WorldWideScience

Sample records for understand degradation processes

  1. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion crack

  2. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James; Gewirth, Andrew; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next–Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion – crack

  3. The importance of Soil Science to understand and remediate Land Degradation and Desertification processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Johan; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Documentation is abundantly available to demonstrate the devastating effect of Land degradation and desertification on sustainable development in many countries. This present a major barrier to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, as agreed upon at the General Assembly of the UN in September 2015. Research has certainly been successful in reversing these two processes in many case studies but persistant problems remain not only in developing countries but also in developed countries where, for example, soil compaction and loss of soil organic matter due to the industrialization of agriculture, result in a structural decline of agricultural productivity and environmental quality. The problems are quite complex because not only technical matters play a role but also, and often quite prominantly, socio-economic factors. What turn out to be successful remediation procedures at a given location or region, based on the characterization of underlying soil processes, will most likely not work in other regions inhibiting the extrapolation of local research results to areas elsewhere. One important reason for location specificity of research is the variation of soil properties in combination with the location of soils in a given landscape which governs its water, energy and nutrient dynamics, also considering the climate. Different soils are characterized by different natural riks for degradation and , in arid regions, deserticification and their particular remediation potential differs widely as well. Such risks can sometimes be overcome by innovative soil management and knowing the soil type, the climate and landscape processes, extrapolation of such types of innovative management to comparable soils and landscapes elsewhere may be feasible and effective , provided that socio-economic conditions allow the required risk-reducing measures to be realized in practice. More cooperation between soil scientists and physical geographers, familiar with landscape

  4. Understanding Degradation Pathways in Organic Photovoltaics (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, M. T.; Olson, D. C.; Garcia, A.; Kauvar, I.; Kopidakis, N.; Reese, M. O.; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) recently attained power conversion efficiencies that are of interest for commercial production. Consequently, one of the most important unsolved issues facing a new industry is understanding what governs lifetime in organic devices and discovering solutions to mitigate degradation mechanisms. Historically, the active organic components are considered vulnerable to photo-oxidation and represent the primary degradation channel. However, we present several (shelf life and light soaking) studies pointing the relative stability of the active layers and instabilities in commonly used electrode materials. We show that engineering of the hole/electron layer at the electrode can lead to environmentally stable devices even without encapsulation.

  5. IMPORTANT DEGRADATIONS IN POLYETHYLENE TERAPHTALATE EXTRUSION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule ALTUN

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene terephthalate (PET is one of the most used thermo-plastic polymers. The total consumption of PET has been about 30 million tons in the year 2000. Polyester fibers constitute about 60 % of total synthetic fibers consumption. During extrusion, PET polymer is faced to thermal, thermo-oxidative and hydrolytic degradation, which result in severe reduction in its molecular weight, thereby adversely affecting its subsequent melt processability. Therefore, it is essential to understand degradation processes of PET during melt extrusion.

  6. Towards better process understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matero, Sanni Elina; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J; Poutiainen, Sami

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing of tablets involves many unit operations that possess multivariate and complex characteristics. The interactions between the material characteristics and process related variation are presently not comprehensively analyzed due to univariate detection methods. As a consequence......, current best practice to control a typical process is to not allow process-related factors to vary i.e. lock the production parameters. The problem related to the lack of sufficient process understanding is still there: the variation within process and material properties is an intrinsic feature...... and cannot be compensated for with constant process parameters. Instead, a more comprehensive approach based on the use of multivariate tools for investigating processes should be applied. In the pharmaceutical field these methods are referred to as Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tools that aim...

  7. Understanding the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione in relation to the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. italica cv. Bellstar) during storage and mechanical processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raseetha, Siva; Leong, Sze Ying; Burritt, David John; Oey, Indrawati

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione content in broccoli florets (Brassica oleracea L. italica cv. Bellstar) during prolonged storage and subsequent mechanical processing. The initial content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli florets averaged at 5.18 ± 0.23 and 0.70 ± 0.03 μmol/g fresh weight, respectively. Results showed that the content of ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli degraded during storage at 23°C, for at least 4.5-fold after 6 days of storage. On each day of storage, broccoli florets were mechanically processed, but the content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione was not significantly affected. When the mechanically processed broccoli florets were further incubated for up to 6h, the amount of ascorbic acid was greatly reduced as compared to glutathione. To obtain an in-depth understanding on the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione, the activity of enzymes involved in plant antioxidative system via ascorbate-glutathione cycle, as a response towards oxidative stress that took place during storage was determined in this study. The content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli florets before and after mechanical processing were found to decrease concurrently with the activity of ascorbic acid peroxidase and glutathione reductase over the experimental storage duration. Meanwhile, the effect of oxidative stress on the content of ascorbic acid and glutathione was apparent during the 6h of incubation after mechanical processing. This phenomenon was demonstrated by the level of oxidative stress biomarkers examined, in which the formation of lipid peroxides, protein carbonyls and DNA oxidised products was positively associated with the degradation of total ascorbic acid and glutathione. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding the Budget Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Yalvaç

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Many different budgeting techniques can be used in libraries, and some combination of these will be appropriate for almost any individual situation. Li-ne-item, program, performance, formula, variable, and zero-base budgets all have features that may prove beneficial in the preparation of a budget. Budgets also serve a variety of functions, providing for short-term and long-term financial planning as well as for cash management over a period of time. Short-term plans are reflected in the operating budget, while long-term plans are reflected in the capital budget. Since the time when cash is available to an organization does not usually coincide with the time that disbursements must be made, it is also important to carefully plan for the inflow and outflow of funds by means of a cash budget.      During the budget process an organization selects its programs and activities by providing the necessary funding; the library, along with others in the organization, must justify its requests. Because of the cyclical nature of the budget process, it is possible continually to gather information and evaluate alternatives for the next budget period so that the library may achieve its maximum potential for service to its patrons.

  9. Understanding the consultation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the consultation processes between industry, government and First Nations communities regarding resource development. The expectations of the Crown are to facilitate capacity building within First Nations, to promote traditional use studies and to participate with industry proponents on certain consultation issues. The role of industry is to encourage partnerships between established contractors and First Nations contracting firms to allow First Nations firms to grow and experience success under the guidance of a mentor company. It is important to realize that solid First Nations relations are the key to shorter time lines and lower costs in developing projects. However, consultation and involvement must be 'real' with benefits and participation that fall within the First Nations Communities' definition of success

  10. Soil physical land degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    According to the European Soil Framework Directive (2006) soil compaction is besides water and wind erosion one of the main physical reasons and threats of soil degradation. It is estimated, that 32% of the subsoils in Europe are highly degraded and 18% moderately vulnerable to compaction. The problem is not limited to crop land or forest areas (especially because of non-site adjusted harvesting machines) but is also prevalent in rangelands and grassland, and even in so called natural non-disturbed systems. The main reasons for an intense increase in compacted agricultural or forested regions are the still increasing masses of the machines as well the increased frequency of wheeling under non favorable site conditions. Shear and vibration induced soil deformation enhances the deterioration of soil properties especially if the soil water content is very high and the internal soil strength very low. The same is true for animal trampling in combination with overgrazing of moist to wet pastures which subsequently causes a denser (i.e. reduced proportion of coarse pores with smaller continuity) but still structured soil horizons and will finally end in a compacted platy structure. In combination with high water content and shearing due to trampling therefore results in a complete muddy homogeneous soil with no structure at all. (Krümmelbein et al. 2013) Site managements of arable, forestry or horticulture soils requires a sufficiently rigid pore system which guarantees water, gas and heat exchange, nutrient transport and adsorption as well as an optimal rootability in order to avoid subsoil compaction. Such pore system also guarantees a sufficient microbial activity and composition in order to also decompose the plant etc. debris. It is therefore essential that well structured horizons dominate in soils with at best subangular blocky structure or in the top A- horizons a crumbly structure due to biological activity. In contrast defines the formation of a platy

  11. Degradation of Phosphorene in Air: Understanding at Atomic Level

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gaoxue; Slough, William J.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a promising two dimensional (2D) material with a direct band gap, high carrier mobility, and anisotropic electronic properties. Phosphorene-based electronic devices, however, are found to degrade upon exposure to air. In this paper, we provide an atomic level understanding of stability of phosphorene in terms of its interaction with O2 and H2O. The results based on density functional theory together with first principles molecular dynamics calculations show that O2 could sponta...

  12. Photocatalytic Based Degradation Processes of Lignin Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Awungacha Lekelefac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis, belonging to the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs, is a potential new transformation technology for lignin derivatives to value added products (e.g., phenol, benzene, toluene, and xylene. Moreover, lignin represents the only viable source to produce aromatic compounds as fossil fuel alternative. This review covers recent advancement made in the photochemical transformation of industrial lignins. It starts with the photochemical reaction principle followed by results obtained by varying process parameters. In this context, influences of photocatalysts, metal ions, additives, lignin concentration, and illumination intensity and the influence of pH are presented and discussed. Furthermore, an overview is given on several used process analytical methods describing the results obtained from the degradation of lignin derivatives. Finally, a promising concept by coupling photocatalysis with a consecutive biocatalytic process was briefly reviewed.

  13. Does Signal Degradation Affect Top-Down Processing of Speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anita; Pals, Carina; de Blecourt, Charlotte M; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Başkent, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Speech perception is formed based on both the acoustic signal and listeners' knowledge of the world and semantic context. Access to semantic information can facilitate interpretation of degraded speech, such as speech in background noise or the speech signal transmitted via cochlear implants (CIs). This paper focuses on the latter, and investigates the time course of understanding words, and how sentential context reduces listeners' dependency on the acoustic signal for natural and degraded speech via an acoustic CI simulation.In an eye-tracking experiment we combined recordings of listeners' gaze fixations with pupillometry, to capture effects of semantic information on both the time course and effort of speech processing. Normal-hearing listeners were presented with sentences with or without a semantically constraining verb (e.g., crawl) preceding the target (baby), and their ocular responses were recorded to four pictures, including the target, a phonological (bay) competitor and a semantic (worm) and an unrelated distractor.The results show that in natural speech, listeners' gazes reflect their uptake of acoustic information, and integration of preceding semantic context. Degradation of the signal leads to a later disambiguation of phonologically similar words, and to a delay in integration of semantic information. Complementary to this, the pupil dilation data show that early semantic integration reduces the effort in disambiguating phonologically similar words. Processing degraded speech comes with increased effort due to the impoverished nature of the signal. Delayed integration of semantic information further constrains listeners' ability to compensate for inaudible signals.

  14. Doxycycline Degradation by the Oxidative Fenton Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A. Borghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxycycline is a broad-spectrum tetracycline occurring in domestic, industrial, and rural effluents, whose main drawback is the increasing emergence of resistant bacteria. This antibiotic could be degraded by the so-called Fenton process, consisting in the oxidation of organic pollutants by oxygen peroxide (H2O2 in the presence of Fe2+. Experiments were performed according to an experimental Rotational Central Composite Design to investigate the influence of temperature (0–40.0°C, H2O2 concentration (100–900 mg/L, and Fe2+ concentration (5–120 mg/L on residual doxycycline and total organic carbon concentrations. Whereas the final residual doxycycline concentration ranged from 0 to 55.8 mg/L, the oxidation process proved unable to reduce the total organic carbon by more than 30%. The best operating conditions were concentrations of H2O2 and Fe2+ of 611 and 25 mg/L, respectively, and temperature of 35.0°C, but the analysis of variance revealed that only the first variable exerted a statistically significant effect on the residual doxycycline concentration. These results suggest possible application of this process in the treatment of doxycycline-containing effluents and may be used as starting basis to treat tetracycline-contaminated effluents.

  15. Restoration of degraded agricultural terraces: rebuilding landscape structure and process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFevor, M C

    2014-06-01

    The restoration of severely degraded cropland to productive agricultural capacity increases food supply, improves soil and water conservation, and enhances environmental and ecological services. This article examines the key roles that long-term maintenance plays in the processes of repairing degraded agricultural land. Field measurements from Tlaxcala, Mexico stress that restoring agricultural structures (the arrangements of landforms and vegetation) is alone insufficient. Instead, an effective monitoring and maintenance regime of agricultural structures is also crucial if the efforts are to be successful. Consequently, methods of wildland restoration and agricultural restoration may differ in the degree to which the latter must plan for and facilitate a sustained human involvement. An improved understanding of these distinctions is critical for environmental management as restoration programs that employ the technologies of intensive agriculture continue to grow in number and scope. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Land Degradation Processes in the Humid Ethiopian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Tebebu, Tigist; Belachew, Meseret; Langendoen, Eddy; Giri, Shree; Tilahun, Seifu

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation after forest clearing forces a distinct pattern on agricultural production starting with high yields just after clearing to poor productivity or even abandonment after 30-40 years. In the humid Ethiopian highlands forest soils have initial a high organic matter content that decreases with time after clearing. When the organic matter becomes less than 3%, aggregates break up, other cementing elements are being leached out and the texture becomes finer. Since settling velocity in water is related to particle size, the finer soil increases sediment concentration in the infiltration water and hardpan formation accelerates restricting deep percolation of water. This in turn affect the hydrology in which an excess water flows more rapidly as lateral flow to valley bottoms which become wetter with gully formation starting to transmit the additional water down slope approximately 10 years after the initial clearing. This degradation pattern occurs in all soils in the Ethiopian highlands, but the severity varies with climate and parent material. Although we do not yet understand to what degree these factors influence the degradation pattern, it is important to recognize the process because it directly affects the effectiveness of imposed management practices. In this presentation, we will highlight the degradation process for two watersheds in the semi humid Ethiopian highlands. We will document how soil properties changes and discuss hardpan formation and gully development. In addition, we will consider the effect of presently implemented governmental sponsored conservation practices and alternative management practices that might be more beneficial. We are looking forward to discussions on combating the effect of soil degradation in tropical monsoonal regions.

  17. Meadow degradation, hydrological processes and rangeland management in Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siyuan; Richards, Keith

    2013-04-01

    including field sampling and monitoring, model simulation and stable isotope analysis. The understanding of regional hydrological processes and water partitioning under different surface conditions is crucial to an integrated, interdisciplinary study with regard to sustainable use of rangeland resources. Therefore a further consideration of rangeland management under the current condition is proposed. Herders have witnessed some degradation processes and have noticed some climatic variations. However, they do not naturally link meadow degradation to climate change nor do they tend to blame overgrazing. There may be conflicts between scientific knowledge and indigenous experience when the local people are trying to keep their tradition during modernisation, imposed sometimes without thorough consideration. The dependency on weather conditions is turning to dependency on government subsidies when the rangeland management violates practical traditions and is lack of integrated measures to promote local economy. This case in Tibet shows that a sound knowledge of the ecological status of rangeland and an understanding of local people's perspective towards development should be considered together, so that holistic measures, with flexible implementation of policies, can be taken to realise long-term benefit, ecologically and socio-economically.

  18. Degradation of diclofenac by UV-activated persulfate process: Kinetic studies, degradation pathways and toxicity assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Xiang, Huiming; Guo, Youluo

    2017-07-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is the frequently detected non-steroidal pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this study, the degradation of DCF was evaluated by UV-254nm activated persulfate (UV/PS). The degradation of DCF followed the pseudo first-order kinetics pattern. The degradation rate constant (k obs ) was accelerated by UV/PS compared to UV alone and PS alone. Increasing the initial PS dosage or solution pH significantly enhanced the degradation efficiency. Presence of various natural water constituents had different effects on DCF degradation, with an enhancement or inhibition in the presence of inorganic anions (HCO 3 - or Cl - ) and a significant inhibition in the presence of NOM. In addition, preliminary degradation mechanisms and major products were elucidated using LC-MS/MS. Hydroxylation, decarbonylation, ring-opening and cyclation reaction involving the attack of SO 4 • - or other substances, were the main degradation mechanism. TOC analyzer and Microtox bioassay were employed to evaluate the mineralization and cytotoxicity of solutions treated by UV/PS at different times, respectively. Limited elimination of TOC (32%) was observed during the mineralization of DCF. More toxic degradation products and their related intermediate species were formed, and the UV/PS process was suitable for removing the toxicity. Of note, longer degradation time may be considered for the final toxicity removal. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. K-12 Teacher Understanding of Energy Conservation: Conceptual Metaphor, Dissipation, and Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daane, Abigail R.

    In K-12 educational settings, conservation of energy is typically presented in two ways: the conservation of energy principle (energy is neither created nor destroyed) and the sociopolitical need to conserve energy (we guard against energy being used up). These two meanings of conservation typically remain disconnected from each other and can appear contradictory, even after instruction. In an effort to support teachers in building robust understandings of energy from their existing knowledge, I designed a study to investigate the productive ideas in K-12 teachers' conversations about energy. A micro-analysis of discourse, gestures, and artifacts of professional development courses revealed teachers' productive ideas about three aspects of energy: conceptual metaphor, dissipation and degradation. In learning about energy, K-12 teachers come to use conceptual metaphors in their own language and value attending to students' metaphorical language as a means of formative assessment. Teachers' conversations about dissipation suggest that apparent difficulties with energy conservation may have their roots in a strong association between forms of energy (thermal) and their perceptible indicators (warmth). Teachers address this challenge by employing an exaggeration strategy to locate the dissipated thermal energy, making the energy indicator perceptible. Finally, teachers' unprompted statements about sociopolitical aspects of energy are related to both statements from the NGSS and aspects of energy degradation. I conclude that energy conservation can be better taught and learned in K-12 Education by: 1) understanding and applying conceptual metaphors about energy in K-12 settings, 2) using prior experiences to better understand dissipative energy processes involving imperceptible thermal energy, thereby understanding how energy conservation applies in all situations, and 3) connecting productive ideas about sociopolitical aspects of energy to canonical physics. Keywords

  20. North American Soil Degradation: Processes, Practices, and Mitigating Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Baumhardt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil can be degraded by several natural or human-mediated processes, including wind, water, or tillage erosion, and formation of undesirable physical, chemical, or biological properties due to industrialization or use of inappropriate farming practices. Soil degradation occurs whenever these processes supersede natural soil regeneration and, generally, reflects unsustainable resource management that is global in scope and compromises world food security. In North America, soil degradation preceded the catastrophic wind erosion associated with the dust bowl during the 1930s, but that event provided the impetus to improve management of soils degraded by both wind and water erosion. Chemical degradation due to site specific industrial processing and mine spoil contamination began to be addressed during the latter half of the 20th century primarily through point-source water quality concerns, but soil chemical degradation and contamination of surface and subsurface water due to on-farm non-point pesticide and nutrient management practices generally remains unresolved. Remediation or prevention of soil degradation requires integrated management solutions that, for agricultural soils, include using cover crops or crop residue management to reduce raindrop impact, maintain higher infiltration rates, increase soil water storage, and ultimately increase crop production. By increasing plant biomass, and potentially soil organic carbon (SOC concentrations, soil degradation can be mitigated by stabilizing soil aggregates, improving soil structure, enhancing air and water exchange, increasing nutrient cycling, and promoting greater soil biological activity.

  1. Controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers. Second RCM report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    The research and development works carried out by the participants of the CRP (Coordinated Research Project) dealt with natural polymers, synthetic polymers and new techniques for better understanding of radiation degradation of polymers. It includes progress in radiation degradation of polysaccharides from agricultural products (including sodium alginate, carrageenans, chitosan and gum acacia); use of radiation-degradation for doping of conductive polymers; controlling degradation processes in artificial joint implants, surface treatment of materials and food packaging; stabilizer additives for radiation environments; surface treatment of materials; and application of specialized analytical techniques (positron annihilation spectroscopy, ESR, RBS, ERDA, NMR/isotopic-labeling) to gain improved understanding of radiation degradation effects and mechanisms. Projects within the RCM group span the spectrum from fundamental studies through specific technological applications. Participants from Czech Republic, Spain and Turkey benefited from scientific collaboration with Bulgaria on PAS

  2. Fault Management: Degradation Signature Detection, Modeling, and Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fault to Failure Progression (FFP) signature modeling and processing is a new method for applying condition-based signal data to detect degradation, to identify...

  3. Fault Management: Degradation Signature Detection, Modeling, and Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fault to Failure Progression (FFP) signature modeling and processing is a new method for applying condition-based signal data to detect degradation, to identify...

  4. Degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid by advanced oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. P. S. Zanta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs such as the UV/H2O2 and Fenton processes were investigated for the degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (2-HBA in lab-scale experiments. Different [H2O2]/[2-HBA] molar ratios and pH values were used in order to establish the most favorable experimental conditions for the Fenton process. For comparison purposes, degradation of 2-HBA was carried out by the UV/H2O2 process under Fenton experimental conditions. The study showed that the Fenton process (a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Fe2+ ion was the most effective under acidic conditions, leading to the highest rate of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid degradation in a very short time interval. This same process led to a six-fold acceleration of the oxidation rate compared with the UV/H2O2 process. The degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid was found to follow first-order kinetics and to be influenced by the type of process and the experimental conditions. The experimental results showed that the most favorable conditions for 2-HBA degradation by the Fenton process are pH around 4-5, [Fe2+] = 0.6 mmol.L-1, and [H2O2]/[2-HBA] molar ratio = 7. The hydroxylation route is explained here for the two processes, and the results are discussed in the light of literature information.

  5. Process-induced degradation of bioresorbable PDLGA in bone tissue scaffold production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, H; Clarke, S A; Cunningham, E; Buchanan, F

    2017-12-28

    Process-induced degradation of clinically relevant resorbable polymers was investigated for two thermal techniques, filament extrusion followed by fused deposition modelling (FDM). The aim was to develop a clear understanding of the relationship between temperature, processing time and resultant process-induced degradation. This acts to address the current knowledge gap in studies involving thermal processing of resorbable polymers. Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PDLGA) was chosen for its clinically relevant resorption properties. Furthermore, a comparative study of controlled thermal exposure was conducted through compression moulding PDLGA at a selected range of temperatures (150-225 °C) and times (0.5-20 min). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) were used to characterise thermally induced degradation behaviour. DSC proved insensitive to degradation effects, whereas GPC demonstrated distinct reductions in molecular weight allowing for the quantification of degradation. A near-exponential pattern of degradation was identified. Through the application of statistical chain scission equations, a predictive plot of theoretical degradation was created. Thermal degradation was found to have a significant effect on the molecular weight with a reduction of up to 96% experienced in the controlled processing study. The proposed empirical model may assist prediction of changes in molecular weight, however, accuracy limitations are highlighted for twin-screw extrusion, accredited to high-shear mixing. The results from this study highlight the process sensitivity of PDLGA and proposes a methodology for quantification and prediction, which contributes to efforts in understanding the influence of manufacture on performance of degradable medical implants.

  6. How spectroscopy and microspectroscopy of degraded wood contribute to understand fungal wood decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fackler, Karin; Schwanninger, Manfred

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, mid and near infrared, and ultra violet (UV) spectra of wood contain information on its chemistry and composition. When solid wood samples are analysed, information on the molecular structure of the lignocellulose complex of wood e.g. crystallinity of polysaccharides and the orientation of the polymers in wood cell walls can also be gained. UV and infrared spectroscopy allow also for spatially resolved spectroscopy, and state-of-the-art mapping and imaging systems have been able to provide local information on wood chemistry and structure at the level of wood cells (with IR) or cell wall layers (with UV). During the last decades, these methods have also proven useful to follow alterations of the composition, chemistry and physics of the substrate wood after fungi had grown on it as well as changes of the interactions between the wood polymers within the lignocellulose complex caused by decay fungi. This review provides an overview on how molecular spectroscopic methods could contribute to understand these degradation processes and were able to characterise and localise fungal wood decay in its various stages starting from the incipient and early ones even if the major share of research focussed on advanced decay. Practical issues such as requirements in terms of sample preparation and sample form and present examples of optimised data analysis will also be addressed to be able to detect and characterise the generally highly variable microbial degradation processes within their highly variable substrate wood.

  7. Determination of processed soybean meal degradability by Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of processed soybean meal degradability by Pinus eldarica methanol extract. ... Protected soybean meal is an important part of high producing dairy cow diet and many methods are used for its safe and economic processing. Pinus eldarica contains xylose and resins and results show that these components ...

  8. Understanding Patients’ Process to Use Medical Marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L Crowell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the necessity to better understand the process patients need to go through in order to seek treatment via medical marijuana, this study investigates this process to better understand this phenomenon. Specifically, Compassion Care Foundation (CCF and Stockton University worked together to identify a solution to this problem. Specifically, 240 new patients at CCF were asked to complete a 1-page survey regarding various aspects associated with their experience prior to their use of medicinal marijuana—diagnosis, what prompted them to seek treatment, level of satisfaction with specific stages in the process, total length of time the process took, and patient’s level of pain. Results reveal numerous patient diagnoses for which medical marijuana is being prescribed; the top 4 most common are intractable skeletal spasticity, chronic and severe pain, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Next, results indicate a little over half of the patients were first prompted to seek alternative treatment from their physicians, while the remaining patients indicated that other sources such as written information along with friends, relatives, media, and the Internet persuaded them to seek treatment. These data indicate that a variety of sources play a role in prompting patients to seek alternative treatment and is a critical first step in this process. Additional results posit that once patients began the process of qualifying to receive medical marijuana as treatment, the process seemed more positive even though it takes patients on average almost 6 months to obtain their first treatment after they started the process. Finally, results indicate that patients are reporting a moderately high level of pain prior to treatment. Implication of these results highlights several important elements in the patients’ initial steps toward seeking medical marijuana, along with the quality and quantity of the process patients must engage in prior to

  9. Soil degradation processes in the Italian agricultural and forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo A.C. Costantini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of processes of degradation threaten soil functions. Ten of them are acknowledged by the European Union and fifteen by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, but at least another seven have been indicated by different authors in Italy and in other parts of the world. This short review paper summarizes the nature, economic relevance, and territorial impact of soil degradation in Italy, and with reference to Europe as a whole, and highlights the most relevant research needs in soil conservation. The direct annual costs of the main soil degradation processes are estimated to be over 38,000,000,000 euro per year in Europe as a whole, while in Italy, only for landslides, floods, and soil erosion, costs amount to 900,000,000 euro. Loss of the ability to produce food commodities because of soil degradation is particularly important in Italy, since selfsufficiency in food has recently decreased to less than 80% and Italian agricultural soils are hit by several problems, such as limited soil drainage, unfavorable texture and stoniness, shallow rooting depth, and poor chemical properties. On average, soil sealing, reduction in organic matter, and soil compaction in Italy are comparable with those of many other countries, but the occurrence of soil erosion, floods, and landslides is more widespread than in most parts of Europe, and also the presence of salt-affected soils is becoming a major worry. The fight against soil degradation in Italy is certainly more difficult than in other countries because of the high environmental variability. However, according to the current trends, Italy is mostly probably destined not to achieve the European objective to significantly reduce main soil degradation processes by the year 2020. There are several research needs in the field of soil conservation in Italy. These include: i a better basic knowledge about many soil degradation processes and of pedodiversity; ii reliable, sensitive

  10. Soil Degradation Processes; Procesos de Degradacion del Suelo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Crespi, S.; Perez Martinez, M.; Cuesta Santianes, M. J.; Cabrera Jimenez, J. A.

    2007-12-28

    In the European communication entitled Towards a Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, eight main threats to soil were identified: contamination, erosion, loss of organic matter, compaction, salinization; hydro-geological risks, soil sealing, and decline in biodiversity. The main purpose of this report is to provide the current state of knowledge of the soil degradation processes both, in the European Community scale and, particularly, in the Spanish territory. Furthermore, the main research project information related to soil degradation processes is also included, identifying the main actors involved in soil scientific research and development. (Author) 66 refs.

  11. Understanding and Enhancing Soil Biological Health: The Solution for Reversing Soil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Michael Lehman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective is to provide an optimistic strategy for reversing soil degradation by increasing public and private research efforts to understand the role of soil biology, particularly microbiology, on the health of our world’s soils. We begin by defining soil quality/soil health (which we consider to be interchangeable terms, characterizing healthy soil resources, and relating the significance of soil health to agroecosystems and their functions. We examine how soil biology influences soil health and how biological properties and processes contribute to sustainability of agriculture and ecosystem services. We continue by examining what can be done to manipulate soil biology to: (i increase nutrient availability for production of high yielding, high quality crops; (ii protect crops from pests, pathogens, weeds; and (iii manage other factors limiting production, provision of ecosystem services, and resilience to stresses like droughts. Next we look to the future by asking what needs to be known about soil biology that is not currently recognized or fully understood and how these needs could be addressed using emerging research tools. We conclude, based on our perceptions of how new knowledge regarding soil biology will help make agriculture more sustainable and productive, by recommending research emphases that should receive first priority through enhanced public and private research in order to reverse the trajectory toward global soil degradation.

  12. Degraded core reflood. Present understanding based on experimental and analytical database and its impact on LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, Wolfgang; Homann, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The severe fuel damage (SFD) research at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe started with the single rod experiments already before the TMI-2 accident revealed that the knowledge on accident initiation and progression was scarce. The general focus on primary circuit research was the understanding of processes, their interactions, and possibilities for countermeasures. But even today, the most prominent countermeasure, the flooding of a degraded core, is not yet completely understood, namely the influence of adverse effects such as enhanced core degradation and hydrogen spikes under the most probable scenarios. So far, the design basis accident procedures of core reflood can be extended to peak core temperatures of app. 2200 K, if sufficient reflood mss flow rate can be applied. Assuming an average core heat-up rate of 0.5 K/s, this gives only app. 12 min additional time with respect to DBA cases, but moreover a strategy for a successful core reflood before a large in-core pool is formed, which might be uncoolable. (author)

  13. Influence of compatibilizer on blends degradation during processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Waldman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermomechanical degradation of blends made from polypropylene and polystyrene, with or without compatibilizer, was studied using an internal mixer coupled to a torque rheometer. The blends processed without compatibilizer presented regular and expected results regarding torque reduction, with evidence of chain scission. The blends processed with the block copolymer of styrene and butadiene, SBS, as a compatibilizer presented unchanged or less reduced variation on torque values during processing. The extraction of stabilizers from the compatibilizer before processing did not affect the results. The compatibilizer concentration in the blends was varied, with its influence still being observed in concentrations as low as 0.03 parts per hundred. Similar results were obtained in an experiment comparing the performance of a primary commercial anti-oxidant, Irganox 1076, and the compatibilizer SBS. Therefore, the compatibilizer can be considered as a processing aid agent with positive influence on avoiding thermomechanical degradation.

  14. Experiments for understanding soil erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion processes are usually quantified by observation and measurement of their related forms. Rill, and gullies, moulds or sediment sinks are often used to estimate the soil loss. These forms are generally related directly to different types of processes, thus are also used to identify the dominant processes on a certain type of land-use. Nevertheless, the direct observation of erosion processes is constrained by their temporal and spatial erratic occurrence. As a consequence, the process understanding is generally deduced by analogies. Another possibility is to reproduce processes in experiments in both, the lab and in the field. Laboratory experiments are implemented when we want to have full control over all parameters we think are relevant for the process in our focus. So are very useful for identification of parameters influencing processes and their intensities, but also as physical models of the processes and process interactions in our focus. Therefore, we can use them to verify our concepts, and to define relevant parameters. Field experiments generally only simulate with controlled driving forces, this is the rain or the runoff, but dealing with the uncertainty of our study object, the soil. This enables two things: 1) similar as with lab experiments, we are able to identify processes and process interactions and so, to get a deeper understanding of soil erosion; 2) experiments are suitable for providing data about singular processes in the field and thus, to provide data suitable for model parametrisation and calibration. These may be quantitative data about erodibility or soil resistance, sediment detachment or transport. The Physical Geography Group at Trier University has a long lasting experience in the application of experiments in soil erosion research in the field, and has become lead in the further development conception and of devices and procedures to investigate splash detachment and initial transport of soil particles by wind and water

  15. Iodinated contrast media electro-degradation: process performance and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moro, Guido; Pastore, Carlo; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Mascolo, Giuseppe

    2015-02-15

    The electrochemical degradation of six of the most widely used iodinated contrast media was investigated. Batch experiments were performed under constant current conditions using two DSA® electrodes (titanium coated with a proprietary and patented mixed metal oxide solution of precious metals such as iridium, ruthenium, platinum, rhodium and tantalum). The degradation removal never fell below 85% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) when perchlorate was used as the supporting electrolyte; however, when sulphate was used, the degradation performance was above 80% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) for all of the compounds studied. Three main degradation pathways were identified, namely, the reductive de-iodination of the aromatic ring, the reduction of alkyl aromatic amides to simple amides and the de-acylation of N-aromatic amides to produce aromatic amines. However, as amidotrizoate is an aromatic carboxylate, this is added via the decarboxylation reaction. The investigation did not reveal toxicity except for the lower current density used, which has shown a modest toxicity, most likely for some reaction intermediates that are not further degraded. In order to obtain total removal of the contrast media, it was necessary to employ a current intensity between 118 and 182 mA/cm(2) with energy consumption higher than 370 kWh/m(3). Overall, the electrochemical degradation was revealed to be a reliable process for the treatment of iodinated contrast media that can be found in contaminated waters such as hospital wastewater or pharmaceutical waste-contaminated streams. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of compatibilizer on blends degradation during processing

    OpenAIRE

    Waldman, Walter R.; Paoli, Marco-A. De

    2013-01-01

    The thermomechanical degradation of blends made from polypropylene and polystyrene, with or without compatibilizer, was studied using an internal mixer coupled to a torque rheometer. The blends processed without compatibilizer presented regular and expected results regarding torque reduction, with evidence of chain scission. The blends processed with the block copolymer of styrene and butadiene, SBS, as a compatibilizer presented unchanged or less reduced variation on torque values during pro...

  17. Degradation of malachite green in aqueous solution by Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, B H; Lee, T W

    2009-05-30

    In this study, advanced oxidation process utilizing Fenton's reagent was investigated for degradation of malachite green (MG). The effects of different reaction parameters such as the initial MG concentration, initial pH, the initial hydrogen peroxide concentration, the initial ferrous concentration and the reaction temperature on the oxidative degradation of MG have been investigated. The optimal reacting conditions were experimentally found to be pH 3.40, initial hydrogen peroxide concentration=0.50mM and initial ferrous concentration=0.10mM for initial MG concentration of 20mg/L at 30 degrees C. Under optimal conditions, 99.25% degradation efficiency of dye in aqueous solution was achieved after 60 min of reaction.

  18. A Dual Process Approach to Understand Tourists’ Destination Choice Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Florian; Josiassen, Alexander; Assaf, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Most studies that investigate tourists' choices of destinations apply the concept of mental destination representations, also referred to as destination image. The present study investigates tourists’ destination choice processes by conceptualizing how different components of destination image...... are mentally processed in tourists' minds. Specifically, the seminal dual processing approach is applied to the destination image literature. By doing this, we argue that some components of mental destination representations are processed systematically while others serve as inputs for heuristics...... that individuals apply to inform their decision making. Understanding how individuals make use of their mental destination representations and how they color their decision-making is essential in order to better explain tourist behavior....

  19. Understanding the Entrepreneurial Process: a Dynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Maria Jorge Nassif

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable predominance in the adoption of perspectives based on characteristics in research into entrepreneurship. However, most studies describe the entrepreneur from a static or snapshot approach; very few adopt a dynamic perspective. The aim of this study is to contribute to the enhancement of knowledge concerning entrepreneurial process dynamics through an understanding of the values, characteristics and actions of the entrepreneur over time. By focusing on personal attributes, we have developed a framework that shows the importance of affective and cognitive aspects of entrepreneurs and the way that they evolve during the development of their business.

  20. Understanding Combustion Processes Through Microgravity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    A review of research on the effects of gravity on combustion processes is presented, with an emphasis on a discussion of the ways in which reduced-gravity experiments and modeling has led to new understanding. Comparison of time scales shows that the removal of buoyancy-induced convection leads to manifestations of other transport mechanisms, notably radiative heat transfer and diffusional processes such as Lewis number effects. Examples from premixed-gas combustion, non-premixed gas-jet flames, droplet combustion, flame spread over solid and liquid fuels, and other fields are presented. Promising directions for new research are outlined, the most important of which is suggested to be radiative reabsorption effects in weakly burning flames.

  1. The rheology, degradation, processing, and characterization of renewable resource polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jason David

    Renewable resource polymers have become an increasingly popular alternative to conventional fossil fuel based polymers over the past couple decades. The push by the government as well as both industrial and consumer markets to go "green" has provided the drive for companies to research and develop new materials that are more environmentally friendly and which are derived from renewable materials. Two polymers that are currently being produced commercially are poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers, both of which can be derived from renewable feedstocks and have shown to exhibit similar properties to conventional materials such as polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, and PET. PLA and PHA are being used in many applications including food packaging, disposable cups, grocery bags, and biomedical applications. In this work, we report on the rheological properties of blends of PLA and PHA copolymers. The specific materials used in the study include Natureworks RTM 7000D grade PLA and PHA copolymers of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate). Blends ranging from 10 to 50 percent PHA by weight are also examined. Shear and extensional experiments are performed to characterize the flow behavior of the materials in different flow fields. Transient experiments are performed to study the shear rheology over time in order to determine how the viscoelastic properties change under typical processing conditions and understand the thermal degradation behavior of the materials. For the blends, it is determined that increasing the PHA concentration in the blend results in a decrease in viscosity and increase in degradation. Models are fit to the viscosity of the blends using the pure material viscosities in order to be able to predict the behavior at a given blend composition. We also investigate the processability of these materials into films and examine the resultant properties of the cast films. The mechanical and thermal properties of the

  2. Progress in Understanding Degradation Mechanisms and Improving Stability in Organic Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Mateker, William R.

    2016-12-23

    Understanding the degradation mechanisms of organic photovoltaics is particularly important, as they tend to degrade faster than their inorganic counterparts, such as silicon and cadmium telluride. An overview is provided here of the main degradation mechanisms that researchers have identified so far that cause extrinsic degradation from oxygen and water, intrinsic degradation in the dark, and photo-induced burn-in. In addition, it provides methods for researchers to identify these mechanisms in new materials and device structures to screen them more quickly for promising long-term performance. These general strategies will likely be helpful in other photovoltaic technologies that suffer from insufficient stability, such as perovskite solar cells. Finally, the most promising lifetime results are highlighted and recommendations to improve long-term performance are made. To prevent degradation from oxygen and water for sufficiently long time periods, OPVs will likely need to be encapsulated by barrier materials with lower permeation rates of oxygen and water than typical flexible substrate materials. To improve stability at operating temperatures, materials will likely require glass transition temperatures above 100 °C. Methods to prevent photo-induced burn-in are least understood, but recent research indicates that using pure materials with dense and ordered film morphologies can reduce the burn-in effect.

  3. Progress in Understanding Degradation Mechanisms and Improving Stability in Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateker, William R; McGehee, Michael D

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the degradation mechanisms of organic photovoltaics is particularly important, as they tend to degrade faster than their inorganic counterparts, such as silicon and cadmium telluride. An overview is provided here of the main degradation mechanisms that researchers have identified so far that cause extrinsic degradation from oxygen and water, intrinsic degradation in the dark, and photo-induced burn-in. In addition, it provides methods for researchers to identify these mechanisms in new materials and device structures to screen them more quickly for promising long-term performance. These general strategies will likely be helpful in other photovoltaic technologies that suffer from insufficient stability, such as perovskite solar cells. Finally, the most promising lifetime results are highlighted and recommendations to improve long-term performance are made. To prevent degradation from oxygen and water for sufficiently long time periods, OPVs will likely need to be encapsulated by barrier materials with lower permeation rates of oxygen and water than typical flexible substrate materials. To improve stability at operating temperatures, materials will likely require glass transition temperatures above 100 °C. Methods to prevent photo-induced burn-in are least understood, but recent research indicates that using pure materials with dense and ordered film morphologies can reduce the burn-in effect. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    The interest of Member States of the IAEA in introducing radiation technology into the polymer and plastics industry is growing. This publication summarizes a number of studies conducted in the framework of a coordinated research project (CRP) on controlling of degradation effects on polymers by radiation processing technologies. It reviews a variety of applications and details the most important results and achievements of the participating centres and laboratories during the course of the CRP. The publication is intended to be of use to scientists implementing the technology and managers of radiation processing facilities

  5. Natural formation and degradation of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil--challenges to understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laturnus, Frank; Fahimi, Isabelle; Gryndler, Milan; Hartmann, Anton; Heal, Mathew R; Matucha, Miroslav; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich; Schroll, Reiner; Svensson, Teresia

    2005-07-01

    The anthropogenic environmental emissions of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines have been under scrutiny in recent years because the two compound groups are suspected to contribute to forest dieback and stratospheric ozone destruction, respectively. The two organochlorine groups are linked because the atmospheric photochemical oxidation of some volatile organochlorine compounds is one source of phytotoxic chloroacetic acids in the environment. Moreover, both groups are produced in higher amounts by natural chlorination of organic matter, e.g. by soil microorganisms, marine macroalgae and salt lake bacteria, and show similar metabolism pathways. Elucidating the origin and fate of these organohalogens is necessary to implement actions to counteract environmental problems caused by these compounds. While the anthropogenic sources of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines are relatively well-known and within human control, knowledge of relevant natural processes is scarce and fragmented. This article reviews current knowledge on natural formation and degradation processes of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soils, with particular emphasis on processes in the rhizosphere, and discusses future studies necessary to understand the role of forest soils in the formation and degradation of these compounds. Reviewing the present knowledge of the natural formation and degradation processes of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil has revealed gaps in knowledge regarding the actual mechanisms behind these processes. In particular, there remains insufficient quantification of reliable budgets and rates of formation and degradation of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil (both biotic and abiotic processes) to evaluate the strength of forest ecosystems regarding the emission and uptake of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines, both on a regional scale and on a global scale

  6. Terrestrial Particulate Organic Matter Degradation in Estuarine and Coastal Areas: Coupling Lipid Tracers and Molecular Tools to Better Understand Deltaic Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeron, M. A.; Volkman, J. K.; Rontani, J. F.; Radakovitch, O.; Charriere, B.; Amiraux, R.

    2016-02-01

    Deltaic and coastal areas have been studied extensively worldwide, due to their high economic and ecosystemic value. It was long thought that terrestrial particulate organic matter (TPOM) degraded during river transport was refractory to further degradation upon its arrival at sea. But studies on coastal sediments and in the Mackenzie delta (Canada) showed that, on the contrary, TPOM was undergoing intense degradation upon reaching seawater. In order to generalize these results to worldwide river basins, we propose to trace degradation processes impacting TPOM during in-stream transport as well as coastal distribution. We selected the Rhône River (France) for its differences with the Mackenzie River (latitude, temperature, coastal salinity) and carefully researched lipid tracers to help us pinpoint both the origin of the POM and the degradative processes undergone. Betulin, α-/β-amyrins, dehydroabietic acid, sitosterol and their specific degradation products were selected. While the Rhône delta has been studied for decades, there is very little research on its in-stream processes, and how they can be linked with coastal cycles and fluxes. Coupling new specific lipid tracers especially selected for the monitoring of higher plant degradation and molecular biology tools, we were able to better trace the origin of TPOM transported along the Rhône River, as well as better understand its degradation state in the river, the delta, and upon its arrival at sea. We show here that autoxidation (free radical induced oxidation), long overlooked, is a major degradation process impacting TPOM transported along the Rhone River, and is even more intense upon the arrival of TPOM at sea. Salinity, metal ion desorption, bacterial and biochemical activity are amongst the factors studied as inducers of such an intense degradation. This understanding is crucial if we want a truly extensive knowledge of terrestrial particulate organic matter transport and deposition, as well as

  7. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  8. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  9. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.

    2015-01-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm -1 which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm -1 which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm -1 which were associated with NH stretch of NH 2 and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  10. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InsTEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba); Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  11. Degradation of morphine in opium poppy processing waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin Quan; Zhang, Jin Lin; Schuchardt, Frank; Wang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate morphine degradation and optimize turning frequency in opium poppy processing waste composting, a pilot scale windrow composting trial was run for 55 days. Four treatments were designed as without turning (A1), every 5 days turning (A2), every 10 days turning (A3) and every 15 days turning (A4). During composting, a range of physicochemical parameters including the residual morphine degradation, temperature, pH, and the contents of total C, total N, total P and total K were investigated. For all treatments, the residual morphine content decreased below the detection limit and reached the safety standards after day 30 of composting, the longest duration of high temperature (⩾50 °C) was observed in A3, pH increased 16.9-17.54%, total carbon content decreased 15.5-22.5%, C/N ratio reduced from 46 to 26, and the content of total phosphorus and total potassium increased slightly. The final compost obtained by a mixture of all four piles was up to 55.3% of organic matter, 3.3% of total nutrient (N, P2O5 and K2O) and 7.6 of pH. A turning frequency of every ten days for a windrow composting of opium poppy processing waste is recommended to produce homogenous compost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of degradation process on rheological characteristics of polymer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Vojsovičová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of thermoplastic polymer materials before and after exposure in chemical solution were evaluated using Frequency sweep test, which monitors changes in viscoelastic properties of polymers with respect to their molecular structure and their behavior in thermoplastic processes. As experimental material thermoplastic polyethylene and polypropylene samples were used and subjected to influence of n‑hexane solution for period of 3 and 6 months. Measurements were performed using oscillating rheometer Physica Rheometer MCR 301 and carried out at the temperature of 160 °C and 180 °C. Degradation process resulted in changes of complex dynamic viscosity, storage and loss modulus, changes in molar mass and its distribution which sufficiently prove the rheological changes.

  13. Atrazine degradation using chemical-free process of USUV: Analysis of the micro-heterogeneous environments and the degradation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L.J.; Chu, W.; Graham, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two chemical-free AOP processes are combined to enhance atrazine degradation. • ATZ degradation in sonophotolytic process was analyzed using a previous proposed model. • The micro-bubble/liquid heterogeneous environments in sonolytic processes were investigated. • The salt effects on different sonolytic processes were examined. • ATZ degradation mechanisms were investigated and pathways were proposed. - Abstract: The effectiveness of sonolysis (US), photolysis (UV), and sonophotolysis (USUV) for the degradation of atrazine (ATZ) was investigated. An untypical kinetics analysis was found useful to describe the combined process, which is compatible to pseudo first-order kinetics. The heterogeneous environments of two different ultrasounds (20 and 400 kHz) were evaluated. The heterogeneous distribution of ATZ in the ultrasonic solution was found critical in determining the reaction rates at different frequencies. The presence of NaCl would promote/inhibit the rates by the growth and decline of “salting out” effect and surface tension. The benefits of combining these two processes were for the first time investigated from the aspect of promoting the intermediates degradation which were resistant in individual processes. UV caused a rapid transformation of ATZ to 2-hydroxyatrazine (OIET), which was insensitive to UV irradiation; however, US and USUV were able to degrade OIET and other intermediates through • OH attack. On the other hand, UV irradiation also could promote radical generation via H 2 O 2 decomposition, thereby resulting in less accumulation of more hydrophilic intermediates, which are difficult to degradation in the US process. Reaction pathways for ATZ degradation by all three processes are proposed. USUV achieved the greatest degree of ATZ mineralization with more than 60% TOC removed, contributed solely by the oxidation of side chains. Ammeline was found to be the only end-product in both US and USUV

  14. Degradation Processes of Al-Zn Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of metal materials belongs to non-demountable joints. Current trend especially in an automotive industry is to join materials with a different melting temperature. Most of all, there are dural profiles with ferrite or austenite steel. The reason for this is the effort to lower the weight of the whole construction and at the same time preserve sufficient mechanical characteristics. However, there is a big risk of different electrical potentials of both of these metals in this type of non-demountable joints. The experimental part of this paper brings evaluation of mechanical-corrosion processes of overlapped joints produced by the CMT (cold metal transfer method. The base material for weld bead is dural sheet AlMg3 and dural sheet with a surface treatment aluzinc DX51D+AZ 150. Material AlSi5 in the form of a wire was used as an additional material for a welding bath. Method CMT was used in order to create a weld bead. Initial analysis of weld bead was done visually using a binocular microscope. Further, a metallographic analysis of weld bead and base material was processed. The aim was to identify the heat affected area around the welded joint. Microhardness of intermetallic aluminium phases was measured, after the identification of intermetallic phases a chemical analysis EDS was processed. Prepared samples underwent corrosion degradation in a salt spray environment in compliance with the norm ČSN EN ISO 9227. Visual and metallographic evaluation of the individual samples was processed after every week of exposition to the salt spray environment. The goal of this experiment was to record the initial impulse of galvanic corrosion which consists in corrosion degradation in the area of welded joint.

  15. Energy loss process analysis for radiation degradation and immediate recovery of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Beernink, Kevin; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    Performance degradation of a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe triple-junction solar cells due to irradiation of silicon ions, electrons, and protons are investigated using an in-situ current-voltage measurement system. The performance recovery immediately after irradiation is also investigated. Significant recovery is always observed independent of radiation species and temperature. It is shown that the characteristic time, which is obtained by analyzing the short-circuit current annealing behavior, is an important parameter for practical applications in space. In addition, the radiation degradation mechanism is discussed by analyzing the energy loss process of incident particles (ionizing energy loss: IEL, and non-ionizing energy loss: NIEL) and their relative damage factors. It is determined that ionizing dose is the primarily parameter for electron degradation whereas displacement damage dose is the primarily parameter for proton degradation. This is because the ratio of NIEL to IEL in the case of electrons is small enough to be ignored the damage due to NIEL although the defect creation ratio of NIEL is much larger than that of IEL in the cases of both protons and electrons. The impact of “radiation quality effect” has to be considered to understand the degradation due to Si ion irradiation.

  16. Tunable and processable shape memory composites based on degradable polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xi; Geven, Mike A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Peijs, Ton; Gautrot, Julien E.

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable shape memory polymers are attractive materials for the design of biomedical scaffolds as they allow deploying implants remotely with minimal intervention, whilst allowing degradation and tissue repair. However, shape memory properties are difficult to design from common degradable

  17. Degradation Processes of Pesticides Used in Potato Cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, M; Barchańska, H; Turek, M

    Potato is one of the most important crops, after maize, rice and wheat. Its global production is about 300 million tons per year and is constantly increasing. It grows in temperate climate and is used as a source of starch, food, and in breeding industry.Potato cultivation requires application of numerous agro-technical products, including pesticides, since it can be affected by insects, weeds, fungi, and viruses. In the European Union the most frequently used pesticides in potato cultivations check are: thiamethoxam, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin (insecticides), rimsulfuron (herbicide) and metalaxyl (fungicide).Application of pesticides improves crop efficiency, however, as pesticides are not totally selective, it affects also non-target organisms. Moreover, the agrochemicals may accumulate in crops and, as a consequence, negatively influence the quality of food products and consumer health. Additional risks of plant protection products are related to their derivatives, that are created both in the environment (soil, water) and in plant organisms, since many of these compounds may exhibit toxic effects.This article is devoted to the degradation processes of pesticides used in potato crop protection. Attention is also paid to the toxicity of both parent compounds and their degradation products for living organisms, including humans. Information about the level of pesticide contamination in the environment (water, soil) and accumulation level in edible plants complement the current knowledge about the risks associated with widespread use of thiamethoxam, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin, rimsulfuron and metalaxyl in potato cultivation.

  18. Integrated approach to the understanding of the degradation of an urban river: local perceptions, environmental parameters and geoprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Carolina A; Almeida Neto, Miguel S de; Aretakis, Gabriela M A; Santos, Rangel E; de Oliveira, Tiago H; Mourão, José S; Severi, William; El-Deir, Ana C A

    2015-09-15

    The use of interdisciplinary approaches such as the proposed report provides a broad understanding of the relationship between people and the environment, revealing reliable aspects not previously considered in the study of this relationship. This study compiled evidence on the environmental degradation of an urbanized river over the past few decades, providing a diagnosis of the consequences of this process for the river, its ichthyofauna, and the local human population. The study was focused on the Beira Rio community on the Capibaribe River in the municipality of São Lourenço da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil. Data were collected using geoprocessing and ethnobiological approaches, as well as environmental parameters. This research was conducted with the most experienced long-term residents in the local community, through interviews and participatory methodologies to recovering information about the river environment, its ichthyofauna and its environmental services for the last decades. According to the GIS analysis, the study area was subject to an accelerated process of urbanization, with the total urban area increasing from 73 565, 98 m(2) in 1974 to 383 363, 6 m(2) in 2005. The informants perceived the urban growth, especially in the late twentieth century, being this period recognized as the phase of greatest negative changes in the river environment. The perceived decline of fish stocks was indicated by the community as one of the effects of river degradation. According to the interviews, the deterioration of the river affected the ecosystem services and the relationship of the adjacent human community with this ecosystem. The environmental data indicated that the river is suffering eutrophization and has fecal coliform concentrations 160 times higher than the maximum level permitted by Brazilian legislation. The interdisciplinary approach used in this research allowed the understanding of the degradation process of an urban river and some negative effects

  19. Canadian programs on understanding and managing aging degradation of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadha, J.A.; Pachner, J.

    1989-06-01

    Maintaining adequate safety and reliability of nuclear power plants and nuclear power plant life assurance and life extension are growing in importance as nuclear plants get older. Age-related degradation of plant components is complex and not fully understood. This paper provides an overview of the Canadian approach and the main activities and their results towards understanding and managing age-related degradation of nuclear power plant components, structures and systems. A number of pro-active programs have been initiated to anticipate, detect and mitigate potential aging degradation at an early stage before any serious impact on plant safety and reliability. These programs include Operational Safety Management Program, Nuclear Plant Life Assurance Program, systematic plant condition assessment, refurbishment and upgrading, post-service examination and testing, equipment qualification, research and development, and participation in the IAEA programs on safety aspects of nuclear power plant aging and life extension. A regulatory policy on nuclear power plants is under development and will be based on the domestic as well as foreign and international studies and experience

  20. State of the art review of degradation processes in LMFBR materials. Volume II. Corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Degradation of materials exposed to Na in LMFBR service is reviewed. The degradation processes are discussed in sections on corrosion and mass transfer, erosion, wear and self welding, sodium--water reactions, and external corrosion. (JRD)

  1. Understanding the Sales Process by Selling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussière, Dave

    2017-01-01

    Experiential projects bring students closer to real-world situations. This is valuable in sales education because the complexities of the sales process are difficult to learn from a textbook. A student project was developed that involved the selling of advertising space in a one-time newspaper insert. The project included a substantial minimum…

  2. Obsolescence – understanding the underlying processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Obsolescence, defined as the process of declining performance of buildings, is a serious threat for the value, the usefulness and the life span of built properties. Thomsen and van der Flier (2011) developed a model in which obsolescence is categorised on the basis of two distinctions, i.e. between

  3. Understanding Modeling Requirements of Unstructured Business Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allah Bukhsh, Zaharah; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Quartel, Dick

    2017-01-01

    Management of structured business processes is of interest to both academia and industry, where academia focuses on the development of methods and techniques while industry focuses on the development of supporting tools. With the shift from routine to knowledge work, the relevance of management of

  4. Theoretical investigation of loratadine reactivity in order to understand its degradation properties: DFT and MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J; Abramović, Biljana F

    2016-10-01

    Antihistamines are frequently used pharmaceuticals that treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Loratadine (LOR) is an active component of the second generation of selective antihistaminic pharmaceutical usually known as Claritin. Frequent usage of this type of pharmaceuticals imposes the need for understanding their fundamental reactive properties. In this study we have theoretically investigated reactive properties of LOR using both density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. DFT study is used for collecting information related to the molecule stability, structure, frontier molecular orbitals, quantum molecular descriptors, charge distribution, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, charge polarization, and local reactivity properties according to average local ionization energy surfaces. Based on these results, N24 atom of pyridine ring and oxygen atom O1 were identified with nucleophilic nature. In order to collect the information necessary for the proposition of degradation compounds we also calculated bond dissociation energies (BDE) for hydrogen abstraction and single acyclic bonds as well. According to BDE, the oxidation is likely to occur in the piperidine and cycloheptane rings. MD simulations were used in order to understand the interactions with water through radial distribution functions (RDF). Based on RDFs the most important interactions with solvent are determined for carbon atom C5, chlorine atom Cl15, and oxygen atom O1. Collected results based on DFT calculations and MD simulations provided information important for suggestion of possible degradation compounds. Covalent and noncovalent interactions between LOR and (•)OH have also been investigated.

  5. Why do I hear but not understand? Stochastic undersampling as a model of degraded neural encoding of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique A Lopez-Poveda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment is a serious disease with increasing prevalence. It is defined based on increased audiometric thresholds but increased thresholds are only partly responsible for the greater difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments experienced by some older listeners or by hearing-impaired listeners. Identifying the additional factors and mechanisms that impair intelligibility is fundamental to understanding hearing impairment but these factors remain uncertain. Traditionally, these additional factors have been sought in the way the speech spectrum is encoded in the pattern of impaired mechanical cochlear responses. Recent studies, however, are steering the focus toward impaired encoding of the speech waveform in the auditory nerve. In our recent work, we gave evidence that a significant factor might be the loss of afferent auditory nerve fibers, a pathology that comes with aging or noise overexposure. Our approach was based on a signal-processing analogy whereby the auditory nerve may be regarded as a stochastic sampler of the sound waveform and deafferentation may be described in terms of waveform undersampling. We showed that stochastic undersampling simultaneously degrades the encoding of soft and rapid waveform features, and that this degrades speech intelligibility in noise more than in quiet without significant increases in audiometric thresholds. Here, we review our recent work in a broader context and argue that the stochastic undersampling analogy may be extended to study the perceptual consequences of various different hearing pathologies and their treatment.

  6. Degradation Processes in Corona-Charged Electret Filter-Media

    OpenAIRE

    Warren J. Jasper, Ph.D; Roger Barker, Ph.D.; Anushree Mohan; Juan Hinestroza, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of filtration performance for coronachargedelectret filter media exposed to ethyl benzenewas assessed. Nonwoven corona-charged polypropylenefiber mats were exposed to ethyl-benzene using acustom made apparatus. Evaluated scenarios includedethyl-benzene vapor and liquid exposures. The filtrationperformance was evaluated using DOP as a testaerosol to measure filtration performance. It was observedthat significant filtration degradation occurredonly when liquid ethyl benzene came...

  7. Application of controlled radiation-induced degradation in polymers: less exploited aspect of radiation processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji Saeid, M.; Guven, O.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial use of ionizing radiation treatment has been most successful in applications related to polymeric materials. The polymer, plastics and rubber industries have benefited from the unique advantages of ionizing radiation since its inception as an industrial tool to modify their properties and manufacture novel materials with value addition to the end product. The established and emerging applications of electron beam processing of polymers are based on the well known ultimate effects of ionizing radiation on polymers namely, crosslinking, curing, grafting and chain scissioning. Radiation-induced crosslinking dominates most applications, whereas the chain scissioning effect is much less explored and currently limited to radiation-induced degradation of Teflon, cellulose and polypropylene. The controlling of radiation-induced degradation for achieving a target average molecular weight or distribution has been evaluated for some polysaccharides, biopolymers and waste inner tubes whereas mitigation of the degradative effects of radiation has been analyzed from the point of view of using certain stabilizers, copolymers and annealing at an appropriate temperature. Several new or highly specialized techniques such as positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis and solid waste NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been applied to the study or radiation-induced degradation. New information has been collected on the morphological changes associated with radiation-induced degradation processes, including chain scission, oxidation and free volume alteration. The IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Controlling of Degradation Effects in Radiation Processing of Polymers dealt with the role and importance of using ionizing radiation in controlling properties of natural and synthetic polymers through its degradative effect. This paper provides a summary of most important results

  8. UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS AMY MCGOVERN, TIMOTHY SUPINIE, DAVID JOHN GAGNE II, NATHANIEL TROUTMAN,...

