insect infestation and weather data available from the regional database and agrometeorological network. We tested whether the analysis of 13 years of monitoring campaigns can be used as basis for prediction models of B. oleae infestation. We related the percentage of infestation observed in the first part of the host-pest interaction and throughout the whole year to agrometeorological indices formulated for different time periods. A two-step approach was adopted to inspect the effect of weather on infestation: generalized linear model with a binomial error distribution and principal component regression to reduce the number of the agrometeorological factors and remove their collinearity. We found a consistent relationship between the degree of infestation and the temperature-based indices calculated for the previous period. The relationship was stronger with the minimum temperature of winter season. Higher infestation was observed in years following warmer winters. The temperature of the previous winter and spring explained 66 % of variance of early-season infestation. The temperature of previous winter and spring, and current summer, explained 72 % of variance of total annual infestation. These results highlight the importance of multiannual monitoring activity to fully understand the dynamics of B. oleae populations at a regional scale.

  11. Understanding Spatially Complex Segmental and Branch Anatomy Using 3D Printing: Liver, Lung, Prostate, Coronary Arteries, and Circle of Willis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, Ramin; Herrin, Douglas; Tangestanipoor, Ardalan

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) manufacturing is shaping personalized medicine, in which radiologists can play a significant role, be it as consultants to surgeons for surgical planning or by creating powerful visual aids for communicating with patients, physicians, and trainees. This report illustrates the steps in development of custom 3D models that enhance the understanding of complex anatomy. We graphically designed 3D meshes or modified imported data from cross-sectional imaging to develop physical models targeted specifically for teaching complex segmental and branch anatomy. The 3D printing itself is easily accessible through online commercial services, and the models are made of polyamide or gypsum. Anatomic models of the liver, lungs, prostate, coronary arteries, and the Circle of Willis were created. These models have advantages that include customizable detail, relative low cost, full control of design focusing on subsegments, color-coding potential, and the utilization of cross-sectional imaging combined with graphic design. Radiologists have an opportunity to serve as leaders in medical education and clinical care with 3D printed models that provide beneficial interaction with patients, clinicians, and trainees across all specialties by proactively taking on the educator's role. Complex models can be developed to show normal anatomy or common pathology for medical educational purposes. There is a need for randomized trials, which radiologists can design, to demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of 3D printed models for teaching simple and complex anatomy, simulating interventions, measuring patient satisfaction, and improving clinical care. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efforts by Atomic Energy Society of Japan to improve the public understanding on nuclear power. With an additional review on the present status of nuclear engineering education at universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, K.; Kudo, K.; Ishigure, K.; Miyazaki, K.; Kimura, I.; Madarame, H.

    1996-01-01

    On variety of recent public occasions crucial for the progress of Japanese nuclear fuel cycle, the public has expressed their incredulous and reserved attitudes toward further expansion of nuclear power utilization. The typical examples are (1) local town political votes with an issue to decide on the acceptance of a proposed nuclear power plant, ending up with a conclusion against the proposal, and (2) the local dissatisfaction expressed against a proposed, deep-underground research facility, which is intended to produce cold-simulation data on the behavior of high level waste nuclides. Realizing that the dissemination of systematic and correct informations is indispensable for gaining public understanding on the importance of energy resources and nuclear power, the Educational Committee, Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ), has initiated various public relations activities since 1994. In the following we sketch such activities, namely: (1) Reviews conducted on high school textbooks. (2) A request submitted to the Government for revisions of high-school textbooks and governmental guidelines defining these textbooks. (3) Preparations of a source book on nuclear energy and radiations. In addition, (4) the review conducted on the present status of nuclear engineering education in universities over the country with and without nuclear engineering program will be given. (author)

  13. The Holocene history of the North American Monsoon: 'known knowns' and 'known unknowns' in understanding its spatial and temporal complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Sarah E.; Barron, John A.; Davies, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for climatic change across the North American Monsoon (NAM) and adjacent areas is reviewed, drawing on continental and marine records and the application of climate models. Patterns of change at 12,000, 9000, 6000 and 4000 cal yr BP are presented to capture the nature of change from the Younger Dryas (YD) and through the mid-Holocene. At the YD, conditions were cooler overall, wetter in the north and drier in the south, while moving into the Holocene wetter conditions became established in the south and then spread north as the NAM strengthened. Until c. 8000 cal yr BP, the Laurentide Ice Sheet influenced precipitation in the north by pushing the Bermuda High further south. The peak extent of the NAM seems to have occurred around 6000 cal yr BP. 4000 cal yr BP marks the start of important changes across the NAM region, with drying in the north and the establishment of the clear differences between the summer-rain dominated south and central areas and the north, where winter rain is more important. This differentiation between south and north is crucial to understanding many climate responses across the NAM. This increasing variability is coincident with the declining influence of orbital forcing. 4000 cal yr BP also marks the onset of significant anthropogenic activity in many areas. For the last 2000 years, the focus is on higher temporal resolution change, with strong variations across the region. The Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) is characterised by centennial scale ‘megadrought’ across the southwest USA, associated with cooler tropical Pacific SSTs and persistent La Niña type conditions. Proxy data from southern Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean reveal generally wetter conditions, whereas records from the highlands of central Mexico and much of the Yucatan are typified by long -term drought. The Little Ice Age (LIA), in the north, was characterised by cooler, wetter winter conditions that have been linked with increased

  14. Availability of Japanese Government's supplemental texts on radiation reflecting the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident for elementary and secondary education from dental students' understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Midori; Honda, Eiichi; Dashpuntsag, Oyunbat; Maeda, Naoki; Hosoki, Hidehiko; Sakama, Minoru; Tada, Toshiko

    2016-05-01

    Following the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, the Japanese government created two supplemental texts about radiation reflecting the accident for elementary, middle school, and high school students. These texts were made to explain radiation and consequently to obtain public consent for the continuation of the nuclear program. The present study aimed to evaluate the appropriateness of the content of the texts and to collect the basic data on the level of understanding necessary to improve radiation education. Lectures on radiology including nuclear energy and the Fukushima accident were given to 44 fourth-year dental students in 2013. The questionnaire was administered in 2014 when these students were in their sixth-year. The survey was also administered to 40 first-year students and 41 fourth-year students who hadn't any radiology lectures. Students rated their level of understanding of 50 phrases used in the texts on a four-point scale (understanding = 3, a little knowledge = 2, having heard = 1, no knowledge = 0). Questions on taking an advanced physics course in high school and means of learning about radiation in daily life were also asked. The level of understanding of phrases in the supplemental text for middle and high school students was significantly higher among sixth-year students (mean = 1.43) than among first-year (mean = 1.12) or fourth-year (mean = 0.93) students (p radiation from television but four-year and six-year students learning about radiation from newspaper scored significantly higher (p radiation education should be improved by using visual material and preparing educators to teach the material for improving the public's understanding of radiation use-especially nuclear power generation because the phrases used in the supplementary texts are very difficult for students to understand. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Developing Students' Spatial Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Jeanne E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the importance of developing students' understanding of certain spatial aspects of important concepts. Piaget's contributions to the development of spatial conceptualization are included. Some examples for applying spatial techniques in earth sciences, physics, and chemistry are also presented. (HM)

  16. Nuclear Aerosols: Direct Simulation and Elucidation of the Role of Multiple Components, Radioactivity, Charge, Shape and Spatial Inhomogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan K. Loyalka

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear aerosols can originate from severe core damage in light water reactors, core disruptive accidents in fast reactors, nuclear accidents during nuclear material transport, at waste disposal sites, or explosions. These aerosols evolve under natural transport processes as well as under the influence of engineered safety features. Such aerosols can be hazardous for the equipment inside the reactor, and when leaked into the environment, pose potential risks to the public. Hence, the origin, movement and distribution of these aerosols need to be studied and controlled

  17. Monkey Management: Using Spatial Ecology to Understand the Extent and Severity of Human-Baboon Conflict in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali S. Hoffman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Conflict with humans poses one of the greatest threats to the persistence and survival of all wildlife. In the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, human-baboon conflict levels remain high despite substantial investment by conservation authorities in a variety of mitigation measures. Here we explore how spatial ecology can inform wildlife managers on the extent and severity of both current and projected human-baboon conflict. We apply conservative and generous densities - 2.3 and 5.9 baboons/km2 - to hypothetical landscape management scenarios to estimate whether the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus population in the Cape Peninsula is currently overabundant. We correlate conflict indices with spatial variables to explain intertroop differences in conflict levels. We investigate how an understanding of key elements of baboon ecology, including sleeping-site characteristics and intertroop territoriality, can direct management efforts and mitigate conflict. Our findings suggest that the current population of 475 baboons is below even the most conservative density estimate and that the area could potentially sustain up to 799 baboons. Conflict levels correlated positively with the loss of access to low-lying land through habitat transformation (Pearson r = 0.77, p = 0.015, n = 9 troops, and negatively with the distance of sleeping sites from the urban edge (Pearson r = 0.81, p = 0.001, n = 9 troops. Despite the availability of suitable sleeping sites elsewhere, more than half of all troops slept

  18. Understanding culture in territorial management and its implications for spatial planning. The case of floodplain management in urbanised delta regions in the Netherlands and Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwanna Rongwiriyaphanich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiences have shown that the implementation of planning policy does not always lead to the originally intended territorial management outcomes. This issue
is particularly crucial when policy ideas, institutions, models and programmes are transferred into places with different cultural settings without adaptations (Knieling and Othengrafen 2009b; Sanyal 2005. These unexpected consequences in planning practice and management outcomes have brought a significant amount of attention to the importance and roles of culture on shaping decision-making in territorial management process and determining transferability of a policy (Friedmann 2005a, 2005b; de Jong and Mamadouh 2002; Sanyal 2005; Ostrom 2005a; Knieling and Othengrafen 2009b. However, conceptual frameworks that seek to understand the roles of culture and its implications for spatial planning are still rather limited. This study presents and applies an integrative conceptual framework which is used
to explain how culture, planning policy and territorial management outcomes are interrelated, and what the implications are for spatial planning. The framework integrates relevant theories and ideas from anthropology, organisational management and political sciences to understand influences of culture on spatial planning. The integrative framework suggests a way of characterising territorial management in the form of ideal types. This helps simplify cultures regarding territorial management to make them comparable. It enables an analysis of ‘cultures’ that includes a broader scope of culture than existing frameworks that focus primarily on ‘planning cultures’ expressed in forms of planning systems, organisations and instruments. This broader scope includes also the implicit expressions of culture in informal forms, such as ideas, customs and social behaviours shared by involved actors in the management of a given territory. The framework also offers two analytical perspectives

  19. Comparison between a 13-session and one-time program on Korea elementary, middle and high school students' understanding of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To help future generations make accurate value judgments about nuclear power generation and radiation, this study will provide an effective education plan suitable for South Korea by applying and analyzing programs for the understanding of nuclear power within the diversely operated programs in the current Korean education system. This study analyzed the difference in educational effects by operating a 13-session regular curriculum for one semester and a one-session short-term curriculum from March to July 2016. As a result of operating a 13-session model school and a one-time educational program to analyze behavior changes against the traditional learning model, it was found that all elementary, middle and high school students showed higher acceptability of nuclear power in South Korea. The variation was greater for the model school than the short-term program. To prevent future generations from making biased policy decisions stemming from fear regarding nuclear power, it is necessary to bolster their value judgments in policy decisions by acquiring sufficient information about nuclear power generation and radiation through educational programs.

  20. Comparison between a 13-session and one-time program on Korea elementary, middle and high school students' understanding of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok; Lim, Young Khi

    2017-01-01

    To help future generations make accurate value judgments about nuclear power generation and radiation, this study will provide an effective education plan suitable for South Korea by applying and analyzing programs for the understanding of nuclear power within the diversely operated programs in the current Korean education system. This study analyzed the difference in educational effects by operating a 13-session regular curriculum for one semester and a one-session short-term curriculum from March to July 2016. As a result of operating a 13-session model school and a one-time educational program to analyze behavior changes against the traditional learning model, it was found that all elementary, middle and high school students showed higher acceptability of nuclear power in South Korea. The variation was greater for the model school than the short-term program. To prevent future generations from making biased policy decisions stemming from fear regarding nuclear power, it is necessary to bolster their value judgments in policy decisions by acquiring sufficient information about nuclear power generation and radiation through educational programs

  1. Spatial analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA diversity in wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) populations: do marine currents shape the genetic structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fievet, Virgil; Touzet, Pascal; Arnaud, Jean-François; Cuguen, Joël

    2007-05-01

    Patterns of seed dispersal in the wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) are predicted to be influenced by marine currents because populations are widely distributed along the European Atlantic coast. We investigated the potential influence of marine currents on the pattern of spatial genetic structuring in natural populations of sea beet. Populations were located along the French coasts of the Anglo-Norman gulf that features peculiar marine currents in the Channel. Thirty-three populations were sampled, among which 23 were continental and 10 were insular populations located in Jersey, Guernsey and Chausey, for a total of 1224 plants genotyped. To validate the coastal topography influence and the possibility of marine current orientated gene flow on the genetic features of sea beet populations, we assessed patterns of genetic structuring of cytoplasmic and nuclear diversity by: (i) searching for an isolation-by-distance (IBD) pattern using spatial autocorrelation tools; (ii) using the Monmonier algorithm to identify genetic boundaries in the area studied; and (iii) performing assignment tests that are based on multilocus genotype information to ascertain population membership of individuals. Our results showed a highly contrasted cytoplasmic and nuclear genetic differentiation and highlighted the peculiar situation of island populations. Beyond a classical isolation-by-distance due to short-range dispersal, genetic barriers fitting the orientation of marine currents were clearly identified. This suggests the occurrence of long-distance seed dispersal events and an asymmetrical gene flow separating the eastern and western part of the Anglo-Norman gulf.

  2. Advanced Mechanistic 3D Spatial Modeling and Analysis Methods to Accurately Represent Nuclear Facility External Event Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezen, Halil [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering; Aldemir, Tunc [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Denning, R. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Vaidya, N. [Rizzo Associates, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-12-29

    Probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power plants initially focused on events initiated by internal faults at the plant, rather than external hazards including earthquakes and flooding. Although the importance of external hazards risk analysis is now well recognized, the methods for analyzing low probability external hazards rely heavily on subjective judgment of specialists, often resulting in substantial conservatism. This research developed a framework to integrate the risk of seismic and flooding events using realistic structural models and simulation of response of nuclear structures. The results of four application case studies are presented.

  3. Wireless amplified nuclear MR detector (WAND) for high-spatial-resolution MR imaging of internal organs: preclinical demonstration in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chunqi; Yu, Xin; Chen, Der-Yow; Dodd, Stephen; Bouraoud, Nadia; Pothayee, Nikorn; Chen, Yun; Beeman, Scott; Bennett, Kevin; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Koretsky, Alan

    2013-07-01

    To assess the feasibility of imaging deep-lying internal organs at high spatial resolution by imaging kidney glomeruli in a rodent model with use of a newly developed, wireless amplified nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) detector. This study was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee at the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurologic Disorder and Stroke. As a preclinical demonstration of this new detection technology, five different millimeter-scale wireless amplified nuclear MR detectors configured as double frequency resonators were chronically implanted on the medial surface of the kidney in five Sprague-Dawley rats for MR imaging at 11.7 T. Among these rats, two were administered gadopentetate dimeglumine to visualize renal tubules on T1-weighted gradient-refocused echo (GRE) images, two were administered cationized ferritin to visualize glomeruli on T2*-weighted GRE images, and the remaining rat was administered both gadopentetate dimeglumine and cationized ferritin to visualize the interleaved pattern of renal tubules and glomeruli. The image intensity in each pixel was compared with the local tissue signal intensity average to identify regions of hyper- or hypointensity. T1-weighted images with 70-μm in-plane resolution and 200-μm section thickness were obtained within 3.2 minutes to image renal tubules, and T2*-weighted images of the same resolution were obtained within 5.8 minutes to image the glomeruli. Hyperintensity from gadopentetate dimeglumine enabled visualization of renal tubules, and hypointensity from cationic ferritin enabled visualization of the glomeruli. High-spatial-resolution images have been obtained to observe kidney microstructures in vivo with a wireless amplified nuclear MR detector.

  4. Temporal analysis and spatial mapping of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus transcripts and in vitro translation polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Slavicek

    1991-01-01

    Genomic expression of the Lymantriu dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) was studied. Viral specific transcripts expressed in cell culture at various times from 2 through 72 h postinfection were identified and their genomic origins mapped through Northern analysis. Sixty-five distinct transcripts were identified in this...

  5. Understanding the nuclear gas dispersion in early-type galaxies in the context of black hole demographics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, GAV; van der Marel, RP; Noel-Storr, J

    The majority of nearby early-type galaxies contain detectable amounts of emission-line gas at their centers. The nuclear gas kinematics form a valuable diagnostic of the central black hole (BH) mass. Here we analyze and model Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations of a sample of 27 galaxies; 16

  6. 77 FR 6131 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... the location of the proposed facility to terrorist attack. II. Background Nuclear Regulatory... to secure America by preventing, deterring, and responding to terrorist attacks and other ] threats... potential vulnerabilities of the location of the proposed facility to terrorist attack. This review and...

  7. Spatial selection of focal of underground nuclear explosion by means of directed investigation and a method of vibroseismic oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskobojnikova, G.M.; Sedukhina, G.F.; Khajretdinov, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    An approach to task solving on parameters localization and determination within focal area of underground nuclear explosion (UNE) by scanning the inspected area by vibroseismic translucent field is considered. For the method, which application has been justified for task solving on On-Site Inspection (OSI), results of numerical modeling of seismic antenna orientation specifications are given, results of experiments on directed method of vibroseismic oscillation is described, questions on practical application of On-Site Inspection tasks are discussed. (author)

  8. Spatial regulation of the KH domain RNA-binding protein Rnc1 mediated by a Crm1-independent nuclear export system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ryosuke; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Akitomo; Takada, Makoto; Ito, Yuna; Hagihara, Kanako; Inari, Masahiro; Kita, Ayako; Fukao, Akira; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Hirai, Shinya; Tani, Tokio; Sugiura, Reiko

    2017-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, including mRNA stability, transport and translation. Fission yeast rnc1 + encodes a K Homology (KH)-type RBP, which binds and stabilizes the Pmp1 MAPK phosphatase mRNA thereby suppressing the Cl - hypersensitivity of calcineurin deletion and MAPK signaling mutants. Here, we analyzed the spatial regulation of Rnc1 and discovered a putative nuclear export signal (NES) Rnc1 , which dictates the cytoplasmic localization of Rnc1 in a Crm1-independent manner. Notably, mutations in the NES Rnc1 altered nucleocytoplasmic distribution of Rnc1 and abolished its function to suppress calcineurin deletion, although the Rnc1 NES mutant maintains the ability to bind Pmp1 mRNA. Intriguingly, the Rnc1 NES mutant destabilized Pmp1 mRNA, suggesting the functional importance of the Rnc1 cytoplasmic localization. Mutation in Rae1, but not Mex67 deletion or overproduction, induced Rnc1 accumulation in the nucleus, suggesting that Rnc1 is exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via the mRNA export pathway involving Rae1. Importantly, mutations in the Rnc1 KH-domains abolished the mRNA-binding ability and induced nuclear localization, suggesting that Rnc1 may be exported from the nucleus together with its target mRNAs. Collectively, the functional Rae1-dependent mRNA export system may influence the cytoplasmic localization and function of Rnc1. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Spatial distribution of the radon concentration in soil and subterranean water in the Nuclear Center of Mexico and its surrounding using a geographical information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, S.; Pena, P.; Lopez, M.B.E.; Balcazar, M.; Madrigal, D.

    2003-01-01

    The radon concentration in soil of the Nuclear Center of Mexico using solid detectors of nuclear traces (LR 115, type ll) and in water of two aquifers of the Asuncion Tepexoyuca, by means of the liquid scintillation technique it was determined; both places located in the Ocoyoacac municipality, Estado de Mexico. The analysis of spatial distribution it was supported by means of a Geographic Information System. The results of the radon concentration in soil, they registered an average of 2. 64 kBq m -3 in the study area, the more high average value it was of 5. 25 kBq m -3 in the station 12-ZM (Military Area) and the minimum value was of 0. 54 kBq m -3 in the point 7-CO (Dining room). In the radon concentration in water of La Perita it was observed an average value 0.52 Bq L -1 and in El Tunel it was of 0.7 Bq L -1 . (Author)

  10. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional 13C spectra, two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at −20°C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays. PMID:26036615

  11. Expression and function of nuclear receptor coregulators in brain : understanding the cell-specific effects of glucocorticoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Siem van der

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the raising awareness of the role of glucocorticoids in the onset of numerous (neuro)-pathologies constitutes the increasing necessity of understanding the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in bodily processes and brain functioning. Glucocorticoids mediate their effects by binding

  12. Development of nuclear emulsions with 1μm spatial resolution for the AEgIS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C., E-mail: claude.amsler@cern.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2013-12-21

    The main goal of the AEgIS experiment at CERN is to test the weak equivalence principle for antimatter. We will measure the Earth's gravitational acceleration g{sup ¯} with antihydrogen atoms being launched in a horizontal vacuum tube and traversing a moiré deflectometer. We intend to use a position sensitive device made of nuclear emulsions (combined with a time-of-flight detector such as silicon μ-strips) to measure precisely their annihilation points at the end of the tube. The goal is to determine g{sup ¯} with a 1% relative accuracy. In 2012 we tested emulsion films in vacuum and at room temperature with low energy antiprotons from the CERN antiproton decelerator. First results on the expected performance for AEgIS are presented.

  13. New concepts of nuclear reactors and fuel cycles: performing agile technometric studies to understand the promises and the current reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.

    2013-01-01

    The progress of previous projects pointed out the need to face some problems of software for detecting emerging research and development trends from databases of scientific publication. Given the lack of efficient computing applications dedicated to this purpose that we consider to be an artifact of great usefulness to better planning R and D programs in institutions, which are obliged to manage and develop, with limited resources and within the realm of complex and multidisciplinary technology fields as is the case of the Brazilian nuclear sector. We performed a review of the currently available software in such a way that we could clearly delineate the opportunity to develop new tools. As a result, we developed a software called Cite snake, which was especially designed to help the detection and study of emerging trends from the analysis of networks of various types extracted from the scientific databases. Using this powerful and stable computational tool, we performed preliminary analyzes of emerging research and development trends in a few thematic fields. The case that concerns this paper is the one devoted to the eld of Generation IV Nuclear Power Generation Systems. We analyzed the productivity of authors, co-authorship networks, co-citation networks, development structure and emerging sub-areas of research. The idea was to nd what reactors and fuel cycles have evolved more over the past ten years, in such a way to compare the what from the most promising concepts selected from the Generation Four Initiative have better evolved to fulfill some of their promises. (author)

  14. Modeling Np and Pu transport with a surface complexation model and spatially variant sorption capacities: Implications for reactive transport modeling and performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) geochemical transport modeling is used to demonstrate the effects of speciation and sorption reactions on the ground-water transport of Np and Pu, two redox-sensitive elements. Earlier 1D simulations (Reardon, 1981) considered the kinetically limited dissolution of calcite and its effect on ion-exchange reactions (involving 90Sr, Ca, Na, Mg and K), and documented the spatial variation of a 90Sr partition coefficient under both transient and steady-state chemical conditions. In contrast, the simulations presented here assume local equilibrium for all reactions, and consider sorption on constant potential, rather than constant charge, surfaces. Reardon's (1981) seminal findings on the spatial and temporal variability of partitioning (of 90Sr) are reexamined and found partially caused by his assumption of a kinetically limited reaction. In the present work, sorption is assumed the predominant retardation process controlling Pu and Np transport, and is simulated using a diffuse-double-layer-surface-complexation (DDLSC) model. Transport simulations consider the infiltration of Np- and Pu-contaminated waters into an initially uncontaminated environment, followed by the cleanup of the resultant contamination with uncontaminated water. Simulations are conducted using different spatial distributions of sorption capacities (with the same total potential sorption capacity, but with different variances and spatial correlation structures). Results obtained differ markedly from those that would be obtained in transport simulations using constant Kd, Langmuir or Freundlich sorption models. When possible, simulation results (breakthrough curves) are fitted to a constant K d advection-dispersion transport model and compared. Functional differences often are great enough that they prevent a meaningful fit of the simulation results with a constant K d (or even a Langmuir or Freundlich) model, even in the case of Np, a weakly sorbed radionuclide under the

  15. Exploring the spatial dimension of estrogen and progesterone signaling: detection of nuclear labeling in lobular epithelial cells in normal mammary glands adjacent to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Anne; Abbas, Mahmoud; Linder, Nina; Kreipe, Hans H; Lundin, Johan; Feuerhake, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    steroid hormone receptors in their spatial context, we show that lobular structures can be classified based on texture-based image features, unless brisk inflammatory infiltration disrupts the normal morphological structure of the tubular gland epithelium. We consider this approach as prototypic for detection and spatial analysis of nuclear markers in defined regions of interest. We conclude that advanced image analysis at this level of complexity requires adaptation to the individual tumor phenotypes and morphological characteristics of the tumor environment.

