WorldWideScience

Sample records for underprepared health science

  1. African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences is an open access, free online, internationally refereed journal publishing original articles on research, clinical practice, public health, policy, planning, implementation and evaluation, in the health and related sciences relevant to Africa and the tropics. African Health Sciences acknowledges support ...

  2. Understanding the Career Development of Underprepared College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amber N.; Gibbons, Melinda M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career development of underprepared college students using relational career theory. Specifically, the constructs of family influence, locus of control, and career decision-making self-efficacy were explored as they relate to perceived success in college. Significant correlations between external locus…

  3. Archives: African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 67 ... Archives: African Health Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: African Health Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 67 Items, 1 2 > >> ...

  4. African Health Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. This journal does not accept author submission via the AJOL website. Please follow the author guidelines below. Instructions to authors. Introduction African Health Sciences is an internationally refereed, free access, journal publishing original articles on research, clinical practice, public health, policy, ...

  5. Exploring the Use of Faded Worked Examples as a Problem Solving Approach for Underprepared Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Tiffany L.; Gregory, Jess L.

    2015-01-01

    It is not uncommon for students to find themselves underprepared when entering a post secondary institution. In additional to lower levels of academic achievement, underprepared students may not be aware that they lack the skills needed to be successful and effectively acquire and process information. Because of this, students that enter…

  6. Rwanda Journal of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rwanda Journal of Health Sciences, a publication of Kigali Health Institute, publishes original research, short communications, and review articles on current topics of special interest and relevance in various health related fields including public health, allied health sciences, nursing, environmental health, nutrition, ...

  7. Physics of Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baublitz, Millard; Goldberg, Bennett

    A one-semester algebra-based physics course is being offered to Boston University students whose major fields of study are in allied health sciences: physical therapy, athletic training, and speech, language, and hearing sciences. The classroom instruction incorporates high-engagement learning techniques including worksheets, student response devices, small group discussions, and physics demonstrations instead of traditional lectures. The use of pre-session exercises and quizzes has been implemented. The course also requires weekly laboratory experiments in mechanics or electricity. We are using standard pre- and post-course concept inventories to compare this one-semester introductory physics course to ten years of pre- and post-course data collected on students in the same majors but who completed a two-semester course.

  8. Center for Environmental Health Sciences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary research objective of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) at the University of Montana is to advance knowledge of environmental impacts...

  9. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tropical Journal of Health Sciences (TJHS) is an international journal which provides a forum for exchange of ideas to those engaged in work in the Health Sciences and related fields. The journal intends to publish high quality papers on original research, case reports, short communications, commentary, review ...

  10. Research Journal of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Research Journal of Health Sciences is dedicated to promoting high quality research work in the field of health and related biological sciences. It aligns with the mission of the Osun State University, which is “to create a unique institution, committed to the pursuit of academic innovation, skills-based training and a ...

  11. The Effects of Counseling on the Retention and Academic Performance of Underprepared Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Blaire; Ramaswami, Soundaram

    2015-01-01

    Higher education administrators, faculty, and staff expend great effort to increase the academic success and retention of college freshmen. Underprepared college freshmen are of particular concern given their high risk for dropping out. While interventions such as specific orientation programs, remedial/developmental coursework, and special…

  12. A Transition Program for Underprepared Students in General Chemistry: Diagnosis, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Shawn P.; Hogrebe, Mark C.; Spees, William M.; Handlin, Larry B.; Noelken, Greg P.; Riley, Julie M.; Frey, Regina F.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an online exam to diagnose students who are underprepared for college-level general chemistry and implemented a program to support them during the general chemistry sequence. This transition program consists of extended-length recitations, peer-led team-learning (PLTL) study groups, and peer-mentoring groups. We evaluated this…

  13. Online Learning: Outcomes and Satisfaction among Underprepared Students in an Upper-Level Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Colleen; Roberts, Ramona Palmerio; Hummel, Jessamy

    2014-01-01

    Online learning is on the rise, but research on outcomes and student satisfaction has produced conflicting results, and systematic, targeted research on underprepared college students is generally lacking. This study compared three sections (traditional, online, and 50% hybrid) of the same upper-level psychology course, taught with identical…

  14. Yes We Can! A Community College Guide for Developing America's Underprepared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Robert H.

    This book argues that most academically deficient students do not lack talent, but do lack preparation. Nearly half of students entering community colleges are underprepared, and fewer than half gain the competency needed to succeed in college-level courses. Community colleges have the capability to develop these talents for the benefit of the…

  15. Marketing the Health Sciences Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, O. Gene

    The basic activities of marketing are discussed, including gathering information and determining needs, designing a program around the elements of the marketing mix, and managing the marketing program. Following a general discussion, applications of the marketing concepts to a health sciences library are described. The administrator of the health…

  16. Twitter and Health Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    Twitter is a communication platform that can be used to conduct health science research, but a full understanding of its use remains unclear. The purpose of this narrative literature review was to examine how Twitter is currently being used to conduct research in the health sciences and to consider how it might be used in the future. A time-limited search of the health-related research was conducted, which resulted in 31 peer-reviewed articles for review. Information relating to how Twitter is being used to conduct research was extracted and categorized, and an explanatory narrative was developed. To date, Twitter is largely being used to conduct large-scale studies, but this research is complicated by challenges relating to collecting and analyzing big data. Conversely, the use of Twitter to conduct small-scale investigations appears to be relatively unexplored. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Social Science Collaboration with Environmental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Elizabeth; Renauld, Mia; Edelstein, Michael R; Brown, Phil

    2015-11-01

    Social science research has been central in documenting and analyzing community discovery of environmental exposure and consequential processes. Collaboration with environmental health science through team projects has advanced and improved our understanding of environmental health and justice. We sought to identify diverse methods and topics in which social scientists have expanded environmental health understandings at multiple levels, to examine how transdisciplinary environmental health research fosters better science, and to learn how these partnerships have been able to flourish because of the support from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). We analyzed various types of social science research to investigate how social science contributes to environmental health. We also examined NIEHS programs that foster social science. In addition, we developed a case study of a community-based participation research project in Akwesasne in order to demonstrate how social science has enhanced environmental health science. Social science has informed environmental health science through ethnographic studies of contaminated communities, analysis of spatial distribution of environmental injustice, psychological experience of contamination, social construction of risk and risk perception, and social impacts of disasters. Social science-environmental health team science has altered the way scientists traditionally explore exposure by pressing for cumulative exposure approaches and providing research data for policy applications. A transdisciplinary approach for environmental health practice has emerged that engages the social sciences to paint a full picture of the consequences of contamination so that policy makers, regulators, public health officials, and other stakeholders can better ameliorate impacts and prevent future exposure. Hoover E, Renauld M, Edelstein MR, Brown P. 2015. Social science collaboration with environmental health. Environ Health

  18. Social Science Collaboration with Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Elizabeth; Renauld, Mia; Edelstein, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social science research has been central in documenting and analyzing community discovery of environmental exposure and consequential processes. Collaboration with environmental health science through team projects has advanced and improved our understanding of environmental health and justice. Objective We sought to identify diverse methods and topics in which social scientists have expanded environmental health understandings at multiple levels, to examine how transdisciplinary environmental health research fosters better science, and to learn how these partnerships have been able to flourish because of the support from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Methods We analyzed various types of social science research to investigate how social science contributes to environmental health. We also examined NIEHS programs that foster social science. In addition, we developed a case study of a community-based participation research project in Akwesasne in order to demonstrate how social science has enhanced environmental health science. Results Social science has informed environmental health science through ethnographic studies of contaminated communities, analysis of spatial distribution of environmental injustice, psychological experience of contamination, social construction of risk and risk perception, and social impacts of disasters. Social science–environmental health team science has altered the way scientists traditionally explore exposure by pressing for cumulative exposure approaches and providing research data for policy applications. Conclusions A transdisciplinary approach for environmental health practice has emerged that engages the social sciences to paint a full picture of the consequences of contamination so that policy makers, regulators, public health officials, and other stakeholders can better ameliorate impacts and prevent future exposure. Citation Hoover E, Renauld M, Edelstein MR, Brown P. 2015. Social

  19. Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomedical Engineering Biotechnology in relation to Medicine Clinical Sciences Dental Sciences Environment and Health Health Economics and Management Health Information Management Hygiene and Health Education Legal Aspects of Healthcare Medical Education Nursing Sciences Pharmaceutical Sciences

  20. A Dual Approach to Fostering Under-Prepared Student Success: Focusing on Doing and Becoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C. Shaffer, MsEd, MEd

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A paired course model for under-prepared college students incorporates a dual instructional approach, academic skill building and lifelong learning development, to help students do more academically and become stronger lifelong learners. In a reading support course, students improved their reading skills and applied them directly to the paired content course. They also developed lifelong learning attributes through increased self-knowledge (using the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory, reflection, and coaching. Students showed significant gains in lifelong learning, an 85% success rate in the paired content course, and a higher retention rate than students outside the project with similar SAT critical reading scores.

  1. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored.

  2. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  3. Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences is a multidisciplinary and peer-reviewed journal. This journal was established to meet the challenges of health care delivery in the 21st century in Nigeria and other countries with similar setting in the ever-changing world of science and technology. The health care ...

  4. Leadership styles in interdisciplinary health science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnett, Bonita; Clay, Maria

    2008-12-01

    The US Institute of Medicine recommends that all health professionals should deliver patient-centered care as members of interdisciplinary health science teams. The current application of the Bolman and Deal Leadership model to health sciences provides an interesting point of reference to compare leadership styles. This article reviews several applications of that model within academic health care and the aggregate recommendations for leaders of health care disciplines based on collective findings.

  5. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. THE ETHIOPIAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH SCIENCES publishes original research findings, observations, review articles, brief communications, case reports and book reviews related to Public Health and Medicine, Papers presented at recognized conferences may be considered for publication.

  6. Trend spotting--whither health science librarianship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeannette

    2011-12-01

    This feature surveys 20th-century trends in health sciences librarianship. It sets the scene for a series of features looking at 21st-century trends in various countries and regions. Whilst the mission of the health science library remains constant, librarians must find ways of adjusting their role and the services they provide to take account of changes in the external environment. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  7. Climate Change: Science, Health and the Environment

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Climate Change: Science, Health and the Environment Howard Frumkin, MD, DrPH, Director of CDC's National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, discusses the science of climate change, the potential for shifts in the natural world to affect our wellbeing, and the challenges of emerging issues in environmental health.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  8. Reducing the Need for Postsecondary Remediation Using Self-Efficacy to Identify Underprepared African-American and Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Carolyn; Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Postsecondary remedial education is a major problem for Higher Education affecting retention rates, degree completion rates and cost of enrollment. Identification of students who are underprepared for managing the rigors of college and who would benefit from early intervention is necessary to reduce the need for postsecondary…

  9. Smoking in Health Science Students with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Krommydas

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that asthmatic students in a health science department would avoid the hazards of cigarette smoking due to the knowledge they gain through their studies. Surprisingly, health science students with asthma had a higher prevalence of smoking than their healthy colleagues.

  10. Archives: Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 65 ... Archives: Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ...

  11. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal covers technical and clinical studies related to health, ethical and social issues in field of all aspects of medicine (Basic and Clinical), Health Sciences, Nursing, Medical Laboratory Sciences, Medical Radiography and Rehabilitation, Pharmacy, Biomedical Engineering, etc. Articles with clinical interest and ...

  12. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, V M

    1999-10-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries.

  13. African Health Sciences: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences: About this journal. Journal Home > African Health Sciences: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. People. » Contact ...

  14. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee; Research Career... applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W...

  15. Welcome to health information science and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless networking and are applicable to a wide range of health related information including medical data, biomedical data, bioinformatics data, public health data.

  16. Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Toby L; Schmid, Kendra K; Boucher-Payne, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students' spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students' spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including suggestions for curriculum interventions that may ensure students' success.

  17. Authorship outlets of academic health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradigan, P S; Mularski, C A

    1992-04-01

    Journal articles are the most common publication format for U.S. academic health sciences librarians. This is consistent with the findings of other researchers. Of the total publications in this study, 68% were in journals. Watson found that 69% of the academic librarians' publications were published in some type of journal [8]. Similarly, Yerkey and Glogowski found that 67% of the publications in their study were journal articles, although their population consisted of all types of authors of library/information science materials [9]. Both the present study and Watson found that monographs were the second most common publication outlet. Watson found that 16% of the total publications were monographs; the current study identified 14.8% of the total publications as monographs [10]. Although Watson's findings are similar to the newer results, it is important to note that Watson's study was conducted in a different manner and included book reviews, which were not counted in the present study. The health sciences librarians in the present study published more than two thirds of their articles in library/information science journals and 27% in health sciences journals. Similarly, in Yerkey and Glogowski's study, the second-largest number of library/information science articles appeared in medical and health sciences journals [11]. Fang also found that 22.57% of the journal articles on health sciences librarianship or by health sciences librarians were in medical journals [12. This seems to demonstrate the desire of health sciences librarians to communicate with the health professionals. Yerkey and Glogowski that library and information science is an interdisciplinary field, "borrowing and supplying information to and from other disciplines"[13].

  18. On the Health of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Harold G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the present status of science as an industrialized-affluent culture resting upon a public woefully lacking in scientific background and scientists with activities taken in by nihilism. Suggests all scientists actively work together through teaching, talk, and behavior to counter the forces of anti-science and nihilism. (CC)

  19. Political Science Theory for Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Community health educators are well versed in the behavior sciences, including intervention theories. However, most public health professionals are not familiar with the policy theories related to political advocacy. Because health educators are engaging in policy advocacy more frequently, and as a result of the profession including policy…

  20. African Health Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Provide a high quality journal in which health and policy and other researchers and practitioners in the region can and world wide, can publish their work; Promote relevant health system research and publication in the region including alternative means of health care financing, the burden of and solution of health problems ...

  1. Health Sciences in Iran; Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani R.* PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As this is the first issue of the International Archives of Health Sciences, a scholarly journal of Kashan University of medical Sciences, we start with an editorial of Dr. Rouhullah Dehghani, the editor-in-chief, to explain the aims and views of the editorial board members and the scope of the journal.

  2. African Health Sciences - Vol 8 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resilience research and policy/practice discourse in health, social, behavioral, and environmental sciences over the last ten years. EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AM Almedom ...

  3. Behavioural sciences at university of health sciences: the way forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, J.S.; Mukhtar, O.; Tabasum, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association of medical ethics with teaching and training and health profession has been informal, largely dependent on role modelling and the social contract of the physicians with the community that they abide by. This study was conducted to examine the effect, if any, of introducing the subject of Behavioural Sciences on students performance in the clinical years viva voce and patient interactions components of the examinations. Methods: A prospective study on four cohorts of students at UHS from 2007 to 2012 (8,155 candidates). Reliability was calculated through Cronbach Alpha. Linear Regression Analysis was applied to determine the relationship between the scores of Basic Medical Sciences, Behavioural Sciences and Forensic medicine with the viva voce and Structured Stations marks of the Clinical Sciences in OSCE. Gender and demographics analysis was also done. Results: Cronbach Alpha was 0.47, 0.63, 0.67 and 0.53 for the Papers of Behavioural Sciences from 2007 to 2010 respectively. Poor predictive value of Behavioural Sciences for performance in the clinical years viva voce and OSCE was identified. Basic Medical Sciences and Forensic Medicine were statistically significant predictors for the performance of female candidates in all four cohorts of the study (p<0.05). In Central Punjab, Behavioural Sciences statistically significantly predicted for better performance in all four cohorts of the study (p<0.05). Conclusion: It is premature to understand the results of Behavioural Sciences teaching at University of Health Sciences (UHS). We can still safely conclude that it can only have a positive sustained effect on the healthcare delivery systems and patient care in Pakistan if it is integrated within each subject and taught and learned not as a theoretical construct but rather an evaluation of one values within the code of conduct of medical professionalism in the larger context of the societal and cultural norms. (author)

  4. A greater voice for academic health sciences libraries: the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Alison

    2003-04-01

    The founders of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) envisioned the development of a professional organization that would provide a greater voice for academic health sciences libraries, facilitate cooperation and communication with the Association of American Medical Colleges, and create a forum for identifying problems and solutions that are common to academic health sciences libraries. This article focuses on the fulfillment of the "greater voice" vision by describing action and leadership by AAHSL and its members on issues that directly influenced the role of academic health sciences libraries. These include AAHSL's participation in the work that led to the publication of the landmark report, Academic Information in the Academic Health Sciences Center: Roles for the Library in Information Management; its contributions to the recommendations of the Physicians for the Twenty-first Century: The GPEP Report; and the joint publication with the Medical Library Association of Challenge to Action: Planning and Evaluation Guidelines for Academic Health Sciences Libraries.

  5. Predictors of empathy in health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Boyle, Malcolm; Williams, Brett; Molloy, Andrew; Palermo, Claire; McKenna, Lisa; Molloy, Liz

    2011-01-01

    The significance of both empathy and effective communication as key components in the provision of health care services is widely acknowledged. It is important, therefore, to promote those communication styles which facilitate an empathetic understanding among health science students. To explores whether listening and communication styles are predictive of empathy among health science students. A cross-sectional study of 860 undergraduate health science students (response rate, 59%) using paper-based versions of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy-Health Professional Version, Listening Styles Profile, Communicator Styles Measure, and a brief demographic questionnaire. Two stepwise linear regression analyses were completed using the empathy construct as the dependent/criterion variable and listening and communication styles as the two sets of independent/predictor variables. As there was a statistically significant difference in empathy between males and females, gender was controlled for in both regression models. In first model, the People and Time listening styles were found to be predictive of empathy, accounting for 20.3% of the total variance. In the second model, both the Friendly and Relaxed communication styles were predictive of empathy, accounting for 9.7% of the total variance. The findings indicate that People and Time listening styles and the Friendly and Relaxed communication styles were significant predictors of empathy in health science students. The findings suggest that promoting effective communication among health science students may improve their ability to empathize.

  6. Health sciences students' contribution to human resources for health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health sciences students' contribution to human resources for health strategy: A rural health careers day for grade 12 learners in the North West Province of South ... scholarship programme, which highlighted the challenges faced by students from rural communities who try to gain access to institutions of higher education.

  7. Users of Health Sciences Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, Estelle

    1974-01-01

    A history of medical libraries and information, from their exclusive use by physicians decades ago to the present use of such information by researchers, educators, students, health workers other than doctors, and even laymen. (LS)

  8. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing and...

  9. Health, Wellbeing and Social Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore, Giovanni; Agostoni, Carlo

    2016-09-09

    For social interventions aimed at improving nutrition behavior evidence from randomized trials is essential but cannot be the only approach of research activities. Interventions on dietary habits require considerations on food security, economic and environmental sustainability, and a broad meaning of wellbeing which includes, but also goes beyond, health effects. The model of research in nutrition requires a new consideration of observational studies, mainly through different analytical models. Nutrition and food studies need research programs where medical (nutrition and health), psychology (how we behave), economics (how resources are used and their impact on wellbeing) and sociology (how social determinant shape behavior) collaborate.

  10. Health Instruction Packages: Behavioral Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Dianne Dee; And Others

    These four learning modules present text and exercises designed to help allied health students understand various elements of positive interaction with people. The first module, "Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs" by Dianne Mackey, defines human needs, presents Maslow's theories, and helps the learner identify behaviors that reflect the…

  11. Science academy statements on water, health, and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    Several days prior to the Group of 8 (G8) summit of nations on 26-27 May in Deauville, France, science academies from those nations and five others issued joint statements calling for the governments to take actions regarding water and health as well as science education. The water and health statement indicates that nearly 3 billion people will be living in water-scarce countries by 2050 and that 2.6 billion already lack access to proper sanitation and nearly 900 million lack access to a clean water supply. The statement calls for developing basic infrastructure for sanitation, promoting education to change the behavior of populations regarding water supply, funding research and development to identify pathogens, and improving water management and hygiene standards, among other measures.

  12. Oral Health Literacy and Behavior of Health Sciences University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti N Mohd-Dom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the level of oral health literacy and behavior among health sciences. Methods: The method used descriptive cross-sectional survey involving 609 students from Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences in the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Oral health literacy level and behaviour was assessed with a validated and pretested self-administered questionnaire using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS tool and modified Oral Health Adult Literacy Questionnaire (OHL-AQ. Results: A total of 509 participants involved in the study (83.6%. The overall mean oral health literacy score was 10.27 (95% CI 7.92, 12.62, which found dental students showing statistically significant higher scores (mean=11.36, 95% CI 9.70, 13.02 compared to medical (mean=10.72, 95% CI 8.67, 12.77, allied health sciences (mean=9.89, 95% CI 7.34, 12.44 and pharmacy (mean=9.55, 95% CI 7.23, 11.87. Almost all respondents are non-smokers (99.8% and non-drinkers (97.2%. Only 19.1% pay regular dental visits every 6-12 months while 51.1% visit dentist only when they have dental pain. Conclusion: There appears to be a positive relationship between oral health literacy and oral health behavior. Health science university students should be provided substantial dental health education in their curriculum as they show good potential as strategic partners in oral health.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.404

  13. Scientific Inquiry in Health Sciences Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    Background: Assistant professors in the health sciences (108 participants from biomedicine, clinical medicine, dentistry, sports, nursing and public health) submitted their teaching portfolio as part of the requirement for a pedagogical course for university teachers at Aarhus University, Denmark....... The course introduced participants to concepts and methods to create constructive alignment and activating teaching and to a teaching portfolio as a means of reflecting upon inquiry and teaching. Design: This study investigated assistant professors espoused beliefs about the role of scientific inquiry...

  14. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    In Health Physics Branch, work is continuing on development of neutron dosimetry techniques, new thermoluminescent dosimeters, and portable tritium-in-air monitoring instruments. Development of beneficial uses of waste heat has continued in the Environmental Research Branch. Other work includes studies in meteorology, biogeochemistry of nuclear waste management areas, and soil and groundwater studies. Research activity in the Radiation Biology Branch is dealing with the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms. Both genetic and mutagenic effects of damage to DNA are being studied as well as repair mechanisms and human diseases caused by repair mechanism deficiencies. In the Biomedical Research Branch, a collaborative study is being undertaken into the retention and excretion of uranium in fuel fabrication workers. (O.T.)

  15. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  16. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tropical Journal of Health Sciences accords special interest and high priority to: original work; research and training innovations and clinical observations. ... Internationally acceptable nomenclature and units of scientific measurement, Systeme International (S.I) should be used consistently. The 24 hour system should ...

  17. Teaching Health and Safety through Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and investigative work has been an integral element in the teaching of science in schools for many years. Although students have always been taught to work safely, there is now a more general requirement that they will be taught about health and safety and how it should be implemented. That is, they must understand something of the…

  18. Automatic energy expenditure measurement for health science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catal, Cagatay; Akbulut, Akhan

    2018-01-01

    Background and objective: It is crucial to predict the human energy expenditure in any sports activity and health science application accurately to investigate the impact of the activity. However, measurement of the real energy expenditure is not a trivial task and involves complex steps. The

  19. Non Communicable Diseases | Adeniyi | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 3 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  20. The retained placenta | Weeks | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here ...

  1. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All papers are double blind reviewed by at least two assessors in the related discipline. However the final decision to accept or reject any manuscript will be made by the Editor-in-Chief. The Tropical Journal of Health Sciences accords special interest and high priority to: original work; research and training innovations and ...

  2. D:\\African Health Sciences\\Augu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    affected by war and forced migration. Keywords: forced migration, traumatic events, post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, Uganda, Sudan, refugees. African Health Sciences 2004; 4(2):83-93. Correspondence: Unni Krishnan Karunakara. Médecins sans Frontières, PO Box 10014, 1001 EA. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

  3. Comparison of health risk behavior, awareness, and health benefit beliefs of health science and non-health science students: An international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa; Yung, Tony K C; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Rehman, Rehana

    2016-06-01

    This study determines the differences in health risk behavior, knowledge, and health benefit beliefs between health science and non-health science university students in 17 low and middle income countries. Anonymous questionnaire data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of 13,042 undergraduate university students (4,981 health science and 8,061 non-health science students) from 17 universities in 17 countries across Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Results indicate that overall, health science students had the same mean number of health risk behaviors as non-health science university students. Regarding addictive risk behavior, fewer health science students used tobacco, were binge drinkers, or gambled once a week or more. Health science students also had a greater awareness of health behavior risks (5.5) than non-health science students (4.6). Linear regression analysis found a strong association with poor or weak health benefit beliefs and the health risk behavior index. There was no association between risk awareness and health risk behavior among health science students and an inverse association among non-health science students. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Population Health Science: A Core Element of Health Science Education in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Robert A; Engmann, Natalie J; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Amarsi, Yasmin; Macharia, William M; Macfarlane, Sarah B; Ngugi, Anthony K; Rabbani, Fauziah; Walraven, Gijs; Armstrong, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa suffers an inordinate burden of disease and does not have the numbers of suitably trained health care workers to address this challenge. New concepts in health sciences education are needed to offer alternatives to current training approaches.A perspective of integrated training in population health for undergraduate medical and nursing education is advanced, rather than continuing to take separate approaches for clinical and public health education. Population health science educates students in the social and environmental origins of disease, thus complementing disease-specific training and providing opportunities for learners to take the perspective of the community as a critical part of their education.Many of the recent initiatives in health science education in sub-Saharan Africa are reviewed, and two case studies of innovative change in undergraduate medical education are presented that begin to incorporate such population health thinking. The focus is on East Africa, one of the most rapidly growing economies in sub-Saharan Africa where opportunities for change in health science education are opening. The authors conclude that a focus on population health is a timely and effective way for enhancing training of health care professionals to reduce the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. Subject knowledge in the health sciences library: an online survey of Canadian academic health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Erin M

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated whether Canadian academic health sciences librarians found knowledge of the health sciences to be important and, if so, how they acquired and maintained this knowledge. Data were gathered using a Web-based questionnaire made available to Canadian academic health sciences librarians. Respondents recognized the need for subject knowledge: 93.3% of respondents indicated that subject knowledge was "very important" or "somewhat important" to doing their job. However, few respondents felt that holding a degree in the health sciences was necessary. Respondents reported devoting on average more than 6 hours per week to continuing education through various means. Reading or browsing health sciences journals, visiting Websites, studying independently, and participating in professional associations were identified by the largest number of participants as the best ways to become and stay informed. Although more research needs to be done with a larger sample, subject knowledge continues to be important to Canadian academic health sciences librarians. Continuing education, rather than formal degree studies, is the method of choice for obtaining and maintaining this knowledge.

  6. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be a Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Expand Environment & Health Healthy ...

  7. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Oral Health Sciences: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Oral Health Sciences: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches : What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Integrative Health NCCIH Clinical Digest for health professionals Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science ... 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, Info for Patients: Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches Mind and Body ...

  9. Research methods from social science can contribute much to the health sciences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, M.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research methods from social science, such as social network analysis, random coefficient modeling, and advanced measurement techniques, can contribute much to the health sciences. There is, however, a slow rate of transmission of social science methodology into the health sciences. This

  10. Academic health sciences librarians' publication patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularski, C A; Bradigan, P S

    1991-04-01

    This study examines the publication patterns of U.S. academic health sciences librarians. A survey was sent to a random sample of Medical Library Association (MLA) members who work in academic settings. Some survey results are consistent with other research while others vary from the findings of previous studies. Faculty status requiring publication may be an incentive to publish; however, a large percentage of librarians in this study published despite the lack of a requirement. Academic health sciences librarians without advanced degrees other than a master's in library science produced about three quarters of the publications, whereas their colleagues with advanced degrees published slightly more than 25% of the publications. Results concerning professional maturity, position, and geographic location reflect findings of earlier studies of academic librarians' publication patterns. Publication productivity generally increased with professional maturity, most authors held administrative or supervisory positions, and many lived in the Northeast and Midwest regions of the United States. The differences in rates of publication between males and females was not statistically significant after controlling for respondents' professional maturity and position. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

  11. Data science, learning, and applications to biomedical and health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nabil R; Wieder, Robert; Ghosh, Debopriya

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has seen an unprecedented increase in the volume and variety of electronic data related to research and development, health records, and patient self-tracking, collectively referred to as Big Data. Properly harnessed, Big Data can provide insights and drive discovery that will accelerate biomedical advances, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. However, the considerable potential of Big Data remains unrealized owing to obstacles including a limited ability to standardize and consolidate data and challenges in sharing data, among a variety of sources, providers, and facilities. Here, we discuss some of these challenges and potential solutions, as well as initiatives that are already underway to take advantage of Big Data. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  13. Coordinators for health science libraries in the Midwest Health Science Library Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtum, E A; McKloskey, J; Mahan, R

    1977-04-01

    In the summer of 1973 one resource library in each of the six states of the Midwest Health Science Library Network received funding from the National Library of Medicine to hire a coordinator for health science libraries. The development of the role of coordinator is examined and evaluated. The coordinators have proved valuable in the areas of consortium formation, basic unit development, communication facilitation, and program initiation. The function of the coordinators in the extensive planning effort now being undertaken by the network and the future need for the coordinator positions are discussed.

  14. Learning to Teach Inquiry: A Beginning Science Teacher of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Irasema; Luft, Julie A.; Wong, Sissy S.

    2013-01-01

    Early career science teachers are often assigned to classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs). For the underprepared early career science teacher, these circumstances are challenging. This study examines the changes in beliefs and practices of an early career science teacher who taught high numbers of ELLs in an urban…

  15. [Social Sciences and Humanities in Health in ABRASCO: the construction of social theory in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Aurea Maria Zöllner; Spadacio, Cristiane; Barboza, Renato; Alves, Olga Sofia Fabergé; Viana, Sabrina Daniela Lopes; Rocha, Ane Talita

    2014-11-01

    The development of recent social thinking in health in Brazil is associated with the establishment of the Public Health field and the Brazilian Association of Graduate Studies in Public Health (ABRASCO). The area of Social Sciences in Health was created together with the founding of ABRASCO. This article presents the main aspects related to the establishment and institutionalization of Social Sciences in Health in ABRASCO, based on interviews with its presidents and the coordinators of the Social Sciences Committees from 1995 to 2011. The interviews allowed capturing and analyzing the context in which this field was established and its relevance and history in Public Health as a whole, grouped in five analytical categories: (1) the development of Social Sciences and the Humanities in Health; (2) interdisciplinarity in Public Health; (3) the contribution of Social Sciences to Public Health; (4) Social Sciences in Health and the "traditional" Social Sciences; and (5) challenges for Social Sciences and the Humanities in Health.

  16. A hermeneutic science: health economics and Habermas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Neil; Mannion, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Mainstream health economics labours under a misleading understanding of the nature of the topic area and suffers from a concomitant poverty of thinking about theory and method. The purpose here is to explore this critical position and argue that health economics should aspire to being more than a technical discipline. It can, and should, engage with transformative discourse. It is argued that the hermeneutic sciences, emphasising interpretation not instrumentality or domination, offer a route into the change to which one seeks to contribute. The article specifically focuses on the way Habermas provides insights in his approach to knowledge, reason and political economy. How he emphasises complexity and interaction within cultural milieu is explored and primacy is given to preserving the life-world against the encroachments of a narrow rationalization. The argument for a critical re-imagining of health economics is presented in three stages. First, the antecedents, current assumptions and critical voices from contemporary economics and health economics are reviewed. Second, the way in which health is best understood via engaging with the complexity of both the subject itself and the society and culture within which it is embedded is explored. Third, the contribution that hermeneutics, and Habermas' critical theory, could make to a new health economics is examined. The paper offers a radical alternative to health economics. It explores the shortcomings of current thinking and argues an optimistic position. Progress via reason is possible if one reframes both in the direction of communication and in the appreciation of reflexivity and communality. This is a position that resonates with many who challenge prevailing paradigms, in economics and elsewhere.

  17. High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health NCCIH Clinical Digest for health professionals High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says ... chemically identical to the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Available evidence on the cholesterol- ...

  18. Hookah pipe smoking among health sciences students | van der ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , especially among South African youth. The extent of this practice among health sciences students, and their knowledge regarding the health risks, are unknown. This is important, as these students will become future health professionals ...

  19. Academic dishonesty among health science school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, Nazan Tuna; Can, Hafize Öztürk; Şenol, Selmin; Hadımlı, Aytül Pelik

    2016-12-01

    Academic dishonesty has become a serious problem at institutions of higher learning. What is the frequency of academic dishonesty and what factors affect the tendency of dishonesty among Turkish health science school students? This descriptive and cross-sectional study aims to evaluate academic dishonesty among university nursing, midwifery, and dietetic students. Participants and research context: The study sample consisted of 499 health science students in Turkey. The tendency toward academic dishonesty was investigated using the Academic Dishonesty Tendency Scale. Ethical considerations: Institutional review board approved the study. Written permission was obtained from the researcher to use Turkish version of the Academic Dishonesty Tendency Scale. Of all the students, 80.0% claimed to refer to Internet during homework preparation and 49.1% of students reported to cite the references at the end of article on some instances. Of the students, 56.1% claimed never to have cheated in the exams. It was found that academic dishonesty was partly low (1.80-2.59) in students. For students using a library while doing their homework, mean scores were significantly lower ( p academic dishonesty was lower among students who use Internet and library more frequently. These findings are consistent with previous studies. Measurements to take against academic dishonesty should be directed toward not only students but institutions and instructors as well.