  9. Degradation process in organic thin film devices fabricated using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hexylthiophene); organic semiconductors; conducting polymers; degradation. ... The stability of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene 2,5-diyl) (P3HT) thin films sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) and aluminium (Al) electrodes have ...

  10. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics'era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment's complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment's reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying "omics" approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition, we

  11. Effect of Linked Rules on Business Process Model Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei; Indulska, Marta; Sadiq, Shazia

    2017-01-01

    of business processes has not been empirically evaluated. In this paper, we report on an experiment that investigates the effect of linked rules, a specific rule integration approach, on business process model understanding. Our results indicate that linked rules are associated with better time efficiency......Business process models are widely used in organizations by information systems analysts to represent complex business requirements and by business users to understand business operations and constraints. This understanding is extracted from graphical process models as well as business rules. Prior...... research advocated integrating business rules into business process models to improve the effectiveness of important organizational activities, such as developing shared understanding, effective communication, and process improvement. However, whether such integrated modeling can improve the understanding...

  12. Unveiling the irreversible performance degradation of organo-inorganic halide perovskite films and solar cells during heating and cooling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, Abdullah Al; Ava, Tanzila Tasnim; Byun, Hye Ryung; Jeong, Hyeon Jun; Jeong, Mun Seok; Nguyen, Loi; Gausin, Christine; Namkoong, Gon

    2017-07-26

    While organo-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells show great potential to meet future energy needs, their thermal instability raises serious questions about their commercialization viability. At present, the stability of perovskite solar cells has been studied under various environmental conditions including humidity and temperature. Nonetheless, understanding of the performance of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x perovskite solar cells is limited. This study reports the irreversible performance degradation of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x perovskite solar cells during the heating and cooling processes under AM 1.5 and unveils what triggers the irreversible performance degradation of solar cells. Particularly, the primary cause of the irreversible performance degradation of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x is quantitatively analyzed by monitoring in real time the development of deteriorated crystallinity, charge trapping/detrapping, trap depth, and the PbI 2 phase, namely a critical signal of perovskite degradation while varying the temperature of the perovskite films and solar cells. Most surprisingly, it is revealed that the degradation of both perovskite films and solar cells was triggered at ∼70 °C. Remarkably, even after the device temperature cooled down to room temperature, the degraded performance of the solar cells persisted with increasing charge trapping and further development of the PbI 2 phase. Identification of the irreversible performance degradation of perovskite solar cells provides guidance for future development of more stable perovskite solar cells.

  13. Thermal degradation process of poly (alpha-methylstyrene) microspheres coated with glow discharge polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhanwen; Huang Yong; Tang Yongjian; Li Bo; Chen Sufen; He Zhibing

    2009-01-01

    Glow discharge polymer (GDP) shell was made by the decomposable mandrel technique using poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PAMS) mandrel. The PAMS degradation rate and the GDP shell surface morphology at different equilibrium temperatures were investigated. Degradation rate was calculated from weight variation of PAMS before and after pyrolysis process. Experiment results indicate that the degradation rate decreases at the fixed equilibrium temperature and graded temperature can improve the rate. The degradation process has an effect on the GDP shell properties. The PAMS doesn't molten to flow liquid during degradation. But the degradation can reduce surface finish of GDP coatings. The GDP shell deffects are the result of the PAMS degradiation process. (authors)

  14. Degradation process in organic thin film devices fabricated using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poly(3-hexylthiophene); organic semiconductors; conducting polymers; degradation. PACS Nos 73.61.Ph; 78.40.Me; 72.80.Le. 1. Introduction. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of organic materials for applications as microelectronic devices. Polymer diodes, transistors, solar cells and gas sensors ...

  15. Landform Degradation and Slope Processes on Io: The Galileo View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Chuang, Frank C.; Head, James W., III; McEwen, Alfred S.; Milazzo, Moses P.; Nixon, Brian E.; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Schenk, Paul M.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo mission has revealed remarkable evidence of mass movement and landform degradation on Io. We recognize four major slope types observed on a number of intermediate resolution (250 m/pixel) images and several additional textures on very high resolution (10 m/pixel) images. Slopes and scarps on Io often show evidence of erosion, seen in the simplest form as alcove-carving slumps and slides at all scales. Many of the mass movement deposits on Io are probably mostly the consequence of block release and brittle slope failure. Sputtering plays no significant role. Sapping as envisioned by McCauley et al. remains viable. We speculate that alcove-lined canyons seen in one observation and lobed deposits seen along the bases of scarps in several locations may reflect the plastic deformation and 'glacial' flow of interstitial volatiles (e.g., SO2) heated by locally high geothermal energy to mobilize the volatile. The appearance of some slopes and near-slope surface textures seen in very high resolution images is consistent with erosion from sublimation-degradation. However, a suitable volatile (e.g., H2S) that can sublimate fast enough to alter Io's youthful surface has not been identified. Disaggregation from chemical decomposition of solid S2O and other polysulfur oxides may conceivably operate on Io. This mechanism could degrade landforms in a manner that resembles degradation from sublimation, and at a rate that can compete with resurfacing.

  16. Understanding the Complexity of Social Issues through Process Drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Attempts to capture the process of understanding and questioning deforestation through process drama (in which students and teacher work both in and out of role to explore a problem, situation, or theme). Notes that moving topics such as the destruction of a rainforest into process drama introduces complexity into social issues. Considers how…

  17. Task-specific visual cues for improving process model understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusel, Razvan; Mendling, Jan; Reijers, Hajo A.

    2016-01-01

    Context Business process models support various stakeholders in managing business processes and designing process-aware information systems. In order to make effective use of these models, they have to be readily understandable. Objective Prior research has emphasized the potential of visual cues to

  18. Kinetic studies on the degradation of crystal violet by the Fenton oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Fan, M M; Li, C F; Peng, M; Sheng, L J; Pan, Q; Song, G W

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of dye crystal violet (CV) by Fenton oxidation process was investigated. The UV-Vis spectrogram has shown that CV can be degraded effectively by Fenton oxidation process. Different system variables namely initial H(2)O(2) concentration, initial Fe(2 + ) concentration and reaction temperature, which have effect on the degradation of CV by Fenton oxidation process, have been studied systematically. The degradation kinetics of CV was also elucidated based on the experimental data. The degradation of CV obeys the first-order reaction kinetics. The kinetic model can be described as k=1.5 exp(-(7.5)/(RT))[H(2)O(2)](0)(0.8718)[Fe(2+)](0)(0.5062). According to the IR spectrogram, it is concluded that the benzene ring of crystal violet has been destroyed by Fenton oxidation. The result will be useful in treating dyeing wastewater containing CV by Fenton oxidation process.

  19. Effective degradation of organic water pollutants by atmospheric non-thermal plasma torch and analysis of degradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansode, Avinash S; More, Supriya E; Siddiqui, Ejaz Ahmad; Satpute, Shruti; Ahmad, Absar; Bhoraskar, Sudha V; Mathe, Vikas L

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports the use of atmospheric non-thermal plasma torch as a catalyst for degradation of various organic pollutants dissolved in water. A flow of He mixed with air was used to produce the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), at the tip of the torch, using pulsed electric excitation at 12 kV. The torch, operated at a power of 750 mW/mm 2 , was seen to completely degrade the aqueous solutions of the pollutants namely methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO) and rhodamine-B (RB), at around 10 -4  M concentrations, the concentration of polluants is one order higher than of routinely used heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions, within 10 min of irradiation time at room temperature. UV Visible spectra of the organic dye molecules, monitored after different intervals of plasma-irradiation, ranging between 1 and 10 min, have been used as tools to quantify their sequential degradation. Further, instead of using He, only air was used to form plasma plume and used for degradation of organic dye which follow similar trend as that of He plasma. Further, Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (LCMS) technique has been used to understand degradation pathway of methylene blue (MB) as a representative case. Total organic carbon (TOC) measurements indicates significant decrease in its content as a function of duration of plasma exposure onto methylene blue as a representative case. Toxicity studies were carried out onto Gram negative Escherichia coli. This indicated that methylene blue, without plasma treatment, shows growth inhibition, whereas with plasma treatment no inhibition was observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Increasing process understanding by analyzing complex interactions in experimental data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naelapaa, Kaisa; Allesø, Morten; Kristensen, Henning Gjelstrup

    2009-01-01

    There is a recognized need for new approaches to understand unit operations with pharmaceutical relevance. A method for analyzing complex interactions in experimental data is introduced. Higher-order interactions do exist between process parameters, which complicate the interpretation...... understanding of a coating process. It was possible to model the response, that is, the amount of drug released, using both mentioned techniques. However, the ANOVAmodel was difficult to interpret as several interactions between process parameters existed. In contrast to ANOVA, GEMANOVA is especially suited...... for modeling complex interactions and making easily understandable models of these. GEMANOVA modeling allowed a simple visualization of the entire experimental space. Furthermore, information was obtained on how relative changes in the settings of process parameters influence the film quality and thereby drug...

  1. Degradation of bisphenol A using electrochemical assistant Fe(II-activated peroxydisulfate process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-wei Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of bisphenol A (BPA in aqueous solution using sulfate radicals was investigated using the Fe(II-activated peroxydisulfate (PDS process, electrochemical process, electrochemical process with 2.5 mmol/L Na2S2O8 without Fe(II, and electrochemical assistant Fe(II-activated PDS process. It was found that the electrochemical assistant Fe(II-activated PDS process performed best in the degradation of BPA. The variables considered to influence the degradation efficiency of BPA were the initial concentration of Fe2+, the initial concentration of Na2S2O8, and the current density. More than 97% of the BPA removals were achieved within 120 min under the optimum operational condition. The degradation of BPA was accompanied by the formation of phenol, hydroquinone, and small-molecule compounds such as succinic acid. The electron transfer was the principal step in the oxidation of BPA.

  2. Environmental persistence of pesticides and their ecotoxicity: A review of natural degradation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez Valderrama, Jhon Fredy; Palacio Baena, Jaime Alberto; Molina Perez, Francisco Jose

    2012-01-01

    Pesticides are allochthonous pollutants discharged in natural environments. Once in the environment, natural factors such as biodegradation, photodegradation and chemical hydrolysis trigger partial or total pesticide transformation and reduce their environmental persistence. However, some degraded compounds have a greater ecotoxicological effect on the biota that the parent compounds and the change in the physicochemical properties increase the bioaccumulation, toxicity and transference processes. Therefore, knowledge about degradation processes in the environment is crucial in studies related to the dynamics and behavior of these substances in the environment and the impact on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This review aims to show the influence of natural degradation processes on the persistence of pesticides, their ecotoxicity and dynamics. Also discuss the application of the degradation processes in water treatment and pesticides removal. While biodegradation processes have been improved by using genetically engineered microorganisms, in the photodegradation has been applied advanced oxidation technologies (TAOS) in the treatment of water contaminated with pesticides.

  3. Understanding and Managing Process Interaction in IS Development Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a challenge for the IS project manager, since business change and information systems development usually are performed as separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage......-technical innovation in a situation where the organisational change process and the IS development process are parallel but incongruent. We also argue that iterative software engineering frameworks are well structured to support process interaction. Finally, we advocate that the IS project manager needs to manage...... the relationship between these two kinds of processes. To understand the interaction between information systems development and planned organisational change we introduce the concept of process interaction. We draw on a longitudinal case study of an IS development project that used an iterative and incremental...

  4. Understanding the process of greening of Brazilian business schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbour, C.J.C.; Sarkis, J.; De Sousa Jabbour, A.B.L.

    2013-01-01

    activities; (d) paradoxically, the analyzed business schools can be considered academic leaders in the field, but have had difficulties in adopting environmental management practices internally; (e) there is a "path dependence" effect in this process; (f) there are barriers to organizational change towards...... green business schools; (g) institutional entrepreneurs are important to the process of greening. This research represents the first research shedding light to understanding the process of greening of Brazilian business schools while considering the multidimensional aspects (teaching, research, outreach...

  5. Understanding Control Function and Failure From a Process Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai; Lind, Morten

    2012-01-01

    In control design, fault-identification and fault tolerant control, the controlled process is usually perceived as a dynamical process, captured in a mathematical model. The design of a control system for a complex process, however, begins typically long before these mathematical models become...... relevant and available. To consider the role of control functions in process design, a good qualitative understanding of the process as well as of control functions is required. As the purpose of a control function is closely tied to the process functions, its failure has a direct effects on the process...... behaviour and its function. This paper presents a formal methodology for the qualitative representation of control functions in relation to their process context. Different types of relevant process and control abstractions are introduced and their application to formal analysis of control failure modes...

  6. Real-time scattered light dark-field microscopic imaging of the dynamic degradation process of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-28

    Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of NaDDC under neutral and alkaline conditions was proposed, and the inhibition effects of metal ions including Zn(II) and Cu(II) were investigated in order to understand the decomposition process in different environments. It was found that Cu(II) forms the most stable complex with NaDDC with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 2, which greatly reduces the toxicity.

  7. Thermo-mechanical processing of austenitic steel to mitigate surface related degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idell, Yaakov Jonathan

    Thermo-mechanical processing plays an important role in materials property optimization through microstructure modification, required by demanding modern materials applications. Due to the critical role of austenitic stainless steels, such as 316L, as structural components in harsh environments, e.g. in nuclear power plants, improved degradation resistance is desirable. A novel two-dimensional plane strain machining process has shown promise achieving significant grain size refinement through severe plastic deformation (SPD) and imparting large strains in the surface and subsurface regions of the substrate in various metals and alloys. The deformation process creates a heavily deformed 20 -- 30 micron thick nanocrystalline surface layer with increased hardness and minimal martensite formation. Post-deformation processing annealing treatments have been applied to assess stability of the refined scale microstructures and the potential for obtaining grain boundary engineered microstructures with increased fraction of low-energy grain boundaries and altered grain boundary network structure. Varying the deformation and heat treatment process parameters, allows for development of a full understanding of the nanocrystalline layer and cross-section of the surface substrate created. Micro-characterization was performed using hardness measurements, magnetometry, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy to assess property and microstructural changes. This study provides a fundamental understanding of two-dimensional plane strain machining as a thermo-mechanical processing technique, which may in the future deliver capabilities for creating grain boundary engineered surface modified components, typified by a combination of grain refinement with improved grain boundary network interconnectivity attributes suitable for use in harsh environments, such as those in commercial nuclear power plants where improved resistance to irradiation stress corrosion

  8. A Miniature Membrane Reactor for Evaluation of Process Design Options on the Enzymatic Degradation of Pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zainal Alam, Muhd Nazrul Hisham; Pinelo, Manuel; Arnous, Anis

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess if a membrane microbioreactor system could potentially be used to diagnose consequences of different process design and reactor operation options relevant for larger-scale enzymatic degradation of pectin reactions. The membrane microbioreactor prototype...... design affected the membrane rejection profile. The results obtained thus underlined the suitability of a miniature membrane reactor system for evaluating different process design options that are relevant for larger-scale reactions of enzymatic pectin degradation....

  9. Investigation of the degradation mechanism of catalytic wires during oxidation of ammonia process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pura, Jarosław, E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wieciński, Piotr; Kwaśniak, Piotr; Zwolińska, Marta; Garbacz, Halina; Zdunek, Joanna [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Laskowski, Zbigniew; Gierej, Maciej [Precious Metal Mint, Weteranów 95, 05-250 Radzymin (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Degradation mechanisms of precious metal catalytic gauzes is proposed. • Significant change of gauzes morphology and chemical composition was observed. • Samples were analyzed using SEM, EDS and micro-XCT techniques. - Abstract: The most common catalysts for the ammonia oxidation process are 80 μm diameter platinum-rhodium wires knitted or woven into the form of a gauze. In an aggressive environment and under extreme conditions (temperature 800–900 °C, intensive gas flow, high pressure) precious elements are drained from the surface of the wires. Part of this separated material quickly decomposes on the surface in the form of characteristic “cauliflower-shape protrusions”. The rest of the platinum is captured by palladium-nickel catalytic-capture gauzes located beneath. In our investigation we focused on the effects of the degradation of gauzes from one industrial catalytic system. The aim of the study was to compare the degree and the mechanism of degradation of gauzes from a different part of the reactor. The study covered PtRh7 catalytic and PdNi5 catalytic-capture gauzes. X-ray computer microtomography investigation revealed that despite strong differences in morphology, each Pt-Rh wire has a similar specific surface area. This indicates that the oxidation process and morphological changes of the wires occur in a self-regulating balance, resulting in the value of the specific surface area of the catalyst. Microtomography analysis of Pd-Ni wires revealed strong redevelopment of the wires’ surface, which is related to the platinum capture phenomenon. Scanning electron microscope observations also revealed the nanostructure in the cauliflower-shape protrusions and large grains in the wires’ preserved cores. The high temperature in the reactor and the long-term nature of the process do not favor the occurrence of the nanostructure in this type of material. Further and detailed analysis of this phenomena will provide a better

  10. Lignocellulose Biomass: Constitutive Polymers. Biological Processes of Lignin Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Manzanares, P.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the lignocellulosic materials and the chemical composition of their main constitutive polymers, cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are described. The most promising transformation processes according to the type of biomass considered: hardwood, softwood an herbaceous and the perspectives of biotechnological processes for bio pulping, bio bleaching and effluents decolorisation in the paper pulp industry are also discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  11. Distribution of electrical energy consumption for the efficient degradation control of THMs mixture in sonophotolytic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beomguk; Cho, Eunju; Son, Younggyu; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2014-11-01

    Sonophotolytic degradation of THMs mixture with different electrical energy ratio was carried out for efficient design of process. The total consumed electrical energy was fixed around 50W, and five different energy conditions were applied. The maximum degradation rate showed in conditions of US:UV=1:3 and US:UV=0:4. This is because the photolytic degradation of bromate compounds is dominant degradation mechanism for THMs removal. However, the fastest degradation of total organic carbon was observed in a condition of US:UV=1:3. Because hydrogen peroxide generated by sonication was effectively dissociated to hydroxyl radicals by ultraviolet, the concentration of hydroxyl radical was maintained high. This mechanism provided additional degradation of organics. This result was supported by comparison between the concentration of hydrogen peroxide sole and combined process. Consequently, the optimal energy ratio was US:UV=1:3 for degradation of THMs in sonophotolytic process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preliminary degradation process study of infectious biological waste in a 5 k W thermal plasma equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xochihua S M, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    This work is a preliminary study of infectious biological waste degradation process by thermal plasma and was made in Thermal Plasma Applications Laboratory of Environmental Studies Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). Infectious biological waste degradation process is realized by using samples such polyethylene, cotton, glass, etc., but the present study scope is to analyze polyethylene degradation process with mass and energy balances involved. Degradation method is realized as follow: a polyethylene sample is put in an appropriated crucible localized inside a pyrolysis reactor chamber, the plasma jet is projected to the sample, by the pyrolysis phenomena the sample is degraded into its constitutive particles: carbon and hydrogen. Air was utilized as a recombination gas in order to obtain the higher percent of CO 2 if amount of O 2 is greater in the recombination gas, the CO generation is reduced. The effluent gases of exhaust pyrolysis reactor through are passed through a heat exchanger to get cooled gases, the temperature water used is 15 Centigrade degrees. Finally the gases was tried into absorption tower with water as an absorbent fluid. Thermal plasma degradation process is a very promising technology, but is necessary to develop engineering process area to avail all advantages of thermal plasma. (Author)

  13. Understanding the folding process of synthetic polymers by small ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    *For correspondence. Understanding the folding process of synthetic polymers by ... Conformational control in biological macromole- cules depends largely ... context of sensors. 11–13 and more recently with regard to foldamers. 14–17. In these systems, the com- plexation of the OE segment by a metal-ion leads to either a ...

  14. Understanding the folding process of synthetic polymers by small ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Understanding the folding process of synthetic polymers by small-molecule folding agents. S G RAMKUMAR and S RAMAKRISHNAN*. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 e-mail: raman@ipc.iisc.ernet.in. Abstract. Two acceptor containing polyimides PDI and NDI ...

  15. Understanding the Advising Learning Process Using Learning Taxonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleck, Jeanette K.; Smith, Cathleen L.; Allen, Janine M.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the learning that transpires in advising, we used Anderson et al.'s (2001) revision of Bloom's (1956) taxonomy and Krathwohl, Bloom, and Masia's (1964) affective taxonomy to analyze eight student-reported advising outcomes from Smith and Allen (2014). Using the cognitive processes and knowledge domains of Anderson et al.'s…

  16. Understanding the Process by Which New Employees Enter Work Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Donald B.

    1977-01-01

    The Group Integration Process, described in this article, serves as a broad and guiding set of steps (invitation, induction, orientation, training, relationship, and integration) that helps the supervisor better understand what is to be done in managing a new employee's entrance into a work group. (TA)

  17. Understanding the IT/business partnership - a business process perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siurdyban, Artur

    2014-01-01

    From a business process perspective, the business value of information technologies (IT) stems from how they improve or enable business processes. At the same time, in the field of strategic IT/business alignment, the locus of discussion has been how IT/business partnerships enhance the value of IT....... Despite this apparent relationship, the business process perspective has been absent from the IT/business alignment discussion. In this paper, we use the case of an industrial company to develop a model for understanding IT/business partnerships in business process terms. Based on our findings, we define...... these partnerships by allocating responsibilities between central IT and the local business during two stages of a process lifecycle: formation and standardization. The significance of the findings lies in how the model’s configuration leads to different types of IT units’ process centricity. This in turn affects...

  18. Degradation of acrylamide by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ze-Chen; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Pan, Yang; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Gao, Nai-Yun; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Chen, Ming

    2017-11-01

    The degradation of acrylamide (AA) during UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated in this study. The degradation of AA was negligible during UV irradiation alone. However, AA could be effectively degraded and mineralized during UV/chlorination due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH). The degradation kinetics of AA during UV/chlorination fitted the pseudo-first order kinetics with the rate constant between AA and OH radicals being determined as 2.11 × 10 9  M -1  s -1 . The degradation rate and mineralization of AA during UV/chlorination were significantly promoted at acidic conditions as well as increasing chlorine dosage. The volatile degradation products of AA during UV/chlorination were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed accordingly. The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in Milli-Q water and tap water during UV/chlorination of AA was also investigated. The DBPs included chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, 2,2-dichloroacetamide and 2,2,2-trichloroacetamide. Furthermore, the variations of AA degradation during UV/chlorination in different real water samples were evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Processing of growth hormone by rat adipocytes in primary culture: differentiation between release of intact hormone and degradative processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupas, P; Herington, A C

    1987-10-01

    Rat adipocytes in primary culture have been used to study the intracellular processing of GH. These classic target cells for GH have been shown to process GH through two pathways: a nondegradative pathway which resulted in the rapid release of intact GH, and a slower, degradative pathway which involved the degradation of GH and release of degraded ligand. Differentiation between the two pathways was on the basis of differences in their kinetics and temperature dependence. The present study has investigated the relative characteristics of the two pathways further. Incubation of [125I]human GH ([125I]hGH)-preloaded adipocytes with extracellular unlabeled hGH (400 ng/ml) resulted in an increase in the absolute amount of [125I]hGH released. The increased amount of [125I]hGH released was all intact. Extracellular, unlabeled hGH had no effect on the rate or amount of degraded [125I]hGH released. This suggests that the nondegradative pathway is sensitive to the number of internalized hormone-receptor complexes and that GH which is not immediately degraded or stored in the degradative pathway, is redirected and processed via the faster non-degradative pathway. Ammonium chloride (known to inhibit the lysosomal degradation of many polypeptide hormones) markedly inhibited the absolute amount of [125I]hGH released from preloaded adipocytes. This inhibition was due to an effect on the release of degraded [125I]hGH. NH4Cl had no effect on the rate or amount of intact [125I]hGH released. Finally, it was found that dinitrophenol and sodium fluoride (agents known to deplete cellular energy) inhibited the release of degraded GH but not intact GH suggesting that the degradative pathway involves an energy-dependent step, most likely the fusion of hormone-containing vesicles with the lysosomal membrane. The mechanism of release of intact hormone by energy-independent means is not yet known. These data indicate that the processing of GH by cultured rat adipocytes is complex and involves

  20. Optimization of process variables for the microbial degradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... 1Biochemical Engineering Research Unit, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of. Technology, Ogbomoso ... three process parameters for phenol biodegradation was studied. Statistically designed ... tually may reach down to streams, rivers, lakes, and soil, which represent a ...

  1. Reliability demonstration methodology for products with Gamma Process by optimal accelerated degradation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Xiang; Tan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yashun

    2015-01-01

    For products with high reliability and long lifetime, accelerated degradation testing (ADT) may be adopted during product development phase to verify whether its reliability satisfies the predetermined level within feasible test duration. The actual degradation from engineering is usually a strictly monotonic process, such as fatigue crack growth, wear, and erosion. However, the method for reliability demonstration by ADT with monotonic degradation process has not been investigated so far. This paper proposes a reliability demonstration methodology by ADT for this kind of product. We first apply Gamma process to describe the monotonic degradation. Next, we present a reliability demonstration method by converting the required reliability level into allowable cumulative degradation in ADT and comparing the actual accumulative degradation with the allowable level. Further, we suggest an analytical optimal ADT design method for more efficient reliability demonstration by minimizing the asymptotic variance of decision variable in reliability demonstration under the constraints of sample size, test duration, test cost, and predetermined decision risks. The method is validated and illustrated with example on reliability demonstration of alloy product, and is applied to demonstrate the wear reliability within long service duration of spherical plain bearing in the end. - Highlights: • We present a reliability demonstration method by ADT for products with monotonic degradation process, which may be applied to verify reliability with long service life for products with monotonic degradation process within feasible test duration. • We suggest an analytical optimal ADT design method for more efficient reliability demonstration, which differs from the existed optimal ADT design for more accurate reliability estimation by different objective function and different constraints. • The methods are applied to demonstrate the wear reliability within long service duration of

  2. Degradation data analysis based on a generalized Wiener process subject to measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxing; Wang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yongbo; Fu, Huimin; Liu, Chengrui; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2017-09-01

    Wiener processes have received considerable attention in degradation modeling over the last two decades. In this paper, we propose a generalized Wiener process degradation model that takes unit-to-unit variation, time-correlated structure and measurement error into considerations simultaneously. The constructed methodology subsumes a series of models studied in the literature as limiting cases. A simple method is given to determine the transformed time scale forms of the Wiener process degradation model. Then model parameters can be estimated based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) and the probability distribution function (PDF) of the Wiener process with measurement errors are given based on the concept of the first hitting time (FHT). The percentiles of performance degradation (PD) and failure time distribution (FTD) are also obtained. Finally, a comprehensive simulation study is accomplished to demonstrate the necessity of incorporating measurement errors in the degradation model and the efficiency of the proposed model. Two illustrative real applications involving the degradation of carbon-film resistors and the wear of sliding metal are given. The comparative results show that the constructed approach can derive a reasonable result and an enhanced inference precision.

  3. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  4. Diamex process: hydrolytic and radiolytic degradation of the diamide extractant DMDOHEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthon, L.; Cames, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydrolysis and radiolysis of a diamide (malonamide) which is the extractant of the DIAMEX process for the extraction of minor actinides from high level liquid radioactive waste. The semi-developed formula of the malonamides investigated is RR'NCO(CHR'')CONRR' (where R, R' and R'' are alkyl or oxy-alkyl groups). The formula of the extractant molecule has been optimized and has led to DMDOHEMA (NN'-dimethyl N,N'-di-octyl hexyl-oxy-ethyl malonamide: (C 8 H 17 (CH 3 )NCO) 2 CH(C 2 H 4 OC 6 H 13 )) which is the present reference extractant for the DIAMEX process. The aim of this study was to: -identify and quantify the main DMDOHEMA degradation products; - identify the potential degradation pathways for diamides; -correlate the concentration of the identified degradation products with the extracting properties of the spent solvents to identify the most disturbing degradation products. (authors)

  5. Understanding degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells through modeling of electrochemical potential profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2016-01-01

    conductivities in the electrolyte, the gas composition, temperature, and pressure on the current density distribution over the cell and the oxygen activity distribution within the electrolyte. The developed model is further used to simulate long-term durability experiments during different stages of operation......, thereby helping to rationalize microstructural and chemical changes observed in post-mortem analysis. Finally, measures to mitigate degradation by changing conditions of operation, material or electrode properties or overall cell geometry are suggested....

  6. A New Alkali-Stable Phosphonium Cation Based on Fundamental Understanding of Degradation Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingzi; Kaspar, Robert B; Gu, Shuang; Wang, Junhua; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Yan, Yushan

    2016-09-08

    Highly alkali-stable cationic groups are a critical component of hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs). To search for such cations, we studied the degradation kinetics and mechanisms of a series of quaternary phosphonium (QP) cations. Benzyl tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium [BTPP-(2,4,6-MeO)] was determined to have higher alkaline stability than the benchmark cation, benzyl trimethylammonium (BTMA). A multi-step methoxy-triggered degradation mechanism for BTPP-(2,4,6-MeO) was proposed and verified. By replacing methoxy substituents with methyl groups, a superior QP cation, methyl tris(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)phosphonium [MTPP-(2,4,6-Me)] was developed. MTPP-(2,4,6-Me) is one of the most stable cations reported to date, with <20 % degradation after 5000 h at 80 °C in a 1 m KOD in CD3 OD/D2 O (5:1 v/v) solution. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Development and Performance of a Highly Sensitive Model Formulation Based on Torasemide to Enhance Hot-Melt Extrusion Process Understanding and Process Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rachel C; Kyeremateng, Samuel O; Asmus, Lutz; Degenhardt, Matthias; Rosenberg, Joerg; Wagner, Karl G

    2018-02-27

    The aim of this work was to investigate the use of torasemide as a highly sensitive indicator substance and to develop a formulation thereof for establishing quantitative relationships between hot-melt extrusion process conditions and critical quality attributes (CQAs). Using solid-state characterization techniques and a 10 mm lab-scale co-rotating twin-screw extruder, we studied torasemide in a Soluplus® (SOL)-polyethylene glycol 1500 (PEG 1500) matrix, and developed and characterized a formulation which was used as a process indicator to study thermal- and hydrolysis-induced degradation, as well as residual crystallinity. We found that torasemide first dissolved into the matrix and then degraded. Based on this mechanism, extrudates with measurable levels of degradation and residual crystallinity were produced, depending strongly on the main barrel and die temperature and residence time applied. In addition, we found that 10% w/w PEG 1500 as plasticizer resulted in the widest operating space with the widest range of measurable residual crystallinity and degradant levels. Torasemide as an indicator substance behaves like a challenging-to-process API, only with higher sensitivity and more pronounced effects, e.g., degradation and residual crystallinity. Application of a model formulation containing torasemide will enhance the understanding of the dynamic environment inside an extruder and elucidate the cumulative thermal and hydrolysis effects of the extrusion process. The use of such a formulation will also facilitate rational process development and scaling by establishing clear links between process conditions and CQAs.

  8. Understanding uncertainty in process-based hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. P.; Kavetski, D.; Slater, A. G.; Newman, A. J.; Marks, D. G.; Landry, C.; Lundquist, J. D.; Rupp, D. E.; Nijssen, B.

    2013-12-01

    Building an environmental model requires making a series of decisions regarding the appropriate representation of natural processes. While some of these decisions can already be based on well-established physical understanding, gaps in our current understanding of environmental dynamics, combined with incomplete knowledge of properties and boundary conditions of most environmental systems, make many important modeling decisions far more ambiguous. There is consequently little agreement regarding what a 'correct' model structure is, especially at relatively larger spatial scales such as catchments and beyond. In current practice, faced with such a range of decisions, different modelers will generally make different modeling decisions, often on an ad hoc basis, based on their balancing of process understanding, the data available to evaluate the model, the purpose of the modeling exercise, and their familiarity with or investment in an existing model infrastructure. This presentation describes development and application of multiple-hypothesis models to evaluate process-based hydrologic models. Our numerical model uses robust solutions of the hydrology and thermodynamic governing equations as the structural core, and incorporates multiple options to represent the impact of different modeling decisions, including multiple options for model parameterizations (e.g., below-canopy wind speed, thermal conductivity, storage and transmission of liquid water through soil, etc.), as well as multiple options for model architecture, that is, the coupling and organization of different model components (e.g., representations of sub-grid variability and hydrologic connectivity, coupling with groundwater, etc.). Application of this modeling framework across a collection of different research basins demonstrates that differences among model parameterizations are often overwhelmed by differences among equally-plausible model parameter sets, while differences in model architecture lead

  9. Understanding the similarities and differences between ozone and peroxone in the degradation of naphthenic acids: Comparative performance for potential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshref, Mohamed N A; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Islam, Md Shahinoor; McPhedran, Kerry N; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Ozonation at high doses is a costly treatment for oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) naphthenic acids (NAs) degradation. To decrease costs and limit doses, different peroxone (hydrogen peroxide/ozone; H 2 O 2 :O 3 ) processes using mild-ozone doses of 30 and 50 mg/L were investigated. The degradation efficiency of O x -NAs (classical (O 2 -NAs) + oxidized NAs) improved from 58% at 30 mg/L ozone to 59%, 63% and 76% at peroxone (1:1), 50 mg/L ozone, and peroxone (1:2), respectively. Suppressing the hydroxyl radical (•OH) pathway by adding tert-butyl alcohol did significantly reduce the degradation in all treatments, while molecular ozone contribution was around 50% and 34% for O 2 -NAs and O x -NAs, respectively. Structure reactivity toward degradation was observed with degradation increase for both O 2 -NAs and O x -NAs with increase of both carbon (n) and hydrogen deficiency/or |-Z| numbers in all treatments. However, the combined effect of n and Z showed specific insights and differences between ozone and peroxone treatments. The degradation pathway for |-Z|≥10 isomers in ozone treatments through molecular ozone was significant compared to •OH. Though peroxone (1:2) highly reduced the fluorophore organics and toxicity to Vibrio fischeri, the best oxidant utilization in the degradation of O 2 -NAs (mg/L) per ozone dose (mg/L) was observed in the peroxone (1:1) (0.91) and 30 mg/L ozone treatments (0.92). At n = 9-11, peroxone (1:1) had similar or enhanced effect on the O 2 -NAs degradation compared to 50 mg/L ozone. Enhancing •OH pathway through peroxone versus ozone may be an effective OSPW treatment that will allow its safe release into receiving environments with marginal cost addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding and Managing Process Interaction in IS Development Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2012-01-01

    Software-based information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a major challenge, since business change and the development of software-based information systems usually are performed in separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage...... critical events in the case, what led to the events, and what the consequences are. We discuss the implications for information systems research and in particular we discuss the contribution to project management of iterative and incremental software development.......Software-based information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a major challenge, since business change and the development of software-based information systems usually are performed in separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage...

  11. Degraded speech sound processing in a rat model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T; Centanni, Tracy M; Im, Kwok W; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Buell, Elizabeth P; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-05-20

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. Impaired phonological processing in fragile X syndrome interferes with the development of language skills. Although auditory cortex responses are known to be abnormal in fragile X syndrome, it is not clear how these differences impact speech sound processing. This study provides the first evidence that the cortical representation of speech sounds is impaired in Fmr1 knockout rats, despite normal speech discrimination behavior. Evoked potentials and spiking activity in response to speech sounds, noise burst trains, and tones were significantly degraded in primary auditory cortex, anterior auditory field and the ventral auditory field. Neurometric analysis of speech evoked activity using a pattern classifier confirmed that activity in these fields contains significantly less information about speech sound identity in Fmr1 knockout rats compared to control rats. Responses were normal in the posterior auditory field, which is associated with sound localization. The greatest impairment was observed in the ventral auditory field, which is related to emotional regulation. Dysfunction in the ventral auditory field may contribute to poor emotional regulation in fragile X syndrome and may help explain the observation that later auditory evoked responses are more disturbed in fragile X syndrome compared to earlier responses. Rodent models of fragile X syndrome are likely to prove useful for understanding the biological basis of fragile X syndrome and for testing candidate therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Toward understanding dynamic annealing processes in irradiated ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Michael Thomas [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-05-01

    High energy particle irradiation inevitably generates defects in solids. The ballistic formation and thermalization of the defect creation process occur rapidly, and are believed to be reasonably well understood. However, knowledge of the evolution of defects after damage cascade thermalization, referred to as dynamic annealing, is quite limited. Unraveling the mechanisms associated with dynamic annealing is crucial since such processes play an important role in the formation of stable postirradiation disorder in ion-beam-processing of semiconductors, and determines the “radiation tolerance” of many nuclear materials. The purpose of this dissertation is to further our understanding of the processes involved in dynamic annealing. In order to achieve this, two main tasks are undertaken.

  13. Experiments to understand the corrosion process of fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeschel, F.; Hermann, A.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel rods in light water reactors have to respond to the trends in increased burn-up and extended dwelling time in reactor. Waterside corrosion of the cladding affecting wall thickness, mechanical stability due to hydriding and the heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide scale may become the limiting factors. The corrosion process is complex and involves a large variety of mechanisms. Understanding of the process is important for safe operation and a prerequisite for development of improved materials. A variety of analytical techniques and mechanical tests, including examination of irradiated pathfinder rods, are used to tackle the different aspects. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  14. Planning of step-stress accelerated degradation test based on the inverse Gaussian process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Guan-jun; Duan, Feng-jun

    2016-01-01

    The step-stress accelerated degradation test (SSADT) is a useful tool for assessing the lifetime distribution of highly reliable or expensive product. Some efficient SSADT plans have been proposed when the underlying degradation follows the Wiener process or Gamma process. However, how to design an efficient SSADT plan for the inverse Gaussian (IG) process is still a problem to be solved. The aim of this paper is to provide an optimal SSADT plan for the IG degradation process. A cumulative exposure model for the SSADT is adopted, in which the product degradation path depends only on the current stress level and the degradation accumulated, and has nothing to do with the way of accumulation. Under the constraint of the total experimental budget, some design variables are optimized by minimizing the asymptotic variance of the estimated p-quantile of the lifetime distribution of the product. Finally, we use the proposed method to deal with the optimal SSADT design for a type of electrical connector based on a set of stress relaxation data. The sensitivity and stability of the SSADT plan are studied, and we find that the optimal test plan is quite robust for a moderate departure from the values of the parameters. - Highlights: • We propose an optimal SSADT plan for the IG degradation process. • A CE model is assumed in describing the degradation path of the SSADT. • The asymptotic variance of the estimated p-quantile is used as the objective function. • A set of stress relaxation data is analyzed and used for illustration of our method.

  15. Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process driven by microbial fuel cells for triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Dong-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Dong [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Yan, Zhi-Ying [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Environmental Microbiology, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Science, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhou, Jun; Wu, Xia-Yuan [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Wei, Ping [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jia, Hong-Hua [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Zheng, Tao, E-mail: zhengtao@ms.giec.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Nengyuan Road, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yong, Yang-Chun, E-mail: ycyong@ujs.edu.cn [Biofuels Institute, School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process for TPTC degradation. - Highlights: • A Bio-Electro-Fenton process was performed for TPTC degradation. • TPTC removal efficiency achieved 78.32 ± 2.07% within 100 h. • The TPTC degradation rate (0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L{sup −1} h{sup −1}) was much higher than previous reports. - Abstract: The intensive use of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) has caused serious environmental pollution. In this study, an effective method for TPTC degradation was proposed based on the Bio-Electron-Fenton process in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum voltage of the MFC with graphite felt as electrode was 278.47% higher than that of carbon cloth. The electricity generated by MFC can be used for in situ generation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to a maximum of 135.96 μmol L{sup −1} at the Fe@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3(*)}/graphite felt composite cathode, which further reacted with leached Fe{sup 2+} to produce hydroxyl radicals. While 100 μmol L{sup −1} TPTC was added to the cathodic chamber, the degradation efficiency of TPTC reached 78.32 ± 2.07%, with a rate of 0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L{sup −1} h{sup −1}. This Bio-Electron-Fenton driving TPTC degradation might involve in Sn−C bonds breaking and the main process is probably a stepwise dephenylation until the formation of inorganic tin and CO{sub 2}. This study provides an energy saving and efficient approach for TPTC degradation.

  16. Efficiency of Photo-Fenton Process in Degradation of 2-Chlorophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Moradi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Phenolic compounds have been extensively used in industries for applications such as petrochemical, oil refineries, papers, plastics, steel, pharmaceuticals, textiles, coal conversion, and so on. Specified amounts of Phenolic compounds are lost in the process of their manufacturing and utilization and often cause environmental pollution problems. So, removal these compounds of industrial wastewaters are necessary. The aim of this paper, is the photo-degradation environmental pollutant 2-Chlorophenol (2-CP using photo-Fenton process which was used a photo reactor for photo-catalytic degradation of 2-CP in aqueous solution. Materials & Methods: This is an experimental study on a laboratory scale. Fe2+ ions as a homogeneous catalyst applied for the degradation of 2-CP in aqueous solution. The study was performed on synthetic wastewaters that contain 2-CP pollutant. The effect of operational parameters such as: pH, initial concentration Fe2+, H2O2 concentration and temperature were studied. The effect of UV irradiation, UV/H2O2 and UV/Fe2+/H2O2 on photo-catalytic degradation of 2-CP were studied. The reaction kinetic was studied. In this paper, optimum conditions were determined for the photo-catalytic degradation of 2-CP using a factor at the time method. Results: The optimal conditions for this reaction were obtained at pH of 6, initial concentration Fe2+ at 20 ppm, H2O2 concentration at 14 ppm and temperature at 45 °C. A first order reaction with rate constant (k=0.0375 min−1 was observed for the photo-catalytic degradation reaction. These experiments demonstrated that UV radiation, Fe2+ ions and H2O2 oxidation process were needed for the effective degradation of 2-CP. Conclusion: The results showed that the photo-Fenton process can be suitable alternative to removal phenolic compounds from wastewaters.

  17. Bearing Degradation Process Prediction Based on the Support Vector Machine and Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojiang Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the degradation process of bearings before they reach the failure threshold is extremely important in industry. This paper proposed a novel method based on the support vector machine (SVM and the Markov model to achieve this goal. Firstly, the features are extracted by time and time-frequency domain methods. However, the extracted original features are still with high dimensional and include superfluous information, and the nonlinear multifeatures fusion technique LTSA is used to merge the features and reduces the dimension. Then, based on the extracted features, the SVM model is used to predict the bearings degradation process, and the CAO method is used to determine the embedding dimension of the SVM model. After the bearing degradation process is predicted by SVM model, the Markov model is used to improve the prediction accuracy. The proposed method was validated by two bearing run-to-failure experiments, and the results proved the effectiveness of the methodology.

  18. Effect of food processing on degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane and its isomers in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sujatha; Nelapati, Krishnaiah

    2017-03-01

    To study the effect of different food processing techniques on the degradation of organochlorine compounds (α, β, ɣ and δ hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH)) residues in both natural and fortified samples of milk. Raw milk samples are collected from the local areas of Hyderabad, India. Naturally and fortified milk samples (HCH) were subjected to various food processing techniques, pasteurization (63ºC for ½ h), sterilization (121ºC for 15 min) and boiling for 5 min and analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detector using quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe method for multiresidue analysis of pesticides in milk with slight modification. The final mean residual concentration of pesticide in milk after heat processing and percentage of degradation were calculated with respective treatments. Heat treatments are highly effective on reduction of mean residual concentration of HCH in milk. In which Sterilization and boiling proved to be more effective in degradation of HCH isomers.

  19. Enhanced sonochemical degradation of azure B dye by the electroFenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Susana Silva; Uribe, Edgar Velasco

    2012-01-01

    The degradation of azure B dye (C15H16ClN3S; AB) has been studied by Fenton, sonolysis and sono-electroFenton processes employing ultrasound at 23 kHz and the electrogeneration of H2O2 at the reticulated vitreous carbon electrode. It was found that the dye degradation followed apparent first-order kinetics in all the degradation processes tested. The rate constant was affected by both the pH of the solution and initial concentration of Fe2+, with the highest degradation obtained at pH between 2.6 and 3. The first-order rate constant decreased in the following order: sono-electroFenton>Fenton>sonolysis. The rate constant for AB degradation by sono-electroFenton is ∼10-fold that of sonolysis and ∼2-fold the one obtained by Fenton under silent conditions. The chemical oxygen demand was abated ∼68% and ∼85% by Fenton and sono-electroFenton respectively, achieving AB concentration removal over 90% with both processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Commentary: how can technology help us understand the communication process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann

    2012-08-01

    In this commentary, the author reflects on the articles chosen for the special section on communications analysis. These articles problematize communication and raise an interesting set of questions for both human factors and communication scholars to ponder. In the end, both sets of scholars seek the same goal: How do we better examine communication to improve it? Problematizing communication requires scholars to challenge their fundamental assumptions about the phenomenon as well as to tease out the distinctions of methodological approaches typically used by both human factors and communication scholars. Human factors scholars tend to favor forms of communication in which technology or task roles control who can communicate and how. Communication scholars tend to favor contexts in which information flows more freely with fewer explicit restrictions. Creating opportunities to collaborate in research on the communication process may create the best understanding of technology that can better serve our understanding of communication.

  1. Degradation of azo and anthraquinone dyes by a low-cost Fe 0/air process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Hsien; Wang, Kai-Sung; Chao, Shu-Ju; Peng, Tzu-Huan; Huang, Lung-Chiu

    2009-07-30

    Degradation of two different kinds of dyes, anthraquinone Reactive Blue 4 (RB4) and azo Reactive Black 5 (RB5), by low-cost zero valent iron (Fe(0)) in a N(2) bubbling system (Fe(0)/N(2) process) and air bubbling system (Fe(0)/air process) was investigated. The operating parameters, including initial solution pH, dye concentration and Fe(0) dose, were also evaluated. The Fe(0)/air process shows a higher decolorization rate compared to the Fe(0)/N(2) process. Both RB4 and RB5 solutions at 100 mg L(-1) were rapidly decolorized by Fe(0)/air process within 9 and 3 min, respectively, at initial solution pH 3, Fe dose of 50 g L(-1) and air flow rate of 5 L min(-1). The optimal initial solution pH was 3. The Fe(0)/N(2) process removed only degradation of RB4 and RB5 solutions.

  2. Understanding Quality Factor Degradation in Superconducting Niobium Cavities at Low Microwave Field Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, A.; Schuster, D. I.

    2017-12-01

    In niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle acceleration, a decrease of the quality factor at lower fields—a so-called low field Q slope or LFQS—has been a long-standing unexplained effect. By extending the high Q measurement techniques to ultralow fields, we discover two previously unknown features of the effect: (i) saturation at rf fields lower than Eacc˜0.1 MV /m ; (ii) strong degradation enhancement by growing thicker niobium pentoxide. Our findings suggest that the LFQS may be caused by the two level systems in the natural niobium oxide on the inner cavity surface, thereby identifying a new source of residual resistance and providing guidance for potential nonaccelerator low-field applications of SRF cavities.

  3. Importance of isotopes for understanding the sedimentation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Isotopes of either radioactive or stable depending upon radiation emitted or not respectively which have wide applications in understanding not only the history of sedimentation, but also provide information about paleoclimate. Stable isotope mass difference occurs due to changes in physicochemical conditions of the ambient environment, for instance temperature, evaporation, precipitation, redox processes, and changes in the mobility of elements during weathering processes, biological uptake, metabolism, re-mineralization of biogenic material, etc. In contrast, radionuclides emit radiation because of excess of neutrons present in the nucleus when compared to protons of an atom. The decay of radioactive isotopes is unaffected despite changes in physicochemical variations; hence, they are useful for determining ages of different types of materials on earth. The radioisotopes can be classified based on origin and half life into primordial or long-lived, cosmogenic and artificial radionuclides or fission products. In this study, the importance of 137 Cs artificial radionuclides will be highlighted to understand short-term sedimentation processes, particularly in estuaries, deltas/continental shelf of west coast of India. The distribution of 137 Cs in sediments of south-western continental margin of India indicates that coastal marginal environments are filters or sinks for fall-out radionuclides. The sparse of 137 Cs in the open continental shelf environment indicates that most of sediments are either older or sediments being diluted by components generated in the marine environment

  4. A review of concentrated flow erosion processes on rangelands: Fundamental understanding and knowledge gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayjro K. Nouwakpo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated flow erosion processes are distinguished from splash and sheetflow processes in their enhanced ability to mobilize and transport large amounts of soil, water and dissolved elements. On rangelands, soil, nutrients and water are scarce and only narrow margins of resource losses are tolerable before crossing the sustainability threshold. In these ecosystems, concentrated flow processes are perceived as indicators of degradation and often warrant the implementation of mitigation strategies. Nevertheless, this negative perception of concentrated flow processes may conflict with the need to improve understanding of the role of these transport vessels in redistributing water, soil and nutrients along the rangeland hillslope. Vegetation influences the development and erosion of concentrated flowpaths and has been the primary factor used to control and mitigate erosion on rangelands. At the ecohydrologic level, vegetation and concentrated flow pathways are engaged in a feedback relationship, the understanding of which might help improve rangeland management and restoration strategies. In this paper, we review published literature on experimental and conceptual research pertaining to concentrated flow processes on rangelands to: (1 present the fundamental science underpinning concentrated flow erosion modeling in these landscapes, (2 discuss the influence of vegetation on these erosion processes, (3 evaluate the contribution of concentrated flow erosion to overall sediment budget and (4 identify knowledge gaps.

  5. Understanding the Relationship Between Soil Processes and Atmospheric Methane Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laybolt, W. D.; O'Connell, E.; Risk, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    As vehicle-based atmospheric surveying becomes more commonplace, its natural evolution will see an increased movement towards detection of multiple gases and geochemical approaches for discriminating leaks of different origin. While multi-gas surveys are already feasible, the factor limiting our ability to interpret them is the understanding of gas source-sink dynamics, particularly at the soil level. This study aims to understand the relationship between soil processes and atmospheric methane concentrations. Using source regions of approximately 100 km2, extensive soil gas surveys were completed, measuring CH4, δ13CH4 and CO2. We compared this to daytime and nighttime vehicle-based surveys where we acquired data for the same gases to see which of these individual gases, or ratios thereof, could be detected in the lower atmosphere. These surveys were done in two contrasting regions, which were also expected to have different source/sink processes. Results showed that atmospheric CH4 concentration, its isotopic signature, and the CO2/CH4 ratio of above-background concentrations showed the highest level of correspondence with the soil CH4 values. Anomalies in CH4 concentrations in the first study area appeared to be from predominantly biological sources (δ13CH4 values near -60‰) rather than from a fossil source (underlying coal beds). However, the study area also showed anomalous values of δ13CH4, which may have been due to a soil CH4 sink. In both regions, nighttime atmospheric studies generally yield stronger signals and correlations because decreased night winds contributed to pooling of gases and higher atmospheric concentrations. This study helps advance our understanding of the relationship between soil processes and atmospheric methane, which is essential for improving vehicle-based surveys for use in detecting environmental side-effects of energy and geosequestration projects in regions of complex surface gas dynamics.

  6. A unique mechanism for protein processing and degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Enrique; Zouhar, Jan; Carter, Clay; Kovaleva, Valentina; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2003-01-01

    Precursor protease vesicles are plant-specific compartments containing precursors of enzymes that are thought to participate in the degradation of cellular components in organs undergoing senescence. We report in vivo evidence that the precursor protease vesicle-localized vacuolar processing enzyme-γ (VPEγ) is critical for maturation of the plant vacuolar protease AtCPY. We also provide biochemical and functional evidence that VPEγ is involved in degradation of the vacuolar invertase AtFruct4 in aging tissues. Moreover, a proteomics-based approach identified various proteins found in the vacuoles of aging vpeγ mutants but not in WT plants, suggesting a unique role of VPEγ in protein processing and degradation in Arabidopsis. PMID:12773619

  7. Effect of anionic surfactants on the process of Fenton degradation of methyl orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C W; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Fenton process has been shown to be very successful to remove dyes from water. However, the influence of other constituents in dyeing industry wastewater, such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) surfactants, has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of SDS surfactant on the kinetics of Methyl Orange degradation undergoing Fenton process was investigated. Results show that Methyl Orange degradation rate decreased as SDS concentration increased, which was attributed to the consumption of hydroxyl radicals (OH) by surfactants and the formation of Methyl Orange-SDS complex. No evidence was found that the Methyl Orange degradation pathway was affected by the presence of SDS. The kinetics modelling indicates the reaction was the first-order reaction to Methyl Orange.

  8. Degrading organic micropollutants: The next challenge in the evolution of biological wastewater treatment processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh eSinghal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Global water scarcity is driving the need for identifying new water source. Wastewater could be a potential water resource if appropriate treatment technologies could be developed. One of the barriers to obtaining high quality water from wastewater arises from the presence of organic micropollutants, which are biologically active at trace levels. Removal of these compounds from wastewater by current physico-chemical technologies is prohibitively expensive. While biological treatment processes are comparatively cheap, current systems are not capable of degrading the wide range of organic micropollutants present in wastewater. As current wastewater treatment processes were developed for treating conventional pollutants present at mg/L levels, degrading the ng/L levels of micropollutants will require a different approach to system design and operation. In this paper we discuss strategies that could be employed to develop biological wastewater treatment systems capable of degrading organic micropollutants.

  9. Understanding the process by which female entrepreneurs create INVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Gitte Ohrt; Hannibal, Martin

    than remaining in one´s domestic market (e.g. in terms of risk propensity, ability to acquire foreign market knowledge, growth ambitions, network connections and such like), answers to the questions of “Who am I?, What do I know? Whom do I know?” in the founding stage for INVs are likely to be very...... different than for purely domestic new ventures. However, despite this apparent logic, INV scholars have only recently begun to explore how the founding characteristics and processes of INVs may vary from those of purely domestic ventures (e.g. Bell et al., 2003; Coviello, 2006; Coviello & Cox, 2006; Di...... Gregorio et al., 2008). Unfortunately, while the above studies have contributed to our understanding, they are all gender-neutral i.e. they fail to consider the process of INV creation from a female entrepreneurial perspective. This is problematic given the rapidly rising numbers of women-owned ventures...

  10. Towards an understanding of parietal mnemonic processes: some conceptual guideposts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The posterior parietal lobes have been implicated in a range of episodic memory retrieval tasks, but the nature of parietal contributions to remembering remains unclear. In an attempt to identify fruitful avenues of further research, several heuristic questions about parietal mnemonic activations are considered in light of recent empirical findings: Do such parietal activations reflect memory processes, or their contents? Do they precede, follow, or co-occur with retrieval? What can we learn from their pattern of lateralization? Do they index access to episodic representations, or the feeling of remembering? Are parietal activations graded by memory strength, quantity of retrieved information, or the type of retrieval? How do memory-related activations map onto functional parcellation of parietal lobes suggested by other cognitive phenomena? Consideration of these questions can promote understanding of the relationship between parietal mnemonic effects and perceptual, attentional, and action-oriented cognitive processes. PMID:22783175

  11. Towards an understanding of parietal mnemonic processes: Some conceptual guideposts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Levy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The posterior parietal lobes have been implicated in a range of episodic memory retrieval tasks, but the nature of parietal contributions to remembering remains unclear. In an attempt to identify fruitful avenues of further research, several heuristic questions about parietal-mnemonic activations are considered in light of recent empirical findings: Do such parietal activations reflect memory processes or their contents? Do they precede, follow, or co-occur with retrieval? What can we learn from their pattern of lateralization? Do they index access to episodic representations or the feeling of remembering? Are parietal activations graded by memory strength, quantity of retrieved information, or the type of retrieval? How do memory-related activations map onto functional parcellation of parietal lobes suggested by other cognitive phenomena? Consideration of these questions can promote understanding of the relationship between parietal-mnemonic effects and perceptual, attentional, and action-oriented cognitive processes.

  12. Understanding and Predicting the Process of Software Maintenance Releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Victor; Briand, Lionel; Condon, Steven; Kim, Yong-Mi; Melo, Walcelio L.; Valett, Jon D.

    1996-01-01

    One of the major concerns of any maintenance organization is to understand and estimate the cost of maintenance releases of software systems. Planning the next release so as to maximize the increase in functionality and the improvement in quality are vital to successful maintenance management. The objective of this paper is to present the results of a case study in which an incremental approach was used to better understand the effort distribution of releases and build a predictive effort model for software maintenance releases. This study was conducted in the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC). This paper presents three main results: 1) a predictive effort model developed for the FDD's software maintenance release process; 2) measurement-based lessons learned about the maintenance process in the FDD; and 3) a set of lessons learned about the establishment of a measurement-based software maintenance improvement program. In addition, this study provides insights and guidelines for obtaining similar results in other maintenance organizations.

  13. Degradation of flumequine by the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes: Evaluation of residual antimicrobial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Maniero, Milena Guedes; Rath, Susanne; Guimarães, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Flumequine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent of the quinolone class, and it is widely used as a veterinary drug in food-producing animals. The presence of flumequine in the environment may contribute to the development of drug resistant bacterial strains. In this study, water samples fortified with flumequine (500 μg L −1 ) were degraded using the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes. The maximum degradation efficiency for flumequine by the Fenton process was approximately 40% (0.5 mmol L −1 Fe(II), 2.0 mmol L −1 H 2 O 2 and 15 min). By applying UV radiation (photo-Fenton process), the efficiency reached more than 94% in 60 min when 0.25 mmol L −1 Fe(II) and 10.0 mmol L −1 H 2 O 2 were used. Under these conditions, the Fenton process was able to reduce the biological activity, whereas the photo-Fenton process eliminated almost all of the antimicrobial activity because it was not detected. Four byproducts with an m/z of 244, 238, 220 and 202 were identified by mass spectrometry, and a degradation pathway for flumequine was proposed. The byproducts were derived from decarboxylation and defluorination reactions and from modifications in the alkylamino chain of the fluoroquinolone. - Highlights: ► Photo-Fenton process achieved the maximum performance, degrading 94% of flumequine. ► As the flumequine concentration decreased, antimicrobial activity also decreased. ► Four byproducts with m/z of 244, 238, 220 and 202 were identified. ► A degradation pathway for flumequine was proposed

  14. Degradation of flumequine by the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes: Evaluation of residual antimicrobial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Maniero, Milena Guedes [School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urbanism, University of Campinas — UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6021, CEP 13083-852, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rath, Susanne [Chemistry Institute, University of Campinas — UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, CEP 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, José Roberto, E-mail: jorober@fec.unicamp.br [School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urbanism, University of Campinas — UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6021, CEP 13083-852, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2013-02-15

    Flumequine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent of the quinolone class, and it is widely used as a veterinary drug in food-producing animals. The presence of flumequine in the environment may contribute to the development of drug resistant bacterial strains. In this study, water samples fortified with flumequine (500 μg L{sup −1}) were degraded using the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes. The maximum degradation efficiency for flumequine by the Fenton process was approximately 40% (0.5 mmol L{sup −1} Fe(II), 2.0 mmol L{sup −1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 15 min). By applying UV radiation (photo-Fenton process), the efficiency reached more than 94% in 60 min when 0.25 mmol L{sup −1} Fe(II) and 10.0 mmol L{sup −1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were used. Under these conditions, the Fenton process was able to reduce the biological activity, whereas the photo-Fenton process eliminated almost all of the antimicrobial activity because it was not detected. Four byproducts with an m/z of 244, 238, 220 and 202 were identified by mass spectrometry, and a degradation pathway for flumequine was proposed. The byproducts were derived from decarboxylation and defluorination reactions and from modifications in the alkylamino chain of the fluoroquinolone. - Highlights: ► Photo-Fenton process achieved the maximum performance, degrading 94% of flumequine. ► As the flumequine concentration decreased, antimicrobial activity also decreased. ► Four byproducts with m/z of 244, 238, 220 and 202 were identified. ► A degradation pathway for flumequine was proposed.