  16. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He + ions and 7 MeV Au 5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to −0.7% and −2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about −22% to −38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by −8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11 B and 27 Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO 4 to BO 3 units but also a formation of AlO 5 and AlO 6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed. - Highlights: • Mechanical and structural properties of two borosilicate glass compositions irradiated with alpha particles and heavy ions were investigated. • Both kinds of particles induced a decrease of the hardness, reduced Young's modulus and density. • Electronic and nuclear interactions are responsible for the changes observed. • The evolution of the mechanical properties under irradiation is linked to the changes occured in the

  17. Nuclear inelastic scattering and density-functional-theory calculations on the understanding of the vibronic properties of polynuclear iron complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faus, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of 3d elements with an electronic configuration of d 4 to d 8 can show a temperature dependent spin transition. This process is called spin crossover (SCO) effect and describes the transition between two states, the low spin (LS) state and the high spin (HS) state. In the LS state the spin is as low as possible, caused by none or a minimal number of unpaired electrons. In the HS state the spin is as high as possible with a maximal number of unpaired electrons. Because of this bistability, SCO materials are promising candidates for innovative molecular storage devices. Directly related to the SCO effect is the cooperativity, which specifies the interaction of metal centers between molecules (intermolecular cooperativity) or in a molecule (intramolecular cooperativity). Cooperativity is of vital importance for the switching behavior of SCO complexes with broad hysteresis. Therefore, three dinuclear SCO complexes which show a varying degree of cooperativity due to different geometries of their bridging ligands were investigated. By means of nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS), it could be clarified whether it is possible to find intramolecular cooperative effects in the vibrational patterns of these complexes. With corresponding density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it was possible for all of the dinuclear complexes to correlate the experimental NIS bands to the corresponding molecular vibrational modes. In the LS-LS or HS-HS state of the three complexes two modes exist lying energetically close together, which show a similar movement of the whole complex, with only a difference in the movement of the iron atoms. Thereby, the irons are moving either in the same or in the opposite direction. For complexes with a high degree of cooperativity there are nearly exclusively small energy shifts between this kind of nearly twofold energetically degenerated modes (ΔE <7 cm -1 ), for the complex with a low degree of cooperativity there are

  18. Research with radiation and radioisotopes to better understand plant physiology and agricultural consequences of radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2017-01-01

    Research carried out by me and my group over the last almost four decades are summarized here. The main emphasis of my work was and continues to be on plant physiology using radiation and radioisotopes. Plants live on water and inorganic elements. In the case of water, we developed neutron imaging methods and produced 15 O-labeled water (half-life 2 min) and applied them to understand water circulation pattern in the plant. In the case of elements, we developed neutron activation analysis methods to analyze a large number of plant tissues to follow element specific distribution. Then, we developed real-time imaging system using conventional radioisotopes for the macroscopic and microscopic observation of element movement. After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, we, the academic staff of Graduate School, have been studying agricultural effects of radioactive fallout; the main results are summarized in two books published by Springer.

  19. Research with radiation and radioisotopes to better understand plant physiology and agricultural consequences of radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    Research carried out by me and my group over the last almost four decades are summarized here. The main emphasis of my work was and continues to be on plant physiology using radiation and radioisotopes. Plants live on water and inorganic elements. In the case of water, we developed neutron imaging methods and produced 15 O-labeled water (half-life 2 min) and applied them to understand water circulation pattern in the plant. In the case of elements, we developed neutron activation analysis methods to analyze a large number of plant tissues to follow element specific distribution. Then, we developed real-time imaging system using conventional radioisotopes for the macroscopic and microscopic observation of element movement. After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, we, the academic staff of Graduate School, have been studying agricultural effects of radioactive fallout; the main results are summarized in two books published by Springer. (author)

  20. Acquiring Common Sense Spatial Knowledge through Implicit Spatial Templates

    OpenAIRE

    Collell, Guillem; Van Gool, Luc; Moens, Marie-Francine

    2017-01-01

    Spatial understanding is a fundamental problem with wide-reaching real-world applications. The representation of spatial knowledge is often modeled with spatial templates, i.e., regions of acceptability of two objects under an explicit spatial relationship (e.g., "on", "below", etc.). In contrast with prior work that restricts spatial templates to explicit spatial prepositions (e.g., "glass on table"), here we extend this concept to implicit spatial language, i.e., those relationships (genera...

  1. Procedure of calculation of the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes in the steam generator of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, A. A.; Sedov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    A method for combined 3D/1D-modeling of thermohydraulics of a once-through steam generator (SG) based on the joint analysis of three-dimensional thermo- and hydrodynamics of a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and one-dimensional thermohydraulics of steam-generating channels (tubes) with the use of well-known friction and heat-transfer correlations under various boiling conditions is discussed. This method allows one to determine the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes of heat-exchange surfaces of SGs with a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and with steam generation within tubes. The method was applied in the analytical investigation of typical operation of a once-through SG of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron heavy-metal reactor that is being designed by Kurchatov Institute in collaboration with OKB GIDROPRESS and Leipunsky Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. Flow pattern and temperature fields were obtained for the heavy-metal heating coolant in the intertube space. Nonuniformities of heating of the steam-water coolant in different heat-exchange tubes and nonuniformities in the distribution of heat fluxes at SG heat-exchange surfaces were revealed.

  2. Space and panic : The application of space syntax to understand the relationship between mortality rates and spatial configuration in Banda Aceh during the tsunami 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakhrurrazi, F.; Van Nes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reveal the correlation between mortality rates from the tsunami of 2004 and the spatial structure of Banda Aceh’s street net. Structurally, the city is divided up in several small villages, which consists of a couple of urban blocks. The mortality rates for each of these

  3. Geographical Network Analysis and Spatial Econometrics as Tools to Enhance Our Understanding of Student Migration Patterns and Benefits in the U.S. Higher Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Canché, Manuel S.

    2018-01-01

    This study measures the extent to which student outmigration outside the 4-year sector takes place and posits that the benefits from attracting non-resident students exist regardless of sector of enrollment. The study also provides empirical evidence about the relevance of employing geographical network analysis (GNA) and spatial econometrics in…

  4. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  5. Nuclear blackmail and nuclear balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book raises pointed questions about nuclear saber rattling. More than a dozen cases since the bombing of Hiroshima and Magasaki in which some sort of nuclear threat was used as a sparring technique in tense confrontations are cited. Each incident is described and analyzed. Two theories offered to explain America's use of nuclear threats, the balance of interest theory and the balance of power theory, are contrasted throughout the book. This book helps to fill the gap in the understanding of nuclear weapons and their uses, while pointing out that nuclear bravado could lead to an unintended unleashing of these weapons

  6. Using spatial-stream-network models and long-term data to understand and predict dynamics of faecal contamination in a mixed land-use catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Aaron James; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Strachan, Norval James Colin; Hough, Rupert Lloyd; Avery, Lisa Marie; Watson, Helen; Soulsby, Chris

    2018-01-15

    An 11year dataset of concentrations of E. coli at 10 spatially-distributed sites in a mixed land-use catchment in NE Scotland (52km 2 ) revealed that concentrations were not clearly associated with flow or season. The lack of a clear flow-concentration relationship may have been due to greater water fluxes from less-contaminated headwaters during high flows diluting downstream concentrations, the importance of persistent point sources of E. coli both anthropogenic and agricultural, and possibly the temporal resolution of the dataset. Point sources and year-round grazing of livestock probably obscured clear seasonality in concentrations. Multiple linear regression models identified potential for contamination by anthropogenic point sources as a significant predictor of long-term spatial patterns of low, average and high concentrations of E. coli. Neither arable nor pasture land was significant, even when accounting for hydrological connectivity with a topographic-index method. However, this may have reflected coarse-scale land-cover data inadequately representing "point sources" of agricultural contamination (e.g. direct defecation of livestock into the stream) and temporal changes in availability of E. coli from diffuse sources. Spatial-stream-network models (SSNMs) were applied in a novel context, and had value in making more robust catchment-scale predictions of concentrations of E. coli with estimates of uncertainty, and in enabling identification of potential "hot spots" of faecal contamination. Successfully managing faecal contamination of surface waters is vital for safeguarding public health. Our finding that concentrations of E. coli could not clearly be associated with flow or season may suggest that management strategies should not necessarily target only high flow events or summer when faecal contamination risk is often assumed to be greatest. Furthermore, we identified SSNMs as valuable tools for identifying possible "hot spots" of contamination which

  7. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents hypobaric hypoxia-induced spatial memory impairment through extracellular related kinase-mediated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhwal, K; Hota, S K; Jain, V; Prasad, D; Singh, S B; Ilavazhagan, G

    2009-06-30

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, a condition involving decreased availability of oxygen is known to be associated with oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. The multifactorial response of the brain and the complex signaling pathways involved therewith limits the therapeutic efficacy of several antioxidants in ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the potential of acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR), a known antioxidant that has been reported to augment neurotrophin-mediated survival mechanisms, in ameliorating hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor involved in the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress related to brain injury and neurological disorders. The study was designed to understand the mechanisms involving Nrf2 stabilization following exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The results displayed reference memory impairment in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (7620 m) for 14 consecutive days which however improved on administration of ALCAR during hypoxic exposure. The study also revealed Nrf2 regulated augmented antioxidant response on administration of ALCAR which was through a novel tyrosine kinase A (TrkA) receptor-mediated mechanism. A decrease in free radical generation, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was also observed along with a concomitant increase in thioredoxin and reduced glutathione levels on administration of ALCAR during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The present study therefore reveals the therapeutic potential of ALCAR under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia and elucidates a novel mechanism of action of the drug.

  8. Inverted nuclear architecture and its development during differentiation of mouse rod photoreceptor cells: a new model to study nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovei, I; Joffe, B

    2010-09-01

    Interphase nuclei have a conserved architecture: heterochromatin occupies the nuclear periphery, whereas euchromatin resides in the nuclear interior. It has recently been found that rod photoreceptor cells of nocturnal mammals have an inverted architecture, which transforms these nuclei in microlenses and supposedly facilitates a reduction in photon loss in the retina. This unique deviation from the nearly universal pattern throws a new light on the nuclear organization. In the article we discuss the implications of the studies of the inverted nuclei for understanding the role of the spatial organization of the nucleus in nuclear functions.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized

  10. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  11. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  12. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This brochure is intended as a contribution to a better and more general understanding of one of the most urgent problems of present society. Emphasis is laid on three issues that are always raised in the nuclear debate: 1) Fuel cycle, 2) environmental effects of nuclear power plants, 3) waste disposal problems. (GL) [de

  13. Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  14. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1983-06-01

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  15. Availability of Japanese Government's supplemental texts on radiation reflecting the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident for elementary and secondary education from dental students' understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Midori; Honda, Eiichi; Dashpuntsag, Oyunbat; Maeda, Naoki; Hosoki, Hidehiko; Sakama, Minoru; Tada, Toshiko

    2016-01-01

    Following the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, the Japanese government created two supplemental texts about radiation reflecting the accident for elementary, middle school, and high school students. These texts were made to explain radiation and consequently to obtain public consent for the continuation of the nuclear program. The present study aimed to evaluate the appropriateness of the content of the texts and to collect the basic data on the level of understanding necessary to improve radiation education. Lectures on radiology including nuclear energy and the Fukushima accident were given to 44 fourth-year dental students in 2013. The questionnaire was administered in 2014 when these students were in their sixth-year. The survey was also administered to 40 first-year students and 41 fourth-year students who hadn't any radiology lectures. Students rated their level of understanding of 50 phrases used in the texts on a four-point scale (understanding = 3, a little knowledge = 2, having heard = 1, no knowledge = 0). Questions on taking an advanced physics course in high school and means of learning about radiation in daily life were also asked. The level of understanding of phrases in the supplemental text for middle and high school students was significantly higher among sixth-year students (mean = 1.43) than among first-year (mean = 1.12) or fourth-year (mean = 0.93) students (p < 0.05). Overall, the level of understanding was low, with scores indicating that most students knew only a little. First-year students learning about radiation from television but four-year and six-year students learning about radiation from newspaper scored significantly higher (p < 0.05). It was concluded that radiation education should be improved by using visual material and preparing educators to teach the material for improving the public's understanding of radiation use—especially nuclear power generation because the phrases used in the

  16. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  17. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  18. Partitioning Evapotranspiration into Green and Blue Water Sources: Understanding Temporal Dynamics (2001-2015) and Spatial Variability in the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2017-12-01

    Information on how much of direct rain water (green water) and/or non-rain water (blue water) are being productively used by the crops/vegetation is critical for efficient water resources management. In this study, we developed a simple but robust methodology to partition actual evapotranspiration (ET) into green (rainfall-based) and blue (surface water/groundwater) sources. We combined two 1 km MODIS-based actual evapotranspiration datasets, one obtained from a root zone water balance model and another from an energy balance model, to partition annual ET into green water ET (GWET) and blue water ET (BWET). Time series maps of GWET and BWET were produced for the conterminous United States (CONUS) over 2001-2015 and spatial variability and dynamics of blue and green water ET were analyzed. Our results indicate that average green and blue water sources for all land cover types in CONUS account for nearly 70% and 30% of the total ET, respectively. The ET in the eastern US arises mostly from green water, and in the western US, it is mostly from blue water sources. Analysis of the BWET in the 16 selected irrigated areas in CONUS revealed interesting results. While the magnitude of the BWET showed a gradual decline from west to east, the increase in coefficient of variation from west to east confirmed greater use of supplemental irrigation in the central and eastern US. We also established relationships between hydro-climatic regions and their blue water requirements. This study provides insights into the relative contributions and the spatiotemporal dynamics of GWET and BWET, which could lead to improved water resources management.

  19. Workshop to exchange and transfer knowledge for the purpose of increasing public understanding relating to nuclear safety and to provide a forum for discussion of alternatives available to promote revitalization of nuclear power in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranston, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper proposes an information dissemination program to adequately familiarize the public with the actual health and safety risks of nuclear energy development. It plans for a discussion panel for alternatives available to promote revitalization of nuclear power in the US. It also provides for technology transfer between contractors, designers, and training staff. It recognizes problem areas in licensing and certification by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and ways to standardize the administrative procedures

  20. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  1. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Explains the concepts in detail and in depth. Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook explains the experimental basics, effects and theory of nuclear physics. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams help to better understand the explanations. A better feeling to the subject of the book is given with sketches about the historical development of nuclear physics. The main topics of this book include the phenomena associated with passage of charged particles and radiation through matter which are related to nuclear resonance fluorescence and the Moessbauer effect., Gamov's theory of alpha decay, Fermi theory of beta decay, electron capture and gamma decay. The discussion of general properties of nuclei covers nuclear sizes and nuclear force, nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment. Nuclear instability against various modes of decay and Yukawa theory are explained. Nuclear models such as Fermi Gas Model, Shell Model, Liquid Drop Model, Collective Model and Optical Model are outlined to explain various experimental facts related to nuclear structure. Heavy ion reactions, including nuclear fusion, are explained. Nuclear fission and fusion power production is treated elaborately.

  2. Two Paradigmatic Waves of Public Discourse on Nuclear Waste in the United States, 1945-2009: Understanding a Magnitudinal and Longitudinal Phenomenon in Anthropological Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajo, Judi

    2016-01-01

    This project set out to illuminate the discursive existence of nuclear waste in American culture. Given the significant temporal dimension of the phenomenon as well as the challenging size of the United States setting, the project adapted key methodological elements of the sociocultural anthropology tradition and produced proxies for ethnographic fieldnotes and key informant interviews through sampling the digital archives of the New York Times over a 64-year period that starts with the first recorded occurrence of the notion of nuclear waste and ends with the conclusion of the presidency of George W. Bush. Two paradigmatic waves of American public discourse on nuclear waste come to light when subjecting this empirical data to quantitative inventorying and interpretive analysis: between 1945 and 1969 nuclear waste was generally framed in light of the beneficial utilizations of nuclear reactions and with optimistic expectations for a scientific/technological solution; by contrast, between 1969 and 2009 nuclear waste was conceptualized as inherited harm that could not be undone and contestation that required political/legal management. Besides this key finding and the empirical timing of the two paradigms, the study's value lies also with its detailed empirical documentation of nuclear waste in its sociocultural existence.

  3. Spatially Integrated Social Science

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This document contains the chapter abstracts for the book—each chapter  illustrating how the spatial perspective adds value and insight to social science research, beyond what traditional non-spatial approaches might reveal.  The 21 chapters exemplify the founding principle for the Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science (CSISS)—that the analysis of social phenomena in space and time enhances our understanding of social processes. The chapters offer substantive empirical content for il...

  4. Modelling Deep Water Habitats to Develop a Spatially Explicit, Fine Scale Understanding of the Distribution of the Western Rock Lobster, Panulirus cygnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Renae K.; Van Niel, Kimberly P.; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Pember, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus, is endemic to Western Australia and supports substantial commercial and recreational fisheries. Due to and its wide distribution and the commercial and recreational importance of the species a key component of managing western rock lobster is understanding the ecological processes and interactions that may influence lobster abundance and distribution. Using terrain analyses and distribution models of substrate and benthic biota, we assess the physical drivers that influence the distribution of lobsters at a key fishery site. Methods and Findings Using data collected from hydroacoustic and towed video surveys, 20 variables (including geophysical, substrate and biota variables) were developed to predict the distributions of substrate type (three classes of reef, rhodoliths and sand) and dominant biota (kelp, sessile invertebrates and macroalgae) within a 40 km2 area about 30 km off the west Australian coast. Lobster presence/absence data were collected within this area using georeferenced pots. These datasets were used to develop a classification tree model for predicting the distribution of the western rock lobster. Interestingly, kelp and reef were not selected as predictors. Instead, the model selected geophysical and geomorphic scalar variables, which emphasise a mix of terrain within limited distances. The model of lobster presence had an adjusted D2 of 64 and an 80% correct classification. Conclusions Species distribution models indicate that juxtaposition in fine scale terrain is most important to the western rock lobster. While key features like kelp and reef may be important to lobster distribution at a broad scale, it is the fine scale features in terrain that are likely to define its ecological niche. Determining the most appropriate landscape configuration and scale will be essential to refining niche habitats and will aid in selecting appropriate sites for protecting critical lobster habitats. PMID

  5. Case-study session 1. Mass media and public information on nuclear energy and radiation: Striving for two-way confidence and understanding. Introduction by session chairman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SanLaholma, Juhani

    1989-01-01

    The ENS Information Committee carried out an assessment of public opinion and news media. The conclusions of this assessment are presented. The ENS recognized fully the significant role of the news media in reflecting public opinion in the nuclear field. It was concluded that it is worthwhile and important for the nuclear organizations to consider why unverified, even false, information appears so often in the media. The study emphasized that the nuclear organizations' relations with the news media are of high significance. ENS emphasized that it is important for the nuclear sector sector to pursue an active and frank information policy with the news media. ENS recognized that it is our task to prepare and provide the news media and the public with prompt, correct and objective information it is endless work but, at the same time, our only way of winning and attaining credibility and confidence among the public

  6. Combining Long-Term Watershed Monitoring at Buck Creek with Spatially Extensive Ecosystem Data to Understand the Processes of Acid Rain Effects and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G. B.; Ross, D. S.; Sullivan, T. J.; McDonnell, T. C.; Bailey, S. W.; Dukett, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Buck Creek Monitoring Watershed, in the western Adirondack Region of New York, has provided long-term data back to 1982 for tracking acid rain effects and recovery, and for supporting fundamental research on environmental change. At Buck Creek, monitoring acidic deposition effects as they worsened, then diminished, has advanced our understanding of key biogeochemical processes such as Al mobilization. Although Al mobilization has been one of the primary adverse effects of acidic deposition, in the recovery phase it is now affecting terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in new ways that could be both positive and negative, as soils and surface waters respond to further declines in acidic deposition. Using stream Al measurements from Buck Creek over varying seasons and flows, a new index, the base cation surplus (BCS), was developed to account for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) effects on the relationship between ANC and inorganic Al. Mobilization of inorganic Al, the form toxic to biota, occurs below a BCS of zero, regardless of DOC concentrations. Soil and stream data from Adirondack surveys showed that a BCS value of zero corresponds to a soil base saturation value in the B horizon of approximately 12%. Additional Adirondack survey work indicated that, where sugar maple stands grew in soils with base saturation values below 12%, seedling regeneration was nearly zero, suggesting a link between Al mobilization and impairment of tree regeneration. In recovering Adirondack lakes, the BCS was also used to show that increasing trends in DOC were accelerating decreases of inorganic Al beyond what would be expected from the increasing trends of ANC. Similar decreases of inorganic Al in Buck Creek, were coupled with increases in organic Al concentrations, which resulted in no trend in total Al concentrations despite a strong increase in pH. Sampling of Buck Creek soils in 1997, and again in 2009-2010, indicated a substantial decrease in forest floor exchangeable Al, of

  7. Thermal ageing of steels; from expertise and understanding of the ageing mechanisms to a maintenance strategy for operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdikian, G.; Ould, P.

    2004-01-01

    Some parts of reactor coolant circuit on Nuclear PWR power plants, elbows on primary circuit, are made in cast duplex stainless steel material. It is now identify that the mechanical characteristic of this material should be decrease under thermal ageing mainly after a long time in operation in at reactor coolant circuit temperature conditions. The sensitiveness to the thermal ageing of these components is in relation with chemical composition and the ferrite content, especially the grade of Chromium equivalent (Ceq %Cr + %Si + %Mo). In the context of justification to maintain in operation on the plants these cat duplex components, an important programme of expertises was carried out on cast elbows after removing on the plants during the Steam Generators replacements (SGR). Several expertises, performed in the objective to understand the thermal ageing phenomenon and mechanism on cast components in service on plants, were permit to validate the prediction formulas established from a large database and programme in laboratories. The expertises were based on a lot of metallurgical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of components in operation Small Angle Neutrons Scattering (SANS), Thermal Electric Power (TEP), micro hardness and toughness measurement on small specimens from boat sample (CT10-5) The expertise carried out on one SG inlet elbows from DAMPIERRE, removed a during SGR after 100000 h in operation is shown, the toughness values are very high compared to the prediction formulas. The TEP measurements performed on the specimen cut off on two elbows and the ingots of the same material aged in laboratory in furnace, are very coherent; it is confirmed that this methodology is a good indicator to follow the ageing characteristic of material. The results of expertises on aged material are a mean of validation of the methodology applied on the file of demonstration of maintaining in operation of cast duplex stainless steel sensitive to thermal ageing. So the

  8. Applications of nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  9. Applications of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  10. Textural Analysis of Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Antigen (NuMA Spatial Distribution in Interphase Nuclei from Human Drug-Resistant CEM Lymphoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Rafki‐Beljebbar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In tumour cell lines, the resistance of cancer cells to a variety of structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs is termed multidrug‐resistance or MDR. We reported previously that MDR leukemic cells displayed nuclear texture changes, as assessed by image cytometry. The nature of these changes remained uncertain but they could be associated with alterations of the nuclear matrix which could serve an important role in DNA organization and chromatin structure. Therefore, we have compared the textural features observed in G0/G1 nuclei from human leukemic CEM cells and their MDR variant CEM‐VLB, after staining of either DNA by Feulgen method or nuclear matrix by immunodetection of NuMA antigen on DNase treated samples. Chromatin or NuMA distributions within the nucleus were evaluated by image cytometry. Changes in textural parameters indicate that modifications of NuMA distribution observed in MDR cells are parallel to those observed at the whole chromatin level (i.e., a more decondensed and coarse texture with increase of Energy and Long‐run sections and decrease of Contrast and Short‐run sections. Moreover, Optical Densities measurements indicate that MDR cells seem to contain less NuMA, a datum confirmed by immunoblotting of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, chromatin changes observed by image cytometry in drug‐resistant human leukemic CEM cells appear associated with modifications of the nuclear matrix structure.

