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Sample records for underlying spheromak formation

  1. Spheromak experiment using separate guns for formation and sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.R.; Martin, A.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment is described that incorporates the use of separate magnetized plasma guns for formation and sustainment of a spheromak. It is shown that energy coupling efficiency approaches unity if the gun and spheromak are of comparable size. A large gun should be able to operate at lower current and therefore lower voltage. In addition, it is expected that a gun matched to the size of the spheromak will cause less perturbation to the equilibrium. It is proposed to use a smaller gun for spheromak formation and a large, efficient gun for sustainment. The theoretical basis for the experiment is developed, and the details of the experiment are described. A prediction of the equilibrium magnetic flux surfaces using the EFIT code is presented. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Field-Reversed Configuration Formation Scheme Utilizing a Spheromak and Solenoid Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Belova, E.V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Ren, Y.; McGeehan, B.; Inomoto, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current drive. The transition is accomplished only in argon and krypton plasmas, where low-n kink modes are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal tilt-mode, or an n=2 kink instability, both resulting in discharge termination. The stability of argon and krypton plasmas through the transition is attributed to the rapid magnetic diffusion of the currents that drive the kink-instability. The decay of helicity during the transition is consistent with that expected from resistivity. This observation indicates a new scheme to form a FRC plasma, provided stability to low-n modes is maintained, as well as a unique situation where the FRC is a preferred state

  3. Field-Reversed Configuration Formation Scheme Utilizing a Spheromak and Solenoid Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Belova, E. V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Ren, B.; McGeehan, B.; Inomoto, M.

    2008-06-12

    A new field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current drive. The transition is accomplished only in argon and krypton plasmas, where low-n kink modes are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal tilt-mode, or an n=2 kink instability, both resulting in discharge termination. The stability of argon and krypton plasmas through the transition is attributed to the rapid magnetic diffusion of the currents that drive the kink-instability. The decay of helicity during the transition is consistent with that expected from resistivity. This observation indicates a new scheme to form a FRC plasma, provided stability to low-n modes is maintained, as well as a unique situation where the FRC is a preferred state.

  4. Sustained spheromak technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Hoida, H.W.; Henins, I.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to devise a technique for driving a spheromak using dc-powered electrodes. The reduction or elimination of pulsed power components in the spheromak source would result in more attractive reactors, and simpler, cheaper experiments. This is important as experiments get larger and approach reactor size. According to some concepts, the dc spheromak would operate with plasma injection so that it would clean up any impurities produced during its formation. These features make the investigation of dc-powered spheromaks interesting. The questions that need to be answered in this investigation are: (1) can a spheromak be sustained by a dc source; and (2) can a practical source be designed to produce a hot clean plasma. After summarizing the evidence which suggests an answer to question one, the approach being taken to answer question two is discussed

  5. Experimental Identification of the Kink Instability as a Poloidal Flux Amplification Mechanism for Coaxial Gun Spheromak Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma...

  6. Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S C; Bellan, P M

    2003-05-30

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma. Onset of column kinking agrees quantitatively with the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and the kink acts as a dynamo which converts toroidal to poloidal flux. Regime II clearly leads to both poloidal flux amplification and the development of a spheromak configuration.

  7. Formation and sustainment of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by spheromak merging and neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Masaaki [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey USA (United States)

    2016-03-25

    This paper briefly reviews a compact toroid reactor concept that addresses critical issues for forming, stabilizing and sustaining a field reversed configuration (FRC) with the use of plasma merging, plasma shaping, conducting shells, neutral beam injection (NBI). In this concept, an FRC plasma is generated by the merging of counter-helicity spheromaks produced by inductive discharges and sustained by the use of neutral beam injection (NBI). Plasma shaping, conducting shells, and the NBI would provide stabilization to global MHD modes. Although a specific FRC reactor design is outside the scope of the present paper, an example of a promising FRC reactor program is summarized based on the previously developed SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasmas by Induction, Reconnection and Injection Techniques) concept in order to connect this concept to the recently achieved the High Performance FRC plasmas obtained by Tri Alpha Energy [Binderbauer et al, Phys. Plasmas 22,056110, (2015)]. This paper includes a brief summary of the previous concept paper by M. Yamada et al, Plasma Fusion Res. 2, 004 (2007) and the recent experimental results from MRX.