  15. Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation in wire explosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, B.; Wong, C.S.; Bhuyan, H.; Lee, Y.S.; Yap, S.L.; Favre, M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of nanoparticle formation by wire explosion process has been investigated by optical emission spectroscopy in Antony et al. 2010 [2] [J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2010; 111:2509]. It was reported that the size of the nanoparticles formed in Ar ambience increases with increasing pressure, while an opposite trend was observed for the nanoparticles produced in N 2 and He ambiences. However, the physics behind this opposite trend seems unclear. In this work, we have investigated the probable mechanism behind the opposite trend in particle size with pressure of different gases and understand the mechanism of nanoparticle formation in wire explosion process. The experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of ambient gas species (Ar and N 2 ) and pressure on arc plasma formation and its corresponding effects on the characteristics of the produced nanoparticles in wire explosion process. Our results show that the arc plasma formation is probably the mechanism that may account for the opposite trend of particle size with pressure of different gases. -- Highlights: ► Cu nanoparticles have been synthesized by wire explosion technique. ► Investigate the effect of the ambient gas species and pressure. ► Arc plasma formation in wire explosion process is investigated. ► Arc plasma formation plays a crucial role in characteristic of the nanoparticles

  16. Linking trajectories of land change, land degradation processes and ecosystem services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smiraglia, D.; Ceccarelli, T.; Bajocco, S.; Salvati, L.; Perini, L.

    2016-01-01

    Land Degradation (LD) is a complex phenomenon resulting in a progressive reduction in the capacity of providing ecosystem services (ES). Landscape transformations promoting an unsustainable use of land often reveal latent processes of LD. An evaluation carried out in respect to the different

  17. Does mechanistic modeling of filter strip pesticide mass balance and degradation processes affect environmental exposure assessments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Ritter, Amy; Fox, Garey A; Perez-Ovilla, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) are a widely adopted practice for limiting pesticide transport from adjacent fields to receiving waterbodies. The efficacy of VFS depends on site-specific input factors. To elucidate the complex and non-linear relationships among these factors requires a process-based modeling framework. Previous research proposed linking existing higher-tier environmental exposure models with a well-tested VFS model (VFSMOD). However, the framework assumed pesticide mass stored in the VFS was not available for transport in subsequent storm events. A new pesticide mass balance component was developed to estimate surface pesticide residue trapped in the VFS and its degradation between consecutive runoff events. The influence and necessity of the updated framework on acute and chronic estimated environmental concentrations (EECs) and percent reductions in EECs were investigated across three, 30-year U.S. EPA scenarios: Illinois corn, California tomato, and Oregon wheat. The updated framework with degradation predicted higher EECs than the existing framework without degradation for scenarios with greater sediment transport, longer VFS lengths, and highly sorbing and persistent pesticides. Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) assessed the relative importance of mass balance and degradation processes in the context of other input factors like VFS length (VL), organic-carbon sorption coefficient (Koc), and soil and water half-lives. Considering VFS pesticide residue and degradation was not important if single, large runoff events controlled transport, as is typical for higher percentiles considered in exposure assessments. Degradation processes become more important when considering percent reductions in acute or chronic EECs, especially under scenarios with lower pesticide losses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent advances in remote sensing and geoinformation processing for land degradation assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Roeder, Achim

    2009-01-01

    Acknowledgements Contributors Achim Röder & Joachim Hill, Remote sensing and geoinformation processing in land degradation assessment-an introduction Part 1 Setting the scene: principles in remote sensing and spatial scene modelling for land degradation assessmentEric F. Lambin, Helmut Geist, James F. Reynolds & D. Mark Stafford-Smith, Coupled human-environment system approaches to desertification: Linking people to pixels Susan L. Ustin, Alacia Palacios-Orueta, Michael L. Whiting, Stéphane Jacquemoud & Lin Li, Remote sensing based assessm

  19. Effect of food processing on plant DNA degradation and PCR-based GMO analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryson, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    The applicability of a DNA-based method for GMO detection and quantification depends on the quality and quantity of the DNA. Important food-processing conditions, for example temperature and pH, may lead to degradation of the DNA, rendering PCR analysis impossible or GMO quantification unreliable. This review discusses the effect of several food processes on DNA degradation and subsequent GMO detection and quantification. The data show that, although many of these processes do indeed lead to the fragmentation of DNA, amplification of the DNA may still be possible. Length and composition of the amplicon may, however, affect the result, as also may the method of extraction used. Also, many techniques are used to describe the behaviour of DNA in food processing, which occasionally makes it difficult to compare research results. Further research should be aimed at defining ingredients in terms of their DNA quality and PCR amplification ability, and elaboration of matrix-specific certified reference materials.

  20. Degradation of the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen by electro-peroxone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Yujue; Yuan, Shi; Li, Zhaoxin; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2014-10-15

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) treatment of the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The E-peroxone process combined conventional ozonation with electrolysis processes, and used a carbon-polytetrafluorethylene cathode to electrochemically generate H2O2 from O2 in the sparged ozone generator effluent (O2 and O3 mixture). The in-situ generated H2O2 then reacted with the sparged O3 to produce aqueous •OH, which can in turn oxidize pollutants effectively in the bulk solution. The E-peroxone process overcomes several intrinsic limitations of conventional ozonation and electrolysis processes for pollutant degradation such as the selective oxidation with O3 and mass transfer limitations of pollutants to the electrodes, and thus significantly enhanced both ibuprofen degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) mineralization. Results show that ibuprofen could be completely degraded much more rapidly in the E-peroxone process (e.g., 5-15 min under all tested reaction conditions) than in ozonation (≥30 min) and electrolysis (several hours) processes. In addition, thanks to the powerful and non-selective oxidation capacity of •OH, toxic intermediates formed during ibuprofen degradation could be completely mineralized in the E-peroxone process. The E-peroxone effluent (2 h) thus exhibited much lower toxicity (5% inhibition of bioluminescence of Vibrio fisheri) than the ozonation and electrolysis effluents (22% and 88% inhibition, respectively). The results of this study indicate that the E-peroxone process may provide a promising technology for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of food processing on degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane and its isomers in milk

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sujatha; Nelapati, Krishnaiah

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of different food processing techniques on the degradation of organochlorine compounds (α, β, ɣ and δ hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH)) residues in both natural and fortified samples of milk. Materials and Methods: Raw milk samples are collected from the local areas of Hyderabad, India. Naturally and fortified milk samples (HCH) were subjected to various food processing techniques, pasteurization (63ºC for ½ h), sterilization (121ºC for 15 min) and boiling for 5...

  2. Impact of process variations and long term degradation on 6T-SRAM cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Fischer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In modern deep-submicron CMOS technologies voltage scaling can not keep up with the scaling of the dimensions of transistors. Therefore the electrical fields inside the transistors are not constant anymore, while scaling down the device area. The rising electrical fields bring up reliability problems, such as hot carrier injection. Also other long term degradation mechanisms like Negative Bias Temperature Instability (NBTI come into the focus of circuit design.

    Along with process device parameter variations (threshold voltage, mobility, variations due to the degradation of devices form a big challenge for designers to build circuits that both yield high under the influence of process variations and remain functional with respect to long term device drift.

    In this work we present the influence of long term degradation and process variations on the performance of SRAM core-cells and parametric yield of SRAM arrays. For different use cases we show the performance degradation depending on temperature and supply voltage.

  3. Performance and dye-degrading bacteria isolation of a hybrid membrane process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sheng-Jie, E-mail: sjyou@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, No. 200, Rd. Chung-Pei, Chungli 320, Taiwan (China); Teng, Jun-Yu, E-mail: nickprometheus@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chungli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Textile dyeing wastewater contains harmful compounds, which are toxic to both marine organisms and human beings if it discharged into an aquatic environmental without suitable treatment. In this study, the wastewater containing the azo dye, Reactive Black 5 (RB5), was partially treated in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor which was further treated either in an aerobic membrane bioreactors (AOMBR) or in combined aerobic membrane bioreactor/reverse osmosis (AOMBR/RO) process. The results showed that in the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor the RB5 dye was degraded to form aromatic amine intermediate metabolites, which were further mineralized in the AOMBR. It was also observed that although all effluents from the AOMBR and AOMBR/RO processes met the Taiwan EPA's effluent criteria, irrespective of which membranes were used in the aerobic tank, the effluent from the AOMBR/RO process met the criteria for reuse for toilet flushing, landscaping, irrigation, and cooling water purposes, where as the AOMBR effluent only met the criteria for cooling water due to incomplete color removal. Five anaerobic high dye-degrading bacteria were isolated, which were identified to be the same species of Lactococcus lactis by 16S rRNA sequencing. The L. lactis showed complete degradation of RB5 and further studies showed that it can also able to degrade Reactive Red 120 and Reactive Yellow 84 efficiently within 6 h.

  4. Performance and dye-degrading bacteria isolation of a hybrid membrane process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Sheng-Jie; Teng, Jun-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Textile dyeing wastewater contains harmful compounds, which are toxic to both marine organisms and human beings if it discharged into an aquatic environmental without suitable treatment. In this study, the wastewater containing the azo dye, Reactive Black 5 (RB5), was partially treated in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor which was further treated either in an aerobic membrane bioreactors (AOMBR) or in combined aerobic membrane bioreactor/reverse osmosis (AOMBR/RO) process. The results showed that in the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor the RB5 dye was degraded to form aromatic amine intermediate metabolites, which were further mineralized in the AOMBR. It was also observed that although all effluents from the AOMBR and AOMBR/RO processes met the Taiwan EPA's effluent criteria, irrespective of which membranes were used in the aerobic tank, the effluent from the AOMBR/RO process met the criteria for reuse for toilet flushing, landscaping, irrigation, and cooling water purposes, where as the AOMBR effluent only met the criteria for cooling water due to incomplete color removal. Five anaerobic high dye-degrading bacteria were isolated, which were identified to be the same species of Lactococcus lactis by 16S rRNA sequencing. The L. lactis showed complete degradation of RB5 and further studies showed that it can also able to degrade Reactive Red 120 and Reactive Yellow 84 efficiently within 6 h.

  5. Degradation characteristic of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye by UV/H2O2 process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidin, Che Zulzikrami Azner; Fahmi, Muhammad Ridwan; Fazara, Md Ali Umi; Nadhirah, Siti Nurfatin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the degradation characteristic of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye by UV/H 2 O 2 process was evaluated based on the trend of color, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Three types of dyes consist of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dyes were used to compare the degradation mechanism of the dyes. The UV/H 2 O 2 experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale cylindrical glass reactor operated in semi-batch mode. The UV/Vis characterization of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye indicated that the rapid degradation of the dyes by UV/H 2 O 2 process is meaningful with respect to decolourization, as a result of the azo bonds and substitute antraquinone chromophore degradation. However, this process is not efficient for aromatic amines removal. The monoazo MO was difficult to be decolorized than diazo RR120 dye, which imply that number of sulphonic groups in the dye molecules determines the reactivity with hydroxyl radical. The increased in COD removal is the evidence for oxidation and decreased in carbon content of dye molecules. TOC removal analysis shows that low TOC removal of monoazo MO and diazo RR120, as compared to anthraquinone RB19 may indicate an accumulation of by-products that are resistant to the H 2 O 2 photolysis

  6. Degradation characteristic of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye by UV / H2O2 process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Che Zulzikrami Azner; Fahmi, Muhammad Ridwan; Fazara, Md Ali Umi; Nadhirah, Siti Nurfatin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the degradation characteristic of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye by UV / H2O2 process was evaluated based on the trend of color, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Three types of dyes consist of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dyes were used to compare the degradation mechanism of the dyes. The UV / H2O2 experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale cylindrical glass reactor operated in semi-batch mode. The UV/Vis characterization of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye indicated that the rapid degradation of the dyes by UV / H2O2 process is meaningful with respect to decolourization, as a result of the azo bonds and substitute antraquinone chromophore degradation. However, this process is not efficient for aromatic amines removal. The monoazo MO was difficult to be decolorized than diazo RR120 dye, which imply that number of sulphonic groups in the dye molecules determines the reactivity with hydroxyl radical. The increased in COD removal is the evidence for oxidation and decreased in carbon content of dye molecules. TOC removal analysis shows that low TOC removal of monoazo MO and diazo RR120, as compared to anthraquinone RB19 may indicate an accumulation of by-products that are resistant to the H2O2 photolysis.

  7. Understanding how replication processes can maintain systems away from equilibrium using Algorithmic Information Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Sean D

    2016-02-01

    Replication can be envisaged as a computational process that is able to generate and maintain order far-from-equilibrium. Replication processes, can self-regulate, as the drive to replicate can counter degradation processes that impact on a system. The capability of replicated structures to access high quality energy and eject disorder allows Landauer's principle, in conjunction with Algorithmic Information Theory, to quantify the entropy requirements to maintain a system far-from-equilibrium. Using Landauer's principle, where destabilising processes, operating under the second law of thermodynamics, change the information content or the algorithmic entropy of a system by ΔH bits, replication processes can access order, eject disorder, and counter the change without outside interventions. Both diversity in replicated structures, and the coupling of different replicated systems, increase the ability of the system (or systems) to self-regulate in a changing environment as adaptation processes select those structures that use resources more efficiently. At the level of the structure, as selection processes minimise the information loss, the irreversibility is minimised. While each structure that emerges can be said to be more entropically efficient, as such replicating structures proliferate, the dissipation of the system as a whole is higher than would be the case for inert or simpler structures. While a detailed application to most real systems would be difficult, the approach may well be useful in understanding incremental changes to real systems and provide broad descriptions of system behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced degradation of 4-nitrophenol by microwave assisted Fe/EDTA process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Li Song; Zhao Yongjun; Wu Wenfei; Zhang Xuxiang; Gu Xueyuan; Li Ruihua; Yang Shaogui

    2010-01-01

    A microwave assisted zero-valent iron oxidation process was studied in order to investigate the synergetic effects of MW irradiation on Fe/EDTA system (Fe/EDTA/MW) treated 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) from aqueous solution. The results indicated that the thermal effect of microwave improved the removal effect of 4-NP and TOC through raising the temperature of the system, as well as the non-thermal effect generated by the interaction between the microwave and the Fe resulting in an increase in the hydrophobic character of Fe surface. During the degradation of 4-NP in Fe/EDTA/MW system, the optimum value for MW power, Fe, EDTA dosage was 400 W, 2 g and 0.4 mM, respectively. The possible pathway for degrading the 4-NP was proposed based on GC/MS and HPLC analysis of the degradation intermediates. The concentration change course of the main bio-refractory by-products, the aminophenol formed in the degradation of 4-NP suggested a more efficient degradation and mineralization in Fe/EDTA/MW system. Finally, BOD 5 /COD Cr of the solution increased from 0.237 to 0.635 after reaction for 18 min, indicating that the biodegradability of wastewater was greatly improved by Fe/EDTA/MW system and would benefit to further treatment by biochemical methods.

  9. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and degradative processing of growth hormone by rat adipocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupas, P; Herington, A C

    1987-05-01

    At 37 degrees C, cultured rat adipocytes bound [125I]human GH ([125I]hGH) rapidly, with binding being detectable within 1 min of incubation. The bound [125I]hGH was then internalized (within 10 min) and accumulated in the cell interior until a steady state was reached (by 60 min). At this time, where the rates of GH internalization, processing, and release are equivalent, 55% of total cell-associated [125I]hGH was intracellular. Internalization of [125I]hGH by acutely isolated (noncultured) adipocytes was preceded by a 20-min lag phase indicative of a temporary postbinding defect. The lag phase was not seen with cultured adipocytes. After preloading of [125I]hGH into the cell interior, cultured cells rapidly released [125I]hGH (t1/2 = 20-30 min) into the extracellular medium as both intact (25%) and degraded (75%) GH. The release of intact vs. degraded GH was distinguishable on the basis of kinetics and temperature dependence. In order to determine when internalized [125I]hGH entered a catabolic compartment, cultured adipocytes were incubated with [125I]hGH and the composition of intracellular GH was determined as a function of time. All [125I]hGH internalized during the first 20 min was intact. Between 20 and 30 min some of the internalized [125I]hGH entered a catabolic compartment and degradation products began accumulating within the adipocytes. Release of degraded [125I]hGH from cultured adipocytes began at 60 min. The processing of GH through the complete degradative pathway (binding, internalization, degradation, release) required a period of 1 h at 37 degrees C.

  10. Towards an understanding of business model innovation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Boer, Harry; Lindgren, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Companies today, in some industries more than others, invest more capital and resources just to stay competitive, develop more diverse solutions, and increasingly start to think more radically, when considering to innovate their business model. However, the development and innovation of business...... models is a complex venture and has not been widely researched yet. The objective of this paper is therefore 1) to build a [descriptive] theoretical understanding, based on Christensen’s (2005) three-step procedure, to business models and their innovation and, as a result of that, 2) to strengthen...... researchers’ and practitioners’ perspectives as to how the process of business model innovation can be realized. By using various researchers’ perspectives and assumptions, we identify relevant inconsistencies, which consequently lead us to propose possible supplementary solutions. We conclude our paper...

  11. Theory Building- Towards an understanding of business model innovation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Boer, Harry; Lindgren, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Companies today, in some industries more than others, invest more capital and resources just to stay competitive, develop more diverse solutions, and increasingly start to think more radically, when considering to innovate their business model. However, the development and innovation of business...... models is a complex venture and has not been widely researched yet. The objective of this paper is therefore 1) to build a [descriptive] theoretical understanding, based on Christensen's (2005) three-step procedure, to business models and their innovation and, as a result of that, 2) to strengthen...... researchers' and practitioners' perspectives as to how the process of business model innovation can be realized. By using various researchers' perspectives and assumptions, we identify relevant inconsistencies, which consequently lead us to propose possible supplementary solutions. We conclude our paper...

  12. Using infrared thermography for understanding and quantifying soil surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, João L. M. P.

    2017-04-01

    At present, our understanding of the soil hydrologic response is restricted by measurement limitations. In the literature, there have been repeatedly calls for interdisciplinary approaches to expand our knowledge in this field and eventually overcome the limitations that are inherent to conventional measuring techniques used, for example, for tracing water at the basin, hillslope and even field or plot scales. Infrared thermography is a versatile, accurate and fast technique of monitoring surface temperature and has been used in a variety of fields, such as military surveillance, medical diagnosis, industrial processes optimisation, building inspections and agriculture. However, many applications are still to be fully explored. In surface hydrology, it has been successfully employed as a high spatial and temporal resolution non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tool to e.g. access groundwater discharges into waterbodies or quantify thermal heterogeneities of streams. It is believed that thermal infrared imagery can grasp the spatial and temporal variability of many processes at the soil surface. Thermography interprets the heat signals and can provide an attractive view for identifying both areas where water is flowing or has infiltrated more, or accumulated temporarily in depressions or macropores. Therefore, we hope to demonstrate the potential for thermal infrared imagery to indirectly make a quantitative estimation of several hydrologic processes. Applications include: e.g. mapping infiltration, microrelief and macropores; estimating flow velocities; defining sampling strategies; identifying water sources, accumulation of waters or even connectivity. Protocols for the assessment of several hydrologic processes with the help of IR thermography will be briefly explained, presenting some examples from laboratory soil flumes and field.

  13. A Science-Based Understanding of Cermet Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, III, Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roach, Robert Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kilgo, Alice C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Susan, Donald Francis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Ornum, David J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stuecker, John N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shollenberger, Kimberly A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report is a summary of the work completed in FY01 for science-based characterization of the processes used to fabricate 1) cermet vias in source feedthrus using slurry and paste-filling techniques and 2) cermet powder for dry pressing. Common defects found in cermet vias were characterized based on the ability of subsequent processing techniques (isopressing and firing) to remove the defects. Non-aqueous spray drying and mist granulation techniques were explored as alternative methods of creating CND50, the powder commonly used for dry pressed parts. Compaction and flow characteristics of these techniques were analyzed and compared to standard dry-ball-milled CND50. Due to processing changes, changes in microstructure can occur. A microstructure characterization technique was developed to numerically describe cermet microstructure. Machining and electrical properties of dry pressed parts were also analyzed and related to microstructure using this analytical technique.3 Executive SummaryThis report outlines accomplishments in the science-based understanding of cermet processing up to fiscal year 2002 for Sandia National Laboratories. The three main areas of work are centered on 1) increasing production yields of slurry-filled cermets, 2) evaluating the viability of high-solids-loading pastes for the same cermet components, and 3) optimizing cermet powder used in pressing processes (CND50). An additional development that was created as a result of the effort to fully understand the impacts of alternative processing techniques is the use of analytical methods to relate microstructure to physical properties. Recommendations are suggested at the end of this report. Summaries of these four efforts are as follows:1.Increase Production Yields of Slurry-Filled Cermet Vias Finalized slurry filling criteria were determined based on three designs of experiments where the following factors were analyzed: vacuum time, solids loading, pressure drop across the filter paper

  14. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Recent development of VUV-based processes for air pollutants degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibao eHuang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As air pollution become more and more serious nowadays, it is essential to find out a way to efficiently degrade the air pollutants. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV-based processes are an emerging and promising technologies for environmental remediation such as air cleaning, wastewater treatment and air/water disinfection. With VUV irradiation, photolysis, photocatalyst is and ozone-assisted oxidation are involved at the same time, resulting in the fast degradation of air pollutants because of their strong oxidizing capacity. The mechanisms of how the oxidants are produced and reacted are discussed in this review. This paper mainly focuses on the three VUV-based oxidation processes including VUV photolysis, VUV combined with ozone-assisted oxidation and VUV-PCO with emphasis on their mechanisms and applications. Also, the outlooks of these processes are outlined in this paper.

  16. SIMULTANEOUS DEGRADATION OF SOME PHTHALATE ESTERS UNDER FENTON AND PHOTO-FENTON OXIDATION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELDEAN-GALEA M.S.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the assessment of the degradation efficiency of five phthalates, DEP, BBP, DEHP, DINP and DIDP, found in a mixture in a liquid phase, using the Fenton and Photo Fenton oxidation processes, was conducted. It was observed that the main parameters that influence the Fenton oxidative processes of phthalates were the concentration of the oxidizing agent, H2O2, the concentration of the catalyst used, Fe2+, the pH value, UV irradiation and the reaction time. For the Fenton oxidative process, the highest degradation efficiencies were 19% for DEP, 50% for BBP, 84% for DEHP, 90% for DINP and 48% for DIDP, when the experiments were carried out using concentrations of 20 mg L-1 phthalate mixture, 100 mg L-1 H2O2, 10 mg L-1 Fe2+ at a pH value of 3, with a total reaction time of 30 minutes. For the Photo-Fenton oxidative process carried out in the same conditions as Fenton oxidative process, it was observed that after an irradiation time of 90 minutes under UV radiation the degradation efficiencies of phthalates were improved, being 22% for DEP, 71% for BBP, 97% for DEHP, 97% for DINP and 81% for DIDP.

  17. Understanding Aquatic Rhizosphere Processes Through Metabolomics and Metagenomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jian; Mynampati, Kalyan; Drautz, Daniela; Arumugam, Krithika; Williams, Rohan; Schuster, Stephan; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-04-01

    The aquatic rhizosphere is a region around the roots of aquatic plants. Many studies focusing on terrestrial rhizosphere have led to a good understanding of the interactions between the roots, its exudates and its associated rhizobacteria. The rhizosphere of free-floating roots, however, is a different habitat that poses several additional challenges, including rapid diffusion rates of signals and nutrient molecules, which are further influenced by the hydrodynamic forces. These can lead to rapid diffusion and complicates the studying of diffusible factors from both plant and/or rhizobacterial origins. These plant systems are being increasingly used for self purification of water bodies to provide sustainable solution. A better understanding of these processes will help in improving their performance for ecological engineering of freshwater systems. The same principles can also be used to improve the yield of hydroponic cultures. Novel toolsets and approaches are needed to investigate the processes occurring in the aquatic rhizosphere. We are interested in understanding the interaction between root exudates and the complex microbial communities that are associated with the roots, using a systems biology approach involving metabolomics and metagenomics. With this aim, we have developed a RhizoFlowCell (RFC) system that provides a controlled study of aquatic plants, observed the root biofilms, collect root exudates and subject the rhizosphere system to changes in various chemical or physical perturbations. As proof of concept, we have used RFC to test the response of root exudation patterns of Pandanus amaryllifolius after exposure to the pollutant naphthalene. Complexity of root exudates in the aquatic rhizosphere was captured using this device and analysed using LC-qTOF-MS. The highly complex metabolomic profile allowed us to study the dynamics of the response of roots to varying levels of naphthalene. The metabolic profile changed within 5mins after spiking with

  18. Relationship between fiber degradation and residence time distribution in the processing of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT were processed by in-line compounding equipment with a modified single screw extruder. A pulse stimulus response technique using PET spheres as the tracer was adopted to obtain residence time distribution (RTD of extrusion compounding. RTD curves were fitted by the model based on the supposition that extrusion compounding was the combination of plug flow and mixed flow. Characteristic parameters of RTD model including P the fraction of plug flow reactor (PFR and d the fraction of dead volume of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR were used to associate with fiber degradation presented by fiber length and dispersion. The effects of screw speed, mixing length and channel depth on RTD curves, and characteristic parameters of RTD models as well as their effects on the fiber degradation were investigated. The influence of shear force with different screw speeds and variable channel depth on fiber degradation was studied and the main impetus of fiber degradation was also presented. The optimal process for obtaining the balance of fiber length and dispersion was presented.

  19. Carrot β-carotene degradation and isomerization kinetics during thermal processing in the presence of oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knockaert, Griet; Pulissery, Sudheer K; Lemmens, Lien; Van Buggenhout, Sandy; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2012-10-17

    The effect of thermal processing (85-130 °C) on the stability and isomerization of β-carotene in both an olive oil/carrot emulsion and an olive oil phase enriched with carrot β-carotene was studied. During processing, degradation of total β-carotene took place. Initially, total β-carotene concentration decreased quickly, after which a plateau value was reached, which was dependent on the applied temperature. In the oil/carrot emulsion, the total β-carotene concentration could be modeled by a fractional conversion model. The temperature dependence of the degradation rate constants was described by the activation energy and was estimated to be 45.0 kJ/mol. In the enriched oil phase, less degradation took place and the results could not be modeled. Besides degradation, β-carotene isomerization was studied. In both matrices, a fractional conversion model could be used to model total isomerization and formation of 13-Z- and 15-Z-β-carotene. β-Carotene isomerization was similar in both the oil/carrot emulsion and enriched oil phase as the simultaneously estimated kinetic parameters (isomerization reaction rate constant and activation energy) of both matrices did not differ significantly. The activation energies of isomerization were estimated to be 70.5 and 75.0 kJ/mol in the oil/carrot emulsion and enriched oil phase, respectively.

  20. Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process driven by microbial fuel cells for triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Dong-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Dong; Yan, Zhi-Ying; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Xia-Yuan; Wei, Ping; Jia, Hong-Hua; Zheng, Tao; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2017-02-15

    The intensive use of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) has caused serious environmental pollution. In this study, an effective method for TPTC degradation was proposed based on the Bio-Electron-Fenton process in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum voltage of the MFC with graphite felt as electrode was 278.47% higher than that of carbon cloth. The electricity generated by MFC can be used for in situ generation of H 2 O 2 to a maximum of 135.96μmolL -1 at the Fe@Fe 2 O 3(*) /graphite felt composite cathode, which further reacted with leached Fe 2+ to produce hydroxyl radicals. While 100μmolL -1 TPTC was added to the cathodic chamber, the degradation efficiency of TPTC reached 78.32±2.07%, with a rate of 0.775±0.021μmolL -1 h -1 . This Bio-Electron-Fenton driving TPTC degradation might involve in SnC bonds breaking and the main process is probably a stepwise dephenylation until the formation of inorganic tin and CO 2 . This study provides an energy saving and efficient approach for TPTC degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Degradation processes in high power multi-mode InGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Presser, Nathan; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers have attracted much attention because of their unparalleled high optical output power characteristics that narrow stripe lasers or tapered lasers can not achieve. However, broad-area lasers suffer from poor beam quality and their high reliability operation has not been proven for communications applications. This paper concerns reliability and degradation aspects of broad-area lasers. Good facet passivation techniques along with optimized structural designs have led to successful demonstration of reliable 980nm single-mode lasers, and the dominant failure mode of both single-mode and broadarea lasers is catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), which limits maximum output powers and also determines operating output powers. Although broad-area lasers have shown characteristics unseen from singlemode lasers including filamentation, their effects on long-term reliability and degradation processes have not been fully investigated. Filamentation can lead to instantaneous increase in optical power density and thus temperature rise at localized areas through spatial-hole burning and thermal lensing which significantly reduces filament sizes under high power operation, enhancing the COMD process. We investigated degradation processes in commercial MOCVD-grown broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers at ~975nm with and without passivation layers by performing accelerated lifetests of these devices followed by failure mode analyses with various micro-analytical techniques. Since instantaneous fluctuations of filaments can lead to faster wear-out of passivation layer thus leading to facet degradation, both passivated and unpassivated broad-area lasers were studied that yielded catastrophic failures at the front facet and also in the bulk. Electron beam induced current technique was employed to study dark line defects (DLDs) generated in degraded lasers stressed under different test conditions and focused

  2. The Contribution of GGOS to Understanding Dynamic Earth Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Geodesy is the science of the Earth's shape, size, gravity and rotation, including their evolution in time. Geodetic observations play a major role in the solid Earth sciences because they are fundamental for the understanding and modeling of Earth system processes. Changes in the Earth's shape, its gravitational field, and its rotation are caused by external forces acting on the Earth system and internal processes involving mass transfer and exchange of angular and linear momentum. Thus, variations in these geodetic quantities of the Earth reflect and constrain mechanical and thermo-dynamic processes in the Earth system. Mitigating the impact on human life and property of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, debris flows, landslides, land subsidence, sea level change, tsunamis, floods, storm surges, hurricanes and extreme weather is an important scientific task to which geodetic observations make fundamental contributions. Geodetic observations can be used to monitor the pre-eruptive deformation of volcanoes and the pre-seismic deformation of earthquake fault zones, aiding in the issuance of volcanic eruption and earthquake warnings. They can also be used to rapidly estimate earthquake fault motion, aiding in the modeling of tsunami genesis and the issuance of tsunami warnings. Geodetic observations are also used in other areas of the Earth sciences, not just the solid Earth sciences. For example, geodesy contributes to atmospheric science by supporting both observation and prediction of the weather by geo-referencing meteorological observing data and by globally tracking change in stratospheric mass and lower tropospheric water vapor fields. Geodetic measurements of refraction profiles derived from satellite occultation data are routinely assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Geodesy contributes to hydrologic studies by providing a unique global reference system for measurements of: sub-seasonal, seasonal and secular movements

  3. Stability-indicating assay method for determination of actarit, its process related impurities and degradation products: Insight into stability profile and degradation pathways☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abiramasundari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of the drug actarit was studied under different stress conditions like hydrolysis (acid, alkaline and neutral, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation as recommended by International Conference on Harmonization (ICH guidelines. Drug was found to be unstable in acidic, basic and photolytic conditions and produced a common degradation product while oxidative stress condition produced three additional degradation products. Drug was impassive to neutral hydrolysis, dry thermal and accelerated stability conditions. Degradation products were identified, isolated and characterized by different spectroscopic analyses. Drug and the degradation products were synthesized by a new route using green chemistry. The chromatographic separation of the drug and its impurities was achieved in a phenomenex luna C18 column employing a step gradient elution by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to photodiode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC–PDA–MS. A specific and sensitive stability-indicating assay method for the simultaneous determination of the drug actarit, its process related impurities and degradation products was developed and validated. Keywords: Actarit, Forced degradation, Stability-indicating assay method

  4. Study of Aramid Fiber/Polychloroprene Recycling Process by Thermal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Dabkiewicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aramid fiber is an important polymer applied as reinforcement in high-performance composites, which, due its exceptional properties, becomes an excellent impact absorption material. It has been broadly utilized in aeronautic industry and ballistic protection. In aircrafts, it is mainly used in secondary structures, such as fairings, floor panels, and bullet proof structures in helicopters, whereas, in ballistic protection industry, it is applied in automotive armor and bullet proof vest. Under environmental perspective, it is worrying the development and application of composites, which generate proportional discards of these materials, whether originated from manufacturing process, spare parts or end of life cycle. High-performance composite materials like those using aramid fiber are generally difficult to recycle due to their properties and the difficulty for the separation of the components, making their recycling economically unviable. From the characteristics of composite materials and environmental viewpoint, this paper presents a new aramid fiber recycling process. The main objective of this research was to study different recycling methods in aramid fibers/Neoprene® composites. To promote the Neoprene® degradation, it was used a pyrolysis oven with controlled atmosphere and CO 2 injection. For the degraded separation, it was designed a mechanical washing machine in which the most degraded separation occurred. To complete the materials separation, it was employed a manual cleaning process, and, at least to prove the efficacy of the process, it was applied a tensile test in the yarns.

  5. Optimization of nonlinear, non-Gaussian Bayesian filtering for diagnosis and prognosis of monotonic degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Matteo; Sbarufatti, Claudio; Giglio, Marco; Todd, Michael D.

    2018-05-01

    The present work critically analyzes the probabilistic definition of dynamic state-space models subject to Bayesian filters used for monitoring and predicting monotonic degradation processes. The study focuses on the selection of the random process, often called process noise, which is a key perturbation source in the evolution equation of particle filtering. Despite the large number of applications of particle filtering predicting structural degradation, the adequacy of the picked process noise has not been investigated. This paper reviews existing process noise models that are typically embedded in particle filters dedicated to monitoring and predicting structural damage caused by fatigue, which is monotonic in nature. The analysis emphasizes that existing formulations of the process noise can jeopardize the performance of the filter in terms of state estimation and remaining life prediction (i.e., damage prognosis). This paper subsequently proposes an optimal and unbiased process noise model and a list of requirements that the stochastic model must satisfy to guarantee high prognostic performance. These requirements are useful for future and further implementations of particle filtering for monotonic system dynamics. The validity of the new process noise formulation is assessed against experimental fatigue crack growth data from a full-scale aeronautical structure using dedicated performance metrics.

  6. Understanding Stoichiometric Controls in Nutrient Processing Along the River Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayburu-Caruso, V. A.; Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Van Horn, D. J.; Covino, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Eutrophication is the second most common cause of water impairment across the U.S. Nutrient retention in streams is controlled by physical and biochemical processes, including biomass availability and stoichiometric limitations. Decoupling the interactions between hydrology, nutrient supply and biogeochemical processes remains challenging for the scientific community due to lack of mechanistic understanding. Consequently, more knowledge regarding optimal controls for nutrient retention is needed to implement better management and restoration practices. We conducted column experiments to investigate how stoichiometric limitations influence nutrient spiraling in shallow sediment-water interactions along representative sites of the Jemez River-Rio Grande continuum (which spans eight stream orders), in New Mexico, USA. In each stream order we incubated six columns packed with different sediments (i.e., Silica Cone Density Sand ASTM D 1556 (0.075-2.00 mm), gravel (>2mm) and native sediments) from each site for three months. We performed two laboratory tracer experiments using columns of each substrate under identical flow conditions. In the first experiment we added a short-term pulse of reactive and conservative tracers (i.e. NaNO3 and NaBr). In the second experiment we added a short-term pulse of NaBr and nutrients following Redfield's ratio (106C:16N:1P). We estimated uptake kinetics using the Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC) method and evaluated how ideal stoichiometric conditions controlled efficient nutrient retention along fluvial networks. Our results suggest that biological uptake of nitrate is limited by nitrogen in headwater streams and by phosphorus and carbon in larger stream orders.

  7. Assessment and Measurements of Degradation Processes in the Engineering Barriers of LILW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Sajna, A.; Petkovsek, B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 the Slovenian national agency for radwaste management (ARAO) adopted the national spatial plan for the low and intermediate level waste (LILW) repository to be located in Krsko municipality near NPP Krsko. The selected option for disposal was based on a silo type structure for the near surface disposal facility that will be situated close to a saturated aquifer. The soil in the region can be described as silt that extends a few hundred meters deep. The silt also contains sections of sand or clay. As the possibility exists that the natural geological barrier system will not be able to contain radionuclide migration it is a pre requisite that the proposed LILW repository must install engineered barriers. Research on different cementation materials are currently underway in order to find sustainable materials for the manufacturing of engineered barriers for the repository (silo, backfilling, concrete containers). The research also includes the assessment of possible site specific degradation processes in order to provide a methodology for the selection of appropriate locally available materials that will minimize the degradation processes. The research methodology was based on studying the characteristics (workability, compressive strength), durability (resistance to penetration of water, freeze/thaw resistance, resistance to groundwater), rheology (heat of hydration, autogenous and concrete shrinkage) and reinforcement corrosion of different concrete compositions. The characterization results were used to develop a numerical model for degradation processes to be found in the current concrete compositions. Although initial results indicated that the current concrete compositions are satisfactory, the research must be extended to the addition of binder materials to improve the characteristics of the manufactures concrete before degradation processes can be studied. (author)

  8. Novel bacterial consortia isolated from plastic garbage processing areas demonstrated enhanced degradation for low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Manjunatha, Vishal; Sultana, Subiya; Jois, Chandana; Bai, Vidya; Vasist, Kiran S

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to formulate novel microbial consortia isolated from plastic garbage processing areas and thereby devise an eco-friendly approach for enhanced degradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE). The LDPE degrading bacteria were screened and microbiologically characterized. The best isolates were formulated as bacterial consortia, and degradation efficiency was compared with the consortia formulated using known isolates obtained from the Microbial Culture Collection Centre (MTCC). The degradation products were analyzed by FTIR, GC-FID, tensile strength, and SEM. The bacterial consortia were characterized by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. The formulated bacterial consortia demonstrated 81 ± 4 and 38 ± 3 % of weight reduction for LDPE strips and LDPE pellets, respectively, over a period of 120 days. However, the consortia formulated by MTCC strains demonstrated 49 ± 4 and 20 ± 2 % of weight reduction for LDPE strips and pellets, respectively, for the same period. Furthermore, the three isolates in its individual application exhibited 70 ± 4, 68 ± 4, and 64 ± 4 % weight reduction for LDPE strips and 21 ± 2, 28 ± 2, 24 ± 2 % weight reduction for LDPE pellets over a period of 120 days (p waste management of LDPE and similar types of plastic garbage.

  9. Degradation of Polybrominated Aiphenyl Ethers in a UV Advanced Reduction Process with Different Reducing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Chaolin; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Guosheng

    2018-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are toxic and persistent, and their efficient degradation is currently a challenge. In this study, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) was selected as the target compound and was degraded by a UV photochemical system with different reducing agent. The result showed that the optimal BDE-209 removal in 1 hour by UV/sodium sulphite (Na2SO3) was 86.87%. With the same concentration of BDE-209 and reaction time, the optimal removal rate by UV/sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was 89.25%. Kinetic analysis revealed that the degradation of BDE-209 conformed to the first-order kinetic model. The order of rate constant of different UV photochemical processes is kUVdegradation of BDE-209. As a reducing agent, sodium borohydride showed a better enhanced effect for the removal of bromines.

  10. "Slight" of hand: the processing of visually degraded gestures with speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Spencer D; Hansen, Bruce C; Clark, David T

    2012-01-01

    Co-speech hand gestures influence language comprehension. The present experiment explored what part of the visual processing system is optimized for processing these gestures. Participants viewed short video clips of speech and gestures (e.g., a person saying "chop" or "twist" while making a chopping gesture) and had to determine whether the two modalities were congruent or incongruent. Gesture videos were designed to stimulate the parvocellular or magnocellular visual pathways by filtering out low or high spatial frequencies (HSF versus LSF) at two levels of degradation severity (moderate and severe). Participants were less accurate and slower at processing gesture and speech at severe versus moderate levels of degradation. In addition, they were slower for LSF versus HSF stimuli, and this difference was most pronounced in the severely degraded condition. However, exploratory item analyses showed that the HSF advantage was modulated by the range of motion and amount of motion energy in each video. The results suggest that hand gestures exploit a wide range of spatial frequencies, and depending on what frequencies carry the most motion energy, parvocellular or magnocellular visual pathways are maximized to quickly and optimally extract meaning.

  11. Effect of food processing on degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane and its isomers in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of different food processing techniques on the degradation of organochlorine compounds (α, β, ɣ and δ hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH residues in both natural and fortified samples of milk. Materials and Methods: Raw milk samples are collected from the local areas of Hyderabad, India. Naturally and fortified milk samples (HCH were subjected to various food processing techniques, pasteurization (63ºC for ½ h, sterilization (121ºC for 15 min and boiling for 5 min and analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detector using quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe method for multiresidue analysis of pesticides in milk with slight modification. Results: The final mean residual concentration of pesticide in milk after heat processing and percentage of degradation were calculated with respective treatments. Conclusion: Heat treatments are highly effective on reduction of mean residual concentration of HCH in milk. In which Sterilization and boiling proved to be more effective in degradation of HCH isomers.

  12. Degradation of thiamethoxam and metoprolol by UV, O3 and UV/O3 hybrid processes: Kinetics, degradation intermediates and toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šojić, D.; Despotović, V.; Orčić, D.; Szabó, E.; Arany, E.; Armaković, S.; Illés, E.; Gajda-Schrantz, K.; Dombi, A.; Alapi, T.; Sajben-Nagy, E.; Palágyi, A.; Vágvölgyi, Cs.; Manczinger, L.; Bjelica, L.; Abramović, B.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryA comprehensive study of the degradation of thiamethoxam (THIA) and metoprolol (MET) was conducted by using UV-induced photolysis (λ = 254 nm), ozonation, and a combination of these methods. In order to investigate how molecular structure of the substrate influences the rate of its degradation, we compared these three processes for the insecticide THIA and the drug MET (a β1-blocker). Of the three treatments applied, the UV photolysis and the combination of UV/O3 were found to be most effective in the degradation of THIA, while the UV/O3 process appeared to be the most efficient in terms of MET decay. The degradation kinetics was monitored by LC-DAD, and spectrophotometry, while the mineralization of the substrates was studied by TOC analysis. Reaction intermediates were studied in detail and a number of them were identified using LC-MS (ESI+/ESI-). Both parent compounds showed slight toxic effects towards algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and bacteria Vibrio fischeri. However, the toxicity of the solutions containing also the degradation intermediates appeared to be much higher for all the test organisms. The inhibition/mortality rates were reduced most efficiently by the UV/O3 procedure. Ames test and Comet assay were used to follow the genotoxicity during the degradation of the studied compounds. Genotoxic intermediates were frequently detected in the case of MET in the UV treatment alone or in the presence of ozone. Treatments of THIA samples resulted less frequently in genotoxic intermediates. To our best knowledge, this work is the first genotoxicological investigation dealing with the photolytic degradation process of the studied compounds.

  13. High Temperature Degradation of Powder-processed Ni-based Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Luptáková

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present work is to study the high temperature degradation of the powder-processed polycrystalline superalloy Ni-15Cr-18Co-4Al-3.5Ti-5Mo. This superalloy has been applied as material for grips of a creep machine. The material was exposed at 1100 °C for about 10 days at 10 MPa stress. During the creep test occurred unacceptable creep deformation of grips as well as severe surface oxidation with scales peeling off. Three types of the microstructure were observed in the studied alloy: (i unexposed state; (ii heat treated (annealing - 10 min/1200 °C and (iii after using as a part of the equipment of the creep machine during the creep test. It is shown that the microstructure degradation resulting from the revealed γ´ phase fcc Ni3(Al,Ti particles preferentially created at the grain boundaries of the samples after performing creep tests affects mechanical properties of the alloy and represents a significant contribution to all degradation processes affecting performance and service life of the creep machine grips. Based on investigation and obtained results, the given material is not recommended to be used for grips of creep machine at temperatures above 1000 °C.

  14. On the kinetics of organic pollutant degradation with Co2+/peroxymonosulfate process: When ammonium meets chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Yang, Fei; Ai, Luoyan; Feng, Min; Wang, Chi; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2017-07-01

    A large amount of chloride and ammonium ions were produced and released from industrial processes with non-biodegradable organic pollutants to affect efficiencies of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Here, the influences of chloride and ammonium ions on Co/peroxymonosulfate (Co/PMS) reaction system, a widely used AOPs to produce sulfate radicals, were investigated by examining the degradation efficiency of an azo dye (Acid Orange 7, AO7). The experimental results showed that a significant decrease in the degradation rate of AO7 was observed in the presence of NH 4 + , while a dual effect of chloride on AO7 bleaching appeared. The presence of NH 4 Cl was unfavorable for AO7 degradation at low concentration (20 mM) apparently accelerated AO7 discoloration rate. The apparent effects of the two co-existing inorganic ions were determined by roles of the dominating ions at varied molar ratio of [NH 4 + ]/[Cl - ]. The present study may have technical implications for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing diverse ions in practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantification of Polymerisation Processes During The Oxidative Degradation of 14C-Labelled Chlorophenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, Roland; Richnow, Hans H.; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2002-01-01

    In experiments employing the lignocellulose-decaying basidiomycetes Trametes versicolor and Stropharia rugosoannulata degrading uniformly 14 C-labelled 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, a combination of size exclusion chromatography (SEC),fractionation, and β-scintillation counting was applied to quantify polymerisation products formed during chlorophenol degradation. Time-dependent mass balances were generated by analysis of 14 C in polymerisation products,CO 2 , as well as monomer non-polar and polar metabolites. Approximately 30% of the chlorophenols were found to be polymerised. A major fraction of the polymerised products corresponded to a molecular weight range from 0.24 - 40 kDa.Only a minor fraction could be attributed to a molecular weight >40 kDa. This method proved to be useful in quantification of polymerisation products and kinetics of the polymerisation processes, whereas UV/Vis detection of polymerisation products separated by SEC led to false positive results. The SEC- 14 C method could also be applied for other complex processes where polymerisation or depolymerisation occurs (humification, degradation of lignocellulose, formation of bound residues from xenobiotics such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and where spectrophotometric determinations are difficult or impossible

  16. Quantification of Polymerisation Processes During The Oxidative Degradation of {sup 14}C-Labelled Chlorophenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, Roland [Microbiology of Subterrestrial Aquatic Systems Group, UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle (Germany)], E-mail: roland@halle.ufz.de; Richnow, Hans H. [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Remediation Research (Germany); Schlosser, Dietmar [Microbiology of Subterrestrial Aquatic Systems Group, UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle (Germany)

    2002-05-15

    In experiments employing the lignocellulose-decaying basidiomycetes Trametes versicolor and Stropharia rugosoannulata degrading uniformly{sup 14}C-labelled 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, a combination of size exclusion chromatography (SEC),fractionation, and {beta}-scintillation counting was applied to quantify polymerisation products formed during chlorophenol degradation. Time-dependent mass balances were generated by analysis of {sup 14}C in polymerisation products,CO{sub 2}, as well as monomer non-polar and polar metabolites. Approximately 30% of the chlorophenols were found to be polymerised. A major fraction of the polymerised products corresponded to a molecular weight range from 0.24 - 40 kDa.Only a minor fraction could be attributed to a molecular weight >40 kDa. This method proved to be useful in quantification of polymerisation products and kinetics of the polymerisation processes, whereas UV/Vis detection of polymerisation products separated by SEC led to false positive results. The SEC-{sup 14}C method could also be applied for other complex processes where polymerisation or depolymerisation occurs (humification, degradation of lignocellulose, formation of bound residues from xenobiotics such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and where spectrophotometric determinations are difficult or impossible.

  17. Decolorization and degradation of reactive dye during the dyed cotton fabric rinsing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Deng-Hong; Zheng, Qing-Kang; Chen, Sheng; Liu, Qing-Shu; Wang, Xiu-Xing; Guan, Yu; Pu, Zong-Yao

    2010-01-01

    Dyeing process of textile consumes large quantities of water, which results in huge amounts of colored wastewater. Most of the dye wastewater treating methods focused on the treatment of wastewater after the rinsing process of dyed textile. In this paper, tetraacetylethylenediamine/hydrogen peroxide (TAED/H₂O₂) active oxidation (AO) system was developed to rinse dyed textile and decolorize the rinsing wastewater simultaneously. The results indicated that the decolorization ratio of the rinse effluent obtained by AO method were in the range of 51.72%-84.15% according to different dyes and the COD value decreased more than 30% compared with that of traditional rinsing process. The decolorization kinetics investigation showed that the decolorization of dyes during AO rinsing process followed the law of pseudo-first order kinetics. The result of UV-Vis and UPLC-MS analysis demonstrated that the dye was degraded into colorless organic molecular fragments and partly mineralized during the AO rinsing process.

  18. Understanding Metallic Bonding: Structure, Process and Interaction by Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students'…

  19. Study of the degradation process of polyimide induced by high energetic ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severin, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The dissertation focuses on the radiation hardness of Kapton under extreme radiation environment conditions. To study ion-beam induced modifications, Kapton foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (e.g. Ti, Mo, Au, and U) within a large fluence regime (1 x 10 10 -5 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 ). The irradiated Kapton foils were analysed by means of infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy, tensile strength measurement, mass loss analysis, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. For testing the radiation stability of Kapton at the cryogenic operation temperature (5-10 K) of the superconducting magnets, additional irradiation experiments were performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL, France) focusing on the online analysis of the outgassing process of small volatile degradation fragments. The investigations of the electrical properties analysed by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy exhibit a different trend: high fluence irradiations with light ions (e.g. Ti) lead to a slight increase of the conductivity, whereas heavy ions (e.g. Sm, Au) cause a drastic change already in the fluence regime of nonoverlapping tracks (5 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 ). Online analysis of the outgassing process during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures shows the release of a variety of small gaseous molecules (e.g. CO, CO 2 , and short hydro carbons). Also a small amount of large polymer fragments is identified. The results allow the following conclusions which are of special interest for the application of Kapton as insulating material in a high-energetic particle radiation environment. a) The material degradation measured with the optical spectroscopy and tensile strength tests are scalable with the dose deposited by the ions. The high correlation of the results allows the prediction of the mechanical degradation with the simple and non-destructive infrared spectroscopy. The degradation curve points to a critical material degradation which

  20. Study of the degradation process of polyimide induced by high energetic ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severin, Daniel

    2008-09-19

    The dissertation focuses on the radiation hardness of Kapton under extreme radiation environment conditions. To study ion-beam induced modifications, Kapton foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (e.g. Ti, Mo, Au, and U) within a large fluence regime (1 x 10{sup 10}-5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}). The irradiated Kapton foils were analysed by means of infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy, tensile strength measurement, mass loss analysis, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. For testing the radiation stability of Kapton at the cryogenic operation temperature (5-10 K) of the superconducting magnets, additional irradiation experiments were performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL, France) focusing on the online analysis of the outgassing process of small volatile degradation fragments. The investigations of the electrical properties analysed by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy exhibit a different trend: high fluence irradiations with light ions (e.g. Ti) lead to a slight increase of the conductivity, whereas heavy ions (e.g. Sm, Au) cause a drastic change already in the fluence regime of nonoverlapping tracks (5 x 10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2}). Online analysis of the outgassing process during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures shows the release of a variety of small gaseous molecules (e.g. CO, CO{sub 2}, and short hydro carbons). Also a small amount of large polymer fragments is identified. The results allow the following conclusions which are of special interest for the application of Kapton as insulating material in a high-energetic particle radiation environment. a) The material degradation measured with the optical spectroscopy and tensile strength tests are scalable with the dose deposited by the ions. The high correlation of the results allows the prediction of the mechanical degradation with the simple and non-destructive infrared spectroscopy. The degradation curve points to a

  1. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular...... matrix (ECM) of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. METHODS: We 1) cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I) 2) investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...

  2. Photo degradation of methyl orange an azo dye by advanced Fenton process using zero valent metallic iron: influence of various reaction parameters and its degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi Devi, L; Girish Kumar, S; Mohan Reddy, K; Munikrishnappa, C

    2009-05-30

    Advanced Fenton process (AFP) using zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) is studied as a potential technique to degrade the azo dye in the aqueous medium. The influence of various reaction parameters like effect of iron dosage, concentration of H(2)O(2)/ammonium per sulfate (APS), initial dye concentration, effect of pH and the influence of radical scavenger are studied and optimum conditions are reported. The degradation rate decreased at higher iron dosages and also at higher oxidant concentrations due to the surface precipitation which deactivates the iron surface. The rate constant for the processes Fe(0)/UV and Fe(0)/APS/UV is twice compared to their respective Fe(0)/dark and Fe(0)/APS/dark processes. The rate constant for Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/UV process is four times higher than Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/dark process. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/UV process is attributed to the cleavage of stable iron complexes which produces Fe(2+) ions that participates in cyclic Fenton mechanism for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/APS/UV or H(2)O(2) compared to dark process is due to continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals and also due to the frequent photo reduction of Fe(3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. Though H(2)O(2) is a better oxidant than APS in all respects, but it is more susceptible to deactivation by hydroxyl radical scavengers. The decrease in the rate constant in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger is more for H(2)O(2) than APS. Iron powder retains its recycling efficiency better in the presence of H(2)O(2) than APS. The decrease in the degradation rate in the presence of APS as an oxidant is due to the fact that generation of free radicals on iron surface is slower compared to H(2)O(2). Also, the excess acidity provided by APS retards the degradation rate as excess H(+) ions acts as hydroxyl radical scavenger. The degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) using Fe(0) is an acid driven process shows higher efficiency at pH 3. The

  3. Degradation of PLA/ZnO and PHBV/ZnO composites prepared by melt processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Anžlovar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Composites of polylactide (PLA or poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV and ZnO nanoparticles (nZnO were prepared by melt processing. During extrusion and moulding nano ZnO formed aggregates with sizes between 0.5 and 5 μm in PLA and between 0.5 and 15 μm in PHBV. Nano ZnO acted as a disruptor of PLA crystallization process and shifted the polymer glass transition temperature to lower temperatures. This was explained by degradation of PLA polymer chains during melt processing. SEC, FTIR and 1H NMR confirmed that PLA degradation was correlated to nZnO concentration. The effect of nZnO on crystallization of PHBV matrix was much less intense which was shown by TGA. On the other hand, PHBV showed significantly lower thermal stability than PLA. ZnO participated as a reactant and an accelerator in the degradation reaction of PLA and at a smaller extent with PHBV. The results of this study revealed that addition of pure nZnO in concentrations higher than 0.1 wt.% is not recommended for the preparation of PLA/nZnO composites by melt processing while in the case of PHBV the nZnO concentration may be higher but it should not exceed 1.0 wt.%. The exposure time of these materials to high temperatures during melt processing should also be minimized.

  4. Degradation of a xanthene dye by Fe(II)-mediated activation of Oxone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y R; Chu, W

    2011-02-28

    A powerful oxidation process using sulfate radicals activated by transition metal mediated Oxone process has been evaluated in depth by monitoring the degradation of a xanthene dye Rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous solution. Ferrous ion was chosen as the transition metal due to its potential catalytic effect and wide availability in dyeing industrial effluent. The effects of parameters including reactant dosing sequence, Fe(II)/Oxone molar ratio and concentration, solution pH, and inorganic salts on the process performance have been investigated. Total RhB removal was obtained within 90 min under an optimal Fe(II)/Oxone molar ratio of 1:1. The RhB degradation was found to be a two-stage kinetics, consisting of a rapid initial decay and followed by a retarded stage. Additionally, experimental results indicated that the presence of certain anions had either a positive or negative effect on the process. The inhibitory effect in the presence of SO(4)(2-) was elucidated by a proposed formula using Nernst equation. Furthermore, dye mineralization in terms of TOC removal indicates that stepwise addition of Fe(II) and Oxone can significantly improve the process performance by about 20%, and the retention time required can be greatly reduced comparing with the conventional one-off dosing method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Organophosphorus insecticides: Toxic effects and bioanalytical tests for evaluating toxicity during degradation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Mirjana B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus insecticides have been the most applied group of insecticides for the last two decades. Their main toxic effects are related to irreversible inactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Actually, they covalently bind to serine OH group in the enzyme active site forming phosphorylated enzyme that cannot hydrolyze acetylcholine. Organophosphorus insecticides in the environment undergo the natural degradation pathway including mainly homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrolysis (especially at high pH generating non-inhibiting products. Additionally, thio organophosphates are easily oxidized by naturally present oxidants and UV light, forming more toxic and stable oxons. Thus, oxidative degradation procedures, generally referred as advanced oxidation processes (AOP, have been applied for their efficient removal from contaminated waters. The most applied bioassays to monitor the organophosphate toxicity i.e. the detoxification degree during AOP are Vibrio fischeri and AChE bioassays. Vibrio fischeri toxicity test exploits bioluminescence as the measure of luciferase activity of this marine bacterium, whereas AChE bioassay is based on AChE activity inhibition. Both bioanalytical techniques are rapid (several minutes, simple, sensitive and reproducible. Vibrio fischeri test seems to be a versatile indicator of toxic compounds generated in AOP for organophosphorus insecticides degradation. However, detection of neurotoxic AChE inhibitors, which can be formed in AOP of some organophosphates, requires AChE bioassays. Therefore, AChE toxicity test is more appropriate for monitoring the degradation processes of thio organophosphates, because more toxic oxo organophosphates might be formed and overlooked by Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition. In addition, during organophosphates removal by AOP, compounds with strong genotoxic potential may be formed, which cannot be detected by standard toxicity tests. For this reason, determination of

  6. Processing Factors of Several Pesticides and Degradation Products in Carrots by Household and Industrial Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnechere, Aurore; Hanot, Vincent; Jolie, Ruben; Hendrickx, Marc; Bragard, Claude; Bedoret, Thomas; Van Loco, Joris

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the effect of household and industrial processing on the pesticide residues, carrots (Daucus carota) were sprayed during cultivation with three fungicides (boscalid, difenoconazole and tebuconazole), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and dimethoate) and one herbicide (linuron). The most concentrated formulations were applied pursuant to Good Agricultural Practices, to ensure sufficiently high levels of residues, The subsequent processing conditions were established to correspond as c...