  11. Textural Analysis of Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Antigen (NuMA) Spatial Distribution in Interphase Nuclei from Human Drug-Resistant CEM Lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafki‐Beljebbar, Naima; Liautaud‐Roger, Françoise; Ploton, Dominique; Dufer, Jean

    1999-01-01

    In tumour cell lines, the resistance of cancer cells to a variety of structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs is termed multidrug‐resistance or MDR. We reported previously that MDR leukemic cells displayed nuclear texture changes, as assessed by image cytometry. The nature of these changes remained uncertain but they could be associated with alterations of the nuclear matrix which could serve an important role in DNA organization and chromatin structure. Therefore, we have compared the textural features observed in G0/G1 nuclei from human leukemic CEM cells and their MDR variant CEM‐VLB, after staining of either DNA by Feulgen method or nuclear matrix by immunodetection of NuMA antigen on DNase treated samples. Chromatin or NuMA distributions within the nucleus were evaluated by image cytometry. Changes in textural parameters indicate that modifications of NuMA distribution observed in MDR cells are parallel to those observed at the whole chromatin level (i.e., a more decondensed and coarse texture with increase of Energy and Long‐run sections and decrease of Contrast and Short‐run sections). Moreover, Optical Densities measurements indicate that MDR cells seem to contain less NuMA, a datum confirmed by immunoblotting of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, chromatin changes observed by image cytometry in drug‐resistant human leukemic CEM cells appear associated with modifications of the nuclear matrix structure. PMID:10609561

  12. Calibration of the nuclear power channels for the cylindrical configuration of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of gold foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Silva, Alexandre F. Povoa da; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Aredes, Vitor Ottoni Garcia; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: alexpovoa@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The activation foil is one of the most used techniques to obtain and compare nuclear parameters from the nuclear data libraries, given by a gamma spectrometry system. Through the measurements of activity induced in the foils, it is possible to determine the neutron flux profile exactly where it has been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. The objective of this work is to obtain, for a cylindrical configuration, the power generation through a spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 Reactor, by irradiating gold foils positioned symmetrically into the core. They are put in a Lucite plate which will not interfere in the analysis of the neutron flux, because of its low microscopic absorption cross section for the analyzed neutrons. The foils are irradiated with and without cadmium covered small plates, to obtain the thermal and epithermal neutron flux, through specific equations. The correlation between the average power neutron flux, as a result of the foil's irradiation, and the average power digital neutron flux of the nuclear power channels, allows the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. This same correlation was done in 2008 with the reactor in a rectangular configuration, which resulted in a specific calibration of the power level operation. This calibration cannot be used in the cylindrical configuration, because the nuclear parameters could change, which may lead to a different neutron profile. Furthermore, the precise knowledge of the power neutron flux in the core also validates the mathematics used to calculate the power neutron flux. (author)

  13. Study on measurement of spatial dose rates from simulated products made from recycled metal below clearance levels arising from dismantling of nuclear facilities. Contract research

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, A; Kitami, Y; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M; Saitô, K

    2002-01-01

    In order to contribute to safety assessment of recycling products made from dismantling metal wastes, metal ingots containing sup 6 sup 0 Co were produced and spatial dose rates from ingots were evaluated by gamma-ray measurement and calculation. Stripping operations were made using detector response functions calculated by Monte Carlo program to derive spatial dose rates from measured gamma-ray spectra. In the computer simulation, Monte Carlo and point kernel calculation codes were used. Agreement between measured and calculated values was satisfactory in spite of an extremely low concentration of sup 6 sup 0 Co in the ingots and a complicated geometric condition between detector and samples.

  14. Understanding of the characteristics of the local newspapers providing media coverage on the matters of nuclear energy in the regions where nuclear facilities are located. Based on analysis of the media reports and interviews with journalists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Taking into consideration the influence of the media coverage, this research aims to analyze the characteristics of the local newspapers that cover diverse events relevant to nuclear energy in regional areas where nuclear facilities are located (hereinafter called the 'region'). According to the previous surveys, local residents in the region are more interested in the nuclear energy matters than those who live in urban areas. Plus, the local newspapers turn out to report more events of nuclear energy from a variety of angles. Through interviews with executives and journalists of the local newspaper companies in the regions, it is revealed that the local newspapers tend not to report news sensationally, but they would rather take a supportive stance toward the development in their regions. The interviewees hope that various activities of the nuclear industry will promote education, employment and cooperation among government, industry and academia. They also desire that the industry's activities will help to increase benefits in their regions. It appears that the interviewees' awareness reflects articles of the local newspapers. As a result of the surveys conducted for this research, it is considered that the journalists expect that their region will make particularly qualitative progress in the future. (author)

  15. Calibration of the nuclear power channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Lucas Batista

    2008-01-01

    Several nuclear parameters are obtained through the gamma spectrometry of targets irradiated in a research reactor core and this is the case of the activation foils which make possible, through the measurements of the activity induced, to determine the neutron flux in the place where they had been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. This work aims to get the power operation of the reactor through of spatial neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 reactor by the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils and prudently located in its interior. These foils were made in the form of metallic alloy in concentration levels such that the phenomena of flux disturbance, as the self-shielding factors to neutrons become worthless. These activation foils has only 1% of dispersed gold atoms in an aluminium matrix content of 99% of this element. The irradiations of foils have been carried through with and without cadmium plate. The total correlation between the average thermal neutron flux obtained by irradiation of infinitely diluted activation foils and the average digital value of current of the nuclear power channels 5 and 6 (non-compensated ionization chambers - CINC), allow the calibration of the nuclear channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. (author)

  16. Understanding long-term corrosion of Alloy 22 container in the potential Yucca Mountain repository for high-level nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, T.; Jung, H.; He, X.; Pensado, O.

    2008-09-01

    Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-4Fe) is the candidate material for the waste package outer container in a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This alloy exhibits very low corrosion rates in the absence of environmental conditions promoting crevice corrosion. However, there are uncertainties regarding Alloy 22's corrosion performance when general corrosion rates and susceptibility to crevice corrosion are extrapolated to a geological time period (e.g. 10 5 years). This paper presents an analysis of available literature information relevant to the long-term extrapolation of general corrosion processes and the crevice corrosion behavior of Alloy 22, under potential repository environments. For assessment of general corrosion rates, potential degradation processes causing the loss of the long-term persistence of passive film formed are considered. For crevice corrosion, induction time, and the extent of susceptibility and opening area, are considered. Disclaimer: The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff views expressed herein are preliminary and do not constitute a final judgment or determination of the matters addressed nor of the acceptability of a license application for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The paper describes work performed by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) for NRC under Contract Number NRC-02-02-012. The activities reported here were performed by CNWRA on behalf of the NRC office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, Division of High Level Waste Repository Safety. This paper is an independent product of the CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the view or regulatory position of the NRC.

  17. Towards a Spatial Understanding of Trade-Offs in Sustainable Development: A Meso-Scale Analysis of the Nexus between Land Use, Poverty, and Environment in the Lao PDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Peter; Bader, Christoph; Hett, Cornelia; Epprecht, Michael; Heinimann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In land systems, equitably managing trade-offs between planetary boundaries and human development needs represents a grand challenge in sustainability oriented initiatives. Informing such initiatives requires knowledge about the nexus between land use, poverty, and environment. This paper presents results from Lao PDR, where we combined nationwide spatial data on land use types and the environmental state of landscapes with village-level poverty indicators. Our analysis reveals two general but contrasting trends. First, landscapes with paddy or permanent agriculture allow a greater number of people to live in less poverty but come at the price of a decrease in natural vegetation cover. Second, people practising extensive swidden agriculture and living in intact environments are often better off than people in degraded paddy or permanent agriculture. As poverty rates within different landscape types vary more than between landscape types, we cannot stipulate a land use–poverty–environment nexus. However, the distinct spatial patterns or configurations of these rates point to other important factors at play. Drawing on ethnicity as a proximate factor for endogenous development potentials and accessibility as a proximate factor for external influences, we further explore these linkages. Ethnicity is strongly related to poverty in all land use types almost independently of accessibility, implying that social distance outweighs geographic or physical distance. In turn, accessibility, almost a precondition for poverty alleviation, is mainly beneficial to ethnic majority groups and people living in paddy or permanent agriculture. These groups are able to translate improved accessibility into poverty alleviation. Our results show that the concurrence of external influences with local—highly contextual—development potentials is key to shaping outcomes of the land use–poverty–environment nexus. By addressing such leverage points, these findings help guide more

  18. Towards a Spatial Understanding of Trade-Offs in Sustainable Development: A Meso-Scale Analysis of the Nexus between Land Use, Poverty, and Environment in the Lao PDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Messerli

    Full Text Available In land systems, equitably managing trade-offs between planetary boundaries and human development needs represents a grand challenge in sustainability oriented initiatives. Informing such initiatives requires knowledge about the nexus between land use, poverty, and environment. This paper presents results from Lao PDR, where we combined nationwide spatial data on land use types and the environmental state of landscapes with village-level poverty indicators. Our analysis reveals two general but contrasting trends. First, landscapes with paddy or permanent agriculture allow a greater number of people to live in less poverty but come at the price of a decrease in natural vegetation cover. Second, people practising extensive swidden agriculture and living in intact environments are often better off than people in degraded paddy or permanent agriculture. As poverty rates within different landscape types vary more than between landscape types, we cannot stipulate a land use-poverty-environment nexus. However, the distinct spatial patterns or configurations of these rates point to other important factors at play. Drawing on ethnicity as a proximate factor for endogenous development potentials and accessibility as a proximate factor for external influences, we further explore these linkages. Ethnicity is strongly related to poverty in all land use types almost independently of accessibility, implying that social distance outweighs geographic or physical distance. In turn, accessibility, almost a precondition for poverty alleviation, is mainly beneficial to ethnic majority groups and people living in paddy or permanent agriculture. These groups are able to translate improved accessibility into poverty alleviation. Our results show that the concurrence of external influences with local-highly contextual-development potentials is key to shaping outcomes of the land use-poverty-environment nexus. By addressing such leverage points, these findings help guide

  19. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  20. Characteristic X-ray imaging for palliative therapy using strontium-89 chloride: understanding the mechanism of nuclear medicine imaging of strontium-89 chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owaki, Yoshiki; Inoue, Kazumasa; Narita, Hiroto; Tsuda, Keisuke; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Strontium-89 (Sr-89) chloride is a targeted palliative therapy used for painful bone metastasis in which repeated doses can be administered, and its usefulness has been reported in the case of bone metastasis of various primary tumors. However, the effectiveness of the pain relief treatment is only described using a subjective index such as the visual analog scale, which lacks objectivity. Although various attempts at quantifying the effectiveness of Sr-89 chloride therapy have been reported using nuclear medicine imaging for energy peaks around 70-80 keV, the principle of Sr-89 chloride imaging has not been explained. In this study, the principle of nuclear medicine imaging for Sr-89 chloride was evaluated using a fundamental study. Additionally, the optimal collimator for acquiring Sr-89 chloride image data was evaluated. Based on the results, the principle of nuclear medicine imaging for Sr-89 chloride could be explained: the energy peaks were characteristic X-rays produced by interactions between gamma rays (514 keV) emitted from Sr-85, which is included during the manufacturing process of the Sr-89 chloride solution, and the lead collimator used in the imaging. The optimal collimator for generating characteristic X-rays efficiently was identified as a middle-to-high energy collimator.

  1. Evaluated Nuclear Data Processing and Nuclear Reactor Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. J. S.; Jones, G. O. L.; Jones, B.; Opgenoorth, H.; Hägström, I.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Activities Associated with Nuclear Data * Basic nuclear data production * Nuclear data evaluation * Evaluated nuclear data processing * Nuclear data applications * Nuclear Data Classification * Basic nuclear data * Evaluated nuclear data libraries * Problem-Independent Group Constants Libraries * Multigroup Constants Libraries * Problem Dependent Few-Group Constants * Definition of Group Averaged Constants * Single valued energy dependent parameters * Differential energy-angle dependent parameters * The Resonance region * Group condensation * Spatial homogenisation * A Multigroup Library Update - An Example * Multigroup library format * Library update strategy * The choice of the processing codes * Possible sources of error * Summary * References

  2. Professional analysis in spatial planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Černe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial analysis contributes to accomplishment of the three basic aims of spatial planning: it is basic element for setting spatial policies, concepts and strategies, gives basic information to inhabitants, land owners, investors, planners and helps in performing spatial policies, strategies, plans, programmes and projects. Analysis in planning are generally devoted to: understand current circumstances and emerging conditions within planning decisions; determine priorities of open questions and their solutions; formulate general principles for further development.

  3. Spatial Sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grande, John

    1990-01-01

    Describes seven spatial abilities related to mathematics including eye-motor coordination, figure-ground perception, perceptual constancy, position-in-space perception, perception of spatial relationships, visual discrimination, and visual memory. Discusses the relationship of the spatial abilities to the study of geometry. Lists 19 references.…

  4. Be steadily on the progress, be in pursuit of brilliance. For deep understanding the development tendency of quality management in nuclear geologic exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiuying

    2006-01-01

    A new knowledge economy era driven by brings forth new ideas in science-technology and marked by quality innovation as an important element has come. At present, a great upsurge of quality management represented by outstanding quality management models such as Liuxigma management, outstanding achievement-effect evaluation and quality management system etc. are spreading throughout the world like a raging fire. Enterprises of nuclear geological exploration must be steadily on the progress, to strengthen quality management, to guarantee the successful fulfillment of tasks in uranium resources exploration by outstanding achievements. (authors)

  5. Nuclear honeymoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Australian National University (ANU) and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate across research fields including key accelerator facilities, future energy sources and nuclear non-proliferation. T he potential of this partnership demonstrates the value of Commonwealth institutions working together for the betterment of all Australians,' says ANY vice-chancellor Professor Ian Chubb who believes that both organisations have infrastructure and facilities available that if shared could bring greater benefit to the nation. The partnership will develop a national strategy to coordinate use and development of a heavy-ion accelerator and ion source technology, he says. In addition, it will undertake collaborative activities that enhance educational programs in nuclear physics, nuclear engineering and materials science.

  6. Spatial assessment of radiocaesium in the largest lagoon in Fukushima after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Shota; Zhang, Jing; Narita, Hisashi

    2017-09-15

    Radionuclides deposited on land by global fallouts and nuclear power station accidents spread over coastal environments through estuarine areas connecting land to ocean. In this study, we monitored activity concentration of radiocaesium in surface sediment and re-suspended particles in Matsukawa-ura lagoon, the largest lagoon in Fukushima, after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident. Radiocaesium distribution in surface sediment varied spatiotemporally and irregularly due to the effect of tidal waves. The effective half-life was significantly shorter than physical half-life, suggesting some system of radiocaesium discharge in the lagoon. Sediment trap observation revealed re-suspended particles from sediment were transported to the ocean. For these reasons, it is suggested that re-suspension of particles in the lagoon and their transportation to the ocean by the seawater exchange process are important processes of radiocaesium discharge. Moreover, our results show that seawater exchange process contributes to the dispersion of radiocaesium in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding radiation effects in SRAM-based field programmable gate arrays for implementing instrumentation and control systems of nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Nidhin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs are getting more attention in safety-related and safety-critical application development of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The high logic density and advancements in architectural features make static random access memory (SRAM-based FPGAs suitable for complex design implementations. Devices deployed in the nuclear environment face radiation particle strike that causes transient and permanent failures. The major reasons for failures are total ionization dose effects, displacement damage dose effects, and single event effects. Different from the case of space applications, soft errors are the major concern in terrestrial applications. In this article, a review of radiation effects on FPGAs is presented, especially soft errors in SRAM-based FPGAs. Single event upset (SEU shows a high probability of error in the dependable application development in FPGAs. This survey covers the main sources of radiation and its effects on FPGAs, with emphasis on SEUs as well as on the measurement of radiation upset sensitivity and irradiation experimental results at various facilities. This article also presents a comparison between the major SEU mitigation techniques in the configuration memory and user logics of SRAM-based FPGAs.

  8. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  9. Financing nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, N.C.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) To provide an historical framework for understanding why it is difficult to finance nuclear power projects in the U.S.; (2) To mention briefly certain financing techniques utilized by companies to finance nuclear investments; and (3) To set forth the requirements investors will need before taking on the risks associated with nuclear power projects

  10. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  11. Nuclear politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Tony.

    1986-01-01

    Written by an arts graduate journalist this is intended for a non-technical general readership. It chronicles the history of the nuclear power industry in Britain from its beginnings, which were inextricably tied to the development of the atomic bomb, to the Sellafield investigation and Sizewell public inquiry. In particular the government decisions which have influenced the present structure and state of the industry are criticised. With important decisions about to be made the author questions the accountability of the nuclear industry and the government's ability to understand the complex technical aspects of the industry. (U.K.)

  12. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashore, T.M.; Shaffer, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The birth of nuclear cardiology has generally been attributed to a 1927 experiment during which a radium salt was injected in one arm vein and the circulation time calculated by recording the arrival of the radioactivity in the opposite arm. This simple experiment lead to the radiocardiogram in the late 1940s that was used to measure left ventricular function and, later, cardiac output. This chapter provides a brief overview of nuclear cardiology. Methodology is presented when it is important for the understanding of test results. The use of these studies in the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular disease is emphasized

  13. Understanding solution-state noncovalent interactions between xenobiotics and natural organic matter using 19F/1H heteronuclear saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, André J

    2011-08-01

    A combination of forward and reverse heteronuclear ((19)F/(1)H) saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques were applied to characterize the noncovalent interactions between perfluorinated aromatic xenobiotics and dissolved humic acid. These NMR techniques produce detailed molecular-level descriptions of weak noncovalent associations between components in complex environmental mixtures, allowing the mechanisms underlying these interactions to be explored; (19)F observed heteronuclear STD (H-STD) is used to describe the average molecular orientation of the xenobiotics during their interactions with humic acid, whereas (1)H observed reverse-heteronuclear STD (RH-STD) is used to both identify and quantify preferences exhibited by xenobiotics for interactions at different types of humic acid moieties. First, by using H-STD, it is shown that selected aromatic organofluorides orient with their nonfluorine functional groups (OH, NH(2), and COOH) directed away from humic acid during the interactions, suggesting that these functional groups are not specifically involved. Second, the RH-STD experiment is shown to be sensitive to subtle differences in preferred interaction sites in humic acid and is used here to demonstrate preferential interactions at aromatic humic acid sites for selected aromatic xenobiotics, C(10)F(7)OH, and C(6)F(4)X(2), (where X = F, OH, NH(2), NO(2), or COOH), that can be predicted from the electrostatic potential density maps of the xenobiotic. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  14. Spatial Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda VELICANU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a brief description of the most important operations that can be performed on spatial data such as spatial queries, create, update, insert, delete operations, conversions, operations on the map or analysis on grid cells. Each operation has a graphical example and some of them have code examples in Oracle and PostgreSQL.

  15. Spatializing Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations.......The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations....

  16. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehoucq, Roland; Klotz, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Astronomy deals with the position and observation of the objects in our Universe, from planets to galaxies. It is the oldest of the sciences. Astrophysics is the study of the physical properties of these objects. It dates from the start of the 20. century. Nuclear astrophysics is the marriage of nuclear physics, a laboratory science concerned with the infinitely small, and astrophysics, the science of what is far away and infinitely large. Its aim is to explain the origin, evolution and abundance of the elements in the Universe. It was born in 1938 with the work of Hans Bethe, an American physicist who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1967, on the nuclear reactions that can occur at the center of stars. It explains where the incredible energy of the stars and the Sun comes from and enables us to understand how they are born, live and die. The matter all around us and from which we are made, is made up of ninety-two chemical elements that can be found in every corner of the Universe. Nuclear astrophysics explains the origin of these chemical elements by nucleosynthesis, which is the synthesis of atomic nuclei in different astrophysical environments such as stars. Nuclear astrophysics provides answers to fundamental questions: - Our Sun and the stars in general shine because nuclear reactions are taking place within them. - The stars follow a sequence of nuclear reaction cycles. Nucleosynthesis in the stars enables us to explain the origin and abundance of elements essential to life, such as carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and iron. - Star explosions, in the form of supernovae, disperse the nuclei formed by nucleosynthesis into space and explain the formation of the heaviest chemical elements such as gold, platinum and lead. Nuclear astrophysics is still a growing area of science. (authors)

  17. The future of nuclear (science and) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the future of nuclear science and technology. It discusses the implications of nuclear renaissance, nuclear social contract and Fukushima for nuclear science and technology. Nuclear science and technology priorities for Canada are to understand and address the fear of radiation, reduce the threats and address the fear of nuclear proliferation and terrorism, preclude core melt and make used fuel an asset.

  18. Robustness of spatial micronetworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Thomas C.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Bagrow, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  19. Spatial and temporal mapping of 10B distrubtion in vivo using nuclear reactor-based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis and image reconstruction techniques. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelyn Yanch

    2006-01-01

    This project involved the development of a method for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the investigation of Boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee. The overall objective of this work was a robust approach for rapid screening of new 10 B-labelled compounds to determine their suitability for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis via Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). For BNCS it is essential to obtain a compound showing high uptake levels in the synovium and long residence time in the joints. Previously the in vivo uptake behavior of potential compounds was evaluated in the arthritic knee joints of rabbits via extensive dissection studies. These studies are very labor-intensive and involve sacrificing large numbers of animals. An in vivo 10 B screening approach was developed to provide initial evaluation of potential compounds. Only those compounds showing positive uptake and retention characteristics will be evaluated further via dissection studies. No further studies will be performed with compounds showing rapid clearance and/or low synovial uptake. Two approaches to in vivo screening were investigated using both simulation methods and experimentation. Both make use of neutron beams generated at the MIT Research Reactor. The first, Transmission Computed Tomography (TCT) was developed and tested but was eventually rejected due to very limited spatial resolution using existing reactor beams. The second, in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGNAA) was much more promising. IVPGNAA was developed using computer simulation and physical measurement coupled with image reconstruction techniques. The method was tested in arthritic New Zealand rabbits previously injected intra-articularly with three boron labeled compounds and shown to be effective in providing information regarding uptake level and residence time of 10 B in the joint

  20. From nuclear field to cultural heritage conservation - Understanding of the long term corrosion mechanisms of ferrous alloys through multi scale characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion of metals such as steel presents a high variability depending on the environments of alteration (aqueous aerated and deaerated atmosphere, binders and concrete...) and durations considered. As part of my research, in order to understand these mechanisms over long periods the study of archaeological artefacts corroded over tens to hundreds of years has been chosen. This research was crucial in many application areas, ranging from the preservation of objects of cultural heritage and studies for the storage and disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological environment. In this area the archaeological artefacts constitute unparalleled analogues for the study of corrosion of steel elements embedded in the multi-barrier to separate the radionuclides from the biosphere. Characterization of corrosion systems was conducted through a methodology based on the coupling of multi scale techniques for materials characterization (SEM-EDS, Raman microspectroscopy, micro XRD, XAS synchrotron radiation...) providing information on the location, morphology, composition and structure of the crystalline phases present in a layer of corrosion products. Moreover, studies of the reaction processes and of the chemical or electrochemical reactivity of the systems by re-corrosion experiments of archaeological objects in labeled medium (D 2 O, 18 O) or under external stimuli (chemical, electrochemical) have highlighted phenomena controlling the corrosion process at the micrometric scale. Perspectives of my research are the study of further constraints of the corrosion processes such as the presence of bacteria in the environment, the study of processes at the nano-scale (TEM, STXM) but also the methodological development of new analytical approaches based on a combination of morphological imaging methods (FEG-SEM), composition (EDS), structure (μXRD under synchrotron radiation) or hyper spectral (Raman microspectroscopy) to determine the synergy of the nano and microscale

  1. Spatial distribution of the radon concentration in soil and subterranean water in the Nuclear Center of Mexico and its surrounding using a geographical information system; Distribucion espacial de la concentracion de radon en suelo y agua subterranea en el Centro Nuclear de Mexico y sus alrededores utilizando un sistema de informacion geografica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, S.; Pena, P.; Lopez, M.B.E.; Balcazar, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Madrigal, D. [UAEM, Facultad de Geografia, 50000 Toluca, estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The radon concentration in soil of the Nuclear Center of Mexico using solid detectors of nuclear traces (LR 115, type ll) and in water of two aquifers of the Asuncion Tepexoyuca, by means of the liquid scintillation technique it was determined; both places located in the Ocoyoacac municipality, Estado de Mexico. The analysis of spatial distribution it was supported by means of a Geographic Information System. The results of the radon concentration in soil, they registered an average of 2. 64 kBq m{sup -3} in the study area, the more high average value it was of 5. 25 kBq m{sup -3} in the station 12-ZM (Military Area) and the minimum value was of 0. 54 kBq m{sup -3} in the point 7-CO (Dining room). In the radon concentration in water of La Perita it was observed an average value 0.52 Bq L{sup -1} and in El Tunel it was of 0.7 Bq L{sup -1}. (Author)

  2. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  3. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  4. Invisible nuclear; converting nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jongmoon

    1993-03-01

    This book consists of 14 chapters which are CNN era and big science, from East and West to North and South, illusory nuclear strategy, UN and nuclear arms reduction, management of armaments, advent of petroleum period, the track of nuclear power generation, view of energy, internationalization of environment, the war over water in the Middle East, influence of radiation and an isotope technology transfer and transfer armament into civilian industry, the end of nuclear period and the nuclear Nonproliferation, national scientific and technological power and political organ and executive organ.