  20. Qualitative Descriptive Methods in Health Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorafi, Karen Jiggins; Evans, Bronwynne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this methodology paper is to describe an approach to qualitative design known as qualitative descriptive that is well suited to junior health sciences researchers because it can be used with a variety of theoretical approaches, sampling techniques, and data collection strategies. It is often difficult for junior qualitative researchers to pull together the tools and resources they need to embark on a high-quality qualitative research study and to manage the volumes of data they collect during qualitative studies. This paper seeks to pull together much needed resources and provide an overview of methods. A step-by-step guide to planning a qualitative descriptive study and analyzing the data is provided, utilizing exemplars from the authors' research. This paper presents steps to conducting a qualitative descriptive study under the following headings: describing the qualitative descriptive approach, designing a qualitative descriptive study, steps to data analysis, and ensuring rigor of findings. The qualitative descriptive approach results in a summary in everyday, factual language that facilitates understanding of a selected phenomenon across disciplines of health science researchers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Satellite stories: capturing professional experiences of academic health sciences librarians working in delocalized health sciences programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Jackie; Horsman, Amanda Rose

    2018-01-01

    Health sciences training programs have progressively expanded onto satellite campuses, allowing students the opportunity to learn in communities away from an academic institution's main campus. This expansion has encouraged a new role for librarians to assume, in that a subset of health sciences librarians identify as "satellite librarians" who are permanently located at a distance from the main campus. Due to the unique nature of this role and lack of existing data on the topic, the authors investigated the experiences and perceptions of this unique group of information professionals. An electronic survey was distributed to health sciences librarians via two prominent North American email discussion lists. Questions addressed the librarians' demographics, feelings of social inclusion, technological support, autonomy, professional support, and more. Eighteen surveys were analyzed. While several respondents stated that they had positive working relationships with colleagues, many cited issues with technology, scheduling, and lack of consideration as barriers to feeling socially included at both the parent and local campuses. Social inclusion, policy creation, and collection management issues were subject to their unique situations and their colleagues' perceptions of their roles as satellite librarians. The results from this survey suggest that the role of the academic health sciences librarian at the satellite campus needs to be clearly communicated and defined. This, in turn, will enhance the experience for the librarian and provide better service to the client.

  2. Health, Health Care, and Systems Science: Emerging Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Health is a continuum of an optimized state of a biologic system, an outcome of positive relationships with the self and others. A healthy system follows the principles of systems science derived from observations of nature, highlighting the character of relationships as the key determinant. Relationships evolve from our decisions, which are consequential to the function of our own biologic system on all levels, including the genome, where epigenetics impact our morphology. In healthy systems, decisions emanate from the reciprocal collaboration of hippocampal memory and the executive prefrontal cortex. We can decide to change relationships through choices. What is selected, however, only represents the cognitive interpretation of our limited sensory perception; it strongly reflects inherent biases toward either optimizing state, making a biologic system healthy, or not. Health or its absence is then the outcome; there is no inconsequential choice. Public health effort should not focus on punitive steps (e.g. taxation of unhealthy products or behaviors) in order to achieve a higher level of public’s health. It should teach people the process of making healthy decisions; otherwise, people will just migrate/shift from one unhealthy product/behavior to another, and well-intended punitive steps will not make much difference. Physical activity, accompanied by nutrition and stress management, have the greatest impact on fashioning health and simultaneously are the most cost-effective measures. Moderate-to-vigorous exercise not only improves aerobic fitness but also positively influences cognition, including memory and senses. Collective, rational societal decisions can then be anticipated. Health care is a business system principally governed by self-maximizing decisions of its components; uneven and contradictory outcomes are the consequences within such a non-optimized system. Health is not health care. We are biologic systems subject to the laws of biology in spite

  3. Health, Health Care, and Systems Science: Emerging Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Ivo

    2017-02-15

    Health is a continuum of an optimized state of a biologic system, an outcome of positive relationships with the self and others. A healthy system follows the principles of systems science derived from observations of nature, highlighting the character of relationships as the key determinant. Relationships evolve from our decisions, which are consequential to the function of our own biologic system on all levels, including the genome, where epigenetics impact our morphology. In healthy systems, decisions emanate from the reciprocal collaboration of hippocampal memory and the executive prefrontal cortex. We can decide to change relationships through choices. What is selected, however, only represents the cognitive interpretation of our limited sensory perception; it strongly reflects inherent biases toward either optimizing state, making a biologic system healthy, or not. Health or its absence is then the outcome; there is no inconsequential choice. Public health effort should not focus on punitive steps (e.g. taxation of unhealthy products or behaviors) in order to achieve a higher level of public's health. It should teach people the process of making healthy decisions; otherwise, people will just migrate/shift from one unhealthy product/behavior to another, and well-intended punitive steps will not make much difference. Physical activity, accompanied by nutrition and stress management, have the greatest impact on fashioning health and simultaneously are the most cost-effective measures. Moderate-to-vigorous exercise not only improves aerobic fitness but also positively influences cognition, including memory and senses. Collective, rational societal decisions can then be anticipated. Health care is a business system principally governed by self-maximizing decisions of its components; uneven and contradictory outcomes are the consequences within such a non-optimized system. Health is not health care. We are biologic systems subject to the laws of biology in spite of

  4. Dual pricing of health sciences periodicals: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D R; Jensen, J E

    1980-01-01

    A survey of dual pricing practices among publishers of health-related journals identified 281 periodicals with an average price differential of over 100% between individual and institutional subscription rates. Both the practice itself and the amount of the differential are increasing, indicating that journal subscriptions of health sciences libraries increasingly provide the financial support necessary for the publication of health sciences journals. Dual pricing is also correlated with copyright royalties. The problems that dual pricing creates for health sciences libraries' budgets are due in part to uncritical purchasing by libraries. Increased consumerism on the part of health science librarians is recommended. PMID:7437588

  5. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  6. Translating science into action: periodontal health through public health approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgensen, Nanna; Petersen, Poul E; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Sayaka

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and public health research data have shown that a number of individual, professional and community health measures may be valuable in preventing the major oral diseases. The fundamental gap in knowledge, however, is not confined to 'what to do' but rather 'how' to translate the scientific findings into effective and sustainable programs for groups and populations. The advances in oral health science have not yet benefitted the poor and disadvantaged population groups around the world to the fullest extent possible and this has led to inequalities in periodontal health as well as in other chronic diseases. Research on the causative role of tobacco use in periodontal disease is strong because of the fact that tobacco-induced disease ultimately may lead to the loss of teeth. Studies also indicate that wound healing may be negatively affected by the use of tobacco. Likewise, research has shown that extreme use of alcohol, poor diet and nutrition, and psychological stress all have negative effects on periodontal health. Research on sociobehavioral risk factors has great implication to prevent periodontal disease. The case for tobacco is illustrated in this report. The global exposure to tobacco use in adults and adolescents is outlined. Because of the global Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (2003), the solid research on the harmful effect of tobacco is now being widely used for public health. The importance of tobacco prevention within the context of health-promoting schools is emphasized. Research on other population-directed strategies and their implications on public health would be instrumental to integrated prevention of chronic disease and periodontal disease. Community interventions and delivery of preventive oral care by oral health services may have positive outcomes for periodontal health but periodontal research needs to be further strengthened by the provision of sound evidence. It is somewhat remarkable that research on true population

  7. International trends in health science librarianship part 20: Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeannette; Jargin, Serge

    2017-03-01

    This is the last in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is Russia. The next feature column will initiate a new series entitled New Directions in Health Science Librarianship. The first contribution will be from Australia. JM. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  8. Digital reference service: trends in academic health science libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl R

    2005-01-01

    Two years after the initial 2002 study, a greater number of academic health science libraries are offering digital reference chat services, and this number appears poised to grow in the coming years. This 2004 follow-up study found that 36 (27%) of the academic health science libraries examined provide digital chat reference services; this was an approximately 6% increase over the 25 libraries (21%) located in 2002. Trends in digital reference services in academic health science libraries were derived from the exploration of academic health science library Web sites and from digital correspondence with academic health science library personnel using e-mail and chat. This article presents an overview of the current state of digital reference service in academic health science libraries.

  9. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L

    1993-10-01

    The Medical Library Association's third annual survey of recent health sciences library building projects identified fourteen libraries planning, expanding, or constructing new library facilities. Three of five new library buildings are freestanding structures where the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. The two other new facilities are for separately administered units where the library is a major tenant. Nine projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Six projects are in projected, predesign, or design stages or are awaiting funding approval. This paper describes four projects that illustrate technology's growing effect on librarians and libraries. They are designed to accommodate change, a plethora of electronic gear, and easy use of technology. Outwardly, they do not look much different than many other modern buildings. But, inside, the changes have been dramatic although they have evolved slowly as the building structure has been adapted to new conditions.

  10. Progress report Physics and Health Sciences. Health Sciences section. 1987 July 01-December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report covers the fourth semi-annual period since the Research Company was reorganized. We now have eight research fellows on staff, six fully funded by Physics and Health Sciences (P and HS). The first section of this report contains an excellent topical review of the program in Health Sciences on tritium toxicity which involves scientists from all three of the Chalk River branches of Health Sciences. Their work on cancer proneness is expanding data on apparently normal people and has been extended to include cancer patients. All tests are now blind. The work was the subject of two very fine TV presentations, one each shown on the French and English networks of the CBC. Investigation also continues on the complex influence of hyperthermia on cancer induction and promotion. The potency of natural killer cells in human blood which have the ability to recognize and destroy cancerous cells have been shown to be very sensitive to temperature. A method may have been found for extending the life of T-lymphocytes grown in culture beyond the present 30 to 60-day limit. Activities in environmental research are moving in the direction of studies of a more fundamental nature so that the results will have a certain portability. Model studies form a large part of this new emphasis and notable among those is the Twin Lakes tracer study. Work is in progress to follow the plume the full 240 metres to the discharge zone with considerable success in the mathematical modelling. Members of the Health Sciences unit at CRNL were active as resource people for the Hare Commission on Ontario Nuclear Safety Review during the late fall. At Partnerships for Profit, which brought 85 senior executives of Canadian business in contact with the Research Company's capabilities, Physics and Health Sciences manned four booths on cancer screening, environmental protection, ANDI and nuclear physics instrumentation. Discussions with MOSST and other government departments were initiated on the

  11. Operational Health Physics-Science or Philosophy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    Operational health physics is concerned with protecting workers and the public from harm due to ionizing radiation. This requires the application of philosophy (ethics) as well as science. Operational health physics philosophy has been dominated by the ICRP. A particular aspect of ICRP's philosophy that is often misunderstood is (As low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account). (ALARA) Although the ALARA philosophy has been interpreted as a cost-benefit approach it is in fact a risk-benefit approach including social considerations as the ICRP has emphasised from time to time. A recent report has accused the ICRP of using a discarded philosophical approach, namely Utilitarianism, as a result of which its recommendations are unethical. The report suggests that a (rights) based philosophy such as Rawls' Theory of Justice would be a more appropriate basis. This paper discusses this accusation, considers some relevant philosophies and concludes that the accusation is not valid and that ICRP's recommendations are ethical but are frequently misinterpreted. (Author)

  12. Operational Health Physics-Science or Philosophy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M. W.

    2004-07-01

    Operational health physics is concerned with protecting workers and the public from harm due to ionizing radiation. This requires the application of philosophy (ethics) as well as science. Operational health physics philosophy has been dominated by the ICRP. A particular aspect of ICRP's philosophy that is often misunderstood is (As low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account). (ALARA) Although the ALARA philosophy has been interpreted as a cost-benefit approach it is in fact a risk-benefit approach including social considerations as the ICRP has emphasised from time to time. A recent report has accused the ICRP of using a discarded philosophical approach, namely Utilitarianism, as a result of which its recommendations are unethical. The report suggests that a (rights) based philosophy such as Rawls' Theory of Justice would be a more appropriate basis. This paper discusses this accusation, considers some relevant philosophies and concludes that the accusation is not valid and that ICRP's recommendations are ethical but are frequently misinterpreted. (Author)

  13. Nottingham Health Science Biobank: a sustainable bioresource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharoo-Ball, Balwir; Thomson, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Nottingham Health Science Biobank (NHSB) was established in 2011 by a 3-year "pump priming" grant from the United Kingdom National Institute of Health Research. Before biobanking operations began, NHSB commissioned a financial report on the full costs of biobanking and worked with key stakeholders and external consultants to develop a business plan with the aim of achieving financial and operational sustainability. The plan included: scanning published information, telephone interviews with commercial companies, Freedom of Information Requests, dialogue with prospective customers, and a market analysis of global trends in the use of human tissue samples in research. Our financial report provided a comprehensive and structured costing template for biobanking and confirmed the absolute requirement to ensure cost-efficient processes, careful staff utilization, and maximization of sample turnover. Together with our external consultants, we developed a business model responsive to global interest in healthcare founded on i) identification of key therapeutic areas that mapped to the strengths of the NHSB; ii) a systematic approach to identifying companies operating in these therapy areas; iii) engagement with noncommercial stakeholders to agree strategically aligned sample collection with the aim of ensuring the value of our tissue resource. By adopting this systematic approach to business modelling, the NHSB has achieved sustainability after less than 3 years of operation.

  14. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section - 1986 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This progress report contains a summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate chapters are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical Biophysics. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, environmental processes of radioisotope transport (e.g. atmospheric, ground water), dosimetry and employee monitoring, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.)

  15. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section - 1986 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This progress report contains a summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate chapters are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical Biophysics. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes (e.g., Strontium 85, Strontium 90, Tritium), environmental processes of radioisotope transport (e.g. ground water) dosimetry and employee monitoring, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.)

  16. African Health Sciences Vol 9 Special Issue.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    1Department of Psychiatry, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Uganda , Department Research and Developmental ... Key Words: Multidimensional Scale of Perceived social support, (MSPSS), adaptation, social support, validity, reliability. African Health ... psychological concept, social support comprises of.

  17. Experiences of health science students during clinical placements at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical placement is an essential component of training in health sciences because it is where theory and practice interface. Objective: To explore experiences of health sciences students during clinical placement in terms of supervision, challenges and coping strategies. Design: It was a cross sectional survey ...

  18. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Pathology department, Faculty of Medicine and health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University Al Ain,. UAE. 2. Pathology department, Tawam Hospital, Al Ain/ UAE. Key words: Soft tissue sarcoma; Epithelioid sarcoma; Paediatric; Submandibular. African Health Sciences 2010; 10(4): 400 - 404. *Corresponding author:.

  19. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Division of Extramural Research... Division. Organizing Institute: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dates and Times: June...

  20. 76 FR 63311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section... Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Review of Worker... Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations...

  1. 76 FR 19378 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences...

  2. 77 FR 5261 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis..., Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review...

  3. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: November 15... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive...

  4. 77 FR 22793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P...

  5. 78 FR 18359 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis....nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...

  6. 76 FR 5184 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis.... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences...

  7. 77 FR 12602 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101...

  8. Towards a Common Understanding of the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, G; Rubinelli, S; Reinhardt, J D; Bickenbach, J E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of health sciences is to maintain and improve the health of individuals and populations and to limit disability. Health research has expanded astoundingly over the last century and a variety of scientific disciplines rooted in very different scientific and intellectual traditions has contributed to these goals. To allow health scientists to fully contextualize their work and engage in interdisciplinary research, a common understanding of the health sciences is needed. The aim of this paper is to respond to the call of the 1986 Ottawa Charter to improve health care by looking both within and beyond health and health care, and to use the opportunity offered by WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for a universal operationalization of health, in order to develop a common understanding and conceptualization of the field of health sciences that account for its richness and vitality. A critical analysis of health sciences based on WHO's ICF, on WHO's definition of health systems and on the content and methodological approaches promoted by the biological, clinical and socio-humanistic traditions engaged in health research. The field of health sciences is presented according to: 1) a specification of the content of the field in terms of people's health needs and the societal response to them, 2) a meta-level framework to exhaustively represent the range of mutually recognizable scientific disciplines engaged in health research and 3) a heuristic framework for the specification of a set of shared methodological approaches relevant across the range of these disciplines. This conceptualization of health sciences is offered to contextualize the work of health researchers, thereby fostering interdisciplinarity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Automatic energy expenditure measurement for health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Cagatay; Akbulut, Akhan

    2018-04-01

    It is crucial to predict the human energy expenditure in any sports activity and health science application accurately to investigate the impact of the activity. However, measurement of the real energy expenditure is not a trivial task and involves complex steps. The objective of this work is to improve the performance of existing estimation models of energy expenditure by using machine learning algorithms and several data from different sensors and provide this estimation service in a cloud-based platform. In this study, we used input data such as breathe rate, and hearth rate from three sensors. Inputs are received from a web form and sent to the web service which applies a regression model on Azure cloud platform. During the experiments, we assessed several machine learning models based on regression methods. Our experimental results showed that our novel model which applies Boosted Decision Tree Regression in conjunction with the median aggregation technique provides the best result among other five regression algorithms. This cloud-based energy expenditure system which uses a web service showed that cloud computing technology is a great opportunity to develop estimation systems and the new model which applies Boosted Decision Tree Regression with the median aggregation provides remarkable results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Health sciences libraries in the United States: new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Barbara A

    2017-12-01

    This article is the third in a series in this regular feature. The intention of the series is to look at important global developments in health science libraries. These articles will serve as a road map, describing the key changes in the field and exploring factors driving these changes. The present article by the current president of the Medical Library Association outlines two important developments in the United States. The topics chosen for consideration are national initiatives in the United States impacting health sciences libraries and librarians and enhanced roles for U.S. health sciences librarians in providing support for research. J.M. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  11. Applied Statistics for the Social and Health Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Rachel A A

    2012-01-01

    Applied Statistics for the Social and Health Sciences provides graduate students in the social and health sciences with the basic skills that they need to estimate, interpret, present, and publish statistical models using contemporary standards. The book targets the social and health science branches such as human development, public health, sociology, psychology, education, and social work in which students bring a wide range of mathematical skills and have a wide range of methodological affinities. For these students, a successful course in statistics will not only offer statistical content

  12. Health Information Needs and Reliability of Sources Among Nondegree Health Sciences Students: A Prerequisite for Designing eHealth Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Hussein; Tshuma, Ndumiso; Hu, Xiao

    Understanding health information needs and health-seeking behavior is a prerequisite for developing an electronic health information literacy (EHIL) or eHealth literacy program for nondegree health sciences students. At present, interest in researching health information needs and reliable sources paradigms has gained momentum in many countries. However, most studies focus on health professionals and students in higher education institutions. The present study was aimed at providing new insight and filling the existing gap by examining health information needs and reliability of sources among nondegree health sciences students in Tanzania. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 conveniently selected health training institutions, where 403 health sciences students were participated. Thirty health sciences students were both purposely and conveniently chosen from each health-training institution. The selected students were pursuing nursing and midwifery, clinical medicine, dentistry, environmental health sciences, pharmacy, and medical laboratory sciences courses. Involved students were either in their first year, second year, or third year of study. Health sciences students' health information needs focus on their educational requirements, clinical practice, and personal information. They use print, human, and electronic health information. They lack eHealth research skills in navigating health information resources and have insufficient facilities for accessing eHealth information, a lack of specialists in health information, high costs for subscription electronic information, and unawareness of the availability of free Internet and other online health-related databases. This study found that nondegree health sciences students have limited skills in EHIL. Thus, designing and incorporating EHIL skills programs into the curriculum of nondegree health sciences students is vital. EHIL is a requirement common to all health settings, learning environments, and

  13. Generating Youth Interest in Science Careers Through 4-H Health Science Explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hutson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Health Science Explorations is a Maryland 4-H Program for youth ages ten and older. Hospital-based multi-day summer sessions and clubs that meet regularly, enable youth to interact with health care professionals in authentic medical settings. The program introduces youth to local health career opportunities, fosters science literacy and interest in science careers, and teaches healthy lifestyle practices. The authors share strategies to guide other educators through the process of developing their own science career exploration programs.

  14. A current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Gerald J; Roderer, Nancy K; Assar, Soraya

    2005-04-01

    The article offers a current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship. The authors: (1) discuss how definitions of medical informatics have changed in relation to health sciences librarianship and the broader domain of information science; (2) compare the missions of health sciences librarianship and health sciences informatics, reviewing the characteristics of both disciplines; (3) propose a new definition of health sciences informatics; (4) consider the research agendas of both disciplines and the possibility that they have merged; and (5) conclude with some comments about actions and roles for health sciences librarians to flourish in the biomedical information environment of today and tomorrow. Boundaries are disappearing between the sources and types of and uses for health information managed by informaticians and librarians. Definitions of the professional domains of each have been impacted by these changes in information. Evolving definitions reflect the increasingly overlapping research agendas of both disciplines. Professionals in these disciplines are increasingly functioning collaboratively as "boundary spanners," incorporating human factors that unite technology with health care delivery.

  15. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section 1987 January 1 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report covers the third semi-annual period since the Reserach Company was reorganized. A highlight of the period was the first peer review of all the activities in Physics and Health Sciences by external examiners. The review was conducted in April by three separate Technical Review Committees (TRC) one for each of the three main areas: health sciences, nuclear physics and condensed matter physics. In all cases the TRCs gave strong support to our programs having a mandate to assess research programs with respect to (a) their quality and (b) their relevance to Canada. The principal programs reviewed were: DNA damage and repair mechanisms; synergistic effects of chemicals and radiation; the tritium RBE study; radiosensitivity of human bone marrow cells; radioprotective enzymes; radiation biochemistry; chemistry of oxazolinones, benzofuroxanes and cyclodextrins; myeloid leukemia in mice; tritium monitoring, and quality factors; metabolic modeling; neutron dosimetry; groundwater/contaminant modeling; sediment exchange and speciation; and atmospheric dispersion. Very considerable effort was spent on preparing a proposal for a centre of excellence in toxicology for presentation in March to the Premier's Council in the Province of Ontario. Although the proposal was not one of the 7 (out of 28) successful proposals, much useful preparatory work was done towards the establishing of a centre for health and environmental research on toxic agents

  16. Research methods from social science can contribute much to the health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensing, Michel

    2008-06-01

    Research methods from social science, such as social network analysis, random coefficient modeling, and advanced measurement techniques, can contribute much to the health sciences. There is, however, a slow rate of transmission of social science methodology into the health sciences. This paper identifies some of the barriers for adoption and proposes ideas for the future. Commentary. Contributions of social science to the health sciences are not always recognized as such. It may help if the professional profile of social science in the health sciences would be higher and if its focus would be more on making useful predictions. Clinical epidemiologists may assume that their discipline includes all relevant methods and that social science is largely based on qualitative research. These perceptions need to be challenged in order to widen the scope of clinical epidemiology and include relevant methods from other sciences. New methods help to ask new research questions and to provide better to old questions. This paper has sketched challenges for both social science researchers and clinical epidemiologists.

  17. The pivotal role of the social sciences in environmental health sciences research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Symma; Collman, Gwen

    2016-09-06

    Environmental health sciences research seeks to elucidate environmental factors that put human health at risk. A primary aim is to develop strategies to prevent or reduce exposures and disease occurrence. Given this primary focus on prevention, environmental health sciences research focuses on the populations most at risk such as communities of color and/or low socioeconomic status. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences research programs incorporate the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research to study health disparities. These programs promote community engagement, culturally appropriate communications with a variety of stakeholders, and consideration of the social determinants of health that interact with environmental factors to increase risk. Multidisciplinary research teams that include social and behavioral scientists are essential to conduct this type of research. This article outlines the history of social and behavioral research funding at National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and offers examples of National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-funded projects that exemplify the value of social science to the environmental health sciences. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Progress report. Physics and health sciences. Health sciences section. 1988 January 01-June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    Work of the Health Sciences section in the first half of 1988 covered the areas of radiation risks; neutron, thermoluminescence and beta dosimetry; tritium, stack and effluent monitoring; radiochemical analysis; atmospheric, lake and river processes; groundwater and streamflow interactions; flow and contaminant transport in groundwater; environmental assessment criteria, techniques and implementation; environmental monitoring; radiation sensitivity and mutagenesis; and radiobiology. Members of the section were closely involved with the international re-evaluation of risk estimates taking into account the new data on dose for Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors

  19. International trends in health science librarianship part 17: a comparison of health science libraries with academic and research libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeannette

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 4 years this Regular Feature has looked at trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. Although there are still a few more regions to be covered in this series, this issue explores general trends in academic and research libraries with a view to discovering whether the trends identified for health science libraries are similar. Are health science libraries unique? Or do their experiences mirror those found in the wider world of academic and research libraries? © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  1. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting?

  2. The flipped classroom: practices and opportunities for health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "flipped classroom" instructional model is being introduced into medical and health sciences curricula to provide greater efficiency in curriculum delivery and produce greater opportunity for in-depth class discussion and problem solving among participants. As educators employ the flipped classroom to invert curriculum delivery and enhance learning, health sciences librarians are also starting to explore the flipped classroom model for library instruction. This article discusses how academic and health sciences librarians are using the flipped classroom and suggests opportunities for this model to be further explored for library services.

  3. D:\\African Health Sciences\\New

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Rachel Klein*. Tufts University, Community Health and Spanish Major, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 50 Haven. Avenue, Box #266, Columbia University. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced in. September of 2003 that HIV / AIDS should be labeled. “global health emergency” rather ...

  4. African Health Sciences - Equinet.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brian

    Abstract: Introduction: Health care financing provides the resources and economic incentives for operating health systems and is a key determinant of health system performance. Equitable financing is based on: financial protection, progressive financing and cross-subsidies. This paper describes Uganda's health care ...

  5. Habermasian knowledge interests: epistemological implications for health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero-Molina, José; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Muñoz Terrón, José María; Aranda Torres, Cayetano

    2015-04-01

    The Habermasian concept of 'interest' has had a profound effect on the characterization of scientific disciplines. Going beyond issues unrelated to the theory itself, intra-theoretical interest characterizes the specific ways of approaching any science-related discipline, defining research topics and methodologies. This approach was developed by Jürgen Habermas in relation to empirical-analytical sciences, historical-hermeneutics sciences, and critical sciences; however, he did not make any specific references to health sciences. This article aims to contribute to shaping a general epistemological framework for health sciences, as well as its specific implications for the medical and nursing areas, via an analysis of the basic knowledge interests developed by Habermas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Social science and health research: growth at the National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Christine A; Abeles, Ronald P

    2004-01-01

    Programs within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have recently taken steps to enhance social science contributions to health research. A June 2000 conference convened by the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research highlighted the role of the social sciences in health research and developed an agenda for advancing such research. The conference and agenda underscored the importance of research on basic social scientific concepts and constructs, basic social science research on the etiology of health and illness, and the application of basic social science constructs in health services, treatment, and prevention research. Recent activities at NIH suggest a growing commitment to social science research and its integration into interdisciplinary multilevel studies of health.

  7. Human genes and genomes: science, health, society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenberg, Leon E; Rosenberg, Diane Drobnis

    2012-01-01

    "In the nearly 60 years since Watson and Crick proposed the double helical structure of DNA, the molecule of heredity, waves of discoveries have made genetics the most thrilling field in the sciences...

  8. Health Technology Assessment - science or art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    The founding disciplines of HTA are clearly scientific, and have been firmly based among the natural sciences. However, common definitions of HTA indicate that HTA is something more than the "pure application of science". This article investigates whether this "something" also makes HTA an art. The question of whether HTA is a science or an art is pursued in two specific and historically rich directions. The first is whether HTA is an art in the same way that medicine is described as an art. It has been argued extensively that medicine is based on two different and partly incompatible cultures, i.e., the natural sciences and humanities. Medicine is based on disciplines within the natural sciences, while its value judgments have been placed in the humanities camp. This dichotomy is present in HTA as well, and the first part of the investigation illustrates how HTA is an art in terms of its inherent and constitutive value-judgments. The second part of the science/art-scrutiny leads us to the ancient (Hippocratic) concept of art, téchne, where we find an etymological and a conceptual link between HTA and art. It demonstrates HTA is not an arbitrary process, even though it involves value judgments and relates complex decision making processes. As an art (téchne) HTA has a specific subject matter, requires inquiry and mastery of general rational principles, and is oriented to a specific end. In conclusion, the science-or-art-question makes sense in two specific perspectives, illustrating that HTA is a science based art. This has implications for the practice of HTA, for its education, and for the status of its results.

  9. Environmental health science at the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Bright, Patricia R.

    2013-01-01

    USGS environmental health science focuses on the environment-health interface. Research characterizes the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, as well as the factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents and the resulting toxicologic or infectious disease. The mission of USGS in environmental health science is to contribute scientific information to environmental, natural resource, agricultural, and public-health managers, who use that information to support sound decisionmaking. Coordination with partners and stakeholders will enable USGS to focus on the highest priority environmental health issues, to make relevant, timely, and useable contributions, and to become a “partner of first choice” for environmental health science.

  10. Entrepreneurial Health Informatics for Computer Science and Information Systems Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James; Joseph, Anthony; Narula, Stuti

    2014-01-01

    Corporate entrepreneurship is a critical area of curricula for computer science and information systems students. Few institutions of computer science and information systems have entrepreneurship in the curricula however. This paper presents entrepreneurial health informatics as a course in a concentration of Technology Entrepreneurship at a…

  11. Career and practice intentions of health science students at three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), primarily motivated by career development, financial reasons and job opportunities. Conclusion. The findings demonstrate that health science students, similar to medical students, are influenced by a multitude of factors in making career ...

  12. Health Technology Assessment – science or art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    The founding disciplines of HTA are clearly scientific, and have been firmly based among the natural sciences. However, common definitions of HTA indicate that HTA is something more than the “pure application of science”. This article investigates whether this “something” also makes HTA an art. The question of whether HTA is a science or an art is pursued in two specific and historically rich directions. The first is whether HTA is an art in the same way that medicine is described as an art. It has been argued extensively that medicine is based on two different and partly incompatible cultures, i.e., the natural sciences and humanities. Medicine is based on disciplines within the natural sciences, while its value judgments have been placed in the humanities camp. This dichotomy is present in HTA as well, and the first part of the investigation illustrates how HTA is an art in terms of its inherent and constitutive value-judgments. The second part of the science/art-scrutiny leads us to the ancient (Hippocratic) concept of art, téchne, where we find an etymological and a conceptual link between HTA and art. It demonstrates HTA is not an arbitrary process, even though it involves value judgments and relates complex decision making processes. As an art (téchne) HTA has a specific subject matter, requires inquiry and mastery of general rational principles, and is oriented to a specific end. In conclusion, the science-or-art-question makes sense in two specific perspectives, illustrating that HTA is a science based art. This has implications for the practice of HTA, for its education, and for the status of its results. PMID:23935761

  13. African Health Sciences - Equinet.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brian

    Methods: We conducted interviews with health insurance providers, and a sample of employers and employees in Kampala, using structured ... Results: Health insurance and/or prepayment schemes are offered by a handful of organisations or private health providers, mainly in ... in Kampala (capital city). Kampala was ...

  14. African Health Sciences - Equinet.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brian

    Introduction: Uganda is currently designing a National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme, with the aim of raising additional resources for the ... Methods: We conducted interviews with health insurance providers, and a sample of employers and employees in Kampala, .... another offered health insurance as well as other life.

  15. The Outlook in the Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Janell

    2009-01-01

    Never before has the demand for health care professionals been as great as it is now. But the supply of qualified domestic graduates is not expected to keep up with this demand, thus creating a shortage in most fields. Although the need in nursing is well documented, just as great a need exists in other health care fields: home health aides,…

  16. Systems science: a good investment for the public's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Patricia L; Kaplan, Robert M

    2013-10-01

    This supplement of Health Education & Behavior showcases the current state of the field of systems science applications in health promotion and public health. Behind this work lies a steady stream of public dollars at the federal level. This perspective details nearly a decade of investment by the National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. These investments have included funding opportunity announcements, training programs, developing resources for researchers, cross-disciplinary fertilization, and publication. While much progress has been made, continuing investment is needed in the future to ensure the viability and sustainability of this young but increasingly important field.

  17. New directions in health sciences libraries in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhiyun; Zhang, Jianjing

    2018-04-16

    This article briefly describes the services provided by Chinese health science libraries and the factors which influence service provision. Driven by new technologies and national initiatives, the key services delivered by Chinese health libraries in the last 10 years have been research support services (such as research impact assessment, support for data management), evidence-based medicine, systematic reviews, the promotion of health information literacy, and the development of institutional repositories. J.M. © 2018 Health Libraries Group.

  18. Interdisciplinarity and Systems Science to Improve Population Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Patricia L.; Olster, Deborah H.; Morgan, Glen D.; Abrams, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Fueled by the rapid pace of discovery, humankind's ability to understand the ultimate causes of preventable common disease burdens and to identify solutions is now reaching a revolutionary tipping point. Achieving optimal health and well-being for all members of society lies as much in the understanding of the factors identified by the behavioral, social, and public health sciences as by the biological ones. Accumulating advances in mathematical modeling, informatics, imaging, sensor technology, and communication tools have stimulated several converging trends in science: an emerging understanding of epigenomic regulation; dramatic successes in achieving population health-behavior changes; and improved scientific rigor in behavioral, social, and economic sciences. Fostering stronger interdisciplinary partnerships to bring together the behavioral–social–ecologic models of multilevel “causes of the causes” and the molecular, cellular, and, ultimately, physiological bases of health and disease will facilitate breakthroughs to improve the public's health. The strategic vision of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is rooted in a collaborative approach to addressing the complex and multidimensional issues that challenge the public's health. This paper describes OBSSR's four key programmatic directions (next-generation basic science, interdisciplinary research, systems science, and a problem-based focus for population impact) to illustrate how interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspectives can foster the vertical integration of research among biological, behavioral, social, and population levels of analysis over the lifespan and across generations. Interdisciplinary and multilevel approaches are critical both to the OBSSR's mission of integrating behavioral and social sciences more fully into the NIH scientific enterprise and to the overall NIH mission of utilizing science in the pursuit

  19. Scenario planning: a tool for academic health sciences libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Logan; Giesecke, Joan; Walton, Linda

    2010-03-01

    Review the International Campaign to Revitalise Academic Medicine (ICRAM) Future Scenarios as a potential starting point for developing scenarios to envisage plausible futures for health sciences libraries. At an educational workshop, 15 groups, each composed of four to seven Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) directors and AAHSL/NLM Fellows, created plausible stories using the five ICRAM scenarios. Participants created 15 plausible stories regarding roles played by health sciences librarians, how libraries are used and their physical properties in response to technology, scholarly communication, learning environments and health care economic changes. Libraries are affected by many forces, including economic pressures, curriculum and changes in technology, health care delivery and scholarly communications business models. The future is likely to contain ICRAM scenario elements, although not all, and each, if they come to pass, will impact health sciences libraries. The AAHSL groups identified common features in their scenarios to learn lessons for now. The hope is that other groups find the scenarios useful in thinking about academic health science library futures.