  7. Performance of Fluidized bed Fenton process in Degrading Acid Blue 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, M. M.; Raman, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    The performance of a fluidized bed Fenton process in degrading Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) was investigated. Fluidized bed Fenton process is a modification of conventional Fenton oxidation, aimed at reducing sludge generation and improving process performance. Response surface methodology was used to study the effects of operational parameter on the color removal from the dye. Dimensionless factors, Dye/Fe2+, H2O2/Fe2+ and pH were used as the independent variables in Box-Behnken Design (BDD). Reduced quadratic model was developed to predict the color removal. The process could remove up to 99 % of the initial color. The most significant factor for color removal was found to be Dye/Fe2+, followed by H2O2/Fe2+. Unlike conventional Fenton, the initial pH of the solution does not have a significant effect on the color removal.

  8. Evaluation of the degradation effect on the processability of high molecular weight polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinzato, Rodrigo; Otaguro, Harumi; Lima, Luis F.C.P.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente], E-mail: rodrigo.shinzato@gmail.com, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Artel, Beatriz W.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Radiacao Ltda. (EMBRARAD), Cotia, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    One way to improve the processability of high molecular weight and melt strength of Polypropylene (PP) is reducing its molecular weight by chain scission with increase of flow index. Nevertheless, the more significant occurrence of chain scission in its structure, further improved its processability is at expense of physical properties. It is well known that the high energy radiation creates free radicals in the polymer chains that subsequently stabilize forming structures. These structures composed by low molecular weight chains and by grafted, branched and crosslinked chains modify the physical and chemical properties of the polymer, depending of their distribution. The low molecular weight chains become from the degradation process by high energy irradiation, which decreases the melt strength and improves its processability. So, this work has the objective to evaluate the degradation of the high molecular weight PP using different irradiation doses. Two kinds of PP samples were utilized. The first one, without additive, presented a flow index of 1.9 g/10 min, and the second, additivated with 0.2 wt % of antioxidant phenolic, Irganox 1010, with a flow index of 0.9 g/10 min. These samples were irradiated with doses of 12.5 and 20.0 kGy. The results of flow index and melt strength obtained with these two kinds of samples showed the antioxidant and the radiation action. (author)

  9. Degradation of humic acid and formation of formaldehyde in PEROXONE processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.W.; Rhee, D.S. [Kangwon National University, Chunchon (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    This research was studied the action of the coupling ozone-hydrogen peroxide on aqueous humic acid. PEROXONE process is enhanced the generation of hydroxyl radicals which is effective for degradation of organic matters. Therefore the changes of UV{sub 254} and TOC were investigated through the change of concentrations, injection time of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, initial pH of aqueous humic acid and concentrations of radical scavenger as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in the PEROXONE processes. And the GC/ECD was used to detect the formaldehyde formed by ozonation of humic acid. From the experimental results, concentrations and injection time of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and initial pH in solution in the PEROXONE processes were very important for enhancing the efficiency of degradation in humic acid. The results indicated that removal efficiency of TOC was the highest when concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 5 mg/L, injection time of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 5 minutes and initial pH in solution was 10.5. And presence of alkalinity in solution was reduced the efficiency of treatment. The formaldehyde were formed less PEROXONE processes than only ozone. When initial pH in solution were changed from 3.5 to 10.5, the formaldehyde were formed the highest concentration at pH 5. (author). 18 refs., 12 figs.

  10. A study on the degradation of endocrine disruptors and dioxins by ozonation and advanced oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kenmochi, Y.; Tutumi, K.; Tanaka, T. [Ebara Corp., Fujisawa (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Recently, enhancement and development of treatment technologies related to contaminated water environment by endocrine disruptors such as bisphenol-A(BPA), estradiol(E2) and dioxins have become a focus of attention. In this study, the influence of O{sub 3} dosage and the forms of endocrine disruptors on the degradability during O{sub 3} treatment and AOP treatment were investigated. A reaction kinetic evaluation of these processes was also carried out. In this study, the endocrine disruptors were classified into 2 groups: (1) DXNs: dioxins and (2) EDs: endocrine disruptors other than dioxins. For the case of DXNs decomposition, highly concentrated DXNs from incinerator washwater were degraded by UV/O{sub 3} combined treatment. Influence of O{sub 3} dosage and forms of DXNs on the reaction rate constant were evaluated. For the case of EDs decomposition, the effect of O{sub 3} dosage on the reaction rate constant were investigated during O{sub 3} treatment of secondary treated sewage. Also, a degradability comparison was made for the above 2 groups. (orig.)

  11. Optimal Constant-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Plans Using Nonlinear Generalized Wiener Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated degradation test (ADT has been widely used to assess highly reliable products’ lifetime. To conduct an ADT, an appropriate degradation model and test plan should be determined in advance. Although many historical studies have proposed quite a few models, there is still room for improvement. Hence we propose a Nonlinear Generalized Wiener Process (NGWP model with consideration of the effects of stress level, product-to-product variability, and measurement errors for a higher estimation accuracy and a wider range of use. Then under the constraints of sample size, test duration, and test cost, the plans of constant-stress ADT (CSADT with multiple stress levels based on the NGWP are designed by minimizing the asymptotic variance of the reliability estimation of the products under normal operation conditions. An optimization algorithm is developed to determine the optimal stress levels, the number of units allocated to each level, inspection frequency, and measurement times simultaneously. In addition, a comparison based on degradation data of LEDs is made to show better goodness-of-fit of the NGWP than that of other models. Finally, optimal two-level and three-level CSADT plans under various constraints and a detailed sensitivity analysis are demonstrated through examples in this paper.

  12. Joint photomicrobial process for the degradation of the insensitive munition N-guanylurea-dinitramide (FOX-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Nancy N; Halasz, Annamaria; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2013-05-21

    N-Guanylurea-dinitramide (FOX-12) is a very insensitive energetic material intended to be used in the composition of next-generation insensitive munitions. To help predict the environmental behavior and fate of FOX-12, we conducted a study to determine its photodegradability and biodegradability. When dissolved in water, FOX-12, a guanylurea-dinitramide salt, also named GUDN, dissociated instantly to produce the dinitramide moiety and guanylurea, as demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. When an aqueous solution of FOX-12 was subjected to photolysis using a solar-simulated photoreactor, we found a rapid removal of the dinitramide with concurrent formation of N₂O, NO₂(-), and NO₃(-). The second component, guanylurea, was photostable. However, when FOX-12 was incubated aerobically with the soil isolate Variovorax strain VC1 and protected from light, the dinitramide component of FOX-12 was recalcitrant but guanylurea degraded effectively to ammonia, guanidine, and presumably CO₂. When FOX-12 was incubated with strain VC1 in the presence of light, both components of FOX-12 degraded, giving similar products to those described above. We concluded that the new insensitive explosive FOX-12 can be effectively degraded by a joint photomicrobial process and, therefore, should not cause persistent contamination of surface waters.

  13. The critical role of RNA processing and degradation in the control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraiano, Cecília M; Andrade, José M; Domingues, Susana; Guinote, Inês B; Malecki, Michal; Matos, Rute G; Moreira, Ricardo N; Pobre, Vânia; Reis, Filipa P; Saramago, Margarida; Silva, Inês J; Viegas, Sandra C

    2010-09-01

    The continuous degradation and synthesis of prokaryotic mRNAs not only give rise to the metabolic changes that are required as cells grow and divide but also rapid adaptation to new environmental conditions. In bacteria, RNAs can be degraded by mechanisms that act independently, but in parallel, and that target different sites with different efficiencies. The accessibility of sites for degradation depends on several factors, including RNA higher-order structure, protection by translating ribosomes and polyadenylation status. Furthermore, RNA degradation mechanisms have shown to be determinant for the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. RNases mediate the processing, decay and quality control of RNA. RNases can be divided into endonucleases that cleave the RNA internally or exonucleases that cleave the RNA from one of the extremities. Just in Escherichia coli there are >20 different RNases. RNase E is a single-strand-specific endonuclease critical for mRNA decay in E. coli. The enzyme interacts with the exonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), enolase and RNA helicase B (RhlB) to form the degradosome. However, in Bacillus subtilis, this enzyme is absent, but it has other main endonucleases such as RNase J1 and RNase III. RNase III cleaves double-stranded RNA and family members are involved in RNA interference in eukaryotes. RNase II family members are ubiquitous exonucleases, and in eukaryotes, they can act as the catalytic subunit of the exosome. RNases act in different pathways to execute the maturation of rRNAs and tRNAs, and intervene in the decay of many different mRNAs and small noncoding RNAs. In general, RNases act as a global regulatory network extremely important for the regulation of RNA levels.

  14. DOCUMENTATION PROTOCOLS TO GENERATE RISK INDICATORS REGARDING DEGRADATION PROCESSES FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE RISK EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kioussi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable maintenance and preservation of cultural heritage assets depends highly on its resilience to external or internal alterations and to various hazards. Risk assessment of a heritage asset's can be defined as the identification of all potential hazards affecting it and the evaluation of the asset's vulnerability (building materials and building structure conservation state.Potential hazards for cultural heritage are complex and varying. The risk of decay and damage associated with monuments is not limited to certain long term natural processes, sudden events and human impact (macroscale of the heritage asset but is also a function of the degradation processes within materials and structural elements due to physical and chemical procedures. Obviously, these factors cover different scales of the problem. The deteriorating processes in materials may be triggered by external influences or caused because of internal chemical and/or physical variations of materials properties and characteristics. Therefore risk evaluation should be dealt in the direction of revealing the specific active decay and damage mechanism both in mesoscale [type of decay and damage] and microscale [decay phenomenon mechanism] level. A prerequisite for risk indicators identification and development is the existence of an organised source of comparable and interoperable data about heritage assets under observation. This unified source of information offers a knowledge based background of the asset's vulnerability through the diagnosis of building materials' and building structure's conservation state, through the identification of all potential hazards affecting these and through mapping of its possible alterations during its entire life-time. In this framework the identification and analysis of risks regarding degradation processes for the development of qualitative and quantitative indicators can be supported by documentation protocols. The data investigated by such

  15. Degradation of l-polylactide during melt processing with layered double hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Nathalie; Katiyar, Vimal; Koch, Christian Bender

    2012-01-01

    PLA was melt compounded in small-scale batches with two forms of laurate-modified magnesium–aluminum layered double hydroxide (Mg-Al-LDH-C12), the corresponding carbonate form (Mg-Al-LDH-CO3) and a series of other additives. Various methods were then adopted to characterize the resulting compounds...... in an effort to gain greater insights into PLA degradation during melt processing. PLA molecular weight reduction was found to vary according to the type of LDH additive. It is considered that the degree of particle dispersion and LDH exfoliation, and hence the accessibility of the hydroxide layer surfaces...

  16. Comparison of Five Advanced Oxidation Processes for Degradation of Pesticide in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Chioma Affam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study compared the technical efficiency and economic cost of five advanced oxidation processes (Fenton, UV photo-Fenton, solar photo-Fenton, UV/TiO2/H2O2 and FeGAC/H2O2 for degradation of the pesticides chlorpyrifos cypermethrin and chlorothalonil in aqueous solution. The highest degradation in terms of COD and TOC removals and improvement of the biodegradability (BOD5/COD ratio index (BI were observed to be (i Fenton - 69.03% (COD, 55.61% (TOC, and 0.35 (BI; (ii UV photo-Fenton -78.56% (COD, 63.76% (TOC and 0.38 (BI;  (iii solar photo-Fenton - 74.19% (COD, 58.32% (TOC and 0.36 (BI; (iv UV/TiO2/H2O2 - 53.62% (COD, 21.54% (TOC, and 0.26 (BI; and  (v the most technical efficient and cost effective process was FeGAC/H2O2. At an optimum condition (FeGAC 5 g/L, H2O2 100 mg/L, and reaction time of 60 min at pH 3, the COD and TOC removal efficiency were 96.19 and 85.60%, respectively, and the biodegradation index was 0.40. The degradation rate constant and cost were 0.0246 min-1 and $0.74/kg TOC, respectively. The FeGAC/H2O2 process is the most technically efficient and cost effective for pretreatment of the pesticide wastewater before biological treatment. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 26th July 2017; Revised: 26nd September 2017; Accepted: 27th September 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Affam, A.C., Chaudhuri, M., Kutty, S.R.M. (2018. Comparison of Five Advanced Oxidation Processes for Degradation of Pesticide in Aqueous Solution. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 179-186 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1394.179-186

  17. Study of herbicide ametryne degradation in HDPE packaging using the advanced oxidation process by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Debora Cristina de

    2008-01-01

    This study is part of the project with the objective to evaluate pesticides degradation for decontamination of commercial polymeric packaging of high density polyethylene, HDPE, used in agriculture. The herbicide used to this study was the herbicide ametryne (commercial name, Gesapax 500), due to its great use, mainly on field crops and on corn. Ametryne is commercialized since 1975, and, depending on the pesticide formulation and type of application, residues may be detectable in water, soil and on the surfaces for months or years. In order to evaluate the efficiency of radiation processing on removal the pesticides contamination, HDPE packaging were irradiated using Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1,5 MeV energy and 37 kW, in batch system. The samples were irradiated with water, in various absorbed doses. Ametryne was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC Shimadzu 17A), after extraction with hexane/dichloromethane (1:1 v/v) solution. The calibration curve was obtained with a regression coefficient of 0.986, and the relative standard deviation was lower than 10%. The radiation processing yield was evaluated by the rate of ametryne degradation and by the destruction G-value (Gd). The electron beam irradiation processing, showed high efficiency in destroying ametryne in the HDPE packaging when the samples were irradiated in presence of small quantities of water. (author)

  18. Understanding the Process of Acculturation for Primary Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. W.

    This paper reviews the concepts of acculturation and adaptation to provide a framework for understanding the highly variable relationship between acculturation and mental health in refugee populations. It begins with an extended definition and discussion of the concepts of acculturation and adaptation. The characteristics of acculturating groups…

  19. Genetic Aspects of Deafness: Understanding the Counseling Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughman, Joann A.; Shaver, Kathleen A.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of the genetic concepts applicable to individual cases of deafness, as well as an appreciation of the complex nature of determinaton of recurrence risks in families, will facilitate the referral of individuals and families for genetic evaluation and counseling. (Author)

  20. Understanding pre-registration nursing fitness to practise processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Jessica; Haycock-Stuart, Elaine; McLachlan, Alison; James, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Protection of the public is a key aspect of pre-registration nursing education and UK Nursing and Midwifery Council monitoring processes. Universities must ensure that nursing students are "fit to practise" both during their programme and at the point of registration. However, current evidence suggests that institutional fitness to practise policies and processes can be inconsistent, lacking in clarity, and open to legal challenge. To examine fitness to practise processes in pre-registration nursing programmes in Scotland. Academic personnel (n=11) with key roles in fitness to practise processes in nine of the eleven Scottish universities providing pre-registration nursing programmes. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with eleven academics with responsibility for fitness to practise processes in pre-registration programmes. The qualitative data and documentary evidence including institutional policies and processes were thematically analysed. In this paper, we focus on illuminating the key theme of Stages and Thresholds in Fitness to Practise processes i.e. Pre-fitness to practise, Stage 1, Stage 2, and Appeal, along with two thresholds (between Pre-fitness to practise and Stage 1; between Stage 1 and Stage 2. Diverse fitness to practise processes are currently in place for Scottish pre-registration nursing students. These processes draw on a shared set of principles but are couched in different terminology and vary according to their location within different university structures. Nevertheless, universities appear to be confronting broadly similar issues around ensuring fitness to practise and are building a body of expertise in this area. Examples of good practice are identified and include the use of staged processes and graduated outcomes, the incorporation of teaching about fitness to practise into nursing programmes, positive attitudes around health and disability, and collaborative decision making. Areas of challenge include systems for

  1. Learning from Game Design : Understanding Participatory processes through Game Mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ampatzidou, Christina; Gugerell, Katharina; Diephuis, Jeremiah

    With the increasing interest of local governments in civic participation, it becomes important to explore the available methods for orchestrating participatory processes and evaluate how different tools address some of the common issues associated with participatory processes. Game design is an

  2. The influence of using sonicator type to produce alcohol in the glycerol degradation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Ruslan; Sumarno, S.; Mahfud., M.

    2017-05-01

    The last few years the energy crisis happens everywhere, not least in Indonesia. One reason is the need for fossil energy is increasing with the increasing population, in addition to the depletion of oil reserves on the Earth Indonesia. Therefore it takes a plant-based alternative energy, one of which is biodiesel. The transesterification process will produce primary products such as methyl ester and byproducts / waste in the form of about 10-15 % glycerol so that glycerol is quite abundant. This research aims to study the effect of the sonicator type (vibrating horn and cleaning bath) as well as the effect of γ-Al2O3 catalyst on the degradation of glycerol. The production process was conducted in a batch reactor equipped with an ultrasonic wave generator. Operating conditions of this study was the atmospheric pressure with mass ratio of glycerol water 1:10. The research variables were sonication temperature of 30 and 40 ° C, sonication time of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90 minutes with and without the catalyst. Products of degradation were analyzed by Gas Chromatography (GC). The results showed that, the products of degradation product (methanol and allyl alcohol) using a sonicator vibrating horn type were greater compared to using cleaning bath type sonicator. The glycerol conversion was 63.21 % at sonication time of 90 minutes, a temperature of 40 °C using γ-Al2O3 catalyst. While the greatest product yield was 18.17 % methanol at sonication time of 90 minutes, a temperature of 40 °C with the use of vibrating horn sonicator type, with the addition of γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

  3. Early diagnostic of concurrent gear degradation processes progressing under time-varying loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    This study develops a gear diagnostic procedure for the detection of multi- and concurrent degradation processes evolving under time-varying loads. Instead of a conventional comparison between a descriptor and an alarm level, this procedure bases its detection strategy on a descriptor evolution tracking; a lasting descriptor increase denotes the presence of ongoing degradation mechanisms. The procedure works from time domain residual signals prepared in the frequency domain, and accepts any gear conditions as reference signature. To extract the load fluctuation repercussions, the procedure integrates a scaling factor. The investigation first examines a simplification assuming a linear connection between the load and the dynamic response amplitudes. However, while generally valuable, the precision losses associated with large load variations may mask the contribution of tiny flaws. To better reflect the real non-linear relation, the paper reformulates the scaling factor; a power law with an exponent value of 0.85 produces noticeable improvements of the load effect extraction. To reduce the consequences of remaining oscillations, the procedure also includes a filtering phase. During the validation program, a synthetic wear progression assuming a commensurate relation between the wear depth and friction assured controlled evolutions of the surface degradation influence, whereas the fillet crack growth remained entirely determined by the operation conditions. Globally, the tested conditions attest that the final strategy provides accurate monitoring of coexisting isolated damages and general surface deterioration, and that its tracking-detection capacities are unaffected by severe time variations of external loads. The procedure promptly detects the presence of evolving abnormal phenomena. The tests show that the descriptor curve shapes virtually describe the constant wear progression superimposed on the crack length evolution. At the tooth fracture, the mean values of

  4. MODIS Time Series to Detect Anthropogenic Interventions and Degradation Processes in Tropical Pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alves Aguiar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unavoidable diet change in emerging countries, projected for the coming years, will significantly increase the global consumption of animal protein. It is expected that Brazilian livestock production, responsible for close to 15% of global production, be prepared to answer to the increasing demand of beef. Consequently, the evaluation of pasture quality at regional scale is important to inform public policies towards a rational land use strategy directed to improve livestock productivity in the country. Our hypothesis is that MODIS images can be used to evaluate the processes of degradation, restoration and renovation of tropical pastures. To test this hypothesis, two field campaigns were performed covering a route of approximately 40,000 km through nine Brazilian states. To characterize the sampled pastures, biophysical parameters were measured and observations about the pastures, the adopted management and the landscape were collected. Each sampled pasture was evaluated using a time series of MODIS EVI2 images from 2000–2012, according to a new protocol based on seven phenological metrics, 14 Boolean criteria and two numerical criteria. The theoretical basis of this protocol was derived from interviews with producers and livestock experts during a third field campaign. The analysis of the MODIS EVI2 time series provided valuable historical information on the type of intervention and on the biological degradation process of the sampled pastures. Of the 782 pastures sampled, 26.6% experienced some type of intervention, 19.1% were under biological degradation, and 54.3% presented neither intervention nor trend of biomass decrease during the period analyzed.

  5. Degradation of endogenous and exogenous genes of genetically modified rice with Cry1Ab during food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xing, Fuguo; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Liu, Yang

    2014-05-01

    In order to assess the degradation of endogenous and exogenous genes during food processing, genetically modified rice with Cry1Ab was used as raw material to produce 4 processed foods: steamed rice, rice noodles, rice crackers, and sweet rice wine. The results showed various processing procedures caused different degrees of degradation of both endogenous and exogenous genes. During the processing of steamed rice and rice noodles, the procedures were so mild that only genes larger than 1500 bp were degraded, and no degradation of NOS terminator and Hpt gene was detected. For rice crackers, frying was the most severe procedure, followed by microwaving, baking, boiling, 1st drying, and 2nd drying. For sweet rice wine, fermentation had more impact on degradation of genes than the other processing procedures. All procedures in this study did not lead to degradation of genes to below 200 bp, except for NOS terminator. In the case of stability of the genes studied during processing of rice crackers and sweet rice wine, SPS gene was the most, followed by the Cry1Ab gene, Hpt gene, Pubi promoter, and NOS terminator. In our study, we gained some information about the degradation of endogenous and exogenous genes during 4 foods processing, compared the different stabilities between endogenous and exogenous genes, and analyzed different effects of procedure on degradation of genes. In addition, the fragments of endogenous and exogenous genes about 200 bp could be detected in final products, except NOS terminator. As a result, we provided some base information about risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) food and appropriate length of fragment to detect GM component in processed foods. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Analysis of the Durability of PEM FC Membrane Electrode Assemblies in Automotive Applications through the Fundamental Understanding of Membrane and MEA Degradation Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Randal L. [DuPont

    2013-10-31

    The Project focused on mitigation of degradation processes on membrane electrode assemblies. The approach was to develop a model to improve understanding of the mechanisms, and to use it to focus mitigation strategies. The detailed effects of various accelerated stress tests (ASTs) were evaluated to determine the best subset to use in model development. A combination of ASTs developed by the Fuel Cell Commercialization Conference of Japan and the Fuel Cell Tech Team were selected for use. The ASTs were compared by measuring effects on performance, running in-situ diagnostics, and performing microscopic analyses of the membrane electrode assemblies after the stress tests were complete. Nissan ran FCCJ AST protocols and performed in situ and ex-situ electrochemical testing. DuPont ran FCTT and USFCC AST protocols, performed scanning and transmission electron microscopy and ran in-situ electrochemical tests. Other ex-situ testing was performed by IIT, along with much of the data analysis and model development. These tests were then modified to generate time-dependent data of the degradation mechanisms. Three different catalyst types and four membrane variants were then used to generate data for a theoretically-based degradation model. An important part of the approach was to use commercially available materials in the electrodes and membranes made in scalable semiworks processes rather than lab-based materials. This constraint ensured all materials would be practicable for full-scale testing. The initial model for the electrode layer was tested for internal consistency and agreement with the data. A Java-based computer application was developed to analyze the time-dependent AST data using polarization curves with four different cathode gas feeds and generate model parameters. Data showed very good reproducibility and good consistency as cathode catalyst loadings were varied. At the point of termination of the project, a basic electrode model was in hand with several

  7. Suffering transaction: a process of reflecting and understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Shyh-Heng

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the transaction of the lived experience of ‘suffering’ in the process of psychotherapy. ‘Suffering’ is conceptualised as having its weight and value transacted between a psychotherapist and his or her client. As a psychotherapist from a family with a disabled member, my fieldwork in a hospital with the parents of disabled children was conducted in Taiwan. The development of our therapeutic relationship was discovered as the process of ‘suffering transaction’...

  8. ECOSYSTEM APPROACH FOR EVALUATING DEGRADATION PROCESSES AND NATURE PROTECTION IN INNER ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chultem Dugarjav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available he paper presents results of eco-biological assessment of Inner Asian ecosystems using the example of Mongolia as a case study. The comprehensive environmental analysis of changes in Mongolia’s environment included approaches based on three principles: (1 formal, (2 administrative division, and (3 landscape-ecological. We analyzed ecosystems that have undergone at last three levels of alterations (moderate, heavy, and very heavy due to anthropogenic factors. Based on our analysis of degradation processes that result in heavy and very heavy anthropogenic alteration of the natural environment, we isolated 5 groups of hazardous degradation processes: (1 rangeland overgrowth with shrubs, (2 deforestation of forest-steppe ecosystems, (3 desertification of ecosystems on light soils, (4 depletion of ecosystems of hydromorphic landscapes, and (5 narcotization of agrocenoses in modified ecosystems. The comprehensive assessment of adverse changes of natural habitats has enabled a revision of the state policy for the organization of the optimum network of wildlife reserves for conservation of floristic and faunistic diversity.

  9. Solar photocatalytic degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshuk, Tim; Wong, Timothy; Linley, Stuart; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Gu, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Bitumen mining in the Canadian oil sands creates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), the toxicity of which is due in part to naphthenic acids (NAs) and other acid extractable organics (AEO). The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of solar photocatalysis over TiO2 to remove AEO from OSPW. One day of photocatalytic treatment under natural sunlight (25 MJ/m(2) over ∼14 h daylight) eradicated AEO from raw OSPW, and acute toxicity of the OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was eliminated. Nearly complete mineralization of organic carbon was achieved within 1-7 day equivalents of sunlight exposure, and degradation was shown to proceed through a superoxide-mediated oxidation pathway. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis of oxidized intermediate compounds indicated preferential degradation of the heavier and more cyclic NAs (higher number of double bond equivalents), which are the most environmentally persistent fractions. The photocatalyst was shown to be recyclable for multiple uses, and thus solar photocatalysis may be a promising "green" advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A mechanistic kinetic model for phenol degradation by the Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Ricardo F F; Moraes, José E F; Machulek, Amilcar; Pinto, José M

    2010-04-15

    The objective of this paper is to develop and validate a mechanistic model for the degradation of phenol by the Fenton process. Experiments were performed in semi-batch operation, in which phenol, catechol and hydroquinone concentrations were measured. Using the methodology described in Pontes and Pinto [R.F.F. Pontes, J.M. Pinto, Analysis of integrated kinetic and flow models for anaerobic digesters, Chemical Engineering Journal 122 (1-2) (2006) 65-80], a stoichiometric model was first developed, with 53 reactions and 26 compounds, followed by the corresponding kinetic model. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the most influential kinetic parameters of the model that were estimated with the obtained experimental results. The adjusted model was used to analyze the impact of the initial concentration and flow rate of reactants on the efficiency of the Fenton process to degrade phenol. Moreover, the model was applied to evaluate the treatment cost of wastewater contaminated with phenol in order to meet environmental standards. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Degraded perceptual and affective processing of racial out-groups: An electrophysiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Feng; Du, Na; Han, Shihui

    2017-08-01

    Human beings process perceptual and affective information of racial out-groups in a degraded manner. Relative to racial in-group members, we lack perceptual individuation of racial out-group members and empathize their pain to a less degree. To date, however, the relationship between the deficiency of individuation and the impairment of empathy in responding to racial out-groups remains elusive. By recording event-related brain potentials in response to racial in-group and out-group faces portraying pain and neutral expressions, we simultaneously measured neural activity that underpinned individuation and empathy. Deficiency in individuating members of racial out-groups, manifesting as reduced reactivity of face-sensitive N170 in the occipitotemporal region of the brain, predicted attenuation of fronto-central empathic response to the suffering of racial out-groups. Further, the individuation bias mediated the influence of racial prejudice on racial in-group bias in empathic neural responses. These findings suggest an interplay between degraded perceptual and affective processing of racial out-groups.

  12. Noise Equally Degrades Central Auditory Processing in 2- and 4-Year-Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemitalo-Haapola, Elina; Haapala, Sini; Kujala, Teija; Raappana, Antti; Kujala, Tiia; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira

    2017-08-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate developmental and noise-induced changes in central auditory processing indexed by event-related potentials in typically developing children. P1, N2, and N4 responses as well as mismatch negativities (MMNs) were recorded for standard syllables and consonants, frequency, intensity, vowel, and vowel duration changes in silent and noisy conditions in the same 14 children at the ages of 2 and 4 years. The P1 and N2 latencies decreased and the N2, N4, and MMN amplitudes increased with development of the children. The amplitude changes were strongest at frontal electrodes. At both ages, background noise decreased the P1 amplitude, increased the N2 amplitude, and shortened the N4 latency. The noise-induced amplitude changes of P1, N2, and N4 were strongest frontally. Furthermore, background noise degraded the MMN. At both ages, MMN was significantly elicited only by the consonant change, and at the age of 4 years, also by the vowel duration change during noise. Developmental changes indexing maturation of central auditory processing were found from every response studied. Noise degraded sound encoding and echoic memory and impaired auditory discrimination at both ages. The older children were as vulnerable to the impact of noise as the younger children. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5233939.

  13. Understanding mid-level representations in visual processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that early visual processing provides an image-based representation of the visual scene: Neurons in Striate cortex (V1) encode nothing about the meaning of a scene, but they do provide a great deal of information about the image features within it. The mechanisms of these “low-level” visual processes are relatively well understood. We can construct plausible models for how neurons, up to and including those in V1, build their representations from preceding inputs down to the level of photoreceptors. It is also clear that at some point we have a semantic, “high-level” representation of the visual scene because we can describe verbally the objects that we are viewing and their meaning to us. A huge number of studies are examining these “high-level” visual processes each year. Less well studied are the processes of “mid-level” vision, which presumably provide the bridge between these “low-level” representations of edges, colors, and lights and the “high-level” semantic representations of objects, faces, and scenes. This article and the special issue of papers in which it is published consider the nature of “mid-level” visual processing and some of the reasons why we might not have made as much progress in this domain as we would like. PMID:26053241

  14. Comparison between the Understanding Levels of Boys and Girls on the Concepts of Environmental Degradation, Meteorology and Climate Change in Tanzanian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Ernest S.; Komba, Sotco C.

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to determine whether there was any significant difference in understanding levels between secondary school boys and girls on the concepts of environmental degradation, meteorology and climate change. Both structured survey and focus group discussions were used to collect information from 480 students, sampled randomly from 12…

  15. Degradation of phthalate in aqueous solution by advanced oxidation process, photo-fenton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabelsi, S.; Bellakhal, N.; Oturan, N.; Oturan, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A photochemical method for degradation of persistent organic pollutants present in liquid effluents from the plastic industry and in the leaching described. This method, called P hoto-Fenton i nvolves the generation of radicals hydroxyl coupling between the Fenton reaction and photochemistry, OH radicals. Thus formed react with very high speeds, organic substances pollutants leading to their oxidation to total mineralization. In this study, we applied the process photo-Fenton treatment Plasticizers, Phthalates. For this, optimization of experimental parameters (namely the relationship between the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and iron concentration catalyst) was performed. Under optimal conditions and determined the kinetics mineralization of phthalic anhydride by OH was studied. The overall results confirm the effectiveness of photo-Fenton process for the decontamination of liquid effluents responsible for persistent organic pollutants (Pop's).

  16. Understanding the process by which female entrepreneurs create INVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Gitte Ohrt; Hannibal, Martin

    , or vice-versa (Sarasvathy, 2005)? The present paper provides a comparative case study of the founding processes of nine Danish female-owned ventures (in the fashion design industry in Denmark). All have entered foreign markets within the first year of establishment. The retrospective case study draws...... close family members. As regards the latter, the effectual process of opportunity creation was very different across the case firms with some being more the result of collaboration with social network partners, whereas others appeared to be totally random or coincidental. The paper discusses the above...

  17. Degradation of chlorinated paraben by integrated irradiation and biological treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizong; Wang, Jianlong; Sun, Yuliang

    2017-03-15

    Chlorinated paraben, namely, methyl 3, 5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate (MDHB) is the by-product of chlorination disinfection of paraben and frequently detected in the aquatic environments, which exhibited higher persistence and toxicity than paraben itself. In this paper, the combined irradiation and biological treatment process was employed to investigate the removal of MDHB from aqueous solution. The results showed that the removal efficiency of MDHB and total organic carbon (TOC) by irradiation process increased with radiation dose no matter what the initial concentration of MDHB was. The maximum removal efficiency of MDHB was 100%, 91.1%, 93%, respectively, for the initial concentration of MDHB of 1 mg/L, 5 mg/L and 10 mg/L with the radiation dose of 800 Gy. However, the maximum removal efficiency of TOC among all the experimental groups was only 15.3% obtained with the initial concentration of 1 mg/L at dose of 800 Gy. The subsequent biological treatment enhanced the mineralization of MDHB. The suitable radiation dose for the subsequent biological treatment was determined to be 600 Gy. In this case the removal efficiency of TOC increased to about 70%. Compared to the single biological treatment, the integrated irradiation and biological treatment significantly increase the degradation and mineralization of MDHB. Moreover, the dechlorination efficiency reached 77.4% during the integrated irradiation and biological treatment process. In addition, eight intermediates were identified during the combined process and the possible degradation pathway was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of Creosote degradation process under isothermal experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Bojan Ž; Janković, Marija M

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal degradation process of commercial Creosote was analyzed by the thermogravimetric (TG) technique in a nitrogen atmosphere, at four different operating temperatures (230, 250, 270 and 290°C). The kinetic triplet [Ea , A and f(α)] and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH (≠), ΔS (≠)and ΔG (≠)) for investigated Creosote samples were calculated. It was found that two-parameter autocatalytic Šesták-Berggren (SB) kinetic model best describes the process, but in the form of accommodation function with phenomenological character. Applying the multiplicative factor, the true value of activation energy (E (true) a ) was calculated. The experimental density distribution function of the apparent activation energy values was evaluated from isoconversional kinetic analysis. Based of the characteristic shape of distribution curve, it was concluded that the isothermal degradation of Creosote represents a complex physico-chemical process, given the chemical structure of the studied system. It is assumed that the considered process probably includes primary and secondary (autocatalytic) pyrolysis reactions, together with various decomposition reactions and radicals recombination pathways. The objective of the presented work is the proof of principle of the pyrolysis-based thermo-chemical conversion technologies for the production of value-added chemicals from the complex organic compounds, which even include chemical contaminants (such as PAHs). Also, the present work allows us that by using a unified kinetic approach we can obtain a significant physico-chemical characteristics of the tested system, which can then be used in the procedure for the separation of organics from creosote-treated woods and creosote-contaminated soils. The significance of this research is to identify the global kinetic behavior of some target contaminant compounds for pyrolysis, which are primarily PAHs.

  19. Understanding the cognitive processes involved in writing to learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kathleen M; Umanath, Sharda; Thio, Kara; Reilly, Walter B; McDaniel, Mark A; Marsh, Elizabeth J

    2017-06-01

    Writing is often used as a tool for learning. However, empirical support for the benefits of writing-to-learn is mixed, likely because the literature conflates diverse activities (e.g., summaries, term papers) under the single umbrella of writing-to-learn. Following recent trends in the writing-to-learn literature, the authors focus on the underlying cognitive processes. They draw on the largely independent writing-to-learn and cognitive psychology learning literatures to identify important cognitive processes. The current experiment examines learning from 3 writing tasks (and 1 nonwriting control), with an emphasis on whether or not the tasks engaged retrieval. Tasks that engaged retrieval (essay writing and free recall) led to better final test performance than those that did not (note taking and highlighting). Individual differences in structure building (the ability to construct mental representations of narratives; Gernsbacher, Varner, & Faust, 1990) modified this effect; skilled structure builders benefited more from essay writing and free recall than did less skilled structure builders. Further, more essay-like responses led to better performance, implicating the importance of additional cognitive processes such as reorganization and elaboration. The results highlight how both task instructions and individual differences affect the cognitive processes involved when writing-to-learn, with consequences for the effectiveness of the learning strategy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Using Ancient DNA to Understand Evolutionary and Ecological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Cooper, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Ancient DNA provides a unique means to record genetic change through time and directly observe evolutionary and ecological processes. Although mostly based on mitochondrial DNA, the increasing availability of genomic sequences is leading to unprecedented levels of resolution. Temporal studies of ...

  1. Understanding Social Learning Processes in a Citrus Farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on what would traditionally be termed 'non-formal' learning processes in the context of a case study examining how citrus farming communities in the Patensie Valley in the Eastern Cape in South Africa were learning conservation practices. Communities of Practice theory was used to provide a ...

  2. Interviewing International Students to Understand the Process of Expatriate Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is the most influential trend of the early twenty-first century. However, many students have had limited direct contact with cultures other than their own. The following teaching innovation targets such students to give them an experiential learning opportunity about the process of acculturation for expatriates. This is accomplished…

  3. When seeing depends on knowing: adults with Autism Spectrum Conditions show diminished top-down processes in the visual perception of degraded faces but not degraded objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Eva; Gómez, Juan Carlos; Happé, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    Behavioural, neuroimaging and neurophysiological approaches emphasise the active and constructive nature of visual perception, determined not solely by the environmental input, but modulated top-down by prior knowledge. For example, degraded images, which at first appear as meaningless 'blobs', can easily be recognized as, say, a face, after having seen the same image un-degraded. This conscious perception of the fragmented stimuli relies on top-down priming influences from systems involved in attention and mental imagery on the processing of stimulus attributes, and feature-binding [Dolan, R. J., Fink, G. R., Rolls, E., Booth, M., Holmes, A., Frackowiak, R. S. J., et al. (1997). How the brain learns to see objects and faces in an impoverished context. Nature, 389, 596-599]. In Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), face processing abnormalities are well-established, but top-down anomalies in various domains have also been shown. Thus, we tested two alternative hypotheses: (i) that people with ASC show overall reduced top-down modulation in visual perception, or (ii) that top-down anomalies affect specifically the perception of faces. Participants were presented with sets of three consecutive images: degraded images (of faces or objects), corresponding or non-corresponding grey-scale photographs, and the same degraded images again. In a passive viewing sequence we compared gaze times (an index of focal attention) on faces/objects vs. background before and after viewers had seen the undegraded photographs. In an active viewing sequence, we compared how many faces/objects were identified pre- and post-exposure. Behavioural and gaze tracking data showed significantly reduced effects of prior knowledge on the conscious perception of degraded faces, but not objects in the ASC group. Implications for future work on the underlying mechanisms, at the cognitive and neurofunctional levels, are discussed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding the process of fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharraz, Yacine; Guerra, Joana; Pessina, Patrizia; Serrano, Antonio L; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is the aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components during tissue healing leading to loss of its architecture and function. Fibrotic diseases are often associated with chronic pathologies and occur in a large variety of vital organs and tissues, including skeletal muscle. In human muscle, fibrosis is most readily associated with the severe muscle wasting disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by loss of dystrophin gene function. In DMD, skeletal muscle degenerates and is infiltrated by inflammatory cells and the functions of the muscle stem cells (satellite cells) become impeded and fibrogenic cells hyperproliferate and are overactivated, leading to the substitution of skeletal muscle with nonfunctional fibrotic tissue. Here, we review new developments in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to fibrosis in DMD and several recent advances towards reverting it, as potential treatments to attenuate disease progression.

  5. Understanding the Process of Fibrosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Kharraz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is the aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM components during tissue healing leading to loss of its architecture and function. Fibrotic diseases are often associated with chronic pathologies and occur in a large variety of vital organs and tissues, including skeletal muscle. In human muscle, fibrosis is most readily associated with the severe muscle wasting disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by loss of dystrophin gene function. In DMD, skeletal muscle degenerates and is infiltrated by inflammatory cells and the functions of the muscle stem cells (satellite cells become impeded and fibrogenic cells hyperproliferate and are overactivated, leading to the substitution of skeletal muscle with nonfunctional fibrotic tissue. Here, we review new developments in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to fibrosis in DMD and several recent advances towards reverting it, as potential treatments to attenuate disease progression.

  6. Ultrathin (Understanding the processing, structure, and physical and electrical limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. L.; Gusev, E. P.; Degraeve, R.; Garfunkel, E. L.

    2001-09-01

    The outstanding properties of SiO2, which include high resistivity, excellent dielectric strength, a large band gap, a high melting point, and a native, low defect density interface with Si, are in large part responsible for enabling the microelectronics revolution. The Si/SiO2 interface, which forms the heart of the modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor, the building block of the integrated circuit, is arguably the worlds most economically and technologically important materials interface. This article summarizes recent progress and current scientific understanding of ultrathin (understanding of the limits of these gate dielectrics, i.e., how their continuously shrinking thickness, dictated by integrated circuit device scaling, results in physical and electrical property changes that impose limits on their usefulness. We observe, in conclusion, that although Si microelectronic devices will be manufactured with SiO2 and Si-O-N for the foreseeable future, continued scaling of integrated circuit devices, essentially the continued adherence to Moore's law, will necessitate the introduction of an alternate gate dielectric once the SiO2 gate dielectric thickness approaches ˜1.2 nm. It is hoped that this article will prove useful to members of the silicon microelectronics community, newcomers to the gate dielectrics field, practitioners in allied fields, and graduate students. Parts of this article have been adapted from earlier articles by the authors [L. Feldman, E. P. Gusev, and E. Garfunkel, in Fundamental Aspects of Ultrathin Dielectrics on Si-based Devices, edited by E. Garfunkel, E. P. Gusev, and A. Y. Vul' (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1998), p. 1 [Ref. 1]; E. P. Gusev, H. C. Lu, E. Garfunkel, T. Gustafsson, and M. Green, IBM J. Res. Dev. 43, 265 (1999) [Ref. 2]; R. Degraeve, B. Kaczer, and G. Groeseneken, Microelectron. Reliab. 39, 1445 (1999) [Ref. 3].

  7. Modeling Dynamic Food Choice Processes to Understand Dietary Intervention Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Christopher Steven; Goldring, Megan R; McBride, Colleen M; Persky, Susan

    2018-02-17

    Meal construction is largely governed by nonconscious and habit-based processes that can be represented as a collection of in dividual, micro-level food choices that eventually give rise to a final plate. Despite this, dietary behavior intervention research rarely captures these micro-level food choice processes, instead measuring outcomes at aggregated levels. This is due in part to a dearth of analytic techniques to model these dynamic time-series events. The current article addresses this limitation by applying a generalization of the relational event framework to model micro-level food choice behavior following an educational intervention. Relational event modeling was used to model the food choices that 221 mothers made for their child following receipt of an information-based intervention. Participants were randomized to receive either (a) control information; (b) childhood obesity risk information; (c) childhood obesity risk information plus a personalized family history-based risk estimate for their child. Participants then made food choices for their child in a virtual reality-based food buffet simulation. Micro-level aspects of the built environment, such as the ordering of each food in the buffet, were influential. Other dynamic processes such as choice inertia also influenced food selection. Among participants receiving the strongest intervention condition, choice inertia decreased and the overall rate of food selection increased. Modeling food selection processes can elucidate the points at which interventions exert their influence. Researchers can leverage these findings to gain insight into nonconscious and uncontrollable aspects of food selection that influence dietary outcomes, which can ultimately improve the design of dietary interventions.

  8. Understanding the work of telehealth implementation using Normalization Process Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Janet Gwyneth

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation uses the theoretical constructs of Normalization Process Theory (NPT) to examine the successful implementation of an innovative telehealth service that delivers occupational health nursing services to a large healthcare employee population over a wide geographic area. Telehealth services have come to be regarded as a possible means to improve access to health care services, clinical efficiency, and cost effectiveness in an era where there are shrinking resources and growing ...

  9. How does crowdfunding work? Understanding the process through its activity

    OpenAIRE

    Stiver, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Crowdfunding is a process featuring incremental financial donations from a ‘crowd’ of backers to help fund a project initiated by a creator. In recent years, crowdfunding has generated significant revenue as well as great interest from industry, government, and creative entrepreneurs. However, rate of successful funding for crowdfunding projects remains around 35% for global crowdfunding leader Kickstarter1, and lower yet for other platforms.\\ud \\ud The identified gap between crowdfunding gro...

  10. Understanding Social Contagion in Adoption Processes Using Dynamic Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Mauricio; Armelini, Guillermo; Salvaj, Erica

    2015-01-01

    There are many studies in the marketing and diffusion literature of the conditions in which social contagion affects adoption processes. Yet most of these studies assume that social interactions do not change over time, even though actors in social networks exhibit different likelihoods of being influenced across the diffusion period. Rooted in physics and epidemiology theories, this study proposes a Susceptible Infectious Susceptible (SIS) model to assess the role of social contagion in adoption processes, which takes changes in social dynamics over time into account. To study the adoption over a span of ten years, the authors used detailed data sets from a community of consumers and determined the importance of social contagion, as well as how the interplay of social and non-social influences from outside the community drives adoption processes. Although social contagion matters for diffusion, it is less relevant in shaping adoption when the study also includes social dynamics among members of the community. This finding is relevant for managers and entrepreneurs who trust in word-of-mouth marketing campaigns whose effect may be overestimated if marketers fail to acknowledge variations in social interactions.

  11. Understanding Social Contagion in Adoption Processes Using Dynamic Social Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Herrera

    Full Text Available There are many studies in the marketing and diffusion literature of the conditions in which social contagion affects adoption processes. Yet most of these studies assume that social interactions do not change over time, even though actors in social networks exhibit different likelihoods of being influenced across the diffusion period. Rooted in physics and epidemiology theories, this study proposes a Susceptible Infectious Susceptible (SIS model to assess the role of social contagion in adoption processes, which takes changes in social dynamics over time into account. To study the adoption over a span of ten years, the authors used detailed data sets from a community of consumers and determined the importance of social contagion, as well as how the interplay of social and non-social influences from outside the community drives adoption processes. Although social contagion matters for diffusion, it is less relevant in shaping adoption when the study also includes social dynamics among members of the community. This finding is relevant for managers and entrepreneurs who trust in word-of-mouth marketing campaigns whose effect may be overestimated if marketers fail to acknowledge variations in social interactions.

  12. In vivo degradation of processed dermal sheep collagen evaluated with transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wachem, P.B.; van Luyn, M.J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Koerten, H.K.; Olde damink, L.H.H.; Olde-Damink, L.; ten Hoopen, Hermina W.M.; Feijen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The in vivo degradation of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Discs of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Both an intra- and an extracellular route of degradation could

  13. INVIVO DEGRADATION OF PROCESSED DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN EVALUATED WITH TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWACHEM, PB; VANLUYN, MJA; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KOERTEN, HK; DAMINK, LO; TENHOOPEN, H; FEIJEN, J

    The in vivo degradation of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Discs of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Both an intra- and an extracellular route of degradation could

  14. Comparing population patterns to processes: abundance and survival of a forest salamander following habitat degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint R V Otto

    Full Text Available Habitat degradation resulting from anthropogenic activities poses immediate and prolonged threats to biodiversity, particularly among declining amphibians. Many studies infer amphibian response to habitat degradation by correlating patterns in species occupancy or abundance with environmental effects, often without regard to the demographic processes underlying these patterns. We evaluated how retention of vertical green trees (CANOPY and coarse woody debris (CWD influenced terrestrial salamander abundance and apparent survival in recently clearcut forests. Estimated abundance of unmarked salamanders was positively related to CANOPY (β Canopy  = 0.21 (0.02-1.19; 95% CI, but not CWD (β CWD  = 0.11 (-0.13-0.35 within 3,600 m2 sites, whereas estimated abundance of unmarked salamanders was not related to CANOPY (β Canopy  = -0.01 (-0.21-0.18 or CWD (β CWD  = -0.02 (-0.23-0.19 for 9 m2 enclosures. In contrast, apparent survival of marked salamanders within our enclosures over 1 month was positively influenced by both CANOPY and CWD retention (β Canopy  = 0.73 (0.27-1.19; 95% CI and β CWD  = 1.01 (0.53-1.50. Our results indicate that environmental correlates to abundance are scale dependent reflecting habitat selection processes and organism movements after a habitat disturbance event. Our study also provides a cautionary example of how scientific inference is conditional on the response variable(s, and scale(s of measure chosen by the investigator, which can have important implications for species conservation and management. Our research highlights the need for joint evaluation of population state variables, such as abundance, and population-level process, such as survival, when assessing anthropogenic impacts on forest biodiversity.

  15. Drug-releasing shape-memory polymers - the role of morphology, processing effects, and matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischke, Christian; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) have gained interest for temporary drug-release systems that should be anchored in the body by self-sufficient active movements of the polymeric matrix. Based on the so far published scientific literature, this review highlights three aspects that require particular attention when combining SMPs with drug molecules: i) the defined polymer morphology as required for the shape-memory function, ii) the strong effects that processing conditions such as drug-loading methodologies can have on the drug-release pattern from SMPs, and iii) the independent control of drug release and degradation by their timely separation. The combination of SMPs with a drug-release functionality leads to multifunctional carriers that are an interesting technology for pharmaceutical sciences and can be further expanded by new materials such as thermoplastic SMPs or temperature-memory polymers. Experimental studies should include relevant molecules as (model) drugs and provide a thermomechanical characterization also in an aqueous environment, report on the potential effect of drug type and loading levels on the shape-memory functionality, and explore the potential correlation of polymer degradation and drug release.

  16. ssDNA degradation along capillary electrophoresis process using a Tris buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ric, Audrey; Ong-Meang, Varravaddheay; Poinsot, Verena; Martins-Froment, Nathalie; Chauvet, Fabien; Boutonnet, Audrey; Ginot, Frédéric; Ecochard, Vincent; Paquereau, Laurent; Couderc, François

    2017-06-01

    Tris-Acetate buffer is currently used in the selection and the characterization of ssDNA by capillary electrophoresis (CE). By applying high voltage, the migration of ionic species into the capillary generates a current that induces water electrolysis. This phenomenon is followed by the modification of the pH and the production of Tris derivatives. By injecting ten times by capillary electrophoresis ssDNA (50 nM), the whole oligonucleotide was degraded. In this paper, we will show that the Tris buffer in the running vials is modified along the electrophoretic process by electrochemical reactions. We also observed that the composition of the metal ions changes in the running buffer vials. This phenomenon, never described in CE, is important for fluorescent ssDNA analysis using Tris buffer. The oligonucleotides are degraded by electrochemically synthesized species (present in the running Tris vials) until it disappears, even if the separation buffer in the capillary is clean. To address these issues, we propose to use a sodium phosphate buffer that we demonstrate to be electrochemically inactive. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A highly energy-efficient flow-through electro-Fenton process for organic pollutants degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Liang; Zhou, Minghua; Ren, Gengbo; Yang, Weilu; Liang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A highly energy-efficient flow-through electro-Fenton reactor was designed. • It had high H 2 O 2 yield and low energy consumption for organic pollutants degradation. • The effect of operational parameters was optimized and possible process mechanism was studied. • The novel system performed wide practicability and potential for organic pollutants degradation. - Abstract: A highly energy-efficient flow-through Electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) reactor for oxidation of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution was designed using a perforated DSA as anode and the graphite felt modified by carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as cathode for the in situ generation of H 2 O 2 . The modified cathode had a high H 2 O 2 production with low energy consumption, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption study and contact angle. The flow-through E-Fenton system was compared to the flow-by and regular one, and confirmed to be best on MB removal and TOC degradation. The operational parameters such as current density, pH, Fe 2+ concentration and flow rate were optimized. The MB and TOC removal efficiency of the effluents could keep above 90% and 50%, respectively, and the energy consumption was 23.0 kWh/kgTOC at the current density of 50 mA, pH 3, 0.3 mM Fe 2+ , and the flow rate of 7 mL/min. ·OH was proved to be the main oxidizing species in this system. After 5 times operation, the system, especially cathode, still showed good stability. Five more organic pollutants including orange II (OG), tartrazine, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), tetracycline (TC) and 2,4-dichlorophen (2,4-DCP) were investigated and the electric energy consumption (EEC) was compared with literatures. All results demonstrated that this flow-through E-Fenton system was energy-efficient and potential for degradation of organic pollutants.

  18. Understanding movement data and movement processes: current and emerging directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Robert S; Loarie, Scott R; Colchero, Fernando; Best, Benjamin D; Boustany, Andre; Conde, Dalia A; Halpin, Patrick N; Joppa, Lucas N; McClellan, Catherine M; Clark, James S

    2008-12-01

    Animal movement has been the focus on much theoretical and empirical work in ecology over the last 25 years. By studying the causes and consequences of individual movement, ecologists have gained greater insight into the behavior of individuals and the spatial dynamics of populations at increasingly higher levels of organization. In particular, ecologists have focused on the interaction between individuals and their environment in an effort to understand future impacts from habitat loss and climate change. Tools to examine this interaction have included: fractal analysis, first passage time, Lévy flights, multi-behavioral analysis, hidden markov models, and state-space models. Concurrent with the development of movement models has been an increase in the sophistication and availability of hierarchical bayesian models. In this review we bring these two threads together by using hierarchical structures as a framework for reviewing individual models. We synthesize emerging themes in movement ecology, and propose a new hierarchical model for animal movement that builds on these emerging themes. This model moves away from traditional random walks, and instead focuses inference on how moving animals with complex behavior interact with their landscape and make choices about its suitability.

  19. An online method for estimation of degradable substrate and biomass in an aerated activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegärd, Marcus; Wik, Torsten

    2011-12-01

    The activated sludge process for degradation of organic matter is one of the main processes commonly used in biological wastewater treatment, and aeration in that process stands for a large part of the energy consumed in a plant. Hence, there have been many attempts to improve the operation of the activated sludge process using mathematical models of the process. The advanced models used has in general their origin in IWA (former IAWQ) activated sludge model no 1 (ASM1). Unfortunately, optimization w.r.t. discharge and economy is limited for municipal wastewater treatment plants because several of the most important variables; heterotrophic biomass, readily biodegradable soluble substrate, and slowly biodegradable substrate cannot be reliably measured online because of their complexity hiding behind their notation. With the predenitrifying WWTP in Göteborg having post nitrification in trickling filters as an example, we resolve this problem by deriving an observer that estimates these concentrations in the aerobic parts based on only the commonly available online measurements of oxygen, water flows, TSS concentration and supplied air. Based on control theory analysis and simulations it is concluded that estimation does not work for an activated sludge process with aeration in one stirred tank alone, but when the activated sludge process can be described by at least two tanks in series, with oxygen measurements in each tank, the estimates converge. A sensitivity analysis with respect to deviations in model parameters reveals that the derived estimator is also fairly robust to model errors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Degradation of a commercial textile biocide with advanced oxidation processes and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of significant amounts of biocidal finishing agents in the environment as a consequence of intensive textile finishing activities has become a subject of major public health concern and scientific interest only recently. In the present study, the treatment efficiency of selected, well-known advanced oxidation processes (Fenton, Photo-Fenton, TiO(2)/UV-A, TiO(2)/UV-A/H(2)O(2)) and ozone was compared for the degradation and detoxification of a commercial textile biocide formulation containing a 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether as the active ingredient. The aqueous biocide solution was prepared to mimic typical effluent originating from the antimicrobial finishing operation (BOD(5,o) Daphnia magna)=8% v/v). Ozonation experiments were conducted at different ozone doses (500-900 mg/h) and initial pH (7-12) to assess the effect of ozonation on degradation (COD, DOC removal), dearomatization (UV(280) and UV(254) abatement), dechlorination (AOX removal) and detoxification (changes in LC(50)). For the Fenton experiments, the effect of varying ferrous iron catalyst concentrations and UV-A light irradiation (the Photo-Fenton process) was examined. In the heterogenous photocatalytic experiments, Degussa P25-type TiO(2) was used as the catalyst and the effect of reaction pH (3, 7 and 12) and H(2)O(2) addition on the photocatalytic treatment efficiency was examined. Although in the photochemical (i.e. Photo-Fenton, TiO(2)/UV-A and TiO(2)/UV-A/H(2)O(2)) experiments appreciably higher COD and DOC removal efficiencies were obtained, ozonation appeared to be equally effective to achieve dearomatization (UV(280) abatement) at all studied reaction pH. During ozonation of the textile biocide effluent, AOX abatement proceeded significantly faster than dearomatization and was complete after 20 min ozonation (267 mg O(3)). On the other hand, for complete detoxification, ozonation had to be continued for at least 30 min (corresponding to 400mg O(3)). Effective AOX

  1. Efficient peroxydisulfate activation process not relying on sulfate radical generation for water pollutant degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2014-05-20

    Peroxydisulfate (PDS) is an appealing oxidant for contaminated groundwater and toxic industrial wastewaters. Activation of PDS is necessary for application because of its low reactivity. Present activation processes always generate sulfate radicals as actual oxidants which unselectively oxidize organics and halide anions reducing oxidation capacity of PDS and producing toxic halogenated products. Here we report that copper oxide (CuO) can efficiently activate PDS under mild conditions without producing sulfate radicals. The PDS/CuO coupled process is most efficient at neutral pH for decomposing a model compound, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 0.55 min, over 90% of 2,4-DCP (initially 20 μM) and 90% of adsorbable organic chlorine (AOCl) can be removed at the PDS/2,4-DCP molar ratio of 1 and 4, respectively. Based on kinetic study and surface characterization, PDS is proposed to be first activated by CuO through outer-sphere interaction, the rate-limiting step, followed by a rapid reaction with 2,4-DCP present in the solution. In the presence of ubiquitous chloride ions in groundwater/industrial wastewater, the PDS/CuO oxidation shows significant advantages over sulfate radical oxidation by achieving much higher 2,4-DCP degradation capacity and avoiding the formation of highly chlorinated degradation products. This work provides a new way of PDS activation for contaminant removal. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  2. Framework for Understanding LENR Processes, Using Ordinary Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As I have emphasizedootnotetextS.R. Chubb, Proc. ICCF10 (in press). Also, http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf, S.R. Chubb, Trans. Amer. Nuc. Soc. 88 , 618 (2003)., in discussions of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions(LENRs), mainstream many-body physics ideas have been largely ignored. A key point is that in condensed matter, delocalized, wave-like effects can allow large amounts of momentum to be transferred instantly to distant locations, without any particular particle (or particles) acquiring high velocity through a Broken Gauge Symmetry. Explicit features in the electronic structure explain how this can occur^1 in finite size PdD crystals, with real boundaries. The essential physics^1 can be related to standard many-body techniquesootnotetextBurke,P.G. and K.A. Berrington, Atomic and Molecular Processes:an R matrix Approach (Bristol: IOP Publishing, 1993).. In the paper, I examine this relationship, the relationship of the theory^1 to other LENR theories, and the importance of certain features (for example, boundaries^1) that are not included in the other LENR theories.

  3. Integrating Process and Factor Understanding of Environmental Innovation by Water Utilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiller, Marc; McIntosh, Brian S.; Seaton, Roger A.F.; Jeffrey, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Innovations in technology and organisations are central to enabling the water sector to adapt to major environmental changes such as climate change, land degradation or drinking water pollution. While there are literatures on innovation as a process and on the factors that influence it, there is

  4. Degradation kinetics of reactive dye by UV/H2O2/US process under continuous mode operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, P C; Poon, C S; Chu, C W; Tsui, S M

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of a dye, C. I . Reactive Red 120, in dyeing waatewater by the process o UV/H2O2/US was studied with a bench-scale reactor under the continuous mode of operation. The effects of dyeing wastewater flow rate and the feeding rate of an oxidant, H2O2, on the color removal efficiency of the process were investigated. The significance of ultrasonic (US) combined with UV irradiation was also investigated and the performances of the process on color removal were evaluated. The results showed that the decoloration process followed a pseudo first-order kinetic model and the UV light is the most significant factor on dye removal. Besides, at higher flow rates, incomplete color removal was observed due to relatively insufficient irradiation time (low degradation rate). In order to achieve a higher degradation rate, the feeding rate of H2O2 should be increased.