  5. Spatial ecology across scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Alan; Petrovskii, Sergei; Morozov, Andrew

    2011-04-23

    The international conference 'Models in population dynamics and ecology 2010: animal movement, dispersal and spatial ecology' took place at the University of Leicester, UK, on 1-3 September 2010, focusing on mathematical approaches to spatial population dynamics and emphasizing cross-scale issues. Exciting new developments in scaling up from individual level movement to descriptions of this movement at the macroscopic level highlighted the importance of mechanistic approaches, with different descriptions at the microscopic level leading to different ecological outcomes. At higher levels of organization, different macroscopic descriptions of movement also led to different properties at the ecosystem and larger scales. New developments from Levy flight descriptions to the incorporation of new methods from physics and elsewhere are revitalizing research in spatial ecology, which will both increase understanding of fundamental ecological processes and lead to tools for better management.

  6. Spatial interpolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, A.

    1991-01-01

    The theory and practical application of techniques of statistical interpolation are studied in this thesis, and new developments in multivariate spatial interpolation and the design of sampling plans are discussed. Several applications to studies in soil science are

  7. Spatial measurement errors in the field of spatial epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijie; Manjourides, Justin; Cohen, Ted; Hu, Yi; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-07-01

    Spatial epidemiology has been aided by advances in geographic information systems, remote sensing, global positioning systems and the development of new statistical methodologies specifically designed for such data. Given the growing popularity of these studies, we sought to review and analyze the types of spatial measurement errors commonly encountered during spatial epidemiological analysis of spatial data. Google Scholar, Medline, and Scopus databases were searched using a broad set of terms for papers indexed by a term indicating location (space or geography or location or position) and measurement error (measurement error or measurement inaccuracy or misclassification or uncertainty): we reviewed all papers appearing before December 20, 2014. These papers and their citations were reviewed to identify the relevance to our review. We were able to define and classify spatial measurement errors into four groups: (1) pure spatial location measurement errors, including both non-instrumental errors (multiple addresses, geocoding errors, outcome aggregations, and covariate aggregation) and instrumental errors; (2) location-based outcome measurement error (purely outcome measurement errors and missing outcome measurements); (3) location-based covariate measurement errors (address proxies); and (4) Covariate-Outcome spatial misaligned measurement errors. We propose how these four classes of errors can be unified within an integrated theoretical model and possible solutions were discussed. Spatial measurement errors are ubiquitous threat to the validity of spatial epidemiological studies. We propose a systematic framework for understanding the various mechanisms which generate spatial measurement errors and present practical examples of such errors.

  8. Fundamentals of nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces the current understanding of the fundamentals of nuclear physics by referring to key experimental data and by providing a theoretical understanding of principal nuclear properties. It primarily covers the structure of nuclei at low excitation in detail. It also examines nuclear forces and decay properties. In addition to fundamentals, the book treats several new research areas such as non-relativistic as well as relativistic Hartree–Fock calculations, the synthesis of super-heavy elements, the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram, and nucleosynthesis in stars, to convey to readers the flavor of current research frontiers in nuclear physics. The authors explain semi-classical arguments and derivation of its formulae. In these ways an intuitive understanding of complex nuclear phenomena is provided. The book is aimed at graduate school students as well as junior and senior undergraduate students and postdoctoral fellows. It is also useful for researchers to update their knowledge of diver...

  9. Impacts of C-uptake by plants on the spatial distribution of14C accumulated in vegetation around a nuclear facility-Application of a sophisticated land surface14C model to the Rokkasho reprocessing plant, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masakazu; Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of carbon uptake by plants on the spatial distribution of radiocarbon ( 14 C) accumulated in vegetation around a nuclear facility were investigated by numerical simulations using a sophisticated land surface 14 C model (SOLVEG-II). In the simulation, SOLVEG-II was combined with a mesoscale meteorological model and an atmospheric dispersion model. The model combination was applied to simulate the transfer of 14 CO 2 and to assess the radiological impact of 14 C accumulation in rice grains during test operations of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP), Japan, in 2007. The calculated 14 C-specific activities in rice grains agreed with the observed activities in paddy fields around the RRP within a factor of four. The annual effective dose delivered from 14 C in the rice grain was estimated to be less than 0.7 μSv, only 0.07% of the annual effective dose limit of 1 mSv for the public. Numerical experiments of hypothetical continuous atmospheric 14 CO 2 release from the RRP showed that the 14 C-specific activities of rice plants at harvest differed from the annual mean activities in the air. The difference was attributed to seasonal variations in the atmospheric 14 CO 2 concentration and the growth of the rice plant. Accumulation of 14 C in the rice plant significantly increased when 14 CO 2 releases were limited during daytime hours, compared with the results observed during the nighttime. These results indicated that plant growth stages and diurnal photosynthesis should be considered in predictions of the ingestion dose of 14 C for long-term chronic releases and short-term diurnal releases of 14 CO 2 , respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear liability - nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, H.

    1981-01-01

    In the fourth concluding article on this subject (following articles in VW 1981 pp. 483, 552 and 629), the author explains procedures, duties and obligations according to the Para. Para. 5, 6 and 7 of the AHBKA. These obligations are to be observed before or after the occurrence of damages. In addition, legal consequences following violations of duties - loss of right - joint, insurance, transfer ban, period for filing suit, duty to notify, 'The German Nuclear Reactor Insurance and Reinsurance Community', the insurance according to the 'General terms and conditions governing the liability insurance of licensed activities involving nuclear fuels and other radioactive substances outside nuclear installations (AHBStr.)', object, beginning and exclusion of coverage, 'Special conditions governing the transport of nuclear fuels according to Para. 25 (2) of the Atomic Energy Law' are attached to the General Terms and Conditions governing the liability insurance of licenced activities involving nuclear fuels and other radioactive substances outside nuclear installations. (HSCH) [de

  11. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ajoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  12. Understanding classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subianto, M.

    2009-01-01

    In practical data analysis, the understandability of models plays an important role in their acceptance. In the data mining literature, however, understandability plays is hardly ever mentioned. If it is mentioned, it is interpreted as meaning that the models have to be simple. In this thesis we

  13. Development: Ages & Stages--Spatial Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Carla; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2006-01-01

    Spatial concepts such as a sense of distance are learned through movement and exploration which is the most effective way for children to gain body awareness and an understanding of spatial relationships. It simultaneously develops muscle strength, coordination, self-confidence, and thinking skills. Spatial awareness can be defined as "an…

  14. Embodied understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Western culture has inherited a view of understanding as an intellectual cognitive operation of grasping of concepts and their relations. However, cognitive science research has shown that this received intellectualist conception is substantially out of touch with how humans actually make and experience meaning. The view emerging from the mind sciences recognizes that understanding is profoundly embodied, insofar as our conceptualization and reasoning recruit sensory, motor, and affective patterns and processes to structure our understanding of, and engagement with, our world. A psychologically realistic account of understanding must begin with the patterns of ongoing interaction between an organism and its physical and cultural environments and must include both our emotional responses to changes in our body and environment, and also the actions by which we continuously transform our experience. Consequently, embodied understanding is not merely a conceptual/propositional activity of thought, but rather constitutes our most basic way of being in, and engaging with, our surroundings in a deep visceral manner.

  15. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Spatial Culture – A Humanities Perspective Abstract of introductory essay by Henrik Reeh Secured by alliances between socio-political development and cultural practices, a new field of humanistic studies in spatial culture has developed since the 1990s. To focus on links between urban culture...... and modern society is, however, an intellectual practice which has a much longer history. Already in the 1980s, the debate on the modern and the postmodern cited Paris and Los Angeles as spatio-cultural illustrations of these major philosophical concepts. Earlier, in the history of critical studies, the work...... Foucault considered a constitutive feature of 20th-century thinking and one that continues to occupy intellectual and cultural debates in the third millennium. A conceptual framework is, nevertheless, necessary, if the humanities are to adequa-tely address city and space – themes that have long been...

  16. Overview of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    For many years, nuclear structure and decay data have been compiled and disseminated by an International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators under the auspices of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In this lecture I will discuss the kinds of data that are available and describe various ways to obtain this information. We will learn about some of the publications that are available and Internet sources of nuclear data. You will be introduced to Isotope Explorer software for retrieving and displaying nuclear structure and radioactive decay data. The on-line resources Table of Radioactive Isotopes, PGAA Database Viewer, Nuclear Science Reference Search, Table of Isotopes Educational Website, and other information sources will be discussed. Exercises will be provided to increase your ability to understand, access, and use nuclear data

  17. Overview of nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2003-06-30

    For many years, nuclear structure and decay data have been compiled and disseminated by an International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators under the auspices of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In this lecture I will discuss the kinds of data that are available and describe various ways to obtain this information. We will learn about some of the publications that are available and Internet sources of nuclear data. You will be introduced to Isotope Explorer software for retrieving and displaying nuclear structure and radioactive decay data. The on-line resources Table of Radioactive Isotopes, PGAA Database Viewer, Nuclear Science Reference Search, Table of Isotopes Educational Website, and other information sources will be discussed. Exercises will be provided to increase your ability to understand, access, and use nuclear data.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  19. [Nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion

  20. Understanding semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Understanding natural language is a cognitive, information-driven process. Discussing some of the consequences of this fact, the paper offers a novel look at the semantic effect of lexical nouns and the identification of reference types....

  1. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  2. Understanding homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on understanding homelessness. It criticizes approaches that ignore, distort or diminish the humanity of homeless people, or else, add little to our understanding of that humanity. In particular, it rejects what it calls “epidemiological” approaches, which deny the possibility of agency for homeless people, insofar as those approaches view the situation of those people largely as a “social fact”, to be explained in terms of causal variables or “risk factors” ...

  3. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    of analysis of Ti foil after glow discharge with deuterium / I. B. Savvatimova and D. V. Gavritenkov. Enhancement mechanisms of low-energy nuclear reactions / F. A. Gareev, I. E. Zhidkova, and Y. L. Ratis. Co-deposition of palladium with hydrogen isotopes / J. Dash and A. Ambadkar. Variation of the concentration of isotopes copper and zinc in human plasmas of patients affected by cancer / A. Triassi. Transmutation of metal at low energy in a confined plasma in water / D. Cirillo and V. Iorio. The conditions and realization of self-similar Coulomb collapse of condensed target and low-energy laboratory nucleosynthesis / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii. The spatial structure of water and the problem of controlled low-energy nuclear reactions in water matrix / V. I. Vysotskii and A. A. Kornilova. Experiments on controlled decontamination of water mixture of longlived active isotopes in biological cells / V. I. Vysotskii. Assessment of the biological effects of "strange" radiation / E. A. Pryakhin ... [et al.]. Possible nuclear transmutation of nitrogen in the earth's atmosphere / M. Fukuhara. Evidences on the occurrence of LENR-type processes in alchemical transmutations / J. Pérez-Pariente. History of the discovery of transmutation at Texas A&M University / J. O.-M. Bockris -- 4. Theory. Quantum electrodynamics. Concerning the modeling of systems in terms of quantum electro dynamics: the special case of "cold fusion" / M. Abyaneh ... [et al.]. Screening. Theoretical model of the probability of fusion between deuterons within deformed lattices with microcracks at room temperature / F. Fulvio. Resonant tunnelling. Effective interaction potential in the deuterium plasma and multiple resonance scattering / T. Toimela. Multiple scattering theory and condensed matter nuclear science - "super-absorption" in a crystal latice / X. Z. Li ... [et al.]. Ion band states. Framework for understanding LENR processes, using conventional condensed matter physics / S. R. Chubb. I

  4. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  5. Nuclear photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  6. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    , the notion of aesthetics (taken in the original signification of aisthesis: sensory perception) helped to map the relations between city, human experience, and various forms of art and culture. Delving into our simultaneously optical and tactical reception of space (a dialectics pointed out by Walter...... Benjamin), studies in urbanity and aesthetics may highlight mul-tisensory everyday practices that pass unnoticed in the current era of visual domination. A humanistic approach to urban and spatial cultures should also learn from German sociologist and philosopher Georg Simmel’s hypothesis of a modern need......: Memory”, and ”Staging and Interpretation: Places”....

  7. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, W.; Hintermann, K.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy, naturally, is rated very high in discussions at the most different levels. Often it is noted that hasty opinions supported by little actual Knowledge are expressed and published. It is an active duty of scientists and technicians by speaking in plain language, to instil as many readers as possible with understanding of the bases and applications of the powers residing in an atomic core - which is all but an easy task. The two authors, experienced researchers and teachers, in the form of this book make an important contribution destined for the broad public. The natural scientist's supreme principle of keeping to facts and avoid personal tinges is satisfied in this book throughout. The first chapter describes the historical development of the atomic model. Its solid mooring in physics was the result of the research work and discovering in that field in the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, of which we get a fine description in the second chapter. The third chapter describes the way to the discovery of nuclear fission by Otto Hahn, Fritz Strassmann and Lise Meitner. The fourth chapter is above all dedicated to the genial achievements of Enrico Fermi. Before the description of energy production from nuclear energy in the sixth chapter, the fifth chapter reflects on basic questions of energy conversion. In the last chapter problems of global character such as fuel reserves, the environment etc. are dealt with. This book fulfills an important obligation of the scientist to the public. (orig./GL) [de

  8. Structure and gating of the nuclear pore complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibauer, Matthias; Pellanda, Mauro; Turgay, Yagmur; Dubrovsky, Anna; Wild, Annik; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) perforate the nuclear envelope and allow the exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. To acquire a deeper understanding of this transport mechanism, we analyse the structure of the NPC scaffold and permeability barrier, by reconstructing the Xenopus laevis oocyte NPC from native nuclear envelopes up to 20 Å resolution by cryo-electron tomography in conjunction with subtomogram averaging. In addition to resolving individual protein domains of the NPC constituents, we propose a model for the architecture of the molecular gate at its central channel. Furthermore, we compare and contrast this native NPC structure to one that exhibits reduced transport activity and unveil the spatial properties of the NPC gate.

  9. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell model close quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. (author). 25 refs., 7 figs

  10. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.; Tanihata, I.

    1992-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides. One goal, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell modelclose quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. 25 refs., 7 figs

  11. Understanding Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Maple is a powerful symbolic computation system that is widely used in universities around the world. This short introduction gives readers an insight into the rules that control how the system works, and how to understand, fix, and avoid common problems. Topics covered include algebra, calculus, linear algebra, graphics, programming, and procedures. Each chapter contains numerous illustrative examples, using mathematics that does not extend beyond first-year undergraduate material. Maple worksheets containing these examples are available for download from the author's personal website. The book is suitable for new users, but where advanced topics are central to understanding Maple they are tackled head-on. Many concepts which are absent from introductory books and manuals are described in detail. With this book, students, teachers and researchers will gain a solid understanding of Maple and how to use it to solve complex mathematical problems in a simple and efficient way.

  12. Nuclear-pumped lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Prelas, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on Nuclear-Pumped Laser (NPL) technology and provides the reader with a fundamental understanding of NPLs, a review of research in the field, and exploration of large scale NPL system design and applications. Early chapters look at the fundamental properties of lasers, nuclear-pumping and nuclear reactions that may be used as drivers for nuclear-pumped lasers. The book goes on to explore the efficient transport of energy from the ionizing radiation to the laser medium and then the operational characteristics of existing nuclear-pumped lasers. Models based on Mathematica, explanations and a tutorial all assist the reader’s understanding of this technology. Later chapters consider the integration of the various systems involved in NPLs and the ways in which they can be used, including beyond the military agenda. As readers will discover, there are significant humanitarian applications for high energy/power lasers, such as deflecting asteroids, space propulsion, power transmission and mining....

  13. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Peterson, Steven K [ORNL; Scaglione, John M [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  14. Understanding physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Understanding Physics - Second edition is a comprehensive, yet compact, introductory physics textbook aimed at physics undergraduates and also at engineers and other scientists taking a general physics course. Written with today's students in mind, this text covers the core material required by an introductory course in a clear and refreshing way. A second colour is used throughout to enhance learning and understanding. Each topic is introduced from first principles so that the text is suitable for students without a prior background in physics. At the same time the book is designed to enable

  15. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  16. Perceptual spatial differentiation of Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Krevs

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Geographical studies of human perception of places at local scale are usually aimed at bet-ter understanding of human spatial perception and knowledge about the places, and of using this knowledge in spatial decision-making or spatial behaviour. Our focus on the first part of these general research aims is presented based on a case study, revealing how residents of the Municipality of Ljubljana perceive and value neighbourhoods of “their” municipality at the beginning of the century1.

  17. The Spatial Politics of Spatial Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian; Richardson, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the interplay between the spatial politics of new governance landscapes and innovations in the use of spatial representations in planning. The central premise is that planning experiments with new relational approaches become enmeshed in spatial politics. The case of strategic...... spatial planning in Denmark reveals how fuzzy spatial representations and relational spatial concepts are being used to depoliticise strategic spatial planning processes and to camouflage spatial politics. The paper concludes that, while relational geography might play an important role in building...

  18. Nuclear moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  19. Living with nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnesale, A.; Doty, P.; Hoffmann, S.; Huntington, S.P.; Nye, J.S. Jr.; Sagan, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    At Harvard President Derek Bok's request, six Harvard professors explain nuclear arms issues to help citizens understand all sides of the national security debates. The goal is to encourage public participation in policy formulation. The book emphasizes that escapism will not improve security; that idealistic plans to eliminate nuclear weapons are a form of escapism. Learning to live with nuclear weapons, they suggest, requires an understanding of the current nuclear predicament and the implications of alternative weapons and policy choices. After reviewing these matters, they emphasize that informed persons will continue to disagree, but that knowledge will improve understanding and appreciation of their differences and improve the quality of policy debates. 54 references, 5 figures, 2 tables. (DCK)

  20. Understanding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  1. Understanding translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  2. Understanding Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the ability to adapt successfully in the face of stress and adversity. Stressful life events, trauma and chronic adversity can have a substantial impact on brain function and structure, and can result in the development of PTSD, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, most individuals do not develop such illnesses after experiencing stressful life events, and are thus thought to be resilient. Resilience as successful adaptation relies on effective responses to environmental challenges and ultimate resistance to the deleterious effects of stress, therefore a greater understanding of the factors that promote such effects is of great relevance. This review focuses on recent findings regarding genetic, epigenetic, developmental, psychosocial and neurochemical factors that are considered essential contributors to the development of resilience. Neural circuits and pathways involved in mediating resilience are also discussed. The growing understanding of resilience factors will hopefully lead to the development of new pharmacological and psychological interventions for enhancing resilience and mitigating the untoward consequences.

  3. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  4. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  5. Understanding unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Rocheteau

    2006-01-01

    Modern economists have built models of the labor market, which isolate the market’s key drivers and describe the way these interact to produce particular levels of unemployment. One of the most popular models used by macroeconomists today is the search-matching model of equilibrium unemployment. We explain this model, and show how it can be applied to understand the way various policies, such as unemployment benefits, taxes, or technological changes, can affect the unemployment rate.

  6. Understanding Technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Bendtsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We are facing radical changes in our ways of living in the nearest future. Not necessarily of our own choice, but because tchnological development is moving so fast, that it will have still greater impact on many aspects of our lives. We have seen the beginnings of that change within the latest 35 years or so, but according to newest research that change will speed up immensely in the nearest years to come. The impact of that change or these changes will affect our working life immensely as a consequence of automation. How these changes are brought about and which are their consequences in a broad sense is being attempted to be understood and guessed by researchers. No one knows for sure, but specific patterns are visible. This paper will not try to guess, what will come, but will rather try to understand the deepest ”nature” of technology in order to understand the driving factors in this development: the genesis of technology in a broad sense in order to contibute to the understanding of the basis for the expected development.

  7. Rumlig kultur / Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    artikler et forskningsfelt for rumlig kultur, hvori alskens sanse- og refleksionsformer finder sammen. Based in humanistic urban studies as practiced in the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, SPATIAL CULTURE outlines a novel framework for understanding the social....... Considerable parts of the volume are in both English and Danish. Along with the introductory chapter by Henrik Reeh, Associate Professor of Humanistic Urban Studies and Modern Culture, University of Copenhagen, and the final essay by Albertó Pérez-Gómez, Professor of the History of Architecture, Mc...

  8. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  9. Nuclear power

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    David Waller and Alan McDonald ask whether a nuclear renaissance can be predicted; Judith M. Greenwald discusses keeping the nuclear power option open; Paul Mobbs considers the availability of uranium and the future of nuclear energy.

  10. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  11. Pediatric nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Hannon, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology methods have had less impact upon pediatric cardiology than upon adult cardiology. Most pediatric heart disease results from congenital malformations of the heart and great vessels, which is usually discovered in infancy, and is most often treated definitively in infancy or early childhood. Unfortunately, nuclear medicine techniques are limited in their spatial resolution - structures that overlie each other are separated with difficulty. As a result, nuclear cardiology is usually of limited value in the anatomic characterization of the congenital heart abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been useful in the detection and quantification of the pathophysiologic consequences of many congenital cardiac malformations. The authors review application of nuclear medicine in pediatric cardiology, and attempt to assess each in terms of its clinical utility

  12. Can Urbanization, Social and Spatial Disparities Help to Understand the Rise of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Bobo-Dioulasso? A Study in a Secondary City of Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeba, Augustin Nawidimbasba; Yaméogo, Marceline Téné; Tougouma, Somnoma Jean-Baptiste; Kassié, Daouda; Fournet, Florence

    2017-04-04

    Background : Unplanned urbanization plays a key role in chronic disease growth. This population-based cross-sectional study assessed the occurrence of cardiometabolic risk factors in Bobo-Dioulasso and their association with urbanization conditions. Methods : Through spatial sampling, four Bobo-Dioulasso sub-spaces were selected for a population survey to measure the adult health status. Yéguéré, Dogona, Tounouma and Secteur 25 had very different urbanization conditions (position within the city; time of creation and healthcare structure access). The sample size was estimated at 1000 households (250 for each sub-space) in which one adult (35 to 59-year-old) was randomly selected. Finally, 860 adults were surveyed. Anthropometric, socioeconomic and clinical data were collected. Arterial blood pressure was measured and blood samples were collected to assess glycemia. Results : Weight, body mass index and waist circumference (mean values) and serum glycemia (83.4 mg/dL ± 4.62 mmol/L) were significantly higher in Tounouma, Dogona, and Secteur 25 than in Yéguéré; the poorest and most rural-like sub-space ( p = 0.001). Overall, 43.2%, 40.5%, 5.3% and 60.9% of participants had overweight, hypertension, hyperglycemia and one or more cardiometabolic risk markers, respectively. Conclusions : Bobo-Dioulasso is unprepared to face this public health issue and urgent responses are needed to reduce the health risks associated with unplanned urbanization.