  20. Attitude in students of Health Sciences toward scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merideidy Plazas Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Educating health professionals implies the challenge of creating and developing an inquiring mind, ready to be in a state of permanent questioning. For this purpose, it is fundamental to generate a positive attitude toward the generation of knowledge and science. Objective: to determine the attitude toward science and the scientific method in undergraduate students of health sciences. Materials and methods: a cross-sectional study was made by applying a self-administered survey, excluding those who were transferred from other universities and repeated. The attitude toward science and the scientific method were valued using the scale validated and published by Hren, which contains three domains: value of scientific knowledge, value of scientific methodology, and value of science for health professions. Results: 362 students were included, 86,6% of them graded the attitude toward scientific knowledge above 135 points, neutral scale value. Similar scores were registered in the domains value of scientific knowlede for the human dimension of the students and value of science for health professions. 91,4% of the students graded the value of scientific methodology below 48 points. Conclusions: the favorable attitude of the students can be explained by the contact that they have with the scientific method since the beginning of their studies and its concordance with the evolution of science. The domain value of scientific methodology obtained the lowest grade on the part of the students, which could be related to the lack of knowledge about scientific methodology.

  1. Research in health sciences library and information science: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, A

    1992-10-01

    A content analysis of research articles published between 1966 and 1990 in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association was undertaken. Four specific questions were addressed: What subjects are of interest to health sciences librarians? Who is conducting this research? How do health sciences librarians conduct their research? Do health sciences librarians obtain funding for their research activities? Bibliometric characteristics of the research articles are described and compared to characteristics of research in library and information science as a whole in terms of subject and methodology. General findings were that most research in health sciences librarianship is conducted by librarians affiliated with academic health sciences libraries (51.8%); most deals with an applied (45.7%) or a theoretical (29.2%) topic; survey (41.0%) or observational (20.7%) research methodologies are used; descriptive quantitative analytical techniques are used (83.5%); and over 25% of research is funded. The average number of authors was 1.85, average article length was 7.25 pages, and average number of citations per article was 9.23. These findings are consistent with those reported in the general library and information science literature for the most part, although specific differences do exist in methodological and analytical areas.

  2. Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  3. Human genes and genomes: science, health, society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenberg, Leon E; Rosenberg, Diane Drobnis

    2012-01-01

    .... With the use of core concepts and the integration of extensive references, this book provides students and professionals alike with the most in-depth view of the current state of the science and its relevance across disciplines."--Publisher's website.

  4. Problem-based learning in a health sciences librarianship course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, A; Ancona, A M; Beman, S B; Dodge, A M; Hutchinson, K L; LaBonte, M J; Mays, T L; Simon, D T

    1998-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been adopted by many medical schools in North America. Because problem solving, information seeking, and lifelong learning skills are central to the PBL curriculum, health sciences librarians have been actively involved in the PBL process at these medical schools. The introduction of PBL in a library and information science curriculum may be appropriate to consider at this time. PBL techniques have been incorporated into a health sciences librarianship course at the School of Library and Information Science (LIS) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to explore the use of this method in an advanced Library and Information Science course. After completion of the course, the use of PBL has been evaluated by the students and the instructor. The modified PBL course design is presented and the perceptions of the students and the instructor are discussed. PMID:9681169

  5. Bioinformatic training needs at a health sciences campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Health sciences research is increasingly focusing on big data applications, such as genomic technologies and precision medicine, to address key issues in human health. These approaches rely on biological data repositories and bioinformatic analyses, both of which are growing rapidly in size and scope. Libraries play a key role in supporting researchers in navigating these and other information resources. With the goal of supporting bioinformatics research in the health sciences, the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library established a Bioinformation program. To shape the support provided by the library, I developed and administered a needs assessment survey to the University of Arizona Health Sciences campus in Tucson, Arizona. The survey was designed to identify the training topics of interest to health sciences researchers and the preferred modes of training. Survey respondents expressed an interest in a broad array of potential training topics, including "traditional" information seeking as well as interest in analytical training. Of particular interest were training in transcriptomic tools and the use of databases linking genotypes and phenotypes. Staff were most interested in bioinformatics training topics, while faculty were the least interested. Hands-on workshops were significantly preferred over any other mode of training. The University of Arizona Health Sciences Library is meeting those needs through internal programming and external partnerships. The results of the survey demonstrate a keen interest in a variety of bioinformatic resources; the challenge to the library is how to address those training needs. The mode of support depends largely on library staff expertise in the numerous subject-specific databases and tools. Librarian-led bioinformatic training sessions provide opportunities for engagement with researchers at multiple points of the research life cycle. When training needs exceed library capacity, partnering with intramural and

  6. Informatics for Health 2017: Advancing both science and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Philip J; Cornet, Ronald; McCowan, Colin; Peek, Niels; Fraccaro, Paolo; Geifman, Nophar; Gude, Wouter T; Hulme, William; Martin, Glen P; Williams, Richard

    2017-04-21

    The Informatics for Health congress, 24-26 April 2017, in Manchester, UK, brought together the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) conference and the Farr Institute International Conference. This special issue of the Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics contains 113 presentation abstracts and 149 poster abstracts from the congress. The twin programmes of "Big Data" and "Digital Health" are not always joined up by coherent policy and investment priorities. Substantial global investment in health IT and data science has led to sound progress but highly variable outcomes. Society needs an approach that brings together the science and the practice of health informatics. The goal is multi-level Learning Health Systems that consume and intelligently act upon both patient data and organizational intervention outcomes. Informatics for Health demonstrated the art of the possible, seen in the breadth and depth of our contributions. We call upon policy makers, research funders and programme leaders to learn from this joined-up approach.

  7. Advancing nursing science through health trajectory research: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Jean F; Henly, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Center for Health Trajectory Research has focused on developing ways to better understand how interventions influence health trajectories during transitional, acute, or chronic health challenges across the life span. The health trajectory perspective advances nursing science by providing a person-centered point of view that emphasizes change in health over time within individuals, families, groups, or communities. Theoretical considerations and statistical modeling approaches used in studying health trajectories, along with exemplars from nursing research studies from this special issue of Nursing Research, are highlighted.

  8. Healing of implants installed in over- or under-prepared sites--an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Massimiliano; Lang, Niklaus P; Ricci, Sara; Mintrone, Francesco; González González, Gladys; Botticelli, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    To study bone healing at implants installed with different insertion torques. In six Labrador dogs, all mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted. After 4 months of healing, flaps were elevated, and two implant sites were prepared at each side of the mandible. In the right side of the mandible, the distal sites were prepared conventionally, while the mesial sites were over-prepared by 0.2 mm. As a consequence, a final insertion torque of ~30 Ncm at the distal and a minimal insertion torque close to 0 Ncm at the mesial sites were obtained. In the left sides of the mandible, however, the recipient sites were underprepared by 0.3 mm resulting in an insertion torque of ≥ 70 Ncm at both implants. Cover screws were applied, and flaps sutured to fully submerge the experimental sites. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections obtained for histological evaluation. The mineralized bone-to-implant contact was in the range of 55.2-62.1%, displaying the highest value at implants with ~30 Ncm insertion torque and the lowest value at the implant sites with close to 0 Ncm insertion torque. No statistically significant differences were revealed. Bone density was in the range of 43.4-54.9%, yielding the highest value at implants with ≥ 70 Ncm insertion torque and the lowest at the implant sites with close to 0 Ncm insertion torque. The difference between the sites of ~30 Ncm and the corresponding ≥ 70 Ncm insertion torque reached statistical significance. Similar amounts of osseointegration were obtained irrespective of the insertion torque applied. Moreover, implants installed in sites with close to 0 Ncm insertion torque may properly osseointegrate as well. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. African Health Sciences - Equinet.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brian

    technical and policy considerations about whether or not CHI has a role to play in Ugandan health system. ... both member contributions and another health provider mostly a non-governmental organisation. (NGO) or a private hospital. A management committee or a team is ... Ishaka Hospital Bushenyi Ishaka Adventist.

  10. Science and social responsibility in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Douglas L; McKeown, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologists and environmental health researchers have a joint responsibility to acquire scientific knowledge that matters to public health and to apply the knowledge gained in public health practice. We examine the nature and source of these social responsibilities, discuss a debate in the epidemiological literature on roles and responsibilities, and cite approaches to environmental justice as reflective of them. At one level, responsibility refers to accountability, as in being responsible for actions taken. A deeper meaning of responsibility corresponds to commitment to the pursuit and achievement of a valued end. Epidemiologists are committed to the scientific study of health and disease in human populations and to the application of scientific knowledge to improve the public's health. Responsibility is also closely linked to reliability. Responsible professionals reliably perform the tasks they set for themselves as well as the tasks society expects them to undertake. The defining axiom for our approach is that the health of the public is a social good we commit ourselves to pursue, thus assuming an obligation to contribute to its achievement. Epidemiologists cannot claim to be committed to public health as a social good and not accept the responsibility of ensuring that the knowledge gained in their roles as scientists is used to achieve that good. The social responsibilities of environmental health researchers are conspicuous in the environmental justice movement, for example, in community-based participatory research. Responsibility is an ethical concept particularly well suited to frame many key aspects of the ethics of our profession. PMID:14602514

  11. The ascent of public health science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the recent history of public health, we see that evolution of concepts has led to new investigative methods, and .... Investigations of the social causes of ill health are rooted in nine- teenth century approaches, but was much stronger in Europe, especially UK. The origins of this line .... The emergence of HIV/AIDS in the clos-.

  12. African Health Sciences - Equinet.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brian

    Coalition for Health Promotion and Social Development (HEPS-Uganda). Abstract. Background: HIV/AIDS prevalence in Uganda is beginning to show an upward trend despite increased inflow of funds to fight HIV/AIDS in Uganda. Objectives: To monitor health sector financing from an HIV/AIDS perspective so as to produce ...

  13. 77 FR 16844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis..., Scientific Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute Environmental Health...

  14. 77 FR 4572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Review of Conferences and Scientific Meetings with an Environmental Health Focus. Date: February...

  15. 76 FR 4925 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... the meeting will be provided. In Person: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Keystone..., Director, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of ] Environmental Health...

  16. African Health Sciences Vol 9 Special Issue.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 9 Special Issue1 1 August 2009. S8. Non-adherence to anti-TB ... Objectives:To determine the prevalence and factors associated with non-adherence to anti-TB drugs among TB/HIV co-infected patients in Mbarara .... alcohol consumption, distance to the health facility, smoking, being on ART ...

  17. Learning from Longitudinal Research in Criminology and the Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstaay, Steven L.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews longitudinal research within criminology and the health sciences on the relationship between reading and criminal, delinquent, or antisocial behavior. Longitudinal research in criminology, medicine, and psychology examines the role of reading within a broad set of interactive processes, connecting literacy to public health via…

  18. Utilising technology in health sciences education | De Villiers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The curriculum would support problem based, media based, co-operative and reflective learning. Curriculum implementation ought to occur in an interactive, critical, democratic and collaborative learning climate. Suggestions on how to utilise information technology in health sciences education are discussed. Health SA ...

  19. Global mental health: from science to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    This article charts the historical development of the discipline of global mental health, whose goal is to improve access to mental health care and reduce inequalities in mental health outcomes between and within nations. The article begins with an overview of the contribution of four scientific foundations toward the discipline's core agenda: to scale up services for people with mental disorders and to promote their human rights. Next, the article highlights four recent, key events that are indicative of the actions shaping the discipline: the Mental Health Gap Action Programme to synthesize evidence on what treatments are effective for a range of mental disorders; the evidence on task shifting to nonspecialist health workers to deliver these treatments; the Movement for Global Mental Health's efforts to build a common platform for professionals and civil society to advocate for their shared goal; and the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health, which has identified the research priorities that, within the next decade, can lead to substantial improvements in the lives of people living with mental disorders. The article ends by examining the major challenges for the field, and the opportunities for addressing them in the future.

  20. Abstracts of the International Congress of Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Reis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this book of abstracts / proceedings were submitted to the Scientific Commission of the International Congress of Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development, held on 11 and 12 November 2016, at the University of Évora, Évora, Portugal, under the topic of Exercise and Health, Sports and Human Development. The content of the abstracts is solely and exclusively of its authors responsibility. The editors and the Scientific Committee of the International Congress of Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development do not assume any responsibility for the opinions and statements expressed by the authors. Partial reproduction of the texts and their use without commercial purposes is allowed, provided the source / reference is duly mentioned.

  1. Culture, Health, and Science: A Multidisciplinary Liberal Arts Alternative to the Public Health Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lynn M; Knight, Sabina; Gubrium, Aline C

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2003 call by the Institute of Medicine to educate undergraduates in public health, various models have emerged for incorporating public health into the liberal arts and sciences. One model is a professionalized public health major that uses core public health competencies to prepare a workforce of health professionals. A second model offers a broad-based public health major rooted in liberal arts principles, resisting the utilitarian trend toward human capital formation. A third model resists even the label of "public health," preferring instead to introduce undergraduates to many ways of analyzing human health and healing. The multidisciplinary Culture, Health, and Science Program, based on six key commitments for preparing liberal arts students to analyze health and respond to global health challenges, is offered as an alternative to the public health major. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. International trends in health science librarianship: Part 2--Northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfuss, Helmut; Bauer, Bruno; Declève, Ghislaine; Verhaaren, Henri; Utard-Wlerick, Guillemette; Bakker, Suzanne; Leclerq, Edith; Murphy, Jeannette

    2012-06-01

    This is the third in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors were asked to reflect on developments in their country--viz. Austria, Belgium, France and the Netherlands. Future issues will track trends in the Nordic countries, Southern Europe and Latin America. JM. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  3. Learning style preferences of Australian health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghi, Maryam; Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Roller, Louis; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Palermo, Claire; McKenna, Lisa; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Hewitt, Lesley; Sim, Jenny; Holt, Tangerine-Ann

    2010-01-01

    It has been identified that health science student groups may have distinctive learning needs. By university educators' and professional fieldwork supervisors' being aware of the unique learning style preferences of health science students, they have the capacity to adjust their teaching approaches to best fit with their students' learning preferences. The purpose of this study was to investigate the learning style preferences of a group of Australian health science students enrolled in 10 different disciplines. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory was distributed to 2,885 students enrolled in dietetics and nutrition, midwifery, nursing, occupational therapy, paramedics, pharmacy, physiotherapy, radiation therapy, radiography, and social work at one Australian university. A total of 752 usable survey forms were returned (response rate 26%). The results indicated the converger learning style to be most frequently preferred by health science students and that the diverger and accommodator learning styles were the least preferred. It is recommended that educators take learning style preferences of health science students into consideration when planning, implementing, and evaluating teaching activities, such as including more problem-solving activities that fit within the converger learning style.

  4. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Materials and Methods: Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes...

  5. Advancing Global Health – The Need for (Better) Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    In his perspective "Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health," Ooms argues that actions taken in the field of global health are dependent not only on available resources, but on the normative premise that guides how these resources are spent. This comment sets out how the application of a predominately biomedical positivist research tradition in global health, has potentially limited understanding of the value judgements underlying decisions in the field. To redress this critical social science, including health policy analysis has much to offer, to the field of global health including on questions of governance. PMID:27239873

  6. Health metrics and evaluation: strengthening the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher J L; Frenk, Julio

    2008-04-05

    With the growing importance of health in the global agenda comes the responsibility to develop a scientific foundation of metrics and evaluation. The scope of this emerging field can be viewed in terms of key topics, including health outcomes, other social outcomes related to health systems, health services, resource inputs, evaluations of programmes and systems, and analyses to support policy choice. It can also be defined in terms of key activities that are needed to strengthen the scientific basis of the field: development of new methods, instruments, software, and hardware; setting global norms and standards for data collection; increasing the availability of high-quality primary data; systematic analysis and synthesis of existing datasets; strengthening national capacity to obtain, analyse, and use data; and reporting and disseminating results. We explore in depth topics with major scientific challenges and institutional and cultural barriers that are slowing the development of the field. Cutting across the various topical areas and disciplinary approaches to these problems are some common scientific issues, including limited comparability of measurement, uncorrected known biases in data, no standard approach to missing data, unrealistic uncertainty estimates, and the use of disease models that have not been properly validated. Only through concerted action will it be possible to assure the production, reproduction, and use of knowledge that is crucial to the advancement of global health.

  7. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative.

  8. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  9. Improving Health with Science: Exploring Community-Driven Science Education in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Anne Emerson

    This study examines the role of place-based science education in fostering student-driven health interventions. While literature shows the need to connect science with students' place and community, there is limited understanding of strategies for doing so. Making such connections is important for underrepresented students who tend to perceive learning science in school as disconnected to their experiences out of school (Aikenhead, Calabrese-Barton, & Chinn, 2006). To better understand how students can learn to connect place and community with science and engineering practices in a village in Kenya, I worked with community leaders, teachers, and students to develop and study an education program (a school-based health club) with the goal of improving knowledge of health and sanitation in a Kenyan village. While students selected the health topics and problems they hoped to address through participating in the club, the topics were taught with a focus on providing opportunities for students to learn the practices of science and health applications of these practices. Students learned chemistry, physics, environmental science, and engineering to help them address the health problems they had identified in their community. Surveys, student artifacts, ethnographic field notes, and interview data from six months of field research were used to examine the following questions: (1) In what ways were learning opportunities planned for using science and engineering practices to improve community health? (2) In what ways did students apply science and engineering practices and knowledge learned from the health club in their school, homes, and community? and (3) What factors seemed to influence whether students applied or intended to apply what they learned in the health club? Drawing on place-based science education theory and community-engagement models of health, process and structural coding (Saldana, 2013) were used to determine patterns in students' applications of their

  10. 2009 Report (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The volunteers’ suitcases, containing medications, vitamins, toothbrushes and fluoride, served as mobile pharmacies. “I was overwhelmed by the...energy technology , journalism and global health. The program began nearly a decade ago, when calls went out to several science labs around the...science and technology ,” said Annabelle Ombac, logistics manager for the program. “Specifically, they learn what radiation is, what everyday items

  11. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a high school student looking toward your future education, a college student exploring the possibilities of a health-related ... from the Wanna Be Librarian blog on the importance of networking and finding a ... Program including online learning and specializations! Connect with ...

  12. In this issue | Tumwine | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One such strategy is health education to children ad adolescents to avoid contact with Ebola patients. ... information flow and local adaptations to family planning practice in Morocco.4 Chandani and Breton use their Morocco experience tomake a few conclusions: both external and internal funding and technical expertise ...

  13. Burton's microbiology for the health sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Engelkirk, Paul G; Duben-Engelkirk, Janet L; Burton, Gwendolyn R. W

    2011-01-01

    .... Moreover, you'll get the lastest information on such key topics as antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents, epidemiology and public health, healthcare-associated infections, infection control and laboratory tests used to assist in the diagnosis of infectious diseases."--BOOK JACKET.

  14. D:\\African Health Sciences\\New

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    training opportunities amongst healthcare workers serving in government (public) health centres within Blantyre ... while only 18 (31.6%) had prior training in research methods. Twenty-three (40.4%) had ever participated in a ... divide as has been feared by many authors 8. While the telephone and internet facilities are ...

  15. D:\\African Health Sciences\\Afri

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    up with the help of Rotary International, the Ministry of health and Makerere University. AHS: How often did you do heart surgery in Ngora? A: The utilisation rate of the hospital shot up more than. 1000 times between my arrival and the time I left. Correspondence. Dr. Charles Wendo. The New Vision Printing and Publishing ...

  16. African Journal of Health Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal is dedicated to serving primarily scientists in Africa who desire to publish their research findings, and those outside the continent wishing to contribute to global health. The Editorial Board will therefore give ... Watkins WM, Howells RE, Branding-Bennet AD and Koech DK.In tro susceptibility of Plasmodium ...

  17. Journal rankings by citation analysis in health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M L

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify objectively a hierarchical ranking of journals for health sciences librarians with faculty status. Such a guideline can indicate a journal's value for promotion and tenure consideration. Lists of recent research articles (1982-1986) in health sciences librarianship, and articles written by health sciences librarians, were compiled by searching Social SCISEARCH and MEDLINE. The journals publishing those articles are presented. Results show BMLA as the most prominent journal in the field. Therefore, citations from articles in BMLA from 1982 to 1986 were chosen as a sample for citation analysis. Citation analysis was employed to identify the most frequently cited journals. Some characteristics of the citations in BMLA are also discussed. The ranking of journals based on citation frequency, as a result, was identified. PMID:2655785

  18. [Health concepts in current science-oriented discourse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Maria Thereza Avila Dantas; Almeida Filho, Naomar de

    2002-01-01

    This article analyzes health as a concept in some science-oriented discourses by representative authors of functional sociology, anthropology and epistemology, by focusing their notions of illness and procedures. In the field of sociology, the ideas of normality, labeling, and deviation from labeling patterns stand out. Additionally, we present the main health models in North American health anthropology and evaluate the proposition of a new perspective that intends to overcome the duality between culture and society - the theory of signal, meaning and practice systems. We also analyze the Canguilhemian difference between normality and health, as well as the notion of health as normative capacity. Finally, we propose the distinctive concepts of primary, secondary and tertiary health as the first step of a theoretical construction that can guide health policies and social procedures based on a positive notion of health.

  19. Dissemination, Implementation, and Improvement Science Research in Population Health: Opportunities for Public Health and CTSAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N.; Inkelas, Moira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Importance The complex, dynamic nature of health systems requires dissemination, implementation, and improvement (DII) sciences to effectively translate emerging knowledge into practice. Although they hold great promise for informing multisector policies and system‐level changes, these methods are often not strategically used by public health. Objectives and Methods More than 120 stakeholders from Southern California, including the community, federal and local government, university, and health services were convened to identify key priorities and opportunities for public health departments and Clinical and Translational Science Awards programs (CTSAs) to advance DII sciences in population health. Main Outcomes Participants identified challenges (mismatch of practice realities with narrowly focused research questions; lack of iterative learning) and solutions (using methods that fit the dynamic nature of the real world; aligning theories of change across sectors) for applying DII science research to public health problems. Pragmatic steps that public health and CTSAs can take to facilitate DII science research include: employing appropriate study designs; training scientists and practicing professionals in these methods; securing resources to advance this work; and supporting team science to solve complex‐systems issues. Conclusions Public health and CTSAs represent a unique model of practice for advancing DII research in population health. The partnership can inform policy and program development in local communities. PMID:26243323

  20. Tufts Health Sciences Database: lessons, issues, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mary Y; Albright, Susan A; Alkasab, Tarik; Damassa, David A; Wang, Paul J; Eaton, Elizabeth K

    2003-03-01

    The authors present their seven-year experience with developing the Tufts Health Sciences Database (Tufts HSDB), a database-driven information management system that combines the strengths of a digital library, content delivery tools, and curriculum management. They describe a future where online tools will provide a health sciences learning infrastructure that fosters the work of an increasingly interdisciplinary community of learners and allows content to be shared across institutions as well as with academic and commercial information repositories. The authors note the key partners in Tufts HSDB's success--the close collaboration of the health sciences library, educational affairs, and information technology staff. Tufts HSDB moved quickly from serving the medical curriculum to supporting Tufts' veterinary, dental, biomedical sciences, and nutrition schools, thus leveraging Tufts HSDB research and development with university-wide efforts including Internet2 middleware, wireless access, information security, and digital libraries. The authors identify major effects on teaching and learning, e.g., what is better taught with multimedia, how faculty preparation and student learning time can be more efficient and effective, how content integration for interdisciplinary teaching and learning is promoted, and how continuous improvement methods can be integrated. Also addressed are issues of faculty development, copyright and intellectual property, budgetary concerns, and coordinating IT across schools and hospitals. The authors describe Tufts' recent experience with sharing its infrastructure with other schools, and welcome inquiries from those wishing to explore national and international partnerships to create a truly open and integrated infrastructure for education across the health sciences.

  1. Synergy: Information technology and health sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Deena Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology is evolving to meet the demands of the current population in need of health promotion and education, and access to care in rural areas that are attacked with chronic illness. Physicians and nurses in hospitals are using telemedicine, telenursing, and e-nursing as advanced technologies. These technologies are continually expanding to develop new modes of medical care delivery. This article deals with telemedicine, telenursing, and e-nursing in terms of their applications and advantages.

  2. 76 FR 62424 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee's State of Science Subcommittee meeting...

  3. Open science initiatives: challenges for public health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmeyer, Cheryl

    2018-03-07

    While academic open access, open data and open science initiatives have proliferated in recent years, facilitating new research resources for health promotion, open initiatives are not one-size-fits-all. Health research particularly illustrates how open initiatives may serve various interests and ends. Open initiatives not only foster new pathways of research access; they also discipline research in new ways, especially when associated with new regimes of research use and peer review, while participating in innovation ecosystems that often perpetuate existing systemic biases toward commercial biomedicine. Currently, many open initiatives are more oriented toward biomedical research paradigms than paradigms associated with public health promotion, such as social determinants of health research. Moreover, open initiatives too often dovetail with, rather than challenge, neoliberal policy paradigms. Such initiatives are unlikely to transform existing health research landscapes and redress health inequities. In this context, attunement to social determinants of health research and community-based local knowledge is vital to orient open initiatives toward public health promotion and health equity. Such an approach calls for discourses, norms and innovation ecosystems that contest neoliberal policy frameworks and foster upstream interventions to promote health, beyond biomedical paradigms. This analysis highlights challenges and possibilities for leveraging open initiatives on behalf of a wider range of health research stakeholders, while emphasizing public health promotion, health equity and social justice as benchmarks of transformation.

  4. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Heyler, Carla; Alvarez-Galvez, Javier; Veenstra, Marja Y.; García-Ibáñez, Jose; Carpenter, Sylvia; Bertelli, Marco; Munir, Kerim; Torr, Jennifer; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health aspects of ID at every level of the education system. Specific aim This paper aims to (1) update the current information about availability of training and education in ID and related health issues in Europe with a particular focus in mental health; and (2) to identify opportunities arising from the initial process of educational harmonization in Europe to include ID contents in health sciences curricula and professional training. Method We carried out a systematic search of scientific databases and websites, as well as policy and research reports from the European Commission, European Council and WHO. Furthermore, we contacted key international organisations related to health education and/or ID in Europe, as well as other regional institutions. Results ID modules and contents are minimal in the revised health sciences curricula and publications on ID training in Europe are equally scarce. European countries report few undergraduate and graduate training modules in ID, even in key specialties such as paediatrics. Within the health sector, ID programmes focus mainly on psychiatry and psychology. Conclusion The poor availability of ID training in health sciences is a matter of concern. However, the current European policy on training provides an opportunity to promote ID in the curricula of programmes at all levels. This strategy should address all professionals working in ID and it should increase the focus on ID relative to other developmental disorders at all stages of life. PMID:25705375

  5. New library buildings. Health Sciences Library, University of Cininnati.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, N M; Bentley, P W

    1977-07-01

    The new Health Sciences Library at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio is described. The library is a self-contained unit within the Medical Sciences Building. The Health Sciences Library contains a total of 90,000 gross square feet, 56,000 of which are assignable. The total project cost was $5,490,000, or $61.00 per square foot. Seating capacity is over 800. The library has a Media Resources Center equipped with a cable television system that is used to project information from the library to patient care areas in the Cincinnati community. The library was first occupied in June 1974; its dedication was held in the fall of 1974.

  6. Herzl's Altneuland: Zionist utopia, medical science and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch, Nadav; Seidelman, Rhona

    In this article we explore how the vision uniting Zionism, science, medicine and public health is depicted in Herzl's novel Altneuland (Old-New Land). Altneuland, which belongs to the genre of fin-de-siècle utopian novels, presents a modernistic vision of progress, integrating science with a humanistic society of equals. The remedy for the "psychopathology of the Jew" was believed by many Zionists to be a return to Palestine, and the establishment there of a healthy national Jewish home. Yet, Herzl's utopia, as depicted in Altneuland, is homogeneous, not allowing for other voices to be expressed, such as those of women and Arabs. Moreover, the belief that science and technology could solve social problems did not take into account the tensions that they would create in the society and environment. This vision of science and society, with its inherent tensions, will continue to inform the Zionist discourse of our present day.

  7. Rural origin health science students in South African universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted in 2003. Lists of undergraduate students admitted from 1999 to 2002 for medicine, dentistry, physiotherapy and occupational therapy were obtained from 9 health science faculties. Origins of students were classified as city, town and rural by means of postal codes.

  8. Master's and doctoral theses in the faculty of Health Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the publication success and problems of postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State (UFS). The sample consisted of students who obtained a postgraduate qualification based on a Master's or doctoral thesis in the faculty from March 2001 to April

  9. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4 December 2010. 307 advantages of spoligotyping are that it is cheap, easy to perform and fast. In addition, it has been demonstrated that the results are highly reproducible9. Comparative-genomics approaches greatly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms of insertion and ...

  10. Editorial: In this issue | Tumwine | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Happy birthday African Health Sciences! Today we celebrate the first birthday of our journal with humility but also with a sense of satisfaction. In our continent where the infant mortality rate for both humans and journals is very high, survival ushers in a sense of satisfaction and increased responsibility for the future.

  11. Eating, drinking and physical activity in Faculty of Health Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Students studying towards a qualification in Health Sciences should have more knowledge of a healthy lifestyle than other university students. However, it has been questioned whether or not these students apply such knowledge. While studies have been conducted on the lifestyle habits of students in general, ...

  12. GIS: A Spatial Turn in the Health Science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schipperijn, Jasper; Ejstrud, Bo; Troelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In recent years health science seems to have taken a “spatial turn” with a renewed interest in spatially oriented research. There are a number of reasons behind this rediscovery of “the power of maps”. One of the predominant drivers has been the development of Geographical Information Systems (GI...

  13. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The work of the Health Sciences Division during the quarter included development of improved radiation counters and dosimeters, studies of radionuclide migration through the environment, investigations of the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms, and calculation of improved dosimetry factors

  14. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 19 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS on infected individuals in the Capricorn District of Limpopo Province, South Africa · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... research at the Department of Physical Education and Exercise Science, Kenyatta University (1988-2011): Implications for health and sports development in ...

  15. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 1.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Conclusions: Open intramedullary fixation of femur fractures leads to considerable peri-operative blood loss. This is can be reduced by use of diathermy during surgery. African Health Sciences 2010; 10(1): 18 - 25. Introduction. Studies of major orthopedic surgery procedures demonstrate a considerable intra-operative ...

  16. Faculty Perceptions of Critical Thinking at a Health Sciences University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, Joie; Morgan, Christine; Burns, Shari; Merchant, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The fostering of critical thinking skills has become an expectation of faculty, especially those teaching in the health sciences. The manner in which critical thinking is defined by faculty impacts how they will address the challenge to promote critical thinking among their students. This study reports the perceptions of critical thinking held by…

  17. Letter to the Editor | Joob | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 4 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Letter to the Editor. B Joob, V Wiwanitkit. Abstract. Ebola outbreak in west Africa ...

  18. Letter to Editor | Kieran | Annals of Medical and Health Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Letter to Editor. W Kieran. Abstract.

  19. Health sciences libraries building survey, 1999–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Logan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A survey was conducted of health sciences libraries to obtain information about newer buildings, additions, remodeling, and renovations. Method: An online survey was developed, and announcements of survey availability posted to three major email discussion lists: Medical Library Association (MLA), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and MEDLIB-L. Previous discussions of library building projects on email discussion lists, a literature review, personal communications, and the author's consulting experiences identified additional projects. Results: Seventy-eight health sciences library building projects at seventy-three institutions are reported. Twenty-two are newer facilities built within the last ten years; two are space expansions; forty-five are renovation projects; and nine are combinations of new and renovated space. Six institutions report multiple or ongoing renovation projects during the last ten years. Conclusions: The survey results confirm a continuing migration from print-based to digitally based collections and reveal trends in library space design. Some health sciences libraries report loss of space as they move toward creating space for “community” building. Libraries are becoming more proactive in using or retooling space for concentration, collaboration, contemplation, communication, and socialization. All are moving toward a clearer operational vision of the library as the institution's information nexus and not merely as a physical location with print collections. PMID:20428277

  20. Health sciences libraries building survey, 1999-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Logan

    2010-04-01

    A survey was conducted of health sciences libraries to obtain information about newer buildings, additions, remodeling, and renovations. An online survey was developed, and announcements of survey availability posted to three major email discussion lists: Medical Library Association (MLA), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and MEDLIB-L. Previous discussions of library building projects on email discussion lists, a literature review, personal communications, and the author's consulting experiences identified additional projects. Seventy-eight health sciences library building projects at seventy-three institutions are reported. Twenty-two are newer facilities built within the last ten years; two are space expansions; forty-five are renovation projects; and nine are combinations of new and renovated space. Six institutions report multiple or ongoing renovation projects during the last ten years. The survey results confirm a continuing migration from print-based to digitally based collections and reveal trends in library space design. Some health sciences libraries report loss of space as they move toward creating space for "community" building. Libraries are becoming more proactive in using or retooling space for concentration, collaboration, contemplation, communication, and socialization. All are moving toward a clearer operational vision of the library as the institution's information nexus and not merely as a physical location with print collections.