  8. Review of spheromak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    Spheromak research from 1979 to the present is reviewed including over 160 references. Emphasis is on understanding and interpretation of results. In addition to summarizing results some new interpretations are presented. An introduction and brief history is followed by a discussion of generalized helicity and its time derivative. Formation and sustainment are discussed including five different methods, flux core, θ-pinch z-pinch, coaxial source, conical θ-pinch, and kinked z-pinch. All methods are helicity injections. Steady-state methods and rules for designing spheromak experiments are covered, followed by equilibrium and stability. Methods of stabilizing the tilt and shift modes are discussed as well as their impact on the reactor designs. Current-driven and pressure-driven instabilities as well as relaxation in general are covered. Energy confinement is discussed in terms of helicity decay time and βs limits. The confinement in high and low open-flux geometries are compared and the reactor implications discussed. (author)

  9. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    2001-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e >100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  10. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    1999-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e > 100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  11. Design Point for a Spheromak Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; O'Bryan, John; Stuber, James; Darpa Spheromak Team

    2015-11-01

    Two principal issues for the spheromak concept remain to be addressed experimentally: formation efficiency and confinement scaling. We are therefore developing a design point for a spheromak experiment that will be heated by adiabatic compression, utilizing the CORSICA and NIMROD codes as well as analytic modeling with target parameters R_initial =0.3m, R_final =0.1m, T_initial =0.2keV, T_final =1.8keV, n_initial =1019m-3 and n_final = 1021m-3, with radial convergence of C =3. This low convergence differentiates the concept from MTF with C =10 or more, since the plasma will be held in equilibrium throughout compression. We present results from CORSICA showing the placement of coils and passive structure to ensure stability during compression, and design of the capacitor bank needed to both form the target plasma and compress it. We specify target parameters for the compression in terms of plasma beta, formation efficiency and energy confinement. Work performed under DARPA grant N66001-14-1-4044.

  12. NIMROD Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Spheromak Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E B; Cohen, B I; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Romero-Talamas, C A; Sovinec, C R

    2007-12-11

    The physics of spheromak plasmas is addressed by time-dependent, three-dimensional, resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations with the NIMROD code. Included in some detail are the formation of a spheromak driven electrostatically by a coaxial plasma gun with a flux-conserver geometry and power systems that accurately model the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) (R. D. Wood, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, 1582 (2005)). The controlled decay of the spheromak plasma over several milliseconds is also modeled as the programmable current and voltage relax, resulting in simulations of entire experimental pulses. Reconnection phenomena and the effects of current profile evolution on the growth of symmetry-breaking toroidal modes are diagnosed; these in turn affect the quality of magnetic surfaces and the energy confinement. The sensitivity of the simulation results address variations in both physical and numerical parameters, including spatial resolution. There are significant points of agreement between the simulations and the observed experimental behavior, e.g., in the evolution of the magnetics and the sensitivity of the energy confinement to the presence of symmetry-breaking magnetic fluctuations.

  13. Spheromak Physics Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-01

    The spheromak is a Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) configuration, which is a leading alternative to the tokamak. It has a simple geometry which offers an opportunity to achieve the promise of fusion energy if the physics of confinement, current drive, and pressure holding capability extrapolate favorably to a reactor. Recent changes in the US MFE program, taken in response to budget constraints and programmatic directions from Congress, include a revitalization of an experimental alternative concept effort. Detailed studies of the spheromak were consequently undertaken to examine the major physics issues which need to be resolved to advance it as a fusion plasma, the optimum configuration for an advanced experiment, and its potential as a reactor. As a result of this study, we conclude that it is important to evaluate several physics issues experimentally. Such an experiment might be appropriately be named the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). It would address several critical issues, the solution to which will provide the physics basis to enable an advanced experiment. The specific scientific goals of SSPX would be to: * Demonstrate that electron and ion temperatures of a few hundred electron volts can be achieved in a steady-state spheromak plasma sustained by a magnetic dynamo (''helicity injection''). * Relate energy confinement quantitatively to the magnetic turbulence accompanying the dynamo and use this knowledge to optimize performance. * Measure the magnetic field profiles and magnetic turbulence in the plasma and relate these to the science of the magnetic dynamo which drives the current in the plasma. * Examine experimentally the pressure holding capability (''beta limit'') of the spheromak. * Understand the initial phases of the transition of the plasma from an equilibrium supported by a magnetic-flux conserving wall to one supported by external coils

  14. Simulation of Spheromak Evolution and Energy Confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.; Hooper, E.; Cohen, R.; Hill, D.; McLean, H.; Wood, R.; Woodruff, S.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation results are presented that illustrate the formation and decay of a spheromak plasma driven by a coaxial electrostatic plasma gun, and that model the energy confinement of the plasma. The physics of magnetic reconnection during spheromak formation is also illuminated. The simulations are performed with the three-dimensional, time-dependent, resistive magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code. The dimensional, simulation results are compared to data from the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The simulation results are tracking the experiment with increasing fidelity (e.g., improved agreement with measurements of the magnetic field, fluctuation amplitudes, and electron temperature) as the simulation has been improved in its representations of the geometry of the experiment (plasma gun and flux conserver), the magnetic bias coils, and the detailed time dependence of the current source driving the plasma gun, and uses realistic parameters. The simulations are providing a better understanding of the dominant physics in SSPX, including when the flux surfaces close and the mechanisms limiting the efficiency of electrostatic drive

  15. Flow Dynamics and Plasma Heating of Spheromaks in SSX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. R.; Cothran, C. D.; Cohen, D. H.; Horwitz, J.; Chaplin, V.