  13. Can Urbanization, Social and Spatial Disparities Help to Understand the Rise of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Bobo-Dioulasso? A Study in a Secondary City of Burkina Faso, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeba, Augustin Nawidimbasba; Yaméogo, Marceline Téné; Tougouma, Somnoma Jean-Baptiste; Kassié, Daouda; Fournet, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Background: Unplanned urbanization plays a key role in chronic disease growth. This population-based cross-sectional study assessed the occurrence of cardiometabolic risk factors in Bobo-Dioulasso and their association with urbanization conditions. Methods: Through spatial sampling, four Bobo-Dioulasso sub-spaces were selected for a population survey to measure the adult health status. Yéguéré, Dogona, Tounouma and Secteur 25 had very different urbanization conditions (position within the city; time of creation and healthcare structure access). The sample size was estimated at 1000 households (250 for each sub-space) in which one adult (35 to 59-year-old) was randomly selected. Finally, 860 adults were surveyed. Anthropometric, socioeconomic and clinical data were collected. Arterial blood pressure was measured and blood samples were collected to assess glycemia. Results: Weight, body mass index and waist circumference (mean values) and serum glycemia (83.4 mg/dL ± 4.62 mmol/L) were significantly higher in Tounouma, Dogona, and Secteur 25 than in Yéguéré; the poorest and most rural-like sub-space (p = 0.001). Overall, 43.2%, 40.5%, 5.3% and 60.9% of participants had overweight, hypertension, hyperglycemia and one or more cardiometabolic risk markers, respectively. Conclusions: Bobo-Dioulasso is unprepared to face this public health issue and urgent responses are needed to reduce the health risks associated with unplanned urbanization. PMID:28375173

  14. Can Urbanization, Social and Spatial Disparities Help to Understand the Rise of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Bobo-Dioulasso? A Study in a Secondary City of Burkina Faso, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin Nawidimbasba Zeba

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unplanned urbanization plays a key role in chronic disease growth. This population-based cross-sectional study assessed the occurrence of cardiometabolic risk factors in Bobo-Dioulasso and their association with urbanization conditions. Methods: Through spatial sampling, four Bobo-Dioulasso sub-spaces were selected for a population survey to measure the adult health status. Yéguéré, Dogona, Tounouma and Secteur 25 had very different urbanization conditions (position within the city; time of creation and healthcare structure access. The sample size was estimated at 1000 households (250 for each sub-space in which one adult (35 to 59-year-old was randomly selected. Finally, 860 adults were surveyed. Anthropometric, socioeconomic and clinical data were collected. Arterial blood pressure was measured and blood samples were collected to assess glycemia. Results: Weight, body mass index and waist circumference (mean values and serum glycemia (83.4 mg/dL ± 4.62 mmol/L were significantly higher in Tounouma, Dogona, and Secteur 25 than in Yéguéré; the poorest and most rural-like sub-space (p = 0.001. Overall, 43.2%, 40.5%, 5.3% and 60.9% of participants had overweight, hypertension, hyperglycemia and one or more cardiometabolic risk markers, respectively. Conclusions: Bobo-Dioulasso is unprepared to face this public health issue and urgent responses are needed to reduce the health risks associated with unplanned urbanization.

  15. Understanding uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Lindley, Dennis V

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition ""...a reference for everyone who is interested in knowing and handling uncertainty.""-Journal of Applied Statistics The critically acclaimed First Edition of Understanding Uncertainty provided a study of uncertainty addressed to scholars in all fields, showing that uncertainty could be measured by probability, and that probability obeyed three basic rules that enabled uncertainty to be handled sensibly in everyday life. These ideas were extended to embrace the scientific method and to show how decisions, containing an uncertain element, could be rationally made.

  16. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    of amblyopia , or a lazy eye. This "artificial amblyopia " of isoluminance is con- venient for experiments because it can be switched on and off and...from amblyopia , which is a help for at least intuitive understanding. A further and dramatic loss is of a certain kind of stereoscopic depth. The...with surface segregation, assumptions grounded in likelihood and simplicity are prevalent . To these are added various assumptive geometric

  17. Applying spatial thinking in social science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R; Zhang, Weiwei; Xu, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    Spatial methods that build upon Geographic Information Systems are spreading quickly across the social sciences. This essay points out that the appropriate use of spatial tools requires more careful thinking about spatial concepts. As easy as it is now to measure distance, it is increasingly important to understand what we think it represents. To interpret spatial patterns, we need spatial theories. We review here a number of key concepts as well as some of the methodological approaches that are now at the disposal of researchers, and illustrate them with studies that reflect the very wide range of problems that use these tools.

  18. Constructing Spatial Meaning: Spatial Affordances in Museum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman, Jean D.; Peponis, John

    2010-01-01

    Informal education in museums is structured through movement in space. This article summarizes a range of research that examines the role of spatial layout in shaping the ways in which visitors explore, engage, and understand museums and museum exhibitions. It is demonstrated that behavior patterns are systematically linked to spatial…

  19. Understanding analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This lively introductory text exposes the student to the rewards of a rigorous study of functions of a real variable. In each chapter, informal discussions of questions that give analysis its inherent fascination are followed by precise, but not overly formal, developments of the techniques needed to make sense of them. By focusing on the unifying themes of approximation and the resolution of paradoxes that arise in the transition from the finite to the infinite, the text turns what could be a daunting cascade of definitions and theorems into a coherent and engaging progression of ideas. Acutely aware of the need for rigor, the student is much better prepared to understand what constitutes a proper mathematical proof and how to write one. Fifteen years of classroom experience with the first edition of Understanding Analysis have solidified and refined the central narrative of the second edition. Roughly 150 new exercises join a selection of the best exercises from the first edition, and three more project-sty...

  20. Understanding ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Vaidya Dilip

    2010-01-01

    Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda's power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  1. Understanding Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya Dilip Gadgil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda′s power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  2. Six Myths About Spatial Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, Nora S.; Stieff, Mike

    2012-04-01

    Visualizations are an increasingly important part of scientific education and discovery. However, users often do not gain knowledge from them in a complete or efficient way. This article aims to direct research on visualizations in science education in productive directions by reviewing the evidence for widespread assumptions that learning styles, sex differences, developmental stages, and spatial language determine the impact of visualizations on science learning. First, we examine the assumption that people differ in their verbal versus visual learning style. Due to the lack of rigorous evaluation, there is no current support for this distinction. Future research should distinguish between two different kinds of visual learning style. Second, we consider the belief that there are large and intractable sex differences in spatial ability resultant from immutable biological reasons. Although there are some spatial sex differences (in some types of spatial tests although not all), there is actually only very mixed support for biological causation. Most important, there is conclusive evidence that spatial skills can be improved through training and education. Third, we explore educators' use of Piaget's ideas about spatial development to draw conclusions about 'developmental appropriateness'. However, recent research on spatial development has focused on identifying sequences that begin with early starting points of skill, and spatial education is possible in some form at all ages. Fourth, although spatial language does not determine spatial thought, it does frame attention in a way that can have impact on learning and understanding. We examine the empirical support for each assumption and its relevance to future research on visualizations in science education.

  3. Nuclear power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea

  4. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, V.

    1982-01-01

    The author of the book has had 25 years of experience at the Nuclear Chemistry of Prague Technical University. In consequence, the book is intended as a basic textbook for students of this field. Its main objectives are an easily understandable presentation of the complex subject and in spite of the uncertainty which still characterizes the definition and subjects of nuclear chemistry - a systematic classification and logical structure. Contents: 1. Introduction (history and definition); 2. General nuclear chemistry (physical fundamentals, hot atom chemistry, interaction of nuclear radiation with matter, radioactive elements, isotope effects, isotope exchange, chemistry of radioactive trace elements); 3. Methods of nuclear chemistry of nuclear chemistry (radiochemical methods, activation, separation and enrichment chemistry); 4. Preparative nuclear chemistry (isotope production, labelled compounds); 5. Analytival nuclear chemistry; 6. Applied nuclear chemistry (isotope applications in general physical and analytical chemistry). The book is supplemented by an annex with tables, a name catalogue and a subject index which will facilitate access to important information. (RB) [de

  5. Understanding physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cassidy, David; Rutherford, James

    2002-01-01

    Understanding Physics provides a thorough grounding in contemporary physics while placing physics into its social and historical context Based in large part on the highly respected Project Physics Course developed by two of the authors, it also integrates the results of recent pedagogical research The text thus - teaches about the basic phenomena in the physical world and the concepts developed to explain them - shows that science is a rational human endeavor with a long and continuing tradition, involving many different cultures and people - develops facility in critical thinking, reasoned argumentation, evaluation of evidence, mathematical modeling, and ethical values The treatment emphasizes not only what we know but also how we know it, why we believe it, and what effects that knowledge has - Why do we believe the Earth and planets revolve around the Sun? - Why do we believe that matter is made of atoms? - How do relativity theory and quantum mechanics alter our conception of Nature and in what ways do th...

  6. Spatial geometry and special relativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho

    2016-01-01

    In this work, it is shown the interplay of relative and absolute entities, which are present in both spatial geometry and special relativity. In order to strengthen the understanding of special relativity, we discuss firstly an instance of geometry and the existence of both frame-dependent and fr...

  7. Understanding Callisto's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John

    2016-10-01

    We plan to address first-order questions about the nature and origin of the mysterious atmosphere of Callisto, including its composition, longitudinal distribution, formation, and support mechanisms. This investigation is made possible by the remarkable sensitivity of the COS instrument, which has recently detected faint 1304 A and 1356 A O I emission from Callisto's leading / Jupiter-facing quadrant. The emission is probably due to dissociation of O2 molecules in Callisto's atmosphere by photo-electrons, and resonant scattering from an extended atomic O corona. We suspect, from Galileo ionospheric data, that the atmosphere may be much denser, and brighter in emission, on the trailing hemisphere, as expected for a sputter-generated atmosphere, and propose to test the sputter generation hypothesis with 4-orbit COS integrations on the leading and trailing hemispheres. If the trailing side emissions are indeed brighter, the improved SNR there will also allow much improved determination of atmospheric and coronal composition and optical depth. The observations will set the stage for, and aid in planning of, the extensive observations of Callisto's environment planned for the JUICE mission. Because Callisto's atmospheric oxygen emissions are indirectly illuminated by sunlight, which is uniform and quantifiable, it is much easier to understand atmospheric spatial distribution, and thus origin, than on Europa and Ganymede were emissions depend on magnetospheric excitation which is spatially variable and poorly understood. Callisto's atmosphere thus provides a unique chance to better understand the oxygen atmospheres of all the icy Galilean moons.

  8. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.; Tasker, A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides about a fifth of both Britain's and the world's electricity. It is the largest single source of electricity in Western Europe; in France three quarters of electricity is generated by nuclear power stations. This booklet is about the safety of those plants. It approaches the subject by outlining the basic principles and approaches behind nuclear safety, describing the protective barriers and safety systems that are designed to prevent the escape of radioactive material, and summarising the regulations that govern the construction and operation of nuclear power stations. The aim is to provide a general understanding of the subject by explaining the general principles of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor and setting out the UKAEA strategy for nuclear safety, the objective being always to minimize risk. (author)

  9. Teachers and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The aims of the seminar were: to exchange national experience in informing and assisting teachers in the nuclear field, and to determine the conditions for improving the effectiveness of these programmes; to develop an international understanding on the basic training and information requirements to assist secondary-school teachers in discussing nuclear energy in an appropriately wide and balanced context at school; to study the respective contributions of national authorities, industry and relevant institutes in this endeavour

  10. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: The science of chemical thermodynamics has substantially contributed to the understanding of the many problems encountered in nuclear and reactor technology. These problems include reaction of materials with their surroundings and chemical and physical changes of fuels. Modern reactor technology, by its very nature, has offered new fields of investigations for the scientists and engineers concerned with the design of nuclear fuel elements. Moreover, thermodynamics has been vital in predicting the behaviour of new materials for fission as well as fusion reactors. In this regard, the Symposium was organized to provide a mechanism for review and discussion of recent thermodynamic investigations of nuclear materials. The Symposium was held in the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre, at the invitation of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany. The International Atomic Energy Agency has given much attention to the thermodynamics of nuclear materials, as is evidenced by its sponsorship of four international symposia in 1962, 1965, 1967, and 1974. The first three meetings were primarily concerned with the fundamental thermodynamics of nuclear materials; as with the 1974 meeting, this last Symposium was primarily aimed at the thermodynamic behaviour of nuclear materials in actual practice, i.e., applied thermodynamics. Many advances have been made since the 1974 meeting, both in fundamental and applied thermodynamics of nuclear materials, and this meeting provided opportunities for an exchange of new information on this topic. The Symposium dealt in part with the thermodynamic analysis of nuclear materials under conditions of high temperatures and a severe radiation environment. Several sessions were devoted to the thermodynamic studies of nuclear fuels and fission and fusion reactor materials under adverse conditions. These papers and ensuing discussions provided a better understanding of the chemical behaviour of fuels and materials under these

  11. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  12. Developing spatial biophysical accounting for multiple ecosystem services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, R.P.; Schroter, M.; Hein, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem accounting is receiving increasing interest as a way to systematically monitor the conditions of ecosystems and the ecosystem services they provide. A critical element of ecosystem accounting is understanding spatially explicit flows of ecosystem services. We developed spatial biophysical

  13. Nuclear links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections: introduction; energy and the third world; world energy consumption 1978; oil -the energy dilemma; nuclear chains - introduction; uranium; Namibia; enrichment and reprocessing; countries with enrichment and reprocessing facilities; waste; conclusion; why take the nuclear option; third world countries with nuclear reactors; the arms connection; government spending and human resources 1977 (by countries); nuclear power - the final solution; the fascists; world bank; campaigns; community action in Plogoff; Australian labour movement; NUM against nuclear power; Scottish campaign; students against nuclear energy; anti-nuclear campaign; partizans; 3W1 disarmament and development; campaign ATOM; CANUC; 3W1; SANE. (U.K.)

  14. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented of the Fourth International Symposium on Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials held in Vienna, 21-25 October 1974. The technological theme of the Symposium was the application of thermodynamics to the understanding of the chemistry of irradiated nuclear fuels and to safety assessments for hypothetical accident conditions in reactors. The first four sessions were devoted to these topics and they were followed by four more sessions on the more basic thermodynamics, phase diagrams and the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of nuclear materials. Sixty-seven papers were presented

  15. Nuclear spins in nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coish, W.A.; Baugh, J.

    2009-01-01

    We review recent theoretical and experimental advances toward understanding the effects of nuclear spins in confined nanostructures. These systems, which include quantum dots, defect centers, and molecular magnets, are particularly interesting for their importance in quantum information processing devices, which aim to coherently manipulate single electron spins with high precision. On one hand, interactions between confined electron spins and a nuclear-spin environment provide a decoherence source for the electron, and on the other, a strong effective magnetic field that can be used to execute local coherent rotations. A great deal of effort has been directed toward understanding the details of the relevant decoherence processes and to find new methods to manipulate the coupled electron-nuclear system. A sequence of spectacular new results have provided understanding of spin-bath decoherence, nuclear spin diffusion, and preparation of the nuclear state through dynamic polarization and more general manipulation of the nuclear-spin density matrix through ''state narrowing.'' These results demonstrate the richness of this physical system and promise many new mysteries for the future. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Spatial navigation by congenitally blind individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Schinazi, Victor R.; Thrash, Tyler; Chebat, Daniel?Robert

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the absence of vision has been investigated from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. These different approaches have progressed our understanding of spatial knowledge acquisition by blind individuals, including their abilities, strategies, and corresponding mental representations. In this review, we propose a framework for investigating differences in spatial knowledge acquisition by blind and sighted people consisting of three longitudinal models (i.e., convergen...

  17. Nuclear terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    RUTIC SRDJAN Z.

    2016-01-01

    The paper has analyzed different manifestations of terrorism with nuclear weapons and ionizing radiation as a special kind of terrorism. Possibilities that terrorist groups come into possession of nuclear weapons and apply them for terrorist purposes have been analysed. The forms and methods of terrorist activities with nuclear means have been given as well. It has been concluded that nuclear terrorism includes various forms of threats, including not only nuclear weapons but also the sources ...

  18. Understanding NMR: self-learning manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastler, B.

    2000-01-01

    This initiation to the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging allows to understand the essential basic physical principles for the realization and the interpretation of an NMR examination. (J.S.)

  19. Understanding PISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen DOWNES

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding PISA Stephen DOWNESMoncton, CANADA ABSTRACT The headline was dramatic enough to cause a ripple in the reading public. "Students who use computers a lot at school have worse maths and reading performance," noted the BBC news article, citing a 2004 study by Ludger Woessmann and Thomas Fuchs (Fuchs and Woessman, 2004. It was not long before the blogosphere took notice. Taking the theme and running with it, Alice and Bill ask, "Computers Make School Kids Dumber?" They theorize, "If you track the admitted decline of education, you'll probably notice that it follows along with the increase of technology in the classroom." In a similar vein, James Bartholomew asks, "Do you think that the government will turn down the volume of its boasting about how it has spent billions introducing computers in schools (while keeping down the pay of teachers so much that there are shortages? Do you think it will stop sending governors of state schools glossy pamphlets about insisting that computers are used in their schools as much as possible?" In this study, therefore, PISA looks well beyond educational attainment, and also includes school demographics, such as whether it is a public or private school, has large or small classes, or has access or not to technological resources. Finally, it does measure student information-their family background, access to books and computers and parental support as well. The PISA survey departs from previous surveys in disregarding the stated curricula of the schools being measured. Therefore, the conclusion is not surprising, nor even wrong for him to consider independently of any parental or teacher support, considered without reference to the software running on it, considered without reference to student attitudes and interests, does not positively impact an education. Finally, he focus on missing the reporting of results

  20. Spatial and Social Networks in Organizational Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman, Jean D.; Kabo, Felichism W.; Davis, Gerald F.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the enabling factors of innovation has focused on either the social component of organizations or on the spatial dimensions involved in the innovation process. But no one has examined the aggregate consequences of the link from spatial layout, to social networks, to innovation. This project enriches our understanding of how innovation…

  1. Why Do Spatial Abilities Predict Mathematical Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosto, Maria Grazia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Dale, Philip S.; Malykh, Sergey; Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Spatial ability predicts performance in mathematics and eventual expertise in science, technology and engineering. Spatial skills have also been shown to rely on neuronal networks partially shared with mathematics. Understanding the nature of this association can inform educational practices and intervention for mathematical underperformance.…

  2. The Spatial Know-How of Graffiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannes van Loon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available My research interest lies in understand the spatial behaviour of graffiti writers (van Loon, 2014. Although graffiti writers have unique perspectives on urban landscapes that determine where and what type of graffiti they produce, they also have collective or shared senses of place – i.e., a spatial know-how that structures their production (Castree, 2003.

  3. The Spatial Know-How of Graffiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannes van Loon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available My research interest lies in understand the spatial behaviour of graffiti writers (van Loon, 2014. Although graffiti writers have unique perspectives on urban landscapes that determine where and what type of graffiti they produce, they also have collective or shared senses of place – i.e., a spatial know-how that structures their production (Castree, 2003.

  4. Nuclear safeguards and nuclear shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The issues involved in the California nuclear initiative (Proposition 15) are described. Some of the characteristics of the anti-nuclear lobby are outlined. Some do's and don'ts for the nuclear group are listed. The nuclear shutdown effort was concentrated on the safeguards and high-level waste disposal issues

  5. Land Administration and Spatial Data Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, John R.; Enemark, Stig

    2005-01-01

    of developing land policies that effectively and efficiently incorporate appropriate spatial data infrastructures, including an understanding of the value of integrating the land administration/cadastre/land registration function with the topographic mapping function. This paper presents an overview...

  6. Spatial Management Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spatial management files combine all related and relevant spatial management files into an integrated fisheries management file. Overlaps of the redundant spatial...

  7. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.

    2000-01-01

    project is to provide the scientific understanding and rationale for developing improved glass and ceramic waste forms and to develop scientifically-based predictive models of the near-term (<500 years) and long-term performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Studies under this project have focused on the effects of ionization and elastic collisions on defect 3 production, defect interactions, diffusion, solid-state phase transformations, gas accumulation and dissolution kinetics using actinide-containing materials, gamma irradiation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of a-decay and b-decay on relevant nuclear waste materials. This project has exploited both experimental and computer simulation methods to characterize damage production processes, damage recovery processes, defect migration energies, defect interactions, evolution of microstructure, phase transformations, and dissolution mechanisms, all of which ultimately affect the structural integrity and dissolution kinetics of nuclear waste materials. New atomic-level simulation capabilities, which crosscut both spatial and temporal scales, could lead to more sophisticated predictive capabilities in the future

  8. The (Spatial) Memory Game: Testing the Relationship Between Spatial Language, Object Knowledge, and Spatial Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudde, Harmen B; Griffiths, Debra; Coventry, Kenny R

    2018-02-19

    The memory game paradigm is a behavioral procedure to explore the relationship between language, spatial memory, and object knowledge. Using two different versions of the paradigm, spatial language use and memory for object location are tested under different, experimentally manipulated conditions. This allows us to tease apart proposed models explaining the influence of object knowledge on spatial language (e.g., spatial demonstratives), and spatial memory, as well as understanding the parameters that affect demonstrative choice and spatial memory more broadly. Key to the development of the method was the need to collect data on language use (e.g., spatial demonstratives: "this/that") and spatial memory data under strictly controlled conditions, while retaining a degree of ecological validity. The language version (section 3.1) of the memory game tests how conditions affect language use. Participants refer verbally to objects placed at different locations (e.g., using spatial demonstratives: "this/that red circle"). Different parameters can be experimentally manipulated: the distance from the participant, the position of a conspecific, and for example whether the participant owns, knows, or sees the object while referring to it. The same parameters can be manipulated in the memory version of the memory game (section 3.2). This version tests the effects of the different conditions on object-location memory. Following object placement, participants get 10 seconds to memorize the object's location. After the object and location cues are removed, participants verbally direct the experimenter to move a stick to indicate where the object was. The difference between the memorized and the actual location shows the direction and strength of the memory error, allowing comparisons between the influences of the respective parameters.

  9. Nuclear energy and the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromova, E.; Vargoncik, D.; Sovadina, M.

    2013-01-01

    A popular interactive multimedia publication on nuclear energy in Slovak. 'Nuclear energy and energy' is a modern electronic publication that through engaging interpretation, combined with a number of interactive elements, explains the basic principles and facts of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Operation of nuclear power plants, an important part of the energy resources of developed countries, is frequently discussed topic in different social groups. Especially important is truthful knowledgeability of the general public about the benefits of technical solutions, but also on the risks and safety measures throughout the nuclear industry. According to an online survey 'Nuclear energy and energy' is the most comprehensive electronic multimedia publication worldwide, dedicated to the popularization of nuclear energy. With easy to understand texts, interactive and rich collection of accessories stock it belongs to modern educational and informational titles of the present time. The basic explanatory text of the publication is accompanied by history and the present time of all Slovak nuclear installations, including stock photos. For readers are presented the various attractions legible for the interpretation, which help them in a visual way to make a more complete picture of the concerned issue. Each chapter ends with a test pad where the readers can test their knowledge. Whole explanatory text (72 multimedia pages, 81,000 words) is accompanied by a lot of stock of graphic materials. The publication also includes 336 photos in 60 thematic photo galleries, 45 stock charts and drawings, diagrams and interactive 31 videos and 3D models.