  5. Floating Photocatalysts for Passive Solar Degradation of Naphthenic Acids in Oil Sands Process-Affected Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Leshuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW, generated from bitumen extraction in the Canadian oil sands, may require treatment to enable safe discharge to receiving watersheds, as dissolved naphthenic acids (NAs and other acid extractable organics (AEO, identified as the primary toxic components of OSPW, are environmentally persistent and poorly biodegradable. However, conventional advanced oxidation processes (AOPs are impractically expensive to treat the volumes of OSPW stockpiled in the Athabasca region. Here we prepared floating photocatalysts (FPCs by immobilizing TiO2 on glass microbubbles, such that the composite particles float at the air-water interface for passive solar photocatalysis. The FPCs were demonstrated to outperform P25 TiO2 nanoparticles in degrading AEO in raw OSPW under natural sunlight and gentle mixing conditions. The FPCs were also found to be recyclable for multiple uses through simple flotation and skimming. This paper thus demonstrates the concept of a fully passive AOP that may be scalable to oil sands water treatment challenges, achieving efficient NA reduction solely through the energy provided by sunlight and natural mixing processes (wind and waves.

  6. Spies and Bloggers: New Synthetic Biology Tools to Understand Microbial Processes in Soils and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Fulk, E. M.; Gao, X.; Bennett, G. N.

    2017-12-01

    Microbes can be programmed through synthetic biology to report on their behavior, informing researchers when their environment has triggered changes in their gene expression (e.g. in response to shifts in O2 or H2O), or when they have participated in a specific step of an elemental cycle (e.g. denitrification). This use of synthetic biology has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of microbes' roles in elemental and water cycling, because it allows reporting on the environment from the perspective of a microbe, matching the measurement scale exactly to the scale that a microbe experiences. However, synthetic microbes have not yet seen wide use in soil and sediment laboratory experiments because synthetic organisms typically report by fluorescing, making their signals difficult to detect outside the petri dish. We are developing a new suite of microbial programs that report instead by releasing easily-detected gases, allowing the real-time, noninvasive monitoring of behaviors in sediments and soils. Microbial biosensors can, in theory, be programmed to detect dynamic processes that contribute to a wide range of geobiological processes, including C cycling (biofilm production, methanogenesis, and synthesis of extracellular enzymes that degrade organic matter), N cycling (expression of enzymes that underlie different steps of the N cycle) and potentially S cycling. We will provide an overview of the potential uses of gas-reporting biosensors in soil and sediment lab experiments, and will report the development of the systematics of these sensors. Successful development of gas biosensors for laboratory use will require addressing issues including: engineering the intensity and selectivity of microbial gas production to maximize the signal to noise ratio; normalizing the gas reporter signal to cell population size, managing gas diffusion effects on signal shape; and developing multiple gases that can be used in parallel.

  7. Towards an Understanding of Enabling Process Knowing in Global Software Development: A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Mansooreh; Babar, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Shared understanding of Software Engineering (SE) processes, that we call process knowing, is required for effective communication and coordination and communication within a team in order to improve team performance. SE Process knowledge can include roles, responsibilities and flow of information...... over a project lifecycle. Developing and sustaining process knowledge can be more challenging in Global Software Development (GSD). GSD distances can limit the ability of a team to develop a common understanding of processes. Anecdotes of the problems caused by lack of common understanding of processes...

  8. Linking trajectories of land change, land degradation processes and ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiraglia, D; Ceccarelli, T; Bajocco, S; Salvati, L; Perini, L

    2016-05-01

    Land Degradation (LD) is a complex phenomenon resulting in a progressive reduction in the capacity of providing ecosystem services (ES). Landscape transformations promoting an unsustainable use of land often reveal latent processes of LD. An evaluation carried out in respect to the different ecosystem services is nowadays regarded as the most appropriate approach for assessing the effects of LD. The aim of this study is to develop an evaluation framework for identifying the linkages between land changes, LD processes and ES and suggesting Sustainable Land Management (SLM) options suited to reverse (or mitigate) LD impact. A SWOT analysis was carried out with the aim to identify internal and external factors that are favorable (or unfavorable) to achieve the proposed SLM actions. The study areas are the Fortore valley and the Valpadana, in Italy. The main trajectory identified for the Fortore valley is related to land abandonment due to population aging and the progressive emigration started in the 1950s. The most relevant LD processes are soil erosion and geomorphological instability, affecting regulating services such as natural hazard and erosion control. SLM options should consider interventions to contrast geomorphological instability, the promotion of climate smart agriculture and of typical products, and an efficient water resources management. The main trajectories identified for Valpadana are related to urban expansion and farmland abandonment and, as a consequence, land take due to anthropogenic pressure and woodland expansion as the main LD process. The reduction of food production was identified as the most relevant provisioning service affected. SLM should envisage best practices finalized to water saving and soil consumption reduction: efficient irrigation solutions, climate smart agriculture and zero sealing practices. This study highlights the diagnostic value of the suggested approach where LD processes are elicited from land change trajectories

  9. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Experimental Data and Model Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Nopens, I.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental data are presented that resulted from aerobic batch degradation experiments in activated sludge with simple carbon sources (acetate and dextrose) as substrates. Data collection was done using combined respirometric-titrimetric measurements. The respirometer consists of an open aerated...... vessel and a closed non-aerated respiration chamber for monitoring the oxygen uptake rate related to substrate degradation. The respirometer is combined with a titrimetric unit that keeps the pH of the activated sludge sample at a constant value by addition of acid and/or base. The experimental data...... clearly showed that the activated sludge bacteria react with consumption or production of protons during aerobic degradation of the two carbon sources under study. Thus, the cumulative amount of added acid and/or base could serve as a complementary information source on the degradation processes...

  10. Oxidative degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Bin [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: wenwu7611@hotmail.com; Gao Naiyun [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: gaonaiyun@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Cheng Hefa [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Xia Shengji; Rui Min; Zhao Dandan [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2009-03-15

    The photochemical degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} advanced oxidation process was studied and a kinetic model based on the elementary reactions involved was developed in this paper. Relatively slow DMP degradation was observed during UV radiation, while DMP was not oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. In contrast, the combined UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process could effectively degraded DMP, which is attributed to the strong oxidation strength of hydroxyl radical produced. Results show that DMP degradation rate was affected by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, intensity of UV radiation, initial DMP concentration, and solution pH. A kinetic model without the pseudo-steady state assumption was established according to the generally accepted elementary reactions in UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} advanced oxidation process. The rate constant for the reaction between DMP and hydroxyl radical was found to be 4.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} through fitting the experimental data to this model. The kinetic model could adequately describe the influence of key factors on DMP degradation rate in UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} advanced oxidation process, and could serve as a guide in designing treatment systems for DMP removal.

  11. Project SAFE. Modelling of long-term concrete degradation processes in the Swedish SFR repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeglund, L.O. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    This study concerns the leaching of concrete barriers, in particular the silo construction, in the Swedish SFR repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. A conceptual model for the leaching of concrete in a saline groundwater has been proposed based on the increased understanding achieved from research studies presented in the literature. The conceptual model has been used to set up a numerical model for the complex chemical interactions between the cement minerals of the concrete with the groundwater. The calculations show that various chemical reactions are expected to occur in the concrete over time. Different cases have been calculated. The results show that the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers will maintain alkaline for long time. In the most exposed parts of the concrete a high degree of leaching can be expected during the considered 10,000 years, whereas only for the most unfavourable assumptions (initially fractured concrete with groundwater flow-through) the inner parts of the concrete will be degraded to any significant degree.

  12. Fundamental processes governing operation and degradation in state of the art P-OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Matthew; Asada, Kohei; Cass, Michael; Coward, Chris; King, Simon; Lee, Andrew; Pintani, Martina; Ramon, Miguel; Foden, Clare

    2010-05-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of operation and degradation of model fluorescent blue bilayer polymer organic light emitting diodes (P-OLED). Optical and electrical simulations of bilayer P-OLEDs are used to highlight the key material and device parameters required for efficient recombination and outcoupling of excitons. Mobility data for a model interlayer material poly (9,9-dioctylfluorene-N-(4-(2-butyl)phenyl)-diphenylamine) (TFB) and a model fluorescent blue light emitting material poly-(9,9'- dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N, N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'- phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (95:5 mol%) (F8-PFB random copoloymer), is shown to satisfy the key charge transport characteristics required to ensure exciton formation at the optimum location for efficient extraction of the light where μh (LEP) 90%) of the quenching sites produced. This highlights the importance of understanding these reversible phenomena in improving P-OLED lifetime and commercial adoption of the technology.

  13. Project SAFE. Modelling of long-term concrete degradation processes in the Swedish SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeglund, L.O.

    2001-04-01

    This study concerns the leaching of concrete barriers, in particular the silo construction, in the Swedish SFR repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. A conceptual model for the leaching of concrete in a saline groundwater has been proposed based on the increased understanding achieved from research studies presented in the literature. The conceptual model has been used to set up a numerical model for the complex chemical interactions between the cement minerals of the concrete with the groundwater. The calculations show that various chemical reactions are expected to occur in the concrete over time. Different cases have been calculated. The results show that the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers will maintain alkaline for long time. In the most exposed parts of the concrete a high degree of leaching can be expected during the considered 10,000 years, whereas only for the most unfavourable assumptions (initially fractured concrete with groundwater flow-through) the inner parts of the concrete will be degraded to any significant degree

  14. Degradation of the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes based on hydrogen peroxide electrogeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinea, Elena; Garrido, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Cabot, Pere-Lluis; Arias, Conchita; Centellas, Francesc [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Brillas, Enric, E-mail: brillas@ub.ed [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Solutions of the veterinary fluoroquinolone antibiotic enrofloxacin in 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} of pH 3.0 have been comparatively degraded by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (AO-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), electro-Fenton (EF), photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) at constant current density. The study has been performed using an undivided stirred tank reactor of 100 ml and a batch recirculation flow plant of 2.5 l with an undivided filter-press cell coupled to a solar photoreactor, both equipped with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-polytetrafluoroethylene gas diffusion cathode to generate H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from O{sub 2} reduction. In EF, PEF and SPEF, hydroxyl radical (centre dotOH) is formed from Fenton's reaction between added catalytic Fe{sup 2+} and generated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Almost total decontamination of enrofloxacin solutions is achieved in the stirred tank reactor by SPEF with BDD. The use of the batch recirculation flow plant showed that this process is the most efficient and can be viable for industrial application, becoming more economic and yielding higher mineralization degree with raising antibiotic content. This is feasible because organics are quickly oxidized with centre dotOH formed from Fenton's reaction and at BDD from water oxidation, combined with the fast photolysis of complexes of Fe(III) with generated carboxylic acids under solar irradiation. The lower intensity of UVA irradiation used in PEF with BDD causes a slower degradation. EF with BDD is less efficient since centre dotOH cannot destroy the most persistent Fe(III)-oxalate and Fe(III)-oxamate complexes. AO-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with BDD yields the poorest mineralization because pollutants are only removed with centre dotOH generated at BDD. All procedures are less potent using Pt as anode due to the lower production of centre dotOH at its surface. Enrofloxacin

  15. Characterization of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation Profile Due to Microbial and Chemical Processes in a Constructed Wetland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobolewski, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    .... With their upward flow capability it is possible to introduce an aerobic and anaerobic environment with a consortium of microorganisms available to degrade the contaminants to within acceptable...

  16. Degradation of phenylethylamine and tyramine by gamma radiation process and docking studies of its radiolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, Monique; Souza, Stefânia Priscila de; Lima, Keila dos Santos Cople; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Lima, Antonio Luis dos Santos, E-mail: santoslima@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamanto de Engenharia Quimica; Oliveira, Aline Alves [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), São Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Rezende, Cláudia Moraes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-07-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are toxic low molecular weight organic bases with aliphatic or heterocyclic structures that can be found in several foods. The consumption of food containing large amounts of BA can result in allergic reactions, rash, vomiting, and hypertension. Besides, BA are also known as possible precursors of carcinogens. In the present study we evaluated the effect of different gamma irradiation doses on methanol and water solutions of the BA phenylethylamine and tyramine. Our best results showed that, at a dose of 5 kGy (SI unit used for measurement of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation), it was possible to reduce the content of these two BA up to 85 and 60%, respectively, suggesting that the use of the irradiation process can be an efficient tool for its degradation. Further docking studies also suggested that the radiolytes produced in the irradiation process have more affinity for the human detoxifying enzymes monoaminoxidases type A and B (MAO-A and MAO-B) being, therefore, less toxic than its precursors. (author)

  17. The influence of grazing intensity on soil properties and degradation processes in Mediterranean rangelands (Extremadura, SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Fernández, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne; Francisco Lavado-Contador, Joaquín

    2014-05-01

    Rangelands cover vast extensions of land in Spain (>90,000 km2), where a total amount of 13 millions of domestic animals graze extensively their pastures. By clear-cutting shrubs, removing selected trees and by cultivation, these rangelands were created from former Mediterranean oak forests, mainly composed by holm oak and cork oak (Quercus ilex rotundifolia and Q. suber) as tree species, Nowadays this land system is exploited economically in large farms (>100 ha), most of them held on private ownership (80% of total) and dedicated to extensive ranching. Overgrazing is common and the excessive stocking rates may deteriorate soil quality, causing economic losses and environmental damage. Many studies have been developed on the effects of livestock grazing over soil properties and degradation processes, most of them by only comparing extreme cases (e.g. ungrazed vs. grazed or overgrazed areas). The main goal of this study is to contribute to the understanding on how animal grazing affects soil properties and degradation processes. The study is particularly focused on soil compaction and sheet erosion as related to the reduction of vegetation cover by defoliation. Soil properties were analysed from 119 environmental units selected from 56 farms distributed throughout the region of Extremadura (SW Spain). The units are representative of different rangeland types, i.e. scrublands of Retama sphaerocarpa, dehesas (wooded rangelands) and treeless grasslands. Soil surface cover was determined along transects in September 2010 (antecedent rainfall: 413-923 mm) considering the following classes: bare ground, grasses, mosses, litter, stones (<2 mm) and rock outcrops. Farmer interviews were also conducted in order to quantify stocking rates and to assess land management in 12 out of 56 farms. In the farms where transects and farmer interviews could not be carried out, bare soil surface and livestock densities were estimated. Bare soil surface was determined by classifying

  18. Mechanistic Insight into the Degradation of Nitrosamines via Aqueous-Phase UV Photolysis or a UV-Based Advanced Oxidation Process: Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Minakata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosamines are a group of carcinogenic chemicals that are present in aquatic environments that result from byproducts of industrial processes and disinfection products. As indirect and direct potable reuse increase, the presence of trace nitrosamines presents challenges to water infrastructures that incorporate effluent from wastewater treatment. Ultraviolet (UV photolysis or UV-based advanced oxidation processes that produce highly reactive hydroxyl radicals are promising technologies to remove nitrosamines from water. However, complex reaction mechanisms involving radicals limit our understandings of the elementary reaction pathways embedded in the overall reactions identified experimentally. In this study, we perform quantum mechanical calculations to identify the hydroxyl radical-induced initial elementary reactions with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA, N-nitrosomethylethylamine, and N-nitrosomethylbutylamine. We also investigate the UV-induced NDMA degradation mechanisms. Our calculations reveal that the alkyl side chains of nitrosamine affect the reaction mechanism of hydroxyl radicals with each nitrosamine investigated in this study. Nitrosamines with one- or two-carbon alkyl chains caused the delocalization of the electron density, leading to slower subsequent degradation. Additionally, three major initial elementary reactions and the subsequent radical-involved reaction pathways are identified in the UV-induced NDMA degradation process. This study provides mechanistic insight into the elementary reaction pathways, and a future study will combine these results with the kinetic information to predict the time-dependent concentration profiles of nitrosamines and their transformation products.

  19. Reactive transport modeling of chemical and isotope data to identify degradation processes of chlorinated ethenes in a diffusion-dominated media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Damgaard, Ida; Jeannottat, Simon

    Chlorinated ethenes are among the most widespread contaminants in the subsurface and a major threat to groundwater quality at numerous contaminated sites. Many of these contaminated sites are found in low-permeability media, such as clay tills, where contaminant transport is controlled by diffusi...... is an important finding, that is further supported by microbial and chemical data. Improved understanding of degradation processes in clay tills is useful for improving the reliability of risk assessment and the design of remediation schemes for chlorinated solvents........ Degradation and transport processes of chlorinated ethenes are not well understood in such geological settings, therefore risk assessment and remediation at these sites are particularly challenging. In this work, a combined approach of chemical and isotope analysis on core samples, and reactive transport...... modeling has been used to identify the degradation processes occurring at the core scale. The field data was from a site located at Vadsby, Denmark, where chlorinated solvents were spilled during the 1960-70’s, resulting in contamination of the clay till and the underlying sandy layer (15 meters below...

  20. Quantitation of chlorophylls and 22 of their colored degradation products in culinary aromatic herbs by HPLC-DAD-MS and correlation with color changes during the dehydration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafeuille, Jean-Louis; Lefèvre, Stéphane; Lebuhotel, Julie

    2014-02-26

    Chlorophylls and their green and olive-brown derivatives were successfully separated from culinary herb extracts by HPLC with photodiode-array and mass spectrometry detection. The method involved a ternary gradient elution and reverse-phase separation conditions capable of resolving 24 different pigments (2 chlorophylls and 22 of their derivatives) of different polarities within 28 min. The method was applied to monitor color changes in 50 samples of culinary aromatic herbs subjected to five different drying treatments. Of the 24 pigments, 14 were key to understanding the differences between the primary degradation pathways of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b in culinary herbs during drying processes. A color degradation ladder based on the total molar percentage of all the remaining green pigments was also proposed as a tool to measure the impact of drying treatments on aromatic herb visual aspects.

  1. How land degradation affects the carbon balance and its component processes: case of study in SE Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ballesteros, Ana; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Rosario Moya, M.; Domingo, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The concept of land degradation stems from the loss of an ecosystem's biological productivity, which in turn relies on several degradation processes such as long-term loss of natural vegetation, depletion of soil nutrients, soil compaction or water and wind erosion. In this context, desertification means land degradation in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas due to climatic and/or human factors. Currently, drylands occupy more than one third of the global terrestrial surface and will probably expand under future climate change scenarios. Drylands' key role in the global C balance has been demonstrated, but the effects of desertification and/or climate change on C sequestration by these ecosystems needs further research. In the present study, we compare net carbon exchange between two experimental sites representing a "degraded" and "non-degraded" grazed semiarid grasslands, separated by ˜15 km in SE Spain, via eddy covariance measurements over 6 years, with high variability in precipitation magnitude and distribution. Results show a striking difference in the annual C balances with average emissions of 196 ± 40 and -23 ± 20 g C m-2 yr-1 for the "degraded" and "non-degraded" sites, respectively. At the seasonal scale, differing patterns in net CO2 fluxes were detected over both growing and dry seasons. As expected, larger net C uptake over longer periods was observed in the "non-degraded" site, however, much greater net C release was measured in the "degraded" site over drought period. We tested differences in all monitored meteorological, ambient and subsoil variables and found most relevant that CO2 at 1.50 m belowground was around 1000 ppm higher in the "degraded" site. Thus, we believe that subterranean ventilation of this vadose zone CO2, observed at both sites, largely drives the differences in C dynamics between them. Overall, the 12 site-years of data allow direct exploration of the roles of climate and land degradation in the biological and non

  2. Assessment of DNA degradation induced by thermal and UV radiation processing: implications for quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballari, Rajashekhar V; Martin, Asha

    2013-12-01

    DNA quality is an important parameter for the detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO's) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Food processing leads to degradation of DNA, which may impair GMO detection and quantification. This study evaluated the effect of various processing treatments such as heating, baking, microwaving, autoclaving and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the relative transgenic content of MON 810 maize using pRSETMON-02, a dual target plasmid as a model system. Amongst all the processing treatments examined, autoclaving and UV irradiation resulted in the least recovery of the transgenic (CaMV 35S promoter) and taxon-specific (zein) target DNA sequences. Although a profound impact on DNA degradation was seen during the processing, DNA could still be reliably quantified by Real-time PCR. The measured mean DNA copy number ratios of the processed samples were in agreement with the expected values. Our study confirms the premise that the final analytical value assigned to a particular sample is independent of the degree of DNA degradation since the transgenic and the taxon-specific target sequences possessing approximately similar lengths degrade in parallel. The results of our study demonstrate that food processing does not alter the relative quantification of the transgenic content provided the quantitative assays target shorter amplicons and the difference in the amplicon size between the transgenic and taxon-specific genes is minimal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of grain source, grain processing, and protein degradability on rumen kinetics and microbial protein synthesis in Boer kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, M-E; Chouinard, P Y; Berthiaume, R; Tremblay, G F; Gervais, R; Martineau, R; Cinq-Mars, D

    2015-11-01

    Microbial protein synthesis in the rumen would be optimized when dietary carbohydrates and proteins have synchronized rates and extent of degradation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of varying ruminal degradation rate of energy and nitrogen sources on intake, nitrogen balance, microbial protein yield, and kinetics of nutrients in the rumen of growing kids. Eight Boer goats (38.2 ± 3.0 kg) were used. The treatments were arranged in a split-plot Latin square design with grain sources (barley or corn) forming the main plots (squares). Grain processing methods and levels of protein degradability formed the subplots in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement for a total of 8 dietary treatments. The grain processing method was rolling for barley and cracking for corn. Levels of protein degradability were obtained by feeding untreated soybean meal (SBM) or heat-treated soybean meal (HSBM). Each experimental period lasted 21 d, consisting of a 10-d adaptation period, a 7-d digestibility determination period, and a 4-d rumen evacuation and sampling period. Kids fed with corn had higher purine derivatives (PD) excretion when coupled with SBM compared with HSBM and the opposite occurred with barley-fed kids ( ≤ 0.01). Unprocessed grain offered with SBM led to higher PD excretion than with HSBM whereas protein degradability had no effect when processed grain was fed ( ≤ 0.03). Results of the current experiment with high-concentrate diets showed that microbial N synthesis could be maximized in goat kids by combining slowly fermented grains (corn or unprocessed grains) with a highly degradable protein supplement (SBM). With barley, a more rapidly fermented grain, a greater microbial N synthesis was observed when supplementing a low-degradable protein (HSBM).

  4. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Mon

    2004-10-11

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to drip shield and waste package modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Thirty-three FEPs associated with the waste package and drip shield performance have been identified (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). A screening decision, either ''included'' or ''excluded,'' has been assigned to each FEP, with the technical bases for screening decisions, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs analyses in this report address issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the drip shield and waste package over the post closure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For included FEPs, this report summarizes the disposition of the FEP in TSPA-LA. For excluded FEPs, this report provides the technical bases for the screening arguments for exclusion from TSPA-LA. The analyses are for the TSPA-LA base-case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]), where a drip shield is placed over the waste package without backfill over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP includes one or more specific issues, collectively described by a FEP name and description. The FEP description encompasses a single feature, event, or process, or a few closely related or coupled processes, provided the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs were assigned to associated Project reports, so the screening decisions reside with the relevant subject-matter experts.

  5. Biotic and abiotic processes contribute to successful anaerobic degradation of cyanide by UASB reactor biomass treating brewery waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Domen; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Pirc, Elizabeta Tratar; Jerman, Vesna; Insam, Heribert; Logar, Romana Marinšek; Stres, Blaž

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to the general aerobic detoxification of industrial effluents containing cyanide, anaerobic cyanide degradation is not well understood, including the microbial communities involved. To address this knowledge gap, this study measured anaerobic cyanide degradation and the rearrangements in bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor biomass treating brewery waste water using bio-methane potential assays, molecular profiling, sequencing and microarray approaches. Successful biogas formation and cyanide removal without inhibition were observed at cyanide concentrations up to 5 mg l(-1). At 8.5 mg l(-1) cyanide, there was a 22 day lag phase in microbial activity, but subsequent methane production rates were equivalent to when 5 mg l(-1) was used. The higher cumulative methane production in cyanide-amended samples indicated that part of the biogas was derived from cyanide degradation. Anaerobic degradation of cyanide using autoclaved UASB biomass proceeded at a rate more than two times lower than when UASB biomass was not autoclaved, indicating that anaerobic cyanide degradation was in fact a combination of simultaneous abiotic and biotic processes. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes for the first time identified and linked the bacterial phylum Firmicutes and the archaeal genus Methanosarcina sp. as important microbial groups involved in cyanide degradation. Methanogenic activity of unadapted granulated biomass was detected at higher cyanide concentrations than reported previously for the unadapted suspended biomass, making the aggregated structure and predominantly hydrogenotrophic nature of methanogenic community important features in cyanide degradation. The combination of brewery waste water and cyanide substrate was thus shown to be of high interest for industrial level anaerobic cyanide degradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. University Students' Understanding of Chemistry Processes and the Quality of Evidence in Their Written Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Eulsun; Choi, Aeran; Pestel, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a process-oriented chemistry laboratory curriculum for non-science majors. The purpose of this study is both to explore university students' understanding of chemistry processes and to evaluate the quality of evidence students use to support their claims regarding chemistry processes in a process-oriented chemistry laboratory…

  7. Effective degradation of primary color direct azo dyes using Fe0aggregates-activated persulfate process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Ding, Feng; Weng, Chih-Huang; Hwang, Chi-Chin; Lin, Yao-Tung

    2018-01-15

    The present study examined the oxidation power of a Fe 0 aggregates/persulfate (PS/Fe 0 ) system for the degradation of the wastewater containing mixed primary direct dyes (i.e., Sirius ® Gelb S-2G, Sirius ® Red F3B, and Sirius ® Turkis GL01). Results indicated that decolorization efficiency was determined by operating parameters of the PS/Fe 0 system and the structural complexity of dye molecules. System efficiency increased with increasing persulfate and Fe 0 dosages. Faster decolorization was observed in experiments conducted at pH 10.5) and low PS concentration (dye containing ADMI (the American Dye Manufacture Institute) 15105 was achieved within10 min in the PS/Fe 0 /55 °C system with an initial pH of 6.0 and dosages of 5 × 10 -3  M Na 2 S 2 O 8 and 0.5 g/L Fe 0 . Low molecular weight intermediates including organic acids were identified. Due to a relatively low activation energy (4.68 kcaL/mol), the PS/Fe 0 system exhibited higher efficiency at higher temperature. This study demonstrated that Fe 0 -activated PS is a promising process for the treatment of textile wastewaters containing mixed azo direct dyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Benzoate degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after dormancy: Characterization of dioxygenases involved in the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyanikova, Inna P; Emelyanova, Elena V; Borzova, Oksana V; Golovleva, Ludmila A

    2016-01-01

    The process of benzoate degradation by strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after a five-year dormancy was investigated and its peculiarities were revealed. The strain was shown to be capable of growth on benzoate at a concentration of up to 10 g L(-1). The substrate specificity of benzoate dioxygenase (BDO) during the culture growth on a medium with a low (200-250 mg L(-1)) and high (4 g L(-1)) concentration of benzoate was assessed. BDO of R. opacus 1CP was shown to be an extremely narrow specificity enzyme. Out of 31 substituted benzoates, only with one, 3-chlorobenzoate, its activity was higher than 9% of that of benzoate. Two dioxygenases, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (Cat 1,2-DO) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCA 3,4-DO), were identified in a cell-free extract, purified and characterized. The substrate specificity of Cat 1,2-DO isolated from cells of strain 1CP after the dormancy was found to differ significantly from that of Cat 1,2-DO isolated earlier from cells of this strain grown on benzoate. By its substrate specificity, the described Cat 1,2-DO was close to the Cat 1,2-DO from strain 1CP grown on 4-methylbenzoate. Neither activity nor inhibition by protocatechuate was observed during the reaction of Cat 1,2-DO with catechol, and catechol had no inhibitory effect on the reaction of PCA 3,4-DO with protocatechuate.

  9. Resolution capacity of geophysical monitoring regarding permafrost degradation induced by hydrological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mewes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical methods are often used to characterize and monitor the subsurface composition of permafrost. The resolution capacity of standard methods, i.e. electrical resistivity tomography and refraction seismic tomography, depends not only on static parameters such as measurement geometry, but also on the temporal variability in the contrast of the geophysical target variables (electrical resistivity and P-wave velocity. Our study analyses the resolution capacity of electrical resistivity tomography and refraction seismic tomography for typical processes in the context of permafrost degradation using synthetic and field data sets of mountain permafrost terrain. In addition, we tested the resolution capacity of a petrophysically based quantitative combination of both methods, the so-called 4-phase model, and through this analysed the expected changes in water and ice content upon permafrost thaw. The results from the synthetic data experiments suggest a higher sensitivity regarding an increase in water content compared to a decrease in ice content. A potentially larger uncertainty originates from the individual geophysical methods than from the combined evaluation with the 4-phase model. In the latter, a loss of ground ice can be detected quite reliably, whereas artefacts occur in the case of increased horizontal or vertical water flow. Analysis of field data from a well-investigated rock glacier in the Swiss Alps successfully visualized the seasonal ice loss in summer and the complex spatially variable ice, water and air content changes in an interannual comparison.

  10. Technical development of UV-C- and VUV-photochemically induced oxidative degradation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.M.; Gassiot Pintori, I.; Wakahata, Y.; Woerner, M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltmesstechnik, Univ. Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Popp, H.P. [Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltmesstechnik, Univ. Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)]|[Lichttechnisches Inst., Univ. Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Technical development work is presented, where the VUV photochemically induced oxidative degradation is used (i) for analytic purposes and (ii) for small to medium scale (< 10 m{sup 2}/d) waste water treatment processes or ultra pure water production. In the first case, small xe-excimer radiation sources with an integrated reaction space designed for optimal conditions, as far as incident photon flux density, turbulence and concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen are concerned, have been built and tested. Under conditions of exhaustive oxidation and/or mineralization of pollutants in a continuous regime, they may be used for sample pre-treatment modules prior TOC, TOX and electrochemical trace metal analysis. Under conditions of partial oxidation or mineralization, the same lamp/reactor combination may be used for functionalization purposes prior to e.g. GC or HPLC analyses. In the second case, mass transfer limitations between the non-irradiated bulk volume and the irradiated volume are overcome by the electrochemical generation of molecular oxygen within or close to the irradiated volume and by the design of the photochemical part of the reactor. (orig.)

  11. Degradation of chitosans with chitinase B from Serratia marcescens. Production of chito-oligosaccharides and insight into enzyme processivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørbotten, Audun; Horn, Svein J; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Vårum, Kjell M

    2005-01-01

    Family 18 chitinases such as chitinase B (ChiB) from Serratia marcescens catalyze glycoside hydrolysis via a mechanism involving the N-acetyl group of the sugar bound to the -1 subsite. We have studied the degradation of the soluble heteropolymer chitosan, to obtain further insight into catalysis in ChiB and to experimentally assess the proposed processive action of this enzyme. Degradation of chitosans with varying degrees of acetylation was monitored by following the size-distribution of oligomers, and oligomers were isolated and partly sequenced using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Degradation of a chitosan with 65% acetylated units showed that ChiB is an exo-enzyme which degrades the polymer chains from their nonreducing ends. The degradation showed biphasic kinetics: the faster phase is dominated by cleavage on the reducing side of two acetylated units (occupying subsites -2 and -1), while the slower kinetic phase reflects cleavage on the reducing side of a deacetylated and an acetylated unit (bound to subsites -2 and -1, respectively). The enzyme did not show preferences with respect to acetylation of the sugar bound in the +1 subsite. Thus, the preference for an acetylated unit is absolute in the -1 subsite, whereas substrate specificity is less stringent in the -2 and +1 subsites. Consequently, even chitosans with low degrees of acetylation could be degraded by ChiB, permitting the production of mixtures of oligosaccharides with different size distributions and chemical composition. Initially, the degradation of the 65% acetylated chitosan almost exclusively yielded oligomers with even-numbered chain lengths. This provides experimental evidence for a processive mode of action, moving the sugar chain two residues at a time. The results show that nonproductive binding events are not necessarily followed by substrate release but rather by consecutive relocations of the sugar chain.

  12. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.G. Mon; L.A. Rottinghaus

    2004-01-01

    closely related or coupled processes provided that the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA disposition. Descriptor phrases provide additional detail about the subject and content of the FEP beyond the FEP name and description. The FEPs have been assigned to associated scientific analyses. The assignments were based on the nature of the FEPs so that the analysis and resolution for screening decisions reside with the subject-matter experts in the relevant disciplines. This scientific analysis addresses the screening decisions associated with the FEPs for the Performance Assessment Project Waste Package Degradation Modeling group

  13. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon; L.A. Rottinghaus

    2004-03-26

    or event, or a few closely related or coupled processes provided that the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA disposition. Descriptor phrases provide additional detail about the subject and content of the FEP beyond the FEP name and description. The FEPs have been assigned to associated scientific analyses. The assignments were based on the nature of the FEPs so that the analysis and resolution for screening decisions reside with the subject-matter experts in the relevant disciplines. This scientific analysis addresses the screening decisions associated with the FEPs for the Performance Assessment Project Waste Package Degradation Modeling group.

  14. Understanding the Thermal Properties of Precursor-Ionomers to Optimize Fabrication Processes for Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Trabia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs are one of many smart materials and have ionomer bases with a noble metal plated on the surface. The ionomer is usually Nafion, but recently Aquivion has been shown to be a promising alternative. Ionomers are available in the form of precursor pellets. This is an un-activated form that is able to melt, unlike the activated form. However, there is little study on the thermal characteristics of these precursor ionomers. This lack of knowledge causes issues when trying to fabricate ionomer shapes using methods such as extrusion, hot-pressing, and more recently, injection molding and 3D printing. To understand the two precursor-ionomers, a set of tests were conducted to measure the thermal degradation temperature, viscosity, melting temperature, and glass transition. The results have shown that the precursor Aquivion has a higher melting temperature (240 °C than precursor Nafion (200 °C and a larger glass transition range (32–65°C compared with 21–45 °C. The two have the same thermal degradation temperature (~400 °C. Precursor Aquivion is more viscous than precursor Nafion as temperature increases. Based on the results gathered, it seems that the precursor Aquivion is more stable as temperature increases, facilitating the manufacturing processes. This paper presents the data collected to assist researchers in thermal-based fabrication processes.

  15. Effects of processing technologies and pectolytic enzymes on degradability of nonstarch polysaccharides from rapeseed meal in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de S.; Pustjens, A.M.; Kabel, M.A.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Rapeseed meal (RSM) contains a high level of nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) that are not well degraded in poultry and interfere with digestion of other nutrients as protein, starch, and fat. By altering physicochemical properties of NSP from RSM, processing and enzyme technologies might improve

  16. Degradation Mechanism of Cyanobacterial Toxin Cylindrospermopsin by Hydroxyl Radicals in Homogeneous UV/H2O2 Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    The degradation of cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a widely distributed and highly toxic cyanobacterial toxin (cyanotoxin), remains poorly elucidated. In this study, the mechanism of CYN destruction by UV-254 nm/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated by mass spectrometr...

  17. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  18. Experimental study of key parameters investigation in turnout crossing degradation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Markine, V.L.; Shevtsov, I.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The continuous increasing demand of public transportation capacity requires the railway network operating in tight schedule. The high transporting volumes not only aggravate the degradation of railway infrastructure but also shorten the time for maintenance. Well-arranged infrastructure maintenance

  19. Marine Oil-Degrading Microorganisms and Biodegradation Process of Petroleum Hydrocarbon in Marine Environments: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianliang; Yu, Yang; Bai, Yu; Wang, Liping; Wu, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Due to the toxicity of petroleum compounds, the increasing accidents of marine oil spills/leakages have had a significant impact on our environment. Recently, different remedial techniques for the treatment of marine petroleum pollution have been proposed, such as bioremediation, controlled burning, skimming, and solidifying. (Hedlund and Staley in Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 51:61-66, 2001). This review introduces an important remedial method for marine oil pollution treatment-bioremediation technique-which is considered as a reliable, efficient, cost-effective, and eco-friendly method. First, the necessity of bioremediation for marine oil pollution was discussed. Second, this paper discussed the species of oil-degrading microorganisms, degradation pathways and mechanisms, the degradation rate and reaction model, and the factors affecting the degradation. Last, several suggestions for the further research in the field of marine oil spill bioremediation were proposed.

  20. Application of noise analysis to investigate core degradation process during PHEBUS-FPT1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Ritsuo

    1997-01-01

    Noise analysis has been performed for measurement data obtained during PHEBUS-FPT1 test. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the applicability of the noise analysis to the following problems: To get more knowledge about the physical processes going on during severe core conditions; To better understand the core melting process; To establish appropriate on-line shut-down data. Results of the study indicate that the noise analysis is quite promising as a tool for investigating physical processes during the experiment. Compared with conventional approach of evaluating the signal's mean value behaviour, the noise analysis can provide additional, more detailed information: It was found that the neutron flux signal is subjected to additional reactivity perturbations in conjunction with fuel melting and relocation. This can easily be detected by applying noise analysis for the neutron flux signal. It has been demonstrated that the method developed in the present study can provide more accurate estimates of the onset of fuel relocation than using temperature signals from thermocouples in the thermal shroud. Moreover, the result suggests a potential of the present method for tracking the whole process of relocation. The result of the data analysis suggests a possibility of sensor diagnostics which may be important for confirming the quality and reliability of the recorded data. Based on the results achieved it is believed that the combined use of noise analysis and thermocouple signals will provide reliable shut-down criteria for the experiment. 8 refs

  1. DBP formation from degradation of DEET and ibuprofen by UV/chlorine process and subsequent post-chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdam, Ehsan; Xiang, Yingying; Sun, Jianliang; Shang, Chii; Yang, Xin; Fang, Jingyun

    2017-08-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from the degradation of N,N-diethyl-3-methyl benzoyl amide (DEET) and ibuprofen (IBP) by the ultraviolet irradiation (UV)/chlorine process and subsequent post-chlorination was investigated and compared with the UV/H 2 O 2 process. The pseudo first-order rate constants of the degradation of DEET and IBP by the UV/chlorine process were 2 and 3.1 times higher than those by the UV/H 2 O 2 process, respectively, under the tested conditions. This was due to the significant contributions of both reactive chlorine species (RCS) and hydroxyl radicals (HO) in the UV/chlorine process. Trichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone and dichloroacetic acid were the major known DBPs formed after 90% of both DEET and IBP that were degraded by the UV/chlorine process. Their yields increased by over 50% after subsequent 1-day post-chlorination. The detected DBPs after the degradation of DEET and IBP comprised 13.5% and 19.8% of total organic chlorine (TOCl), respectively, and the proportions increased to 19.8% and 33.9% after subsequent chlorination, respectively. In comparison to the UV/H 2 O 2 process accompanied with post-chlorination, the formation of DBPs and TOCl in the UV/chlorine process together with post-chlorination was 5%-63% higher, likely due to the generation of more DBP precursors from the attack of RCS, in addition to HO. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Degradation characteristic of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abidin, Che Zulzikrami Azner, E-mail: zulzikrami@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: drfahmi@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: umifazara@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: fatinnadhirah89@gmail.com; Fahmi, Muhammad Ridwan, E-mail: zulzikrami@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: drfahmi@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: umifazara@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: fatinnadhirah89@gmail.com; Fazara, Md Ali Umi, E-mail: zulzikrami@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: drfahmi@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: umifazara@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: fatinnadhirah89@gmail.com; Nadhirah, Siti Nurfatin, E-mail: zulzikrami@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: drfahmi@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: umifazara@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: fatinnadhirah89@gmail.com [School of Environmental Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kompleks Pusat Pengajian Jejawi 3, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    In this study, the degradation characteristic of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process was evaluated based on the trend of color, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Three types of dyes consist of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dyes were used to compare the degradation mechanism of the dyes. The UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale cylindrical glass reactor operated in semi-batch mode. The UV/Vis characterization of monoazo, diazo and anthraquinone dye indicated that the rapid degradation of the dyes by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process is meaningful with respect to decolourization, as a result of the azo bonds and substitute antraquinone chromophore degradation. However, this process is not efficient for aromatic amines removal. The monoazo MO was difficult to be decolorized than diazo RR120 dye, which imply that number of sulphonic groups in the dye molecules determines the reactivity with hydroxyl radical. The increased in COD removal is the evidence for oxidation and decreased in carbon content of dye molecules. TOC removal analysis shows that low TOC removal of monoazo MO and diazo RR120, as compared to anthraquinone RB19 may indicate an accumulation of by-products that are resistant to the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} photolysis.

  3. SEM-EDX Study of the Degradation Process of Two Xenograft Materials Used in Sinus Lift Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Piedad Ramírez Fernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have demonstrated that in vivo degradation processes are influenced by the material’s physico-chemical properties. The present study compares two hydroxyapatites manufactured on an industrial scale, deproteinized at low and high temperatures, and how physico-chemical properties can influence the mineral degradation process of material performance in bone biopsies retrieved six months after maxillary sinus augmentation. Residual biomaterial particles were examined by field scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX to determine the composition and degree of degradation of the bone graft substitute material. According to the EDX analysis, the Ca/P ratio significantly lowered in the residual biomaterial (1.08 ± 0.32 compared to the initial composition (2.22 ± 0.08 for the low-temperature sintered group, which also presented high porosity, low crystallinity, low density, a large surface area, poor stability, and a high resorption rate compared to the high-temperature sintered material. This demonstrates that variations in the physico-chemical properties of bone substitute material clearly influence the degradation process. Further studies are needed to determine whether the resorption of deproteinized bone particles proceeds slowly enough to allow sufficient time for bone maturation to occur.

  4. New insight into monitoring degradation products during the TiO2-photocatalysis process by multivariate molecular spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Sandra; do Amaral, Bianca; Bach, Larissa; Nagata, Noemi; Peralta-Zamora, Patricio G

    2017-03-01

    This study focuses on the feasibility of a spectroscopic multivariate method for monitoring the concentration of phenol and its main degradation products during heterogeneous photocatalysis. Phenolic compounds were chosen as model to evaluate the degradation process due to their toxicity and persistence in the environment and also their well-known degradation pathway. The predictive capability of the multivariate method developed by partial least squares regression (PLSR) over the spectral range of 200-350 nm was satisfactory, allowing mean predicted errors below 5.0 % in the simultaneous determination of the target compounds using six latent variables and smoothing spectra. Suitable results were reported for the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone, resorcinol, pyrocatechol, and p-benzoquinone in accordance to the chromatographic method. Characteristics such as simplicity, low cost, and fast data acquisition are remarkable in this procedure, which makes it appropriate for this type of analytical control.

  5. Fermented liquid feed - Feed processing has a big impact on microbial degradation of free lysine during fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canibe, Nuria; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of feed processing on the microbial degradation of free lysine during fermentation of liquid feed, a study at laboratory scale was carried out. Based on a standard Danish grower diet with extra free amino acids added, two treatments were prepared: treatment 1......) pelleted (83 °C) diet; treatment 2) mash, non-heated diet. The feed was mixed with water (1:2.75, w/w) and incubated at  25 °C. The number of Enterobacteriaceae was higher in liquid feed prepared with the mash than with the pelleted feed immediately after feed and water were added to the mixture but after...... pelleted feed was used. This was specially observed in a more established FLF (after backslopping had been practiced for several days). In conclusion, the data showed that free lysine was degraded to a high extent when fermenting non-pelleted-non-heated feed, whereas a limited degradation occurred during...

  6. Central composite design optimization of pilot plant fluidized-bed heterogeneous Fenton process for degradation of an azo dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdasinia, Hassan; Bagheri, Rasoul; Vahid, Behrouz; Khataee, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    Optimization of Acid Yellow 36 (AY36) degradation by heterogeneous Fenton process in a recirculated fluidized-bed reactor was studied using central composite design (CCD). Natural pyrite was applied as the catalyst characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The CCD model was developed for the estimation of degradation efficiency as a function of independent operational parameters including hydrogen peroxide concentration (0.5-2.5 mmol/L), initial AY36 concentration (5-25 mg/L), pH (3-9) and catalyst dosage (0.4-1.2 mg/L). The obtained data from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data (R(2 )= 0.964). Moreover, this model is applicable not only to determine the optimized experimental conditions for maximum AY36 degradation, but also to find individual and interactive effects of the mentioned parameters. Finally, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) was utilized for the identification of some degradation intermediates and a plausible degradation pathway was proposed.

  7. Efficient degradation of solid yeast biomass from ethanol industry by Fenton and UV-Fenton processes applying multivariate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geórgia Labuto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic agro-industrial residues have been successfully used as biosorbents and promoting new uses from agricultural wastes benefits the economy. However, the allocation of a solid waste biosorbent after the sorption of contaminants has limited their effective application on a large scale as an alternative treatment of water and wastewaters. One solution could be degradation to convert the biosorbent material and adsorbed organic contaminants into environmental friendly compounds suitable for discharge. This study used an experimental design to evaluate the Fenton degradation of yeast biomass (YB from the alcohol industry as a potential biosorbent. The efficiency of degradation was monitored according to the degraded mass (DM and total organic carbon (TOC remaining in the solution. The ANOVA showed an error of 9.7% for the effects and the media of interaction for the employed model for DM. Conducting the experiments with the best-predicted conditions (60 min, 25 g of YB, pH 3, 8,000 mg L-1 H2O2 and 40 mg L-1 Fe2+ with 30 W UV irradiation resulted in a YB reduction of 72  2% with a TOC of 30  2%. This suggests that an advanced oxidative process is an alternative for degradation of a biosorbent after sorption.

  8. Degradation of amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin antibiotics in aqueous solution by the UV/ZnO photocatalytic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmolla, Emad S.; Chaudhuri, Malay

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effect of operating conditions (zinc oxide concentration, pH and irradiation time) of the UV/ZnO photocatalytic process on degradation of amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin in aqueous solution. pH has a great effect on amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin degradation. The optimum operating conditions for complete degradation of antibiotics in an aqueous solution containing 104, 105 and 103 mg/L amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin, respectively were: zinc oxide 0.5 g/L, irradiation time 180 min and pH 11. Under optimum operating conditions, complete degradation of amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin occurred and COD and DOC removal were 23.9 and 9.7%, respectively. The photocatalytic reactions under optimum conditions approximately followed a pseudo-first order kinetics with rate constant (k) 0.018, 0.015 and 0.029 min -1 for amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin, respectively. UV/ZnO photocatalysis can be used for amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin degradation in aqueous solution.

  9. Degradation of amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin antibiotics in aqueous solution by the UV/ZnO photocatalytic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmolla, Emad S., E-mail: em_civil@yahoo.com [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Chaudhuri, Malay [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2010-01-15

    The study examined the effect of operating conditions (zinc oxide concentration, pH and irradiation time) of the UV/ZnO photocatalytic process on degradation of amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin in aqueous solution. pH has a great effect on amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin degradation. The optimum operating conditions for complete degradation of antibiotics in an aqueous solution containing 104, 105 and 103 mg/L amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin, respectively were: zinc oxide 0.5 g/L, irradiation time 180 min and pH 11. Under optimum operating conditions, complete degradation of amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin occurred and COD and DOC removal were 23.9 and 9.7%, respectively. The photocatalytic reactions under optimum conditions approximately followed a pseudo-first order kinetics with rate constant (k) 0.018, 0.015 and 0.029 min{sup -1} for amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin, respectively. UV/ZnO photocatalysis can be used for amoxicillin, ampicillin and cloxacillin degradation in aqueous solution.

  10. THE USE OF TIO2-ZEOLIT AS A CATALYST ON THE DEGRADATION PROCESS OF ERIONIL RED DYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Sumartono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of erionil red dye using photo catalytic processes with TiO2-zeolit as a catalyst was carried out. Degradation of the dye was observed in 10 L volume, and erionil red dye was used as a model of organic pollutant. The parameters examinated were  intensity of the spectrum, the decrease of pH, percentage of degradation, and the efectifity TiO2-zeolit  as a catalyst. The use of UV lamp and TiO2-zeolit as a catalyst showed a good results because the dye could be degraded. This could be seen from the decreasing of the intensity of the spectrum  24 h after illumination. The pH of erionil red increased from around 4 into 5.5 which is still acidic. Effectivity of TiO2 composit as a catalyst could be used only two times. The compound resulted from degradation that could be detected using HPLC was oxalic acid.   Keywords: dye, erionil red, photocatalytic, TiO2

  11. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry monitoring of indigo carmine degradation by advanced oxidative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmázio, Ilza; de Urzedo, Ana P F M; Alves, Tania M A; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Nascentes, Clésia C; Augusti, Rodinei

    2007-10-01

    The degradation of the dye indigo carmine in aqueous solution induced by two oxidative processes (H(2)O(2)/iodide and O(3)) was investigated. The reactions were monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode, ESI(-)-MS, and the intermediates and oxidation products characterized by ESI(-)-MS/MS. Both oxidative systems showed to be highly efficient in removing the color of the dye aqueous solutions. In the ESI(-)-MS of the indigo carmine solution treated with H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2)/iodide, the presence of the ions of m/z 210 (indigo carmine in its anionic form, 1), 216, 226, 235, and 244 was noticeable. The anion of m/z 235 was proposed to be the unprecedented hydroperoxide intermediate 2 formed in solution via an electrophilic attack by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals of the exocyclic C=C bond of 1. This intermediate was suggested to be rapidly converted into the anionic forms of 2,3-dioxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid (3, m/z 226), 2-amino-alpha-oxo-5-sulfo-benzeneacetic acid (4, m/z 244), and 2-amino-5-sulfo-benzoic acid (5, m/z 216). In the ESI(-)-MS of the indigo carmine solution treated with O(3), two main anions were detected: m/z 216 (5) and 244 (4). Both products were proposed to be produced via an unstable ozonide intermediate. Other anions in this ESI(-) mass spectrum were attributed to be [4 - H + Na](-) of m/z 266, [4 - H](2-) of m/z 121.5, and [5 - H](2-) of m/z 107.5. ESI-MS/MS data were consistent with the proposed structures for the anionic products 2-5.

  12. Concurrent degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A by Ochrobactrum sp. T under aerobic condition and estrogenic transition during these processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Lei; Xiong, Jukun; Li, Guiying; Fang, Yanjun; An, Taicheng

    2014-06-01

    The effect of concurrent degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by the strain Ochrobactrum sp. T under aerobic condition was investigated. The results demonstrated that four extra energy source-addition systems still followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The addition of ethanol or glucose could promote the biodegradation ability of Ochrobactrum sp. T to TBBPA, and 90.1 percent and 77.5 percent of TBBPA (5mg L(-1)) could be removed with corresponding TBBPA half-lives of 26 and 36h, respectively, after 96h reaction. Comparatively, the degradation efficiency of the sole TBBPA system was only 72.9 percent under the same condition. In contrast, two other co-substrates 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP) and bisphenol A (BPA) showed a negative effect on the TBBPA biodegradation, and the degradation efficiencies of TBBPA were achieved as 44.7 percent and 67.4 percent, respectively. For the TBBPA+TBP system, the competitive inhibition for the TBBPA debromination was less than the inhibition of the toxicity to the bacterium. While for the TBBPA+BPA system, the degradation of TBBPA could be promoted at the beginning of the reaction, and was then inhibited slightly with further prolonging of reaction time. This is probably due to the substrates being oxidized, and BPA can consume partial oxygen and provide the electrons during the concurrent biodegradation process. In addition, although higher estrogenic activity could be detected for the debrominated intermediates in TBBPA co-degradation process than the original TBBPA, the estrogenicity of the whole system still decreased finally after 96h degradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A new perspective on proxy report: Investigating implicit processes of understanding through patient-proxy congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Carolyn E; Ayandeh, Armon; Rodgers, Jonathan D; Duberstein, Paul; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Benedict, Ralph H B

    2015-11-01

    Utilizing proxy report is a common solution to gathering quality-of-life information from people who are not capable of reliably answering questionnaires, such as people with dementia. Proxy report could, however, also provide information about patients' implicit processes of understanding, which we define as automatic, schema-driven cognitive processes that allow one to have a better understanding of oneself and of one's body, make oneself known and knowable to members of the social network, and allow one to react proactively in response to cues. We investigated whether implicit processes of understanding explain some of the association between reserve and healthy lifestyle behaviors. We operationalized three implicit processes of understanding: (a) psychosocial understanding; (b) insight into physical disability; and (c) somatic awareness. This secondary analysis involved a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients and their caregiver informants (n = 118 pairs). Measures included a neurologist-administered Expanded Disability Status Scale, patient- and informant-completed survey measures, and a heartbeat perception test (interoception). Patient-other congruence assessed implicit processes of understanding: psychosocial understanding (neurocognitive and personality); physical-disability insight; and somatic awareness (interoception). Effect sizes (ES) for the inter-correlations between the three implicit processes were small. Psychosocial understanding was associated with higher past reserve-building activities (small ES). Psychosocial understanding explained variance in healthy lifestyle behaviors over and above the variance explained by current reserve-building activities (∆R (2) = 0.04; model R Adjusted (2) = 0.18). Proxy versus patient report can provide information about underlying interpretational processes related to insight. These processes are distinct from reserve, predict health outcomes, and can inform lifestyle-changing interventions.

  14. Degradation of benzalkonium chloride coupling photochemical advanced oxidation technologies with biological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meichtry, J; Lamponi, A; Gautier, E; Acosta, T; Fiol, P; Curutchet, G; Candal, R; Litter, M

    2005-01-01

    The combination of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs) and biological processes can be visualized as a very successful technological option for treatment of effluents, because it combines high oxidizing technologies with a conventional, low-cost and well-established treatment technology.Photochemical AOTs, like UV-C with or without H 2 O 2 , photo-Fenton (PF, UV/H 2 O 2 /Fe(II-III)) and UV/TiO 2 heterogeneous photo catalysis involve the generation and use of powerful oxidizing species, mainly the hydroxyl radical.In almost all AOTs, it is possible to use sunlight. Benzalkonium chloride (dodecyldimetylbencylammonium chloride, BKC) is a widely used surfactant, which has many industrial applications.Due to its antibacterial effect, it cannot be eliminated from effluents by a biological treatment, and the complexity of its chemical structure makes necessary the use of drastic oxidizing treatments to achieve complete mineralization and to avoid the formation of byproducts even more toxic than the initial compound.In this study, different alternatives for BKC treatment using photochemical AOTs followed by bio catalytic techniques are presented.Three AOTs were tested: a) UV-C (254 nm, germicide lamp) with and without H 2 O 2 , b) PF (366 nm), c) UV/TiO 2 (254 and 366 nm). PF at a 15:1:1 H 2 O 2 total/BKC 0 /Fe 0 molar ratio at 55 degree C was the most efficient treatment in order to decrease the tensioactivity and the total organic carbon of the solution . The biocatalysis was studied in a reactor fitted with a biofilm of microorganisms coming from a sludge-water treatment plant. To evaluate the maximal BKC concentration that could be allowed to ingress to the biological reactor after the AOT treatment, the toxicity of solutions of different BKC concentrations was analyzed. The study of the relevant parameters of both processes and their combination allowed to establish the preliminary conditions for optimizing the pollutant degradation

  15. Quantitative modelling of the degradation processes of cement grout. Project CEMMOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Galindez, Juan-Manuel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-05-15

    Grout cement is planned to be used in the sealing of water-conducting fractures in the deep geological storage of spent nuclear fuel waste. The integrity of such cementitious materials should be ensured in a time framework of decades to a hundred of years as mimum. However, their durability must be quantified since grout degradation may jeopardize the stability of other components in the repository due to the potential release of hyperalkaline plumes. The model prediction of the cement alteration has been challenging in the last years mainly due to the difficulty to reproduce the progressive change in composition of the Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) compounds as the alteration proceeds. In general, the data obtained from laboratory experiments show a rather similar dependence between the pH of pore water and the Ca-Si ratio of the CSH phases. The Ca-Si ratio decreases as the CSH is progressively replaced by Si-enriched phases. An elegant and reasonable approach is the use of solid solution models even keeping in mind that CSH phases are not crystalline solids but gels. An additional obstacle is the uncertainty in the initial composition of the grout to be considered in the calculations because only the recipe of low-pH clinker is commonly provided by the manufacturer. The hydration process leads to the formation of new phases and, importantly, creates porosity. A number of solid solution models have been reported in literature. Most of them assumed a strong non-ideal binary solid solution series to account for the observed changes in the Ca-Si ratios in CSH. However, it results very difficult to reproduce the degradation of the CSH in the whole Ca-Si range of compositions (commonly Ca/Si=0.5-2.5) by considering only two end-members and fixed nonideality parameters. Models with multiple non-ideal end-members with interaction parameters as a function of the solid composition can solve the problem but these can not be managed in the existing codes of reactive

  16. A spatial dynamic model to assess piospheric land degradation processes of SW Iberian rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herguido Sevillano, Estela; Ibáñez, Javier; Francisco Lavado Contador, Joaquín; Pulido-Fernández, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Iberian open wooded rangelands (known as dehesas or montados) constitute valuable agro-silvo-pastoral systems traditionally considered as highly sustainable. Nevertheless, in the recent decades, those systems are undergoing changes of land use and management practices that compromise its sustainability. Some of those changes, as the rising construction of watering points and the high spatial fragmentation and livestock movement restriction associated to fencing, show an aggregated effect with livestock, producing an impact gradient over soil and vegetation. Soil compaction related to livestock pressure is higher around watering points, with bare soil halos and patches of scarce vegetation or nude soil developing with higher frequency in areas close to them. Using the freeware Dinamica EGO as environmental modeling platform, we have developed a theoretic spatial dynamic model that represents some of the processes of land degradation associated to livestock grazing in dehesa fenced enclosures. Spatial resolution is high since every cell in the model is a square unit area of 1 m2. We paid particular attention to the relationships between soil degradation by compaction (porosity), livestock pressure, rainfall, pasture growth and shrub cover and bare soil generation. The model considers pasture growth as related to soil compaction, measured by the pore space in the top 10 cm soil layer. Annual precipitation is randomly generated following a normal distribution. When annual precipitation and pore space increase, also does pasture growth. Besides, there is a feedback between pasture growth and pore space, given that pasture roots increases soil porosity. The cell utility for livestock function has been defined as an exponential function of the distance of a cell to watering points and the amount of pasture present in it. The closer the cell to a pond and the higher the amount of pasture, the higher is cell utility. The latter is modulated by a normal random variable to

  17. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2011-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  18. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    OpenAIRE

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2011-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Paper presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  19. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2012-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Paper presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  20. Optical monitoring of surface processes relevant to thin film growth by chemical vapour deposition Oxidation; Surface degradation

    CERN Document Server

    Simcock, M N

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports on the investigation of the use of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) as an in-situ monitor for the preparation and oxidation of GaAs(100) c(4x4) surfaces using a CVD 2000 MOCVD reactor. These surfaces were oxidised using air. It was found that it was possible to follow surface degradation using RA transients at 2.6eV and 4eV. From this data it was possible to speculate on the nature of the surface oxidation process. A study was performed into the rate of surface degradation under different concentrations of air, it was found that the relation between the air concentration and the surface degradation was complicated but that the behaviour of the first third of the degradation approximated a first order behaviour. An estimation of the activation energy of the process was then made, and an assessment of the potential use of the glove-box for STM studies which is an integral part of the MOCVD equipment was also made. Following this, a description is given of the construction of an inte...