    2008-06-01

    We report several new experimental results related to flow dynamics and heating from single dipole-trapped spheromaks and spheromak merging studies at SSX. Single spheromaks (stabilized with a pair of external coils, see Brown, Phys. Plasmas 13 102503 (2006)) and merged FRC-like configurations (see Brown, Phys. Plasmas 13, 056503 (2006)) are trapped in our prolate ( R = 0.2 m, L = 0.6 m) copper flux conserver. Local spheromak flow is studied with two Mach probes ( r 1 ≤ ρ i , r 2 ≥ ρ i ) calibrated by time-of-flight with a fast set of magnetic probes at the edge of the device. Both Mach probes feature six ion collectors housed in a boron nitride sheath. The larger Mach probe will ultimately be used in the MST reversed field pinch. Line averaged flow is measured by ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) at the midplane. The SSX IDS instrument measures with 1 μ s or better time resolution the width and Doppler shift of the C III impurity (H plasma) 229.7 nm line to determine the temperature and line-averaged flow velocity (see Cothran, RSI 77, 063504 (2006)). We find axial flows up to 100 km/s during formation of the dipole trapped spheromak. Flow returns at the wall to form a large vortex. Recent high-resolution IDS velocity measurements during spheromak merging show bi-directional outflow jets at ±40 km/s (nearly the Alfvén speed). We also measure T i ≥ 80 eV and T e ≥ 20 eV during spheromak merging events after all plasma facing surfaces are cleaned with helium glow discharge conditioning. Transient electron heating is inferred from bursts on a four-channel soft x-ray array. The spheromaks are also characterized by a suite of magnetic probe arrays for magnetic structure B(r,t), and interferometry for n e . Finally, we are designing a new oblate, trapezoidal flux conserver for FRC studies. Equilibrium and dynamical simulations suggest that a tilt-stable, oblate FRC can be formed by spheromak merging in the new flux conserver.

  16. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T e and higher n e than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase

  17. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Claude [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low Te and higher ne than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  18. Energy confinement and magnetic field generation in the SSPX spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, B; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Hooper, E B; Hill, D N; Jayakumar, J; Moller, J; Romero-Talamas, C; Casper, T A; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Johnson, III, J A; Mezonlin, E

    2008-02-11

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [E.B. Hooper, et. al., Nuclear Fusion, Vol. 39, No. 7] explores the physics of efficient magnetic field buildup and energy confinement, both essential parts of advancing the spheromak concept. Extending the spheromak formation phase increases the efficiency of magnetic field generation with the maximum edge magnetic field for a given injector current (B/I) from 0.65 T/MA previously to 0.9 T/MA. We have achieved the highest electron temperatures (T{sub e}) recorded for a spheromak with T{sub e} > 500 eV, toroidal magnetic field {approx}1 T and toroidal current ({approx}1 MA) [R.D. Wood, D.N. Hill, H.S. McLean, E.B. Hooper, B.F. Hudson, J.M. Moller, 'Improved magnetic field generation efficiency and higher temperature spheromak plasmas', submitted to Physical Review Letters]. Extending the sustainment phase to > 8 ms extends the period of low magnetic fluctuations (< 1 %) by 50%. The NIMROD 3-D resistive MHD code [C.R. Sovinec, T.A. Gianakon, E.D. Held, S.E. Kruger and D.D. Schnack, The NIMROD Team, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1727 (2003)] reproduces the observed flux amplification {Psi}{sub pol}/{Psi}{sub gun}. Successive gun pulses are demonstrated to maintain the magnetic field in a quasi-steady state against resistive decay. Initial measurements of neutral particle flux in multi-pulse operation show charge-exchange power loss < 1% of gun input power and dominantly collisional majority ion heating. The evolution of electron temperature shows a distinct and robust feature of spheromak formation: a hollow-to-peaked T{sub e}(r) associated with q {approx} 1/2.

  19. New mode of operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for injecting magnetic helicity into a spheromak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S; Hill, D N; Stallard, B W; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B; Holcomb, C T; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2003-03-07

    By operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun continuously with just sufficient current to enable plasma ejection, large gun-voltage spikes (approximately 1 kV) are produced, giving the highest sustained voltage approximately 500 V and highest sustained helicity injection rate observed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment. The spheromak magnetic field increases monotonically with time, exhibiting the lowest fluctuation levels observed during formation of any spheromak (B/B>/=2%). The results suggest an important mechanism for field generation by helicity injection, namely, the merging of helicity-carrying filaments.