  10. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  11. Memorandum of understanding between the Government of the Kingdom of Norway and the Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands on early notification of a nuclear accident and exchange of safety related information concerning the operation and management of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Agreement was concluded in implementation of the IAEA 1986 Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident. Both Governments undertake to notify each other forthwith of any abnormal radiation levels in their respective countries. They will exchange safety related information on nuclear facilities and inform each other of measures to protect the population and the environment. (NEA)

  12. Risk-communication issues in radiation safety: еvaluation of public awareness in St. Petersburg and the Leningrad region on the activities of the nuclear industry and public understanding of the hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Arkhangelskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2016, St. Petersburg Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene named after Professor P.V. Ramzaev developed a Program for the radiation risk communication management for the adequate perception risks associated with the use of various technologies in the nuclear industry by the public. Carrying out sociological research is one of the stages of this program. The aim of the analysis presented in the article is to study the population’s awareness of radiation safety issues and its attitude to further development of the nuclear industry. The data used in this analysis is a part of a large sociological survey conducted in St. Petersburg and the Leningrad Region The sociological research was conducted by the method of a selective questionnaire survey among the adult population permanently residing in the territory of St. Petersburg and the Leningrad Region. The volume of the sample studied was 2369 respondents: 1006 in St. Petersburg and 1363 in the Leningrad Region, including Sosnovy Bor – 401. The analysis showed that the population of all the studied territories estimates the environmental situation as being mainly favorable. The residents consider the main environmental problems in all areas studied to be a collection, removal, storage, disposal of garbage, as well as air and water pollution. The population of the region is relatively poorly informed about the current projects in the nuclear industry. One-third of the inhabitants of the region perceives the Leningrad nuclear power plant as a source of danger. Respondents see the main danger in the possibility of an accident on it. There is a sharply negative attitude of the population towards the construction of radioactive waste disposal sites anywhere in the region. According to the results of the study, it can be concluded that the population of the studied region is poorly informed about the existing radiation situation and the nuclear industry projects. It requires an optimization of the

  13. Applications of nuclear physics to interdisciplinary research and to industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey

    2000-04-01

    Techniques that have been developed to understand nuclear structure can be used for interdisciplinary research and to determine useful properties. Both microscopic and macroscopic techniques can be used. The introduction discusses the diversity of fields that can benefit from applying nuclear physics techniques. Three current areas of research are used as illustrations. The use of gamma-ray spectroscopy following thermal neutron capture to better understand the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Such measurements can be performed from orbit, on landers or on rovers, but each type of measurement puts different constraints on the instrument design. Nuclear resonant reaction analysis has recently been used to better understand the chemical kinetics in the curing of cement. Elemental concentrations of hydrogen have been measured with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers at the grain surface and about 20 nanometers at a depth of about two microns as a function of time during the reaction. Finally, x-ray techniques are being developed to provide an x-ray fluorescence instrument that can be used safely and reliably at a crime scene for investigative purposes. Unique problems of applying laboratory techniques to random, human-occupied locations and the requirements for providing a technically viable analysis that will be accepted by our legal system will be discussed.

  14. Nuclear works. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, Danielle; Calberg-Challot, Marie; Alexander, Catherine; Bergsman, Anne; Meyer, Morgan; Taebi, Behnam; Kloosterman, Jan Leen; Kelfaoui, Mahdi; Gingras, Yves; Laborie, Leonard; Beltran, Alain; Bouvier, Yves; Raineau, Laurence; Poirot-Delpech, Sophie; Ollivon, Franck; Mueller, Birgit; Lemarchand, Frederick; Rivat, Emmanuel; Mormont, Marc; Aparicio, Luis; Fassert, Christine; Lehtonen, Markku; Billet, Philippe; Girard, Berenice; Fournier, Pierre; Marion, Richard; Lot, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary conference 'How can the social sciences help us understand the nuclear world?' seeks to reassess the relations between nuclear and social science research. It has two objectives. First, it seeks to take stock of and build on existing research by making explicit the theoretical approaches, the research methods, the difficulties met by researchers and by possibly identifying aspects of the nuclear phenomenon that may have been neglected or left out by existing research. Second, it wishes to question the relevance of social science to contemporary nuclear debates and policy making. The conference was organized in 6 sessions dealing with: 1 - Nuclear discourses - Contents and legitimacies: Nuclear terminology: from the dictionary to industrial practices (Danielle Candel, Marie Calberg-Challot), The problem of recognizing nuclear objects (Catherine Alexander), Demonstrating safety (Anne Bergsman, Morgan Meyer), Designing for nuclear safety, security and sustainability: a philosophical discourse of the nuclear reactor (Behnam Taebi, Jan Leen Kloosterman); 2 - History, time and space. Tropes of nuclear activity: The Gentilly-1 NPP history: a technological failure? (Mahdi Kelfaoui, Yves Gingras), Nuclear history: experience and research prospects (Leonard Laborie, Yves Bouvier, Alain Beltran), Temporality clash in front of radioactive wastes disposal (Laurence Raineau, Sophie Poirot-Delpech), Canadian nuclear from the standpoint of territoriality: how a NPP shapes space? (Franck Ollivon); 3 - Citizen mobilizations and the experience of disaster: 'We could make a moonscape out of the whole country...' Anti-Nuclear Activism at the Czech - Austrian Border (Birgit Mueller), From a catastrophe to the other: living with nuclear (Frederick Lemarchand), Nuclear contestation: between information, confrontation and political communication - 1970-2010 (Emmanuel Rivat); 4 - Social science meets the nuclear industry: Renegotiating repository safety: the history of

  15. Spatial attention systems in spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-08-01

    It has been established that processes relating to 'spatial attention' are implemented at cortical level by goal-directed (top-down) and stimulus-driven (bottom-up) networks. Spatial neglect in brain-damaged individuals has been interpreted as a distinguished exemplar for a disturbance of these processes. The present paper elaborates this assumption. Functioning of the two attentional networks seem to dissociate in spatial neglect; behavioral studies of patients' orienting and exploration behavior point to a disturbed stimulus-driven but preserved goal-directed attention system. When a target suddenly appears somewhere in space, neglect patients demonstrate disturbed detection and orienting if it is located in contralesional direction. In contrast, if neglect patients explore a scene with voluntarily, top-down controlled shifts of spatial attention, they perform movements that are oriented into all spatial directions without any direction-specific disturbances. The paper thus argues that not the top-down control of spatial attention itself, rather a body-related matrix on top of which this process is executed, seems affected. In that sense, the traditional role of spatial neglect as a stroke model for 'spatial attention' requires adjustment. Beyond its insights into the human stimulus-driven attentional system, the disorder most notably provides vistas in how our brain encodes topographical information and organizes spatially oriented action - including the top-down control of spatial attention - in relation to body position. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding land administration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. Williamson, Ian; Enemark, Stig; Wallace, Judy

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces basic land administration theory and highlights four key concepts that are fundamental to understanding modern land administration systems - firstly the land management paradigm and its influence on the land administration framework, secondly the role that the cadastre plays...... in contributing to sustainable development, thirdly the changing nature of ownership and the role of land markets, and lastly a land management vision that promotes land administration in support of sustainable development and spatial enablement of society. We present here the first part of the paper. The second...... part focuses on the changing  role of ownership and the role of land markets, and a land management vision will be published in November issue of Coordinates. Udgivelsesdato: Oktober...

  17. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    Partial Contents: Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear Development, Nuclear Power Plant, Uranium, Missiles, Space Firm Protested, Satellite, Rocket Launching, Nuclear Submarine, Environmental, Radioactivity, Nuclear Plant...

  18. International nuclear material safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Azmi Syed Ali

    1985-01-01

    History can be a very dull subject if it relates to events which have long since lost their relevance. The factors which led to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), however, are as important and relevant today as they were when the Agency was first created. Without understanding these factors it is impossible to realise how important the Agency is in the present world or to understand some of the controversies surrounding its future. Central to these controversies is the question of how best to promote the international transfer of nuclear technology without contributing further to the problem of proliferating nuclear explosives or explosive capabilities. One effective means is to subject nuclear materials (see accompanying article in box), which forms the basic link between the manufacture of nuclear explosives and nuclear power generation, to international safeguards. This was realized very early in the development of nuclear power and was given greater emphasis following the deployment of the first two atomic bombs towards the end of World War II. (author)

  19. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials, or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion and can contribute significantly to the identification of the sources of the materials and the industrial processes used to obtain them. In the case of an explosion, nuclear forensics can also reconstruct key features of the nuclear device. Nuclear forensic analysis works best in conjunction with other law enforcement, radiological protection dosimetry, traditional forensics, and intelligence work to provide the basis for attributing the materials and/or nuclear device to its originators. Nuclear forensics is a piece of the overall attribution process, not a stand-alone activity

  20. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  1. Nuclear manpower development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. A.; Lee, K. B.; Shin, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    The nuclear manpower development project has concentrated on the systemisation and specialization of education and training programs and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new nuclear courses based on the experience of the Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) accumulated over the past years. As the demand of education program for training nuclear manpower is increasing due to the remarkable growth of nuclear industry, NTC developed customized education programs making the most use of nuclear experiment equipment and providing practical exercise with research reactor. For improving organizational performance and the development of skilled manpower, KAERI-ACE 2.0 system offered diverse programs addressing the type of occupation and position based on individual competency. Also education on IT was carried out to improve public relations on nuclear and field trips were arranged to encourage local residents' better understanding of the nuclear industry. As a continuous effort, In 2011, NTC specially conducted a survey of employees who are attached to small and medium sized business, and analyzed the present business situations and education requirements for the development of a Pre/under job education program. Prior to this, a briefing session took place for mutual exchange of opinions of industry and academia, based on which a test operation on 'Basic Radiation Education' was carried out. This program has a significance that it was first step toward connection between the nuclear industry and academia as well as an opportunity to educate the employee involved in nuclear engineering field. In 2012, this program is planned to be expanded. With reference to the in-house training, NTC established an 'e-HRD system' providing available resources concerned with education program for cultivating talented personnel. All the education programs are based on individual competency. The e-HRD system will be test operated in 2012 and applied to the

  2. Nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'nuclear structure' is the Appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) Annual Report 1985/86, and contains the research work carried out at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury, within that period. During the year a total of 74 experiments were scheduled covering the main areas of activity including: nuclear collective motion, nuclei far from stability, and nuclear collisions. The Appendix contains brief reports on these experiments and associated theory. (U.K.)

  3. Earthquake engineering for nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kuno, Michiya

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of earthquake- and tsunami-related technologies and knowledge for the design and construction of nuclear facilities. As such, it covers a wide range of fields including civil engineering, architecture, geotechnical engineering, mechanical engineering, and nuclear engineering, for the development of new technologies providing greater resistance against earthquakes and tsunamis. It is crucial both for students of nuclear energy courses and for young engineers in nuclear power generation industries to understand the basics and principles of earthquake- and tsunami-resistant design of nuclear facilities. In Part I, "Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants", the design of nuclear power plants to withstand earthquakes and tsunamis is explained, focusing on buildings, equipment's, and civil engineering structures. In Part II, "Basics of Earthquake Engineering", fundamental knowledge of earthquakes and tsunamis as well as the dynamic response of structures and foundation ground...

  4. Nuclear power in our societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardeau, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Hiroshima, Chernobyl, Fukushima Daiichi are the well known sad milestones on the path toward a broad development of nuclear energy. They are so well known that they have blurred certainly for long in a very unfair way the positive image of nuclear energy in the public eye. The impact of the media appetite for disasters favours the fear and puts aside all the achievements of nuclear sciences like nuclear medicine for instance and all the assets of nuclear power like the quasi absence of greenhouse gas emission or its massive capacity to produce electricity or heat. The unique solution to enhance nuclear acceptance is the reduction of the fear through a better understanding of nuclear sciences by the public. (A.C.)

  5. Relativistic models of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, V.; Kim, E.J.; Cauvin, M.; Kohmura, T.; Ohnaka, S.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction of the relativistic field formalism for the description of nuclear structure has improved our understanding of fundamental nuclear mechanisms such as saturation or many body forces. We discuss some of these progresses, both in the semi-classical mean field approximation and in a quantized meson field approach. (author)

  6. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, T.

    1981-09-01

    A short survey is given on nuclear radiation detectors and nuclear electronics. It is written for newcomers and those, who are not very familiar with this technique. Some additional information is given on typical failures in nuclear measurement systems. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  8. Nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports of alleged terrorist plans to build a 'dirty bomb' have heightened longstanding concerns about nuclear terrorism. This briefing outlines possible forms of attack, such as: detonation of a nuclear weapon; attacks involving radioactive materials; attacks on nuclear facilities. Legislation addressing these risks and the UK's strategy for coping with them are also considered

  9. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  10. Spatial econometrics using microdata

    CERN Document Server

    Dubé, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to spatial analyses concerning disaggregated (or micro) spatial data.Particular emphasis is put on spatial data compilation and the structuring of the connections between the observations. Descriptive analysis methods of spatial data are presented in order to identify and measure the spatial, global and local dependency.The authors then focus on autoregressive spatial models, to control the problem of spatial dependency between the residues of a basic linear statistical model, thereby contravening one of the basic hypotheses of the ordinary least squares appr

  11. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  12. Dynamics of nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book looks beyond policy disputes to make a systematic examination of the assumptions and contending hypotheses that constitute contemporary thinking on nuclear proliferation. Rather than determine who is right or wrong, the intent is to develop a better picture by using the various schools of thought as analytic windows. A better understanding of how the process operates should offer better guidance for predicting future nuclear proliferation and, ultimately, for controlling it. Separate chapters deal with the contending views, the technological and motivational bases of nuclear proliferation, the presence of a technological imperative, testing the motivational hypothesis, the dynamics of the process, and forecasting. Four appendices present historical decisions, the technical model, cost-estimating procedures, and procedures for estimating nuclear propensities. 288 references, 17 figures, 26 tables

  13. Nuclear power. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Lay language brings an understanding of nuclear technology and nuclear politics to the non-specialist reader. The author notes that there has been little change in the technology during the four decades of the nuclear age, but mankind has still to learn how to live with it. Part One explains how reactors work, identifies different reactor types, and describes the fuel cycle. Part two follows research developments during the pre-Manhatten Project days, the war effort, and the decision to pursue commercial nuclear power. He traces the development of policies to secure fission materials and international efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons grade material and the safe handling of radioactive wastes on a global as well as national scale. There are four appendices, including an annotated reference to other publications. 9 figures.

  14. Biotic, temporal and spatial variability of tritium concentrations in transpirate samples collected in the vicinity of a near-surface low-level nuclear waste disposal site and nearby research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, J R; Hughes, C E; Harrison, J J; Hankin, S; Crawford, J; Johansen, M; Dyer, L

    2011-06-01

    The results of a 21 month sampling program measuring tritium in tree transpirate with respect to local sources are reported. The aim was to assess the potential of tree transpirate to indicate the presence of sub-surface seepage plumes. Transpirate gathered from trees near low-level nuclear waste disposal trenches contained activity concentrations of (3)H that were significantly higher (up to ∼700 Bq L(-1)) than local background levels (0-10 Bq L(-1)). The effects of the waste source declined rapidly with distance to be at background levels within 10s of metres. A research reactor 1.6 km south of the site contributed significant (p nuclear waste site. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. High energy nuclear collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some basic concepts of relativistic heavy-ion physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

  17. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  18. Understanding Geo-spatial Information on Social Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis carried out two major investigations on how the geographical information generated by users in social media can be used to model and predict human behaviours. The first investigation regards the mobility patterns of social media users, which utilizes the relations between geographical

  19. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  20. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadeniz, O.; Guenalp, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the methodology of nuclear forensics and illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensics is relatively new scientific branch whose aim it is to read out material inherent from nuclear material. Nuclear forensics investigations have to be considered as part of a comprehensive set of measures for detection,interception, categorization and characterization of illicitly trafficking nuclear material. Prevention, detection and response are the main elements in combating illicit trafficking. Forensics is a key element in the response process. Forensic science is defined as the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. Besides, in this study we will explain age determination of nuclear materials.

  1. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  2. Understanding Lustre Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feiyi [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [ORNL; Wang, Di [ORNL; Huang, He [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    Lustre was initiated and funded, almost a decade ago, by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) Office of Science and National Nuclear Security Administration laboratories to address the need for an open source, highly-scalable, high-performance parallel filesystem on by then present and future supercomputing platforms. Throughout the last decade, it was deployed over numerous medium-to-large-scale supercomputing platforms and clusters, and it performed and met the expectations of the Lustre user community. As it stands at the time of writing this document, according to the Top500 list, 15 of the top 30 supercomputers in the world use Lustre filesystem. This report aims to present a streamlined overview on how Lustre works internally at reasonable details including relevant data structures, APIs, protocols and algorithms involved for Lustre version 1.6 source code base. More importantly, it tries to explain how various components interconnect with each other and function as a system. Portions of this report are based on discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lustre Center of Excellence team members and portions of it are based on our own understanding of how the code works. We, as the authors team bare all responsibilities for all errors and omissions in this document. We can only hope it helps current and future Lustre users and Lustre code developers as much as it helped us understanding the Lustre source code and its internal workings.

  3. Integrative Structure Determination of Protein Assemblies by Satisfaction of Spatial Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Frank; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej

    To understand the cell, we need to determine the structures of macromolecular assemblies, many of which consist of tens to hundreds of components. A great variety of experimental data can be used to characterize the assemblies at several levels of resolution, from atomic structures to component configurations. To maximize completeness, resolution, accuracy, precision and efficiency of the structure determination, a computational approach is needed that can use spatial information from a variety of experimental methods. We propose such an approach, defined by its three main components: a hierarchical representation of the assembly, a scoring function consisting of spatial restraints derived from experimental data, and an optimization method that generates structures consistent with the data. We illustrate the approach by determining the configuration of the 456 proteins in the nuclear pore complex from Baker's yeast.

  4. Nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations

  5. Spatial analysis of NDVI readings with difference sampling density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advanced remote sensing technologies provide research an innovative way of collecting spatial data for use in precision agriculture. Sensor information and spatial analysis together allow for a complete understanding of the spatial complexity of a field and its crop. The objective of the study was...

  6. Language and Spatial Reorientation: Evidence from Severe Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Judith; Blades, Mark; Siegal, Michael; Varley, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    Investigating spatial cognition in individuals with acquired language impairments can inform our understanding of how components of language are involved in spatial representation. Using the reorientation paradigm of Hermer-Vazquez, Spelke, and Katsnelson (1999), we examined spatial cue integration (landmark-geometry conjunctions) in individuals…

  7. Fostering Spatial Skill Acquisition by General Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Deborah; Tyson, Julian; Nieswandt, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The study of chemistry requires the understanding and use of spatial relationships, which can be challenging for many students. Prior research has shown that there is a need to develop students' spatial reasoning skills. To that end, this study implemented guided activities designed to strengthen students' spatial skills, with the aim of improving…

  8. The Ability of Young Korean Children to Use Spatial Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsung; Bednarz, Robert; Kim, Jaeyil

    2012-01-01

    The National Research Council emphasizes using tools of representation as an essential element of spatial thinking. However, it is debatable at what age the use of spatial representation for spatial thinking skills should begin. This study investigated whether young Korean children possess the potential to understand map-like representation using…

  9. Visuo-Spatial Ability in Colonoscopy Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Buzink, Sonja N.; Verwey, Willem B.; Jakimowicz, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using "Visualization" tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To remedy this situation, the current study…

  10. Visuo-spatial ability in colonoscopy simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Verwey, W.B.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using Visualization tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To

  11. Spatial patterns of recreational impact on experimental campsites

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Christopher A. Monz

    2004-01-01

    Management of camping impacts in protected areas worldwide is limited by inadequate understanding of spatial patterns of impact and attention to spatial management strategies. Spatial patterns of campsite impact were studied in two subalpine plant communities in the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, USA (a forest and a meadow). Response to chronic disturbance and recovery...

  12. Sensitizing Concepts for Socio-Spatial Literacy in HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Peter Gall; Petersen, Marianne Graves; O'Hara, Kenton

    2017-01-01

    People inherently share spaces with other people. Congenitally, interactive technologies and ubiquitous environments shape our opportunities for enacting social relations. Proxemics and Spatial Sharing have been suggested as foundations for our understanding of the socio-spatial aspects of comput...... in a design process. The proposed sensitizing concepts and the theoretical work of the paper contribute to enhanced Socio-spatial literacy in HCI....

  13. Nuclear renaissance and nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy would grow in response to climate change and the need for a stable energy supply even in an unstable global non-proliferation regime. Some emerging countries probably will try to acquire nuclear fuel cycle as a part of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. How to avoid the risk of proliferation of sensitive technologies is a crucial challenge for the international community. This paper describes the direction to peaceful use of nuclear technology, particularly nuclear fuel cycle, with appropriate non-proliferation measures. (author)

  14. The Spatial Thinking Workbook: A Research-Validated Spatial Skills Curriculum for Geology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, Carol J.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Tikoff, Basil; Dutrow, Barbara; Goodwin, Laurel B.; Hickson, Thomas; Atit, Kinnari; Gagnier, Kristin; Resnick, Ilyse

    2017-01-01

    Spatial visualization is an essential prerequisite for understanding geological features at all scales, such as the atomic structures of minerals, the geometry of a complex fault system, or the architecture of sedimentary deposits. Undergraduate geoscience majors bring a range of spatial skill levels to upper-level courses. Fortunately, spatial…

  15. Nuclear medicine in developing nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nofal, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Agency activities in nuclear medicine are directed towards effectively applying techniques to the diagnosis and management of patients attending nuclear medicine units in about 60 developing countries. A corollary purpose is to use these techniques in investigations related to control of parasitic diseases distinctive to some of these countries. Through such efforts, the aim is to improve health standards through better diagnosis, and to achieve a better understanding of disease processes as well as their prevention and management. Among general trends observed for the region: Clinical nuclear medicine; Radiopharmaceuticals; Monoclonal antibodies; Radioimmunoassay (RIA); Nuclear imaging

  16. Avian spatial responses to forest spatial heterogeneity at the landscape level: conceptual and statistical challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortin, M.J.; Melles, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    An explicit consideration of spatial structure in ecological studies plays an increasingly important role in attempts to better understand and manage ecological processes, such as deforestation, forest homogenization, and escalating landscape heterogeneity. The goal of this chapter is to quantify

  17. Spatial Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Mamoulis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Spatial database management deals with the storage, indexing, and querying of data with spatial features, such as location and geometric extent. Many applications require the efficient management of spatial data, including Geographic Information Systems, Computer Aided Design, and Location Based Services. The goal of this book is to provide the reader with an overview of spatial data management technology, with an emphasis on indexing and search techniques. It first introduces spatial data models and queries and discusses the main issues of extending a database system to support spatial data.