  1. Understanding process-induced microstructures in RBa2Cu3O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, R. W.; Kramer, M. J.

    1990-06-01

    During the processing of rare earth (R)-barium-copper-oxygen superconductors, a variety of microstructures can be induced. Many processes are designed to avoid forming some structures, but these same processes can result in other structures which degrade the superconducting properties. Because liquid phases can be detrimental, for example, low-temperature calcination is often employed. But the CO2 gas evolved during calcination leads to the formation of a nanoc-rystalline microstructure which may affect superconducting properties. Textures and defects can be induced by high-temperature and high-pressure deformation. For commercial dreams to become reality, these processing-induced microstructures, and their effects on properties, will have to be understood and controlled.

  2. Towards a molecular understanding of symbiont function: identification of a fungal gene for the degradation of xylan in the fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtt, Morten; De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Lange, Lene

    2008-01-01

    -substrate degradation in fungus gardens is a multi-step process comparable to normal biodegradation of organic matter in soil ecosystems, but with the crucial difference that a single fungal symbiont realizes most of the steps that are normally provided by a series of microorganisms that colonize fallen leaves...... in the fungus gardens in order to investigate the dynamics of degradation activities. RESULTS: We cloned a xylanase gene from the mutualistic fungus of Acromyrmex echinatior, determined its protein sequence, and inserted it in a yeast expression vector to confirm its substrate specificity. Our results show...... that the fungus has a functional xylanase gene. We also show by lab experiments in vivo that the activity of fungal xylanase and cellulase is not evenly distributed, but concentrated in the lower layer of fungus gardens, with only modest activity in the middle layer where gongylidia are produced and intermediate...

  3. A Doping Lattice of Aluminum and Copper with Accelerated Electron Transfer Process and Enhanced Reductive Degradation Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Gao, Xue; Zhang, Zhixuan; Zhang, Mingbo; Cheng, Yiqian; Su, Jixin

    2016-08-18

    Treatment of azo dye effluents has received increasing concerns over the years due to their potential harms to natural environment and human health. The present study described the degrading ability of the as-synthesized crystalline Al-Cu alloys for removal of high-concentration Acid Scarlet 3R in alkaline aqueous solutions and its degradation mechanism. Al-Cu alloy particles with Al/Cu ratios 19:1 were successfully synthesized by high-energy mechanical milling. Characterization results showed that 10 h mechanical alloying process could lead to the formation of crystalline Al(Cu) solid solution. Batch experiment results confirmed the excellent ability of Al-Cu alloy particles for the degradation of 3R in aqueous solution. Under a certain condition ([Al-Cu]0 = 2 g/L, [3R]0 = 200 mg/L, [NaCl]0 = 25 g/L, initial pH = 10.9), the 3R could be completely degraded within only 3 min. It was also found that the degradation reaction followed zero-order kinetics model with respect to the initial dye concentration. The intermediate compounds were identified by UV-vis, FT-IR and HPLC-MS, and a pathway was proposed. Additionally, post-treatment Al-Cu alloy particles were characterized by SEM and TEM, and the results showed that the degradation might be attributed to the corrosion effect of Al-Cu alloys.

  4. A model for understanding and learning of the game process of computer games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    time make sure that the students learn to act and reflect like game designers? We fell our game design model managed to just that end. Our model entails a guideline for the computer game design process in its entirety, and at same time distributes clear and easy understandable insight to a particular......This abstract focuses on the computer game design process in the education of engineers at the university level. We present a model for understanding the different layers in the game design process, and an articulation of their intricate interconnectedness. Our motivation is propelled by our daily...... teaching practice of game design. We have observed a need for a design model that quickly can create an easily understandable overview over something as complex as the design processes of computer games. This posed a problem: how do we present a broad overview of the game design process and at the same...

  5. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters.

  6. Study of the degradation performance (TOC, BOD, and toxicity) of bisphenol A by the photo-Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moya, M; Kaisto, T; Navarro, M; Del Valle, L J

    2017-03-01

    Degradation of bisphenol A (BPA, 0.5 L, 30 mg L -1 ) was studied by photo-Fenton treatment, while Fenton reagents were variables. The efficiency of the degradation process was evaluated by the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC), the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and toxicity. For toxicity analysis, bacterial methods were found infeasible, but the in vitro assay of VERO cells culture was successfully applied. Experiments according to a 2 2 design of experiments (DOE) with star points and three center points for statistical validity allowed selecting those process conditions (Fe(II) and H 2 O 2 load) that maximized the process performance. Photo-Fenton process effectively eliminated BPA and partly degraded its by-products (residual TOC TOC = 92 %) was attained. Toxicity was also detected to 50 % of cellular mortality even at long reaction times. However, 40.25 mg L -1 of H 2 O 2 decreased residual TOC to 70 % while cell mortality decreased down to 25 %. With more H 2 O 2 , the residual TOC decreased down to 15 % but cell mortality remained within the 20-25 % level. Photo-Fenton increased the biodegradability and reduced the toxicity of the studied sample.

  7. Conjugated Silicon–Based Polymer Resists for Nanotechnologies: EB and UV Meditated Degradation Processes in Polysilanes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, F.; Schauer, Petr; Kuřitka, I.; Hua, B.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 197-201 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100622 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : ultra violet degradability * polysilylenes * weak bond * conformation defect * nanorezists Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010

  8. Degradation Processes in High-Power Diode Lasers under External Optical Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomm, Jens. W.; Hempel, Martin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effect of moderate external feedback on the gradual degradation of 808 nm emitting AlGaAs-based high-power broad-area diode lasers is analyzed. Eventually the quantum well that actually experiences the highest total optical load remains unaffected by the aging, while severe impact...

  9. Photooxidation processes for an azo dye in aqueous media: modeling of degradation kinetic and ecological parameters evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusic, Hrvoje; Juretic, Daria; Koprivanac, Natalija; Marin, Vedrana; Božić, Ana Lončarić

    2011-01-30

    Three photooxidation processes, UV/H(2)O(2), UV/S(2)O(8)(2-) and UV/O(3) were applied to the treatment of model wastewater containing non-biodegradable organic pollutant, azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7). Dye degradation was monitored using UV/VIS and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis, determining decolorization, the degradation/formation of naphthalene and benzene structured AO7 by-products, and the mineralization of model wastewater. The water quality during the treatment was evaluated on the bases of ecological parameters: chemical (COD) and biochemical (BOD(5)) oxygen demand and toxicity on Vibrio fischeri determining the EC(50) value. The main goals of the study were to develop an appropriate mathematic model (MM) predicting the behavior of the systems under investigation, and to evaluate the toxicity and biodegradability of the model wastewater during treatments. MM developed showed a high accuracy in predicting the degradation of AO7 when considering the following observed parameters: decolorization, formation/degradation of by-products and mineralization. Good agreement of the data predicted and the empirically obtained was confirmed by calculated standard deviations. The biodegradability of model wastewater was significantly improved by three processes after mineralizing a half of the initially present organic content. The toxicity AO7 model wastewater was decreased as well. The differences in monitored ecological parameters during the treatment indicated the formation of different by-products of dye degradation regarding the oxidant type applied. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Factorial experimental design for the optimization of catalytic degradation of malachite green dye in aqueous solution by Fenton process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elhalil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the optimization of the catalytic degradation of malachite green dye (MG by Fenton process “Fe2+/H2O2”. A 24 full factorial experimental design was used to evaluate the effects of four factors considered in the optimization of the oxidative process: concentration of MG (X1, concentration of Fe2+ (X2, concentration of H2O2 (X3 and temperature (X4. Individual and interaction effects of the factors that influenced the percentage of dye degradation were tested. The effect of interactions between the four parameters shows that there is a dependency between concentration of MG and concentration of Fe2+; concentration of Fe2+ and concentration of H2O2, expressed by the great values of the coefficient of interaction. The analysis of variance proved that, the concentration of MG, the concentration of Fe2+ and the concentration of H2O2 have an influence on the catalytic degradation while it is not the case for the temperature. In the optimization, the great dependence between observed and predicted degradation efficiency, the correlation coefficient for the model (R2=0.986 and the important value of F-ratio proved the validity of the model. The optimum degradation efficiency of malachite green was 93.83%, when the operational parameters were malachite green concentration of 10 mg/L, Fe2+ concentration of 10 mM, H2O2 concentration of 25.6 mM and temperature of 40 °C.

  11. Impact of humic acid on the photoreductive degradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by UV/Iodide process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuyu; Zhang, Chaojie; Chen, Pei; Zhou, Qi; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2017-12-15

    Iodide photolysis under UV illumination affords an effective method to produce hydrated electrons (e aq - ) in aqueous solution. Therefore, UV/Iodide photolysis can be utilized for the reductive degradation of many recalcitrant pollutants. However, the effect of naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) such as humic and fulvic acids (HA/FA), which may impact the efficiency of UV/Iodide photoreduction, is poorly understood. In this study, the UV photoreductive degradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the presence of I - and HA is studied. PFOS undergoes a relatively slow direct photoreduction in pure water, a moderate level of degradation via UV/Iodide, but a rapid degradation via UV/Iodide/HA photolysis. After 1.5 h of photolysis, 86.0% of the initial [PFOS] was degraded in the presence of both I - and HA with a corresponding defluorination ratio of 55.6%, whereas only 51.7% of PFOS was degraded with a defluorination ratio of 4.4% via UV/Iodide illumination in the absence of HA. The relative enhancement in the presence of HA in the photodegradation of PFOS can be attributed to several factors: a) HA enhances the effective generation of e aq - due to the reduction of I 2 , HOI, IO 3 - and I 3 - back to I - ; b) certain functional groups of HA (i.e., quinones) enhance the electron transfer efficiency as electron shuttles; c) a weakly-bonded association of I - and PFOS with HA increases the reaction probability; and d) absorption of UV photons by HA itself produces e aq - . The degradation and defluorination efficiency of PFOS by UV/Iodide/HA process is dependent on pH and HA concentration. As pH increases from 7.0 to 10.0, the enhancement effect of HA improves significantly. The optimal HA concentration for the degradation of 0.03 mM PFOS is 1.0 mg L -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The probability distribution of maintenance cost of a system affected by the gamma process of degradation: Finite time solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Tianjin; Pandey, Mahesh D.; Weide, J.A.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    The stochastic gamma process has been widely used to model uncertain degradation in engineering systems and structures. The optimization of the condition-based maintenance (CBM) policy is typically based on the minimization of the asymptotic cost rate. In the financial planning of a maintenance program, however, a more accurate prediction interval for the cost is needed for prudent decision making. The prediction interval cannot be estimated unless the probability distribution of cost is known. In this context, the asymptotic cost rate has a limited utility. This paper presents the derivation of the probability distribution of maintenance cost, when the system degradation is modelled as a stochastic gamma process. A renewal equation is formulated to derive the characteristic function, then the discrete Fourier transform of the characteristic function leads to the complete probability distribution of cost in a finite time setting. The proposed approach is useful for a precise estimation of prediction limits and optimization of the maintenance cost.

  13. Understanding erosion process using rare earth element tracers in a preformed interrill-rill system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracking sediment source and movement is essential to fully understanding soil erosion processes. The objectives of this study were to identify dominant erosion process and to characterize the effects of upslope interrill erosion on downslope interrill and rill erosion in a preformed interrill-rill ...

  14. Process understanding on high shear granulated lactose agglomerates during and after drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwmeyer, F.J.S.

    2009-01-01

    In 2001 the FDA launched the Process Analytical Technology initiative as a response to the growing public and industrial awareness that there is a lack of process understanding required to have an optimal control of pharmaceutical manufacturing. The current research project was initiated based upon

  15. Differentiating Processes of Control and Understanding in the Early Development of Emotion and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion; Leerkes, Esther M.; Marcovitch, Stuart; Calkins, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the hypothesis that preschoolers' performance on emotion and cognitive tasks is organized into discrete processes of control and understanding within the domains of emotion and cognition. Additionally, we examined the relations among component processes using mother report, behavioral observation, and physiological…

  16. Using Annual Landsat Time Series for the Detection of Dry Forest Degradation Processes in South-Central Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Schneibel; David Frantz; Achim Röder; Marion Stellmes; Kim Fischer; Joachim Hill

    2017-01-01

    Dry tropical forests undergo massive conversion and degradation processes. This also holds true for the extensive Miombo forests that cover large parts of Southern Africa. While the largest proportional area can be found in Angola, the country still struggles with food shortages, insufficient medical and educational supplies, as well as the ongoing reconstruction of infrastructure after 27 years of civil war. Especially in rural areas, the local population is therefore still heavily dependent...

  17. Sulfate radical-induced degradation of Acid Orange 7 by a new magnetic composite catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Ma, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xi; Qian, Guangren

    2014-08-30

    We synthesized a novel magnetic composite, Fe3O4/Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH, as a heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the solution using sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes. The physicochemical properties of the composite synthesized via two-step microwave hydrothermal method were characterized by several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The degradation tests were performed at 25°C with Acid Orange 7 (AO7) initial concentration of 25mg/L and AO7/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) molar ratio of 1:10, which showed that the complete degradation by Fe3O4/Cu1.5Ni0.5Cr-LDH could be achieved and the mineralization rate could reach 46%. PMS was activated by Cu (II) and Fe (II/III) of Fe3O4/Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH to generate sulfate radicals (SO4(-)). Subsequently, the organic functional groups of AO7 molecules were destroyed by sulfate radicals (SO4(-)), inducing the degradation of AO7. Moreover, the catalytic behavior of the catalysts could be reused five times. Therefore, our work suggested that the Fe3O4/Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH composite could be applied widely for the treatment of organic dyes in wastewater. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Chemical Degradation and Processes of Erosion of Post-Mine Territories After Mining Exploration of Iron Ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Pusz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of this study were uncultivated mining waste heaps which are remnants of the territories abandoned after the exploration of iron ore. The aim of this analysis was the assessment of the influence of these objects on the soil located in the nearest surroundings, as well as estimation of the level of their degradation. It was ascertained that direct geomechanical degradation exists in the examined object, which is connected with soil profile destruction in consequence of transformation of hitherto existing geomorphological conditions, deformation of natural shape of territory, density of soil levels and deformation of the spatial layout. As a result of the examination, it was pointed out that chemical degradation as well as degradation of ecological structure occur on the analyzed territory. Progressing processes of water erosion on the side of waste heap are the consequence of improperly profiled, steep slopes causing the uncontrolled flow of rainwater, lack of flora and dense, micrograiny structure of soils which prevents the effective infiltration of water. Penetration of water into the ground causes the creation of channels which, in dry periods, can become additional pathways for the possible landslides.

  19. Gestalt Processing in Autism: Failure to Process Perceptual Relationships and the Implications for Contextual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark J.; Scott, Fiona J.; Fox, Simone; Pye, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    Background: Deficits in autism have been characterised as a bias towards local over global processing. This paper examines whether there is a deficit in gestalt grouping in autism. Method: Twenty-five low-functioning children with autism and 25 controls who were matched for chronological age and verbal mental age took part in the study. Results:…

  20. Degradation of biogenetic amines by gamma radiation process and identification by GC/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, Monique; Souza, Stefania P. de; Lima, Keila dos S.C.; Lima, Antonio L. dos S.

    2011-01-01

    , using a research radiator with Cs-137 source and maximum dose rate of 1,8kGy/h. Dosimetry was performed with the calculation of the source exposure time using a specific program for the irradiator. For identification of amines it was used gas chromatography associated with a mass detector. The chromatographic conditions used were: interface temperature at 200 degree C, SCAN mode for m/z 15 to 300, helium mobile phase, manual injection, split rate of 1/5 and flow rate of 1.00mL/min. The heating was linear from 40 degree C to 300 degree C, with a rate of 10 degree C/min. Chromatographic separation was performed with column RTx-5MS, 30m x 0,25mm x 0,25 μm, stationary phase 5% diphenyl - 95% dimethylpolysiloxane. The content of the amines after the irradiation process suffered considerable reduction. Tryptamine was more radiosensitive being reduced by about 85% at 1kGy, 99% at 3kGy and 100% at 5kGy. The b-phenylethylamine was reduced from its initial amount in about 20% at 1kGy, 70% at 3kGy and 85% at 5kGy. Tyramine showed less sensitivity to gamma radiation with reduction only 20% at 1kGy, 50% at 3kGy and 60% at 5kGy. These results show that the use of the irradiation process was efficient in the degradation of the amines tested. (author)

  1. Degradation of biogenetic amines by gamma radiation process and identification by GC/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, Monique; Souza, Stefania P. de; Lima, Keila dos S.C.; Lima, Antonio L. dos S., E-mail: santoslima@ime.eb.br [Departamento de Quimica - IME, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    , using a research radiator with Cs-137 source and maximum dose rate of 1,8kGy/h. Dosimetry was performed with the calculation of the source exposure time using a specific program for the irradiator. For identification of amines it was used gas chromatography associated with a mass detector. The chromatographic conditions used were: interface temperature at 200 degree C, SCAN mode for m/z 15 to 300, helium mobile phase, manual injection, split rate of 1/5 and flow rate of 1.00mL/min. The heating was linear from 40 degree C to 300 degree C, with a rate of 10 degree C/min. Chromatographic separation was performed with column RTx-5MS, 30m x 0,25mm x 0,25 {mu}m, stationary phase 5% diphenyl - 95% dimethylpolysiloxane. The content of the amines after the irradiation process suffered considerable reduction. Tryptamine was more radiosensitive being reduced by about 85% at 1kGy, 99% at 3kGy and 100% at 5kGy. The b-phenylethylamine was reduced from its initial amount in about 20% at 1kGy, 70% at 3kGy and 85% at 5kGy. Tyramine showed less sensitivity to gamma radiation with reduction only 20% at 1kGy, 50% at 3kGy and 60% at 5kGy. These results show that the use of the irradiation process was efficient in the degradation of the amines tested. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Degradation Kinetic of Tomato Paste Color in Heat Processing and Modeling of These Changes by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganjeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Color is an important qualitative factor in tomato products such as tomato paste which is affected by heat processing. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the degradation kinetics of tomato paste color during heat processing by Arrhenius equation and modeling of these changes by response surface methodology (RSM. Considering this purpose, tomato paste was processed at three temperatures of 60, 70 and 80 °C for 25-100 minutes and by three main color indices including L, a and b, a/b ratio, total color difference (TCD, Saturation index (SI and hue angle (HU was analyzed. Degradation kinetics of these parameters was evaluated by Arrhenius equation and their changing trends were modeled by RSM. All parameters except TCA (zero order followed a first order reaction. The b index by highest and TCA and a/b by least activation energies had the maximum and minimum sensitivity to the temperature changes, respectively. Also, TCD and b had the maximum and minimum changing rates, respectively. All responses were influenced by independent parameters (the influence of temperature was more than time and RSM was capable of modeling and predicting these responses. In general, Arrhenius equation was appropriate to evaluate degradation kinetics of tomato paste color changes and RSM was able to estimate independent and interaction effects of time and temperature so that quadratic models were capable to predict these changes by a high accuracy (R2 > 0.95.

  3. Organic contaminants degradation from the S(IV) autoxidation process catalyzed by ferrous-manganous ions: A noticeable Mn(III) oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaming; Ma, Jun; Song, Haoran; Sun, Shaofang; Zhang, Zhongxiang; Yang, Tao

    2018-04-15

    Remarkable atrazine degradation in the S(IV) autoxidation process catalyzed by Fe 2+ -Mn 2+ (Fe 2+ /Mn 2+ /sulfite) was demonstrated in this study. Competitive kinetic experiments, alcohol inhibiting methods and electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments proved that sulfur radicals were not the major oxidation species. Mn(III) was demonstrated to be the primary active species in the Fe 2+ /Mn 2+ /sulfite process based on the comparison of oxidation selectivity. Moreover, the inhibiting effect of the Mn(III) hydrolysis and the S(IV) autoxidation in the presence of organic contaminants indicated the existence of three Mn(III) consumption routes in the Fe 2+ /Mn 2+ /sulfite process. The absence of hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical was interpreted by the competitive dynamics method. The oxidation capacity of the Fe 2+ /Mn 2+ /sulfite was independent of the initial pH (4.0-6.0) because the fast decay of S(IV) decreased initial pH below 4.0 rapidly. The rate of ATZ degradation was independent of the dissolved oxygen (DO) because that the major DO consumption process was not the rate determining step during the production of SO 5 •- . Phosphate and bicarbonate were confirmed to have greater inhibitory effects than other environmental factors because of their strong pH buffering capacity and complexing capacity for Fe 3+ . The proposed acetylation degradation pathway of ATZ showed the application of the Fe 2+ /Mn 2+ /sulfite process in the research of contaminants degradation pathways. This work investigated the characteristics of the Fe 2+ /Mn 2+ /sulfite process in the presence of organic contaminants, which might promote the development of Mn(III) oxidation technology. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A Holistic Understanding of Conflicts during the Enterprise Resource Planning Change Process: A Dialectic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    MUSLEH ALSULAMI

    2017-01-01

    This doctoral study investigates conflicts during ERP change process from a dialectic perspective. A major motivation of this study thus arises from the recognition that a high level of risk is generally associated with the ERP change process. This is due to three reasons: a) limited understanding and experience in supporting the ERP change process, b) highly complex and risky involvement of multiple ERP stakeholders who have contrasting expectations, and c) inherent ERP conflicts in the ERP ...

  5. Determination of Polybutadiene Unsaturation Content in Thermal and Thermo-Oxidative Degradation Processes by NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Ziaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsaturation content of various polybutadiene (PBD types of 1,4-cis, 1,4-trans and 1,2-vinyl isomers with different molecular weights was investigated. An important parameter for unsaturation content of polybutadiene would be the determination of olefnic and aliphatic contents for three types of isomers. For this purpose, proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods were employed for determination of 1,4-cis, 1,4-trans and 1,2-vinyl contents. A change of adjustable parameter of NMR software was made for accurate integrals giving better results. The accuracy in calculation of low molecular weight PBD, surface area of chain end group decreased in aliphatic region. Furthermore, the changing of unsaturation content versus time was considered for 1,2-PBD and 1,4-PBD in thermal degradation conditions at 250°C. NMR results showed that during heating, the unsaturation content decreased for 1,2-PBD and was not changed for 1,4-PBD. In fact, the basic factor responsible for changing of unsaturation content in thermal degradation of PBD may be due to the presence of 1,2-vinyl isomer. Finally, changing in unsaturation content versus time was observed for 1,2-PBD and 1,4-PBD in thermo-oxidative degradation conditions at 100°C. The NMR results showed that at extended time, the unsaturation content decreased for 1,4-PBD and was not changed for 1,2-PBD. Moreover, the basic factor for changes in unsaturation content in thermo-oxidative degradation of PBD is due to the presence of 1,4-cis and 1,4-trans isomers.

  6. Dynamics of Photoinduced Degradation of Perovskite Photovoltaics: From Reversible to Irreversible Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khenkin, M. V.; Anoop, K. M.; Visoly-Fischer, I.

    2018-01-01

    The operational stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) remains a limiting factor in their commercial implementation. We studied the long-term outdoor stability of ITO/SnO2/Cs0.05((CH3NH3)0.15(CH(NH2)2)0.85)0.95PbI2.55Br0.45/spiro-OMeTAD/Au cells, as well as the dynamics of their degradation...

  7. Small-scale barriers mitigate desertification processes and enhance plant recruitment in a degraded semiarid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Stephen E; Decker, Cheryl E.; Duniway, Michael C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic desertification is a problem that plagues drylands globally; however, the factors which maintain degraded states are often unclear. In Canyonlands National Park on the Colorado Plateau of southeastern Utah, many degraded grasslands have not recovered structure and function >40 yr after release from livestock grazing pressure, necessitating active restoration. We hypothesized that multiple factors contribute to the persistent degraded state, including lack of seed availability, surficial soil-hydrological properties, and high levels of spatial connectivity (lack of perennial vegetation and other surface structure to retain water, litter, seed, and sediment). In combination with seeding and surface raking treatments, we tested the effect of small barrier structures (“ConMods”) designed to disrupt the loss of litter, seed and sediment in degraded soil patches within the park. Grass establishment was highest when all treatments (structures, seed addition, and soil disturbance) were combined, but only in the second year after installation, following favorable climatic conditions. We suggest that multiple limiting factors were ameliorated by treatments, including seed limitation and microsite availability, seed removal by harvester ants, and stressful abiotic conditions. Higher densities of grass seedlings on the north and east sides of barrier structures following the summer months suggest that structures may have functioned as artificial “nurse-plants”, sheltering seedlings from wind and radiation as well as accumulating wind-blown resources. Barrier structures increased the establishment of both native perennial grasses and exotic annuals, although there were species-specific differences in mortality related to spatial distribution of seedlings within barrier structures. The unique success of all treatments combined, and even then only under favorable climatic conditions and in certain soil patches, highlights that restoration success (and

  8. DI-(2-ETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION BY FENTON PROCESS IN SYNTHETIC AND REAL PETROCHEMICAL WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Esmaeli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Di-(2-Ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP belongs to the class of phthalate esters and is used as an additive in many products including plastics, paints and inks or as a solvent in industrial formulations. The degradation of DEHP in aqueous solution using oxidative Fenton reaction (H2O2/Fe2+ was carried out in this study. It was found that H2O2 concentration, Fe2+ concentration, and pH were the three main factors that could significantly influence the degradation rates of DEHP. The highest degradation percentage (85.6 % of DEHP was observed within 60 min at pH 3 in H2O2/Fe2+ system. The results of our study suggested that the concentration with 90 mg/L H2O2, 5 mg/L Fe2+, and 20 mg/L DEHP in the solution at pH 3 were the optimal conditions. The optimized reaction parameters were preceded for treatment of real wastewater obtained from a petrochemical plant.

  9. Naproxen degradation test to monitor Trametes versicolor activity in solid-state bioremediation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Caminal, Gloria

    2010-07-15

    The white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor has been studied as a potential agent for the removal of environmental pollutants. For long-time solid-phase bioremediation systems a test is required to monitor the metabolic status of T. versicolor and its degradation capability at different stages. A biodegradation test based on the percentage of degradation of a spiked model pharmaceutical (anti-inflammatory naproxen) in 24 h (ND24) is proposed to monitor the removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in sewage sludge. ND24 is intended to act as a test complementary to ergosterol quantification as specific fungal biomarker, and laccase activity as extracellular oxidative capacity of T. versicolor. For samples collected over 45 d, ND24 values did not necessarily correlate with ergosterol or laccase amounts but in most cases, they were over 30% degradation, indicating that T. versicolor may be suitable for bioremediation of sewage sludge in the studied period. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sulfate radical-induced degradation of Acid Orange 7 by a new magnetic composite catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dan; Ma, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xi; Qian, Guangren

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Organic dyes could be absorbed on the surface of the composite or dispersed in the solution. Sulfate radicals (SO 4 · − ) generated by the synergistic reaction between peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and the composite, attacked the organic functional groups of the dyes molecules both adsorbed on the composite surface and dispersed in the solution, which resulted in the degradation of AO7 dye. - Highlights: • A new composite was synthesized successfully via microwave hydrothermal method. • The complete degradation in the system of FLCN and PMS can be achieved. • The catalytic behavior of FLCN can be reused at least for five times. • The AO7 degradation mechanism in the system of FLCN and PMS was demonstrated. - Abstract: We synthesized a novel magnetic composite, Fe 3 O 4 /Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH, as a heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the solution using sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes. The physicochemical properties of the composite synthesized via two-step microwave hydrothermal method were characterized by several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The degradation tests were performed at 25 °C with Acid Orange 7 (AO7) initial concentration of 25 mg/L and AO7/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) molar ratio of 1:10, which showed that the complete degradation by Fe 3 O 4 /Cu 1.5 Ni 0.5 Cr-LDH could be achieved and the mineralization rate could reach 46%. PMS was activated by Cu (II) and Fe (II/III) of Fe 3 O 4 /Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH to generate sulfate radicals (SO 4 · − ). Subsequently, the organic functional groups of AO7 molecules were destroyed by sulfate radicals (SO 4 · − ), inducing the degradation of AO7. Moreover, the catalytic behavior of the catalysts could be reused five times. Therefore, our work suggested that the Fe 3 O 4 /Cu(Ni)Cr-LDH composite could be applied widely for the

  11. A Process-Philosophical Understanding of Organizational Learning as "Wayfinding": Process, Practices and Sensitivity to Environmental Affordances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to articulate a practice-based, non-cognitivist approach to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: This paper explores the potential contribution of a process-based "practice turn" in social theory for understanding organizational learning. Findings: In complex, turbulent environments, robust…

  12. Application of residual polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in dried shiitake mushrooms as an enzyme preparation in food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, E; Konishi, Y; Tsujiyama, S

    2016-11-01

    To examine the activities of residual enzymes in dried shiitake mushrooms, which are a traditional foodstuff in Japanese cuisine, for possible applications in food processing. Polysaccharide-degrading enzymes remained intact in dried shiitake mushrooms and the activities of amylase, β-glucosidase and pectinase were high. A potato digestion was tested using dried shiitake powder. The enzymes reacted with potato tuber specimens to solubilize sugars even under a heterogeneous solid-state condition and that their reaction modes were different at 38 and 50 °C. Dried shiitake mushrooms have a potential use in food processing as an enzyme preparation.

  13. Process analytical tools for monitoring, understanding, and control of pharmaceutical fluidized bed granulation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraeve, Anneleen; Monteyne, Tinne; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fluidized bed granulation is a widely applied wet granulation technique in the pharmaceutical industry to produce solid dosage forms. The process involves the spraying of a binder liquid onto fluidizing powder particles. As a result, the (wetted) particles collide with each other and form larger permanent aggregates (granules). After spraying the required amount of granulation liquid, the wet granules are rapidly dried in the fluid bed granulator. Since the FDA launched its Process Analytical Technology initiative (and even before), a wide range of analytical process sensors has been used for real-time monitoring and control of fluid bed granulation processes. By applying various data analysis techniques to the multitude of data collected from the process analyzers implemented in fluid bed granulators, a deeper understanding of the process has been achieved. This review gives an overview of the process analytical technologies used during fluid bed granulation to monitor and control the process. The fundamentals of the mechanisms contributing to wet granule growth and the characteristics of fluid bed granulation processing are briefly discussed. This is followed by a detailed overview of the in-line applied process analyzers, contributing to improved fluid bed granulation understanding, modeling, control, and endpoint detection. Analysis and modeling tools enabling the extraction of the relevant information from the complex data collected during granulation and the control of the process are highlighted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Six sigma: process of understanding the control and capability of ranitidine hydrochloride tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabukswar, Ar; Jagdale, Sc; Kuchekar, Bs; Joshi, Vd; Deshmukh, Gr; Kothawade, Hs; Kuckekar, Ab; Lokhande, Pd

    2011-01-01

    The process of understanding the control and capability (PUCC) is an iterative closed loop process for continuous improvement. It covers the DMAIC toolkit in its three phases. PUCC is an iterative approach that rotates between the three pillars of the process of understanding, process control, and process capability, with each iteration resulting in a more capable and robust process. It is rightly said that being at the top is a marathon and not a sprint. The objective of the six sigma study of Ranitidine hydrochloride tablets is to achieve perfection in tablet manufacturing by reviewing the present robust manufacturing process, to find out ways to improve and modify the process, which will yield tablets that are defect-free and will give more customer satisfaction. The application of six sigma led to an improved process capability, due to the improved sigma level of the process from 1.5 to 4, a higher yield, due to reduced variation and reduction of thick tablets, reduction in packing line stoppages, reduction in re-work by 50%, a more standardized process, with smooth flow and change in coating suspension reconstitution level (8%w/w), a huge cost reduction of approximately Rs.90 to 95 lakhs per annum, an improved overall efficiency by 30% approximately, and improved overall quality of the product.

  15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS USING DIPIRONA DEGRADATION PROCESS WITH PHOTO-FENTON UV-C LIGHT AND SOLAR RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Carla Napoleão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of water bodies is a major concern on the part of scientists from different parts of the world. Domestic and industrial activities are the cause of the daily pouring of various types of pollutants which are in most cases resistant to conventional treatments of waters. Among the contaminants, especially noteworthy are the drugs in which it is found that 50% to 90% are discarded without treatment. The concerns about these substances are the adverse effects to human health and animals, especially in aquatic environments. The advanced oxidation processes (AOP have been studied and applied as an efficient alternative treatment, in order that it can be applied to the degradation of the different pollutants, considering that can generate hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive even somewhat selective. This study evaluated the efficiency of the photo-Fenton process using UV-C radiation and sunlight to degradation of the drug dipyrone in aqueous solution contaminated with the active ingredient of the drug at a concentration of 20 mg.L-1. Assays were performed with 50 mL aliquots of the solution following 23 factorial designs with central point, and the variables studied: addition of H2O2, adding FeSO4.7H2O and time. The detection and quantification of dipyrone before and after the AOP was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and verified that about DE100% degradation of the compound was obtained.

  16. Photo-stability study of a solution-processed small molecule solar cell system: correlation between molecular conformation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michael J; Speller, Emily M; Barbé, Jérémy; Luke, Joel; Li, Meng; Li, Zhe; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Jain, Sagar M; Kim, Ji-Seon; Lee, Harrison Ka Hin; Tsoi, Wing Chung

    2018-01-01

    Solution-processed organic small molecule solar cells (SMSCs) have achieved efficiency over 11%. However, very few studies have focused on their stability under illumination and the origin of the degradation during the so-called burn-in period. Here, we studied the burn-in period of a solution-processed SMSC using benzodithiophene terthiophene rhodamine:[6,6]-phenyl C 71 butyric acid methyl ester (BTR:PC 71 BM) with increasing solvent vapour annealing time applied to the active layer, controlling the crystallisation of the BTR phase. We find that the burn-in behaviour is strongly correlated to the crystallinity of BTR. To look at the possible degradation mechanisms, we studied the fresh and photo-aged blend films with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorbance, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Although the crystallinity of BTR affects the performance drop during the burn-in period, the degradation is found not to originate from the crystallinity changes of the BTR phase, but correlates with changes in molecular conformation - rotation of the thiophene side chains, as resolved by Raman spectroscopy which could be correlated to slight photobleaching and changes in PL spectra.

  17. Using process elicitation and validation to understand and improve chemotherapy ordering and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Wilson C; Christov, Stefan C; Avrunin, George S; Clarke, Lori A; Osterweil, Leon J; Cassells, Lucinda J; Marquard, Jenna L

    2012-11-01

    Chemotherapy ordering and administration, in which errors have potentially severe consequences, was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated by employing process formalism (or formal process definition), a technique derived from software engineering, to elicit and rigorously describe the process, after which validation techniques were applied to confirm the accuracy of the described process. The chemotherapy ordering and administration process, including exceptional situations and individuals' recognition of and responses to those situations, was elicited through informal, unstructured interviews with members of an interdisciplinary team. The process description (or process definition), written in a notation developed for software quality assessment purposes, guided process validation (which consisted of direct observations and semistructured interviews to confirm the elicited details for the treatment plan portion of the process). The overall process definition yielded 467 steps; 207 steps (44%) were dedicated to handling 59 exceptional situations. Validation yielded 82 unique process events (35 new expected but not yet described steps, 16 new exceptional situations, and 31 new steps in response to exceptional situations). Process participants actively altered the process as ambiguities and conflicts were discovered by the elicitation and validation components of the study. Chemotherapy error rates declined significantly during and after the project, which was conducted from October 2007 through August 2008. Each elicitation method and the subsequent validation discussions contributed uniquely to understanding the chemotherapy treatment plan review process, supporting rapid adoption of changes, improved communication regarding the process, and ensuing error reduction.

  18. Effects of mechanical and chemical processes on the degradation of plastic beach debris on the island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David A; Corcoran, Patricia L

    2010-05-01

    Plastic debris is accumulating on the beaches of Kauai at an alarming rate, averaging 484 pieces/day in one locality. Particles sampled were analyzed to determine the effects of mechanical and chemical processes on the breakdown of polymers in a subtropical setting. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicates that plastic surfaces contain fractures, horizontal notches, flakes, pits, grooves, and vermiculate textures. The mechanically produced textures provide ideal loci for chemical weathering to occur which further weakens the polymer surface leading to embrittlement. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results show that some particles have highly oxidized surfaces as indicated by intense peaks in the lower wavenumber region of the spectra. Our textural analyses suggest that polyethylene has the potential to degrade more readily than polypropylene. Further evaluation of plastic degradation in the natural environment may lead to a shift away from the production and use of plastic materials with longer residence times. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Annual Landsat Time Series for the Detection of Dry Forest Degradation Processes in South-Central Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schneibel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dry tropical forests undergo massive conversion and degradation processes. This also holds true for the extensive Miombo forests that cover large parts of Southern Africa. While the largest proportional area can be found in Angola, the country still struggles with food shortages, insufficient medical and educational supplies, as well as the ongoing reconstruction of infrastructure after 27 years of civil war. Especially in rural areas, the local population is therefore still heavily dependent on the consumption of natural resources, as well as subsistence agriculture. This leads, on one hand, to large areas of Miombo forests being converted for cultivation purposes, but on the other hand, to degradation processes due to the selective use of forest resources. While forest conversion in south-central rural Angola has already been quantitatively described, information about forest degradation is not yet available. This is due to the history of conflicts and the therewith connected research difficulties, as well as the remote location of this area. We apply an annual time series approach using Landsat data in south-central Angola not only to assess the current degradation status of the Miombo forests, but also to derive past developments reaching back to times of armed conflicts. We use the Disturbance Index based on tasseled cap transformation to exclude external influences like inter-annual variation of rainfall. Based on this time series, linear regression is calculated for forest areas unaffected by conversion, but also for the pre-conversion period of those areas that were used for cultivation purposes during the observation time. Metrics derived from linear regression are used to classify the study area according to their dominant modification processes. We compare our results to MODIS latent integral trends and to further products to derive information on underlying drivers. Around 13% of the Miombo forests are affected by degradation

  20. The Influence of Toy Design Activities on Middle School Students' Understanding of the Engineering Design Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ninger; Pereira, Nielsen L.; George, Tarun Thomas; Alperovich, Jeffrey; Booth, Joran; Chandrasegaran, Senthil; Tew, Jeffrey David; Kulkarni, Devadatta M.; Ramani, Karthik

    2017-10-01

    The societal demand for inspiring and engaging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students and preparing our workforce for the emerging creative economy has necessitated developing students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes from as early as elementary school levels. Hands-on engineering design activities have shown the potential to promote middle school students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes. However, traditional classrooms often lack hands-on engineering design experiences, leaving students unprepared to solve real-world design problems. In this study, we introduce the framework of a toy design workshop and investigate the influence of the workshop activities on students' understanding of and self-efficacy beliefs in engineering design. Using a mixed method approach, we conducted quantitative analyses to show changes in students' engineering design self-efficacy and qualitative analyses to identify students' understanding of the engineering design processes. Findings show that among the 24 participants, there is a significant increase in students' self-efficacy beliefs after attending the workshop. We also identified major themes such as design goals and prototyping in students' understanding of engineering design processes. This research provides insights into the key elements of middle school students' engineering design learning and the benefits of engaging middle school students in hands-on toy design workshops.

  1. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  2. Exploring potentials of sense-making theory for understanding social processes in public hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Ivar

    This paper has point of departure in a planning process on energy infrastructure in Denmark and focuses on a particular public hearing meeting characterised by trenchant opposition and distrust to the authorities among the public. It points at the need to understand the interaction between author...... of such a public meeting and the importance of trust and openness in the social processes in a public hearing....... authorities and the public in such planning often characterised by conflict. A sense-making framework is developed based on Karl Weick's theory to investigate how participants at the meeting change their understanding aspects like other actors' opinions and the infrastructure project. Through interviews...

  3. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Musat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the CH bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane.

  4. Impact of compost process conditions on organic micro pollutant degradation during full scale composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadef, Yumna; Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm; Bester, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about the effects of oxygen concentration, nutrient availability and moisture content on removal of organic micro-pollutants during aerobic composting is at present very limited. Impact of oxygen concentration, readily available nitrogen content (NH4(+), NO3(-)), and moisture content on biological transformation of 15 key organic micro-pollutants during composting, was therefore investigated using bench-scale degradation experiments based on non-sterile compost samples, collected at full-scale composting facilities. In addition, the adequacy of bench-scale composting experiments for representing full-scale composting conditions, was investigated using micro-pollutant concentration measurements from both bench- and full-scale composting experiments. Results showed that lack of oxygen generally prevented transformation of organic micro-pollutants. Increasing readily available nitrogen content from about 50 mg N per 100 g compost to about 140 mg N per 100 g compost actually reduced micro-pollutant transformation, while changes in compost moisture content from 50% to 20% by weight, only had minor influence on micro-pollutant transformation. First-order micro-pollutant degradation rates for 13 organic micro-pollutants were calculated using data from both full- and bench-scale experiments. First-order degradation coefficients for both types of experiments were similar and ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 d(-1) on average, indicating that if a proper sampling strategy is employed, bench-scale experiments can be used to represent full-scale composting conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Technical development of UV-C- and VUV-photochemically induced oxidative degradation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A M; Pintori, I G; Popp, H P; Wakahata, Y; Wörner, M

    2004-01-01

    Technical development work is presented, where the VUV photochemically induced oxidative degradation is used: (i) for analytic purposes, and (ii) for small to medium scale (lamp/reactor combination may be used for functionalization purposes prior to e.g. GC or HPLC analyses. In the second case, mass transfer limitations between the non-irradiated bulk volume and the irradiated volume are overcome by the electrochemical generation of molecular oxygen within or close to the irradiated volume and by the design of the photochemical part of the reactor.

  6. Eco-friendly and facile integrated biological-cum-photo assisted electrooxidation process for degradation of textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Priyadharshini; Subramanyan, Vasudevan; Ferro, Sergio; Gopalakrishnan, Rajagopal

    2016-04-15

    The present article reports an integrated treatment method viz biodegradation followed by photo-assisted electrooxidation, as a new approach, for the abatement of textile wastewater. In the first stage of the integrated treatment scheme, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the real textile effluent was reduced by a biodegradation process using hydrogels of cellulose-degrading Bacillus cereus. The bio-treated effluent was then subjected to the second stage of the integrated scheme viz indirect electrooxidation (InDEO) as well as photo-assisted indirect electro oxidation (P-InDEO) process using Ti/IrO2-RuO2-TiO2 and Ti as electrodes and applying a current density of 20 mA cm(-2). The influence of cellulose in InDEO has been reported here, for the first time. UV-Visible light of 280-800 nm has been irradiated toward the anode/electrolyte interface in P-InDEO. The effectiveness of this combined treatment process in textile effluent degradation has been probed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements and (1)H - nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The obtained results indicate that the biological treatment allows obtaining a 93% of cellulose degradation and 47% of COD removal, increasing the efficiency of the subsequent InDEO by a 33%. In silico molecular docking analysis ascertained that cellulose fibers affect the InDEO process by interacting with the dyes that are responsible of the COD. On the other hand, P-InDEO resulted in both 95% of decolorization and 68% of COD removal, as a result of radical mediators. Free radicals generated during P-InDEO were characterized as oxychloride (OCl) by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). This form of coupled approach is especially suggested for the treatment of textile wastewater containing cellulose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Degradation of nitroaromatic compounds and remediation of residues from the explosive production by reductive-oxidative processes based on zero-valent iron

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalotti, Luiz Fernando Rocha; Peralta-Zamora, Patricio; Rodrigues, Marcio Barreto; Paiva, Teresa Cristina Brazil de

    2009-01-01

    In this work the potentiality of reductive-oxidative processes based on zero-valent iron was studied aiming the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds and the remediation of residues from the explosive industry. The reductive process was applied as a continuous treatment system, using steel-wool as zero-valent iron source. The process permitted an almost total degradation of nitrobenzene, nitrophenol, nitrotoluene, dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene, probably with generation of the respective...

  8. Enhanced heterogeneous photo-Fenton process modified by magnetite and EDDS: BPA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenyu; Luo, Mengqi; Wei, Chaoshuai; Wang, Yinghui; Hanna, Khalil; Mailhot, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    In this research, magnetite and ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) are used in a heterogeneous photo-Fenton system in order to find a new way to remove organic contaminants from water. Influence of different parameters including magnetite dosage, EDDS concentration, H 2 O 2 concentration, and pH value were evaluated. The effect of different radical species including HO · and HO 2 · /O 2 ·- was investigated by addition of different scavengers into the system. The addition of EDDS improved the heterogeneous photo-Fenton degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) through the formation of photochemically efficient Fe-EDDS complex. This effect is dependent on the H 2 O 2 and EDDS concentrations and pH value. The high performance observed at pH 6.2 could be explained by the ability of O 2 ·- to generate Fe(II) from Fe(III) species reduction. GC-MS analysis suggested that the cleavage of the two benzene rings is the first degradation step followed by oxidation leading to the formation of the benzene derivatives. Then, the benzene ring was opened due to the attack of HO · radicals producing short-chain organic compounds of low molecular weight like glycerol and ethylene glycol. These findings regarding the capability of EDDS/magnetite system to promote heterogeneous photo-Fenton oxidation have important practical implications for water treatment technologies.

  9. Macrosystems ecology: novel methods and new understanding of multi-scale patterns and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songlin Fei; Qinfeng Guo; Kevin Potter

    2016-01-01

    As the global biomes are increasingly threatened by human activities, understanding of macroscale patterns and processes is pressingly needed for effective management and policy making. Macrosystems ecology, which studies multiscale ecologicalpatterns and processes, has gained growing interest in the research community. However, as a relatively new field in...

  10. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs

  11. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs.

  12. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Vesely, W.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs.

  13. Determination of degradation products and process related impurities of asenapine maleate in asenapine sublingual tablets by UPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Sangeetha, D.; Kalyanraman, L.

    2017-11-01

    For determination of process related impurities and degradation products of asenapine maleate in asenapine sublingual Tablets, a reversed phase, stability indicating UPLC method was developed. Acetonitrile, methanol and potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with tetra-n- butyl ammonium hydrogen sulphate as ion pair (pH 2.2; 0.01 M) at flow rate of 0.2 ml/min were used in gradient elution mode. Separation was achieved by using acquity BEH Shield RP18 column (1.7 μm, 2.1 mm×100 mm) at 35 ºC. UV detection was performed at 228 nm. Subsequently the liquid chromatography method was validated as per ICH. The drug product was exposed to the stress conditions of acid hydrolysis, base hydrolysis, water hydrolysis, oxidative, thermal, and photolytic. In oxidative stress and thermal stress significant degradation was observed. All the degradation products were well separated from analyte peak and its impurities. Stability indicating nature of the method was proved by demonstrating the peak purity of Asenapine peak in all the stressed samples. The mass balance was found >95% for all the stress conditions. Based on method validation, the method was found specific, linear, accurate, precise, rugged and robust.

  14. Understanding Customer Product Choices: A Case Study Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Smith; Robert J. Bush; Daniel L. Schmoldt

    1996-01-01

    The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used to characterize the bridge material selection decisions of highway officials across the United States. Understanding product choices by utilizing the AHP allowed us to develop strategies for increasing the use of timber in bridge construction. State Department of Transportation engineers, private consulting engineers, and...

  15. Understanding Teachers' Cognitive Processes during Online Professional Learning: A Methodological Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Pamela; Willows, Dale

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of three types of think aloud methods for understanding elementary teachers' cognitive processes as they used a professional development website. A methodology combining a retrospective think aloud procedure with screen capture technology (referred to as the virtual revisit) was compared with concurrent and…

  16. Videogame Construction by Engineering Students for Understanding Modelling Processes: The Case of Simulating Water Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretelín-Ricárdez, Angel; Sacristán, Ana Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present some results of an ongoing research project where university engineering students were asked to construct videogames involving the use of physical systems models. The objective is to help them identify and understand the elements and concepts involved in the modelling process. That is, we use game design as a constructionist approach…

  17. Embedded Formative Assessment and Classroom Process Quality: How Do They Interact in Promoting Science Understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, A. Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment--a well-known teaching practice--and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of…

  18. Utilizing the Theoretical Framework of Collective Identity to Understand Processes in Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores collective identity as a useful theoretical framework for understanding social and developmental processes that occur in youth programs. Through narrative analysis of past participant interviews (n = 21) from an after-school theater program, known as "The SOURCE", it was found that participants very clearly describe…

  19. The Role of Regulation and Processing Strategies in Understanding Science Text among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilppu, Henna; Mikkila-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Ahopelto, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of regulation and processing strategies in understanding science text. A total of 91 student teachers answered open-ended questions concerning photosynthesis before and after reading either a traditional or a refutational science text. After this, they also answered parts of the Inventory of…

  20. Beyond Homophily: A Decade of Advances in Understanding Peer Influence Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechwald, Whitney A.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews empirical and theoretical contributions to a multidisciplinary understanding of peer influence processes in adolescence over the past decade. Five themes of peer influence research from this decade were identified, including a broadening of the range of behaviors for which peer influence occurs, distinguishing the sources of…

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions from soils: how well do we understand the processes and their controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Dannenmann, Michael; Kiese, Ralf; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well established that soils are the dominating source for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), we are still struggling to fully understand the complexity of the underlying microbial production and consumption processes and the links to biotic (e.g. inter- and intraspecies competition, food webs, plant–microbe interaction) and abiotic (e.g. soil climate, physics and chemistry) factors. Recent work shows that a better understanding of the composition and diversity of the microbial community across a variety of soils in different climates and under different land use, as well as plant–microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, may provide a key to better understand the variability of N2O fluxes at the soil–atmosphere interface. Moreover, recent insights into the regulation of the reduction of N2O to dinitrogen (N2) have increased our understanding of N2O exchange. This improved process understanding, building on the increased use of isotope tracing techniques and metagenomics, needs to go along with improvements in measurement techniques for N2O (and N2) emission in order to obtain robust field and laboratory datasets for different ecosystem types. Advances in both fields are currently used to improve process descriptions in biogeochemical models, which may eventually be used not only to test our current process understanding from the microsite to the field level, but also used as tools for up-scaling emissions to landscapes and regions and to explore feedbacks of soil N2O emissions to changes in environmental conditions, land management and land use. PMID:23713120

  2. Efficient degradation of Acid Orange 7 in aqueous solution by iron ore tailing Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gao, Zhanqi; He, Huan; Yang, Shaogui; Sun, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    An effective method based on iron ore tailing Fenton-like process was studied for removing an azo dye, Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in aqueous solution. Five tailings were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscope (XFS), Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of XFS showed that Fe, Si and Ca were the most abundant elements and some toxic heavy metals were also present in the studied tailings. The result of BET analysis indicated that the studied tailings had very low surface areas (0.64-5.68 m(2) g(-1)). The degradation efficiencies of AO7 were positively correlated with the content of iron oxide and cupric oxide, and not related with the BET surface area of the tailings. The co-existing metal elements, particularly Cu, might accelerate the heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction. The effects of other parameters on heterogeneous Fenton-like degradation of AO7 by a converter slag iron tailing (tailing E) which contains highest iron oxide were also investigated. The tailing could be reused 10 times without significant decrease of the catalytic capacity. Very low amount of iron species and almost undetectable toxic elements were leached in the catalytic degradation of AO7 by the tailing E. The reaction products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and a possible pathway of AO7 degradation was proposed. This study not only provides an effective method for removing azo dyes in polluted water by employing waste tailings as Fenton-like catalysts, but also uses waste tailings as the secondary resource. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TiO2 and its composites as effective photocatalyst for glucose degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukh, A. A.; Ivanenko, I. M.; Astrelin, I. M.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium-dioxide photocatalyst was impregnated onto the activated carbon using originally developed low-temperature sol-gel method to form a TiO2:AC composite material. 15% (mass.) solution Ti2(SO4)3 in sulphuric acid was used as a precursor for photocatalyst synthesis. The highly effective composite material was obtained through a combination of properties of titanium dioxide and activated carbon. Synthesized composites TiO2 with activated carbon demonstrate highly developed surface characteristics and exhibit significantly higher activity in comparison with samples of pure TiO2 synthesized the same way, existing analogues of pure TiO2 synthesized from TiCl3 and even industrial photocatalyst. This was testified by the degradation of 1% aqueous glucose solution using TiO2:AC, samples of pure TiO2 and commercial TiO2 AEROXIDE® TiO2 P25 produced by EVONIK Industries.

  4. Toward theoretical understanding of the fertility preservation decision-making process: examining information processing among young women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Finnegan, Lorna; Altfeld, Susan; Lake, Sara; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Young women with cancer now face the complex decision about whether to undergo fertility preservation. Yet little is known about how these women process information involved in making this decision. The purpose of this article is to expand theoretical understanding of the decision-making process by examining aspects of information processing among young women diagnosed with cancer. Using a grounded theory approach, 27 women with cancer participated in individual, semistructured interviews. Data were coded and analyzed using constant-comparison techniques that were guided by 5 dimensions within the Contemplate phase of the decision-making process framework. In the first dimension, young women acquired information primarily from clinicians and Internet sources. Experiential information, often obtained from peers, occurred in the second dimension. Preferences and values were constructed in the third dimension as women acquired factual, moral, and ethical information. Women desired tailored, personalized information that was specific to their situation in the fourth dimension; however, women struggled with communicating these needs to clinicians. In the fifth dimension, women offered detailed descriptions of clinician behaviors that enhance or impede decisional debriefing. Better understanding of theoretical underpinnings surrounding women's information processes can facilitate decision support and improve clinical care.

  5. Enhanced process understanding and multivariate prediction of the relationship between cell culture process and monoclonal antibody quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Michael; Ritscher, Jonathan; MacKinnon, Nicola; Souquet, Jonathan; Broly, Hervé; Morbidelli, Massimo; Butté, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the insights and understanding which can be deduced from predictive process models for the product quality of a monoclonal antibody based on designed high-throughput cell culture experiments performed at milliliter (ambr-15 ® ) scale. The investigated process conditions include various media supplements as well as pH and temperature shifts applied during the process. First, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to show the strong correlation characteristics among the product quality attributes including aggregates, fragments, charge variants, and glycans. Then, partial least square regression (PLS1 and PLS2) is applied to predict the product quality variables based on process information (one by one or simultaneously). The comparison of those two modeling techniques shows that a single (PLS2) model is capable of revealing the interrelationship of the process characteristics to the large set product quality variables. In order to show the dynamic evolution of the process predictability separate models are defined at different time points showing that several product quality attributes are mainly driven by the media composition and, hence, can be decently predicted from early on in the process, while others are strongly affected by process parameter changes during the process. Finally, by coupling the PLS2 models with a genetic algorithm first the model performance can be further improved and, most importantly, the interpretation of the large-dimensioned process-product-interrelationship can be significantly simplified. The generally applicable toolset presented in this case study provides a solid basis for decision making and process optimization throughout process development. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:1368-1380, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Understanding the Role of Water on Electron-Initiated Processes and Radical Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Bruce C [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Colson, Steven D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Laufer, Allan H [US Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences; Ray, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2003-06-10

    On September 26–28, 2002, a workshop entitled “Understanding the Role of Water on Electron-Initiated Processes and Radical Chemistry” was held to assess new research opportunities in electron-driven processes and radical chemistry in aqueous systems. Of particular interest was the unique and complex role that the structure of water plays in influencing these processes. Novel experimental and theoretical approaches to solving long-standing problems in the field were explored. A broad selection of participants from universities and the national laboratories contributed to the workshop, which included scientific and technical presentations and parallel sessions for discussions and report writing.

  7. Understanding Craftsman’s Creativity in a Framework of Person, Process, Product and Press (4Ps)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Chunfang; Tanggaard, Lene

    2016-01-01

    , Process, Product, and Press (4Ps) This research question drives to develop a theoretical study bridging two areas of creativity and craftsman’s work. This will further indicate craftsman’s working practice is full of complexity that stimulates creative behavior and that also requires a systematic view......The recent work has emphasized craftsmen are key actors in developing creative industries. However, little attention has been paid to the particular study on creativity of craftsmen. This paper aims to explore how can we understand craftsman’s creativity in a theoretical framework of Person...... to understand craftsman’s creativity as involving interaction between 4Ps....

  8. Distortion of genetically modified organism quantification in processed foods: influence of particle size compositions and heat-induced DNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreano, Francisco; Busch, Ulrich; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2005-12-28

    Milling fractions from conventional and transgenic corn were prepared at laboratory scale and used to study the influence of sample composition and heat-induced DNA degradation on the relative quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in food products. Particle size distributions of the obtained fractions (coarse grits, regular grits, meal, and flour) were characterized using a laser diffraction system. The application of two DNA isolation protocols revealed a strong correlation between the degree of comminution of the milling fractions and the DNA yield in the extracts. Mixtures of milling fractions from conventional and transgenic material (1%) were prepared and analyzed via real-time polymerase chain reaction. Accurate quantification of the adjusted GMO content was only possible in mixtures containing conventional and transgenic material in the form of analogous milling fractions, whereas mixtures of fractions exhibiting different particle size distributions delivered significantly over- and underestimated GMO contents depending on their compositions. The process of heat-induced nucleic acid degradation was followed by applying two established quantitative assays showing differences between the lengths of the recombinant and reference target sequences (A, deltal(A) = -25 bp; B, deltal(B) = +16 bp; values related to the amplicon length of the reference gene). Data obtained by the application of method A resulted in underestimated recoveries of GMO contents in the samples of heat-treated products, reflecting the favored degradation of the longer target sequence used for the detection of the transgene. In contrast, data yielded by the application of method B resulted in increasingly overestimated recoveries of GMO contents. The results show how commonly used food technological processes may lead to distortions in the results of quantitative GMO analyses.

  9. The effect of process variables on the degradation and physical properties of spray dried insulin intended for inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Kristina; Claesson, Malin; Lilliehorn, Pontus; Lindén, Helena; Bäckström, Kjell

    2002-02-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of process variables on the degradation and physical properties of spray dried insulin intended for inhalation. A 2(4) full factorial experimentally designed study was performed to investigate the influence of the following independent spray drying variables: feed flow rate, nozzle gas flow rate, inlet air temperature and aspirator capacity (drying gas flow rate). Human insulin (biosynthetic and Ph.Eur. quality) was dissolved in distilled water to concentrations of 5 mg/ml. The solutions were spray dried in a Mini Spray Dryer Büchi and the dry powders produced were characterized by high performance liquid chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, laser diffraction, thermo gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and weighing. The degradation of insulin was found to be affected mainly by the process variables that determine the outlet air temperature, i.e.: inlet air temperature, aspirator capacity and feed flow rate. The outlet air temperature should be kept below 120 degrees C to avoid degradation. A statistical optimization of the spray drying variables was performed, and found to recommend an experiment with an outlet air temperature of 61+/-4 degrees C. This experiment ought to generate a yield of 54+/-7% by weight of particles with a mass median diameter 2.9+/-0.4 microm, moisture content 3.9+/-0.5% by weight, content of high molecular weight proteins 0.3+/-0.1% by area, A-21 desamido insulin 0.3+/-0.05% by area and other insulin related compounds 0.3+/-0.1% by area.