  20. Stellarmak a hybrid stellarator: Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses hybridization of modified Stellarator-like transform windings (T-windings) with a Spheromak or Field-Reversed-Mirror configuration. This configuration, Stellarmak, retains the important topological advantage of the Spheromak or FRM of having no plasma linking conductors or blankets. The T-windings provide rotational transformation in toroidal angle of the outer poloidal field lines, in effect creating a reversed B/sub Toroidal/ Spheromak or adding average B/sub T/ to the FRM producing higher shear, increased limiting β, and possibly greater stability to kinks and tilt. The presence of field ripple in the toroidal direction may be sufficient to inhibit cancellation of directed ion current by electron drag to allow steady state operation with the toroidal as well as poloidal current maintained by neutral beams

  1. All plasma spheromak: the plasmak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koloc, P.; Ogden, J.

    1981-01-01

    There has been an evolutionary pattern established in magnetic fusion concepts. The flow in ideas follows three directions. By extrapolating this evolutionary movement, we have anticipated the concept called Spheromak and have predicted the omega of this evolution which is called PLASMAK, or Plasma Spheromak. The evolutionary directions are from open systems to closed systems, from zero or low dimensional compression schemes to three dimensional compression, and finally from plasma configurations without any self confining currents to a plasma configuration which is completely self confined except for the mechanical pressure necessary to maintain the verticle field and hoop stress. Nevertheless, the plasma is imprisoned by heavy poloidal coils and a vacuum wall

  2. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP's and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 μs, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity

  3. Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment is proposed for experimental studies of spheromak confinement issues in a controlled way: in steady state relative to the confinement timescale and at low collisionality. Experiments in a flux - conserver will provide data on transport in the presence of resistive modes in shear-stabilized systems and establish operating regimes which pave the way for true steady-state experiments with the equilibrium field supplied by external coils. The proposal is based on analysis of past experiments, including the achievement of T e = 400 eV in a decaying spheromak in CTX. Electrostatic helicity injection from a coaxial ''''gun'''' into a shaped flux conserver will form and sustain the plasma for several milliseconds. The flux conserver minimizes fluxline intersection with the walls and provides MHD stability. Improvements from previous experiments include modem wall conditioning (especially boronization), a divertor for density and impurity control, and a bias magnetic flux for configurational flexibility. The bias flux will provide innovative experimental opportunities, including testing helicity drive on the large-radius plasma boundary. Diagnostics include Thomson scattering for T e measurements and ultra-short pulse reflectrometry to measure density and magnetic field profiles and turbulence. We expect to operate at T e of several hundred eV, allowing improved understanding of energy and current transport due to resistive MHD turbulence during sustained operation. This will provide an exciting advance in spheromak physics and a firm basis for future experiments in the fusion regime

  4. Spheromak Impedance and Current Amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T K; Hua, D D; Stallard, B W

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that high current amplification can be achieved only by injecting helicity on the timescale for reconnection, τ REC , which determines the effective impedance of the spheromak. An approximate equation for current amplification is: dI TOR 2 /dt ∼ I 2 /τ REC - I TOR 2 /τ closed where I is the gun current, I TOR is the spheromak toroidal current and τ CLOSED is the ohmic decay time of the spheromak. Achieving high current amplification, I TOR >> I, requires τ REC CLOSED . For resistive reconnection, this requires reconnection in a cold zone feeding helicity into a hot zone. Here we propose an impedance model based on these ideas in a form that can be implemented in the Corsica-based helicity transport code. The most important feature of the model is the possibility that τ REC actually increases as the spheromak temperature increases, perhaps accounting for the ''voltage sag'' observed in some experiments, and a tendency toward a constant ratio of field to current, B ∝ I, or I TOR ∼ I. Program implications are discussed

  5. Reflux physics and an operational scenario for the spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-07-20

    The spheromak [1] is a toroidal magnetic confinement geometry for plasma with most of the magnetic field generated by internal currents. It has been demonstrated to have excellent energy confinement properties: A peak electron temperature of 0.4 keV was achieved in the Compact Torus Experiment (CTX) experiment [2] and of 0.5 keV in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [3]. In both cases the plasmas were decaying slowly following formation and (in SSPX) sustainment by coaxial helicity injection (CHI) [4]. In SSPX, power balance analysis during this operational phase yielded electron thermal conductivities in the core plasma in the range of 1-10 m2/s [5, 6], comparable to the tokamak L-mode. These results motivate the consideration of possible operating scenarios for future fusion experiments or even reactors.