  18. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  19. Nuclear chemistry research for the safe disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanghaenel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is of key importance for the future sustainable development of nuclear energy. Concepts foresee the isolation of the nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste is dominated by plutonium and the minor actinides. Hence it is essential for the performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal to understand the chemical behaviour of actinides in a repository system. The aqueous chemistry and thermodynamics of actinides is rather complex in particular due to their very rich redox chemistry. Recent results of our detailed study of the Plutonium and Neptunium redox - and complexation behaviour are presented and discussed. (author)

  20. Nuclear power. Volume 2. Nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) review of nuclear power plants; (2) licensing procedures; (3) safety analysis; (4) project professional services; (5) quality assurance and project organization; (6) construction, scheduling, and operation; (7) nuclear fuel handling and fuel management; (8) plant cost management; and (9) conclusion

  1. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  4. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book is a simple and direct introduction to the tools of modern nuclear physics, both experimental and mathematical. Emphasizes physical intuition and illuminating analogies, rather than formal mathematics. Topics covered include particle accelerators, radioactive series, types of nuclear reactions, detection of the neutrino, nuclear isomerism, binding energy of nuclei, fission chain reactions, and predictions of the shell model. Each chapter contains problems and illustrative examples. Pre-requisites are calculus and elementary vector analysis

  5. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document brings together a series of articles illustrating the way nuclear safety is conceived organised and applied in France. It also deals with foreign experts contributions related to the safety of future nuclear power plants and the impact of probabilistic studies. The opinion of a french Deputy, pleading for nuclear transparency, is sustained by the final conclusions analysing the lessons learned from the past and the current priorities [fr

  6. Putting nuclear in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekengren, Lars

    2002-01-01

    The film is made to create an open platform for discussion around energy and nuclear in specific. By bringing up many difficult issues in the film you broaden the perspective. The advantages and disadvantages of energy production is shown for the main energy sources and nuclear is more likely to be dealt with as any other industry activity with its benefits to society. When you have nuclear in a large picture the discussion or your point will be favoured by the more complete message. The industry is good at discussing nuclear from a defence perspective. We have more than 20 years of practice. It has been essential for us and the public to understand the negative effects from nuclear but the debate has been unbalanced for many years. There is a risk that we be routine start defending our self with out being asked to do so. The film is a tool to avoid us getting stuck in the old trenches. Many young people who don't have any experience from TMI and Chernobyl are not particularly interested in hearing us defend it. We are now an institutionalised part of the society with again, its advantages and disadvantages. If you are 15 years old you were not born by the time of Chernobyl. For young people in special it is essential to be open and inform. Not pushing ideas. If we like to be a part of the solution we must focus on how to use nuclear as a good part of the solution. (author)

  7. Masters in Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickwood, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Continuing global efforts to improve the security of nuclear and other radioactive material against the threat of malicious acts are being assisted by a new initiative, the development of a corps of professional experts to strengthen nuclear security. The IAEA, the European Commission, universities, research institutions and other bodies working in collaboration have established an International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN). In 2011, six European academic institutions, the Vienna University of Technology, the Brandenburg University of Applied Sciences, the Demokritos National Centre for Scientific Research in Greece, the Reactor Institute Delft of the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, the University of Oslo, and the University of Manchester Dalton Nuclear Institute, started developing a European Master of Science Programme in Nuclear Security Management. In March 2013, the masters project was inaugurated when ten students commenced studies at the Brandenburg University of Applied Sciences in Germany for two weeks. In April, they moved to the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands for a further two weeks of studies. The pilot programme consists of six teaching sessions in different academic institutions. At the inauguration in Delft, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano commended this effort to train a new generation of experts who can help to improve global nuclear security. ''It is clear that we will need a new generation of policy-makers and nuclear professionals - people like you - who will have a proper understanding of the importance of nuclear security,'' Mr. Amano told students and faculty members. ''The IAEA's goal is to support the development of such programmes on a global basis,'' said David Lambert, Senior Training Officer in the IAEA's Office of Nuclear Security. ''An existing postgraduate degree programme focused on nuclear security at Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS) is currently supported by

  8. Particle and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Faessler, Amand

    1971-01-01

    Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, Volume 26 covers the significant advances in understanding the fundamentals of particle and nuclear physics. This volume is divided into four chapters, and begins with a brief overview of the various possible ideas beyond the standard model, the problem they address and their experimental tests. The next chapter deals with the basic physics of neutrino mass based on from a gauge theoretic point of view. This chapter considers the various extensions of the standard electroweak theory, along with their implications for neutrino physics. The discussio

  9. Nuclear safety in perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, K.; Sjöberg, B.M.D.; Lauridsen, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the NKS/SOS-1 project has been to enhance common understanding about requirements for nuclear safety by finding improved means of communicat-ing on the subject in society. The project, which has been built around a number of seminars, wassupported by limited research in three sub......-projects: Risk assessment Safety analysis Strategies for safety management The report describes an industry in change due to societal factors. The concepts of risk and safety, safety management and systems forregulatory oversight are de-scribed in the nuclear area and also, to widen the perspective, for other...

  10. Nuclear Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferguson, Joseph; Tarleton, Gael

    2004-01-01

    .... This event was an opportunity for policy makers, security analysts, nuclear scientists and engineers, regional experts, and military planners to share perspectives and identify those issues requiring...

  11. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  12. Theoretical nuclear and subnuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walecka, John Dirk

    1995-01-01

    This comprehensive text expertly details the numerous theoretical techniques central to the discipline of nuclear physics. It is based on lecture notes from a three-lecture series given at CEBAF (the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility), where John Dirk Walecka at the time was Scientific Director: "Graduate Quantum Mechanics", "Advanced Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory" and "Special Topics in Nuclear Physics". The primary goal of this text is pedagogical; providing a clear, logical, in-depth, and unifying treatment of many diverse aspects of modern nuclear theory ranging from the non-relativistic many-body problem to the standard model of the strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions. Four key topics are emphasised in this text: basic nuclear structure, the relativistic nuclear many-body problem, strong-coupling QCD, and electroweak interactions with nuclei. The text is designed to provide graduate students with a basic level of understanding of modern nuclear physics so that they in turn can...

  13. Medical aspects of nuclear armament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janse, M.J.; Schene, A.; Koch, K.

    1983-01-01

    The authors highlight a few medical, biological and psycological aspects of the use of nuclear weapons, drawing attention to their viewpoint that doctors should actively participate in the fight against nuclear armament. The short and long-term radiation effects on man and ecology are presented based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences. The danger of human error within this framework is emphasised and it is suggested that it is the medical profession's duty to point out how the effect of stress and boredom can lead to a nuclear catastrophe. Medical expertise may also help in the identification of unstable personalities among those who have access to nuclear weapons and in the understanding of the psycology of international conflicts and the psychopathology of those leaders who would use nuclear war as an instrument of national policy. Finally the effects of the nuclear war threat on children and teenagers are considered. (C.F.)

  14. Nuclear proliferation and safeguards. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This comprehensive analysis of the technological, economic, and political factors affecting the potential spread of nuclear weapons proved useful in the congressional debate which culminated in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978. The report was subsequently published commercially and has been a frequently cited reference in the literature on proliferation and nuclear power. Despite developments since 1977, the information in the OTA report is still useful to those wishing to obtain an indepth understanding of the issues. Included is an analysis of why a nation might want nuclear weapons development program and the various sources of nuclear material are discussed. The control of proliferation is considered as well as its relation to the nuclear industry

  15. Medical aspects of nuclear armament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janse, M.J.; Schene, A.; Koch, K.

    1983-06-18

    The authors highlight a few medical, biological and psycological aspects of the use of nuclear weapons, drawing attention to their viewpoint that doctors should actively participate in the fight against nuclear armament. The short and long-term radiation effects on man and ecology are presented based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences. The danger of human error within this framework is emphasised and it is suggested that it is the medical profession's duty to point out how the effect of stress and boredom can lead to a nuclear catastrophe. Medical expertise may also help in the identification of unstable personalities among those who have access to nuclear weapons and in the understanding of the psycology of international conflicts and the psychopathology of those leaders who would use nuclear war as an instrument of national policy. Finally the effects of the nuclear war threat on children and teenagers are considered.

  16. Spatial Deixis in Chiwere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jill D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines spatial deixis in Chiwere (Siouan) in the framework of two theories of deixis. Denny (1978) attempts to define a set of distinctive features for spatial deixis, while Rauh (1983) uses spatial deixis as a template for organizing all deictic dimensions. Chiwere data suggest language and dimension specific expansion of both…

  17. Spatial Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhengling

    2016-01-01

    Spatial language constitutes part of the basic fabric of language. Although languages may have the same number of terms to cover a set of spatial relations, they do not always do so in the same way. Spatial languages differ across languages quite radically, thus providing a real semantic challenge for second language learners. The essay first…

  18. The use of natural and archaeological analogues for understanding the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses; L'utilisation des analogues naturels et archeologiques pour la comprehension de l'evolution a long terme des verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libourel, G.; Verney-Carron, A.; Morlok, A. [CNRS UPR2300, centre de recherches petrographiques et geochimiques (CRPG), Nancy-universite, 15, rue Notre-Dame-des-Pauvres, BP 20, 54501 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Libourel, G. [INPL, Ecole nationale superieure de geologie (ENSG), Nancy-universite, rue du Doyen-Marcel-Roubault, BP 20, 54501 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Gin, St. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/SECM/LCLT, 30 (France); Sterpenich, J. [G2R, CNRS-UMR 7566, Nancy-universite, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); Michelin, A.; Neff, D.; Dillmann, Ph. [Laboratoire archeomateriaux et prevision de l' alteration LAPA/SIS2 M, CEA and CNRS, Bat 637, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Michelin, A.; Dillmann, Ph. [LMC IRAMAT UMR5060 CNRS (France)

    2011-02-15

    The knowledge of the long-term behavior of nuclear waste in anticipation of ultimate disposal in a deep geological formation is of prime importance in a waste management strategy. If phenomenological models have been developed to predict the long-term behavior of these materials, validating these models remains a challenge, when considering the time scale of radioactive decay of radionuclides of environmental concern, typically 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yrs. Here we show how natural or archaeological analogues provide critical constraints not only on the phenomenology of glass alteration and the mechanisms involved, but also on the ability of experimental short-term data to predict long-term alteration in complex environments. (authors)

  19. Understanding the Risk of Chloride Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Interim Storage Containers for the Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Evolution of Brine Chemistry on the Container Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Although the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking is well known, uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that exist on the surface of the storage containers. While a diversity of salts is present in atmospheric aerosols, many of these are not stable when placed onto a heated surface. Given that the surface temperature of any container storing spent nuclear fuel will be well above ambient, it is likely that salts deposited on its surface may decompose or degas. To characterize this effect, relevant single and multi-salt mixtures are being evaluated as a function of temperature and relative humidity to establish the rates of degassing, as well as the likely final salt and brine chemistries that will remain on the canister surface.

  20. Understanding the Risk of Chloride Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Interim Storage Containers for the Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Evolution of Brine Chemistry on the Container Surface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-10-01

    Although the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking is well known, uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that exist on the surface of the storage containers. While a diversity of salts is present in atmospheric aerosols, many of these are not stable when placed onto a heated surface. Given that the surface temperature of any container storing spent nuclear fuel will be well above ambient, it is likely that salts deposited on its surface may decompose or degas. To characterize this effect, relevant single and multi-salt mixtures are being evaluated as a function of temperature and relative humidity to establish the rates of degassing, as well as the likely final salt and brine chemistries that will remain on the canister surface.

  1. Development of a Spatially-Resolved Microwave Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Paul; Cooper, Marcia

    2015-06-01

    The development of a spatially-resolved microwave interferometer (SRMI) for non-invasively measuring the internal transit of a shock, detonation, or reaction front in energetic media is presented. Utilizing the transparency of many energetic materials in the RF regime, current microwave interferometers provide continuum-level tracking of the dielectric discontinuity that occurs across a shock or reaction front. While this continuum-level response can provide bulk shock and detonation velocities, it is insufficient to understand the complex wave and material interactions present in heterogeneous energetic materials. Leveraging interferometry and terahertz spectroscopy techniques, a heterodyne, spatially-resolved microwave interferometer was designed. A theoretical description of its operation and potential impact to current energetic materials research is discussed. Preliminary experimental results, including electro-optic sensing of a Doppler shifted microwave beam, are presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-0308A.

  2. The Romanian nuclear regulatory body as a nuclear communicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluculescu, Cristina

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive nuclear law environment could be a relevant tool to promote greater confidence in the nuclear energy. Romania has had laws in place governing the regulation of nuclear activities since 1974, which remained in force throughout and subsequent to the national constitutional changes. Up to December 1996, the CNCAN activities were based on Law No. 61/1974 for the development of the nuclear activities in Romania and Law No. 61982 on the quality assurance of the nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Safety legislation has been enacted in November 1974 (Law No. 61/1974) and it followed as closely as possible (for that time) the US Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended subsequently. The Romanian nuclear regulatory body, called National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) is a governmental organization responsible for the development of the regulatory framework, the control of its implementation and for the licensing of nuclear facilities. An important issue of CNCAN is to provide the correct and reasoning information to the public. The most important topics focused on nuclear activities for the interest of mass media in Romania are: Radioactive waste management; The cost and benefit of nuclear energy compared by conventional energy; The conditions for transportation of radioactive materials; The consequences of a suppositional nuclear accidents; The safety in operation for nuclear installations. The information provided to press and public by regulatory body is clearly and well structured. The target is to clearly explain to mass media and the public should understand very well the difference between the meaning of a nuclear accident, nuclear incident or nuclear event. CNCAN monitories and surveys the operation in safe conditions the nuclear facilities and plants, the protection against nuclear radiation of the professionally exposed personnel, of the population, of the environment and the material goods. It is also

  3. Nuclear Medicine week in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    During the week of 6-12 October 2003 the IAEA organized a Research Coordination Meeting on 'Relationship between lower Respiratory Tract Infection, Gastroesophageal reflux and bronchial Asthma in children' at Hospital San Ignacio in Bogota. Besides there were four workshops in Bogota; workshops on Bone infection and Bone scan in Pediatric ortopaedics at Hospital Militar and Fundacion CardioInfantil, a workshop for Nuclear Medicine Technologists and a workshop on Sentinel Lymph Node mapping and Surgical Gamma Probe Application at Institute of Oncology. A nuclear cardiology workshop was organized in Medellin, and finally crowning them all was the 9th Congress of the Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine at Cali from 10-12 October, 2003; probably the largest and best Colombian nuclear medicine congress every held in the country. A workshop was also organized in Cali for nuclear medicine technologists in conjunction with the Annual Convention. It was a mix of IAEA's Technical Cooperation and Regular Budget activities along with the activities of Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine, bringing in absolute synergy to galvanize the entire nuclear medicine community of the country. The week saw nuclear medicine scientists from more than 20 IAEA Member States converging on Colombia to spread the message of nuclear medicine, share knowledge and to foster International understanding and friendship among the nuclear medicine people of the world

  4. Nuclear innovation in Saskatchewan: innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, N. [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes nuclear innovation in Saskatchewan. The first stage is the Canadian Institute for Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) and how you have a successful discussion about a technically complex issue, understand what information people need in order to have an informed discussion, understand how to convey that information to those people in a constructive way.

  5. Nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraca, J.M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of the results obtained in experiments of measurement of lifetimes for a detailed knowledge of nuclear structure is referred. Direct methods of measurement of nuclear lifetimes are described, namely, electronic methods, recoil-distance method, doppler shift atenuation method and blocking-method. A brief reference is made to indirect methods for measurement of life-times

  6. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  7. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The achievements in commercial nuclear power plants over the past 30 years since the first one was commissioned in 1954 are described. By 1982 there were 297 commercial nuclear units in operation world-wide with a capacity of 173GWe and a further 216 units (205GWe) were under construction. The number and performance of the different types of reactors is examined and the experience in different countries is considered. In particular, nuclear power in France and the USA are compared. Uranium production and demand and the attitude to fuel reprocessing in different countries is considered. It is concluded that with increasing demands for energy, nuclear power must be developed to the full. If the conditions are right it can be the most economically advantageous method of energy production. However public acceptance of nuclear power must be sought as this influences the political will for a nuclear power programme. Winning the public's trust and confidence is thus an important part of the nuclear industry's job. The future place of nuclear power in the developing countries is also an issue which must be tackled. (U.K.)

  8. Nuclear violence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid in the past decade or so to the characteristics of terrorists and their apparent goals and objectives, capabilities, and evolving strategy and tactics with respect to nuclear terrorism. In contrast, little has been said about the procedural aspects of nuclear terrorism, and even less about the way in which such endeavors can fail. This latter omission is important because it bears directly on the ability to evaluate credibly the potential for nuclear terrorism. Here, the author addresses the requirements inherent in acquiring a nuclear explosive capability by three routes: separation of plutonium from irradiated light or heavy water reactor (LWR or HWR) fuel, processing, or use of separated fissile material, and theft of a nuclear weapon. In addition, he deals with other potential acts of nuclear terrorism: sabotage of power reactors, uranium enrichment facilities and spent nuclear fuel in transport, and dispersal of radioactive materials, in particular, plutonium. He specifically does not look at the design or production of a nuclear weapon. Finally, the discussion here assumes that the terrorist is subnational; that is, a nation is not involved. Also, the discussion of subnational participation does not address the possibility of collusion with insiders

  9. Nuclear pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramade, Francois

    1979-01-01

    In this chapter devoted to nuclear pollution the following topics were studied: fundamentals of radiobiology (ecological importance of the various radioisotopes, biological effects of ionizing radiations); ecological effects of radioactive fallout (contamination of atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, oceans). The electronuclear industry and its environmental impact. PWR type reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, contamination of trophic chains by radionuclides released in the environment from nuclear installations [fr

  10. Nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 2 of the document contains some details about the existing Brazilian nuclear installations. Also, safety improvements at Angra 1 and aspects of Angra 2 and 3 are reported

  11. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  12. Nuclear facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: the case for using nuclear energy (Britain's energy needs; energy policy); safety; transport of spent fuel; radiation (natural radioactivity); environment (land use of nuclear power plants; storage and disposal of radioactive wastes). (U.K.)

  13. The Neoliberalisation of Strategic Spatial Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    Despite the fact that strategic spatial planning practices recently have taken ‘a neoliberal turn’ in many European countries, ‘neoliberalism’ and ‘neoliberalisation’ are rarely used as analytical concepts in planning theory. This paper seeks to fill in part of this gap by examining...... the relationship between neoliberalism and strategic spatial planning. This is done through an analysis how the key theoretical ideas underpinning strategic spatial planning might be appropriated by neoliberal political agendas in planning practice. In conclusion, the paper argues that neoliberalism...... and neoliberalisation are helpful analytical concepts to examine and understand contemporary transformations of spatial planning discourses and practices, and that planning theory by adopting such analytical concepts can play an important role in assisting critical empirical studies of how spatial planning practices...

  14. Nuclear astrophysics away from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Howard, W.M.; Takahashi, K.; Ward, R.A.

    1985-08-01

    Explosive astrophysical environments invariably lead to the production of nuclei away from stability. An understanding of the dynamics and nucleosynthesis in such environments is inextricably coupled to an understanding of the properties of the synthesized nuclei. In this talk a review is presented of the basic explosive nucleosynthesis mechanisms (s-process, r-process, n-process, p-process, and rp-process). Specific stellar model calculations are discussed and a summary of the pertinent nuclear data is presented. Possible experiments and nuclear-model calculations are suggested that could facilitate a better understanding of the astrophysical scenarios. 39 refs., 4 figs

  15. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e + e - problem and heavy ion dynamics

  16. Protoparvovirus Knocking at the Nuclear Door.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntylä, Elina; Kann, Michael; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2017-10-02

    Protoparvoviruses target the nucleus due to their dependence on the cellular reproduction machinery during the replication and expression of their single-stranded DNA genome. In recent years, our understanding of the multistep process of the capsid nuclear import has improved, and led to the discovery of unique viral nuclear entry strategies. Preceded by endosomal transport, endosomal escape and microtubule-mediated movement to the vicinity of the nuclear envelope, the protoparvoviruses interact with the nuclear pore complexes. The capsids are transported actively across the nuclear pore complexes using nuclear import receptors. The nuclear import is sometimes accompanied by structural changes in the nuclear envelope, and is completed by intranuclear disassembly of capsids and chromatinization of the viral genome. This review discusses the nuclear import strategies of protoparvoviruses and describes its dynamics comprising active and passive movement, and directed and diffusive motion of capsids in the molecularly crowded environment of the cell.

  17. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  18. Nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, S.

    1978-01-01

    The terms and reactions to President Carter's nuclear policy, culminating in the 1978 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, are reviewed and analyzed. The new law increases restrictions on nuclear exports, encourages continued use of light water reactors in preference to plutonium-fueled reactors, and emphasizes technical solutions to proliferation problems. Critics of the law point out that it will hurt U.S. trade unfairly, that other countries do not have as many fuel options as the U.S. has, and that nuclear sales have as many political and economic as technical solutions. Compromise areas include new international safety guidelines, the possibility of an international nuclear fuel bank, and a willingness to consider each case on its merits. 21 references

  19. Nuclear haematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masjhur, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have been applied to study diagnose and treat various haematological disorders for more than five decades. Two scientists are regarded as pioneers in this field, i.e. John Lawrence who in 1938 used 32 P to treat chronic myeloid leukaemia and George Hevessy who used 32 P labelled erythrocytes to measure blood volume in 1939. At present, many nuclear medicine procedures are available for diagnosis and therapy of a variety of haematological disorders. Although nuclear techniques are somewhat complex, they give direct and quantitative assessment of the kinetics of blood elements as compared to other non-isotopic haematological tests. Basically, equipment required for nuclear haematology is very simple such as well scintillation counters to measure radioactivity in blood samples. More sophisticated equipment like rectilinear scanner or gamma camera is required when imaging is necessary. An overview of the basic principles and clinical applications of nuclear haematology is given

  20. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  1. Spatially-Heterodyned Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Clarence E [Knoxville, TN; Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN

    2006-02-21

    A method of recording a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram, including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis, includes: splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and an object beam; interacting the object beam with an object; focusing the reference beam and the object beam at a focal plane of a digital recorder to form a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; digital recording the spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram; Fourier transforming axes of the recorded spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a heterodyne carrier frequency defined by an angle between the reference beam and the object beam; cutting off signals around an origin; and performing an inverse Fourier transform.

  2. Biological protection against nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateescu, Silvia; Stanciu, Marcela

    2001-01-01

    This monograph is addressed to physicists, chemists, engineers, under-, graduated and enrolled towards PhD degree students, wishing to orient their activity towards research, design, education or production in nuclear power and nuclear technology field. Specifically, the work deals with the biological protection against nuclear radiations. The chapter 1 presents selectively the nuclear radiation types, the interaction of neutrons, gamma radiations and charged particles with matter. Particularly focused is the issue of biological effects of nuclear radiations and the implied permissible limits of irradiation. Chapter 2 describes one of the most intense sources of nuclear radiation, namely, the reactor core; reviewed are the reactor neutron spectra, as well as, the spectra of primary and secondary radiations. Chapter 3 deals with the activation process as a source of nuclear radiations; analyzed are the processes of activation of coolant, structural elements and soils, as well as the tritium production. Chapter 4 treats the nuclear fission process and formation of fission products, another major source of radiations. The principal features of fission products are mentioned such as: decay characteristics, fission yields, fission product activity, decay heat. Chapter 5 tackles the problem of influence of geometric form of the source upon radiation flux spatial distribution. In chapter 6 briefly are described the elements of neutron transport theory, diffusion equation, neutron slowing-down, age theory, i.e. all the knowledge implied in neutron attenuation calculation in shields. Chapter 7 deals with gamma radiation attenuation in shields, namely, spatial distribution of gamma-ray dose rates from point-like sources in an infinite medium, gamma radiation build-up factors, etc. In chapter 8 the phenomenon of heating of biological shields due to nuclear radiation is described. Calculation of heat rate generated by gamma and neutron radiation is sketched. Chapter 9 treats

  3. Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Becky P. Y.; Anderson, Tessa Kate

    outlines the key issues in identifying hazardous road locations (HRLs), considers current approaches used for reducing and preventing road traffic collisions, and outlines a strategy for improved road safety. The book covers spatial accuracy, validation, and other statistical issues, as well as link......Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions centers on the geographical nature of road crashes, and uses spatial methods to provide a greater understanding of the patterns and processes that cause them. Written by internationally known experts in the field of transport geography, the book...

  4. Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Becky P. Y.; Anderson, Tessa Kate

    Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions centers on the geographical nature of road crashes, and uses spatial methods to provide a greater understanding of the patterns and processes that cause them. Written by internationally known experts in the field of transport geography, the book...... outlines the key issues in identifying hazardous road locations (HRLs), considers current approaches used for reducing and preventing road traffic collisions, and outlines a strategy for improved road safety. The book covers spatial accuracy, validation, and other statistical issues, as well as link...

  5. Shape understanding system machine understanding and human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Les, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    This is the third book presenting selected results of research on the further development of the shape understanding system (SUS) carried out by authors in the newly founded Queen Jadwiga Research Institute of Understanding. In this book the new term Machine Understanding is introduced referring to a new area of research aiming to investigate the possibility of building machines with the ability to understand. It is presented that SUS needs to some extent mimic human understanding and for this reason machines are evaluated according to the rules applied for the evaluation of human understanding. The book shows how to formulate problems and how it can be tested if the machine is able to solve these problems.    

  6. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  7. The spatial dimensions of innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne

    2005-01-01

    by the common perceptions, and the institutional infrastructure prevailing in the (local)society. In Poland the latter is closely connected with the process of transition since 1990. The paper reports from a study among Polish manufacturing companies. It categorises the types of innovation prevailing......The paper discusseses the spatial dimensions of innovation in Polish manufacturing companies. The conceptual framework of the paper is an understanding of social networks as a potential resource of the company, whether they are internal or external. Whether the company benefits from the potential...... in the companies and detects the role of networks in the innovation process of the companies. To what extend do the companies draw on external networks, on what points of the innovation process are the networks involved, what kind of networks are involved, and not least, what are the spatial characteristics...