  1. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 2.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 10 No 2 June 2010. 172. Indoor air mycoflora of residential dwellings in Jos metropolis. *Ayanbimpe GM1, Wapwera SD3, Kuchin D3. 1 Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Jos, Plateau State Nigeria,. 2 Department of Geography and Planning, University of Jos, Plateau State ...

  2. West Virginia University's Health Sciences and Technology Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Ann; Dooley, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the Health Sciences and Technology Academy, an outreach and engagement program by West Virginia University to encourage higher education faculty members and administrators, public school teachers, and community leaders to assume the responsibility of mentoring high school students. The primary goal is to increase the college…

  3. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    understand predictive factors for treatment default so that programs can implement specific measure to target the population at risk. Key words: African Health Sciences 2010; 10(4): 320 - 324. Introduction. In 2007, nine miilion new cases of tuberculosis (TB) were diagnosed worldwide, and in the same year. TB has killed 1.8 ...

  4. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in young adults in urban (Kampala city) and rural areas (Kamuli District) of Uganda. Methods: ... College of Health Sciences. Makerere University. P.O Box 7072. Kampala .... Students stood erect, upright and barefooted or in stockings and had extra clothes ...

  5. Resilience in MSF and its Personnel | Filot | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract African Health Sciences Vol. 8 Special Edition 2008: pp. S44-S45. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  6. From trauma to resilience | Christensen | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract African Health Sciences Vol. 8 Special Edition 2008: pp. S39-S40. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  7. From trauma to resilience | Christensen | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if ...

  8. How we see 'Y': South African health sciences students' and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Health sciences education in the 21st century must recognise the changing profile of students, which includes an understanding of the characteristics of Generation Y students (born between 1981 and 2000) as future healthcare professionals. Objective. To examine the perceptions of students and lecturers ...

  9. Counting Journal Title Usage in the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Ruth W.

    1979-01-01

    A noncomputerized study of the journal title usage by the clients of the Extension Division of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Library showed that its validity increased in direct proportion to the number of relevant parameters. Such studies should include both numbers of requesters and numbers of requests. (Author)

  10. Funding health sciences research: a strategy to restore balance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloom, Floyd E; Randolph, Mark A

    1990-01-01

    ... Funds Division of Health Sciences Policy Institute of Medicine Floyd E. Bloom and Mark A. Randolph, editors NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1990 Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the typesetting-specific created from the as publication files other...

  11. Qualitative Research in PBL in Health Sciences Education: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Qualitative methodologies are relatively new in health sciences education research, especially in the area of problem-based learning (PBL). A key advantage of qualitative approaches is the ability to gain in-depth, textured insights into educational phenomena. Key methodological issues arise, however, in terms of the strategies of…

  12. Fournier's gangrene in the HIV era | Ngugi | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 4 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  13. Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences publishes original research articles, case report, review articles and short communications of outstanding research findings. Manuscript Preparation Manuscripts (3 copies) should be typewritten on A4 paper (210 x 297 mm) with double line ...

  14. Distraction-related road traffic collisions | Eid | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 17, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  15. Radiography - A new field among health sciences in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, Ritva [Licentiate of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science and Health Administration, University of Oulu, Lamsantie 14 A1, 90230 Oulu (Finland)]. E-mail: ritva.pakarinen@oulu.fi; Jussila, Aino-Liisa [Doctor of Health Sciences, Department of Social and Health Care, Oulu Polytechnic, Oulu (Finland)

    2007-08-15

    In order to secure high quality X-ray services and efficient operation of clinical radiography, a study programme in radiography science was implemented at the University of Oulu in 1999. The need for a specific field of science has emerged as a result of social changes, such as the aging population, and the fast development of technology that has caused significant changes in the radiological working environment and clinical radiography. A need for a new, research-based informational foundation of clinical radiography is the basis for the programme. As service producers, radiographers need vast knowledge as well as specific expertise. The research object of radiography science is clinical radiography. If it was studied from the viewpoint of other sciences, the key professional skills of a radiographer would remain unexplored. Implementing an own field of science has enabled the development of radiography from its own bases. Basic research in the field is represented, for example, by the concept analysis of radiography in health sciences. Radiography science should produce research results for both clinical radiography and the instruction of radiography. So far, research results have dealt with the professional decision-making of a radiographer, the influences of computer technology on a radiographer's work and measuring the radiation exposure of a population.

  16. Radiography - A new field among health sciences in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakarinen, Ritva; Jussila, Aino-Liisa

    2007-01-01

    In order to secure high quality X-ray services and efficient operation of clinical radiography, a study programme in radiography science was implemented at the University of Oulu in 1999. The need for a specific field of science has emerged as a result of social changes, such as the aging population, and the fast development of technology that has caused significant changes in the radiological working environment and clinical radiography. A need for a new, research-based informational foundation of clinical radiography is the basis for the programme. As service producers, radiographers need vast knowledge as well as specific expertise. The research object of radiography science is clinical radiography. If it was studied from the viewpoint of other sciences, the key professional skills of a radiographer would remain unexplored. Implementing an own field of science has enabled the development of radiography from its own bases. Basic research in the field is represented, for example, by the concept analysis of radiography in health sciences. Radiography science should produce research results for both clinical radiography and the instruction of radiography. So far, research results have dealt with the professional decision-making of a radiographer, the influences of computer technology on a radiographer's work and measuring the radiation exposure of a population

  17. Science to support aquatic animal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Harris, M. Camille

    2016-10-18

    Healthy aquatic ecosystems are home to a diversity of plants, invertebrates, fish and wildlife. Aquatic animal populations face unprecedented threats to their health and survival from climate change, water shortages, habitat alteration, invasive species and environmental contaminants. These environmental stressors can directly impact the prevalence and severity of disease in aquatic populations. For example, periodic fish kills in the upper Chesapeake Bay Watershed are associated with many different opportunistic pathogens that proliferate in stressed fish populations. An estimated 80 percent of endangered juvenile Puget Sound steelhead trout die within two weeks of entering the marine environment, and a role for disease in these losses is being investigated. The introduction of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) into the Great Lakes—a fishery worth an estimated 7 billion dollars annually—resulted in widespread fish die-offs and virus detections in 28 different fish species. Millions of dying sea stars along the west coast of North America have led to investigations into sea star wasting disease. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are assisting managers with these issues through ecological investigations of aquatic animal diseases, field surveillance, and research to promote the development of mitigation strategies.

  18. Museums and science centres for health: from scientific literacy to health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Hellesøe; Bønnelycke, Julie; Mygind, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a scoping study of the written materials used in 19 health promoting exhibitions presented at American and European museums and science centres, with the aim of assessing and discussing their health promotion potentials. Our descriptive results provide an overview of the exhib......This paper presents a scoping study of the written materials used in 19 health promoting exhibitions presented at American and European museums and science centres, with the aim of assessing and discussing their health promotion potentials. Our descriptive results provide an overview...

  19. International trends in health science librarianship: Part 7. Taking stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeannette

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the six papers published so far in this series on global trends in health science librarianship. Starting with a retrospective review of trends in the twentieth-century, the series has covered 6 different regions, with contributions from 21 countries. As this is the half-way point in the survey, it seems a useful point at which to reflect on what has emerged so far. The method of content analysis is used to identify key trends. The top five trends are explored. © 2013 The author. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-10-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field.

  1. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-01-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field. PMID:9803297

  2. Social Media in Health Science Education: An International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Cutts, Emily; Kavikondala, Sushma; Salcedo, Alejandra; D'Souza, Karan; Hernandez-Torre, Martin; Anderson, Claire; Tiwari, Agnes; Ho, Kendall; Last, Jason

    2017-01-04

    Social media is an asset that higher education students can use for an array of purposes. Studies have shown the merits of social media use in educational settings; however, its adoption in health science education has been slow, and the contributing reasons remain unclear. This multidisciplinary study aimed to examine health science students' opinions on the use of social media in health science education and identify factors that may discourage its use. Data were collected from the Universitas 21 "Use of social media in health education" survey, distributed electronically among the health science staff and students from 8 universities in 7 countries. The 1640 student respondents were grouped as users or nonusers based on their reported frequency of social media use in their education. Of the 1640 respondents, 1343 (81.89%) use social media in their education. Only 462 of the 1320 (35.00%) respondents have received specific social media training, and of those who have not, the majority (64.9%, 608/936) would like the opportunity. Users and nonusers reported the same 3 factors as the top barriers to their use of social media: uncertainty on policies, concerns about professionalism, and lack of support from the department. Nonusers reported all the barriers more frequently and almost half of nonusers reported not knowing how to incorporate social media into their learning. Among users, more than one fifth (20.5%, 50/243) of students who use social media "almost always" reported sharing clinical images without explicit permission. Our global, interdisciplinary study demonstrates that a significant number of students across all health science disciplines self-reported sharing clinical images inappropriately, and thus request the need for policies and training specific to social media use in health science education. ©Elizabeth O'Sullivan, Emily Cutts, Sushma Kavikondala, Alejandra Salcedo, Karan D'Souza, Martin Hernandez-Torre, Claire Anderson, Agnes Tiwari, Kendall

  3. 75 FR 55807 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...-Tilotta, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of...

  4. 77 FR 37423 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis..., Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box...

  5. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-03-02

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  6. 76 FR 7572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

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    2011-02-10

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  7. 76 FR 31620 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-06-01

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  8. 76 FR 7225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

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    2011-02-09

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  9. 77 FR 74198 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

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    2012-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. The... program policies and issues. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell...

  10. 76 FR 7574 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

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    2011-02-10

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  11. 75 FR 7487 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-19

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  12. 76 FR 13650 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-03-14

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  13. 77 FR 60445 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-10-03

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  14. 75 FR 78719 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-12-16

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  15. 78 FR 14312 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-03-05

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  16. 78 FR 8156 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-02-05

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  17. 76 FR 5594 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

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    2011-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. The.... Agenda: Discussion of program policies and issues. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences...

  18. 75 FR 8976 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-02-26

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  19. 75 FR 2876 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-01-19

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  20. 76 FR 21387 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-04-15

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  1. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-11-07

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  2. 75 FR 3474 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

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    2010-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. The...: Discussion of program policies and issues. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101...

  3. 78 FR 35637 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2013-06-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, July 15, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to July 15, 2013, 5:00 p.m., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC...

  4. 75 FR 61765 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. ] Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review Branch, P.O. Box...

  5. Lifestyle of health sciences students at Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Alfhaid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We all want to live a long, happy and healthy life with an abundance of energy and vitality to perform well both mentally and physically. A healthy lifestyle is a valuable resource for reducing the incidence and impact of health problems, enabling you better to cope with life stressors, as well as improving your quality of life. Aims The study was aimed to assess the lifestyle (eating habits and physical activity of health sciences students studying at Majmaah University. Methods This cross-sectional institutional based study was conducted from 25th November 2014-3rd May 2015. A total of 450 students (370 males and 80 females aged between 18–28 years were randomly chosen. Self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection from the College of Medicine, College of Applied Medical Sciences and College of Dentistry. Results Majority of the students, 62.4 per cent, were physically inactive. Students from the College of Medicine, 40.4 per cent, were the most physically active. The most common reason that restrained the students from being active was time limitation. In addition to that, many of the participants, 29.6 per cent, have never had breakfast at home. Also, most of the participants, 42.7 per cent, were not satisfied with their eating habits. Almost one quarter of students were consuming soft drinks more than four times a day. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of sedentary lifestyle, physical inactivity and unhealthy dietary habits among health sciences students studying at Majmaah University. There is an urgent need for arranging health education programs for promoting healthy and active living among health sciences students of Majmaah University in Saudi Arabia.

  6. Health and Illness in History, Science and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Rovesti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Health is a fundamental human right. The World Health Organization defines it as a "state of complete physical, psychological and social well - being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity". The health of individuals, however, is also linked to the environment in which they live and especially to their ability to adapt and integrate into their life context. The relationship with the environment is extremely important because it is that interaction that outlines the concept of normality compared to pathology. Such normality needs to be contextualised by gender, geographical origin and by the individuals’ living conditions: as a matter of fact, what is normal for a young person may differ from what is normal for a senior one. That is to say, the concept of health is indeed relative and it is the result of an interesting evolution of the concept of illness. From the first approaches - dealing with the mere treatment of the symptoms - to the promise of a free-from-pain society, science and economics have played a significant role in redefining the dualism health/ illness. The article reflects on these two concepts, health and illness, in history and nowadays, and discusses the future of the medical science.

  7. Science and scepticism: Drug information, young men and counterpublic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Adrian; Fraser, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    It is perhaps no surprise that young people can be sceptical of the drug-related information they receive in school-based health education, health promotion and the media. Significant societal anxiety surrounds young people's drug consumption, so it is tempting to approach this scepticism as a problem to be solved. In this article, we look closely at a group of young Australian men (n = 25), all of whom hold deeply sceptical views about the drug information they received in schools, social marketing campaigns and public speech generally. We do not approach their scepticism as a problem to be solved in itself, however. Instead, we analyse its origins and how it relates to the way knowledge is constructed in drug education, health promotion and media accounts of drug use. To conceptualise this scepticism, we draw on Irwin and Michael's analysis of the changing relationship between science and society, Warner's theorisation of publics and counterpublics, and Race's related notion of 'counterpublic health'. The article organises the data into three key themes: scepticism about the accuracy of the claims made about drug risks and dangers, scepticism about representations of drug users, and scepticism about the motivations behind the health messages and drug policy in general. We then draw these different aspects of scepticism together to argue that the young men can be seen to constitute a health 'counterpublic', and we consider the implications of this approach, arguing for what has been described as a more diplomatic engagement between science and publics.

  8. Informatics for Health 2017: Advancing both science and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Scott

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Informatics for Health congress, 24-26 April 2017, in Manchester, UK, brought together the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE conference and the Farr Institute International Conference. This special issue of the Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics contains 113 presentation abstracts and 149 poster abstracts from the congress. Discussion: The twin programmes of “Big Data” and “Digital Health” are not always joined up by coherent policy and investment priorities. Substantial global investment in health IT and data science has led to sound progress but highly variable outcomes. Society needs an approach that brings together the science and the practice of health informatics. The goal is multi-level Learning Health Systems that consume and intelligently act upon both patient data and organizational intervention outcomes. Conclusions: Informatics for Health demonstrated the art of the possible, seen in the breadth and depth of our contributions. We call upon policy makers, research funders and programme leaders to learn from this joined-up approach.

  9. Applying Nano technology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, S.; Dash, D.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research on bio systems at the nano scale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, necrophorum engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nano bio systems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nano technology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nano scale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nano medical research. The present review explores the significance of nano science and latest nano technologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas

  10. Discovery machines accelerators for science, technology, health and innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Australian Academy of Sciences

    2016-01-01

    Discovery machines: Accelerators for science, technology, health and innovation explores the science of particle accelerators, the machines that supercharge our ability to discover the secrets of nature and have opened up new tools in medicine, energy, manufacturing, and the environment as well as in pure research. Particle accelerators are now an essential ingredient in discovery science because they offer new ways to analyse the world, such as by probing objects with high energy x-rays or colliding them beams of electrons. They also have a huge—but often unnoticed—impact on all our lives; medical imaging, cancer treatment, new materials and even the chips that power our phones and computers have all been transformed by accelerators of various types. Research accelerators also provide fundamental infrastructure that encourages better collaboration between international and domestic scientists, organisations and governments.

  11. Health behaviour surveillance of Health Sciences students in Northern Germany: Design and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tobisch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHealth of students have most often been neglected in recent studies, although students face a transition of life during their studies which has strong implications on health.  During that time, universities play a key role as a setting where future professionals develop independence and learn skills possibly affecting their development and health. Nevertheless, less in known about this group in society and consequently, the aim of this research project was to monitor health of Health Sciences students through a long-term health surveillance system.MethodsSince 2014, an almost complete convenience sample of Health Sciences students is surveyed twice a year at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences. A paper-pencil questionnaire, which includes questions about socio-demographics, well-being, health-promoting and health-risk behaviours, is administered during courses.ResultsOur first surveys achieved response rates of more than 97%. Up to 83% of enrolled students were reached. Undergraduate Health Sciences students reported health-risk behaviours, e.g. binge-drinking on 1 to 2 days (33.9%, regular cannabis use (4.2%, regular cognitive-enhancement (4.0%. Moreover, unhealthy diet was prevalent but almost all students were physically active.ConclusionsA short paper-pencil questionnaire administered during courses and conducted according to standardized processes provides complete data on students’ health with little effort. Trends can be determined, which assist in making decision whether to take action in prevention and/or to evaluate campaigns. These first results show the need for a more targeted health promotion action for students.

  12. Women and Sciences Health UNMSM 1930-1956

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado Félix, Héctor; Puertas Porras, María Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The study of women as professional health sciences between 1930 and 1950 allows us to understand the process of modernization in Peru. In these decades the UNMSM was the main university, the professions were offered medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and obstetrics. The students of pharmacy and biochemist, faculty in 1943, were predominantly female. In the work environment of the 1940s and 1950s these woman were able to work independently and began working at the university and be known scientific...

  13. Health science library and information services in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeley, P J; Marshall, S B; Foster, E C

    1985-01-01

    In an increasingly information-based society, hospitals need a variety of information for multiple purposes--direct patient care, staff development and training, continuing education, patient and community education, and administrative decision support. Health science library and information services play a key role in providing broad-based information support within the hospital. This guide identifies resources that will help administrators plan information services that are appropriate to their needs.

  14. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, dosimetry and employee monitoring, environmental processes of radioisotope transport, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.), and statistics of hospital procedures

  15. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2018-03-01

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  16. Leisure reading collections in academic health sciences and science libraries: results of visits to seven libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Erin M

    2014-03-01

    To visit leisure reading collections in academic science and health sciences libraries to determine how they function and what role they play in their libraries. The author visited seven libraries with leisure reading collections and carried out a semistructured interview with those responsible either for selection of materials or for the establishment of the collection. These collections contained a variety of materials, with some libraries focusing on health-science-related materials and others on providing recreational reading. The size of the collections also varied, from 186 to 9700 books, with corresponding differences in budget size. All collections were housed apart, with the same loan period as the regular collection. No collections contained electronic materials. Although there was little comparable statistical data on usage, at the six libraries at which active selection was occurring, librarians and library staff felt that the collection was well used and felt that it provided library users with benefits such as stress relief and relaxation and exposure to other perspectives. Librarians and library staff at the libraries that undertook active selection felt that their leisure reading collection was worthwhile. It would be interesting for future work to focus on the user experience of such collections. © 2013 The author. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  17. Musical mnemonics in health science: a first look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirigliano, Matthew M

    2013-01-01

    Song, with its memory enhancement potential and ability to engage, has been employed as a learning tool in some academic settings. Of the countless learning environments, health science may seem the most atypical setting for the musical mnemonic, and yet it may be the most suitable for its application. With medicine's robust history of student-made mnemonics, it only seems natural that learners and instructors alike have begun to experiment with song meant to educate and entertain, primarily imparting them through popular media-sharing sites. This initial assessment of song in health science is meant to highlight notions of efficacy, audience, and use through an informal survey of 10 user-made YouTube musical mnemonics. Two of these mnemonics were co-created by the author, while the remaining eight were identified via select search terms and significant viewer numbers. Resulting YouTube data infers that instructors play a major role in the use of musical mnemonics in health science education. User comments indicate that some students have found value in mnemonic songs, helping them recall information during assessments. More robust research methods, like Q-method, meta-analysis, and opinion mining, can further confirm the value and role of musical mnemonics as they pertain to medicine and healthcare.

  18. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bethany A; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. "Early career" health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, "I have demonstrated this competency." Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the "Health Sciences Information Services" competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the "Research, Analysis, and Interpretation" competency. These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies. The results may also inform the development of

  19. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Myers, MSLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals’ self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods: A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants’demographic information and their competency attainment. ‘‘Early career’’ health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, ‘‘I have demonstrated this competency.’’ Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results: One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Health Sciences Information Services’’ competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Research, Analysis, and Interpretation’’ competency. Conclusions: These results contribute to the ongoing discussions

  20. 76 FR 6146 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Advisory Environmental Health Sciences. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. Date: February 16-17, 2011. Open...

  1. 77 FR 3480 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below... Environmental Health Sciences Council. Date: February 15-16, 2012. Time: February 15, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m...

  2. Understanding health systems, health economies and globalization: the need for social science perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Susan F; Bisht, Ramila; Baru, Rama; Pitchforth, Emma

    2012-08-31

    The complex relationship between globalization and health calls for research from many disciplinary and methodological perspectives. This editorial gives an overview of the content trajectory of the interdisciplinary journal 'Globalization and Health' over the first six years of production, 2005 to 2010. The findings show that bio-medical and population health perspectives have been dominant but that social science perspectives have become more evident in recent years. The types of paper published have also changed, with a growing proportion of empirical studies. A special issue on 'Health systems, health economies and globalization: social science perspectives' is introduced, a collection of contributions written from the vantage points of economics, political science, psychology, sociology, business studies, social policy and research policy. The papers concern a range of issues pertaining to the globalization of healthcare markets and governance and regulation issues. They highlight the important contribution that can be made by the social sciences to this field, and also the practical and methodological challenges implicit in the study of globalization and health.

  3. Developing E-science and Research Services and Support at the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Layne M; Butler, John T; Johnston, Lisa R

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of e-science and research support services in the Health Sciences Libraries (HSL) within the Academic Health Center (AHC) at the University of Minnesota (UMN). A review of the broader e-science initiatives within the UMN demonstrates the needs and opportunities that the University Libraries face while building knowledge, skills, and capacity to support e-research. These experiences are being used by the University Libraries administration and HSL to apply support for the growing needs of researchers in the health sciences. Several research areas that would benefit from enhanced e-science support are described. Plans to address the growing e-research needs of health sciences researchers are also discussed.

  4. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation. This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation. The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania, Acorn Technologies (South Africa, Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa, the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar, the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya, and Niprisan’s development by Nigeria’s National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria. All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems. For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While

  5. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bader, Sara; Masum, Hassan; Simiyu, Ken; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2010-12-13

    In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation.This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation.The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania), Acorn Technologies (South Africa), Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa), the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar), the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya), and Niprisan's development by Nigeria's National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria).All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems.For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While this is a long-term strategy

  6. The marriage of art and science in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Pole, J R

    2001-01-01

    This paper invites the reader to consider the marriage of art and science as antidote to much epidemic disease, for our greater personal and societal health. The history of arts medicine is reviewed, identifying its persisting although often tenuous link with health care from pre-history to the present. The author describes his personal encounter with art at the bedside, and how it led to his establishing a comprehensive artist-in-residence program at his university hospital. The scientific evidence underscoring the efficacy of art-making for physical and psychological health are outlined, together with the physiological and biochemical data. The author describes his own program, and offers examples of healing art in action.

  7. Systemic hydration: relating science to clinical practice in vocal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Naomi A; Thibeault, Susan L

    2014-09-01

    To examine the current state of the science regarding the role of systemic hydration in vocal function and health. Literature review. Literature search spanning multiple disciplines, including speech-language pathology, nutrition and dietetics, medicine, sports and exercise science, physiology, and biomechanics. The relationship between hydration and physical function is an area of common interest among multiple professions. Each discipline provides valuable insight into the connection between performance and water balance, as well as complimentary methods of investigation. Existing voice literature suggests a relationship between hydration and voice production; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet defined and a treatment effect for systemic hydration remains to be demonstrated. Literature from other disciplines sheds light on methodological shortcomings and, in some cases, offers an alternative explanation for observed phenomena. A growing body of literature in the field of voice science is documenting a relationship between hydration and vocal function; however, greater understanding is required to guide best practice in the maintenance of vocal health and management of voice disorders. Integration of knowledge and technical expertise from multiple disciplines facilitates analysis of existing literature and provides guidance as to future research. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Enabling Open Science for Health Research: Collaborative Informatics Environment for Learning on Health Outcomes (CIELO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip; Lele, Omkar; Johnson, Beth; Holve, Erin

    2017-07-31

    There is an emergent and intensive dialogue in the United States with regard to the accessibility, reproducibility, and rigor of health research. This discussion is also closely aligned with the need to identify sustainable ways to expand the national research enterprise and to generate actionable results that can be applied to improve the nation's health. The principles and practices of Open Science offer a promising path to address both goals by facilitating (1) increased transparency of data and methods, which promotes research reproducibility and rigor; and (2) cumulative efficiencies wherein research tools and the output of research are combined to accelerate the delivery of new knowledge in proximal domains, thereby resulting in greater productivity and a reduction in redundant research investments. AcademyHealth's Electronic Data Methods (EDM) Forum implemented a proof-of-concept open science platform for health research called the Collaborative Informatics Environment for Learning on Health Outcomes (CIELO). The EDM Forum conducted a user-centered design process to elucidate important and high-level requirements for creating and sustaining an open science paradigm. By implementing CIELO and engaging a variety of potential users in its public beta testing, the EDM Forum has been able to elucidate a broad range of stakeholder needs and requirements related to the use of an open science platform focused on health research in a variety of "real world" settings. Our initial design and development experience over the course of the CIELO project has provided the basis for a vigorous dialogue between stakeholder community members regarding the capabilities that will add the greatest value to an open science platform for the health research community. A number of important questions around user incentives, sustainability, and scalability will require further community dialogue and agreement. ©Philip Payne, Omkar Lele, Beth Johnson, Erin Holve. Originally published

  9. Understanding health systems, health economies and globalization: the need for social science perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The complex relationship between globalization and health calls for research from many disciplinary and methodological perspectives. This editorial gives an overview of the content trajectory of the interdisciplinary journal ‘Globalization and Health’ over the first six years of production, 2005 to 2010. The findings show that bio-medical and population health perspectives have been dominant but that social science perspectives have become more evident in recent years. The types of paper published have also changed, with a growing proportion of empirical studies. A special issue on ‘Health systems, health economies and globalization: social science perspectives’ is introduced, a collection of contributions written from the vantage points of economics, political science, psychology, sociology, business studies, social policy and research policy. The papers concern a range of issues pertaining to the globalization of healthcare markets and governance and regulation issues. They highlight the important contribution that can be made by the social sciences to this field, and also the practical and methodological challenges implicit in the study of globalization and health. PMID:22938504

  10. Health technology assessment in four countries: response from political science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, David

    2004-01-01

    Four studies, each on health technology assessment (HTA) in a different country, are presented in this volume. Conveying differing levels of sensitivity to political aspects of HTA, their storylines are similar in terms of the importance of the institutional structures that produce HTA and mediate its influence on health policy decision making. Regarding the internal politics of HTA, the latter appears to have developed in a relatively depoliticized environment, supported by a dense and varied web of institutional sites for funding, production, and consumption of HTA, buffered from the capricious impacts of electoral politics. Regarding external politics, HTA in all the countries began with relatively politically innocuous studies of technologies recognized to be of major import to national health systems or researcher-initiated studies. However, with increased focus in health systems on explicit determination of health benefits baskets, the role of HTA has become more high profile. This means that political accountability for the entire HTA process will increase. The implication is that future management of HTA programs will require self-conscious attention to the building of institutions capable of handling the delicate process of integrating science and politics in health policy.

  11. Sexual health and older adults: suggestions for social science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliff, Sharron

    2016-11-01

    The body of evidence on older adults' sexual health is beginning to grow. However, it remains an under-researched area particularly within the social sciences. This viewpoint outlines four considerations for those who carry out social science research in this area: 1. defining the age category "older adults"; 2. being clear about the types of sex under research; 3. capturing a range of diverse voices; and 4. considering the use of qualitative research methods to explore the topic in depth. These suggestions are aimed at helping researchers to avoid some of the pitfalls of research in this area, as well as improving the evidence base in order to advance recognition of the issues and drive change in service provision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Shrivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nanotechnology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nanoscale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nanomedical research. The present review explores the significance of nanoscience and latest nanotechnologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas.

  13. Experiences of undergraduate African health sciences students: A hermeneutic inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyama, Davis; Williams, Allison; McCauley, Kay

    2015-06-01

    While efforts have been made to understand the experiences of African students in predominantly white environments, the experiences of African students in clinical placement areas have rarely been explored. This paper is a report on a study designed to address the gap in educational research on the experiences of African health sciences students in clinical placements in predominantly white environments. Interviews adopting an open approach to conversations were conducted with nine African students from three health disciplines at one metropolitan university in Australia between 2012 and 2013. Interview transcripts were analyzed using philosophical hermeneutics, where shared meanings were arrived at by employing key Gadamerian hermeneutic components. Findings revealed a number of factors that had a direct effect on the meaning students derived from their clinical placement experiences. These, as revealed in the interlinked domains of body, space, relationships, and time included difference, acceptance, resilience, and cultural sensitivity. Insights from this study may lead to the adoption of strategies designed to improve the experiences of African students studying health sciences in predominantly white environments. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Health policy--why research it and how: health political science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Evelyne; Clavier, Carole; Breton, Eric

    2014-09-23

    The establishment of policy is key to the implementation of actions for health. We review the nature of policy and the definition and directions of health policy. In doing so, we explicitly cast a health political science gaze on setting parameters for researching policy change for health. A brief overview of core theories of the policy process for health promotion is presented, and illustrated with empirical evidence. The key arguments are that (a) policy is not an intervention, but drives intervention development and implementation; (b) understanding policy processes and their pertinent theories is pivotal for the potential to influence policy change; (c) those theories and associated empirical work need to recognise the wicked, multi-level, and incremental nature of elements in the process; and, therefore, (d) the public health, health promotion, and education research toolbox should more explicitly embrace health political science insights. The rigorous application of insights from and theories of the policy process will enhance our understanding of not just how, but also why health policy is structured and implemented the way it is.

  15. Prevalence of low back pain among health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShayhan, Fahad Abdullah; Saadeddin, Munir

    2018-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) among health sciences students and to identify the associated factors. Cross-sectional study was conducted among 1163 students from five health sciences colleges during the academic year 2016-2017. Self-administered questionnaire was conducted and included 4 sections: demographic characteristics, risk factors, Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and Oswestry disability questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Mean age was 20.74 ± (1.59 years). 70.9% of students were female. Lifetime prevalence of LBP was 56.6%, 12-month prevalence 48.8%, and point prevalence 21.2%. Dentistry students had highest lifetime prevalence of LBP (67.6%) with significant p value (Spending more than 10 h on computer or tablet was significantly associated with LBP (OR 2.19; 95% CI 1.30-3.70; p = 0.003). Feeling discomfort on bed was associated with LBP (OR 1.81; 95% CI 1.38-2.38; p ≤ 0.001). Uncomfortable college furniture was associated with LBP (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.09-1.79; p = 0.008). Using heavy backpack was found to be associated with LBP (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.01-2.03; p = 0.011). Most of students LBP (90.3%) found to cause minimal disability on Oswestry scale. This study has shown high prevalence of LBP among future healthcare provider. These risk factors should be well established to minimize the prevalence of LBP among future health sciences students. Dentistry students at higher risk of developing LBP compared to other students.

  16. 78 FR 64221 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. ] Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Conferences on Environmental Health. Date: November 5, 2013. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda...

  17. 78 FR 64516 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, October 10, 2013, 12:30 p.m. to October 10, 2013, 5:00 p.m...

  18. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...: Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Ph.D., Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health...

  19. 78 FR 32259 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, July 15, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to July 15, 2013, 5:00 p.m...

  20. Tracing technology in the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guard, J Roger; Peay, Wayne J

    2003-04-01

    From the beginning of the association, technology and the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) have been intertwined. Technology was the focus of one of the first committees. Innovative applications of technology have been employed in the operations of the association. Early applications of mini-computers were used in preparing the Annual Statistics. The association's use of network communications was among the first in the country and later applications of the Web have enhanced association services. For its members, technology has transformed libraries. The association's support of the early development of Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) and of its recent reconceptualization has contributed to the intellectual foundation for this revolution.

  1. Computer Assisted Circulation Control at Health Sciences Library SUNYAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean K. Miller

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A description of the circulation system which the Health Sciences Library at the State University of New York at Buffalo has been using since October 1970. Features of the system include automatic production of overdue, fine, and billing notices; notices for call-in of requested books; and book availability notices. Remote operation and processing on the IBM 360/40 and CDC 6400 computer are accomplished via the Administrative Terminal System (ATS and Terminal job Entry (T]E. The system provides information for management of the collection and improved service to the user.

  2. Health sciences librarians, patient contact, and secondary traumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Rachel W; McCrillis, Aileen

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) in health sciences librarians (HSLs) who have direct contact with traumatized individuals and their families. A twenty-five-item survey and the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS) were distributed via email to three Medical Library Association email discussion lists. A total of fifty-five HSLs responded to the survey. Survey results indicate moderate levels of STS and variability of symptoms among participants. Library and employee assistance program managers should be aware of the emotional toll of patient and/or family contact for HSLs.