  6. Particle diffusion in a spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Levinton, F.M.; Yamada, M.

    1988-01-01

    The local carbon particle diffusion coefficient was measured in the Proto S-1/C spheromak using a test particle injection scheme. When the plasma was not in a force-free Taylor state, and when there were pressure gradients in the plasma, the particle diffusion was five times that predicted by Bohm and was consistent with collisional drift wave diffusion. The diffusion appears to be driven by correlations of the fluctuating electric field and density. During the decay phase of the discharge when the plasma was in the Taylor state, the diffusion coefficient of the carbon was classical. 23 refs., 4 figs

  7. Spheromak Buildup in SSPX using a Modular Capacitor Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R D; McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Hooper, E B; Romero-Talamas, C A

    2006-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [1] was designed to address both magnetic field generation and confinement. The SSPX produces 1.5-3.5msec, spheromak plasmas with a 0.33m major radius and a minor radius of ∼0.23m. DC coaxial helicity injection is used to build and sustain the spheromak plasma within the flux conserver. Optimal operation is obtained by flattening the profile of λ = μ 0 j/B, consistent with reducing the drive for tearing and other MHD modes, and matching of edge current and bias flux to minimize |(delta)B/B| rms . With these optimizations, spheromak plasmas with central T e >350eV and β e ∼ 5% with toroidal fields of 0.6T [3] have been obtained. If a favorable balance between current drive efficiency and energy confinement can be shown, the spheromak has the potential to yield an attractive magnetic fusion concept [4]. The original SSPX power system consists of two lumped-circuit capacitor banks with fixed circuit parameters. This power system is used to produce an initial fast formation current pulse (10kV, 0.5MJ formation bank), followed by a lower current, 3.5ms flattop sustainment pulse (5kV, 1.5MJ sustainment bank). Experimental results indicate that a variety of injected current pulses, such as a longer sustainment flattop [5], higher and longer fast formation [6], and multiple current pulses [7], might further our understanding of magnetic field generation. Although the formation bank can be split into two independent banks capable of producing other injected current waveforms, the variety of current waveforms produced by this power system is limited. Thus, to extend the operating range of the SSPX, a new pulsed-power system has been designed and partially constructed. In this paper, we discuss the design of the programmable bank and present first results from using the bank to increase the magnetic field in SSPX

  8. Development of the STPX Spheromak System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. L.; Clark, J.; Weatherford, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    The progress made in starting up the STPX Spheromak system, which is now installed at the Florida A&M University, is reviewed. Experimental, computational and theoretical activities are underway. The control system for firing the magnetized coaxial plasma gun and for collecting data from the diagnostic probes, based on LabView, is being tested and adapted. Preliminary results of testing the installed magnetic field probes, Langmuir triple probes, cylindrical ion probes, and optical diagnostics will be discussed. Progress in modeling this spheromak using simulation codes, such as NIMROD, will be discussed. Progress in investigating the use of algebraic topology to describe this spheromak will be reported.

  9. Theoretical aspects of energy confinement in spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that, despite the poor global energy confinement observed in spheromak experiments to date, the long-term prospects may be favorable as spheromaks are scaled to larger size and higher temperatures. The present performance is traced to excessive magnetic energy loss at the edge compared to tokamaks and heat transport due to magnetic fluctuations, both of which should scale away as the temperature increases

  10. Studies of Helicity Injection in a Spheromak Formed by a Large Area Planar Coaxial Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Scott; Bellan, Paul; Pracko, Steven

    2000-10-01

    A new planar coaxial gun has been constructed in order to study the process of helicity injection during spheromak formation. Improvements in helicity injection, a key method for poloidal field sustainment in spheromaks, would increase the attractiveness of the spheromak configuration as a fusion energy scheme. The goal of this research is to create simple, well-defined experiments allowing the details of helicity injection to be resolved and better understood. The design of the new gun, which was motivated by insights gained from ongoing solar prominence experiments [Bellan and Hansen, Phys. Plasmas 5, 1991 (1998)], involves large planar electrodes with a low field solenoid, in contrast to smaller cylindrical guns with high field solenoids commonly in existence. More efficient spheromak formation and better ``λ-matching'' should be possible in the new setup. The formation and dynamical evolution of twisted flux tubes will be studied using a variety of optical and probe diagnostics, including (1) visible light photography using a pair of fast, gated intensified CCD cameras, (2) local magnetic field measurements using an array of small pickup coils, (3) density and electron temperature measurements using a triple Langmuir probe, and (4) measurements of local ion distribution functions using laser-induced fluorescence. Details of the new gun design and initial experimental results will be presented.