  10. Passive sampling of DDT, DDE and DDD in sediments: accounting for degradation processes with reaction-diffusion modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcaciuc, A Patricia; Borrelli, Raffaella; Zaninetta, Luciano M; Gschwend, Philip M

    2018-01-24

    Passive sampling is becoming a widely used tool for assessing freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants in environmental media. For certain media and target analytes, the time to reach equilibrium exceeds the deployment time, and in such cases, the loss of performance reference compounds (PRCs), loaded in the sampler before deployment, is one of the common ways used to assess the fractional equilibration of target analytes. The key assumption behind the use of PRCs is that their release is solely diffusion driven. But in this work, we show that PRC transformations in the sediment can have a measurable impact on the PRC releases and even allow estimation of that compound's transformation rate in the environment of interest. We found that in both field and lab incubations, the loss of the 13 C 2,4'-DDT PRC from a polyethylene (PE) passive sampler deployed at the sediment-water interface was accelerated compared to the loss of other PRCs ( 13 C-labeled PCBs, 13 C-labeled DDE and DDD). The DDT PRC loss was also accompanied by accumulation in the PE of its degradation product, 13 C 2,4'-DDD. Using a 1D reaction-diffusion model, we deduced the in situ degradation rates of DDT from the measured PRC loss. The in situ degradation rates increased with depth into the sediment bed (0.14 d -1 at 0-10 cm and 1.4 d -1 at 30-40 cm) and although they could not be independently validated, these rates compared favorably with literature values. This work shows that passive sampling users should be cautious when choosing PRCs, as degradation processes can affect some PRC's releases from the passive sampler. More importantly, this work opens up the opportunity for novel applications of passive samplers, particularly with regard to investigating in situ degradation rates, pathways, and products for both legacy and emerging contaminants. However, further work is needed to confirm that the rates deduced from model fitting of PRC loss are a true reflection of DDT

  11. Fabrication of 4H-SiC PiN diodes without bipolar degradation by improved device processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yuan; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Naoki; Shima, Akio

    2017-12-01

    We developed a simple technology for fabricating bipolar degradation-free 6.5 kV SiC PiN diodes on the basal plane dislocation (BPD)-free areas of commercially available 4H-SiC wafers. In order to suppress process-induced basal plane dislocation, we first investigated the causes of BPD generation during fabrication and then improved the processes. We found that no BPD was induced on a flat Si-face, but a large number of BPDs were concentrated in the mesa edge after high-dose Al ions were implanted [p++ ion implantation (I. I.)] at room temperature (RT) followed by activation annealing. Therefore, we examined new technologies in device processes including (I) long-term high-temperature oxidation after the mesa process to remove etching damage in the mesa edge and (II) reducing the Al dose (p+ I. I.) in the mesa edge to suppress BPD generation. We investigated the effect of the Al dose in the mesa edge on BPD generation and bipolar degradation. The results indicated that no BPD appeared when the dose was lower than 1 × 1015 atoms/cm2 and when long-term high-temperature oxidation was applied after the mesa process. As a result, we successfully fabricated 6.5 kV PiN diodes without bipolar degradation on BPD-free areas. Moreover, the diodes are very stable when applying 270 A/cm2 for over 100 h. Photoluminescence (PL) observation indicated that no BPD was generated during the improved fabrication processes. Besides, the Ir-Vr measurements showed that the breakdown voltage was over 8 kV at RT. The leakage currents are as low as 7.6 × 10-5 mA/cm2 (25 °C) and 6.3 × 10-4 mA/cm2 (150 °C) at 6.5 kV. Moreover, this result is applicable not only for PiN diodes but also for MOSFETs (body diode), IGBTs, thyristors, etc.

  12. Degradation of dyes from aqueous solution by Fenton processes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidheesh, Puthiya Veetil; Gandhimathi, Rajan; Ramesh, Srikrishnaperumal Thanga

    2013-04-01

    Several industries are using dyes as coloring agents. The effluents from these industries are increasingly becoming an environmental problem. The removal of dyes from aqueous solution has a great potential in the field of environmental engineering. This paper reviews the classification, characteristics, and problems of dyes in detail. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods used for dye removal are also analyzed. Among these methods, Fenton process-based advanced oxidation processes are an emerging prospect in the field of dye removal. Fenton processes have been classified and represented as "Fenton circle". This paper analyzes the recent studies on Fenton processes. The studies include analyzing different configurations of reactors used for dye removal, its efficiency, and the effects of various operating parameters such as pH, catalyst concentration, H2O2 concentration, initial dye concentration, and temperature of Fenton processes. From the present study, it can be conclude that Fenton processes are very effective and environmentally friendly methods for dye removal.

  13. UNDERSTANDING THAI CULTURE AND ITS IMPACT ON REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING PROCESS MANAGEMENT DURING INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerasak Thanasankit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of Thai culture on managing the decision making process in requirements engineering and contribution a better understand of its influence on the management of requirements engineering process. The paper illustrates the interaction of technology and culture and shows that rather than technology changing culture, culture can change the way technology is used. Thai culture is naturally inherent in Thai daily life and Thais bring that into their work practices. The concepts of power and uncertainty in Thai culture contribute toward hierarchical forms of communication and decision making process in Thailand, especially during requirements engineering, where information systems requirements need to be established for further development. The research shows that the decision making process in Thailand tends to take a much longer time, as every stage during requirements engineering needs to be reported to management for final decisions. The tall structure of Thai organisations also contributes to a bureaucratic, elongated decision-making process during information systems development. Understanding the influence of Thai culture on requirements engineering and information systems development will assist multinational information systems consulting organisations to select, adapt, better manage, or change requirements engineering process and information systems developments methodologies to work best with Thai organisations.

  14. Unraveling micro- and nanoscale degradation processes during operation of high-temperature polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengge, K.; Heinzl, C.; Perchthaler, M.; Varley, D.; Lochner, T.; Scheu, C.

    2017-10-01

    The work in hand presents an electron microscopy based in-depth study of micro- and nanoscale degradation processes that take place during the operation of high-temperature polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). Carbon supported Pt particles were used as cathodic catalyst material and the bimetallic, carbon supported Pt/Ru system was applied as anode. As membrane, cross-linked polybenzimidazole was used. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of cross-sections of as-prepared and long-term operated membrane-electrode-assemblies revealed insight into micrometer scale degradation processes: operation-caused catalyst redistribution and thinning of the membrane and electrodes. Transmission electron microscopy investigations were performed to unravel the nanometer scale phenomena: a band of Pt and Pt/Ru nanoparticles was detected in the membrane adjacent to the cathode catalyst layer. Quantification of the elemental composition of several individual nanoparticles and the overall band area revealed that they stem from both anode and cathode catalyst layers. The results presented do not demonstrate any catastrophic failure but rather intermediate states during fuel cell operation and indications to proceed with targeted HT-PEMFC optimization.

  15. Optimized photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Blue 2 by TiO2/UV process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Sepideh; Nikazar, Manouchehr; Yazdi, Ali Vaziri; Fazaeli, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of synthetic dye solution of Reactive Blue 2 was investigated using UV irradiation in aqueous suspension of nanotitania as photocatalyst and H2O2 as electron acceptor in a slurry photoreactor. To determine the optimum condition of decolorization, the influential parameters including initial dye concentration, catalyst quantity, hydrogen peroxide concentration, pH value and UV light intensity were evaluated using the Taguchi statistical method. The results indicated that compared to the other parameters, UV light intensity was the most effective. The theoretically predicted value of decolorization efficiency (95.48%) was confirmed by the experimental value (95.22%). The mineralization was considered significant with regard to the obtained values of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis (92.52%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis (94.05%) in the optimum condition. Investigations were also carried out to determine the appropriate adsorption isotherm and kinetic model in the optimum condition. The obtained optimum condition for dye removal was finally examined applying a real sample of textile wastewater containing the dye.

  16. Prevenient dye-degradation mechanisms using UV/TiO{sub 2}/carbon nanotubes process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, C.-Y. [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, 123, Section 3, University Road, Douliu, Yunlin, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuocyr@ms35.hinet.net

    2009-04-15

    Photocatalysis research heavily emphasizes increasing photo-efficiency. This study presents the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to increase the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}. It elucidates the effect of CNTs dose on the decolorization efficiency of aqueous azo dye, C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2), determines the effects of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} formation and removal of total organic carbon (TOC), and measures the effects of various ultraviolet wavelengths. Scanning electron microscopy was used to elucidate the mixing phenomenon and the size of TiO{sub 2} and CNTs; X-ray diffraction was used to determine crystallinity; a BET meter was used to measure surface area and a spectrophotometry was used to determine the decolorization of RR2. Experimental results indicated significant effects of photodegradation on the combination of TiO{sub 2} with CNTs and electron transfer is higher for 410 nm irradiation than for 365 nm, revealing that solar light can be used. The electron transfer in the TiO{sub 2}/CNTs composites reduced the electron/hole recombination and increased the photon efficiency and the prevenient dye-degradation mechanisms using UV/TiO{sub 2}/CNTs were established.

  17. Towards the understanding of biogeochemical processes involved in the release of carbonyl sulfide (COS) from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Thomas; Catao, Elisa; Bunk, Rüdiger; Yi, Zhigang; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Trumbore, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is present in the atmosphere in low mixing ratio ( 500ppt). It is relevant in climate change through the effect in aerosol formation. Soils can act as source of COS, e.g. by microbial degradation of thiocyanate from plant material. On the other side it is known that COS can be consumed via various enzymatic pathways. Assuming that biogenic processes dominate over chemical reactions we extracted nucleic acids and performed amplicon sequencing for bacteria (16S rRNA) and fungi (ITS region) from a mid-latitude agricultural maize soil which was previously incubated under ambient COS and COS fumigation ( 1000ppt). The mixing ratios of COS have been measured online from soil samples in a dynamic chamber system under laboratory conditions by an integrated cavity output spectroscopy (IOCS) analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc., USA). Additionally stable carbon isotope values (δ13C values) of COS were measured using a pre-concentration method and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Under low COS mixing ratio ( 50ppt) δ13C +4.7 ‰ for spruce forest ( 23°C), and -24.4‰ for mid-latitude cornfield ( 22°C), respectively. Linking gas release rates of (COS, CO2, CO, NO) to isotopic signatures of COS and molecular results might allow us to indicate bacterial s-compound degradation related to the higher activity of β-Proteobacteria and of the family Acetobacteraceae from the α-Proteobacteria phylum, potentially involved with the hydrolysis of thiocyanate in the soil releasing COS. Furthermore, our study reports the first COS data for rainforest and desert soils which are in the order of 0.5 pmol gdw-1 h-1 and 2 pmol gdw-1 h-1, respectively.

  18. Study on Handing Process and Quality Degradation of Oil Palm Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Sharif, Zainon Binti; Taib, Norhasnina Binti Mohd; Yusof, Mohd Sallehuddin Bin; Rahim, Mohammad Zulafif Bin; Tobi, Abdul Latif Bin Mohd; Othman, Mohd Syafiq Bin

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the relationship between quality of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFB) and handling processes. The study employs exploratory and descriptive design, with quantitative approach and purposive sampling using self-administrated questionnaires, were obtained from 30 smallholder respondents from the Southern Region, Peninsular Malaysia. The study reveals that there was a convincing relationship between quality of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFB) and handling processes. The main handling process factors influencing quality of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFB) were harvesting activity and handling at the plantation area. As a result, it can be deduced that the handling process factors variable explains 82.80% of the variance that reflects the quality of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFB). The overall findings reveal that the handling process factors do play a significant role in the quality of oil palm fresh fruit bunches (FFB).

  19. Societal rationality; towards an understanding of decision making processes in society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, Bjoern

    2001-01-01

    In a search for new ways to structure decision making on complex and controversial issues it is necessary to build an understanding of why traditional decision making processes break down. One reason is connected to the issues themselves. They represent steps into the unknown and decisions should therefore be made with prudence. A second reason is connected to a track record according to which new technologies are seen as generating more problems than solutions. A third and more fundamental reason is connected to the decision making processes themselves and a need to find better ways to approach difficult questions in the society. One way to approach societal decision making processes is to investigate their hidden rationality in an attempt to understand causes of observed difficulties. The paper is based mainly on observations from the nuclear industry, but it builds also on controversies experienced in attempts to agree on global efforts towards sustainable approaches to development. It builds on an earlier paper, which discussed the basis of rationality both on an individual and a societal level. Research in societal decision making has to rely on a true multi-disciplinary approach. It is nor enough to understand the technical and scientific models by which outcomes are predicted, but it is also necessary to understand how people make sense of their environment and how they co-operate. Rationality is in this connection one of the key concepts, with an understanding that people always are rational in their own frame of action. The challenge in this connection is to understand how this subjective rationality is formed. Societal rationality has to do with the allocation of resources. There are decisions in which several conflicting views have to be considered. Spending time and resources ex ante may support a consensus ex post, but unfortunately there is no panacea for approaching difficult decisions. Decisions with an uncertain future have to be more robust than

  20. Societal rationality; towards an understanding of decision making processes in society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, Bjoern [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    In a search for new ways to structure decision making on complex and controversial issues it is necessary to build an understanding of why traditional decision making processes break down. One reason is connected to the issues themselves. They represent steps into the unknown and decisions should therefore be made with prudence. A second reason is connected to a track record according to which new technologies are seen as generating more problems than solutions. A third and more fundamental reason is connected to the decision making processes themselves and a need to find better ways to approach difficult questions in the society. One way to approach societal decision making processes is to investigate their hidden rationality in an attempt to understand causes of observed difficulties. The paper is based mainly on observations from the nuclear industry, but it builds also on controversies experienced in attempts to agree on global efforts towards sustainable approaches to development. It builds on an earlier paper, which discussed the basis of rationality both on an individual and a societal level. Research in societal decision making has to rely on a true multi-disciplinary approach. It is nor enough to understand the technical and scientific models by which outcomes are predicted, but it is also necessary to understand how people make sense of their environment and how they co-operate. Rationality is in this connection one of the key concepts, with an understanding that people always are rational in their own frame of action. The challenge in this connection is to understand how this subjective rationality is formed. Societal rationality has to do with the allocation of resources. There are decisions in which several conflicting views have to be considered. Spending time and resources ex ante may support a consensus ex post, but unfortunately there is no panacea for approaching difficult decisions. Decisions with an uncertain future have to be more robust than

  1. Using a Design Science Perspective to Understand a Complex Design-Based Research Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate how a design science perspective can be used to describe and understand a set of related design-based research processes. We describe and analyze a case study in a manner that is inspired by design science. The case study involves the design of modeling......-based research processes. And we argue that a design science perspective may be useful for both researchers and practitioners....... tools and the redesign of an information service in a library. We use a set of guidelines from a design science perspective to organize the description and analysis of the case study. By doing this we demonstrate the usefulness of design science as an analytical tool for understanding related design...

  2. Improving efficacy of landscape interventions in the (sub) humid Ethiopian highlands by improved understanding of runoff processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebebu, Tigist; Steenhuis, Tammo; Dagnew, Dessalegn; Guzman, Christian; Bayabil, Haimanote; Zegeye, Assefa; Collick, Amy; Langan, Simon; MacAlister, Charlotte; Langendoen, Eddy; Yitaferu, Birru; Tilahun, Seifu

    2015-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars invested in soil and water conservation practices in the (sub) humid Ethiopian highlands and billions of hours of food-for-work farm labor, sediment concentration in rivers is increasing. This paper reports on the research to reverse the current trend. Based on the understanding of the hydrology of highlands, we provide evidence on sources of surface runoff and sediment and on mechanisms that govern the erosion processes and approaches and how they affect soil and water conservation practices. We suggest that priority in landscape interventions should be given to re-vegetation of the degraded areas so as to reduce the sediment concentration contributions originating from these areas. Additionally, efforts should be directed to gully rehabilitation in the saturated bottom landscape that may consist of vegetating shallow gullies and stabilizing head cuts of deeper gullies Finally, rehabilitation efforts should be directed to increase the rain water infiltration in the upland areas through the hard pan layer by connecting the land surface to the original deep flow paths that exist below about 60 cm. It will reduce the direct runoff during the rainy season and increase baseflow during the dry season.

  3. PEM fuel cell degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  4. Photosynthetic and Ultrastructure Parameters of Maize Plants are Affected During the Phyto-Rhizoremediation Process of Degraded Metal Working Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Gutierrez Mañero, Francisco Javier; Fernandez-Pascual, Mercedes; Lucas, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A phyto-rhizoremediation system using corn and esparto fiber as rooting support to remediate degraded metal working fluids (dMWFs) has been developed in the present study. In order to improve the process, plants were inoculated at the root level with bacteria either individually, and with a consortium of strains. All strains used were able to grow with MWFs. The results show that this system significantly lowers the Chemical Oxygen Demand below legal limits within 5 days. However, results were only improved with the bacterial consortium. Despite the effectiveness of the phyto-rhizoremediation process, plants are damaged at the photosynthetic level according to the photosynthetic parameters measured, as well as at the ultrastructure of the vascular cylinder and the Bundle Sheath Cells. Interestingly, the bacterial inoculation protects against this damage. Therefore, it seems that that the inoculation with bacteria can protect the plants against these harmful effects.

  5. Degradation of Antibiotics in Wastewater during Sonolysis, Ozonation, and Their Simultaneous Application: Operating Conditions Effects and Processes Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Naddeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical drugs frequently found in treated effluents, lakes and rivers, can exhibit adverse effects on aquatic organisms. The present study focuses on the application of advanced oxidation processes as ozonation (O3, sonolysis (US, and their combined application (US+O3 for the degradation of diclofenac in wastewater. Under the applied conditions, all three systems proved to be able to induce diclofenac oxidation, leading to 22% of mineralization for O3 and 36% for US process after 40 min of treatment. The synergy observed in the combined schemes, mainly due to the effects of US in enhancing the O3 decomposition, led to a higher mineralization (about 40% for 40-minute treatment and to a significantly higher mineralization level for shorter treatment duration.

  6. Effect of household and industrial processing on the levels of pesticide residues and degradation products in melons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnechère, A; Hanot, V; Bragard, C; Bedoret, T; van Loco, J

    2012-01-01

    Two varieties of melons (Cucumis melo) were treated with two fungicides (carbendazim and maneb) and four insecticides (acetamiprid, cyromazin, imazalil and thiamethoxam) to quantify the effect of household processing on the pesticide residues. To ensure sufficiently high levels of residues in flesh and peel, the most concentrated formulations were applied observing good agricultural practice. The peeling step decreased the concentration of pesticide residues for maneb, imazalil and acetamiprid by more than 90%. Cyromazin, carbendazim and thiamethoxam were reduced by approximately 50%. The reduction of the pesticides could not be fully explained by the systemic character of the pesticides. However, the agricultural practices (time of application), solubility and mode of action (systemic versus contact pesticide) of the pesticides could be used to explain the difference in processing factors for the studied pesticides. Degradation products (melamine and ethylenethiourea) were also investigated in this study, but were not detected.

  7. Embedded formative assessment and classroom process quality. How do they interact in promoting students' science understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, Anna Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment-a well-known teaching practice-and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of floating and sinking. We used data from a cluster-randomized controlled trial and compared curriculum-embedded formative assessment (17 classes) with a cont...

  8. Beyond Homophily: A Decade of Advances in Understanding Peer Influence Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Brechwald, Whitney A.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews empirical and theoretical contributions to a multidisciplinary understanding of peer influence processes in adolescence over the past decade. Five themes of peer influence research from this decade were identified, including a broadening of the range of behaviors for which peer influence occurs, distinguishing the sources of influence, probing the conditions under which influence is amplified/attenuated (moderators), testing theoretically based models of peer influence pr...

  9. Neural Information Processing in Cognition: We Start to Understand the Orchestra, but Where is the Conductor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Research in neural information processing has been successful in the past, providing useful approaches both to practical problems in computer science and to computational models in neuroscience. Recent developments in the area of cognitive neuroscience present new challenges for a computational or theoretical understanding asking for neural information processing models that fulfill criteria or constraints from cognitive psychology, neuroscience and computational efficiency. The most important of these criteria for the evaluation of present and future contributions to this new emerging field are listed at the end of this article. PMID:26858632

  10. Powder stickiness in milk drying: uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for process understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Adrián; Gutiérrez, Soledad; Sin, Gürkan

    2017-01-01

    A powder stickiness model based in the glass transition temperature (Gordon – Taylor equations) was built for a production scale milk drying process (including a spray chamber, and internal/external fluid beds). To help process understanding, the model was subjected to sensitivity analysis (SA......) of inputs/parameters, and uncertainty analysis (UA) to estimate confidence intervals on model predictions. For SA, a differential local and also a global approach were used. A variance decomposition method (e.g. Sobol first order sensitivity index) was implemented for global SA, and Monte Carlo technique...

  11. Referral to a periodontist by a general dentist: An understanding of the referral process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Bhati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is one of the most common health care problems. The type of treatment of periodontal disease depends on the diagnosis. The treatment plan should also focus on managing the risk factors and modifying factors which affect the periodontal disease and treatment. The evidence-based advancements have given a success predictability level to the periodontal diagnosis and treatment plan. The level of specialty education is limited in the curriculum for undergraduates. Patients should receive the same quality of treatment whether administered by a specialist or general practitioner. Therefore, general dentists need to be well informed about how to make timely and appropriate referrals to periodontists when necessary. An online literature search was done through PubMed, PMC, and open access journals to understand the referral process. Articles pertaining to referral process were selected. Based on the search, it was found that knowledge of elements of the referral process, conditions (general and periodontal requiring referral, and selection of periodontist are important aspects of the referral process. This short communication will help the general dentist to understand the referral process that will enable them to provide the timely periodontal referral and treatment to the patients.

  12. Effects of advanced process approaches on electromigration degradation of Cu on-chip interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.A.

    2007-07-12

    This thesis provides a methodology for the investigation of electromigration (EM) in Cu-based interconnects. An experimental framework based on in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations was developed for that purpose. It is capable to visualize the EM-induced void formation and evolution in multi-level test structures in real time. Different types of interconnects were investigated. Furthermore, stressed and unstressed samples were studied applying advanced physical analysis techniques in order to obtain additional information about the microstructure of the interconnects as well as interfaces and grain boundaries. These data were correlated to the observed degradation phenomena. Correlations of the experimental results to recently established theoretical models were highlighted. Three types of Cu-based interconnects were studied. Pure Cu interconnects were compared to Al-alloyed (CuAl) and CoWP-coated interconnects. The latter two represent potential approaches that address EM-related reliability concerns. It was found that in such interconnects the dominant diffusion path is no longer the Cu/capping layer interface for interconnects as in pure Cu interconnects. Instead, void nucleation occurs at the bottom Cu/barrier interface with significant effects from grain boundaries. Moreover, the in-situ investigations revealed that the initial void nucleation does not occur at the cathode end of the lines but several micrometers away from it. The mean times-to-failure of CuAl and CoWP-coated interconnects were increased by at least one order of magnitude compared to Cu interconnects. The improvements were attributed to the presence of foreign metal atoms at the Cu/capping layer interface. Post-mortem EBSD investigations were used to reveal the microstructure of the tested samples. The data were correlated to the in-situ observations. (orig.)

  13. Studying the degradation of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate during processing with clay-based nanofillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabedo, Luis; Plackett, David; Gimenez, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    extrusion processing and was further reduced in the presence of montmorillonite (MMT). However, when PHBV was processed with kaolinite as the additive, no further reduction in polymer molecular weight was observed. Molecular weight also decreased as the MMT clay content increased from 1 to 5 wt......-ray diffraction studies indicated an intercalated morphology in the presence of modified montmorillonite but good dispersion was also achieved when unmodified kaolinite was blended with PHBV. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2009...

  14. Lateral critical current density distributions degraded near edges of coated conductors through cutting processes and their influence on ac loss characteristics of power transmission cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, N.; Li, Q.; Nishino, R.; Takeuchi, K.; Nakamura, T.; Ohmatsu, K.; Ohya, M.; Maruyama, O.; Okuma, T.; Izumi, T.

    2011-01-01

    A wide coated conductor is often cut into narrow ones in fabrication process. We measured the lateral J c distributions of coated conductors cut by a mechanical slitter or a laser. The J c is degraded at 0.15-0.25 mm from the edges of coated conductors through cutting process. The ac losses of superconducting cables are affected by the degraded J c near the edges of coated conductors. It is more marked in cables with fewer layers or carrying larger I t /I c . The critical current density (J c ) near the edges of coated conductor could impact the ac loss characteristics of the cables comprising coated conductors. A wide coated conductor is often cut into narrower coated conductors in fabrication processes, and the J c might degrade near the edges of coated conductors through the cutting process. This possible degradation of J c could depend on cutting technology. Lateral J c distributions of coated conductors cut by using a mechanical slitter as well as a laser were measured by the magnetic knife method. The measured coated conductors are fabricated by PLD process on clad type textured-metal substrates with reduced magnetism. Based on the degradation of J c near the edges of coated conductors which was determined experimentally, ac losses of multi-layer cables as well as mono-layer cables were calculated numerically to evaluate the impact of the J c degradation near the edges of coated conductors on the their ac loss characteristics.

  15. Effect of reprocessing cycles on the degradation of polypropylene copolymer filled with talc or montmorillonite during injection molding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demori, R.; Mauler, R. S., E-mail: raquel.mauler@ufrgs.br [Chemistry Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 (Brazil); Ashton, E.; Weschenfelder, V. F.; Cândido, L. H. A.; Kindlein, W. [Laboratory of Design LDSM, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil)

    2015-05-22

    Mechanical recycling of polymeric materials is a favorable technique resulting in economic and environmental benefits, especially in the case of polymers with a high production volume as the polypropylene copolymer (PP). However, recycling by reprocessing techniques can lead to thermal, mechanical or thermo-oxidative degradation that can affect the structure of the polymer and subsequently the material properties. PP filled with montmorillonite (MMT) or talc are widely produced and studied, however, its degradation reactions by reprocessing cycles are poorly studied so far. In this study, the effects of reprocessing cycles in the structure and in the properties of the PP/MMT and PP/Talc were evaluated. The samples were mixed with 5% talc or MMT Cloisite C15A in a twin-screw extrusion. After extrusion, this filled material was submitted to five reprocessing cycles through an injection molding process. In order to evaluate the changes induced by reprocessing techniques, the samples were characterized by DSC, FT-IR, Izod impact and tensile strength tests. The study showed that Young modulus, elongation at brake and Izod impact were not affected by reprocessing cycles, except when using talc. In this case, the elongation at brake reduced until the fourth cycle, showing rigidity increase. The DSC results showed that melting and crystallization temperature were not affected. A comparison of FT-IR spectra of the reprocessed indicated that in both samples, between the first and the fifth cycle, no noticeable change has occurred. Thus, there is no evidence of thermo oxidative degradation. In general, these results suggest that PP reprocessing cycles using MMT or talc does not change the material properties until the fifth cycle.

  16. Understanding Nutrient Processing Under Similar Hydrologic Conditions Along a River Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayburu-Caruso, V. A.; Mortensen, J.; Van Horn, D. J.; Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is one of the main causes of water impairment across the US. The fate of nutrients in streams is typically described by the dynamic coupling of physical processes and biochemical processes. However, isolating each of these processes and determining its contribution to the whole system is challenging due to the complexity of the physical, chemical and biological domains. We conducted column experiments seeking to understand nutrient processing in shallow sediment-water interactions along representative sites of the Jemez River-Rio Grande continuum (eight stream orders), in New Mexico (USA). For each stream order, we used a set of 6 columns packed with 3 different sediments, i.e., Silica Cone Density Sand ASTM D 1556 (0.075-2.00 mm), gravel (> 2mm) and native sediments from each site. We incubated the sediments for three months and performed tracer experiments in the laboratory under identical flow conditions, seeking to normalize the physical processes along the river continuum. We added a short-term pulse injection of NO3, resazurin and NaCl to each column and determined metabolism and NO3 processing using the Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization method (TASCC). Our methods allowed us to study how changes in bacterial communities and sediment composition along the river continuum define nutrient processing.

  17. Processes of enhanced self-understanding during a counselling programme for parents of children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Karen Therese Sulheim; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Bukholm, Ida Rashida Khan; Haugli, Liv; Hallberg, Ulrika

    2013-03-01

    The stress and burden on parents of children with disabilities are well documented, and the parents' way of handling the situation is crucial to the health and well-being of all family members, including the child with special needs. We conducted a group-based counselling programme for parents, based mainly on Gestalt education and personal construct theories, aiming at increasing the parents' ability to handle the situation. To explore the parents' experiences from processes of change after the counselling programme. METHOD DESIGN: This qualitative study is based on modified grounded theory. The study conducted in Norway examines the experiences of 67 parents (of whom 29 fathers) of children with disabilities. Information was collected through focus group discussions after finishing their sessions of the counselling programme. From the parents' experiences, the following categories were developed: feeling motivated to communicate, describing oneself in new words, being inspired to experience one's own emotions, being more present and in charge and making a difference by taking new steps. The core category in our analysis turned out to be Improved handling of the situation by enhanced self-understanding. The parents seemed to redevelop their self-understanding through new experiences of themselves. They emphasized the importance of a secure setting of peers with similar experiences and skilled counsellors to feel free to explore one's own emotions with connecting thoughts and bodily reactions. Discussion of existential issues as one's own values also contributed to enhanced self-understanding, which strengthened the parents to find new possibilities and priorities in handling the situation. The parents described subjective processes of awareness and self-reflection as important for being able to start a process towards enhanced self-understanding, which helped to detect one's own values and new ways of acting. These experiences may be relevant for the parents and

  18. Chiral Phosphinate Degradation by the Fusarium Species: Scope and Limitation of the Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Kmiecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable capacities of fungal strains of Fusarium oxysporum (DSMZ 2018 and Fusarium culmorum (DSMZ 1094 were tested towards racemic mixture of chiral 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl acetic acid—a compound with two stereogenic centres. The effectiveness of decomposition was dependent on external factors such as temperature and time of the process. Optimal conditions of complete mineralization were established. Both Fusarium species were able to biodegrade every isomer of tested compound at 30°C, but F. culmorum required 10 days and F. oxysporum 11 days to accomplish the process, which was continuously monitored using the 31P NMR technique.

  19. Towards an integrated understanding of how micro scale processes shape groundwater ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susanne I; Cuthbert, Mark O; Schwientek, Marc

    2017-08-15

    Micro scale processes are expected to have a fundamental role in shaping groundwater ecosystems and yet they remain poorly understood and under-researched. In part, this is due to the fact that sampling is rarely carried out at the scale at which microorganisms, and their grazers and predators, function and thus we lack essential information. While set within a larger scale framework in terms of geochemical features, supply with energy and nutrients, and exchange intensity and dynamics, the micro scale adds variability, by providing heterogeneous zones at the micro scale which enable a wider range of redox reactions. Here we outline how understanding micro scale processes better may lead to improved appreciation of the range of ecosystems functions taking place at all scales. Such processes are relied upon in bioremediation and we demonstrate that ecosystem modelling as well as engineering measures have to take into account, and use, understanding at the micro scale. We discuss the importance of integrating faunal processes and computational appraisals in research, in order to continue to secure sustainable water resources from groundwater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Toward understanding the thermodynamics of TALSPEAK process. Medium effects on actinide complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter R Zalupski; Leigh R Martin; Ken Nash; Yoshinobu Nakamura; Masahiko Yamamoto

    2009-07-01

    The ingenious combination of lactate and diethylenetriamine-N,N,N’,N”,N”-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) as an aqueous actinide-complexing medium forms the basis of the successful separation of americium and curium from lanthanides known as the TALSPEAK process. While numerous reports in the prior literature have focused on the optimization of this solvent extraction system, considerably less attention has been devoted to the understanding of the basic thermodynamic features of the complex fluids responsible for the separation. The available thermochemical information of both lactate and DTPA protonation and metal complexation reactions are representative of the behavior of these ions under idealized conditions. Our previous studies of medium effects on lactate protonation suggest that significant departures from the speciation predicted based on reported thermodynamic values should be expected in the TALSPEAK aqueous environment. Thermodynamic parameters describing the separation chemistry of this process thus require further examination at conditions significantly removed from conventional ideal systems commonly employed in fundamental solution chemistry. Such thermodynamic characterization is the key to predictive modelling of TALSPEAK. Improved understanding will, in principle, allow process technologists to more efficiently respond to off-normal conditions during large scale process operation. In this report, the results of calorimetric and potentiometric investigations of the effects of aqueous electrolytes on the thermodynamic parameters for lactate protonation and lactate complexation of americium and neodymium will be presented. Studies on the lactate protonation equilibrium will clearly illustrate distinct thermodynamic variations between strong electrolyte aqueous systems and buffered lactate environment.

  1. Photochemical degradation of emerging contaminants by solar processes: analytical assessment; Degradacion fotoquimica de contaminantes emergentes mediante procesos solares. Evaluacion analitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Estrada, L. A.; Aguera Lopez, A.; Malato Rodriguez, S.

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, the presence of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment has reached a growing interest. These new contaminants are important because many of them are not degraded under the typical biological treatments applied in the wastewater treatment plants and represent a continuous input into the environment. Thus compounds such as diclofenac, dipyrone and malachite green are present in surface waters in all Europe and crucial need for more enhanced technologies that can reduce its presence in the environment has become evident. In this sense, solar advanced oxidation processes represent a good choice for the treatment of hazardous non-biodegradable pollutants. This work deals with the solar photodegradation of these contaminants in aqueous solutions by TiO{sub 2} photo catalysis and photo-Fenton reaction. A pilot-scale facility using a compound parabolic collector (CPC) reactor was used for this study. Results obtained show rapid and complete oxidation of parent compounds and partial mineralization of dissolved organic carbon. The two treatment are compared on the basis of their kinetics (parent compound and TOC), formation of degradation products (as determined by ionic chromatography, GC/MS and LC/TOF-MS), and toxicity (as evaluated by Vibrio fischeri bacteria). (Author)

  2. Effectiveness of photochemical and sonochemical processes in degradation of Basic Violet 16 (BV16 dye from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Zahra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, degradation of Basic Violet 16 (BV16 by ultraviolet radiation (UV, ultrasonic irradiation (US, UV/H2O2 and US/H2O2 processes was investigated in a laboratory-scale batch photoreactor equipped with a 55W immersed-type low-pressure mercury vapor lamp and a sonoreactor with high frequency (130kHz plate type transducer at 100W of acoustic power. The effects of initial dye concentration, concentration of H2O2 and solution pH and presence of Na2SO4 was studied on the sonochemical and photochemical destruction of BV16 in aqueous phase. The results indicated that in the UV/H2O2 and US/H2O2 systems, a sufficient amount of H2O2 was necessary, but a very high H2O2 concentration would inhibit the reaction rate. The optimum H2O2 concentration was achieved in the range of 17 mmol/L at dye concentration of 30 mg/L. A degradation of 99% was obtained with UV/H2O2 within 8 minutes while decolorization efficiency by using UV (23%, US (2O2(

  3. Processes of formation and degradation of marshes along the Louisiana Gulf Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeLaune, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Processes governing the stability of Louisiana's rapidly deteriorating Gulf coast marsh were investigated. Vertical marsh accretion determined from 137 Cs dating were compared to water level increase obtained from tide gauge data. In subsiding coastal environments the

  4. Fundamental understanding of distracted oxygen delignification efficiency by dissolved lignin during biorefinery process of eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huifang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuejin

    2018-02-27

    In this work, a fundamental understanding of oxygen delignification distracted by dissolved lignin was investigated. In the new biorefinery model of shortening kraft pulping integrated with extended oxygen delignification process, increasing content of residual lignin in the original pulp could result in enhanced delignification efficiency, higher pulp viscosity and less carbonyl groups. However, the invalid oxygen consumption by dissolved lignin could be increased with the increase of process temperature and alkali dosage. The normalized ultraviolet absorbance (divided by absorbance at 280 nm) also showed that the content of chromophoric group in dissolved lignin decreased with oxygen delignification proceeded, both of which indicated that dissolved lignin could enhance the invalid oxygen consumption. Therefore, a conclusion that replacement of the liquor at the initial phase of oxygen delignification process would balance the enhancement of delignification efficiency and invalid oxygen consumption was achieved. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cathode degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, D.A.; Selman, J.R.; Ong, E.T.

    1989-12-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year study of cathode degradation in molten carbonate fuel cells involving both experimental and theoretical work. A keystone of the study is the development of a mathematical model, which describes cathode degradation in terms of the fundamental processes of a fluxing mechanism, i.e., dissolution, transport and precipitation. New fundamental data have been obtained on the solubility of NiO, especially on the effect of water vapor, and on the kinetics of NiO dissolution in (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and these data have been incorporated in the model. Laboratory cell testing in 3 cm{sup 2} cells has been carried out to obtain experimental data on degradation rates for direct comparison with the calculated results from the model. These comparisons have helped to verify several aspects of the model. For example, the model predicts with fair accuracy the location of the Ni deposit in the tile and the deposition rate. It is also fair to point out that the model is a relatively simple representation of complex processes, and it does not answer all questions about cathode degradation. Further work is needed. Because of its fundamental basis, the model can readily be upgraded and extended when further experimental data become available. The solubility studies, modeling efforts and cell testing have interacted iteratively to optimize progress. 94 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Cognitive analysis as a way to understand students' problem-solving process in BODMAS rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Ting Su; Kiong, Paul Lau Ngee; Manaf, Badron bin; Hamdan, Anniza Binti; Khium, Chen Chee

    2017-04-01

    Students tend to make lots of careless mistake during the process of mathematics solving. To facilitate effective learning, educators have to understand which cognitive processes are used by students and how these processes help them to solve problems. This paper is only aimed to determine the common errors in mathematics by pre-diploma students that took Intensive Mathematics I (MAT037) in UiTM Sarawak. Then, concentrate on the errors did by the students on the topic of BODMAS rule and the mental processes corresponding to these errors that been developed by students. One class of pre-diploma students taking MAT037 taught by the researchers was selected because they performed poorly in SPM mathematics. It is inevitable that they finished secondary education with many misconceptions in mathematics. The solution scripts for all the tutorials of the participants were collected. This study was predominately qualitative and the solution scripts were content analyzed to identify the common errors committed by the participants, and to generate possible mental processes to these errors. Selected students were interviewed by the researchers during the progress. BODMAS rule could be further divided into Numerical Simplification and Powers Simplification. Furthermore, the erroneous processes could be attributed to categories of Basic Arithmetic Rules, Negative Numbers and Powers.

  7. Understanding the implementation of complex interventions in health care: the normalization process model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers Anne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Normalization Process Model is a theoretical model that assists in explaining the processes by which complex interventions become routinely embedded in health care practice. It offers a framework for process evaluation and also for comparative studies of complex interventions. It focuses on the factors that promote or inhibit the routine embedding of complex interventions in health care practice. Methods A formal theory structure is used to define the model, and its internal causal relations and mechanisms. The model is broken down to show that it is consistent and adequate in generating accurate description, systematic explanation, and the production of rational knowledge claims about the workability and integration of complex interventions. Results The model explains the normalization of complex interventions by reference to four factors demonstrated to promote or inhibit the operationalization and embedding of complex interventions (interactional workability, relational integration, skill-set workability, and contextual integration. Conclusion The model is consistent and adequate. Repeated calls for theoretically sound process evaluations in randomized controlled trials of complex interventions, and policy-makers who call for a proper understanding of implementation processes, emphasize the value of conceptual tools like the Normalization Process Model.

  8. Functional traits can improve our understanding of niche- and dispersal-based processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Xun, Yanhan; Cai, Huiying; Jin, Guangze

    2018-03-01

    Ecologists often determine the relative importance of niche- and dispersal-based processes via variation partitioning based on species composition. Functional traits and their proxies of phylogeny are expected to increase the detection of niche-based processes and reduce the unexplained variation relative to species identity. We collected eight adult tree traits and phylogenetic data of 41 species and employed a phylogenetic fuzzy weighting method to address this issue in a 9-ha temperate forest dynamics plot. We used redundancy analysis to relate species, phylogenetic and functional compositions to environmental (soil resources and topography) and spatial variables. We also performed multi-scaled analyses on spatial variables by adding environment as the covariates to determine if functional traits increase the detection of niche-based processes at broad scales. The functional traits and intraspecific variation of the wood density among ontogenetic stages could dramatically increase the detection of niche-based processes and reduce the unexplained variation relative to species identity. Phylogenetic and functional compositions were mainly driven by total soil P and elevation, while species composition was weakly affected by multiple environmental variables. After controlling for the environment, a larger amount of the compositional variations in seed mass and maximum height were explained by finer-scaled spatial variables, indicating that dispersal processes may be important at fine spatial scales. Our results suggested that considering functional traits and their intraspecific variations could improve our understanding of ecological processes and increase our ability to predict the responses of plants to environmental change.

  9. Humic Acid Degradation via Solar Photo-Fenton Process in Aqueous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Sajjadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of mutagenic and carcinogenic disinfection by-products, particularly Trihalomethanes (THMs and Halo Acetic Acids (HAAs in water treatment process is critical, due to their adverse effects on human health. Generally, reducing the toxicity of these by-products hinges on prior removal of the precursor materials, such as Humic Acid (HA in drinking water. This study was conducted to investigate the role of some parameters that could affect the removal of HA, including HA (5 and 10 ppm and H2O2 (20, 40, 60, and 80 ppm initial concentrations, Iron (II, sulfate heptahydrate dosage (4, 8, 12, and 16 ppm, pH (2, 3, 4 and 5, Oxidation time (5, 10, 15 and 30 min, and Sunlight levels (322±13 kWm-2. To accelerate the process of HA removal, the Solar Photo-Fenton (SPF process was employed by direct irradiation of converged sunlight in a Parabolic Trough Collectors (PTC, with 3m2 effective area. HA levels were measured via quantifying Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC concentrations by means of a TOC Analyzer method. The results showed that the SPF process is under control of the Fe & H2O2 ratio, the Fe2+ dosage and especially the pH quantity. In optimal condition, (pH: 4, oxidation time: 30min, initial HA levels: 50 ppm, H2O2 concentrations: 20 ppm Fe+2 levels: 4 ppm, the study found more than 98% DOC removal. In conclusion, the SPF, as an economically effective technique, could be applied for the removal of HA in aqueous environments.

  10. Effect of household and industrial processing on levels of pesticide residues and degradation products in melons

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnechère, Aurore; Hanot, Vincent; Bragard, Claude; Bedoret, Thomas; Van Loco, Joris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Two varieties of melons (Cucumis melo) were treated by two fungicides (carbendazim and maneb) and four insecticides (acetamiprid, cyromazin, imazalil and thiamethoxam) to quantify the effect of household processing on the pesticide residues. To ensure sufficiently high levels of residues in flesh and peels, the most concentrated formulations were applied pursuant to Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs). The peeling step decreased the concentration of pesticide residues for ...

  11. Damaging process of graphite - new model and its impact on degradation of materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Muto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The most widely accepted model for development of defect structure in neutron irradiated graphite has been such that following the first production of a pair of an interstitial and vacancy, di-interstitials and vacancies are formed and their subsequent growth would result in the production of an interstitial plane or loop in-between the basal planes and vacancy clusters, respectively, which could cause the loss of thermal conductivity and dimensional change. Recently we have claimed that the formation of vacancy clusters and growth of the interstitial planes are not necessarily a unique interpretation of the damaging process. Instead, the damaging process is described by orientational disordering within the basal planes, i.e. fragmentation into small crystallites and rotation of their crystalline axes, change of stacking order and elongation of the interplanar spacing. The orientational disordering within the basal planes proceeds coordinately over a few layers with their layered correlation maintained. This process accompanies changes in bonding nature producing 5 member- and 7 member-atomic rings as appeared in fullerenes. This is so to speak ''self-restoring or reconstruction'' to maintain resonance bonds as strict as possible without the formation of dangling bonds. This paper reviews irradiation effects in graphite such as increase of hydrogen retention, loss of thermal conductivity and dimensional change on the bases of our new model, taking account of the changes of the bonding nature in irradiated graphite. (orig.)

  12. Untargeted Metabolomics Approach in Halophiles: Understanding the Biodeterioration Process of Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Adamiak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the halophile metabolome in building materials using untargeted metabolomics which allows for broad metabolome coverage. For this reason, we used high-performance liquid chromatography interfaced to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC/HRMS. As an alternative to standard microscopy techniques, we introduced pioneering Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy (CARS to non-invasively visualize microbial cells. Brick samples saturated with salt solution (KCl, NaCl (two salinity levels, MgSO4, Mg(NO32, were inoculated with the mixture of preselected halophilic microorganisms, i.e., bacteria: Halobacillus styriensis, Halobacillus naozhouensis, Halobacillus hunanensis, Staphylococcus succinus, Marinococcus halophilus, Virgibacillus halodenitryficans, and yeast: Sterigmatomyces halophilus and stored at 28°C and 80% relative humidity for a year. Metabolites were extracted directly from the brick samples and measured via HPLC/HRMS in both positive and negative ion modes. Overall, untargeted metabolomics allowed for discovering the interactions of halophilic microorganisms with buildings materials which together with CARS microscopy enabled us to elucidate the biodeterioration process caused by halophiles. We observed that halophile metabolome was differently affected by different salt solutions. Furthermore, we found indications for haloadaptive strategies and degradation of brick samples due to microbial pigment production as a salt stress response. Finally, we detected changes in lipid content related to changes in the structure of phospholipid bilayers and membrane fluidity.

  13. Optimisation of decolourisation and degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye under electro-Fenton process using Fe alginate gel beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, O; Fernández de Dios, M A; Rosales, E; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the ability of the electro-Fenton process using Fe alginate gel beads for the remediation of wastewater contaminated with synthetic dyes and using a model diazo dye such as Reactive Black 5 (RB5). Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of main parameters, such as voltage, pH and iron concentration. Dye decolourisation, reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and energy consumption were studied. Central composite face-centred experimental design matrix and response surface methodology were applied to design the experiments and to evaluate the interactive effects of the three studied parameters. A total of 20 experimental runs were set, and the kinetic data were analysed using first-order and second-order models. In all cases, the experimental data were fitted to the empirical second-order model with a suitable degree for the maximum decolourisation of RB5, COD reduction and energy consumption by electro-Fenton-Fe alginate gel beads treatment. Working with the obtained empirical model, the optimisation of the process was carried out. The second-order polynomial regression model suggests that the optimum conditions for attaining maximum decolourisation, COD reduction and energy consumption are voltage, 5.69 V; pH 2.24 and iron concentration, 2.68 mM. Moreover, the fixation of iron on alginate beads suggests that the degradation process can be developed under this electro-Fenton process in repeated batches and in a continuous mode.

  14. The problem of “culture” in the process of intercultural understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreana Marchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n1p251 The problem of “culture” in the process of intercultural understanding is one of the most discussed issues among scholars today. Anthropologists, linguists, literary critics, and philosophers, just to name a few, study this issue in a problem-based and research format. Culture and cultural understanding are hereby presented by demonstrating studies and observations of two cultural anthropologists, R. H. Robbins and Clifford Geertz, a literary critic, Lionel Trilling, and C. S. Lewis, a famous writer of both fiction and non-fiction. My intention here is to answer the question: how to describe and analyze a culture that is so different from the perspective of our own? In this sense, language and discourse are also analyzed in this paper as part of culture and can indicate some of our own moral perspectives and judgments on others’ cultures.

  15. Assessing middle school students` understanding of science relationships and processes: Year 2 - instrument validation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schau, C.; Mattern, N.; Weber, R.; Minnick, K.

    1997-01-01

    Our overall purpose for this multi-year project was to develop an alternative assessment format measuring rural middle school students understanding of science concepts and processes and the interrelationships among them. This kind of understanding is called structural knowledge. We had 3 major interrelated goals: (1) Synthesize the existing literature and critically evaluate the actual and potential use of measures of structural knowledge in science education. (2) Develop a structural knowledge alternative assessment format. (3) Examine the validity of our structural knowledge format. We accomplished the first two goals during year 1. The structural knowledge assessment we identified and developed further was a select-and-fill-in concept map format. The goal for our year 2 work was to begin to validate this assessment approach. This final report summarizes our year 2 work.

  16. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC investigation of dealloying process of electrocatalysts with in-situ XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Noriyuki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro [Yamanashi Univ., Kofu (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    As a complementary research project to the demonstration project of 5MW and 1 MW PAFC plants, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. This work has been performed in the Basic Research Project, as part of that project on PAFC`s, selecting four subjects (Electrocatalysts degradation, Electrolyte fill-level, Cell material corrosion, Electrolyte loss) as the essential factors relating to the life-time. In this study, the effect of temperature and potential on the dealloying process of electrocatalysts was examined in H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} electrolyte with X-ray diffraction measurement.

  17. Kinetics and energy efficiency for the degradation of 1,4-dioxane by electro-peroxone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijiao; Bakheet, Belal; Yuan, Shi; Li, Xiang; Yu, Gang; Murayama, Seiichi; Wang, Yujue

    2015-08-30

    Degradation of 1,4-dioxane by ozonation, electrolysis, and their combined electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) process was investigated. The E-peroxone process used a carbon-polytetrafluorethylene cathode to electrocatalytically convert O2 in the sparged ozone generator effluent (O2 and O3 gas mixture) to H2O2. The electro-generated H2O2 then react with sparged O3 to yield aqueous OH, which can in turn oxidize pollutants rapidly in the bulk solution. Using p-chlorobenzoic acid as OH probe, the pseudo-steady concentration of OH was determined to be ∼0.744×10(-9)mM in the E-peroxone process, which is approximately 10 and 186 times of that in ozonation and electrolysis using a Pt anode. Thanks to its higher OH concentration, the E-peroxone process eliminated 96.6% total organic carbon (TOC) from a 1,4-dioxane solution after 2h treatment with a specific energy consumption (SEC) of 0.376kWhg(-1) TOCremoved. In comparison, ozonation and electrolysis using a boron-doped diamond anode removed only ∼6.1% and 26.9% TOC with SEC of 2.43 and 0.558kWhg(-1) TOCremoved, respectively. The results indicate that the E-peroxone process can significantly improve the kinetics and energy efficiency for 1,4-dioxane mineralization as compared to the two individual processes. The E-peroxone process may thus offer a highly effective and energy-efficient alternative to treat 1,4-dioxane wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding the process of social network evolution: Online-offline integrated analysis of social tie formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Doyeon; Kim, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    It is important to consider the interweaving nature of online and offline social networks when we examine social network evolution. However, it is difficult to find any research that examines the process of social tie formation from an integrated perspective. In our study, we quantitatively measure offline interactions and examine the corresponding evolution of online social network in order to understand the significance of interrelationship between online and offline social factors in generating social ties. We analyze the radio signal strength indicator sensor data from a series of social events to understand offline interactions among the participants and measure the structural attributes of their existing online Facebook social networks. By monitoring the changes in their online social networks before and after offline interactions in a series of social events, we verify that the ability to develop an offline interaction into an online friendship is tied to the number of social connections that participants previously had, while the presence of shared mutual friends between a pair of participants disrupts potential new connections within the pre-designed offline social events. Thus, while our integrative approach enables us to confirm the theory of preferential attachment in the process of network formation, the common neighbor theory is not supported. Our dual-dimensional network analysis allows us to observe the actual process of social network evolution rather than to make predictions based on the assumption of self-organizing networks.

  19. Dual processing and discourse space: Exploring fifth grade students' language, reasoning, and understanding through writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sae Yeol

    analysis of writing and talking. The results showed (1) students' low level of engagement in evaluation impacted their reasoning and use of sources for making meanings, as well as their understanding of the topic. Compared to the results of a previous study, students' complexity of reasoning was relatively less developed, and similarly students' use of reflective sources was generally observed relatively less often. (2) The teacher and students in this study engaged in limited public negotiation, which focused more on articulating than on evaluating ideas. The limited public negotiation that was represented by the dialogical patterns in this study cannot support the development of understanding through writing or the practice of the roles of constructor and critiquer, which play a core function in the comprehension of scientific practice. This study has several implications for teacher education and research. Teacher education needs to be centered more on how to encourage students' engagement in the process of evaluation, since this plays an important function not only in the development of understanding, but also in providing opportunities to perform the roles of both constructor and critiquer. Teachers can use writing as an argumentative activity to encourage or foster students' engagement in the process of evaluation or critique. Additionally, this study provides insight into the importance of the learning environment in which the teacher and students create and develop; this learning environment needs to provide not only opportunities but also demands for students to engage in both constructing and critiquing ideas.

  20. Simultaneous atrazine degradation and E. coli inactivation by simulated solar photo-Fenton-like process using persulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkusheva, Natalya; Matafonova, Galina; Tsenter, Irina; Beck, Sara; Batoev, Valeriy; Linden, Karl

    2017-07-29

    This work evaluated the feasibility of a photo-Fenton-like process using persulfate (PS) and ferrous iron (Fe 2+ ) under simulated solar radiation for degrading the herbicide atrazine (ATZ, 6-Chloro-N-ethyl-N'-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and inactivating E. coli. Milli Q water, lake water, and diluted wastewater effluents were spiked both simultaneously and separately with ATZ (4 mg/L) and E. coli (10 5 CFU/mL), and exposed to treatment. A method for determining the average irradiance throughout the water media in the UV(A+B) range of the Xe lamp emission was developed for bench-scale experiments. These values were used to calculate the UV(A+B) fluences and the solar UV(A+B) energy doses per unit of volume (Q UV(A+B) , kJ/L). The obtained kinetic data were presented versus energy dose. Treatment of lake water at near-neutral pH was ineffective via the photo-Fenton-like process, attaining only 20% ATZ removal and 1-log reduction of E. coli. In Milli Q water and wastewater, the complete degradation of ATZ in the absence of bacteria was observed at an average energy dose of 1.5 kJ/L (60 min), while in the presence of cells the degradation efficiency was ∼60%. When ATZ was present, E. coli inactivation was also affected in Milli Q water, with 1.4-log reduction (93%) at a dose of 1.6 kJ/L (60 min), whereas in wastewater complete inactivation was achieved at a lower dose of 1.3 kJ/L (45 min). The energy requirements on a Q UV(A+B) basis for simultaneous 90% ATZ removal and 99.99% E. coli inactivation in Milli Q water and wastewater were shown to be less than 10 kJ/L. This suggests the solar/PS/Fe 2+ system is promising for simultaneous treatment and disinfection of wastewater effluents.

  1. Microbial degradation processes in radioactive waste repository and in nuclear fuel storage areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.; Gazso, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    The intent of the workshop organizers was to convene experts in the fields of corrosion and spent nuclear fuels. The major points which evolved from the interaction of microbiologists, material scientists, and fuel storage experts are as follows: Corrosion of basin components as well as fuel containers or cladding is occurring; Water chemistry monitoring, if done in the storage facility does not take into account the microbial component; Microbial influenced corrosion is an area that many have not considered to be an important contributor in the aging of metallurgical materials especially those exposed to a radiation field; Many observations indicate that there is a microbial or biological presence in the storage facilities but these observations have not been correlated with any deterioration or aging phenomena taking place in the storage facility; The sessions on the fundamentals of microbial influenced corrosion and biofilm pointed out that these phenomena are real, occurring on similar materials in other industries and probably are occurring in the wet storage of spent fuel; All agreed that more monitoring, testing, and education in the field of biological mediate processes be performed and financially supported; Loosing the integrity of fuel assemblies can only cause problems, relating to the future disposition of the fuel, safety concerns, and environmental issues; In other rad waste scenarios, biological processes may be playing a role, for instance in the mobility of radionuclides in soil, decomposition of organic materials of the rad waste, gas production, etc. The fundamental scientific presentations discussed the full gamut of microbial processes that relate to biological mediated effects on metallic and non-metallic materials used in the storage and containment of radioactive materials

  2. Halocarbons produced by natural oxidation processes during degradation of organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, F.; Eiden, R.; Niedan, V.; Pracht, J.; Schöler, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOC) play an important role in atmospheric chemical processes-contributing, for example, to stratospheric ozone depletion. For anthropogenic VHOC whose sources are well known, the global atmospheric input can be estimated from industrial production data. Halogenated compounds of natural origin can also contribute significantly to the levels of VHOC in the atmosphere. The oceans have been implicated as one of the main natural sources, where organisms such as macroalgae and microalgae can release large quantities of VHOC to the atmosphere. Some terrestrial sources have also been identified, such as wood-rotting fungi, biomass burning and volcanic emissions. Here we report the identification of a different terrestrial source of naturally occurring VHOC. We find that, in soils and sediments, halide ions can be alkylated during the oxidation of organic matter by an electron acceptor such as Fe( III): sunlight or microbial mediation are not required for these reactions. When the available halide ion is chloride, the reaction products are CH 3Cl, C2H5Cl, C3H7Cl and C4H9Cl. (The corresponding alkyl bromides or alkyl iodides are produced when bromide or iodide are present.) Such abiotic processes could make a significant contribution to the budget of the important atmospheric compounds CH3Cl, CH3Br and CH3I.

  3. Activated sludge treatment by electro-Fenton process: Parameter optimization and degradation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, Ali Reza; Azarian, Ghasem; Berizi, Zohreh [Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nematollahi, Davood [Bu-Ali-Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Godini, Kazem [Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the mineralization of activated sludge (MAS) by a facile and environmentally friendly electro-Fenton process (EFP). The effects of initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, pH value, applied current density and operating time on MAS through determining the removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total coliform (TC) were studied. 72% of COD was removed by indirect oxidation double-mediated based on the electro- generation of hydroxyl radical and active chlorine, under the following optimum conditions: 127mmol L{sup -}1 of hydrogen peroxide, pH=3.0, 10 mA cm{sup -}2 of DC current, 120min of operating time, and 0.22mol L{sup -}1 of NaCl as the supporting electrolyte. Only in 10 min and pH 3.0 approximately 100% of TC was removed. The findings indicated that EFP can be applied efficiently for MAS by selecting appropriate operating conditions. The bottom line is that the process is entirely effective owing to the application of green oxidants (hydroxyl radical and active chlorine) and lack of being influenced by environmental situations, which can be introduced as an alternative to current conventional methods.

  4. Two examples of the use of Habitus to understand processes of marginalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arp Fallov, Mia; Armstrong, Jo E.

    This paper offers an evaluation of the concept of habitus from a policy oriented perspective, drawing on empirical material from two research projects; one on urban regeneration, and one on women’s working lives. Addressing different substantive areas, these projects found common strengths...... and weaknesses in applying habitus to understand processes of continuity and change in institutions and individuals’ lives. The concept provides a temporal and spatial framework that is valuable in explaining the embodiment and reproduction of inequality. Using habitus points to the importance of social...

  5. Pharmaceutical quality by design: product and process development, understanding, and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lawrence X

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the pharmaceutical Quality by Design (QbD) and describe how it can be used to ensure pharmaceutical quality. The QbD was described and some of its elements identified. Process parameters and quality attributes were identified for each unit operation during manufacture of solid oral dosage forms. The use of QbD was contrasted with the evaluation of product quality by testing alone. The QbD is a systemic approach to pharmaceutical development. It means designing and developing formulations and manufacturing processes to ensure predefined product quality. Some of the QbD elements include: Defining target product quality profile; Designing product and manufacturing processes; Identifying critical quality attributes, process parameters, and sources of variability; Controlling manufacturing processes to produce consistent quality over time. Using QbD, pharmaceutical quality is assured by understanding and controlling formulation and manufacturing variables. Product testing confirms the product quality. Implementation of QbD will enable transformation of the chemistry, manufacturing, and controls (CMC) review of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) into a science-based pharmaceutical quality assessment.