  3. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are the impact of studies on cultured human fibroblasts with abnormal carcinogen sensitivity. This includes mechanisms of DNA repair and for the initiation of cancer, contribution of such genes to overall societal cancer burden, impact on risk assessment, distribution of risk, and radiation protection, application to improved treatment of cancer, screening for abnormal carcinogen sensitivity and Roberts syndrome

  4. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities. Auxiliary capabilities: environmental health information science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    Sandia Laboratories is an engineering laboratory in which research, development, testing, and evaluation capabilities are integrated by program management for the generation of advanced designs. In fulfilling its primary responsibility to ERDA, Sandia Laboratories has acquired extensive research and development capabilities. The purpose of this series of documents is to catalog the many technical capabilities of the Laboratories. After the listing of capabilities, supporting information is provided in the form of highlights, which show applications. This document deals with auxiliary capabilities, in particular, environmental health and information science. (11 figures, 1 table) (RWR)

  5. Arsenic and Environmental Health: State of the Science and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exposure to inorganic and organic arsenic compounds is a major public health problem that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Exposure to arsenic is associated with cancer and noncancer effects in nearly every organ in the body, and evidence is mounting for health effects at lower levels of arsenic exposure than previously thought. Building from a tremendous knowledge base with > 1,000 scientific papers published annually with “arsenic” in the title, the question becomes, what questions would best drive future research directions? Objectives: The objective is to discuss emerging issues in arsenic research and identify data gaps across disciplines. Methods: The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program convened a workshop to identify emerging issues and research needs to address the multi-faceted challenges related to arsenic and environmental health. This review summarizes information captured during the workshop. Discussion: More information about aggregate exposure to arsenic is needed, including the amount and forms of arsenic found in foods. New strategies for mitigating arsenic exposures and related health effects range from engineered filtering systems to phytogenetics and nutritional interventions. Furthermore, integration of omics data with mechanistic and epidemiological data is a key step toward the goal of linking biomarkers of exposure and suscepti

  6. Evaluation--the Cinderella science of ICT in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, M

    2006-01-01

    Information systems are expensive to create, and consume resources in their operation. They are justified in order to achieve clearly defined objectives in health service quality and efficiency. To ensure that these objectives are being met, and in order to build up an evidence-base to support well focused policies, systems, and practice, evaluation would seem to be fully justified and indeed essential. However, there are major factors jeopardising good evaluation practice, ranging from reluctance to commit resources or expose decisions to scrutiny, through to lack of appreciation of the full range of dimensions which should be studied. This paper seeks to create fuller appreciation of the issues and their importance. Experiential and literature reviews form the basis of an exposition of principles, methods, and key current activities. A summary has been produced of the key challenges to health ICT evaluation, and its adverse comparison with other sectors. An explanation of the viewpoints and levels of health information evaluation is followed by a short history of principal milestones, current scientific methodology activity, and key collaborative activities. The need for a stronger commitment to health ICT evaluation is demonstrated if the application of health informatics systems is to receive due recognition as scientifically and empirically justified. Commitment of resources and scientific endeavour are needed, and thus the recent Declaration of Innsbruck, arising out of an event sponsored by the European Science Foundation, is timely and fully justified.

  7. Teaching lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender health in a South African health sciences faculty: addressing the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alexandra

    2013-12-27

    People who identity as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) have specific health needs. Sexual orientation and gender identity are social determinants of health, as homophobia and heteronormativity persist as prejudices in society. LGBT patients often experience discrimination and prejudice in health care settings. While recent South African policies recognise the need for providing LGBT specific health care, no curricula for teaching about LGBT health related issues exist in South African health sciences faculties. This study aimed to determine the extent to which LGBT health related content is taught in the University of Cape Town's medical curriculum. A curriculum mapping exercise was conducted through an online survey of all academic staff at the UCT health sciences faculty, determining LGBT health related content, pedagogical methodology and assessment. 127 academics, across 31 divisions and research units in the Faculty of Health Sciences, responded to the survey, of which 93 completed the questionnaire. Ten taught some content related to LGBT health in the MBChB curriculum. No LGBT health related content was taught in the allied health sciences curricula. The MBChB curriculum provided no opportunity for students to challenge their own attitudes towards LGBT patients, and key LGBT health topics such as safer sex, mental health, substance abuse and adolescent health were not addressed. At present, UCTs health sciences curricula do not adequately address LGBT specific health issues. Where LGBT health related content is taught in the MBChB curriculum, it is largely discretionary, unsystematic and not incorporated into the overarching structure. Coordinated initiatives to integrate LGBT health related content into all health sciences curricula should be supported, and follow an approach that challenges students to develop professional attitudes and behaviour concerning care for patients from LGBT backgrounds, as well as providing them with specific LGBT

  8. Public health as a catalyst for interprofessional education on a health sciences campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden-Holman, Tanya M; Curry, Susan J; Benz, Loretta; Aquilino, Mary Lober

    2015-03-01

    Although interprofessional education (IPE) has existed in various formats for several decades, the need for IPE recently has taken on renewed interest and momentum. Public health has a critical role to play in furthering IPE, yet schools of public health are often underrepresented in IPE initiatives. The University of Iowa College of Public Health is serving as a catalyst for IPE activities on our health sciences campus, which includes colleges of dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health. IPE-related activities have included campus visit by IPE leaders, administration of the Survey of Critical Elements for Implementing IPE, administration of the Interprofessional Learning Opportunities Inventory survey, the development of a comprehensive strategic plan, and the pilot of an IPE course for all first-year prelicensure students and Master of Health Administration students. Although more work is needed to more fully integrate IPE into the curriculum, success to date of the University of Iowa IPE initiative demonstrates that public health can play a critical role as a convener and catalyst for IPE curricular innovations on a health sciences campus.

  9. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Dena A

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes and behavior by an e-mail invitation with a link to the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory survey that was sent to all 1802 students with Kuwait University Health Sciences Center e-mail addresses. The data were analyzed for frequency distributions, and differences among the groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant ( P behavior than that of their nondental professional fellow students ( P behavior. Dental students and students who were in advanced levels of their training along with female students demonstrated better oral health practices and perceptions than students in lower academic levels and male students, respectively. Additional studies for investigating the effectiveness and identifying areas requiring modification within the dental curriculum at KUHSC may be warranted.

  10. Progress report: Health Sciences Division, 1983 July 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes programs in health physics, radiation biology, environmental sciences and biomedical research. Health physics research included work on neutron dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, measurements of γ- and β-sensitivity of MOSFET detectors, tritium monitoring, a stack effluent monitor, and other radiation instruments. Environmental research included studies of heated plumes, radiotracer studies of flow through rock fractures, radionuclide cycling by plants, stable cobalt in fish, long-term radiation protection objectives for radioactive waste disposal, and tritium in surface waters in the CRNL vicinity. Radiation biology research continued to be concerned with DNA damage from radiation and carcinogenic chemicals, and enzymatic Σrepair processesΣ which help protect cells from such damage. In biomedical research the experiment to measure the fraction of HT by volunteers that is converted to HTO in vivo is progressing satisfactorily

  11. Perceived conflict of interest in health science partnerships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Besley

    Full Text Available University scientists conducting research on topics of potential health concern often want to partner with a range of actors, including government entities, non-governmental organizations, and private enterprises. Such partnerships can provide access to needed resources, including funding. However, those who observe the results of such partnerships may judge those results based on who is involved. This set of studies seeks to assess how people perceive two hypothetical health science research collaborations. In doing so, it also tests the utility of using procedural justice concepts to assess perceptions of research legitimacy as a theoretical way to investigate conflict of interest perceptions. Findings show that including an industry collaborator has clear negative repercussions for how people see a research partnership and that these perceptions shape people's willingness to see the research as a legitimate source of knowledge. Additional research aimed at further communicating procedures that might mitigate the impact of industry collaboration is suggested.

  12. The Provision of Sexual Health Education in Australia: Primary School Teachers' Perspectives in Rural Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda; Fotinatos, Nina; Duffy, Bernadette; Burke, Jenene

    2013-01-01

    In Australian schools, one significant component of whole-school learning in sexuality education is to provide students with developmentally appropriate curriculum and learning opportunities, with the intention of influencing positive health and well-being. In the situation where the usual classroom teacher is under-prepared or unwilling to teach…

  13. Interdisciplinary Environmental-health Science Throughout Disaster Lifecycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Morman, S. A.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Potential human health effects from exposures to hazardous disaster materials and environmental contamination are common concerns following disasters. Using several examples from US Geological Survey environmental disaster responses (e.g., 2001 World Trade Center, mine tailings spills, 2005 Hurricane Katrina, 2007-2013 wildfires, 2011 Gulf oil spill, 2012 Hurricane Sandy, 2013 Colorado floods) and disaster scenarios (2011 ARkStorm, 2013 SAFRR tsunami) this presentation will illustrate the role for collaborative earth, environmental, and health science throughout disaster lifecycles. Pre-disaster environmental baseline measurements are needed to help understand environmental influences on pre-disaster health baselines, and to constrain the magnitude of a disaster's impacts. During and following disasters, there is a need for interdisciplinary rapid-response and longer-term assessments that: sample and characterize the physical, chemical, and microbial makeup of complex materials generated by the disasters; fingerprint material sources; monitor, map, and model dispersal and evolution of disaster materials in the environment; help understand how the materials are modified by environmental processes; and, identify key characteristics and processes that influence the exposures and toxicity of disaster materials to humans and the living environment. This information helps emergency responders, public health experts, and cleanup managers: 1) identify short- and long-term exposures to disaster materials that may affect health; 2) prioritize areas for cleanup; and 3) develop appropriate disposal solutions or restoration uses for disaster materials. By integrating lessons learned from past disasters with geospatial information on vulnerable sources of natural or anthropogenic contaminants, the environmental health implications of looming disasters or disaster scenarios can be better anticipated, which helps enhance preparedness and resilience. Understanding economic costs of

  14. Conceptualising population health: from mechanistic thinking to complexity science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Saroj

    2011-01-20

    The mechanistic interpretation of reality can be traced to the influential work by René Descartes and Sir Isaac Newton. Their theories were able to accurately predict most physical phenomena relating to motion, optics and gravity. This paradigm had at least three principles and approaches: reductionism, linearity and hierarchy. These ideas appear to have influenced social scientists and the discourse on population health. In contrast, Complexity Science takes a more holistic view of systems. It views natural systems as being 'open', with fuzzy borders, constantly adapting to cope with pressures from the environment. These are called Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). The sub-systems within it lack stable hierarchies, and the roles of agency keep changing. The interactions with the environment and among sub-systems are non-linear interactions and lead to self-organisation and emergent properties. Theoretical frameworks such as epi+demos+cracy and the ecosocial approach to health have implicitly used some of these concepts of interacting dynamic sub-systems. Using Complexity Science we can view population health outcomes as an emergent property of CAS, which has numerous dynamic non-linear interactions among its interconnected sub-systems or agents. In order to appreciate these sub-systems and determinants, one should acquire a basic knowledge of diverse disciplines and interact with experts from different disciplines. Strategies to improve health should be multi-pronged, and take into account the diversity of actors, determinants and contexts. The dynamic nature of the system requires that the interventions are constantly monitored to provide early feedback to a flexible system that takes quick corrections.

  15. Conceptualising population health: from mechanistic thinking to complexity science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasinghe Saroj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mechanistic interpretation of reality can be traced to the influential work by René Descartes and Sir Isaac Newton. Their theories were able to accurately predict most physical phenomena relating to motion, optics and gravity. This paradigm had at least three principles and approaches: reductionism, linearity and hierarchy. These ideas appear to have influenced social scientists and the discourse on population health. In contrast, Complexity Science takes a more holistic view of systems. It views natural systems as being 'open', with fuzzy borders, constantly adapting to cope with pressures from the environment. These are called Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS. The sub-systems within it lack stable hierarchies, and the roles of agency keep changing. The interactions with the environment and among sub-systems are non-linear interactions and lead to self-organisation and emergent properties. Theoretical frameworks such as epi+demos+cracy and the ecosocial approach to health have implicitly used some of these concepts of interacting dynamic sub-systems. Using Complexity Science we can view population health outcomes as an emergent property of CAS, which has numerous dynamic non-linear interactions among its interconnected sub-systems or agents. In order to appreciate these sub-systems and determinants, one should acquire a basic knowledge of diverse disciplines and interact with experts from different disciplines. Strategies to improve health should be multi-pronged, and take into account the diversity of actors, determinants and contexts. The dynamic nature of the system requires that the interventions are constantly monitored to provide early feedback to a flexible system that takes quick corrections.

  16. New library buildings: the Health Sciences Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericksen, R B

    1979-07-01

    The new Health Sciences Library of Memorial University of Newfoundland is described and illustrated. A library facility that forms part of a larger health sciences center, this is a medium-sized academic health sciences library built on a single level. Along with a physical description of the library and its features, the concepts of single-level libraries, phased occupancy, and the project management approach to building a large health center library are discussed in detail.

  17. [Health sciences education: dialogues in public health and the education for the citizenship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Denise Alves; da Silva, Eduardo Sergio

    2010-08-01

    In the last decades there have been discussions concerning the educational process of health professionals in Brazil. The discussed subjects are based on the verification of precarious aspects concerning a kind of formation that should be focused on attending the demands of the population, on the principles of SUS and an extended understanding of healthcare. We intended to think about alternatives in relation to the graduation in health sciences and in analyzing the way education in health is registered in the context of higher education.

  18. [The approach of sciences of complexity in health services administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Historically, health services administration has been managed under a Taylorist, Fayolist, humanist and bureaucratic focus approach. However, today dynamic and competitive behaviors that require others approaches in management are developing. Because of the social, scientific and technological changes that are occurring, it is necessary to abandon hierarchical and authoritarian schemes, "up and down" lines, prescriptive rules and order line up must be left behind. Health services administration is an adapted complex system that is not proportional, neither predictable in direction or magnitude. A new proposal is to focus on the sciences of complexity, where the social factors, materials, economics, human and ethics coincide with order and disorder, reason and unreason, and in which we must accept that the phenomenon that emerges creates different organizing different structures from the addition or subtraction of components. There is distance in the process of cause and direct effect. The mirage from the sciences of complexity are trans-disciplinary and we have accepted this in others branches of knowledge, such as quantum physics, non-linear mathematics and cybernetics, so we have to accept the influence of entropy, non-entropy, attractors, the theory of chaos and fractals.

  19. Health Sciences Patrons Use Electronic Books More than Print Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Elizabeth Miller

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Li, J. (2016. Is it cost-effective to purchase print books when the equivalent e-book is available? Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 16(1, 40-48. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15323269.2016.1118288 Abstract Objective – To compare use of books held simultaneously in print and electronic formats. Design – Case study. Setting – A health sciences library at a public comprehensive university with a medical college in the southern United States. Subjects – Usage data for 60 books held by the library simultaneously in print and electronically. The titles were on standing order in print and considered “core” texts for clinical, instructional, or reference for health sciences faculty, students, and medical residents. Methods – Researchers collected usage data for 60 print titles from the integrated library system and compared the data to COUNTER reports for electronic versions of the same titles, for the period spanning 2010-2014. Main Results – Overall, the 60 e-book titles were used more than the print versions, with the electronic versions used a total of 370,695 times while the print versions were used 93 times during the time period being examined. Conclusion – The use of electronic books outnumbers the use of print books of the same title.

  20. Educational gaming in the health sciences: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Gillian; Skirton, Heather; Cooper, Simon; Allum, Peter; Nelmes, Pam

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a report of a review to investigate the use of games to support classroom learning in the health sciences. One aim of education in the health sciences is to enable learners to develop professional competence. Students have a range of learning styles and innovative teaching strategies assist in creating a dynamic learning environment. New attitudes towards experiential learning methods have contributed to the expansion of gaming as a strategy. A search for studies published between January 1980 and June 2008 was undertaken, using appropriate search terms. The databases searched were: British Education Index, British Nursing Index, The Cochrane Library, CINAHLPlus, Medline, PubMed, ERIC, PsychInfo and Australian Education Index. All publications and theses identified through the search were assessed for relevance. Sixteen papers reporting empirical studies or reviews that involved comparison of gaming with didactic methods were included. The limited research available indicates that, while both traditional didactic methods and gaming have been successful in increasing student knowledge, neither method is clearly more helpful to students. The use of games generally enhances student enjoyment and may improve long-term retention of information. While the use of games can be viewed as a viable teaching strategy, care should be exercised in the use of specific games that have not been assessed objectively. Further research on the use of gaming is needed to enable educators to gaming techniques appropriately for the benefit of students and, ultimately, patients.

  1. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah A; Collins, Francis S

    2015-10-06

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation's population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation's health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity's impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce.

  2. Governing GMOs in the USA: science, law and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y Tony; Chen, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Controversy surrounds the production and consumption of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Proponents argue that GMO food sources represent the only viable solution to food shortages in an ever-growing global population. Science reports no harm from GMO use and consumption so far. Opponents fear the potentially negative impact that GMO development and use could have on the environment and consumers, and are concerned about the lack of data on the long-term effects of GMO use. We discuss the development of GMO food sources, the history of legislation and policy for the labeling requirements of GMO food products, and the health, environmental, and legal rationale for and against GMO food labeling. The Food and Drug Administration regulates food with GMOs within a coordinated framework of federal agencies. Despite mounting scientific evidence that GMO foods are substantially equivalent to traditionally bred food sources, debate remains over the appropriateness of GMO food labeling. In fact, food manufacturers have mounted a First Amendment challenge against Vermont's passage of a law that requires GMO labeling. Mandatory GMO labeling is not supported by science. Compulsory GMO labels may not only hinder the development of agricultural biotechnology, but may also exacerbate the misconception that GMOs endanger people's health. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. 75 FR 18837 - Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health; Privacy Act of 1974; Report of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Office of Public Health and...: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Health and Science, Office... to collect and facilitate distribution of minority health information to public and professional...

  4. Social Networking Addiction among Health Sciences Students in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Addiction to social networking sites (SNSs) is an international issue with numerous methods of measurement. The impact of such addictions among health science students is of particular concern. This study aimed to measure SNS addiction rates among health sciences students at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Muscat, Oman. In April 2014, an anonymous English-language six-item electronic self-reporting survey based on the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale was administered to a non-random cohort of 141 medical and laboratory science students at SQU. The survey was used to measure usage of three SNSs: Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California, USA), YouTube (YouTube, San Bruno, California, USA) and Twitter (Twitter Inc., San Francisco, California, USA). Two sets of criteria were used to calculate addiction rates (a score of 3 on at least four survey items or a score of 3 on all six items). Work-related SNS usage was also measured. A total of 81 students completed the survey (response rate: 57.4%). Of the three SNSs, YouTube was most commonly used (100%), followed by Facebook (91.4%) and Twitter (70.4%). Usage and addiction rates varied significantly across the three SNSs. Addiction rates to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, respectively, varied according to the criteria used (14.2%, 47.2% and 33.3% versus 6.3%, 13.8% and 12.8%). However, addiction rates decreased when work-related activity was taken into account. Rates of SNS addiction among this cohort indicate a need for intervention. Additionally, the results suggest that addiction to individual SNSs should be measured and that work-related activities should be taken into account during measurement.

  5. Social Networking Addiction among Health Sciences Students in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Masters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Addiction to social networking sites (SNSs is an international issue with numerous methods of measurement. The impact of such addictions among health science students is of particular concern. This study aimed to measure SNS addiction rates among health sciences students at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU in Muscat, Oman. Methods: In April 2014, an anonymous English-language six-item electronic self-reporting survey based on the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale was administered to a non-random cohort of 141 medical and laboratory science students at SQU. The survey was used to measure usage of three SNSs: Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California, USA, YouTube (YouTube, San Bruno, California, USA and Twitter (Twitter Inc., San Francisco, California, USA. Two sets of criteria were used to calculate addiction rates (a score of 3 on at least four survey items or a score of 3 on all six items. Work-related SNS usage was also measured. Results: A total of 81 students completed the survey (response rate: 57.4%. Of the three SNSs, YouTube was most commonly used (100%, followed by Facebook (91.4% and Twitter (70.4%. Usage and addiction rates varied significantly across the three SNSs. Addiction rates to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, respectively, varied according to the criteria used (14.2%, 47.2% and 33.3% versus 6.3%, 13.8% and 12.8%. However, addiction rates decreased when workrelated activity was taken into account. Conclusion: Rates of SNS addiction among this cohort indicate a need for intervention. Additionally, the results suggest that addiction to individual SNSs should be measured and that workrelated activities should be taken into account during measurement.

  6. Online interprofessional health sciences education: From theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Robert; Solomon, Patty; Baptiste, Sue; Hall, Pippa; Orchard, Carole; Rukholm, Ellen; Carter, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Online learning (e-learning) has a nascent but established history. Its application to interprofessional education (IPE), however, is relatively new. Over the past 2 decades the Internet has been used increasingly to mediate education. We have come past the point of "should we use the Internet for education" to "how should we use the Internet for education." Research has begun on the optimal development of online learning environments to support IPE. Developing online IPE should follow best practices in e-learning generally, though there are some special considerations for acknowledging the interprofessional context and clinical environments that online IPE is designed to support. The design, development, and deployment of effective online IPE must therefore pay special attention to the particular constraints of the health care worker educational matrix, both pre- and postlicensure. In this article we outline the design of online, interprofessional health sciences education. Our work has involved 4 educational and 4 clinical service institutions. We establish the context in which we situate our development activities that created learning modules designed to support IPE and its transfer into new interprofessional health care practices. We illustrate some best practices for the design of effective online IPE, and show how this design can create effective learning for IPE. Challenges exist regarding the full implementation of interprofessional clinical practice that are beginning to be met by coordinated efforts of multiple health care education silos.

  7. Advancing Environmental Health: A Ballroom Dance Between Human Health and Earth Sciences Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.

    2016-12-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is to discover how the environment affects people in order to promote healthier lives. Translation of this mission into a meaningful reality entails extensive interdisciplinary interactions, expertise, and collaborations between the traditional health and earth sciences communities. Efforts to advance our understanding of adverse effects and illness associated with environmental factors requires not only a refined understanding of the biological mechanisms and pathways (e.g., inflammation, epigenetic changes, oxidative stress, mutagenesis, etc.) related to function and disease, but also the incredibly broad and complex environmental exposures and systems that influence these processes. Further complicating efforts to understand such interactions is the need to take into account individual susceptibility to disease across the human life span. While it is clear that environmental exposures can be readily linked to disease in individuals and to disproportionate health disparities in populations, the underlying risk factors for such findings are often elusive. Health and earth scientists have a long tradition of crossing their scientific divides to work together on a wide range of problems and issues, including disasters. Emergency situations, such as the environmental asbestos contamination in Libby, Montana, the Gulf Oil Spill, numerous chemical releases into air and water, wildfires, the World Trade Center Attack, and responses to Ebola, and now Zika, demand the collective expertise of the "environmental health sciences enterprise" to protect the public's health, facilitate recovery, and improve future preparedness. Furthermore, such high visibility efforts stand as a clear example of what human and earth sciences research can accomplish when transformative interdisciplinary approaches and a diverse well-trained cadre of scientists dance together on the ballroom floor.

  8. Progress report. Physics and Health Sciences, Health Sciences Section (1988 July 01 - December 31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, J.D.C.

    1989-04-01

    The screening assay for inherited variations in radiosensitivity has been tested. The object is to determine whether those individuals whose cells are abnormally radiosensitive are in fact prone to cancer. Follow-up of the health of radiation workers at AECL continues. As noted in the Hare report (Ontario Nuclear Safety Review), 'epidemiological analysis of the exposed workers of AECL ... shows cancer mortality to be below that in the general public'. These studies are being extended in order to ensure that the initial conclusions remain valid with up-to-date information. A new, very sensitive thermoluminescent material has been adapted for use in AECL dosimetry. The new material results in a much improved performance for measuring small doses and in addition, for accurate dose estimates of low energy beta rays. Much of the work of the Environmental Research Branch concerns modelling. In the atmosphere, our work on atmospheric plume dispersion and metabolic modelling has led naturally to AECL staff contributing to the high profile international study, BIOMOVS. Similarly, the release of a small quantity of tritiated heavy water provided an excellent opportunity to test our model of surface water flow in the Ottawa River. This rather simple model provided a surprisingly accurate prediction, and gave the best estimate of the total release. Finally, continuing analysis of Twin Lakes tracer data is making significant contributions to our very sophisticated model of groundwater flow in porous, heterogeneous media. Conversion of this model to run under NOS/VE on the new Cyber 990 computer is essentially complete

  9. A university system's approach to enhancing the educational mission of health science schools and institutions: the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, L Maximilian; Cox, Susan M; Lieberman, Steven A; MacClements, Jonathan; Williams, Janet F; Esterl, Robert M; Shine, Kenneth I

    2013-03-13

    The academy movement developed in the United States as an important approach to enhance the educational mission and facilitate the recognition and work of educators at medical schools and health science institutions. Academies initially formed at individual medical schools. Educators and leaders in The University of Texas System (the UT System, UTS) recognized the academy movement as a means both to address special challenges and pursue opportunities for advancing the educational mission of academic health sciences institutions. The UTS academy process was started by the appointment of a Chancellor's Health Fellow for Education in 2004. Subsequently, the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education (UTAHSE) was formed by bringing together esteemed faculty educators from the six UTS health science institutions. Currently, the UTAHSE has 132 voting members who were selected through a rigorous, system-wide peer review and who represent multiple professional backgrounds and all six campuses. With support from the UTS, the UTAHSE has developed and sustained an annual Innovations in Health Science Education conference, a small grants program and an Innovations in Health Science Education Award, among other UTS health science educational activities. The UTAHSE represents one university system's innovative approach to enhancing its educational mission through multi- and interdisciplinary as well as inter-institutional collaboration. The UTAHSE is presented as a model for the development of other consortia-type academies that could involve several components of a university system or coalitions of several institutions.

  10. A university system's approach to enhancing the educational mission of health science schools and institutions: the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, L. Maximilian; Cox, Susan M.; Lieberman, Steven A.; MacClements, Jonathan; Williams, Janet F.; Esterl, Robert M.; Shine, Kenneth I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The academy movement developed in the United States as an important approach to enhance the educational mission and facilitate the recognition and work of educators at medical schools and health science institutions. Objectives Academies initially formed at individual medical schools. Educators and leaders in The University of Texas System (the UT System, UTS) recognized the academy movement as a means both to address special challenges and pursue opportunities for advancing the educational mission of academic health sciences institutions. Methods The UTS academy process was started by the appointment of a Chancellor's Health Fellow for Education in 2004. Subsequently, the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education (UTAHSE) was formed by bringing together esteemed faculty educators from the six UTS health science institutions. Results Currently, the UTAHSE has 132 voting members who were selected through a rigorous, system-wide peer review and who represent multiple professional backgrounds and all six campuses. With support from the UTS, the UTAHSE has developed and sustained an annual Innovations in Health Science Education conference, a small grants program and an Innovations in Health Science Education Award, among other UTS health science educational activities. The UTAHSE represents one university system's innovative approach to enhancing its educational mission through multi- and interdisciplinary as well as inter-institutional collaboration. Conclusions The UTAHSE is presented as a model for the development of other consortia-type academies that could involve several components of a university system or coalitions of several institutions. PMID:23490406

  11. Venture funding for science-based African health innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While venture funding has been applied to biotechnology and health in high-income countries, it is still nascent in these fields in developing countries, and particularly in Africa. Yet the need for implementing innovative solutions to health challenges is greatest in Africa, with its enormous burden of communicable disease. Issues such as risk, investment opportunities, return on investment requirements, and quantifying health impact are critical in assessing venture capital’s potential for supporting health innovation. This paper uses lessons learned from five venture capital firms from Kenya, South Africa, China, India, and the US to suggest design principles for African health venture funds. Discussion The case study method was used to explore relevant funds, and lessons for the African context. The health venture funds in this study included publicly-owned organizations, corporations, social enterprises, and subsidiaries of foreign venture firms. The size and type of investments varied widely. The primary investor in four funds was the International Finance Corporation. Three of the funds aimed primarily for financial returns, one aimed primarily for social and health returns, and one had mixed aims. Lessons learned include the importance of measuring and supporting both social and financial returns; the need to engage both upstream capital such as government risk-funding and downstream capital from the private sector; and the existence of many challenges including difficulty of raising capital, low human resource capacity, regulatory barriers, and risky business environments. Based on these lessons, design principles for appropriate venture funding are suggested. Summary Based on the cases studied and relevant experiences elsewhere, there is a case for venture funding as one support mechanism for science-based African health innovation, with opportunities for risk-tolerant investors to make financial as well as social

  12. Venture funding for science-based African health innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Hassan; Chakma, Justin; Simiyu, Ken; Ronoh, Wesley; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2010-12-13

    While venture funding has been applied to biotechnology and health in high-income countries, it is still nascent in these fields in developing countries, and particularly in Africa. Yet the need for implementing innovative solutions to health challenges is greatest in Africa, with its enormous burden of communicable disease. Issues such as risk, investment opportunities, return on investment requirements, and quantifying health impact are critical in assessing venture capital's potential for supporting health innovation. This paper uses lessons learned from five venture capital firms from Kenya, South Africa, China, India, and the US to suggest design principles for African health venture funds. The case study method was used to explore relevant funds, and lessons for the African context. The health venture funds in this study included publicly-owned organizations, corporations, social enterprises, and subsidiaries of foreign venture firms. The size and type of investments varied widely. The primary investor in four funds was the International Finance Corporation. Three of the funds aimed primarily for financial returns, one aimed primarily for social and health returns, and one had mixed aims. Lessons learned include the importance of measuring and supporting both social and financial returns; the need to engage both upstream capital such as government risk-funding and downstream capital from the private sector; and the existence of many challenges including difficulty of raising capital, low human resource capacity, regulatory barriers, and risky business environments. Based on these lessons, design principles for appropriate venture funding are suggested. Based on the cases studied and relevant experiences elsewhere, there is a case for venture funding as one support mechanism for science-based African health innovation, with opportunities for risk-tolerant investors to make financial as well as social returns. Such funds should be structured to overcome the

  13. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  14. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Rebuilding public trust in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advancement of Science and a former U.S. Congressman, notes public mistrust, misunderstanding, and apathy towards science are evident at the same time researchers are making significant progress in understanding basic questions about health, ...

  15. Exploring the relationship between the engineering and physical sciences and the health and life sciences by advanced bibliometric methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waltman, L.R.; Van, Raan A.F.J.; Smart, S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which advances in the health and life sciences (HLS) are dependent on research in the engineering and physical sciences (EPS), particularly physics, chemistry, mathematics, and engineering. The analysis combines two different bibliometric approaches. The first approach

  16. 78 FR 17219 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Assessment of Adverse Genetic Effects From Exposure to Compounds..., NIEHS Hazardous Waste Worker Health and Safety Training; 93.143, NIEHS Superfund Hazardous Substances... Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological...

  17. 76 FR 59388 - Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... University of the Health Sciences AGENCY: Department of Defense, Uniformed Services University of the Health... Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. DATES: Tuesday, October 25, 2011, from 8:30 a.m. to 11... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Janet S. Taylor, Designated Federal Officer, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda...

  18. Biophysics at the intersection of health science and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquardt, D.; Alsop, R.J.; Rheinstadter, M.C.; Harroun, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    We're all on a quest for improved heart health, but what do we really know about it? A daily regimen of aspirin can help some people with heart disease. We need to lower our cholesterol, and increase our intake of omega fatty acids. There is simply no health benefit to taking extra vitamin E, and it's not known why. Apart from cardiac tests with radiopharmaceuticals, what role does nuclear technology play in this story? It turns out that cold and thermal neutrons are important tools for the biophysicists studying these topics. We will review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E, and aspirin all work at the molecular level, inside the membrane of our cells. These insights could not have been learned without access to research reactor neutron beams such as those at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, and how this new knowledge has really engaged the broader health science community into new ways of thinking about these molecules. (author)

  19. Biophysics at the intersection of health science and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquardt, D.; Alsop, R.J.; Rheinstadter, M.C.; Harroun, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    We're all on a quest for improved heart health, but what do we really know about it? A daily regimen of aspirin can help some people with heart disease. We need to lower our cholesterol, and increase our intake of omega fatty acids. There is simply no health bene t to taking extra vitamin E, and it's not known why. Apart from cardiac tests with radiopharmaceuticals, what role does nuclear technology play in this story? It turns out that cold and thermal neutrons are important tools for the biophysicists studying these topics. We will review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E, and aspirin all work at the molecular level, inside the membrane of our cells. These insights could not have been learned without access to research reactor neutron beams such as those at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, and how this new knowledge has really engaged the broader health science community into new ways of thinking about these molecules. (author)

  20. Biophysics at the intersection of health science and nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, D. [Brock Univ., Dept. of Physics, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada); Alsop, R.J.; Rheinstadter, M.C. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Harroun, T.A. [Brock Univ., Dept. of Physics, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    We're all on a quest for improved heart health, but what do we really know about it? A daily regimen of aspirin can help some people with heart disease. We need to lower our cholesterol, and increase our intake of omega fatty acids. There is simply no health benefit to taking extra vitamin E, and it's not known why. Apart from cardiac tests with radiopharmaceuticals, what role does nuclear technology play in this story? It turns out that cold and thermal neutrons are important tools for the biophysicists studying these topics. We will review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E, and aspirin all work at the molecular level, inside the membrane of our cells. These insights could not have been learned without access to research reactor neutron beams such as those at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, and how this new knowledge has really engaged the broader health science community into new ways of thinking about these molecules. (author)

  1. Biophysics at the intersection of health science and nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, D., E-mail: thad.harroun@brocku.ca [Brock Univ., Dept. of Physics, St. Catherines, Ontario (Canada); Alsop, R.J.; Rheinstadter, M.C. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Harroun, T.A. [Brock University, Dept. of Physics, St. Catherines, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    We're all on a quest for improved heart health, but what do we really know about it? A daily regimen of aspirin can help some people with heart disease. We need to lower our cholesterol, and increase our intake of omega fatty acids. There is simply no health bene t to taking extra vitamin E, and it's not known why. Apart from cardiac tests with radiopharmaceuticals, what role does nuclear technology play in this story? It turns out that cold and thermal neutrons are important tools for the biophysicists studying these topics. We will review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E, and aspirin all work at the molecular level, inside the membrane of our cells. These insights could not have been learned without access to research reactor neutron beams such as those at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, and how this new knowledge has really engaged the broader health science community into new ways of thinking about these molecules. (author)

  2. The Inherent Drawbacks of the Pressure to Publish in Health Sciences: Good or Bad Science [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveria; Teresa Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of scientific publications– it is the era of “hunting the article”. This commentary discusses the drawbacks of the pressure to publish that certainly contribute to the ‘dark side’ of science. In fact, health science career progression greatly relies on the number of scientific publications a researcher has, and in many cases these may be more valorized than the health services provided. Of course, scientific publications hel...