  11. Compact toroid development, activity plan for spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and approach for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the spheromak. This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and a flexible range of output power. The included material represents the second phase of spheromak program planning. The first was completed in February 1983 and was reported in DOE/ER-0160, Compact Toroid Development. This planning builds on that previous report and concentrates on the detailed plans for the next several years of the current DOE sponsored program. It has been deliberately restricted to the experimental and theoretical efforts possible within the present scale of effort. A third phase of this planning exercise will examine the subsequent effort and resources needed to achieve near-term (1987 to 1990) spheromak technical objectives

  12. The Spheromak path to fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Barnes, C.W.; Bellan, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The spheromak is a simple and robust magnetofluid configuration with several attractive reactor attributes including compact geometry, no material center post, high engineering β, and sustained steady state operation through helicity injection. Spheromak physics was extensively studied in the US program and abroad (especially Japan) in the 1980' s with work continuing into the 1990s in Japan and the UK. Scientific results included demonstration of self-organization at constant helicity, control of the tilt and shift modes by shaped flux conservers, elucidation of the role of magnetic reconnection in the magnetic dynamo, and sustainment of a spheromak by helicity injection. Several groups attained electron temperatures above 100 eV in decaying plasmas, with CTX reaching 400 eV. This experiment had high magnetic field (>l T on the edge and ∼ 3 T near the symmetry axis) and good confinement. More recently, analysis of CTX found the energy confinement in the plasma core to be consistent with Rechester-Rosenbluth transport in a fluctuating magnetic field, potentially scaling to good confinement at higher electron temperatures. The SPHEX group developed an understanding of the dynamo in sustained spheromaks but in a relatively cold device. These and other physics results provide a foundation for a new ''concept exploration'' experiment to study the physics of a hot, sustained spheromak. If successful, this work leads to a next generation, proof-of-principle program. The new SSPX experiment will address the physics of a large-scale sustained spheromak in a national laboratory (LLNL) setting. The key issue in near term spheromak research will be to explore the possibly deleterious effects of sustainment on confinement. Other important issues include exploring the β scaling of confinement, scaling with Lundquist number S, and determining the need for active current-profile control. Collaborators from universities and other national laboratories are contributing

  13. Measurements and Phenomenological Modeling of Magnetic FluxBuildup in Spheromak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Talamas, C A; Hooper, E B; Jayakumar, R; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Moller, J M

    2007-12-14

    Internal magnetic field measurements and high-speed imaging at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)] are used to study spheromak formation and field buildup. The measurements are analyzed in the context of a phenomenological model of magnetic helicity based on the topological constraint of minimum helicity in the open flux before reconnecting and linking closed flux. Two stages are analyzed: (1) the initial spheromak formation, i. e. when all flux surfaces are initially open and reconnect to form open and closed flux surfaces, and (2) the stepwise increase of closed flux when operating the gun on a new mode that can apply a train of high-current pulses to the plasma. In the first stage, large kinks in the open flux surfaces are observed in the high-speed images taken shortly after plasma breakdown, and coincide with large magnetic asymmetries recorded in a fixed insertable magnetic probe that spans the flux conserver radius. Closed flux (in the toroidal average sense) appears shortly after this. This stage is also investigated using resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In the second stage, a time lag in response between open and closed flux surfaces after each current pulse is interpreted as the time for the open flux to build helicity, before transferring it through reconnection to the closed flux. Large asymmetries are seen during these events, which then relax to a slowly decaying spheromak before the next pulse.

  14. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported

  15. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design point is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported

  16. Simulation of multi-pulse coaxial helicity injection in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, J. B.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Woodruff, S.

    2018-03-01

    Nonlinear, numerical computation with the NIMROD code is used to explore magnetic self-organization during multi-pulse coaxial helicity injection in the Sustained Spheromak Physics eXperiment. We describe multiple distinct phases of spheromak evolution, starting from vacuum magnetic fields and the formation of the initial magnetic flux bubble through multiple refluxing pulses and the eventual onset of the column mode instability. Experimental and computational magnetic diagnostics agree on the onset of the column mode instability, which first occurs during the second refluxing pulse of the simulated discharge. Our computations also reproduce the injector voltage traces, despite only specifying the injector current and not explicitly modeling the external capacitor bank circuit. The computations demonstrate that global magnetic evolution is fairly robust to different transport models and, therefore, that a single fluid-temperature model is sufficient for a broader, qualitative assessment of spheromak performance. Although discharges with similar traces of normalized injector current produce similar global spheromak evolution, details of the current distribution during the column mode instability impact the relative degree of poloidal flux amplification and magnetic helicity content.

  17. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated

  18. MHD equilibrium and stability of the spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabayashi, M.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1979-08-01

    The MHD stability of spheromak type equilibria from the classical spheromak configuration to the diffuse pinch limit are analyzed numerically. It is found that oblate configurations of ellipticity 0.5 have the optimum stability properties with regard to internal MHD modes and can be stabilized up to an engineering ..beta.. of 15% (defined with respect to the applied external field strength for equilibrium). Stability to global modes requires that a conducting shell surround the plasma. The location of the shell is dependent on geometry and the current profile, but realistic configurations that are stable to all ideal MHD modes have been found with the shell located at approx. 1.2 minor radii.