  6. Geology of the Icy Galilean Satellites: Understanding Crustal Processes and Geologic Histories Through the JIMO Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, P. H.; Tanaka, K.; Senske, D.; Greeley, R.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the geology, style and time history of crustal processes on the icy Galilean satellites is necessary to understanding how these bodies formed and evolved. Data from the Galileo mission have provided a basis for detailed geologic and geo- physical analysis. Due to constrained downlink, Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) data consisted of global coverage at a -1 km/pixel ground sampling and representative, widely spaced regional maps at -200 m/pixel. These two data sets provide a general means to extrapolate units identified at higher resolution to lower resolution data. A sampling of key sites at much higher resolution (10s of m/pixel) allows evaluation of processes on local scales. We are currently producing the first global geological map of Europa using Galileo global and regional-scale data. This work is demonstrating the necessity and utility of planet-wide contiguous image coverage at global, regional, and local scales.

  7. Effects of Planting and Processing Modes on the Degradation of Dithianon and Pyraclostrobin in Chinese Yam (Dioscorea spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kaiwei; Wu, Xujin; Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhou, Ling; Wang, Hong; Li, Li

    2017-12-06

    The yam (Dioscorea spp.) is widely cultivated in China. The degradation of dithianon and pyraclostrobin in yams with different planting and processing treatments was investigated in this article. An analytical method for two pesticides in yam and yam plant was developed, and recoveries were between 77% and 93%, with relative standard deviations from 0.8% to 7.4%, respectively. On the basis of this method, half-lives for plants grown on stakes versus plants grown without stakes were compared. The results indicated that the half-life for pesticide residues for plants grown on stakes versus plants grown without stakes differed as 6.7 versus 3.1 days for dithianon and 5.4 versus 5.2 days for pyraclostrobin. Dithianon was significantly influenced by planting mode because of its low stability under sunlight. The processing factors of various processing treatments (hot air-drying, vacuum freeze-drying, microwave vacuum-drying, infrared-drying, steaming, and boiling) were all pesticides at different levels. Significant amounts of residues were removed during the boiling treatment, whereas the others showed less effect.

  8. Toward understanding the thermodynamics of TALSPEAK process. Medium effects on actinide complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalupski, Peter R.; Martin, Leigh R.; Nash, Ken; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    The ingenious combination of lactate and diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N(double p rime),N(double p rime)-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) as an aqueous actinide-complexing medium forms the basis of the successful separation of americium and curium from lanthanides known as the TALSPEAK process. While numerous reports in the prior literature have focused on the optimization of this solvent extraction system, considerably less attention has been devoted to the understanding of the basic thermodynamic features of the complex fluids responsible for the separation. The available thermochemical information of both lactate and DTPA protonation and metal complexation reactions are representative of the behavior of these ions under idealized conditions. Our previous studies of medium effects on lactate protonation suggest that significant departures from the speciation predicted based on reported thermodynamic values should be expected in the TALSPEAK aqueous environment. Thermodynamic parameters describing the separation chemistry of this process thus require further examination at conditions significantly removed from conventional ideal systems commonly employed in fundamental solution chemistry. Such thermodynamic characterization is the key to predictive modelling of TALSPEAK. Improved understanding will, in principle, allow process technologists to more efficiently respond to off-normal conditions during large scale process operation. In this report, the results of calorimetric and potentiometric investigations of the effects of aqueous electrolytes on the thermodynamic parameters for lactate protonation and lactate complexation of americium and neodymium will be presented. Studies on the lactate protonation equilibrium will clearly illustrate distinct thermodynamic variations between strong electrolyte aqueous systems and buffered lactate environment.

  9. From Process Understanding Via Soil Functions to Sustainable Soil Management - A Systemic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschlaeger, U.; Bartke, S.; Bartkowski, B.; Daedlow, K.; Helming, K.; Kogel-Knabner, I.; Lang, B.; Rabot, E.; Russell, D.; Stößel, B.; Weller, U.; Wiesmeier, M.; Rabot, E.; Vogel, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and the provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which requires preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained: filter for clean water, carbon sequestration, provision and recycling of nutrients, and habitat for biological activity. All these soil functions result from the interaction of a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes that are not yet sufficiently understood. In addition, we lack understanding about the interplay between the socio-economic system and the soil system and how soil functions benefit human wellbeing. Hence, a solid and integrated assessment of soil quality requires the consideration of the ensemble of soil functions and its relation to soil management to finally be able to develop site-specific options for sustainable soil management. We present an integrated modeling approach that investigates the influence of soil management on the ensemble of soil functions. It is based on the mechanistic relationships between soil functional attributes, each explained by a network of interacting processes as derived from scientific evidence. As the evidence base required for feeding the model is for the most part stored in the existing scientific literature, another central component of our work is to set up a public "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive knowledge base on soil processes as a basis for model developments. The connection to the socio-economic system is established using the Drivers-Pressures-Impacts-States-Responses (DPSIR) framework where our improved understanding about soil ecosystem processes is linked to ecosystem services and resource efficiency via the soil functions.

  10. Beyond Engagement to Reflection and Understanding: Focusing on the process of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotchmoor, J. G.; Mitchell, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    We must engage the public and make science more accessible to all...It is important that the scientific community, in its outreach, help people not only to see the fun of science but also to understand what science is, what a scientific theory is, how science is done, that accepted scientific models or theories are based on evidence, that hypotheses are tested by experiment, and that theories change as new evidence emerges. Shirley Ann Jackson, AAAS Presidential Address, 2005 The nature of science is noted as a critical topic for science literacy; however, by all accounts, Americans' understanding of the nature of science is inadequate, and students and teachers at all grade levels have inaccurate understandings of what science is and how it works. Such findings do not bode well for the future of scientific literacy in the United States. In large part, the current confusions about evolution, global warming, stem cell research, and other aspects of science deemed by some as "controversial" are symptomatic of a general misunderstanding of what science is and what it is not. Too few of our citizens view science as a dynamic process through which we gain a reliable understanding of the natural world. As a result, the public becomes vulnerable to misinformation and the very real benefits of science are obscured. New opportunities are emerging for members of the scientific community to share their science with segments of the public - both informally through science cafés and science festivals, and more formally through science competitions and classroom visits. Each of these helps to make science more accessible and provides a critical first step toward connecting the public to the "fun and excitement" of science. Less often these activities focus on how science works - what science is, what it is not, and what is not science - as well as the creativity, curiosity, exploration, dead-ends, and a-ha moments that inspire scientists. This talk will share a teacher

  11. Understanding non-radiative recombination processes of the optoelectronic materials from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yinan

    The annual potential of the solar energy hit on the Earth is several times larger than the total energy consumption in the world. This huge amount of energy source makes it appealing as an alternative to conventional fuels. Due to the problems, for example, global warming, fossil fuel shortage, etc. arising from utilizing the conventional fuels, a tremendous amount of efforts have been applied toward the understanding and developing cost effective optoelectrical devices in the past decades. These efforts have pushed the efficiency of optoelectrical devices, say solar cells, increases from 0% to 46% as reported until 2015. All these facts indicate the significance of the optoelectrical devices not only regarding protecting our planet but also a large potential market. Empirical experience from experiment has played a key role in optimization of optoelectrical devices, however, a deeper understanding of the detailed electron-by-electron, atom-by-atom physical processes when material upon excitation is the key to gain a new sight into the field. It is also useful in developing the next generation of solar materials. Thanks to the advances in computer hardware, new algorithms, and methodologies developed in computational chemistry and physics in the past decades, we are now able to 1). model the real size materials, e.g. nanoparticles, to locate important geometries on the potential energy surfaces(PESs); 2). investigate excited state dynamics of the cluster models to mimic the real systems; 3). screen large amount of possible candidates to be optimized toward certain properties, so to help in the experiment design. In this thesis, I will discuss the efforts we have been doing during the past several years, especially in terms of understanding the non-radiative decay process of silicon nanoparticles with oxygen defects using ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics as well as the accurate, efficient multireference electronic structure theories we have developed to

  12. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Degradation of phenol with using of Fenton-like Processes from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yazdanbakhsh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the serious pollutants from the chemical and petrochemical industries. This pollutant due to its convoluted structure is resistant to biodegradation. One of the methods that are useful to remove this pollutant is advanced oxidation (AOP. A laboratory scale study was done on a synthetic wastewater containing phenol. All experiments were done in batch conditions and effect of variables pH, amount of hydrogen peroxide, iron dosage, contact time and an initial concentration on the phenol removal were tested. The remaining phenol concentration was evaluated using the DR-5000 device. In order to effect of these parameters, the experiment was performance at pH 2 to 6, 5 to 45 ml/ml of peroxide, and time of 5 to 60 minutes with 2 to 15 g/ml iron (Fe˚. The optimum pH, the ratio of hydrogen, Fe˚and time were 3, 15 ml, 8g and 5 minutes respectively. Chemical oxygen demand (COD index was chosen as the parameter for evaluation in this study. Result showed that mineralization of phenol was not complete. The COD removal efficiency was obtained 71%. According to the results of this study, Fenton-like process can be used for conversion organic resistant compounds to other compounds with lower toxicity.

  14. Effects of process variables on micromeritic properties and drug release of non-degradable microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Jelvehgari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate microencapsulated controlled release preparation of theophylline using Eudragit RS 100 as the retardant material with high entrapment efficiency. Methods: Microspheres were prepared by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. A mixed solvent system consisting of methanol and acetone and light liquid paraffin as oily phase were chosen. Sucrose stearate was used as the surfactant to stabilize the emulsification process. The prepared microspheres were characterized by drug loading, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning colorimetry (DSC and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The in vitro release studies were performed at pH 1.2 and 7.4 aqueous medium. Results: Increasing the concentration of emulsifier, sucrose fatty acid ester F-70, decreased the particle size which contributed to increased drug release rate. The drug loading microparticle Eudragit RS100 (1:6 showed 60-75% of entrapment and mean particle size 205.93-352.76 µm. The results showed that, an increase in the ratio of polymer: drug (F5, 6: 1 resulted in a reduction in the release rate of the drug which may be attributed to the hydrophobic nature of the polymer. Conclusion: The release of theophylline is influenced by the drug to polymer ratio and particle size. Drug release is controlled by diffusion and the best-fit release kinetic is Higuchi model.

  15. Effects of process variables on micromeritic properties and drug release of non-degradable microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgari, Mitra; Barar, Jaleh; Nokhodchi, Ali; Shadrou, Sanam; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate microencapsulated controlled release preparation of theophylline using Eudragit RS 100 as the retardant material with high entrapment efficiency. Microspheres were prepared by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. A mixed solvent system consisting of methanol and acetone and light liquid paraffin as oily phase were chosen. Sucrose stearate was used as the surfactant to stabilize the emulsification process. The prepared microspheres were characterized by drug loading, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning colorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The in vitro release studies were performed at pH 1.2 and 7.4 aqueous medium. Increasing the concentration of emulsifier, sucrose fatty acid ester F-70, decreased the particle size which contributed to increased drug release rate. The drug loading microparticle Eudragit RS100(1:6) showed 60-75% of entrapment and mean particle size 205.93-352.76 μm.The results showed that, an increase in the ratio of polymer: drug (F5, 6: 1) resulted in a reduction in the release rate of the drug which may be attributed to the hydrophobic nature of the polymer. The release of theophylline is influenced by the drug to polymer ratio and particle size. Drug release is controlled by diffusion and the best-fit release kinetic is Higuchi model.

  16. UNDERSTANDING AND PERCEPTION OF THE CHARACTER IMAGE BY PRIMARY SCHOOLCHILDREN IN THE PROCESS OF TEXT INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Hnatenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern literature research works practically assert that literature is a way of thinking in imagery, and the interpretation of art works is almost always the interpretation of imagery, in other words perfect reality. Psychologists confirm that educational process in primary school should be formed on the account of both present and potential abilities of the children. Literature is an important means of pupils’ development. Reading in grades 1 − 4 promotes the development of children’s positive moral and will-power qualitie. With its help children perceive the world, learn to understand and love beautiful things. The writer’s ideological content of a piece of literature can be revealed in images. The main objective of text interpretation in grades 1 − 4 is to promote pupils’ perception and comprehension. Nowadays the changes in educational sphere require more attention to the issue of literary perception. In 2011, primary school changed the training course of "Reading" into "Literary reading," which aims at the development of the following reader’s qualities: to be capable to independent reading,to perform different communicative and creative activities. However, the educational process observation showed the existence of problems in young learners’ perception and understanding of literary art, and especially the role of character and its images. Today, the methodology pays attention to the quality of the perception, its depth and awareness. The efficiency level of children’s literary work perception is set on the analysis of readers’ activity results. Difficulties in the determination of the literary work perception level lie in various interpretations, complexity of the perception process, necessity to reflect different sides and emotions of imagination and thinking. Many scientific works are devoted to the analysis of literary texts understanding, to the role of visual images and imagination in literary text understanding

  17. Elementary education preservice teachers' understanding of biotechnology and its related processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien Mweene; Mumba, Frackson; Chitiyo, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    This study examined preservice teachers' understanding of biotechnology and its related processes. A sample comprised 88 elementary education preservice teachers at a large university in the Midwest of the USA. A total of 60 and 28 of the participants were enrolled in introductory and advanced science methods courses, respectively. Most participants had taken two integrated science courses at the college level. Data were collected using a questionnaire, which had open-ended items and which required participants to write the definitions and examples of the following terms: biotechnology, genetic engineering, cloning and genetically modified foods. The results indicate that preservice teachers had limited understanding of biotechnology and its related processes. The majority of the preservice teachers provided poor definitions, explanations, and examples of biotechnology, genetic engineering and genetically modified foods. Surprisingly, however, a moderate number of preservice teachers correctly defined cloning and provided correct examples of cloning. Implications for science teacher education, science curriculum, as well as recommendations for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of below-ground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, M Luke; Dickie, Ian A; Eissenstat, David M; Fahey, Timothy J; Fernandez, Christopher W; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A; Iversen, Colleen M; Jackson, Robert B; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Norby, Richard J; Phillips, Richard P; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Pritchard, Seth G; Rewald, Boris; Zadworny, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain because of the challenges of consistently measuring and interpreting fine-root systems. Traditionally, fine roots have been defined as all roots ≤ 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. Here, we demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, fine roots are either separated into individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine-root pool. Using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally - a c. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. Future work developing tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi into fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand below-ground processes in the terrestrial biosphere. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Making and Unmaking the Endangered in India (1880-Present: Understanding Animal-Criminal Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concerns of the present paper emerge from the single basic question of whether the available histories of the tiger are comprehensive enough to enable an understanding of how this nodular species comprises/contests the power dynamics of the present. Starting with this basic premise, this paper retells a series of events which go to clarify that a nuanced understanding of the manner in which a species serves certain political purposes is not possible by tracking the animal alone. A discourse on endangerment has beginnings in the body and being of species that are remarkably cut off from the tiger-the elephant, birds, and the rhino (and man if we might add-and develops with serious implications for power, resource appropriation, and criminality, over a period of time, before more directly recruiting the tiger itself. If we can refer to this as the intermittent making and unmaking of the endangered, it is by turning to the enunciations of Michel Foucault that we try to canvas a series of events that can be described as animal-criminal processes. The role of such processes in the construction of endangerment, the structuring of space, and shared ideas of man-animal relations is further discussed in this paper.

  20. Metabolomics of the Bio-Degradation Process of Aflatoxin B1 by Actinomycetes at an Initial pH of 6.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Eshelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of food and feed by Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is a cause of serious economic and health problems. Different processes have been used to degrade AFB1. In this study, biological degradation of AFB1 was carried out using three Actinomycete species, Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277, Streptomyces lividans TK 24, and S. aureofaciens ATCC 10762, in liquid cultures. Biodegradation of AFB1 was optimised under a range of temperatures from 25 to 40 °C and pH values of 4.0 to 8.0. An initial concentration of 20 µg/mL of AFB1 was used in this study. The amount of AFB1 remaining was measured against time by thin layer chromatography (TLC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, coupled with UV and mass spectrometry (LC-MS. All species were able to degrade the AFB1, and no significant difference was found between them. AFB1 remained in the liquid culture for R. erythropolis, S. lividans and S. aureofaciens were 0.81 µg/mL, 2.41 µg/mL and 2.78 µg/mL respectively, at the end of the first 24 h. Degradation occurred at all incubation temperatures and the pH with the optimal conditions for R. erythropolis was achieved at 30 °C and pH 6, whereas for S. lividans and S. aureofaciens the optimum conditions for degradation were 30 °C and pH 5. Analysis of the degradative route indicated that each microorganism has a different way of degrading AFB1. The metabolites produced by R. erythropolis were significantly different from the other two microorganisms. Products of degradation were identified through metabolomic studies by utilizing high-resolution mass spectral data. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the degradation of AFB1 was associated with the appearance of a range of lower molecular weight compounds. The pathway of degradation or chemical alteration of AFB1 was followed by means of high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry (HR-FTMS analysis as well as through the MS2 fragmentation to unravel the degradative pathway for

  1. Hydrologic Connectivity for Understanding Watershed Processes: Brand-new Puzzle or Emerging Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, G. A.; Roy, A. G.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    As a way to develop a more holistic approach to watershed assessment and management, the concept of hydrologic connectivity (HC) is often put at the forefront. HC can be seen as the strength of the water-mediated linkages between discrete units of the landscape and as such, it facilitates our intuitive understanding of the mechanisms driving runoff initiation and cessation. Much of the excitement surrounding HC is attributable to its potential to enhance our ability to gain insights into multiple areas including process dynamics, numerical model building, the effects of human elements in our landscape conceptualization, and the development of simplified watershed management tools. However, before such potential can be fully demonstrated, many issues must be resolved with regards to the measure of HC. Here we provide examples highlighting how connectivity can be useful towards understanding water routing in river basins, ecohydrological systems coupling, and intermittent rainfall-runoff dynamics. First, the use of connectivity metrics to examine the relative influence of surface/subsurface topography and soil characteristics on runoff generation will be discussed. Second, the effectiveness of using geochemical tracers will be examined with respect to identifying non-point runoff sources and linking hillslope-to-channel connectivity with surface water-groundwater exchanges in the biologically sensitive hyporheic zone. Third, the identification of different hydrologic thresholds will be presented as a way to discriminate the establishment of connectivity across a range of contrasted catchments located in Canada, Scotland, the USA, and Sweden. These examples will show that current challenges with regards to HC revolve around the choice of an accurate methodological framework for an appropriate translation of experimental findings into effective watershed management approaches. Addressing these questions simultaneously will lead to the emergence of HC as a powerful tool

  2. ATOMIC PHYSICS PROCESSES IMPORTANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCRAPE-OFF LAYER OF TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEST, W.P.; GOLDSMITH,; B. EVANS,T.E.; OLSON, R.J.

    2002-05-01

    The region between the well-confined plasma and the vessel walls of a magnetic confinement fusion research device, the scrape-off layer (SOL), is typically rich in atomic and molecular physics processes. The most advanced magnetic confinement device, the magnetically diverted tokamak, uses a magnetic separatrix to isolate the confinement zone (closed flux surfaces) from the edge plasma (open field lines). Over most of their length the open field lines run parallel to the separatrix, forming a thin magnetic barrier with the nearby vessel walls. In a poloidally-localized region, the open field lines are directed away from the separatrix and into the divertor, a region spatially separated from the separatrix where intense plasma wall interaction can occur relatively safely. Recent data from several tokamaks indicate that particle transport across the field lines of the SOL can be somewhat faster than previously thought. In these cases, the rate at which particles reach the vessel wall is comparable to the rate to the divertor from parallel transport. The SOL can be thin enough that the recycling neutrals and sputtered impurities from the wall may refuel or contaminate the confinement zone more efficiently than divertor plasma wall interaction. Just inside the SOL is a confinement barrier that produces a sharp pedestal in plasma density and temperature. Understanding neutral transport through the SOL and into the pedestal is key to understanding particle balance and particle and impurity exhaust. The SOL plasma is sufficiently hot and dense to excite and ionize neutrals. Ion and neutral temperatures are high enough that charge exchange between the neutrals and fuel and impurity ions is fast. Excitation of neutrals can be fast enough to lead to nonlinear behavior in charge exchange and ionization processes. In this paper the detailed atomic physics important to the understanding of the neutral transport through the SOL will be discussed.

  3. Mechanism of azo dye degradation in Advanced Oxidation Processes: Degradation of Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop and its parent compounds in aqueous solution by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfi, Tamas; Wojnarovits, Laszlo; Takacs, Erzsebet

    2011-01-01

    Mechanistic studies were made on hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron reaction with Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop (SPADNS) as model azo dye in dilute aqueous solution. SPADNS contains 4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid part and 4-sulfophenylazo group. To establish the details of the reaction mechanism the reactions of two simpler molecules without 4-sulfophenylazo part were also studied: one of them contained one (in position 4, II), the other two (in positions 4 and 5, III) -OH groups. Hydroxyl radicals react with these molecules with radical addition to the naphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid part. The adduct hydroxycyclohexadienyl type radical decays in radical-radical reactions, or undergoes a (pH dependent) water elimination to yield naphthoxy radical. The radical decay takes place on the ms timescale. Degradation efficiencies are 0.6-0.8. Hydrated electron in the case of the two simpler molecules reacts with the rings, while in the case of dye with the azo bond. Electron scavenging is followed by protonation, this reaction in the case of II and III yields cyclohexadienyl, while with the dye hydrazo radical. The efficiency of degradation with II and III is 0.2-0.6, while for SPADNS it is close to 1.

  4. X-ray crystallography and its impact on understanding bacterial cell wall remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Renner-Schneck, Michaela; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure of matter defines its properties and function. This is especially true for biological macromolecules such as proteins, which participate in virtually all biochemical processes. A three dimensional structural model of a protein is thus essential for the detailed understanding of its physiological function and the characterization of essential properties such as ligand binding and reaction mechanism. X-ray crystallography is a well-established technique that has been used for many years, but it is still by far the most widely used method for structure determination. A particular strength of this technique is the elucidation of atomic details of molecular interactions, thus providing an invaluable tool for a multitude of scientific projects ranging from the structural classification of macromolecules over the validation of enzymatic mechanisms or the understanding of host-pathogen interactions to structure-guided drug design. In the first part of this review, we describe essential methodological and practical aspects of X-ray crystallography. We provide some pointers that should allow researchers without a background in structural biology to assess the overall quality and reliability of a crystal structure. To highlight its potential, we then survey the impact X-ray crystallography has had on advancing an understanding of a class of enzymes that modify the bacterial cell wall. A substantial number of different bacterial amidase structures have been solved, mostly by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of these structures highlights conserved as well as divergent features. In combination with functional analyses, structural information on these enzymes has therefore proven to be a valuable template not only for understanding their mechanism of catalysis, but also for targeted interference with substrate binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Autophagy-like processes are involved in lipid droplet degradation in Auxenochlorella protothecoides during the heterotrophy-autotrophy transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation process that recycles cytoplasmic components in eukaryotes. Although intensively studied in yeast, plants, and mammals, autophagy in microalgae is not well understood. Auxenochlorella protothecoides is a green microalga that has the ability to grow either autotrophically when under light or heterotrophically when in media containing glucose. The two growth modes are inter-convertible and transition between them is accompanied by drastic changes in morphology and cellular composition; however, the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknown. In this study, we identified autophagy-related genes and characterized their roles in the degradation of lipid droplets during the heterotrophy-to-autotrophy (HA transition in A. protothecoides. Most of the proteins constituting the eukaryotic core machinery were conserved in A. protothecoides. Two proteins, Atg4 and Atg8, were further investigated. A. protothecoides ATG4 was cloned from a cDNA library and expressed within yeast, and was able to functionally restore the autophagy pathway in atg4Δ yeast during nitrogen starvation. Furthermore, Atg8, which displayed high sequence identity with its yeast homolog, was able to conjugate to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE in vitro and was recruited to the phagophore assembly site in yeast. We also identified a C-terminal glycine residue, G118, that was the cleavage site for Atg4. Finally, we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy to reveal that autophagic-like vacuoles were detectable in algal cells during the HA transition. Our data suggested that the lipid droplets in heterotrophic cells were engulfed directly by the autophagic-like vacuole instead of via autophagosomes.

  6. Effect of Alumina Addition to Zirconia Nano-composite on Low Temperature Degradation Process and Biaxial Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moluk Aivazi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic dental materials have been considered as alternatives to metals for dental implants application. In this respect, zirconia tetragonal stabilized with %3 yttrium, is of great importance among the ceramic materials for endosseous dental implant application. Because of its good mechanical properties and color similar to tooth. The aim and novelty of this study was to design and prepare Y-TZP nano-composite to reduce the degradation process at low temperature by alumina addition and maintaining submicron grain sized. Also, flexural strength of nano-composite samples was evaluated. Toward this purpose, alumina-Y-TZP nano-composites containing 0–30 vol% alumina (denoted as A-Y-TZP 0-30 were fabricated using α-alumina and Y-TZP nano-sized by sintering pressure less method. The synthesized samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Nano-composite samples with high density (≥96% and grain sized of ≤ 400 nm was obtained by sintering at 1270 °C for 170 min. After low temperature degradation test (LTD, A-Y-TZP20 and A-Y-TZP30 not showed monoclinic phase and the flexural strength in all of samples were higher than A-Y-TZP0. It was concluded that the grains were remained in submicron sized and A-Y-TZP20 and A-Y-TZP30 did not present biaxial strength reduction after LTD test.

  7. TAILS N-Terminomics and Proteomics Show Protein Degradation Dominates over Proteolytic Processing by Cathepsins in Pancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Prudova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deregulated cathepsin proteolysis occurs across numerous cancers, but in vivo substrates mediating tumorigenesis remain ill-defined. Applying 8-plex iTRAQ terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS, a systems-level N-terminome degradomics approach, we identified cathepsin B, H, L, S, and Z in vivo substrates and cleavage sites with the use of six different cathepsin knockout genotypes in the Rip1-Tag2 mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis. Among 1,935 proteins and 1,114 N termini identified by TAILS, stable proteolytic products were identified in wild-type tumors compared with one or more different cathepsin knockouts (17%–44% of 139 cleavages. This suggests a lack of compensation at the substrate level by other cathepsins. The majority of neo-N termini (56%–83% for all cathepsins was consistent with protein degradation. We validated substrates, including the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 associated with the Warburg effect, the ER chaperone GRP78, and the oncoprotein prothymosin-alpha. Thus, the identification of cathepsin substrates in tumorigenesis improves the understanding of cathepsin functions in normal physiology and cancer.

  8. Primary School Teachers' Understanding of Science Process Skills in Relation to Their Teaching Qualifications and Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahali, Edy H. M.; Halim, Lilia; Treagust, David F.; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the understanding of science process skills (SPS) of 329 science teachers from 52 primary schools selected by random sampling. The understanding of SPS was measured in terms of conceptual and operational aspects of SPS using an instrument called the "Science Process Skills Questionnaire" (SPSQ) with a Cronbach's…

  9. Characterization of Microbial Processes that Degrade Chlorinated Solvents in a Constructed Wetland Using Organic Acid and Inorganic Anion Concentration Profiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... Wetlands possess characteristics necessary for the complete degradation of chlorinated ethenes by microorganisms via anaerobic and aerobic regions that foster the necessary oxidation-reduction conditions...

  10. Plasticizers and their degradation products in the process streams of a large urban physicochemical sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabé, S; Beauchesne, I; Cooper, D G; Nicell, J A

    2008-01-01

    The plasticizers bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEHP), bis (2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (BEHTP) and bis (2-ethylhexyl) adipate (BEHA) were found in significant quantities in the influents, process streams, treated effluent and solid residues of a large physicochemical treatment plant in Montreal, Canada. Of these plasticizers, BEHA was the most abundant in the influent but most was removed during primary treatment. Evidence indicated that significant biodegradation occurred within the sewers and during treatment resulting in the formation of three biodegradation products that had been reported in earlier laboratory studies; namely, 2-ethylhexanol, 2-ethylhexanal and 2-ethylhexanoic acid. Significantly greater concentrations of 2-ethylhexanal were found in process streams than had been reported in earlier laboratory work. This was attributed to the fact that there were fewer opportunities for losses of this volatile compound over the course of wastewater treatment. The plasticizers were removed from the aqueous phase to varying degrees during treatment, with most ending up in the solid residues. All three metabolites and the parent plasticizers were observed in the effluent and most were found in the solids that were analyzed. Results suggest that the treatment plant does not effectively remove plasticizers from the influent and represents a significant source of these compounds and their degradation products in the environment.

  11. Understanding Earthquake Processes in the Central and Eastern US and Implications for Nuclear Reactor Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, D.; Tabatabai, S.

    2012-12-01

    All of the early site permits and new reactor licensing applications, which have been submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC), are located in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). Furthermore, among the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) already licensed to operate in the US, 96 are located in the CEUS. While there are many considerations in siting commercial NPPs, the perceived lower seismic hazard in the CEUS compared to the Western United States is one of the reasons why the majority of operating and potential future nuclear reactors are located in the CEUS. However, one important criterion used in the licensing and safe operation of a nuclear power plant is its seismic design basis, which establishes the plant's ability to withstand ground motions produced by moderate- to large-sized earthquakes without suffering any damage to its critical safety related structures, systems, and components. The seismic design basis for a NPP is site specific and determined using up-to-date knowledge and information about seismic sources surrounding the site and seismic wave propagation characteristics. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the processes generating earthquakes (tectonic or man-made) and the seismic wave propagation characteristics in the CEUS is crucial. The U.S. NRC's seismic review process for evaluating new reactor siting applications heavily relies upon up-to-date scientific knowledge of seismic sources within at least 320 km of a proposed site. However, the availability of up-to-date knowledge and information about potential seismic sources in low-seismicity regions is limited and relevant data are sparse. Recently, the NRC participated in a joint effort to develop new seismic source models to be used in the CEUS seismic hazard studies for nuclear facilities. In addition, efforts are underway to better understand the seismic potential of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone. While very large and successful scientific

  12. Toward an understanding of methane selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarras, Peter C.

    The purpose of this research is to elucidate a better understanding of the conditions relevant to methane selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process. The development of more efficient FT catalysts can result in great commercial profit. The industrially relevant FT process has long been hampered by the production of methane. Nearly 60 percent of FT capital is devoted to the removal of methane and purification of feed-stock gases through steam-reforming. Naturally, a more efficient FT catalyst would need to have a reasonable balance between catalytic activity and suppression of methane formation (low methane selectivity). Though a significant amount of work has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms involved in methane selectivity, the exact mechanism is still not well understood. Density functional theory (DFT) methods provide an opportunity to explore the FT catalytic process at the molecular level. This work represents a combination of various DFT approaches in an attempt to gather new insight on the conditions relevant to methane selectivity. A thorough understanding of the electronic environment involved in the surface-adsorbate interaction is necessary to the advancement of more efficient Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. This study investigates the promotive effect of four late transition metals (Cu, Ag, Au and Pd) on three FT catalytic surfaces (Fe, Co and Ni). The purpose of this research is to examine the surface-adsorbate interaction from two perspectives: 1) interactions occurring between FT precursors and small, bimetallic surface analogs (clusters), and 2) plane-wave calculations of the interactions between FT precursors and simulated bulk surfaces. Our results suggest that promising candidates for the reduction of FT methane selectivity include Au and Pd on Ni, Au and Ag on Co, and Cu, Ag, and Pd on Fe. Additionally, cluster models were susceptible to effects not encountered in the plane-wave approach. Thermodynamic trends can be made more

  13. Toward a better understanding of the complex geochemical processes governing subsurface contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Identification and understanding of the geochemical processes, including ion exchange, precipitation, organic partitioning, chemisorption, aqueous complexation, and colloidal stability and transport, controlling subsurface contamination is essential for making accurate predictions of the fate and transport of these constituents. Current approaches to quantify the effect of these processes primarily involve laboratory techniques, including the use of closed static systems (batch experiments) where small amounts of aquifer solids or minerals are contacted with an aqueous phase containing the components of interest for relatively short durations; and dynamic systems (column experiments) where a larger segment of the aquifer is investigated by analyzing the breakthrough profiles of reactive and non-reactive species. Both approaches are constrained by differences in scale, alteration of media during sample collection and use, and spatial variability. More field reactivity studies are needed to complement established laboratory approaches for the determination of retardation factors and scaling factors, corroboration of batch and column results, and validation of sampling techniques. These studies also serve to accentuate areas of geochemical process research where data deficiencies exist, such as the kinetics of adsorption-desorption, metal-organic-mineral interactions, and colloidal mobility. The advantages and disadvantages of the above approaches are discussed in the context of achieving a more completely integrated approach to geochemical transport experiments, with supportive data presented from selected studies. (Author) (16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  14. A new method of analysis enabled a better understanding of clinical practice guideline development processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Tiago; May, Carl; Mason, James; Eccles, Martin

    2006-11-01

    To describe the process by which various forms of evidence are discussed, valued, and interpreted within the process of developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and, in so doing, to develop a method for such studies. An observational study. Two guideline development groups were observed by a nonparticipant observer. The 21 meetings were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory and frame analysis. Qualitative analysis was complemented with descriptive statistics. The groups organized their discussion around four domains--'science', 'practice', politics', and 'process'--and used boundary work to mediate between these domains. Both groups spent most time discussing 'science', followed by 'practice' or its relation with 'science'. Our analysis offers an innovative, replicable method of analysis of guideline development that permits the identification of the proportions and interrelations between knowledge domains deployed by guideline groups. This analysis also suggests that the participation hierarchy observed here and by others might be an effect of the imbalanced use of knowledge domains in the construction of clinical guidance. This constitutes an important framework to understand the interplay of participants and knowledge in guideline development.

  15. New understanding of rhizosphere processes enabled by advances in molecular and spatially resolved techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the role played by microorganisms within soil systems is challenged by the unique intersection of physics, chemistry, mineralogy and biology in fostering habitat for soil microbial communities. To address these challenges will require observations across multiple spatial and temporal scales to capture the dynamics and emergent behavior from complex and interdependent processes. The heterogeneity and complexity of the rhizosphere require advanced techniques that press the simultaneous frontiers of spatial resolution, analyte sensitivity and specificity, reproducibility, large dynamic range, and high throughput. Fortunately many exciting technical advancements are now available to inform and guide the development of new hypotheses. The aim of this Special issue is to provide a holistic view of the rhizosphere in the perspective of modern molecular biology methodologies that enabled a highly-focused, detailed view on the processes in the rhizosphere, including numerous, strong and complex interactions between plant roots, soil constituents and microorganisms. We discuss the current rhizosphere research challenges and knowledge gaps, as well as perspectives and approaches using newly available state-of-the-art toolboxes. These new approaches and methodologies allow the study of rhizosphere processes and properties, and rhizosphere as a central component of ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles.

  16. A Time-Variant Reliability Model for Copper Bending Pipe under Seawater-Active Corrosion Based on the Stochastic Degradation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Liao, Baopeng; Li, Mengmeng; Ren, Yi; Feng, Qiang; Yang, Dezhen

    2018-03-27

    In the degradation process, the randomness and multiplicity of variables are difficult to describe by mathematical models. However, they are common in engineering and cannot be neglected, so it is necessary to study this issue in depth. In this paper, the copper bending pipe in seawater piping systems is taken as the analysis object, and the time-variant reliability is calculated by solving the interference of limit strength and maximum stress. We did degradation experiments and tensile experiments on copper material, and obtained the limit strength at each time. In addition, degradation experiments on copper bending pipe were done and the thickness at each time has been obtained, then the response of maximum stress was calculated by simulation. Further, with the help of one kind of Monte Carlo method we propose, the time-variant reliability of copper bending pipe was calculated based on the stochastic degradation process and interference theory. Compared with traditional methods and verified by maintenance records, the results show that the time-variant reliability model based on the stochastic degradation process proposed in this paper has better applicability in the reliability analysis, and it can be more convenient and accurate to predict the replacement cycle of copper bending pipe under seawater-active corrosion.

  17. A Time-Variant Reliability Model for Copper Bending Pipe under Seawater-Active Corrosion Based on the Stochastic Degradation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the degradation process, the randomness and multiplicity of variables are difficult to describe by mathematical models. However, they are common in engineering and cannot be neglected, so it is necessary to study this issue in depth. In this paper, the copper bending pipe in seawater piping systems is taken as the analysis object, and the time-variant reliability is calculated by solving the interference of limit strength and maximum stress. We did degradation experiments and tensile experiments on copper material, and obtained the limit strength at each time. In addition, degradation experiments on copper bending pipe were done and the thickness at each time has been obtained, then the response of maximum stress was calculated by simulation. Further, with the help of one kind of Monte Carlo method we propose, the time-variant reliability of copper bending pipe was calculated based on the stochastic degradation process and interference theory. Compared with traditional methods and verified by maintenance records, the results show that the time-variant reliability model based on the stochastic degradation process proposed in this paper has better applicability in the reliability analysis, and it can be more convenient and accurate to predict the replacement cycle of copper bending pipe under seawater-active corrosion.

  18. Study of a low-dose capsule filling process by dynamic and static tests for advanced process understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranzinger, S; Faulhammer, E; Scheibelhofer, O; Calzolari, V; Biserni, S; Paudel, A; Khinast, J G

    2018-04-05

    Precise filling of capsules with doses in the mg-range requires a good understanding of the filling process. Therefore, we investigated the various process steps of the filling process by dynamic and static mode tests. Dynamic tests refer to filling of capsules in a regular laboratory dosator filling machine. Static tests were conducted using a novel filling system developed by us. Three grades of lactose excipients were filled into size 3 capsules with different dosing chamber lengths, nozzle diameters and powder bed heights, and, in the dynamic mode, with two filling speeds (500, 3000 caps/h). The influence of the gap at the bottom of the powder container on the fill weight and variability was assessed. Different gaps resulted in a change in fill weight in all materials, although in different ways. In all cases, the fill weight of highly cohesive Lactohale 220 increased when decreasing the gap. Furthermore, experiments with the stand-alone static test tool indicated that this very challenging powder could successfully be filled without any pre-compression in the range of 5 mg-20 mg with acceptable RSDs. This finding is of great importance since for very fine lactose powders high compression ratios (dosing-chamber-length-to-powder-bed height compression ratios) may result in jamming of the piston. Moreover, it shows that the static mode setup is suitable for studying fill weight and variability. Since cohesive powders, such as Lactohale 220, are hard to fill, we investigated the impact of vibration on the process. Interestingly, we found no correlation between the reported fill weight changes in dynamic mode at 3000 cph and static mode using similar vibration. However, we could show that vibrations during sampling in the static mode dramatically reduced fill weight variability. Overall, our results indicate that by fine-tuning instrumental settings even very challenging powders can be filled with a low-dose dosator capsule filling machine. This study is a

  19. Nursing Students' Experiences of Health Care in Swaziland: Transformational Processes in Developing Cultural Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bethany A

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the experiences of nursing students following a service-learning placement in Swaziland. Students worked in a hospital and implemented community health clinics. Six students were interviewed 1 month after their return from the overseas study experience. A thematic analysis was performed. Four themes emerged. The first theme was transitions-students experienced personal hardships, emotional reactions, and language difficulties that created discomfort. The second theme was perceptions-cultural dissonance was encountered between the health care and nursing cultures of Swaziland and the United States. The third theme was internalization-discomfort and cultural dissonance activated coping mechanisms within students that generated a process of change in attitudes and beliefs. The fourth theme was incorporation-personal and professional growth were demonstrated with greater awareness, compassion, resourcefulness, and comfort with diversity. The stress and cultural dissonance experienced by students led to an increase in cultural understanding and awareness. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Constraining land carbon cycle process understanding with observations of atmospheric CO2 variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collatz, G. J.; Kawa, S. R.; Liu, Y.; Zeng, F.; Ivanoff, A.

    2013-12-01

    We evaluate our understanding of the land biospheric carbon cycle by benchmarking a model and its variants to atmospheric CO2 observations and to an atmospheric CO2 inversion. Though the seasonal cycle in CO2 observations is well simulated by the model (RMSE/standard deviation of observations 40N though fluxes match poorly at regional to continental scales. Regional and global fire emissions are strongly correlated with variability observed at northern flask sample sites and in the global atmospheric CO2 growth rate though in the latter case fire emissions anomalies are not large enough to account fully for the observed variability. We discuss remaining unexplained variability in CO2 observations in terms of the representation of fluxes by the model. This work also demonstrates the limitations of the current network of CO2 observations and the potential of new denser surface measurements and space based column measurements for constraining carbon cycle processes in models.

  1. SOCRATE: an optical bench dedicated to the understanding and improvement of a laser conditioning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertussi, Bertrand; Piombini, Hervé; Damiani, David; Pommies, Matthieu; Le Borgne, Xavier; Plessis, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    We present an automatic excimer laser bench (SOCRATE) allowing for the treatment of optical components by laser conditioning. This apparatus, developed at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique-Le Ripault, has been designed to add to this conditioning process an in situ, accurate laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) measurement and different nondestructive optical techniques for the characterization of the component during treatment. Through different examples, we demonstrate the importance of these characterizations to improve the understanding of the laser conditioning. The role of an in situ adapted metrology associated in real time with a laser conditioning bench offers new opportunities to analyze laser-induced damage mechanisms and subsequently to increase the LIDT of optical components.

  2. Understanding Student Cognition about Complex Earth System Processes Related to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, K. S.; Libarkin, J.; Ledley, T. S.; Dutta, S.; Templeton, M. C.; Geroux, J.; Blakeney, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's climate system includes complex behavior and interconnections with other Earth spheres that present challenges to student learning. To better understand these unique challenges, we have conducted experiments with high-school and introductory level college students to determine how information pertaining to the connections between the Earth's atmospheric system and the other Earth spheres (e.g., hydrosphere and cryosphere) are processed. Specifically, we include psychomotor tests (e.g., eye-tracking) and open-ended questionnaires in this research study, where participants were provided scientific images of the Earth (e.g., global precipitation and ocean and atmospheric currents), eye-tracked, and asked to provide causal or relational explanations about the viewed images. In addition, the students engaged in on-line modules (http://serc.carleton.edu/eslabs/climate/index.html) focused on Earth system science as training activities to address potential cognitive barriers. The developed modules included interactive media, hands-on lessons, links to outside resources, and formative assessment questions to promote a supportive and data-rich learning environment. Student eye movements were tracked during engagement with the materials to determine the role of perception and attention on understanding. Students also completed a conceptual questionnaire pre-post to determine if these on-line curriculum materials assisted in their development of connections between Earth's atmospheric system and the other Earth systems. The pre-post results of students' thinking about climate change concepts, as well as eye-tracking results, will be presented.

  3. Understanding High-Resolution Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Groundwater Recharge Using Process Based Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, G.; Qiu, H.; Li, S. G.; Lusch, D.; Phanikumar, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the natural rates of groundwater recharge and identifying the location and timing of major recharge events are essential for maintaining sustainable water yields and for understanding contaminant transport mechanisms in groundwater systems. Using Ottawa County, Michigan as a case study in sustainable water resources management, this research is part of a larger project that examines the issues of declining water tables and increasing chloride concentrations within the county. A process-based hydrologic model (PAWS) is used to mechanistically evaluate the integrated hydrologic response of both the surface and subsurface systems to further compute daily fluxes due to evapotranspiration, surface runoff, recharge and groundwater-stream interactions. Both rain gauge (NCDC) and NEXRAD precipitation data are used as input for the model. The model is built based on three major watersheds at 300m spatial resolution and daily temporal resolution, covering all of Ottawa County and is calibrated using streamflow data from USGS gauging stations. In addition, synoptic and time-series baseflow data collected using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers and electromagnetic flow meters during the summer of 2015 are used to test the ability of the model to simulate baseflows and to quantify the uncertainty. The MODIS evapotranspiration product is used to evaluate model performance in simulating ET. The primary objectives of this study are to (1) understand the periods of high and low groundwater recharge in the county between the years 2009 and 2015; and (2) analyze the impacts of different types of land use, soil, elevation, and slope on groundwater recharge.

  4. Preparation and Support of Patients through the Transplant Process: Understanding the Recipients' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Mauthner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for heart transplant commonly includes booklets, instructional videos, personalized teaching sessions, and mentorship. This paper explores heart transplant recipients’ thoughts on their preparation and support through the transplant process. Twenty-five interviews were audio-/videotaped capturing voice and body language and transcribed verbatim. Coding addressed language, bodily gesture, volume, and tone in keeping with our visual methodology. Recipients reported that only someone who had a transplant truly understands the experience. As participants face illness and life-altering experiences, maintaining a positive attitude and hope is essential to coping well. Healthcare professionals provide ongoing care and reassurance about recipients’ medical status. Mentors, family members, and close friends play vital roles in supporting recipients. Participants reported that only heart transplant recipients understood the experience, the hope, and ultimately the suffering associated with living with another persons’ heart. Attention needs to be focused not solely on the use of teaching modalities, but also on the development of innovative support networks. This will promote patient and caregiver engagement in self-management. Enhancing clinicians’ knowledge of the existential aspects of transplantation will provide them with a nuanced understanding of the patients’ experience, which will ultimately enhance their ability to better prepare and support patients and their caregivers.

  5. DFN-M field characterization of sandstone for a process-based site conceptual model and numerical simulations of TCE transport with degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Amanda A; Chapman, Steven W; Zimmerman, Laura K; Hurley, Jennifer C; Aravena, Ramon; Cherry, John A; Parker, Beth L

    2018-03-03

    Plumes of trichloroethene (TCE) with degradation products occur at a large industrial site in California where TCE as a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) entered the fractured sandstone bedrock at many locations beginning in the late 1940s. Groundwater flows rapidly in closely spaced fractures but plume fronts are strongly retarded relative to groundwater flow velocities owing largely to matrix diffusion in early decades and degradation processes in later decades and going forward. Multiple data types show field evidence for both biotic and abiotic dechlorination of TCE and its degradation products, resulting in non-chlorinated compounds. Analyses were conducted on groundwater samples from hundreds of monitoring wells and on thousands of rock samples from continuous core over depths ranging from 6 to 426 metres below ground surface. Nearly all of the present-day mass of TCE and degradation products resides in the water-saturated, low-permeability rock matrix blocks. Although groundwater and DNAPL flow primarily occur in the fractures, DNAPL dissolution followed by diffusion and sorption readily transfers contaminant mass into the rock matrix. The presence of non-chlorinated degradation products (ethene, ethane, acetylene) and compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of TCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) indicate at least some complete dechlorination by both biotic and abiotic pathways, consistent with the observed mineralogy and hydrogeochemistry and with published results from crushed rock microcosms. The rock matrix contains abundant iron-bearing minerals and solid-phase organic carbon with large surface areas and long contact times, suggesting degradation processes are occurring in the rock matrix. Multiple, high-resolution datasets provide strong evidence for spatially heterogeneous distributions of TCE and degradation products with varying degrees of degradation observed only when using new methods that achieve better detection of dissolved gases (i

  6. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6

  7. Classroom virtual lab experiments as teaching tools for explaining how we understand planetary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. N.; Schools, H.; Research Team Members

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will report on a classroom pilot study in which we teamed with school teachers in four middle school classes to develop and deploy course modules that connect the real-world to virtual forms of laboratory experiments.The broad goal is to help students realize that seemingly complex Earth system processes can be connected to basic properties of the planet and that this can be illustrated through idealized experiment. Specifically the presentation will describe virtual modules based on on-demand cloud computing technologies that allow students to test the notion that pole equator gradients in radiative forcing together with rotation can explain characteristic patterns of flow in the atmosphere. The module developed aligns with new Massachusetts science standard requirements regarding understanding of weather and climate processes. These new standards emphasize an appreciation of differential solar heating and a qualitative understanding of the significance of rotation. In our preliminary classroom pilot studies we employed pre and post evaluation tests to establish that the modules had increased student knowledge of phenomenology and terms. We will describe the results of these tests as well as results from anecdotal measures of student response. This pilot study suggests that one way to help make Earth science concepts more tractable to a wider audience is through virtual experiments that distill phenomena down, but still retain enough detail that students can see the connection to the real world. Modern computer technology and developments in research models appear to provide an opportunity for more work in this area. We will describe some follow-up possibilities that we envisage.

  8. Understanding the creation of & reducing surface microroughness during polishing & post-processing of glass optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, Tayyab [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    In the follow study, we have developed a detailed understanding of the chemical and mechanical microscopic interactions that occur during polishing affecting the resulting surface microroughness of the workpiece. Through targeted experiments and modeling, the quantitative relationships of many important polishing parameters & characteristics affecting surface microroughness have been determined. These behaviors and phenomena have been described by a number of models including: (a) the Ensemble Hertzian Multi Gap (EHMG) model used to predict the removal rate and roughness at atomic force microscope (AFM) scale lengths as a function of various polishing parameters, (b) the Island Distribution Gap (IDG) model used to predict the roughness at larger scale lengths, (c) the Deraguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek (DLVO) 3-body electrostatic colloidal model used to predict the interaction of slurry particles at the interface and roughness behavior as a function of pH, and (d) a diffusion/chemical reaction rate model of the incorporation of impurities species into the polishing surface layer (called the Bielby layer). Based on this improved understanding, novel strategies to polish the workpiece have been developed simultaneously leading to both ultrasmooth surfaces and high material removal rates. Some of these strategies include: (a) use of narrow PSD slurries, (b) a novel diamond conditioning recipe of the lap to increase the active contact area between the workpiece and lap without destroying its surface figure, (c) proper control of pH for a given glass type to allow for a uniform distribution of slurry particles at the interface, and (d) increase in applied load just up to the transition between molecular to plastic removal regime for a single slurry particle. These techniques have been incorporated into a previously developed finishing process called Convergent Polishing leading to not just economical finishing process with improved surface figure control, but also

  9. The Critical Zone: A Necessary Framework for Understanding Surface Earth Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, W. E.

    2016-12-01

    One definition of the critical zone is: the thin veneer of Earth that extends from the top of the vegetation to the base of weathered bedrock. With this definition we can envision the critical zone as a distinct entity with a well-defined top and a fairly well-defined bottom that is distributed across terrestrial earth landscapes. It is a zone of co-evolving processes and, importantly, much of this zone is well below the soil mantle (and commonly more than 10 times thicker than the soil). Weathering advance into fresh bedrock creates a hydrologically-conductive skin that mediates runoff and solute chemistry, stores water used by vegetation, releases water as baseflow to streams, influences soil production and hillslope evolution, and feeds gasses to the atmosphere. Especially in seasonally dry environments, rock moisture in the critical zone, i.e. moisture that is exchangeable and potentially mobile in the matrix and fractures of the bedrock, can be a significant source of water to plants and is a previously unrecognized large component of the water budget that matters to climate models. First observations on the systematic variation of the critical zone across hillslopes have led to four distinct theories representing four distinct processes for what controls the depth to fresh bedrock (and thus the thickness of this zone across a hillslope). These theories are motivating geophysical surveys, deep drilling, and other actions to parameterize and explore the power of these models. Studies at the NSF-supported Critical Zone Observatories have taught us that the critical zone is an entity and that enduring field studies reveal key processes. A challenge we now face is how to include this emerging understanding of the critical zone into models of reactive transport, hydrologic processes and water supply, critical zone structure, landscape evolution, and climate.

  10. Degradation and aquatic toxicity of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using simulated wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Navdeep S; Franz, Eric D; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Michael D; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) produced during the extraction of bitumen at the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, are toxic to many aquatic organisms. Much of this toxicity is related to a group of dissolved organic acids known as naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are a natural component of bitumen and are released into process water during the separation of bitumen from the oil sand ore by a caustic hot water extraction process. Using laboratory microcosms as an analogue of a proposed constructed wetland reclamation strategy for OSPW, we evaluated the effectiveness of these microcosms in degrading NAs and reducing the aquatic toxicity of OSPW over a 52-week test period. Experimental manipulations included two sources of OSPW (one from Syncrude Canada Ltd. and one from Suncor Energy Inc.), two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs; 40 and 400 d), and increased nutrient availability (added nitrate and phosphate). Microcosms with a longer HRT (for both OSPWs) showed higher reductions in total NAs concentrations (64-74% NAs reduction, p100% v/v) independent of HRT. However, EC20s from separate Microtox® bioassays were relatively unchanged when comparing the input and microcosm waters at both HRTs over the 52-week study period (p>0.05), indicating that some sub-lethal toxicity persisted under these experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that given sufficiently long HRTs, simulated wetland microcosms containing OSPW significantly reduced total NAs concentrations and acute toxicity, but left behind a persistent component of the NAs mixture that appeared to be associated with residual chronic toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kraft lignin depolymerisation by based catalysed degradation (BCD) - The effect of process parameters on conversion degree and structural features of BCD fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmiedl, Schmiedl; Böringer, Sarah; Schweppe, Rainer; Liitiä, Tiina; Rovio, Stella; Tamminen, Tarja; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez Suárez, Ana; Río Andrade, José Carlos del; Río Andrade, José Carlos del

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is the generation of oxy-aromatic compounds (monomer, oligomer) from Eucalyptus- Kraft-lignin via multi-stage processes. These processes (1st base catalysed degradation & 2nd separation of the organic phase from reactor water) have to be feasible in bio refineries & in new Pulp-mill bio refineries as a new technology module. The Eucalyptus-Kraft-lignin (Suzano Pulp & Paper) was used for catalyzed conversion into oxy aromatics. Subsequently, the effect of process par...

  12. Degradation and detection of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis DNA and proteins in flour of three genetically modified rice events submitted to a set of thermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofu; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xu, Junfeng; Dai, Chen; Shen, Wenbiao

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the degradation of three transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes (Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry1Ab/Ac) and the corresponding encoded Bt proteins in KMD1, KF6, and TT51-1 rice powder, respectively, following autoclaving, cooking, baking, or microwaving. Exogenous Bt genes were more stable than the endogenous sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene, and short DNA fragments were detected more frequently than long DNA fragments in both the Bt and SPS genes. Autoclaving, cooking (boiling in water, 30 min), and baking (200 °C, 30 min) induced the most severe Bt protein degradation effects, and Cry1Ab protein was more stable than Cry1Ac and Cry1Ab/Ac protein, which was further confirmed by baking samples at 180 °C for different periods of time. Microwaving induced mild degradation of the Bt and SPS genes, and Bt proteins, whereas baking (180 °C, 15 min), cooking and autoclaving led to further degradation, and baking (200 °C, 30 min) induced the most severe degradation. The findings of the study indicated that degradation of the Bt genes and proteins somewhat correlated with the treatment intensity. Polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and lateral flow tests were used to detect the corresponding transgenic components. Strategies for detecting transgenic ingredients in highly processed foods are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Icepod Plus Potential Field: An Integrated Approach For Understanding Ice Shelf Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frearson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Warm water flowing beneath the large floating ice shelves in Antarctica will play an important role in how fast sea level rises. The lack of detailed bathymetry beneath the large ice shelves and lack of understanding of their internal structure inherently limits our knowledge of how ice shelves will thin and collapse. Understanding the bathymetry beneath the remaining ice shelves is critical to understanding how ice shelves will thin in the future and how that will impact the flux of ice into the global ocean. The Ross Ice Shelf, the largest ice shelf remaining on our planet, buttresses the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The bathymetry beneath the Ross Ice Shelf is the least explored piece of ocean floor on our planet. The IcePod is a compact integrated ice imaging system developed for use on any C-130 aircraft developed with NSF support. The initial development program was targeted towards investigating glacial and ice-sheet processes. In this program, deep and shallow ice radars were developed. Optical instruments, including a scanning laser, Infra-red camera and visible wave camera were integrated into the pod. We have expanded the IcePod instrument suite to include the potential field measurements of magnetic and gravity anomalies with support from the Moore Foundation. During the development, a total field cesium sensor magnetometer and 3-axis fluxgate from previously funded work were also incorporated into the pod. Their behavioral response to being located close to high-frequency electronics, power supplies and metallic objects were studied. We describe in part some of that development process and the positive findings that resulted. The Icepod group is also actively pursuing the development, modification and incorporation of a new gravimeter into the suite of instruments available to the program and is investigating reduction in size of this that may eventually lead to incorporating the gravimeter into the pod itself. As part of this program we are also

  14. Understanding the structured processes followed by organisations prior to engaging in agile processes: A South African Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimrod Noruwana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There appears to be a lack of knowledge on the phases South African (SA organisations go through while adopting agile methods. As a means to address this gap, this study uncovered empirical evidence on the phases SA organisations go through whilst adopting agile methods as well as the disparities between agile prescriptions and the way SA organisations actually implement agile methods. The data collected using a case study approach was analysed through the lens of Actor-Network Theory (ANT. The results reveal that there is no structured process for adopting agile methods and organisations go through various phases in their attempts to adopt agile methods. During the various phases, organisations face challenges which are culture as well as people related. Through this study South African practitioners could now be aware that before adopting an agile methodology, there has to be a common understanding of the problems at hand and the envisioned solution. The findings also inform aspiring adopters in South Africa that adoption of the methods does not have to be as prescribed. They are free to adopt only those aspects the organisations need most.

  15. Degradation Behavior of Thermal Stabilized Polyacrylonitrile Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Shuai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the temperature range of 300-800℃, 40%-50% of the mass lost during the processing of polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber (PANCF. Understanding the degradation behavior will be valuable in understanding the formation mechanism of pseudo-graphite structure, and providing theoretic basis for producing high performance carbon fiber and increasing the carbonization yield. The simulation of the degradation progress was carried out on the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, the results show that there are two degradation steps for PAN fiber stabilized in air, and controlled by cyclization coefficient and oxygen content. The cyclization coefficient and oxygen content are effective to the density of carbon fiber by influencing the degradation behavior, which cause defects in the fiber. The higher cyclization coefficient leads to form less structural defects and higher density of the fiber; on the contrary, the higher oxygen content leads to form more structural defects and lower density of the fiber.

  16. Peer review in design: Understanding the impact of collaboration on the review process and student perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Mahender Arjun

    A cornerstone of design and design education is frequent situated feedback. With increasing class sizes, and shrinking financial and human resources, providing rich feedback to students becomes increasingly difficult. In the field of writing, web-based peer review--the process of utilizing equal status learners within a class to provide feedback to each other on their work using networked computing systems--has been shown to be a reliable and valid source of feedback in addition to improving student learning. Designers communicate in myriad ways, using the many languages of design and combining visual and descriptive information. This complex discourse of design intent makes peer reviews by design students ambiguous and often not helpful to the receivers of this feedback. Furthermore, engaging students in the review process itself is often difficult. Teams can complement individual diversity and may assist novice designers collectively resolve complex task. However, teams often incur production losses and may be impacted by individual biases. In the current work, we look at utilizing a collaborative team of reviewers, working collectively and synchronously, in generating web based peer reviews in a sophomore engineering design class. Students participated in a cross-over design, conducting peer reviews as individuals and collaborative teams in parallel sequences. Raters