  3. The genesis of craniofacial biology as a health science discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, G H; Sperber, S M

    2014-06-01

    The craniofacial complex encapsulates the brain and contains the organs for key functions of the body, including sight, hearing and balance, smell, taste, respiration and mastication. All these systems are intimately integrated within the head. The combination of these diverse systems into a new field was dictated by the dental profession's desire for a research branch of basic science devoted and attuned to its specific needs. The traditional subjects of genetics, embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, dental materials, odontology, molecular biology and palaeoanthropology pertaining to dentistry have been drawn together by many newly emerging technologies. These new technologies include gene sequencing, CAT scanning, MRI imaging, laser scanning, image analysis, ultrasonography, spectroscopy and visualosonics. A vibrant unitary discipline of investigation, craniofacial biology, has emerged that builds on the original concept of 'oral biology' that began in the 1960s. This paper reviews some of the developments that have led to the genesis of craniofacial biology as a fully-fledged health science discipline of significance in the advancement of clinical dental practice. Some of the key figures and milestones in craniofacial biology are identified. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  4. A Qualitative Evaluation of Ethics Educational Program in Health Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Perihan Elif; Oral, Murat; Yurdakul, Eray Serdar

    2015-06-01

    This paper originates from a panel discussion on the evaluation of "Ethics Educational Program in Health Sciences" held during the IAEE Conference 2014 Ankara, Turkey. The participants of the panel had consultations to solidify the concepts about the topic. The qualitative data out of these antecedent discussions became mature with the contributions in the panel. The outcome of this qualitative study mainly focuses on the examples of two current curricula; one from PhD on History of Medicine and Medical Ethics, the other one from an elective course on medical ethics as a part of a PhD program on Pharmacy Management and History, followed by the major challenges the trainees face during their education, their expectations and whether the program was satisfactory, the aspects of the programs which are prone to improvement and their overall evaluations of the programs.

  5. Small grant management in health and behavioral sciences: Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakraida, Teresa J; D'Amico, Jessica; Thibault, Erica

    2010-08-01

    This article describes considerations in health and behavioral sciences small grant management and describes lessons learned during post-award implementation. Using the components by W. Sahlman [Sahlman, W. (1997). How to write a great business plan. Harvard Business Review, 75(4), 98-108] as a business framework, a plan was developed that included (a) building relationships with people in the research program and with external parties providing key resources, (b) establishing a perspective of opportunity for research advancement, (c) identifying the larger context of scientific culture and regulatory environment, and (d) anticipating problems with a flexible response and rewarding teamwork. Small grant management included developing a day-to-day system, building a grant/study program development plan, and initiating a marketing plan. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin-Ragaven Laurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28% completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%. Twenty-two respondents (48% implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66 to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation

  7. [The teaching of social sciences in health: between practice and theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nelson Filice de

    2014-04-01

    The models of teaching social sciences and clinical practice are insufficient for the needs of practical-reflective teaching of social sciences applied to health. The scope of this article is to reflect on the challenges and perspectives of social science education for health professionals. In the 1950s the important movement bringing together social sciences and the field of health began, however weak credentials still prevail. This is due to the low professional status of social scientists in health and the ill-defined position of the social sciences professionals in the health field. It is also due to the scant importance attributed by students to the social sciences, the small number of professionals and the colonization of the social sciences by the biomedical culture in the health field. Thus, the professionals of social sciences applied to health are also faced with the need to build an identity, even after six decades of their presence in the field of health. This is because their ambivalent status has established them as a partial, incomplete and virtual presence, requiring a complex survival strategy in the nebulous area between social sciences and health.

  8. Interdisciplinarity and systems science to improve population health: a view from the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Patricia L; Olster, Deborah H; Morgan, Glen D; Abrams, David B

    2008-08-01

    Fueled by the rapid pace of discovery, humankind's ability to understand the ultimate causes of preventable common disease burdens and to identify solutions is now reaching a revolutionary tipping point. Achieving optimal health and well-being for all members of society lies as much in the understanding of the factors identified by the behavioral, social, and public health sciences as by the biological ones. Accumulating advances in mathematical modeling, informatics, imaging, sensor technology, and communication tools have stimulated several converging trends in science: an emerging understanding of epigenomic regulation; dramatic successes in achieving population health-behavior changes; and improved scientific rigor in behavioral, social, and economic sciences. Fostering stronger interdisciplinary partnerships to bring together the behavioral-social-ecologic models of multilevel "causes of the causes" and the molecular, cellular, and, ultimately, physiological bases of health and disease will facilitate breakthroughs to improve the public's health. The strategic vision of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is rooted in a collaborative approach to addressing the complex and multidimensional issues that challenge the public's health. This paper describes OBSSR's four key programmatic directions (next-generation basic science, interdisciplinary research, systems science, and a problem-based focus for population impact) to illustrate how interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspectives can foster the vertical integration of research among biological, behavioral, social, and population levels of analysis over the lifespan and across generations. Interdisciplinary and multilevel approaches are critical both to the OBSSR's mission of integrating behavioral and social sciences more fully into the NIH scientific enterprise and to the overall NIH mission of utilizing science in the pursuit of

  9. The Interconnectedness of Water and Health: Translating Science Into Public Health-driven Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtveld, M.

    2017-12-01

    Louisiana and other U.S. Gulf Coast communities' unique vulnerability stems from three interconnected stressors they face: historic health disparities, persistent environmental stressors, and a geography prone to both natural and technological disasters. The health of the ecosystem is inextricably linked to that of humans. Specifically, water presents both a central asset and an intransigent environmental health threat. Waterborne illnesses associated with infectious organisms, chemical contaminants, coastal erosion, natural and technological disasters such as hurricanes and oil spills, as well as climate change-associated sea level rise and dead zones, all can negatively impact human health. Existing water-related policies at the federal, state, and local levels have failed to effectively protect the health of communities and their environment to date. For example, despite the existence of the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act, oil spills and drinking water contamination continue to pose significant threats to communities' health and wellbeing. This presentation will examine water-related threats to Gulf Coast communities and their ecosystem. Emphasis will be placed on key examples of policy failure and the impact such failures. A public health-driven framework will demonstrate how science can inform evidence- based policy and in turn prevention-driven public health practice.

  10. Cognitive computing and eScience in health and life science research: artificial intelligence and obesity intervention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Thomas; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffiany; Castelli, Darla; Hoelscher, Deanna

    2017-12-01

    To present research models based on artificial intelligence and discuss the concept of cognitive computing and eScience as disruptive factors in health and life science research methodologies. The paper identifies big data as a catalyst to innovation and the development of artificial intelligence, presents a framework for computer-supported human problem solving and describes a transformation of research support models. This framework includes traditional computer support; federated cognition using machine learning and cognitive agents to augment human intelligence; and a semi-autonomous/autonomous cognitive model, based on deep machine learning, which supports eScience. The paper provides a forward view of the impact of artificial intelligence on our human-computer support and research methods in health and life science research. By augmenting or amplifying human task performance with artificial intelligence, cognitive computing and eScience research models are discussed as novel and innovative systems for developing more effective adaptive obesity intervention programs.

  11. Searching for religion and mental health studies required health, social science, and grey literature databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Judy M; Cottrell, David J; Mir, Ghazala

    2014-07-01

    To determine the optimal databases to search for studies of faith-sensitive interventions for treating depression. We examined 23 health, social science, religious, and grey literature databases searched for an evidence synthesis. Databases were prioritized by yield of (1) search results, (2) potentially relevant references identified during screening, (3) included references contained in the synthesis, and (4) included references that were available in the database. We assessed the impact of databases beyond MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO by their ability to supply studies identifying new themes and issues. We identified pragmatic workload factors that influence database selection. PsycINFO was the best performing database within all priority lists. ArabPsyNet, CINAHL, Dissertations and Theses, EMBASE, Global Health, Health Management Information Consortium, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts were essential for our searches to retrieve the included references. Citation tracking activities and the personal library of one of the research teams made significant contributions of unique, relevant references. Religion studies databases (Am Theo Lib Assoc, FRANCIS) did not provide unique, relevant references. Literature searches for reviews and evidence syntheses of religion and health studies should include social science, grey literature, non-Western databases, personal libraries, and citation tracking activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a health sciences internship for Latino and Native American library students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla; Quasem, Sanjana; Kelly, Janice E; Dutcher, Gale A

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of a graduate-level internship for Latino and Native American library science students or students who are interested in serving those populations. The authors analyzed semi-structured interviews with thirteen internship program graduates or participants. The analysis suggests that the program increased participants' interest in health sciences librarianship and led to improved career opportunities, both in health sciences libraries and other libraries with health information programming. It also highlights specific factors that are likely to contribute to the strength of career pipeline programs aiming to bring Latino and Native American students and students who are interested in serving those communities into health librarianship. Exposing graduate-level interns to a broad range of health sciences librarianship tasks, including outreach to Latino and Native American communities and formal mentorship, is likely to maximize interns' interests in both health sciences librarianship and service to these communities.

  13. International trends in health science librarianship part 12: South Asia (India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Medha; Ali Anwar, Mumtaz; Ullah, Midrar; Kuruppu, Chandrani

    2014-12-01

    This is the 12th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship. This issue describes developments in health science librarianship in the first decade of the 21st century in South Asia. The three contributors report on challenges facing health science librarians in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. There is consensus as to the need for education, training and professional development. Starting in the next issue, the focus will turn to Africa, starting with countries in southern Africa. JM. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Journal.

  14. International trends in health science librarianship Part 10: The Greater China area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhiyun; Chan, Julia L Y; Lam, Louisa Mei Chun; Chiu, Tzu-Heng

    2014-06-01

    This is the 10th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship. This issue describes developments in health science librarianship in the first decade of the 21st century in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. The next issue will report on Japan and South Korea. JM. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  15. Nutrition and the science of disease prevention: a systems approach to support metabolic health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brian J.; Hall, Kevin D.; Hu, Frank B.; McCartney, Anne L.; Roberto, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Progress in nutritional science, genetics, computer science, and behavioral economics can be leveraged to address the challenge of noncommunicable disease. This report highlights the connection between nutrition and the complex science of preventing disease and discusses the promotion of optimal metabolic health, building on input from several complementary disciplines. The discussion focuses on (1) the basic science of optimal metabolic health, including data from gene–diet interactions, microbiome, and epidemiological research in nutrition, with the goal of defining better targets and interventions, and (2) how nutrition, from pharma to lifestyle, can build on systems science to address complex issues. PMID:26415028

  16. Preparedness for eHealth: Health Sciences Students’ Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition of the role eHealth will play in the effective and efficient delivery of healthcare. This research challenges the assumption that students enter university as digital natives, able to confidently and competently adapt their use of information and communication technology (ICT to new contexts. This study explored health sciences students’ preparedness for working, and leading change, in eHealth-enabled environments. Using a cross-sectional study design, 420 undergraduate and postgraduate students participated in an online survey investigating their understanding of and attitude towards eHealth, frequency of online activities and software usage, confidence learning and using ICTs, and perceived learning needs. Although students reported that they regularly engaged with a wide range of online activities and software and were confident learning new ICT skills especially where they have sufficient time or support, their understanding of eHealth was uncertain or limited. Poor understanding of and difficulty translating skills learned in personal contexts to the professional context may impair graduates ability to con-fidently engage in the eHealth-enabled workplace. These results suggest educators need to scaffold the learning experience to ensure students build on their ICT knowledge to transfer this to their future workplaces.

  17. Consumer health information partnerships: the health science library and multitype library system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, S

    1996-04-01

    The University of Illinois Library of the Health Sciences at Rockford (LHS-Rockford) long has honored a commitment to serving the health information needs of the greater Rockford community. Utilization data collected over the past five years indicate that approximately 50% of reference transactions involve persons not affiliated with the university. In early 1994, LHS-Rockford submitted a proposal to the Northern Illinois Library System (NILS), a multitype system spanning twelve counties in northwestern Illinois, asking to serve as a resource library for improving medical and health information services provided by the 138 NILS member libraries. The NILS funded this pilot project as part of an effort to implement a new strategic plan, which encouraged member libraries to form networks to provide reference back-up service. LHS-Rockford acquired InfoTrac's Health Reference Center, a consumer health information database, and set up a dedicated workstation near the information and circulation desk. Referral guidelines were established and the project was promoted among NILS member libraries. Activities were documented in order to track project success in terms of referrals and outcomes. The demonstration project was very successful, and it proves public consumers seeking health information can benefit greatly from this type of cooperative arrangement.

  18. Blood-borne biomarkers and bioindicators for linking exposure to health effects in environmental health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M Ariel Geer; Kormos, Tzipporah M; Pleil, Joachim D

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health science aims to link environmental pollution sources to adverse health outcomes to develop effective exposure intervention strategies that reduce long-term disease risks. Over the past few decades, the public health community recognized that health risk is driven by interaction between the human genome and external environment. Now that the human genetic code has been sequenced, establishing this "G × E" (gene-environment) interaction requires a similar effort to decode the human exposome, which is the accumulation of an individual's environmental exposures and metabolic responses throughout the person's lifetime. The exposome is composed of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, many of which are measurable as biomarkers in blood, breath, and urine. Exposure to pollutants is assessed by analyzing biofluids for the pollutant itself or its metabolic products. New methods are being developed to use a subset of biomarkers, termed bioindicators, to demonstrate biological changes indicative of future adverse health effects. Typically, environmental biomarkers are assessed using noninvasive (excreted) media, such as breath and urine. Blood is often avoided for biomonitoring due to practical reasons such as medical personnel, infectious waste, or clinical setting, despite the fact that blood represents the central compartment that interacts with every living cell and is the most relevant biofluid for certain applications and analyses. The aims of this study were to (1) review the current use of blood samples in environmental health research, (2) briefly contrast blood with other biological media, and (3) propose additional applications for blood analysis in human exposure research.

  19. The Academic Role of the Vice President for Health Sciences: Can a Walrus Become a Unicorn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Edmund D.

    1975-01-01

    The Vice President for Health Sciences is a term used for the chief administrative officer of a multi-unit health science component of a university. This essay reviews this job, and the transformation it has undergone in the past. (Editor/PG)

  20. External Reporting Lines of Academic Special Libraries: A Health Sciences Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Amy G.; Ferree, Nita; Cataldo, Tara T.; Tennant, Michele R.

    2010-01-01

    Very little literature exists on the nature of external reporting lines and funding structures of academic special libraries. This study focuses on academic health sciences libraries. The authors analyze information gathered from statistics published by the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) from 1977 through 2007; an…

  1. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  2. Wellness as a virtue in Health Sciences students: are they practising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the male Health Science students reportedly consumed less vegetables. The general lack of healthy eating habits in all of the students, especially in terms of a lack of dairy, fruit and vegetable intake, as well as the high prevalence of fast food intake, was evident from the study. Half of the students (Health Science ...

  3. Big Data Science: Opportunities and Challenges to Address Minority Health and Health Disparities in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Bourne, Philip E; Peprah, Emmanuel; Duru, O Kenrik; Breen, Nancy; Berrigan, David; Wood, Fred; Jackson, James S; Wong, David W S; Denny, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Addressing minority health and health disparities has been a missing piece of the puzzle in Big Data science. This article focuses on three priority opportunities that Big Data science may offer to the reduction of health and health care disparities. One opportunity is to incorporate standardized information on demographic and social determinants in electronic health records in order to target ways to improve quality of care for the most disadvantaged populations over time. A second opportunity is to enhance public health surveillance by linking geographical variables and social determinants of health for geographically defined populations to clinical data and health outcomes. Third and most importantly, Big Data science may lead to a better understanding of the etiology of health disparities and understanding of minority health in order to guide intervention development. However, the promise of Big Data needs to be considered in light of significant challenges that threaten to widen health disparities. Care must be taken to incorporate diverse populations to realize the potential benefits. Specific recommendations include investing in data collection on small sample populations, building a diverse workforce pipeline for data science, actively seeking to reduce digital divides, developing novel ways to assure digital data privacy for small populations, and promoting widespread data sharing to benefit under-resourced minority-serving institutions and minority researchers. With deliberate efforts, Big Data presents a dramatic opportunity for reducing health disparities but without active engagement, it risks further widening them.

  4. Big Data Science: Opportunities and Challenges to Address Minority Health and Health Disparities in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Bourne, Philip E.; Peprah, Emmanuel; Duru, O. Kenrik; Breen, Nancy; Berrigan, David; Wood, Fred; Jackson, James S.; Wong, David W.S.; Denny, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Addressing minority health and health disparities has been a missing piece of the puzzle in Big Data science. This article focuses on three priority opportunities that Big Data science may offer to the reduction of health and health care disparities. One opportunity is to incorporate standardized information on demographic and social determinants in electronic health records in order to target ways to improve quality of care for the most disadvantaged populations over time. A second opportunity is to enhance public health surveillance by linking geographical variables and social determinants of health for geographically defined populations to clinical data and health outcomes. Third and most importantly, Big Data science may lead to a better understanding of the etiology of health disparities and understanding of minority health in order to guide intervention development. However, the promise of Big Data needs to be considered in light of significant challenges that threaten to widen health disparities. Care must be taken to incorporate diverse populations to realize the potential benefits. Specific recommendations include investing in data collection on small sample populations, building a diverse workforce pipeline for data science, actively seeking to reduce digital divides, developing novel ways to assure digital data privacy for small populations, and promoting widespread data sharing to benefit under-resourced minority-serving institutions and minority researchers. With deliberate efforts, Big Data presents a dramatic opportunity for reducing health disparities but without active engagement, it risks further widening them. PMID:28439179

  5. 78 FR 47715 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Environmental Health...

  6. The science and practice of people-centred health systems | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    She said of the supplement, “it does justice to the heart and science of health systems research and is a foundational start to the term 'people-centred health systems'." The full text articles are freely available on the website of the Health Policy and Planning journal. Read about IDRC's support to health systems research.

  7. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 July 01 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are health and safety aspects of tritium. This includes instrumentation, environmental studies, metabolism, dosimetry and health effects

  8. The science and practice of people-centred health systems | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... She said of the supplement, “it does justice to the heart and science of health systems research and is a foundational start to the term 'people-centred health systems'." The full text articles are freely available on the website of the Health Policy and Planning journal. Read about IDRC's support to health ...

  9. Construct validity of the Health Science Reasoning Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Karen; Black, Lisa; Jensen, Gail M; Deutsch, Judith E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the construct validity of the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT) by determining if the test could discriminate between expert and novice physical therapists' critical-thinking skills. Experts identified from a random list of certified clinical specialists and students in the first year of their physical therapy education from two physical therapy programs completed the HSRT. Experts (n = 73) had a higher total HSRT score (mean 24.06, SD 3.92) than the novices (n = 79) (mean 22.49, SD 3.2), with the difference being statistically significant t (148) = 2.67, p = 0.008. The HSRT total score discriminated between expert and novice critical-thinking skills, therefore establishing construct validity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare expert and novice performance on a standardized test. The opportunity to have a tool that provides evidence of students' critical thinking skills could be helpful for educators and students. The test results could aid in identifying areas of students' strengths and weaknesses, thereby enabling targeted remediation to improve critical thinking skills, which are key factors in clinical reasoning, a necessary skill for effective physical therapy practice.

  10. Problem-based learning online: perceptions of health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaitis, Ruta K; Sword, Wendy A; Jones, Bob; Hodges, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative study explored health sciences students' perceptions of their experiences in online problem based learning (PBL) and focused on their views about learning and group process in the online environment. Participants were novices to online learning and highly experienced in PBL, therefore, they could reflect on past face-to-face PBL experiences. Three groups of learners were involved, including undergraduate nursing and midwifery students and graduate students in a neonatal nurse practitioner program. Findings are presented using the six steps of the PBL process (Rideout & Carpio, 2001). Results indicated that it is feasible to conduct PBL online. Students felt that it increased their flexibility for learning, enhanced their ability to deeply process content, and provided access to valuable learning resources. Students experienced a period of adaptation to the online environment, perceived a heavy workload, and had difficulties making group decisions online. In addition to using asynchronous communication, chats (synchronous communication) were valued to support group decision-making online. Students appreciated validation of their online contributions from their peers and wanted clear expectations of what constituted successful tutorial participation from their tutors. Although online PBL can work effectively, tutors and students need to develop online literacy skills to smooth their transition to an online PBL environment.

  11. A narrative review of acute care nurses' experiences nursing patients with intellectual disability: underprepared, communication barriers and ambiguity about the role of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Peter; Gaffney, Ryan J; Wilson, Nathan J

    2017-06-01

    To describe how nurses experience caring for people with intellectual disability in an acute care setting. Recent advances in the care of people with intellectual disability in hospital are primarily based upon the experiences of people with intellectual disability and their caregivers. Little is known about the experiences of registered nurses caring for people with intellectual disability, yet the experiences of nurses in delivering care largely determine the quality of care experienced by people with intellectual disability and their caregivers. A narrative literature review using electronic database searches was conducted using variants of the terms disability, nursing and acute care. Through our reading of the recent literature describing the experiences of nurses caring for people with intellectual disability in an acute care setting, we have identified three themes: (1) nurses feel underprepared when caring for patients with intellectual disability, (2) nurses experience challenges when communicating with people with intellectual disability and (3) nurses have ambiguous expectations of paid and unpaid caregivers. The enablers of and barriers to the delivery of nursing care in acute care settings need to be made explicit and researchers and nurses need to collaborate in the development, implementation and evaluation of care delivery strategies. Nurses need to be adequately prepared to care for people with intellectual disability. Preparation should include dealing with the complexities of communicating with people with intellectual disability and practical experience of doing so in clinical and educational environments that ensure the safety and dignity of nurses and people with intellectual disability. Nurses need supportive strategies for developing therapeutic relationships with a range of informal and formal caregivers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Developing health science students into integrated health professionals: a practical tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Madeleine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An integrated sense of professionalism enables health professionals to draw on relevant knowledge in context and to apply a set of professional responsibilities and ethical principles in the midst of changing work environments 12. Inculcating professionalism is therefore a critical goal of health professional education. Two multi-professional courses for first year Health Science students at the University of Cape Town, South Africa aim to lay the foundation for becoming an integrated health professional 3. In these courses a diagram depicting the domains of the integrated health professional is used to focus the content of small group experiential exercises towards an appreciation of professionalism. The diagram serves as an organising framework for conceptualising an emerging professional identity and for directing learning towards the domains of 'self as professional' 45. Objective This paper describes how a diagrammatic representation of the core elements of an integrated health professional is used as a template for framing course content and for organising student learning. Based on the assumption that all health care professionals should be knowledgeable, empathic and reflective, the diagram provides students and educators with a visual tool for investigating the subjective and objective dimensions of professionalism. The use of the diagram as an integrating point of reference for individual and small group learning is described and substantiated with relevant literature. Conclusion The authors have applied the diagram with positive impact for the past six years with students and educators reporting that "it just makes sense". The article includes plans for formal evaluation. Evaluation to date is based on preliminary, informal feedback on the value of the diagram as a tool for capturing the domains of professionalism at an early stage in the undergraduate education of health professional students.

  13. The health sciences librarian in medical education: a vital pathways project task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Diane G.; Blobaum, Paul M.; Shipman, Jean P.; Markwell, Linda Garr; Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The Medical Education Task Force of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians reviewed current and future roles of health sciences librarians in medical education at the graduate and undergraduate levels and worked with national organizations to integrate library services, education, and staff into the requirements for training medical students and residents. Methods: Standards for medical education accreditation programs were studied, and a literature search was conducted on the topic of the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education. Results: Expectations for library and information services in current standards were documented, and a draft standard prepared. A comprehensive bibliography on the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education was completed, and an analysis of the services provided by health sciences librarians was created. Conclusion: An essential role and responsibility of the health sciences librarian will be to provide the health care professional with the skills needed to access, manage, and use library and information resources effectively. Validation and recognition of the health sciences librarian's contributions to medical education by accrediting agencies will be critical. The opportunity lies in health sciences librarians embracing the diverse roles that can be served in this vital activity, regardless of accrediting agency mandates. PMID:19851492

  14. The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Wittchen Hans-Ulrich; Knappe Susanne; Andersson Gerhard; Araya Ricardo; Banos Rivera Rosa M; Barkham Michael; Bech Per; Beckers Tom; Berger Thomas; Berking Matthias; Berrocal Carmen; Botella Christina; Carlbring Per; Chouinard Guy; Colom Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories principles and methodological approaches to understand mental health abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may help to depict the advances needed to inform future research agendas specifically on mental health and mental disorders. From an integrative psychological perspective most maladaptive health behaviours...

  15. Life satisfaction, health, self-evaluation and sexuality in current university students of sport sciences, education and natural sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sigmund

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lifestyle and health of an individual are influenced by many factors; a significant factor is life satisfaction. Life satisfaction is understood as a multidimensional construct closely related to the area of personal wellbeing and quality of life. Life satisfaction in university students represents one of the determinants of good health, high motivation for studying, work productivity, satisfactory interpersonal relationships and overall healthy lifestyle. Objective: The main objective of the present study is to identify and compare the level of overall life satisfaction and selected components of health, self-evaluation and sexuality in current university students with respect to their study specialization. Methods: The study included a total of 522 students from Palacký University. These were students from the Faculty of Physical Culture (n = 118, Faculty of Education (n = 218 and Faculty of Science (n = 186. In terms of age, the study focused on young adults aged 19 to 26. To assess the current level of life satisfaction, the research study used a standardized psychodiagnostic tool - Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LSQ. The used diagnostic methods are fully standardized and contain domestic normative values. Statistical result processing was conducted using the Statistica programme v10.0. Results: The highest level of overall life satisfaction was revealed in university students of sport sciences. In comparison with the students of education and students of natural sciences the difference is significant. Satisfaction with health among the students of sport sciences is significantly higher than in the students of education (p ≤ .001; d = 0.53 and the students of natural sciences (p ≤ .05; d = 0.38. Similar results were found in the area of satisfaction with own person and self-evaluation, where the values of the students of sport sciences were significantly higher compared with the students of education (p

  16. Future Perfect? The Future of the Social Sciences in Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Bayer, Ronald; Metsch, Lisa R

    2017-01-01

    This is a critical and perhaps unprecedented time for the social sciences in public health. While there are many opportunities for the social sciences to continue making transformative contributions to improve population health, there are significant challenges in doing so, particularly in a rapidly changing political landscape. Such challenges are both external (e.g., congressional calls for reducing social science funding) and internal (e.g., scholars criticizing the social sciences for being stagnant and siloed). This paper highlights four key tensions that the field is grappling with and that have direct implications for how to train the next generation of social scientists in public health. We also discuss how departmental and institutional decisions made in response to these tensions will determine how the social sciences in public health are ultimately recognized, sustained, and advanced.

  17. Using design science and artificial intelligence to improve health communication: ChronologyMD case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Linda; Kreps, Gary L; Morrison, Kathleen; Athanasoulis, Marcos; Kirienko, Nikolai; Van Brunt, Deryk

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes how design science theory and methods and use of artificial intelligence (AI) components can improve the effectiveness of health communication. We identified key weaknesses of traditional health communication and features of more successful eHealth/AI communication. We examined characteristics of the design science paradigm and the value of its user-centered methods to develop eHealth/AI communication. We analyzed a case example of the participatory design of AI components in the ChronologyMD project intended to improve management of Crohn's disease. eHealth/AI communication created with user-centered design shows improved relevance to users' needs for personalized, timely and interactive communication and is associated with better health outcomes than traditional approaches. Participatory design was essential to develop ChronologyMD system architecture and software applications that benefitted patients. AI components can greatly improve eHealth/AI communication, if designed with the intended audiences. Design science theory and its iterative, participatory methods linked with traditional health communication theory and methods can create effective AI health communication. eHealth/AI communication researchers, developers and practitioners can benefit from a holistic approach that draws from theory and methods in both design sciences and also human and social sciences to create successful AI health communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adherence and perceptions regarding simulation training in undergraduate health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Perpétuo Elias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simulation techniques are spreading rapidly in medicine. Suc h resources are increasingly concentrated in Simulation Laboratories. The MSRP-USP is structuring such a laboratory and is interested in the prevalence of individual initiatives that could be centralized there. The MSRP-USP currently has five full-curriculum courses in the health sciences: Medicine, Speech Therapy, Physical Therapy, Nutrition, and Occupational Therapy, all consisting of core disciplines. GOAL: To determine the prevalence of simulation techniques in the regular courses at MSRP-USP. METHODS: Coordinators of disciplines in the various courses were interviewed using a specifically designed semi-structured questionnaire, and all the collected data were stored in a dedicated database. The disciplines were grouped according to whether they used (GI or did not use (GII simulation resources. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: 256 disciplines were analyzed, of which only 18.3% used simulation techniques, varying according to course: Medicine (24.7.3%, Occupational Therapy (23.0%, Nutrition (15.9%, Physical Therapy (9.8%, and Speech Therapy (9.1%. Computer simulation programs predominated (42.5% in all five courses. The resources were provided mainly by MSRP-USP (56.3%, with additional funding coming from other sources based on individual initiatives. The same pattern was observed for maintenance. There was great interest in centralizing the resources in the new Simulation Laboratory in order to facilitate maintenance, but there was concern about training and access to the material. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The MSRP-USP simulation resources show low complexity and are mainly limited to computer programs; 2 Use of simulation varies according to course, and is most prevalent in Medicine; 3 Resources are scattered across several locations, and their acquisition and maintenance depend on individual initiatives rather than central coordination or curricular guidelines

  19. The randomised controlled trial design: unrecognized opportunities for health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jonathan D

    2003-06-01

    to describe the essential components of the Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) and its major variations; to describe less conventional applications of the RCT design found in the health sciences literature with potential relevance to health sciences librarianship; to discuss the limited number of RCTs within health sciences librarianship. narrative review supported to a limited extent with PubMed and Library Literature database searches consistent with specific search parameters. In addition, more systematic methods, including handsearching of specific journals, to identify health sciences librarianship RCTs. While many RCTs within the health sciences follow more conventional patterns, some RCTs assume certain unique features. Selected examples illustrate the adaptations of this experimental design to answering questions of possible relevance to health sciences librarians. The author offers several strategies for controlling bias in library and informatics applications of the RCT and acknowledges the potential of the electronic era in providing many opportunities to utilize the blinding aspects of RCTs. RCTs within health sciences librarianship inhabit a limited number of subject domains such as education. This limited scope offers both advantages and disadvantages for making Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL) a reality. The RCT design offers the potential to answer far more EBL questions than have been addressed by the design to date. Librarians need only extend their horizons through use of the versatile RCT design into new subject domains to facilitate making EBL a reality.

  20. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Siddhartha; Dash, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is...

  1. Earth Science and Public Health: Proceedings of the Second National Conference on USGS Health-Related Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Pierce, Brenda S.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to serve the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. As the Nation?s largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the USGS can play a significant role in providing scientific knowledge and information that will improve our understanding of the relations of environment and wildlife to human health and disease. USGS human health-related research is unique in the Federal government because it brings together a broad spectrum of natural science expertise and information, including extensive data collection and monitoring on varied landscapes and ecosystems across the Nation. USGS can provide a great service to the public health community by synthesizing the scientific information and knowledge on our natural and living resources that influence human health, and by bringing this science to the public health community in a manner that is most useful. Partnerships with health scientists and managers are essential to the success of these efforts. USGS scientists already are working closely with the public health community to pursue rigorous inquiries into the connections between natural science and public health. Partnering agencies include the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Mine Safety and Health Administration, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Public Health Service, and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Collaborations between public

  2. Students’ attitudes towards impact of the health department website on their health literacy in Semnan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdizadeh, Jamileh; Valinejadi, Ali; Pooyesh, Behnoosh; Jafari, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Background and aim Health literacy has been of interest to policymakers because of its impact on health decision-making as one of the important issues for promoting community health and improving the quality of health care delivery. Therefore, it seems necessary to examine the status of the website of the health sector of the University of Medical Sciences in promoting health literacy from the viewpoint of the students. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 529 medical and allied students in schools affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran between 2016 and 2017. In this study, a valid and reliable adult health literacy questionnaire designed by Montazeri et al. was used. The questionnaire was distributed among students in medical and allied health schools and they were asked to complete the questionnaire. Independent-samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson product-moment correlation were used to analyze data by SPSS 19. Results Mean scores of the participants’ attitudes towards reading of health information was 3.14 and towards decision and usage of health information was 2.53. Relationship between the study subjects’ demographic characteristics and their attitudes was significant (pwebsite. Hence, the results of this study showed that the website of the health department needs to be redesigned, and this design would allow a better link between the University of Medical Sciences and its audience to promote health literacy. PMID:29588815

  3. Students' attitudes towards impact of the health department website on their health literacy in Semnan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdizadeh, Jamileh; Valinejadi, Ali; Pooyesh, Behnoosh; Jafari, Fatemeh; Kahouei, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    Health literacy has been of interest to policymakers because of its impact on health decision-making as one of the important issues for promoting community health and improving the quality of health care delivery. Therefore, it seems necessary to examine the status of the website of the health sector of the University of Medical Sciences in promoting health literacy from the viewpoint of the students. This cross-sectional study was performed on 529 medical and allied students in schools affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran between 2016 and 2017. In this study, a valid and reliable adult health literacy questionnaire designed by Montazeri et al. was used. The questionnaire was distributed among students in medical and allied health schools and they were asked to complete the questionnaire. Independent-samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson product-moment correlation were used to analyze data by SPSS 19. Mean scores of the participants' attitudes towards reading of health information was 3.14 and towards decision and usage of health information was 2.53. Relationship between the study subjects' demographic characteristics and their attitudes was significant (pwebsite. Hence, the results of this study showed that the website of the health department needs to be redesigned, and this design would allow a better link between the University of Medical Sciences and its audience to promote health literacy.