  19. Recent results from the Los Alamos CTX spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Linford, R.K.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Continued discharge cleaning, improved vacuum practices, and optimized plasma formation operation have resulted in the Los Alamos CTX spheromak experiment achieving 1 millisecond plasma lifetimes with average temperatures of 20 to 40 eV. Impurity radiation power loss has been reduced significantly and the plasma behavior appears to be dominated by pressure-driven instabilities causing increased particle loss. The major advance in operation has been the use of a constant, uniform background of 5 to 20 mTorr of H 2 filling the vacuum tank, flux conserver, and plasma source. This fill operation directly reduces the impurities generated in the plasma source, allows operation of the source at parameters resulting in fewer impurities, and provides a neutral source to maintain the density for long lifetimes. In this paper we present data on the improved operation of CTX, and present evidence for its β-limited operation

  20. Global magnetic fluctuations in S-1 spheromak plasmas and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.; Hart, G.W.; Yamada, M.

    1986-01-01

    Globally coherent modes have been observed during formation in the S-1 Spheromak plasma. These modes play an important role in flux conversion and plasma relaxation toward a minimum-energy state. A significant finding is the temporal progression through the n = 5, 4, 3, 2; m = 1 mode sequence as q rises through rational fractions m/n. Peak amplitudes of the modes relative to the unperturbed field are typically less than 5%, while amplitudes as high as 20% have been observed

  1. Experiments of spheromak and reversed field configuration in 2m theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogi, Y.; Shimamura, S.; Ogura, H.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.; Shiina, S.; Yoshimura, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the z-current produces the paramagnetic field near the electrodes, the spheromak formation is more difficult in the straight bias field. In order to help the reconnection at the coil ends, the cusp bias coils are added to both ends of the straight coil. Then the spheromak configuration is formed and the plasma is confined for 5 to 10 μs. On the other hand, the RFC continues for about 30 μs in case of the straight bias field. The confinement time is limited by the rotational instability. Although the start time of the instability is not clear, the elongation of the plasma is detected in 15 to 20 μs after the RFC is formed. The period of the rotation is slightly different every shot. Detailed study of the instability is being pursued

  2. Computational studies of ohmic heating in the spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Time-dependent computational simulations using both single-fluid O-D and two-fluid 1 1/2-D models are developed for and utilized in an investigation of the ohmic heating of a spheromak plasma. The plasma density and composition, the applied magnetic field strength, the plasma size, and the plasma current density profile are considered for their effects on the spheromak heating rate and maximum achievable temperature. The feasibility of ohmic ignition of a reactor-size spheromak plasma is also contemplated

  3. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy

  4. Theory of the evolution of the decaying spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.; Marklin, G.; Mirin, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The strongly nonlinear dynamics present in decaying Spheromaks has been studied by various computational methods, demonstrating the tendency of the plasma to oscillate about or approach relaxed states and resulting in new insight into the significance of minimum energy states

  5. Investigations into the relationship between spheromak, solar, and astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellan, P.M.; Hsu, S.C.; Hansen, J.F.; Tokman, M.; Pracko, S.E.; Romero-Talamas, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Spheromaks offer the potential for a simple, low cost fusion reactor and involve physics similar to certain solar and astrophysical phenomena. A program to improve understanding of spheromaks by exploiting this relationship is underway using (i) a planar spheromak gun and (ii) a solar prominence simulator. These devices differ in symmetry but both involve spheromak technology whereby high-voltage is applied across electrodes linking a bias magnetic flux created by external coils. The planar spheromak gun consists of a co-planar disk and annulus linked by a poloidal bias field. Application of high voltage across the gap between disk and annulus drives a current along the bias field. If the current to flux ratio exceeds the inverse of the characteristic linear dimension, a spheromak is ejected. A distinct kink forms just below the ejection threshold. The solar simulation gun consists of two adjacent electromagnets which generate a 'horse-shoe' arched bias field. A current is driven along this arched field by a capacitor bank. The current channel first undergoes pinching, then writhes, and finally bulges outwards due to the hoop force. (author)

  6. Aspect Ratio Effects in the Driven, Flux-Core Spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E B; Romero-Talam?s, C A; LoDestro, L L; Wood, R D; McLean, H S

    2009-03-02

    Resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to evaluate the effects of the aspect ratio, A (length to radius ratio) in a spheromak driven by coaxial helicity injection. The simulations are benchmarked against the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [R. D. Wood, et al., Nucl. Nucl. Fusion 45, 1582 (2005)]. Amplification of the bias ('gun') poloidal flux is fit well by a linear dependence (insensitive to A) on the ratio of gun current and bias flux above a threshold dependent on A. For low flux amplifications in the simulations the n = 1 mode is coherent and the mean-field geometry looks like a tilted spheromak. Because the mode has relatively large amplitude the field lines are open everywhere, allowing helicity penetration. Strongly-driven helicity injection at A {le} 1.4 in simulations generates reconnection events which open the magnetic field lines; this state is characteristic of SSPX. Near the spheromak tilt-mode limit, A {approx} 1.67 for a cylindrical flux conserver, the tilt approaches 90{sup o}; reconnection events are not generated up to the strongest drives simulated. The time-sequence of these events suggests that they are representative of a chaotic process. Implications for spheromak experiments are discussed.