  8. Nuclear Bashing in Chernobyl Coverage: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    Critics of coverage of nuclear power have charged that the media overemphasize the importance of nuclear accidents, encourage public fear, and omit information vital to public understanding of nuclear power and risk. Some also feel there is an anti-nuclear bias among reporters and editors. A study was conducted to determine if such charges were…

  9. Nuclear war and nuclear peace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, G.; Moreton, E.; Freedman, L.; Baylis, J.

    1983-01-01

    This book is an in-depth examination of East-West tactical and strategic nuclear weapons policy. The contributors explore such issues as the history and implications of tactical weapons in Europe, the general conflicts that have characterized US and Soviet interaction, the development of British nuclear weapons policy, and arms control including SALT I and II and the START talks.

  10. Progress in Spatial Demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Matthews

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Demography is an inherently spatial science, yet the application of spatial data and methods to demographic research has tended to lag that of other disciplines. In recent years, there has been a surge in interest in adding a spatial perspective to demography. This sharp rise in interest has been driven in part by rapid advances in geospatial data, new technologies, and methods of analysis. OBJECTIVE We offer a brief introduction to four of the advanced spatial analytic methods: spatial econometrics, geographically weighted regression, multilevel modeling, and spatial pattern analysis. We look at both the methods used and the insights that can be gained by applying a spatial perspective to demographic processes and outcomes. To help illustrate these substantive insights, we introduce six papers that are included in a Special Collection on Spatial Demography. We close with some predictions for the future, as we anticipate that spatial thinking and the use of geospatial data, technology, and analytical methods will change how many demographers address important demographic research questions. CONCLUSIONS Many important demographic questions can be studied and framed using spatial approaches. This will become even more evident as changes in the volume, source, and form of available demographic data - much of it geocode - -further alter the data landscape, and ultimately the conceptual models and analytical methods used by demographers. This overview provides a brief introduction to a rapidly changing field.

  11. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Do we need nuclear energy. Is it safe. What are the risks. Will it lead to proliferation. The questions are endless, the answers often confused. In the vigorous debates that surround the siting and operation of nuclear power plants, it is all too easy to lose sight of the central issues amid the mass of arguments and counter-arguments put forward. And there remains the doubt, who do we believe. This book presents the facts, simply, straightforwardly, and comprehensibly. It describes the different types of nuclear reactor, how they work, how energy is produced and transformed into usable power, how nuclear waste is handled, what safeguards are built in to prevent accident, contamination and misuse. More important, it does this in the context of the real world, examining the benefits as well as the dangers of a nuclear power programme, quantifying the risks, and providing an authoritative account of the nuclear industry worldwide. Technically complex and politically controversial, the contribution of nuclear energy to our future energy requirements is a crucial topic of our time. (author)

  12. Nuclear inheritance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, Therese

    1997-01-01

    Since the end of the East-West confronting, the nuclear weapon issue has been focused in an international debate with obvious repercussions in Europe, because it is the European continent which indicated first the significance of nuclear deterrence. This debate refers first upon the past, as the German unification allowed capturing numerous documents of Warsaw treaty which revealed the intentions and the plans of Soviet Union during the cold war, and secondly concerns the future, since the role of nuclear weapons must be re-thought in a new context. This is the subject of this book, which refers also to the problem of the nuclear proliferation in the world and evolution of different countries in a political and regional context. The extension of the non-proliferation treaty for an undefined duration, in May 1995, is a incontestable victory because this treaty rules the renouncement to nuclear weapons of 185 countries. However, it does not solve most sensible problems like the Iraq case, for which a specific inspection regime has been instituted, or the case of Iran, which is suspected to acquire the bomb, although no clear evidence has been provided up to now. This is also the case of Israel, India and Pakistan which allege plainly their willingness of keeping open, from security reasons, their nuclear option. The content is displayed in five chapters: 1. Introduction; 2. The role of the nuclear weapons after the cold war; 3. The nuclear proliferation at crossroads; 4. Undefined extension of the NPT, a striking but fragile victory; 5. Conclusions. An appendix containing the text of the Nuclear Weapon Non-Proliferation Treaty and a chronology are added

  13. Integrated Dialogue System for Spatial Decision Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yumi; Fukui, Hiromichi; Kaneyasu, Iwao; Nagasaka, Toshinari; Usuda, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Ai; Kusafuka, Minako

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is a difficult challenge for all countries that uses nuclear energy. In Japan, an implementing agency for HLW was authorized in 2001, and now seeking for municipalities that voluntarily apply to be a preliminary investigation area for a final disposal site. Along with these policy progresses, the HLW disposal program has been gaining social attentions. This leads to high demand for a systematic process for evaluating the proposed policy and environmental impact of geological disposal so that policy decisions can adequately address technical, ethical, and social considerations. As a step toward this objective, we have developed a participatory decision support system on the web. Web-based communication is in its infancy but may be viable support tool to engage different people. Through the study, we aimed to examine the possibility of web-based dialogue system for spatial decision process. One conclusion from the web-based dialogue is that it is possible to create a working environment on the web within those who have different backgrounds and interests. From the results, we found many findings that should be taken into account for further development. One is the need to re-construct the data, model imagery and opinions to judge the problem objectively. We will reexamine the contents based on the international activities so that participants can understand what the information means in the context. Facilitation is key element on the web, also. He or she is expected to make the atmosphere where even those who don't have high-level knowledge can participate in and arouse their opinion from the faceless communication. In the point, the auto navigation comes in very useful

  14. Parcellating connectivity in spatial maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Baldassano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A common goal in biological sciences is to model a complex web of connections using a small number of interacting units. We present a general approach for dividing up elements in a spatial map based on their connectivity properties, allowing for the discovery of local regions underlying large-scale connectivity matrices. Our method is specifically designed to respect spatial layout and identify locally-connected clusters, corresponding to plausible coherent units such as strings of adjacent DNA base pairs, subregions of the brain, animal communities, or geographic ecosystems. Instead of using approximate greedy clustering, our nonparametric Bayesian model infers a precise parcellation using collapsed Gibbs sampling. We utilize an infinite clustering prior that intrinsically incorporates spatial constraints, allowing the model to search directly in the space of spatially-coherent parcellations. After showing results on synthetic datasets, we apply our method to both functional and structural connectivity data from the human brain. We find that our parcellation is substantially more effective than previous approaches at summarizing the brain’s connectivity structure using a small number of clusters, produces better generalization to individual subject data, and reveals functional parcels related to known retinotopic maps in visual cortex. Additionally, we demonstrate the generality of our method by applying the same model to human migration data within the United States. This analysis reveals that migration behavior is generally influenced by state borders, but also identifies regional communities which cut across state lines. Our parcellation approach has a wide range of potential applications in understanding the spatial structure of complex biological networks.

  15. Rotterdam Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    In 1965 Rotterdam Nuclear received an order for the design, supply of materials, manufacture, testing, inspection and preparation for shipment of one 450MW Boiling Water Reactor pressure vessel. This was one of the first orders for a reactor pressure vessel, ever obtained by a European Manufacturer. The Company has since supplied 19 reactor pressure vessels for nuclear power stations, having a total weight of about 10,000,000kg. The nuclear power stations in which these are installed represent an electrical output of about 15,000MW and they are located in seven different countries (USA, Spain, Switzerland, Argentina, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands). (Auth.)

  16. Nuclear questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, W.

    1977-01-01

    This brochure 'nuclear problems' deals with the attitude of the protestant church in the region around the northern Elbe towards further quantitative economic growth, esp. nuclear energy, with the following essays: preaching the Gospel in an environment in danger: the Christian occident and the problems of the third world, facing the problems of exhausted supplies, the role of the prophet, problem of environment - a problem of theology, the political dimension, against ATW, signal Brokdorf, strange effects (defense of the church from unqualified teachings by non-professionals), Christian liberty, church and nuclear energy, violence and robes. (HP) [de

  17. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero B, E.

    1989-01-01

    The rapid technical development of Colombia over the past years, resulted among others, a considerable increase in the number of measuring instrumentation and testing laboratories, scientific research and metrology centers, in industry, agriculture, public health, education on the nuclear field, etc. IAN is a well organized institution with qualified management, trained staff and reasonably equipped laboratories to carry out tasks as: Metrology, standardization, quality control and maintenance and repair of nuclear instruments. The government of Colombia has adopted a policy to establish and operate through the country maintenance and repair facilities for nuclear instrumentation. This policy is reflected in the organization of electronic laboratories in Bogota-IAN

  18. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  19. Nuclear electronics laboratory manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The Nuclear Electronics Laboratory Manual is a joint product of several electronics experts who have been associated with IAEA activity in this field for many years. The manual does not include experiments of a basic nature, such as characteristics of different active electronics components. It starts by introducing small electronics blocks, employing one or more active components. The most demanding exercises instruct a student in the design and construction of complete circuits, as used in commercial nuclear instruments. It is expected that a student who completes all the experiments in the manual should be in a position to design nuclear electronics units and also to understand the functions of advanced commercial instruments which need to be repaired or maintained. The future tasks of nuclear electronics engineers will be increasingly oriented towards designing and building the interfaces between a nuclear experiment and a computer. The manual pays tribute to this development by introducing a number of experiments which illustrate the principles and the technology of interfacing

  20. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  1. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  2. Nuclear data needs in nuclear astrophysics: Charged-particle reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    Progress in understanding a diverse range of astrophysical phenomena - such as the Big Bang, the Sun, the evolution of stars, and stellar explosions - can be significantly aided by improved compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of charged-particle nuclear reaction data. A summary of the charged-particle reaction data needs in these and other astrophysical scenarios is presented, along with recommended future nuclear data projects. (author)

  3. Hazard tolerance of spatially distributed complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Sarah; Wilkinson, Sean

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new methodology for quantifying the reliability of complex systems, using techniques from network graph theory. In recent years, network theory has been applied to many areas of research and has allowed us to gain insight into the behaviour of real systems that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to analyse, for example increasingly complex infrastructure systems. Although this work has made great advances in understanding complex systems, the vast majority of these studies only consider a systems topological reliability and largely ignore their spatial component. It has been shown that the omission of this spatial component can have potentially devastating consequences. In this paper, we propose a number of algorithms for generating a range of synthetic spatial networks with different topological and spatial characteristics and identify real-world networks that share the same characteristics. We assess the influence of nodal location and the spatial distribution of highly connected nodes on hazard tolerance by comparing our generic networks to benchmark networks. We discuss the relevance of these findings for real world networks and show that the combination of topological and spatial configurations renders many real world networks vulnerable to certain spatial hazards. - Highlights: • We develop a method for quantifying the reliability of real-world systems. • We assess the spatial resilience of synthetic spatially distributed networks. • We form algorithms to generate spatial scale-free and exponential networks. • We show how these “synthetic” networks are proxies for real world systems. • Conclude that many real world systems are vulnerable to spatially coherent hazard.

  4. Nuclear buildings and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomah, A.M.H

    2009-01-01

    The main proposal of this thesis based on some practical notes and the theoretical readings, the mathematical equations which led to existing a shared relationship between the nuclear institutions and the economical development with preserving the environment and its recourses which achieves the concept of the sustainable development. The thesis aims also at recognizing the most important characteristics of the nuclear institutions , as the study interests in understanding how the nuclear energy can be distinguished from the other energy resources. Furthermore, the study in its intellectual framework interests in comparing a number of the nuclear institutions that the study finds them related to the research topic and assists in achieving the study goals, which represent in the environmental evaluation of the nuclear institutions inside its biological surroundings. The study consists of four main chapters in addition to the introduction and the conclusion as follows: The first chapter: Recognizing the nuclear institutions and their effect on the environment. The second chapter: Recognizing planning and generalizing the nuclear institutions. The third chapter: Recognizing the limits and standards of the planning and the designing of a nuclear institution. The fourth chapter: The nuclear institutions inside the suburban places.

  5. Comparing Spatial Predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Hering, Amanda S.

    2011-11-01

    Under a general loss function, we develop a hypothesis test to determine whether a significant difference in the spatial predictions produced by two competing models exists on average across the entire spatial domain of interest. The null hypothesis is that of no difference, and a spatial loss differential is created based on the observed data, the two sets of predictions, and the loss function chosen by the researcher. The test assumes only isotropy and short-range spatial dependence of the loss differential but does allow it to be non-Gaussian, non-zero-mean, and spatially correlated. Constant and nonconstant spatial trends in the loss differential are treated in two separate cases. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate the size and power properties of this test, and an example based on daily average wind speeds in Oklahoma is used for illustration. Supplemental results are available online. © 2011 American Statistical Association and the American Society for Qualitys.

  6. Spatial agglomeration dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Danny Quah

    2002-01-01

    This paper develops a model of economic growth and activity locating endogenously on a 3- dimensional featureless global geography. The same economic forces influence simultaneously growth, convergence, and spatial agglomeration and clustering. Economic activity is not concentrated on discrete isolated points but instead a dynamically- fluctuating, smooth spatial distribution. Spatial inequality is a Cass-Koopmans saddlepath, and the global distribution of economic activity converges towards ...

  7. Rumlig kultur / Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the relationships between urbanity and aesthetics. The articles span five realms: sensory and conceptual architecture, urban spaces, aesthetic textualities, collective memory, and spatial consciousness, all of which contribute to establishing spatial culture as an important field of research within the humanities......Gill University, the substantial captions of more than 100 illustrations make SPATIAL CULTURE accessible to an international readership. All contributions contain abstracts in English....

  8. I. SPATIAL SKILLS, THEIR DEVELOPMENT, AND THEIR LINKS TO MATHEMATICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdine, Brian N; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Newcombe, Nora S

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the development of spatial skills is important for promoting school readiness and improving overall success in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields (e.g., Wai, Lubinski, Benbow, & Steiger, 2010). Children use their spatial skills to understand the world, including visualizing how objects fit together, and can practice them via spatial assembly activities (e.g., puzzles or blocks). These skills are incorporated into measures of overall intelligence and have been linked to success in subjects like mathematics (Mix & Cheng, 2012) and science (Pallrand & Seeber, 1984; Pribyl & Bodner, 1987). This monograph sought to answer four questions about early spatial skill development: 1) Can we reliably measure spatial skills in 3- and 4-year-olds?; 2) Do spatial skills measured at 3 predict spatial skills at age 5?; 3) Do preschool spatial skills predict mathematics skills at age 5?; and 4) What factors contribute to individual differences in preschool spatial skills (e.g., SES, gender, fine-motor skills, vocabulary, and executive function)? Longitudinal data generated from a new spatial skill test for 3-year-old children, called the TOSA (Test of Spatial Assembly), show that it is a reliable and valid measure of early spatial skills that provides strong prediction to spatial skills measured with established tests at age 5. New data using this measure finds links between early spatial skill and mathematics, language, and executive function skills. Analyses suggest that preschool spatial experiences may play a central role in children's mathematical skills around the time of school entry. Executive function skills provide an additional unique contribution to predicting mathematical performance. In addition, individual differences, specifically socioeconomic status, are related to spatial and mathematical skill. We conclude by exploring ways of providing rich early spatial experiences to children. © 2017 The Society for Research in Child

  9. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  11. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  12. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  13. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  14. Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Division is engaged in both teaching and research. Staff members teach both graduate and undergraduate courses at the UPR Mayaguez Campus and direct the thesis work of nuclear engineering students. They do research on their own projects and assist the staff of other PRNC divisions as the need arises. The scientists on the Division's staff all hold joint appointments at PRNC and UPR, and they make up the faculty of the UPR Nuclear Engineering Department, the Head of the PRNC Division being also the Chairman of the UPR Department. The Division provides the classrooms, offices, laboratories and equipment, and most of the administrative personnel required for the education and training of the graduate students at the UPR Nuclear Engineering Department

  15. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  16. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended in 1987, directed the Secretary of Energy to, among other things, investigate Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for permanently disposing of highly radioactive wastes in an underground repository. In April 1991, the authors testified on Yucca Mountain project expenditures before your Subcommittee. Because of the significance of the authors findings regrading DOE's program management and expenditures, you asked the authors to continue reviewing program expenditures in depth. As agreed with your office, the authors reviewed the expenditures of project funds made available to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which is the lead project contractor for developing a nuclear waste package that wold be used for disposing of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain. This report discusses the laboratory's use of nuclear waste funds to support independent research projects and to manage Yucca Mountain project activities. It also discusses the laboratory's project contracting practices

  17. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  18. Spatial capture-recapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Sollmann, Rahel; Gardner, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Capture-Recapture provides a revolutionary extension of traditional capture-recapture methods for studying animal populations using data from live trapping, camera trapping, DNA sampling, acoustic sampling, and related field methods. This book is a conceptual and methodological synthesis of spatial capture-recapture modeling. As a comprehensive how-to manual, this reference contains detailed examples of a wide range of relevant spatial capture-recapture models for inference about population size and spatial and temporal variation in demographic parameters. Practicing field biologists studying animal populations will find this book to be a useful resource, as will graduate students and professionals in ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries and wildlife management.

  19. Collective spatial keyword querying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    With the proliferation of geo-positioning and geo-tagging, spatial web objects that possess both a geographical location and a textual description are gaining in prevalence, and spatial keyword queries that exploit both location and textual description are gaining in prominence. However, the quer......With the proliferation of geo-positioning and geo-tagging, spatial web objects that possess both a geographical location and a textual description are gaining in prevalence, and spatial keyword queries that exploit both location and textual description are gaining in prominence. However...

  20. Spatial electric load forecasting

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, H Lee

    2002-01-01

    Spatial Electric Load Forecasting Consumer Demand for Power and ReliabilityCoincidence and Load BehaviorLoad Curve and End-Use ModelingWeather and Electric LoadWeather Design Criteria and Forecast NormalizationSpatial Load Growth BehaviorSpatial Forecast Accuracy and Error MeasuresTrending MethodsSimulation Method: Basic ConceptsA Detailed Look at the Simulation MethodBasics of Computerized SimulationAnalytical Building Blocks for Spatial SimulationAdvanced Elements of Computerized SimulationHybrid Trending-Simulation MethodsAdvanced

  1. Understanding collaborative partnerships between farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asai, Masayasu

    arrangements, either as family or neighbors, or through their local or professional networks. Social relationships are also shown to play an important role in shaping the functions of partnerships, expressed for example in the burden-sharing of manure transportation and spreading, frequency of communication......, duration of the partnership and transport distance. The most important aspects of farmers' perception of successful collaborative arrangements seem to be trust, continuity, flexibility and accessibility. These findings supplement the understanding of farmer collaboration based on spatial-economic models...

  2. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  3. Seguro Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.C.C. de.

    1978-04-01

    A description of the constitutive elements of insurance and its features in the field of law, and special legislation about the matter are given. The relationship between the liability of the nuclear power plant operator and the international conventions about civil liability on nuclear damage is discussed. Some considerations on damage reparing in the United States, Germany, France and Spain are presented. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  4. Nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    On 27 May 1986 the Norwegian government appointed an inter-ministerial committee of senior officials to prepare a report on experiences in connection with the Chernobyl accident. The present second part of the committee's report describes proposals for measures to prevent and deal with similar accidents in the future. The committee's evaluations and proposals are grouped into four main sections: Safety and risk at nuclear power plants; the Norwegian contingency organization for dealing with nuclear accidents; compensation issues; and international cooperation

  5. Nuclear hadrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variables for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon-nucleon and delta-nucleon interactions are reviewed, with emphasis on the type of experimental phenomena which signal the importance of the many-body dynamics. 28 references

  6. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, Paul; Blanc, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of radioisotopes in medical diagnostics are briefly reviewed. Each organ system is considered and the Nuclear medicine procedures pertinent to that system are discussed. This includes, the principle of the test, the detector and the radiopharmaceutical used, the procedure followed and the clinical results obtained. The various types of radiation detectors presently employed in Nuclear Medicine are surveyed, including scanners, gamma cameras, positron cameras and procedures for obtaining tomographic presentation of radionuclide distributions [fr

  7. Nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    All scientists and technologists are agreed that the coal based fuel cycle is somewhere between 50 to 300 times more dangerous than the uranium fuel cycle. Under these circumstances it is not difficult to show that on a more quantitative basis, the nuclear industry, in all countries, has an unblemished safety record when compared with other energy sources. Various hazards and benefits of nuclear power are analyzed in this paper comparing with other energy sources. (Liu)

  8. Nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, Jacky; Fabre, Rene.

    1981-01-01

    This article sums up the Research and Development effort at present being carried out in the five following fields of applications: Health physics and Radioprospection, Control of nuclear reactors, Plant control (preparation and reprocessing of the fuel, testing of nuclear substances, etc.), Research laboratory instrumentation, Detectors. It also sets the place of French industrial activities by means of an estimate of the French market, production and flow of trading with other countries [fr

  9. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book has sixteen peer-reviewed papers divided into four sections that reflect changes in the nuclear power industry occurring since 1981, including escalating capital requirements and a growing worldwide dependence on nuclear power for electricity production. The four sections of this book are: Overview of National Programs; Surveillance and Other Radiation Embrittlement Studies; Pressure Vessel Integrity and Regulatory Considerations; and Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement

  10. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1981-01-01

    Dr Arnott, scientific consultant to PANDORA, emphasises our lack of knowledge of the behaviour of highly active radioactive wastes, particularly effluents, and their characteristics. He proposes that they should be stored, preferably in a solidified state, until our knowledge allows their safe disposal. Political aspects and government policies are discussed and human fallibility is stressed. The nuclear establishment and nuclear power programme are severely criticised. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  12. Public attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, John.

    1981-06-01

    The public is influenced against nuclear power by fear of a large accident, fear of radiation, worry about nuclear waste, and by the fact that it is a symbol of the bureaucratic, impersonal aspects of industrialized society. The nuclear industry must do several things to overcome this public concern. It must be more articulate in speaking to the public in a language the public understands and not in nuclear jargon; it must be strictly accurate and truthful in all statements, and if it believes the case it is putting forward is sound, it should defend the proposal and not promise to do even more to buy off criticism. Acceptance of nuclear power will either have to wait until the energy situation is desperate, or until the industry puts enough effort into presenting and defending its case to convince all objective people

  13. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nuclear investment: performance and opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, B.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power plant ownership in the United States has continued its steady trend toward ownership consolidation and removal of assets from rate regulated environments that began in 1998. This is paralleled by changes in companies providing nuclear services and growing talk of building new units. World wide, new nuclear plant construction and related supplier investment is proceeding around the world. The nuclear fuel supply part of the business is seeing interest and excitement that would have been almost inconceivable a decade ago. Nuclear is now increasingly being recognized for its energy, economic and environmental benefits. For investors, this is a time of opportunity. And the opportunity is strongly supported by excellent performance trends and fundamental change sin the US electricity business. But in order to benefit from these changes, investors must remain cautious and be committed to comprehensively and thoroughly understanding the individual and interrelated technical, regulatory and political issues that surround this useful and powerful technology. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear power: Yes or no

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strotmann, A.

    1979-01-01

    The author deals with the problems of nuclear energy by drawing many comparisons to other fields of engineering and causes of dangers and he does it in a way that the laity can understand him and is informed. Advocates and opponents would act bona fide: the ones were not in fear and would believe in the realization of nuclear energy; the others were in fear for themselves and their environment. So the layman too could either believe or not believe. (HSCH) [de

  16. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  17. Nuclear telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. T.; Szasz, I. J.

    1990-06-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine patient images have been transniitted for 8 years from a regional conununity hospital to a university teaching hospital 700 kiloinetres away employing slow scan TV and telephone. Transruission and interpretation were done at the end of each working day or as circumstances required in cases of emergencies. Referring physicians received the nuclear medicine procedure report at the end of the completion day or within few minutes of completion in case of emergency procedures. To date more than 25 patient studies have been transmitted for interpretation. Blinded reinterpretation of the original hard copy data of 350 patient studies resulted in 100 agreement with the interpretation of transmitted data. This technique provides high quality diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine services in remote hospitals where the services of an on-site nuclear physician is not available. 2. HISTORY Eight years ago when the nuclear medicine physician at Trail Regional Hospital left the Trail area and an other could not be recruited we examined the feasibility of image transmission by phone for interpretation since closing the department would have imposed unacceptable physical and financial hardship and medical constraints on the patient population the nearest nuclear medicine facility was at some 8 hours drive away. In hospital patients would have to be treated either based purely on physical findings or flown to Vancouver at considerable cost to the health care system (estimated cost $1500.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...