  4. The Importance of Computer Science for Public Health Training: An Opportunity and Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Sarah; Christie, Gillian; Yach, Derek; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, the Welch-Rose Report established a public health education system in the United States. Since then, the system has evolved to address emerging health needs and integrate new technologies. Today, personalized health technologies generate large amounts of data. Emerging computer science techniques, such as machine learning, present an opportunity to extract insights from these data that could help identify high-risk individuals and tailor health interventions and recommendations. As these technologies play a larger role in health promotion, collaboration between the public health and technology communities will become the norm. Offering public health trainees coursework in computer science alongside traditional public health disciplines will facilitate this evolution, improving public health's capacity to harness these technologies to improve population health.

  5. Are health science students' beliefs about infant nutrition evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, Joan E; Bloomfield, Molly; Choi, Myunghan

    2014-01-01

    Globally, breastfeeding is a fundamental health promotion strategy, improving the health of mothers and infants, well beyond childhood. Healthcare professionals have the responsibility of providing breastfeeding education to families. Worldwide, most healthcare professionals do not receive sufficient evidence-based education to adequately support breastfeeding families. (1) What experiences have university health science students had with breastfeeding? (2) What are university health science students' beliefs and attitudes toward breast and formula feeding of infants? (3) What are the perceptions of university health science students about how other important people in their lives regard breastfeeding? (4) What are the relationships between students' personal experiences with breastfeeding and their beliefs and attitudes about infant feeding choices? A descriptive cross-sectional survey conceptualized using the Theory of Planned Behavior. The health science college within a major metropolitan research university in the United States. Health science undergraduate and graduate students (N=514), who were over the age of 18 and who were enrolled during the spring of 2011. Validated survey instruments were used to collect the data on the Theory of Planned Behavior variables. The request for participants was done by emailing all health science students. If students chose to participate, they filled out an anonymous on-line survey. Most participants were not parents; however, the majority of the 95 (21.05%) students who were parents reported their child was breastfed. Significantly more positive attitudes and beliefs were found in graduate students (n=101; 20.10%) when compared to undergraduates (n=403; 89.9%). Health science students' beliefs and attitudes toward infant nutrition often were not evidence-based. However, all students were remarkably consistent in their responses concerning formula feeding. Incorporating adequate education about human lactation is an unmet

  6. 78 FR 70040 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides-Health Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides--Health Criteria AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Nitrogen Oxides--Health Criteria'' (EPA/600/R-13/202). The draft document was prepared by the National... Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides--Health Criteria'' will be available primarily via the Internet on NCEA's home...

  7. Social media as a platform for science and health engagement: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Social media has become a major platform for debates on science and health. This commentary argues that while social media can present challenges to communicating important health matters, it can also provide health experts a unique opportunity to engage with and build trust among members of the public.

  8. Influence of biomedical sciences on National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health insurance becomes a viable alternative for financing health care amidst the high cost of health care. This study, conducted in 1997, uses a valuation method to assess the willingness of individuals from the working sector in Accra, Ghana, to join and pay premium for a proposed National Health Insurance Scheme ...

  9. Health Effects of Climate Change | Science Inventory | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathy Sykes provided a general overview of the health effects and the Clean Power Plan expected health benefits while Wayne Cascio discussed the health effects of wildland fires. The Surgeon General requested that the National Prevention representatives from EPA, Kathy Sykes and Wayne Cascio, provide a presentation on the health effects of climate change.

  10. Data science for mental health: a UK perspective on a global challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Andrew M; Stewart, Robert; John, Ann; Smith, Daniel J; Davis, Katrina; Sudlow, Cathie; Corvin, Aiden; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Kingdon, David; Hassan, Lamiece; Hotopf, Matthew; Lawrie, Stephen M; Russ, Tom C; Geddes, John R; Wolpert, Miranda; Wölbert, Eva; Porteous, David J

    2016-10-01

    Data science uses computer science and statistics to extract new knowledge from high-dimensional datasets (ie, those with many different variables and data types). Mental health research, diagnosis, and treatment could benefit from data science that uses cohort studies, genomics, and routine health-care and administrative data. The UK is well placed to trial these approaches through robust NHS-linked data science projects, such as the UK Biobank, Generation Scotland, and the Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) programme. Data science has great potential as a low-cost, high-return catalyst for improved mental health recognition, understanding, support, and outcomes. Lessons learnt from such studies could have global implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Workplace Health and Safety: Hazardous Substances in the Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Noel; Walsh, Wendy; Beiers, Robin

    1997-01-01

    Lists requirements of hazardous-substances legislation as it pertains to science laboratories with a summary of obligations under the Hazardous Substances Compliance Standard for manufacturers, importers, suppliers of hazardous substances, employers or principals, and employees. (AIM)

  12. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (Final Report, Jul 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding whether the current standard f...

  13. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (Final Report, Sep 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria final assessment. This report represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scien...

  14. The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittchen, H.-U.; Knappe, S.; Andersson, G.; Araya, R.; Banos Rivera, R.M.; Barkham, M.; Bech, P.; Beckers, T.; Berger, T.; Berking, M.; Berrocal, C.; Botella, C.; Carlbring, P.; Chouinard, G.; Colom, F.; Csillag, C.; Cuijpers, P.; David, D.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Essau, C.A.; Fava, G.A.; Goschke, T.; Hermans, D.; Hofmann, S.G.; Lutz, W.; Muris, P.; Ollendick, T.H.; Raes, F.; Rief, W.; Riper, H.; Tossani, E.; van der Oord, S.; Vervliet, B.; Haro, J.M.; Schumann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories, principles, and methodological approaches to understand mental health, abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope, current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may

  15. Engaging youth of color in applied science education and public health promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-03-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to supplementary science programming, and fewer opportunities to engage in inquiry-based education. This paper describes outcomes associated with an inquiry-based out-of-school time science education program, Nuestro Futuro: Applied Science Education to Engage Black and Latino Youth (NFASE), which sought to build the capacity of middle school students of color to 'think' like health scientists from diverse disciplinary perspectives. The program was designed with the intent of (1) improving student attitudes toward and motivation for science and (2) increasing active and engaged citizenship (AEC). NFASE students explored health inequity and the social determinants of health locally and engaged in developing health promotion, outreach and education efforts targeted to their peers, parents/families, and community. Interest in the program was high overall, but implementation was not without challenges. Although evaluation outcomes indicate that there were no statistically significant changes in science-related attitudes or motivation, students reported significant increases in neighborhood social connection, as well as overall AEC.

  16. Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Patricia P

    2003-07-01

    Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings.

  17. Progress report - physics and health sciences - physics section 1990 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1990-10-01

    This is the ninth semi-annual report on the Physics section of Physics and Health Sciences. Major areas of discussion include: nuclear physics, accelerator physics, general physics, neutron's solid state physics, theoretical physics and fusion

  18. 76 FR 35225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Pathway to Independence/Career Development. Date: July 14, 2011... Training; 93.143, NIEHS Superfund Hazardous Substances--Basic Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and...

  19. 78 FR 56902 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Pathway to Independence Review. Date: October 10, 2013. Time: 12... Substances--Basic Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental...

  20. 75 FR 34147 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Pathway to Independence/Career Development. Date: July 19, 2010..., NIEHS Superfund Hazardous Substances--Basic Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower...

  1. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SOx ISA reviews information on atmospheric science, exposure, dosimetry, mode of action, and health effects related to sulfur oxides and sulfur dioxide (SO2), including evidence from controlled human exposure, epidemiologic, and toxicological studies.

  2. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  3. The Open System Interconnection as a building block in a health sciences information network.

    OpenAIRE

    Boss, R W

    1985-01-01

    The interconnection of integrated health sciences library systems with other health sciences computer systems to achieve information networks will require either custom linkages among specific devices or the adoption of standards that all systems support. The most appropriate standards appear to be those being developed under the Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model, which specifies a set of rules and functions that computers must follow to exchange information. The protocols hav...

  4. Serious Video Games for Health How Behavioral Science Guided the Development of a Serious Video Game

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Victoria; Jago, Russell; Griffith, Melissa Juliano

    2010-01-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specific actions that can be used to guide key game design decisions. This article reports how behavioral science guided the design of a serious video game to prevent Type 2 diabetes and obesity among you...

  5. Big Data and Intellectual Property Rights in the Health and Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    The vast prospects of Big Data and the shift to more “personalized”, “open” and “transparent” innovation models highlight the importance of an effective governance, regulation and stimulation of high-quality data-uses in the health and life sciences. Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) and related...... selected areas that demonstrate emerging tensions and potential solutions at the interface of Big Data, Standardization and Intellectual Property Rights in the Health and Life Sciences....

  6. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 10, No 2 (2000)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mothers' Health Services Utilization and Health Services Utilization and Health Care Seeking Behaviour During Infant Rearing: A Longitudinal Community Based Study, Southwest Ethiopia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Fasil Tessema, Makonnnen ...

  7. A call for science preparedness for pregnant women during public health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Laura J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Lurie, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Science preparedness, or the ability to conduct scientific research early in a public health emergency, is essential to increase the likelihood that important research questions regarding pregnant women will be addressed during future public health emergencies while the window of opportunity for data collection is open. Science preparedness should include formulation and human subject approval of generic protocols, which could be rapidly updated at the time of the public health emergency; development of a preexisting study network to coordinate time-sensitive research during a public health emergency; and identification of mechanisms for funding these studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Benefits of a department of corrections partnership with a health sciences university: New Jersey's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Rusty; Brewer, Arthur; Debilio, Lisa; Kosseff, Christopher; Dickert, Jeff

    2014-04-01

    More than half of the state prisons in the United States outsource health care. While most states contract with private companies, a small number of states have reached out to their health science universities to meet their needs for health care of prisoners. New Jersey is the most recent state to form such an agreement. This article discusses the benefits of such a model for New Jersey's Department of Corrections and for New Jersey's health sciences university, the Rutgers University, formerly the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. The benefits for both institutions should encourage other states to participate in such affiliations.

  9. Transdiscipline and research in health: science, society and decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances in science should be given to addressing the needs of society and the historical context of the territories. Although technological developments that began with modernity and the industrial revolution allowed human beings to control the resources of nature to put to your service without limits, it is clear that the crisis of the prevailing development models manifest themselves in many ways but with three common denominators: environmental degradation, social injustice and extreme poverty. Consequently, today should not be possible to think a breakthrough in the development of science without addressing global environmental problems and the deep social injustices that increase at all scales under the gaze, impassively in many occasions, of formal science. PMID:26600628

  10. Advancing the Science of Qualitative Research to Promote Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Derek M; Shelton, Rachel C; Kegler, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    Qualitative methods have long been a part of health education research, but how qualitative approaches advance health equity has not been well described. Qualitative research is an increasingly important methodologic tool to use in efforts to understand, inform, and advance health equity. Qualitative research provides critical insight into the subjective meaning and context of health that can be essential for understanding where and how to intervene to inform health equity research and practice. We describe the larger context for this special theme issue of Health Education & Behavior, provide brief overviews of the 15 articles that comprise the issue, and discuss the promise of qualitative research that seeks to contextualize and illuminate answers to research questions in efforts to promote health equity. We highlight the critical role that qualitative research can play in considering and incorporating a diverse array of contextual information that is difficult to capture in quantitative research.

  11. Advancing the conversation: next steps for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ) health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Blake W; Morris, Martin; Nguyen, Tony; Siegel, John; Vardell, Emily

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, librarians in various sectors have been moving forward a conversation on the distinct information needs and information-seeking behavior of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ) patrons and how well the profession recognizes and meets those needs. Health sciences librarianship has been slower than other areas of the profession in creating an evidence base covering the needs of its LGBTQ patrons, with, until recently, only very limited literature on this subject. LGBTQ health sciences librarianship is now starting to attract new interest, with librarians working together to bring this emerging specialization to the attention of the broader professional community. In this paper, the authors report on a dedicated panel discussion that took place at the 2016 joint annual meeting of the Medical Library Association and Canadian Health Libraries Association/Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; discuss subsequent reflections; and highlight the emerging role for health sciences librarians in providing culturally competent services to the LGBTQ population. Recommendations are also provided for establishing a tool kit for LGBTQ health sciences librarianship from which librarians can draw. We conclude by highlighting the importance of critically reflective practice in health sciences librarianship in the context of LGBTQ health information.

  12. Advancing One Health Policy and Implementation Through the Concept of One Medicine One Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Carol; Travis, Dominic A; Berger, Kavita; Coat, Gwenaële; Kennedy, Shaun; Steer, Clifford J; Murtaugh, Michael P; Sriramarao, P

    2015-09-01

    Numerous interspecies disease transmission events, Ebola virus being a recent and cogent example, highlight the complex interactions between human, animal, and environmental health and the importance of addressing medicine and health in a comprehensive scientific manner. The diversity of information gained from the natural, social, behavioral, and systems sciences is critical to developing and sustainably promoting integrated health approaches that can be implemented at the local, national, and international levels to meet grand challenges. The Concept of One Medicine One Science (COMOS) as outlined herein describes the interplay between scientific knowledge that underpins health and medicine and efforts toward stabilizing local systems using 2 linked case studies: the food system and emerging infectious disease. Forums such as the International Conference of One Medicine One Science (iCOMOS), where science and policy can be debated together, missing pieces identified, and science-based collaborations formed among industry, governmental, and nongovernmental policy makers and funders, is an essential step in addressing global health. The expertise of multiple disciplines and research foci to support policy development is critical to the implementation of one health and the successful achievement of global health security goals.

  13. Innovative strategies in teaching of biomedical sciences to health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and skills in biomedical sciences have reached a level, which is difficult to pass on to students in the traditional one to two years by traditional lecture methods and are still expanding. Recently, innovative methods of enabling the students to acquire the knowledge and skills have been evolved, and include ...

  14. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria Dr. Eche Ezeanolue Pediatric Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of Nevada, School of Medicine, 2040 W. Charleston Blvd. Suite 402, Las Vegas, NV, USA Prof. Mohamed Nabih EL.Gharib

  15. The 2012 University of Cape Town Faculty of Health Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-19

    Dec 19, 2014 ... Agriculture (USDA) introduced novel dietary guidelines based on an untested hypothesis of Keys that dietary fat, especially of animal origin, ..... Mottern, who had no formal training in nutrition science,20,21 were ...... diet on weight loss, body composition, and risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular.

  16. Importance of Health Science Education for Personal Fitness Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Moh H.; Nalbone, David P.; Berger, Dale E.; Coburn, Jared W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between commonly used indicators of knowledge and actual knowledge in five areas among fitness trainers. Data from the Fitness Instructors Knowledge Assessment indicated that a bachelor's degree in the field of exercise science and possession of one of two specific certifications strongly predicted a trainer's knowledge,…

  17. Track E Implementation Science, Health Systems and Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Tiam, A.; Oyebanji, O.; Nkonyana, J.; Ahimbisibwe, A.; Putsoane, M.; Mokone, M.; Nyabela, M.; Isavwa, A.; Tsoeu, M.; Foso, M.; Buhendwa, L.; Chamie, G.; Kwarisiima, D.; Clark, T.; Kabami, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to Lesotho's high adult HIV prevalence (23%), considerable resources have been allocated to the HIV/AIDS response, while resources for non-communicable diseases have lagged. Since November 2011, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) has supported Lesotho Ministry of Health to roll out Family Health Days (FHDs), an innovative strategy to increase community access to integrated health services, with a focus on hard-to-reach areas where immunization coverage, HIV ...

  18. An Innovative Program in the Science of Health Care Delivery: Workforce Diversity in the Business of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C; Wade, Nathaniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, disparities in enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education are significant and not improving commensurate with the national population. Similarly, only 12% of graduating medical students and 13% of graduating physician assistant students are from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Established in 2012 to promote health care transformation at the organization and system levels, the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery is aligned with the university and college missions to create innovative, interdisciplinary curricula that meet the needs of our diverse patient and community populations. Three-year enrollment trends in the program exceed most national benchmarks, particularly among students who identify as Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native. The Science of Health Care Delivery program provides students a seamless learning experience that prepares them to be solutions-oriented leaders proficient in the business of health care, change management, innovation, and data-driven decision making. Defined as the study and design of systems, processes, leadership and management used to optimize health care delivery and health for all, the Science of Health Care Delivery will prepare the next generation of creative, diverse, pioneering leaders in health care.

  19. Air Pollution Exposure Modeling for Health Studies | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Michael Breen is leading the development of air pollution exposure models, integrated with novel personal sensor technologies, to improve exposure and risk assessments for individuals in health studies. He is co-investigator for multiple health studies assessing the exposure and effects of air pollutants. These health studies include participants with asthma, diabetes, and coronary artery disease living in various U.S. cities. He has developed, evaluated, and applied novel exposure modeling and time-activity tools, which includes the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI), GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) and Exposure Tracker models. At this seminar, Dr. Breen will present the development and application of these models to predict individual-level personal exposures to particulate matter (PM) for two health studies in central North Carolina. These health studies examine the association between PM and adverse health outcomes for susceptible individuals. During Dr. Breen’s visit, he will also have the opportunity to establish additional collaborations with researchers at Harvard University that may benefit from the use of exposure models for cohort health studies. These research projects that link air pollution exposure with adverse health outcomes benefit EPA by developing model-predicted exposure-dose metrics for individuals in health studies to improve the understanding of exposure-response behavior of air pollutants, and to reduce participant

  20. New Directions in Health Sciences Libraries in Canada: Research and Evidence based Practice Are Key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganshorn, Heather; Giustini, Dean

    2017-07-15

    This article is the second in a new series in this regular feature. The intention of the series is to look at important global developments in health science libraries. These articles will serve as a road map, describing the key changes in the field and exploring factors driving these changes. The present article by two Canadian librarians identifies important national developments which are shaping the profession such as the centralisation of health care services, the challenge of providing consumer health information in the absence of a national strategy, government recognition of the need to recognise and respond to the health needs of indigenous peoples and the growing emphasis on managing research data. Although their profession is strong, health science librarians must find ways of providing enhanced services with fewer staff and demonstrate value to organisations. JM. © 2017 Health Libraries Group Health Information & Libraries Journal.

  1. Politics and the erosion of federal scientific capacity: restoring scientific integrity to public health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rest, Kathleen M; Halpern, Michael H

    2007-11-01

    Our nation's health and prosperity are based on a foundation of independent scientific discovery. Yet in recent years, political interference in federal government science has become widespread, threatening this legacy. We explore the ways science has been misused, the attempts to measure the pervasiveness of this problem, and the effects on our long-term capacity to meet today's most complex public health challenges. Good government and a functioning democracy require public policy decisions to be informed by independent science. The scientific and public health communities must speak out to defend taxpayer-funded science from political interference. Encouragingly, both the scientific community and Congress are exploring ways to restore scientific integrity to federal policymaking.

  2. Teaching about teaching and instruction on instruction: a challenge for health sciences library education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, Ellen Gay

    2012-10-01

    This is a review of the master's-level curricula of the fifty-eight America Library Association-accredited library and information science programs and iSchools for evidence of coursework and content related to library instruction. Special emphasis is placed on the schools and programs that also offer coursework in medical or health sciences librarianship. Fifty-eight school and program websites were reviewed. Course titles and course descriptions for seventy-three separate classes were analyzed. Twenty-three syllabi were examined. All North American library education programs offer at least one course in the general area of library instruction; some programs offer multiple courses. No courses on instruction, however, are focused directly on the specialized area of health sciences librarianship. Master's degree students can take appropriate classes on library instruction, but the medical library profession needs to offer continuing education opportunities for practitioners who want to have specific instruction for the specialized world of the health sciences.

  3. Why and How Political Science Can Contribute to Public Health? Proposals for Collaborative Research Avenues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, France; Bergeron, Pierre; Clavier, Carole; Fafard, Patrick; Martin, Elisabeth; Blouin, Chantal

    2017-04-05

    Written by a group of political science researchers, this commentary focuses on the contributions of political science to public health and proposes research avenues to increase those contributions. Despite progress, the links between researchers from these two fields develop only slowly. Divergences between the approach of political science to public policy and the expectations that public health can have about the role of political science, are often seen as an obstacle to collaboration between experts in these two areas. Thus, promising and practical research avenues are proposed along with strategies to strengthen and develop them. Considering the interdisciplinary and intersectoral nature of population health, it is important to create a critical mass of researchers interested in the health of populations and in healthy public policy that can thrive working at the junction of political science and public health. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  4. Public health policy research: making the case for a political science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Nicole F; Clavier, Carole

    2011-03-01

    The past few years have seen the emergence of claims that the political determinants of health do not get due consideration and a growing demand for better insights into public policy analysis in the health research field. Several public health and health promotion researchers are calling for better training and a stronger research culture in health policy. The development of these studies tends to be more advanced in health promotion than in other areas of public health research, but researchers are still commonly caught in a naïve, idealistic and narrow view of public policy. This article argues that the political science discipline has developed a specific approach to public policy analysis that can help to open up unexplored levers of influence for public health research and practice and that can contribute to a better understanding of public policy as a determinant of health. It describes and critiques the public health model of policy analysis, analyzes political science's specific approach to public policy analysis, and discusses how the politics of research provides opportunities and barriers to the integration of political science's distinctive contributions to policy analysis in health promotion.

  5. African Health Sciences - Vol 5, No 4 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implications of bride price on domestic violence and reproductive health in Wakiso District, Uganda · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ... Competence of maternal and child health clinic workers in detecting malnutrition in Somalia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  6. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 3.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    scheduled to be eradicated by 1995 after smallpox. This eradication deadline was not met and WHO then hoped to certify eradication by 2005. At the. 2006 World Health Assembly(WHA) in Geneva, the. World Health Organisation(WHO) convened an informal meeting on the eradication of dracunculiasis and additional ...

  7. Distance learning approach to train health sciences students at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adjunct faculty at the decentralised training sites provided a platform enabling students to enhance their practical skills in line of health profession and offered mentorship on coping in rural settings where there is scarcity of medical equipment and disposable materials in the health facilities and lack of constant electric power ...

  8. African Health Sciences Vol 9 Special Issue.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The District Health Team (DHT) thought this was due to poor attitude of health workers, lack of confidence and skills in its use. However, in order to improve on its use at least one midwife had been trained in each facility on the use of a partogram. It was expected that trained midwives would practice and subsequently build ...

  9. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    domains, except on poor physical health where being a parent had a positive association (OR 2.12; 95% CI: 1.27 – 3.55). Belonging to an age-range of ... symptoms of poor mental health and symptom severity have been used to make ... advantaged than the men, albeit not to a statistically significant level, which seems ...

  10. Informatics for Health 2017: Advancing both science and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Philip J.; Cornet, Ronald; McCowan, Colin; Peek, Niels; Fraccaro, Paolo; Geifman, Nophar; Gude, Wouter T.; Hulme, William; Martin, Glen P.; Williams, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The Informatics for Health congress, 24-26 April 2017, in Manchester, UK, brought together the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) conference and the Farr Institute International Conference. This special issue of the Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics contains 113 presentation abstracts and

  11. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Miranda, Jeanne M.; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G.; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models. PMID:26430948

  12. Draft Plan for Development of the Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides - Health Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has announced a draft development plan for the next Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for the health effects of nitrogen oxides (NOX) which will serve as the scientific basis for review of the primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard for nitrogen dioxide...

  13. Integrating design science theory and methods to improve the development and evaluation of health communication programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Linda; Kreps, Gary L

    2014-12-01

    Traditional communication theory and research methods provide valuable guidance about designing and evaluating health communication programs. However, efforts to use health communication programs to educate, motivate, and support people to adopt healthy behaviors often fail to meet the desired goals. One reason for this failure is that health promotion issues are complex, changeable, and highly related to the specific needs and contexts of the intended audiences. It is a daunting challenge to effectively influence health behaviors, particularly culturally learned and reinforced behaviors concerning lifestyle factors related to diet, exercise, and substance (such as alcohol and tobacco) use. Too often, program development and evaluation are not adequately linked to provide rapid feedback to health communication program developers so that important revisions can be made to design the most relevant and personally motivating health communication programs for specific audiences. Design science theory and methods commonly used in engineering, computer science, and other fields can address such program and evaluation weaknesses. Design science researchers study human-created programs using tightly connected build-and-evaluate loops in which they use intensive participatory methods to understand problems and develop solutions concurrently and throughout the duration of the program. Such thinking and strategies are especially relevant to address complex health communication issues. In this article, the authors explore the history, scientific foundation, methods, and applications of design science and its potential to enhance health communication programs and their evaluation.

  14. Serious Video Games for Health: How Behavioral Science Guided the Development of a Serious Video Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Victoria; Jago, Russell; Griffith, Melissa Juliano

    2010-01-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specific actions that can be used to guide key game…

  15. 76 FR 13197 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Planning AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute... parties. The goal of this strategic planning process is to define an overarching Vision Statement... encouraged to be submitted online at the NIEHS Strategic Planning Web site: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/od...

  16. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 20: The Balkan States (Serbia and Slovenia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivkovic, Ana; Rožić, Anamarija; Turk, Nana

    2016-12-01

    This is the 20th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Balkan region (Serbia and Slovenia). The next regular feature will look at Russia and the Ukraine. JM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  17. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 19: The Balkan States (Bulgaria and Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Savina; Skoric, Lea

    2016-09-01

    This is the 19th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Balkan Region (Bulgaria and Croatia). The next regular feature column will investigate two other Balkan states - Serbia and Slovenia. JM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  18. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 18: The Middle East (Iran, Qatar and Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Kimia; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Havlin, Tracy; Neves, Karen; Şendir, Mesra

    2016-06-01

    This is the 18th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Middle East (Iran, Qatar and Turkey). The next feature column will investigate trends in the Balkan States JM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  19. Serious video games for health: How behavioral science guided the development of a serious video game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specifi...

  20. Japanese Government Policies in Education, Science, Sports and Culture, 1998. Mental and Physical Health and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture, Tokyo (Japan).

    This annual publication introduces Japan's educational policies in education, science, sports, and culture. Part 1, "Trends in Education Reform," discusses fundamental concepts in educational reform. Part 2, "Mental and Physical Health and Sports," includes two chapters. Chapter 1, "Health and Sports into the Future,"…

  1. Student and Faculty Perceptions about Mandatory Influenza Vaccinations on a Health Sciences Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looper, Philip; George, David; Johnson, Eric J.; Conway, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the perceptions among faculty and health professional students regarding mandatory vaccination policies on a health sciences campus. Participants: A total of 296 faculty and 244 students completed surveys during Fall 2015. Methods: The online survey administered to individuals who received the influenza vaccine during the…

  2. Smoking Prevalence Among Mugla School of Health Sciences Students and Causes of Leading Increase in Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Picakciefe

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the smoking prevalence among Mugla School of Health Sciences students, to determine the effects the increasing causes of smoking and their education about adverse health outcome of smoking. A cross-sectional study was performed among Mugla School of Health Sciences students in Mugla University. All students (417 in Mugla School of Health Sciences included in the study. The participation rates was 85.1%. Data were obtained by the self-administered questionnaire without teachers in classes. SPSS 11.0 was used for data analysis, and the differentiation was assessed by Chi-square analysis. P < 0.05 was accepted statistically significant. The prevalence of current smokers was 25.3% among students in Mugla School of Health Sciences. The students stated that the most important factor of smoking initiation was stress (59.2%. The univariable analysis showed that the friends’ smoking (p: 0.000 , having knowledge about smoking habits of teachers (p: 0.020 , alcohol consumption (p: 0.000, and other smokers out of parent in the home (p: 0.000 was significantly associated with increasing rate of smoking prevalence. The smoking prevalence was quite high (25.3% among Mugla School of Health Sciences students in Mugla University. It is needed to decreasing smoking prevalence among students that antismoking education should be reevaluated, that antismoking campaign should be administered in schools. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 267-272

  3. Serious Video Games for Health How Behavioral Science Guided the Development of a Serious Video Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Victoria; Jago, Russell; Griffith, Melissa Juliano

    2010-08-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specific actions that can be used to guide key game design decisions. This article reports how behavioral science guided the design of a serious video game to prevent Type 2 diabetes and obesity among youth, two health problems increasing in prevalence. It demonstrates how video game designers and behavioral scientists can combine their unique talents to create a highly focused serious video game that entertains while promoting behavior change.

  4. International cooperation for science and technology development: a way forward for equity in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Priscila Almeida; Carvalho, Denise Bomtempo Birche de

    2015-01-01

    Since 1990, international organizations have been increasingly involved in building an international sub-regime for research, development and innovation in health. This article analyzes the priorities of developing countries in health since the 1990s. It is a descriptive and analytical study that investigates the literature and contributions of key informants. Calling for the end of global inequities in the support for science and technology in health, international organizations recommend that developing countries focus their efforts on neglected diseases and operational research, an insufficient agenda for science and technology cooperation to effectively overcome the vulnerabilities between countries.

  5. Climate change and public health policy: translating the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braks, Marieta; van Ginkel, Rijk; Wint, William; Sedda, Luigi; Sprong, Hein

    2013-12-19

    Public health authorities are required to prepare for future threats and need predictions of the likely impact of climate change on public health risks. They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors. In the current paper, we discuss various scientific approaches investigating climate change and its possible impact on public health and discuss their different roles and functions in unraveling the complexity of the subject. It is not our objective to review the available literature or to make predictions for certain diseases or countries, but rather to evaluate the applicability of scientific research articles on climate change to evidence-based public health decisions. In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health. We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character.

  6. Recommendations for the role of social science research in One Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Funk, Julie A; Moccia, Lauren T

    2015-03-01

    The social environment has changed rapidly as technology has facilitated communication among individuals and groups in ways not imagined 20 years ago. Communication technology increasingly plays a role in decision-making about health and environmental behaviors and is being leveraged to influence that process. But at its root is the fundamental need to understand human cognition, communication, and behavior. The concept of 'One Health' has emerged as a framework for interdisciplinary work that cuts across human, animal, and ecosystem health in recognition of their interdependence and the value of an integrated perspective. Yet, the science of communication, information studies, social psychology, and other social sciences have remained marginalized in this emergence. Based on an interdisciplinary collaboration, this paper reports on a nascent conceptual framework for the role of social science in 'One Health' issues and identifies a series of recommendations for research directions that bear additional scrutiny and development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Food and Drug Administration Office of Women's Health: impact of science on regulatory policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obias-Manno, Dulce; Scott, Pamela E; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph; Miller, Margaret; Pinnow, Ellen; Lee-Bishop, Lynda; Jones-London, Michelle; Chapman, Kennerly; Kallgren, Deborah; Uhl, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, the Food and Drug Administration Office of Women's Health (FDA-OWH) was created to provide leadership and policy direction for the Agency regarding issues of women's health. Within its first year, the FDA-OWH established a science program for women's health research, promoting the development of sound policy and regulation. In a little over a decade, the program has provided approximately 14 million dollars to fund more than 100 women's health research studies covering a broad range of health topics affecting women across their lifespan. Some studies, such as those elucidating drug effects on QT prolongation in women and drug-dietary supplement interaction, have had significant influence on regulatory decisions. Other studies have provided sound scientific data on sex and gender differences supporting FDA guidelines to protect women's health. This paper describes the science program at the FDA-OWH, providing examples of how funded research impacts regulatory policy.

  8. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 23 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employee interactive quality and perceived value effects on satisfaction and patronage intentions in commercial health and fitness centres in South Africa · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Dhurup, 301-321 ...

  9. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 22 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    income populations: A systematic review · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ... The impact of a school-based and family physical activity intervention on learners' health behaviour · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  10. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 23, No 3 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -12 Years Children's Dental Health · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... Hepatotoxicity and Associated Risk Factors in Hiv-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahirdar, Ethiopia ...

  11. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 19 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Alpha Theta training on neurophysiology, mood, mindfulness, health and spirituality · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. SD Edwards, DJ Edwards, 770-785 ...

  12. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Journal 2003 Edition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dix, Mary A

    2004-01-01

    ... for the Military Health System (MHS) through the provision of career-oriented, uniquely trained physicians, advanced practice nurses and scientists and specialized educational training, exercises and research to meet the combat...

  13. Developing a taxonomy for the science of improvement in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William; Lownik, Beth; Halverson, Paul; Parrotta, Carmen; Godsall, Jonathan R; Gyllstrom, Elizabeth; Gearin, Kimberly J; Mays, Glen

    2012-11-01

    Quality improvement (QI) methods have been used for almost a decade in public health departments to increase effectiveness and efficiency. Although results are rapidly accumulating, the evidence for the science of improvement is shallow and limited. To advance the use and effectiveness of QI in public health, it is important to develop a science of improvement using practice-based research to build an evidence base for QI projects. This purpose of this study is to advance the science of improvement in public health departments with 3 objectives: (1) establish a taxonomy of QI projects in public health, (2) categorize QI projects undertaken in health departments using the taxonomy, and (3) create an opportunity modes and effects analysis. This study is a qualitative analysis of archival data from 2 separate large databases consisting of 51 QI projects undertaken in public health departments over the last 5 years. The study involves 2 separate QI collaboratives. One includes Minnesota health departments; the other is a national collaborative. We propose a standardized case definition, common metrics, and a taxonomy of QI projects to begin building the evidence base for QI in public health and to advance the science of continuous quality improvement. All projects created an aim statement and used metrics while 53% used a specific QI model with an average of 3.25 QI techniques per project. Approximately 40% of the projects incorporated a process control methodology, and 60% of the projects identified the process from beginning to end, while 11 of 12 PHAB (Public Health Accreditation Board) domains were included. The findings provide a baseline for QI taxonomy to operationalize a science of improvement for public health departments.

  14. Culturally competent library services and related factors among health sciences librarians: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the current state of health sciences libraries' provision of culturally competent services to support health professions education and patient care and examined factors associated with cultural competency in relation to library services and professional development. This was a cross-sectional study. Data were collected with a survey questionnaire that was distributed via SurveyMonkey to several health sciences librarian email discussion lists. Out of 176 respondents, 163 reported serving clients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Various services were provided to develop or support initiatives in cultural competency in health professions education and patient care. A considerable number of respondents were unsure or reported no library services to support initiatives in cultural competency, although a majority of respondents perceived the importance of providing culturally competent library services (156, 89.1%) and cultural competency for health sciences librarians (162, 93.1%). Those who self-identified as nonwhites perceived culturally competent services to be more important than whites ( p =0.04). Those who spoke another language in addition to English had higher self-rated cultural competency ( p =0.01) than those who only spoke English. These findings contribute to our knowledge of the types of library services provided to support cultural competency initiatives and of health sciences librarians' perceived importance in providing culturally competent library services and cultural competency for health sciences librarians. The results suggest implications for health sciences libraries in fostering professional development in cultural competency and in providing culturally competent services to increase library use by people from a wide range of cultures and backgrounds.

  15. Informatics for Health 2017: Advancing both science and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Philip J. Scott; Ronald Cornet; Colin McCowan; Niels Peek; Paolo Fraccaro; Nophar Geifman; Wouter T. Gude; William Hulme; Glen P. Martin; Richard Williams

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Informatics for Health congress, 24-26 April 2017, in Manchester, UK, brought together the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) conference and the Farr Institute International Conference. This special issue of the Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics contains 113 presentation abstracts and 149 poster abstracts from the congress. Discussion: The twin programmes of “Big Data” and “Digital Health” are not always joined up by coherent policy and investment priorities. Sub...

  16. One Health and Toxic Cyanobacteria | Science Inventory | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Health and toxic cyanobacteria Blooms of toxic freshwater blue-green algae or cyanobacteria (HABs) have been in the news after HABs associated with human and animal health problems have been reported in Florida, California and Utah during 2016. HABs occur in warm, slow moving or stagnant surface waters that are enriched with nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. People are exposed to potentially toxic HABs during recreation in contaminated water, after exposure to contaminated drinking water or to blue-green algae supplements. Animals may be exposed to toxic HABs after drinking contaminated surface waters or coming into contact with HABs then ingesting cyanobacteria from their bodies during self-grooming activities. As HABs are being reported more frequently in the US, it is important for veterinarians to secure good exposure histories and to recognize the potential signs and health consequences of HAB exposures. We will review the current knowledge about human and animal health effects associated with freshwater HABs and scenarios that pose the highest risks for illnesses and deaths. This abstract does not necessarily reflect EPA policy. This is a summary of One Health and Cyanobacteria for public health and public practice veterinarians at the American Veterinary Medical Association annual convention. This product is associated with SSWR 4.01B

  17. The parallels in understanding of health factors modern and ancient sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Нерубасская, А. А.

    2015-01-01

    Modern generation has faced the global changing of the world which can not but influence human health and moreover - the health of bifurcational personality as they call it nowadays, i.e. personality that has chosen its path running in unsteady conditions and under decreasing stability. Civilizations changed, philosophy and science changed but health has always had its constants. This is what this article is about. In the works of our contemporaries we can find a lot of different techniques o...

  18. International trends in health science librarianship: part 4--four Southern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Evagelia; Chaleplioglou, Artemis; Cognetti, Gaetana; Della Seta, Maurella; Napolitani Cheyne, Federica; Juan-Quilis, Veronica; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Laura; Lopes, Sílvia; Murphy, Jeannette

    2012-12-01

    This is the fourth in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in four Southern European countries in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors are from Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal. Future issues will track trends in Latin America and Central Europe. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  19. International trends in health science librarianship: Part 6 Central Europe series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viragos, Marta

    2013-06-01

    This is the 6th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship with a focus on Central Europe in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors are from Hungry, Poland and Czech Republic. Future issues will track trends the Middle East and then the Far East. JM. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  20. International trends in health science librarianship: part 1 - the English speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Ruth; Lasserre, Kaye; McTaggart, Jill; Bayley, Liz; McKibbon, Ann; Clark, Megan; Perry, Gerald J; Murphy, Jeannette

    2012-03-01

    This is the second in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors were asked to reflect on developments in their country - viz. Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. Future issues will track trends in Northern Europe, the Nordic countries, Southern Europe and Latin America. JM. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  1. International trends in health science librarianship. Part 5 Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Beverley; Rodrííguez-Jiménez, Teresa M

    2013-03-01

    This is the 5th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in Latin America and the Caribbean in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors are from Argentina, Bermuda and Mexico. Future issues will track trends in Central Europe and the Middle East. JM. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  2. International trends in health science librarianship Part 9: the UK - Scotland and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Ann; Bruch, Sarah; Foster, Wendy; Gorman, Meg; Peters, Janet

    2014-03-01

    This is the 9th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship. The previous article in this series looked at Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. In this issue the focus is Scotland and Wales. There will be three or four more articles this year tracking trends in the Far East, Africa, South Asia and the Middle East. JM. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  3. Harnessing Implementation Science to Increase the Impact of Health Equity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; Woodward, Eva N; Curran, Geoffrey M; Hausmann, Leslie R M

    2017-09-01

    Health disparities are differences in health or health care between groups based on social, economic, and/or environmental disadvantage. Disparity research often follows 3 steps: detecting (phase 1), understanding (phase 2), and reducing (phase 3), disparities. Although disparities have narrowed over time, many remain. We argue that implementation science could enhance disparities research by broadening the scope of phase 2 studies and offering rigorous methods to test disparity-reducing implementation strategies in phase 3 studies. We briefly review the focus of phase 2 and phase 3 disparities research. We then provide a decision tree and case examples to illustrate how implementation science frameworks and research designs could further enhance disparity research. Most health disparities research emphasizes patient and provider factors as predominant mechanisms underlying disparities. Applying implementation science frameworks like the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research could help disparities research widen its scope in phase 2 studies and, in turn, develop broader disparities-reducing implementation strategies in phase 3 studies. Many phase 3 studies of disparity-reducing implementation strategies are similar to case studies, whose designs are not able to fully test causality. Implementation science research designs offer rigorous methods that could accelerate the pace at which equity is achieved in real-world practice. Disparities can be considered a "special case" of implementation challenges-when evidence-based clinical interventions are delivered to, and received by, vulnerable populations at lower rates. Bringing together health disparities research and implementation science could advance equity more than either could achieve on their own.

  4. Massive open online courses in health sciences from Latin American institutions: A need for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culquichicón, Carlos; Helguero-Santin, Luis M; Labán-Seminario, L Max; Cardona-Ospina, Jaime A; Aboshady, Omar A; Correa, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have undergone exponential growth over the past few years, offering free and worldwide access to high-quality education. We identified the characteristics of MOOCs in the health sciences offered by Latin American institutions (LAIs). Methods: We screened the eight leading MOOCs platforms to gather their list of offerings. The MOOCs were classified by region and subject. Then, we obtained the following information: Scopus H-index for each institution and course instructor, QS World University Ranking® 2015/16 of LAI, and official language of the course. Results: Our search identified 4170 MOOCs worldwide. From them, 205 MOOCs were offered by LAIs, and six MOOCs were health sciences related. Most of these courses (n = 115) were offered through Coursera. One health science MOOC was taught by three instructors, of which only one was registered in Scopus (H-index = 0). The remaining five health science MOOCs had solely one instructor (H-index = 4 [0-17]). The Latin American country with the highest participation was Brazil (n = 11). Conclusion: The contribution of LAI to MOOCs in the health sciences is low.

  5. Qualitative exploration of the career aspirations of rural origin health science students in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Paula N; Flack, Penny S; Mabuza, Langalibalele H; Reid, Stephen J Y

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence in the literature that rural background significantly encourages eventual rural practice. Given the shortage of healthcare providers in rural areas, we need to explore ways of ensuring throughput and success of rural-origin students in health sciences. It is therefore important to understand who these students are, what motivates them and the factors involved in the formation of their career choices. The aim of this study is to understand the aspirations of undergraduate health science students of rural origin with regard to their future career plans. The objectives of the study include to explore and identify the key issues facing rural-origin students with regard to their future career plans. Individual interviews were conducted with 15 health science students from two South African universities. Transcriptions were analyzed with the aid of Nvivo v8 (www.qsrinternational.com). The findings suggest health science students of rural origin studying at universities in the South African context face specific challenges related to the nature of the contrast between rural and urban life, in addition to the more generic adaptations that confront all students on entering tertiary education. In order to support rural students in their studies, academic, financial, emotional and social stressors need to be addressed. Universities should strengthen existing support structures as well as aid the development of further support that may be required.Key words: career plan, health science, rural background, South Africa.

  6. A causal model for the effectiveness of internal quality assurance for the health science area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeorn, Kittiya

    2005-10-01

    The purposes of this research were 1) to study the effectiveness of Internal Quality Assurance (IQA) of the Health science area, and 2) to study the factors affecting the effectiveness of the IQA of the Health science area. A causal model has been developed by the researcher comprised of the 6 exogenous latent variables: Attitude towards quality assurance, Teamwork, Staff training, Resource sufficiency, Organizational culture, and Leadership, and the 4 endogenous latent variables, which are the effectiveness of the IQA, Student-centered approach, Decentralized administration, PDCA cycle of work (Plan-Do-Check-Act), and Staff job satisfaction. The research sample consisted of 108 health science faculties derived by stratified random sampling technique. Data were collected by 10 questionnaires having reliability ranging from 0.79 to 0.96. Data analyses were descriptive statistics, and Linear Structure Relationship (LISREL) analysis. The major findings were as follows: 1. The 4 dimensions of effectiveness for the IQA of the Health science areas were significantly higher at the .05 level, after the Health science faculty applied the IQA programme according to the National Education Act of 1999. 2. The causal model of the effectiveness of the IQA was valid and fitted the empirical data. The 6 predictors accounted for 83% of the variance in the effectiveness of IQA. Culture and Leadership were the predictors that significantly accounted for the effectiveness of the IQA.

  7. The dawn of Structural One Health: a new science tracking disease emergence along circuits of capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Robert G; Bergmann, Luke; Kock, Richard; Gilbert, Marius; Hogerwerf, Lenny; Wallace, Rodrick; Holmberg, Mollie

    2015-03-01

    The One Health approach integrates health investigations across the tree of life, including, but not limited to, wildlife, livestock, crops, and humans. It redresses an epistemological alienation at the heart of much modern population health, which has long segregated studies by species. Up to this point, however, One Health research has also omitted addressing fundamental structural causes underlying collapsing health ecologies. In this critical review we unpack the relationship between One Health science and its political economy, particularly the conceptual and methodological trajectories by which it fails to incorporate social determinants of epizootic spillover. We also introduce a Structural One Health that addresses the research gap. The new science, open to incorporating developments across the social sciences, addresses foundational processes underlying multispecies health, including the place-specific deep-time histories, cultural infrastructure, and economic geographies driving disease emergence. We introduce an ongoing project on avian influenza to illustrate Structural One Health's scope and ambition. For the first time researchers are quantifying the relationships among transnational circuits of capital, associated shifts in agroecological landscapes, and the genetic evolution and spatial spread of a xenospecific pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhancing the care navigation model: potential roles for health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jeffrey T; Shapiro, Robert M; Burke, Heather J; Palmer, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the overlap between roles and activities that health care navigators perform and competencies identified by the Medical Library Association’s (MLA’s) educational policy statement.Roles and activities that health care navigators perform were gleaned from published literature. Once common roles and activities that health care navigators perform were identified, MLA competencies were mapped against those roles and activities to identify areas of overlap. The greatest extent of correspondence occurred in patient empowerment and support. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which health sciences librarians might assume responsibility for roles and activities that health care navigators perform

  9. The Navigation Guide systematic review methodology: a rigorous and transparent method for translating environmental health science into better health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Tracey J; Sutton, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    Synthesizing what is known about the environmental drivers of health is instrumental to taking prevention-oriented action. Methods of research synthesis commonly used in environmental health lag behind systematic review methods developed in the clinical sciences over the past 20 years. We sought to develop a proof of concept of the "Navigation Guide," a systematic and transparent method of research synthesis in environmental health. The Navigation Guide methodology builds on best practices in research synthesis in evidence-based medicine and environmental health. Key points of departure from current methods of expert-based narrative review prevalent in environmental health include a prespecified protocol, standardized and transparent documentation including expert judgment, a comprehensive search strategy, assessment of "risk of bias," and separation of the science from values and preferences. Key points of departure from evidence-based medicine include assigning a "moderate" quality rating to human observational studies and combining diverse evidence streams. The Navigation Guide methodology is a systematic and rigorous approach to research synthesis that has been developed to reduce bias and maximize transparency in the evaluation of environmental health information. Although novel aspects of the method will require further development and validation, our findings demonstrated that improved methods of research synthesis under development at the National Toxicology Program and under consideration by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are fully achievable. The institutionalization of robust methods of systematic and transparent review would provide a concrete mechanism for linking science to timely action to prevent harm.

  10. Health Economics in Medical Nutrition: An Emerging Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijten, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the applications of health economic theory to medical nutrition. The published literature provides evidence that medical nutrition, e.g. oral nutritional supplements, is an effective treatment for patients with disease related malnutrition. Malnutrition is associated with mortality risk and complication rates, including infections. Malnutrition is not a new problem and with an ageing population it continues to become a major public health concern as increasing age is associated with an increased risk of malnutrition. This overview shows that in the case RCTs are providing the clinical evidence, there is no methodological difference between a cost-effectiveness analysis for pharmaceutical or nutrition. However, in nutrition the evidence may not always come from RCT data, but will be more often based on observational data. Therefore the clinical evidence of nutrition in itself is not the issue, but the handling of clinical evidence from observational studies. As the link between the consumption of a food product and a resulting health status is often more difficult to establish than the effect of a drug treatment it requires the further development of adapted methodologies in order to correctly predict the impact of food-related health effects and health economic outcomes from a broader perspective. © 2015 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Health incentives: the science and art of motivating healthy behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Employers seeking to motivate and encourage healthy behaviors among their employees are increasingly turning to incentive rewards. In fact, a recent Buck Consultants survey of 555 employers, titled Working Well: A Global Survey of Health Promotion and Workplace Wellness Strategies, predicts the use of such rewards to more than double over the next two to three years. This article provides an overview of the key considerations for employers seeking to maximize the value of incentive rewards. Discussion includes incentive strategies, types of rewards, reward amounts and regulatory considerations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

  12. Improving Medical Decision Making and Health Promotion through Culture-Sensitive Health Communication: An Agenda for Science and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia; Böhm, Robert; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Butler, Robb; Chapman, Gretchen B; Haase, Niels; Herrmann, Benedikt; Igarashi, Tasuku; Kitayama, Shinobu; Korn, Lars; Nurm, Ülla-Karin; Rohrmann, Bernd; Rothman, Alexander J; Shavitt, Sharon; Updegraff, John A; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-10-01

    This review introduces the concept of culture-sensitive health communication. The basic premise is that congruency between the recipient's cultural characteristics and the respective message will increase the communication's effectiveness. Culture-sensitive health communication is therefore defined as the deliberate and evidence-informed adaptation of health communication to the recipients' cultural background in order to increase knowledge and improve preparation for medical decision making and to enhance the persuasiveness of messages in health promotion. To achieve effective health communication in varying cultural contexts, an empirically and theoretically based understanding of culture will be indispensable. We therefore define culture, discuss which evolutionary and structural factors contribute to the development of cultural diversity, and examine how differences are conceptualized as scientific constructs in current models of cultural differences. In addition, we will explicate the implications of cultural differences for psychological theorizing, because common constructs of health behavior theories and decision making, such as attitudes or risk perception, are subject to cultural variation. In terms of communication, we will review both communication strategies and channels that are used to disseminate health messages, and we will discuss the implications of cultural differences for their effectiveness. Finally, we propose an agenda both for science and for practice to advance and apply the evidence base for culture-sensitive health communication. This calls for more interdisciplinary research between science and practice but also between scientific disciplines and between basic and applied research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Overview of research in physics and health sciences at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, J.C.D.

    1988-01-01

    Toxicology research was a logical extension of existing program at Chalk River. Research in radiotoxicology has been going on there since the early forties. An overview of the existing physics and health sciences research programs operating at the Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was presented. Programs in nuclear physics, heavy ion nuclear physics, astrophysical neutrino physics, condensed matter physics, fusion, biology, dosimetry, and environmental sciences were briefly described. In addition, a description of the research company organization was provided

  14. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 18 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance. ... An indicator framework to assess the legacy impacts of the 2010 FIFA World Cup · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. U Bob, E Kassens-Noor, 12-21 ...

  15. African Health Sciences - Vol 6, No 3 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma cholesterol and related lipid levels of seemingly healthy public service employees in Kampala, Uganda · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Reproductive health knowledge, beliefs and determinants of contraceptives use among women attending family planning clinics in Ibadan, Nigeria · EMAIL ...

  16. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 25, No 2 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health information-seeking behavior among hypothyroid patients at Saveetha Medical College and Hospital · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. SS Perumal, S Prasad, KM Surapaneni, A Joshi, 147-154. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejhs.v25i2.7 ...

  17. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 27, No 1 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental health disorders: the deserted illnesses · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Abraham Haileamlak, 1-2. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejhs.v27i1.1 ...

  18. What Health Sciences Programs Want from Biomedical Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Irving R.

    1980-01-01

    A 1979 survey of U.S. members of the Association of Biomedical Communications Directors asked them to rank the importance of eight types of service to each professional program that his unit supports. Service priorities are reported for programs characteristic of medicine, allied health, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy. (Author)

  19. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 19 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness on trust and intention to use mobile social software · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ... Computer anxiety among university and college students majoring in Physical and Health Education · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  20. Research Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 5, No 1 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Female nurses' knowledge, competence and involvement in cervical cancer screening in health care settings in Osun State, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. RO. Fafowora, OO Irinoye, 35-46 ...

  1. Assessment of Scholarly Publications of Nigerian Health Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, 17 articles were published in four international multidisciplinary journals namely: British Medical Journal (BMJ), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). Approximately 80% of the publications were Original Research Articles. Nigerian health ...

  2. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 2.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-03-18

    increases in relapse rate 5 – 6 times and the emergence of resistant ... order to address the research objectives. Whilst the quantitative arm ..... References. 1. World health organisation (2005) global TB fact sheet 2005. Retrieved: March 18, 2006. From: http://www.who.int/tb/publications/2005/en/ index.html. 2. Johansson E ...

  3. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 27, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial: Maternal health indicators signal optimism · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Abraham Haileamlak, 106. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejhs.v27i2.1 ...

  4. Teaching spirituality and spiritual care in health sciences education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, educators seemed to be unprepared and have insufficient knowledge about how to include spirituality in teaching. This review aimed to systematically review previous literature from 2000 to 2013 regarding the content knowledge and teaching strategies used to teach spirituality and spiritual care in health ...

  5. Overweight and hypertension among college of health sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthcare workers, by virtue of their greater access to information, are expected to have less risk of obesity, hypertension, and other health outcomes often linked to lifestyles. However, there is limited evidence on practices and status of personnel who work in the healthcare setting about hypertension and overweight in ...

  6. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences: Editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance. ... Professor T.A. Adedoja (Adapted Physical Activity) Federal College of Education (Special) Oyo, Nigeria. Professor A.L. Toriola (Exercise ... Professor P.M. Wanderi (Traditional Sports and Games) Kenyatta University, Kowloon Tong, China. Professor ...

  7. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 18 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encouraging leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) participation in children and youth: The use of strength training programmes to improve health · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. KM Fleming, FE Cavanah, 76-85 ...

  8. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 22, No 2 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnancy Outcomes Following Assisted Reproduction Technologies For Infertile Women At A Public Health Institution In Nigeria · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. LO Omokanye, KA Durowade, SA Biliaminu, AG Salaudeen, AA Panti, 1-6 ...

  9. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 20 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Can small, medium and micro enterprises contribute to tourism development through economic activities in Butha-Buthe, Lesotho? EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ... Leisure and health in cross-cultural settings: Evidences from China, Korea and Japan · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  10. Use of Information Resources in some Selected Health Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Communication and use of medical information is an important factor in the delivery of quality health services in a timely fashion. This is of great importance to the researchers since they are faced with several millions of medical information packages and locating the précised or the core ones becomes ...

  11. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4 - revised.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    the latest advances in scientific, technological, and pharmaceutical research about HIV/AIDS. When I ask how topics are chosen for HIV/AIDS documents, Mark provides a lengthy response. I can't speak for other departments. WHO fulfills a number of functions. Its mandate is to improve the health of countries, which.

  12. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adebimpe Oyeyemi

    A general presumption is that the quality of education provided in a training ... practice and teaching (Boyer, 1990; Graves, 1992; Evans,. 1994). ... restoration, and the promotion of general health and quality of life. Among academics, research publication is critical for promotion and tenure, and is often the sole yardstick for.

  13. A conceptual analysis of transfer of learning in Health Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All educators in vocational training aim to promote transfer of learning in their students. However, studies on transfer of learning or theory-practice gap in the health professions are criticized for being anecdotal and not viewed as a systemic process. The analysis was done according to Walker and Avant's (2005) eight steps.

  14. SAMJ Editorial From science council to health and medical research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-07-07

    Jul 7, 1994 ... The Silver Jubilee of the Medical Research Council on 1 July. 1994 provides a rather special vantage point in time from which to view the past, present and future of this key organisation in the health structure of our country. The early history and development of the MRC, from its modest beginnings as a ...

  15. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 25, No 1 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health service utilization and reported satisfaction among adolescents in Dejen district, Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... Evaluation of quality of life of adult cancer patients attending Tikur Anbessa specialized referral hospital, Addis Ababa Ethiopia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ...

  16. Vitamins and Health. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Inst. for Science and Mathematics Education Development.

    This module provides information on: (1) the nature of health and nutrition; (2) the nature of vitamins; (3) general characteristics of fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins; (4) the source and major role of several vitamins (vitamins C, B, D, E, and K) as well as deficiences that arise from their oversupply, or insufficiency; and (5) ways of…

  17. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 24, No 3 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EDITORIAL - Integrated Child Health and Development Program: A Key for Human Development · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Dexmedetomidine an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A randomized double blind prospective study · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ...

  18. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 23 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative overview of exercise and health related professions: Athletic training, clinical exercise physiology and biokinetics · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T.J. Ellapen, Y. Paul, M. Swanepoel, G.L. Strydom, 1-12 ...

  19. African Health Sciences - Vol 13, No 4 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of noise induced hearing loss among employees at a mining industry in Zimbabwe · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ... Stereotypes on Nodding syndrome: responses of health workers in the affected region of northern Uganda · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. aculty of Pharmacy, Muhirnbili University College of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of pharmacy practice provided by dispensers in private pharmacies was studied. Parameters used include levels of education of the dispensers, access to health information, knowledge and practice regarding dispensing of drugs to patients, and disposal of expired drugs. A total of 150 dispensers selected from ...

  1. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 13 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among iron status, energy and physical fitness of femail physcial and health education students · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. O A Akeredolu, M A Adefuye, I A Akeredolu, 430-440 ...

  2. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of the health and fitness service quality scale (HAFSQ) in determining the relationship among service quality, satisfaction and loyalty in the service industry · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Dhurup, C Singh, J Surujlal, 238-251.

  3. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical fitness and health risk assessment of urban black females · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Marius F Coetsee, 259-270. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajpherd.v10i4.24672 ...

  4. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 19, No 1 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Cardiorespiratory Fitness Of Inmates In Kano Metropolis Prisons · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... Assessment of Infrastructure and Commodity Supply in Nigeria Private Health Facilities: Implication on the implementation for Maternal and Child Care Policies · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  5. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 17, No 2 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment Duration and Adsorption Capacity of Crushed Bricks in the Removal of Fluoride from Drinking water, Jimma University · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Nasal Carriage and Drug Sensitivity of Staphylococcus Aureus among Health Workers of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwestern Ethiopia ...

  6. Fructose toxicity: is the science ready for public health actions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappy, Luc; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2012-07-01

    The assumption that fructose may be toxic and involved in the pathogenesis of noncommunicable diseases such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and even cancer has resulted in the call for public health action, such as introducing taxes on sweetened beverages. This review evaluates the scientific basis for such action. Although some studies hint towards some potential adverse effects of excessive fructose consumption especially when combined with excess energy intake, the results from clinical trials do not support a significant detrimental effect of fructose on metabolic health when consumed as part of a weight-maintaining diet in amounts consistent with the average-estimated fructose consumption in Western countries. However, definitive studies are missing. Public health policies to eliminate or limit fructose in the diet should be considered premature. Instead, efforts should be made to promote a healthy lifestyle that includes physical activity and nutritious foods while avoiding intake of excess calories until solid evidence to support action against fructose is available. Public health is almost certainly to benefit more from policies that are aimed at promoting what is known to be good than from policies that are prohibiting what is not (yet) known to be bad.

  7. Commentary: Increasing the Connectivity Between Implementation Science and Public Health: Advancing Methodology, Evidence Integration, and Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David A

    2017-12-22

    Gaps remain between the outcomes of biomedical research and their application within clinical and community settings. The field of implementation science, also referred to as dissemination and implementation research, is intended to improve the adoption, uptake, and sustainability of evidence-based health interventions. The articles in this volume's symposium on implementation science and public health identify important directions in the effort to maximize the impact of research on public and population health. Leading researchers present reviews of the use of quasi-experimental designs in implementation science, the movement toward enhancing evidence-based public health, and intervention sustainability. Each article presents lessons learned from prior research and recommendations for the next generation of studies. Collectively, the symposium offers a road map for future implementation science that seeks to optimize public health. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Public Health Volume 39 is April 1, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  8. Investigation into health science students' awareness of occupational therapy: implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naser; Shayea, Abdulaziz; Nadar, Mohammed; Abu Tariah, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the level of awareness of the occupational therapy profession among final-year health sciences students at Kuwait University. This study utilized a survey targeting final-year students in the Health Sciences Center at Kuwait University schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and allied health sciences. The survey addressed awareness of occupational therapy, its scope of practice, work environments, and preference for learning more about the profession. Of the 244 surveys distributed, 132 were returned, for a 54% response rate. The proportion of those who knew about occupational therapy ranged from 94% (radiologic science) to a low of 17% (medicine). Most respondents learned about occupational therapy from colleagues (77.1%), rather than from their academic programs (28.1%). RESULTS indicated that about one fifth of students (21.4%) were unsure about the role of occupational therapists as members of the health care team. Preferences for learning more about the profession were consistent with interprofessional opportunities, such as observing an occupational therapy session (64.5%) and attending a workshop (63.6%) or presentation (59.8%). Although most respondents had some awareness of occupational therapy, specifics about its scope of practice and relevance to the health care team were lacking. Preferences for learning more about occupational therapy were consistent with the current trend for interprofessional education in health care. Implications for interprofessional education are presented.

  9. The Open System Interconnection as a building block in a health sciences information network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R W

    1985-10-01

    The interconnection of integrated health sciences library systems with other health sciences computer systems to achieve information networks will require either custom linkages among specific devices or the adoption of standards that all systems support. The most appropriate standards appear to be those being developed under the Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model, which specifies a set of rules and functions that computers must follow to exchange information. The protocols have been modularized into seven different layers. The lowest three layers are generally available as off-the-shelf interfacing products. The higher layers require special development for particular applications. This paper describes the OSI, its application in health sciences networks, and specific tasks that remain to be undertaken.

  10. An exploration of citizen science for population health research in retail food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Stephanie J; Minaker, Leia M; Mah, Catherine L

    2018-01-22

    Public engagement is an essential component of public health research, practice, knowledge exchange processes, and decision making. Citizen science was first documented in the early 1900s as an approach to public engagement and there is growing interest in how it can be used in health research. This commentary describes how citizen science approaches were incorporated into a public engagement activity as part of a population health intervention research project on the retail food environment, a workshop we hosted called The Food In This Place in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. We used citizen science methods and approaches to train and support participants to critically analyze a sample of everyday local retail food environments.

  11. Eliminating traditional reference services in an academic health sciences library: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Stephanie J

    2011-10-01

    How were traditional librarian reference desk services successfully eliminated at one health sciences library? The analysis was done at an academic health sciences library at a major research university. A gap analysis was performed, evaluating changes in the first eleven months through analysis of reference transaction and instructional session data. Substantial increases were seen in the overall number of specialized reference transactions and those conducted by librarians lasting more than thirty minutes. The number of reference transactions overall increased after implementing the new model. Several new small-scale instructional initiatives began, though perhaps not directly related to the new model. Traditional reference desk services were eliminated at one academic health sciences library without negative impact on reference and instructional statistics. Eliminating ties to the confines of the physical library due to staffing reference desk hours removed one significant barrier to a more proactive liaison program.

  12. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilakazi, S S; Chabeli, M M; Roos, S D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994: 155). Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described.

  13. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Vilakazi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994:155. Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/ goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described.

  14. The trajectory of Virgínia Schall: integration of Health, Education, Science and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Denise Nacif; Struchiner, Miriam; Monteiro, Simone

    2017-10-01

    This article presents Virgínia Schall's professional career, interrupted very early. It highlights her major role in the integration of the fields of Health, Education and Scientific Dissemination in Brazil. The contextualization of her academic and literary production as a researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, demonstrates Virgínia's contribution in strengthening the institution and in the teaching of dozens of researchers and students. With a strong inter- and multidisciplinary approach, she was a pioneer in the field of Health Education, Science Education, and Science Dissemination. Virgínia participated in the implementation of two post graduate courses and regularly worked as consultant for CNPq, CAPES, SVS/MS and the Ministry of Education, consolidating national policies in these areas. Besides being the author of several children's books and educational resources about health, environment and science, Virgínia conceived the Life Museum at Fiocruz-RJ, as a space for integrating science, culture, and society, with focus on science, health, and technology information and education. She was also a poet, member of the Women's Academy of Letters in Minas Gerais, and produced diverse and award-winning poetry and prose literary pieces.

  15. [Informational analysis of global health equity studies based on database of Web of Science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Cui, Lei; Guo, Yan

    2011-06-18

    To present the history of global health equity studies and provide reference for the selection of topics of China's health equity study. In this article citations on the subject of health equity from Web of Science (WOS) were analyzed and 60 papers concerned which were cited more than 30 times selected. Through the co-citation cluster analysis combined with the content analysis of the highly-cited papers, this article attempted to cluster them into several significant categories. Then we analyzed their strategic importance in the field of health equity by drawing citation strategic diagrams. Six hot topics in health equity studies were as follows: health service equity, the relationship between health service demand and utilization; definitions of health equity; socioeconomic status and mortality, income distribution and health, and the measurement of health inequity. Income distribution and health was the biggest concern and the measurement of health inequity was of the greatest novelty. Conducting empirical analyses on the effect of social determinants (including socioeconomic status, social network and psychosocial status etc.) on health by means of health equity measurements marks the development trend of health equity study.

  16. Maintaining Quality While Expanding Our Reach: Using Online Information Literacy Tutorials in the Sciences and Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talitha Rosa Matlin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective – This article aims to assess student achievement of higher-order information literacy learning outcomes from online tutorials as compared to in-person instruction in science and health science courses. Methods – Information literacy instruction via online tutorials or an in-person one-shot session was implemented in multiple sections of a biology (n=100 and a kinesiology course (n=54. After instruction, students in both instructional environments completed an identical library assignment to measure the achievement of higher-order learning outcomes and an anonymous student survey to measure the student experience of instruction. Results – The data collected from library assignments revealed no statistically significant differences between the two instructional groups in total assignment scores or scores on specific questions related to higher-order learning outcomes. Student survey results indicated the student experience is comparable between instruction groups in terms of clarity of instruction, student confidence in completing the course assignment after library instruction, and comfort in asking a librarian for help after instruction. Conclusions – This study demonstrates that it is possible to replace one-shot information literacy instruction sessions with asynchronous online tutorials with no significant reduction in student learning in undergraduate science and health science courses. Replacing in-person instruction with online tutorials will allow librarians at this university to reach a greater number of students and maintain contact with certain courses that are transitioning to completely online environments. While the creation of online tutorials is initially time-intensive, over time implementing online instruction could free up librarian time to allow for the strategic integration of information literacy instruction into other courses. Additional time savings could be realized by incorporating auto

  17. A Health Science Process Framework for Comprehensive Clinical Functional Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Adaptability Inventory-4 • Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale - Inpatient • Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale - Outpatient • Satisfaction with Life...and policies e580 Health services, systems and policies e585 Education and training services, systems and policies e590 Labour and employment services...consistently reported a high degree of satisfaction with the process, and demonstrated a high level of interest in the exercise. In conjunction with the

  18. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 3.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Nigerian Journal of Health and. Biomed 2003;. 2(2): 78-82. 24. Jensen J, Nilas L, Christiansen C. Influence of menopause on serum lipids and lipoproteins. Maturitas 1990; 12:321–31. 25. Matthews K.A., Meilahn E., Kuller L.H., et al. Menopause and risk factors for coronary heart disease. New Engl J Med 1989; 321:641–6.

  19. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inh...

  20. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. 2008 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    fellows through the frustrations and intellectual rewards of bench research. In the past 20 years, his research has focused on Helicobacter pylori ...Education for Health Professionals. Previously, he served as professor and chairman of USU’s Department of Medical History in the F. Edward Hébert School...Clinical Psychology Chair: David S. Krantz, Ph.D. Department of Medical History Chair: Dale C. Smith, Ph.D. (1997–May 2008) Acting Chair: Trueman W. Sharp