  7. Re-examination of spheromak experiments and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.E.; Hammer, J.H.; Barnes, C.W.; Fernandez, J.C.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The results of spheromak experiments are reexamined in light of the hypothesis that the core energy confinement is considerably better than the global confinement and that it extrapolates favorably with magnetic Reynolds number S. The data in decaying spheromaks are found to be consistent with the hypothesis and with magnetic fluctuations scaling as S -1/2 and determining the electron thermal conductivity. No conclusion is drawn from the data for sustained spheromaks, indicating the importance of a new experiment to determine core energy confinement while helicity is injected. The characteristics of such an experiment are discussed, including the importance of using modern vacuum and wall-conditioning techniques and of minimizing magnetic field errors. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  8. Resistive stability of the cylindrical spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLucia, J.; Jardin, S.C.; Glasser, A.H.

    1983-11-01

    The growth rates for resistive instabilities in a straight circular cylinder with spheromak profiles are computed by using two complementary methods. The first method employs boundary layer analysis and asymptotic matching, most valid for values of the magnetic Reynolds number S greater than or equal to 10 5 . The second method solved the full linearized resistive MHD equations as an initial value problem, utilizing zone packing around the mode rational surface. Resolution requirements limit this to S less than or equal to 10 7 . The results from these two methods agree to better than 1 in 10 3 in the overlap region 10 7 greater than or equal to S greater than or equal to 10 5 . A scan of parameter space reveals that for parabolic q-profiles, the least unstable configurations have q 0 R/a approx. 0.67. The Hall term in Ohm's Law is easily incorporated into both methods. Recalculating the resistive MHD growth rates in the presence of this term shows that the resistive interchange mode is completely stabilized for a large enough value of the ion cyclotron time

  9. Progress with energy confinement time in the CTX spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Fernandez, J.C.; Wysocki, F.J.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Knox, S.O.; Marklin, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The 0.67 m radius mesh flux conserver (MFC) in CTX was replaced by a solid flux conserver (SFC), resulting in greatly reduced field errors. Decreased spheromak open flux led to vastly improved decaying discharged, including increased global energy confinement times, τ E (from 20 to 180 μs), and corresponding magnetic energy decay times, τ B 2 (from 0.7 to 2 ms). Improved confinement allowed the observation of the pressure-driven instability (predicted by Mercier) which ejects plasma from the spheromak interior to the wall

  10. Equilibrium and stability of the Los Alamos spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklin, G.

    1984-01-01

    The open mesh flux conserver (MFC) on the Los Alamos spheromak (CTX) has been equipped with a large number of Rogowski loops measuring the current in the individual segments of the MFC, providing a complete picture of the surface current pattern induced by the equilibrium and oscillations of the confined plasma. An analysis was made of the data from these Rogowski loops

  11. 3-D MHD modeling and stability analysis of jet and spheromak plasmas launched into a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward; Arge, C. Nick

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) at the University of New Mexico uses a coaxial plasma gun to launch jet and spheromak magnetic plasma configurations into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) plasma device. Plasma structures launched from the gun drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the background magnetic field of the chamber providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, and shocks. Preliminary modeling is presented using the highly-developed 3-D, MHD, BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets, and is particularly suited to model the parameter regime under investigation. CCD images and magnetic field data from the experiment suggest the stabilization of an m =1 kink mode trailing a plasma jet launched into a background magnetic field. Results from a linear stability code investigating the effect of shear-flow as a cause of this stabilization from magnetic tension forces on the jet will be presented. Initial analyses of a possible magnetic Rayleigh Taylor instability seen at the interface between launched spheromaks and their entraining background magnetic field will also be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  12. Particle control in the sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.D.; Hill, D.N.; Hooper, E.B.; Buchenauer, D.; McLean, H.; Wang, Z.; Woodruff, S.; Wurden, G.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we report on density and impurity measurements in the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX) which has recently started operation. The SSPX plasma is sustained by coaxial helicity injection for a duration of 2 ms with peak toroidal currents of up to 0.5 MA. Plasma-facing components consist of tungsten-coated copper to minimize sputtering. The surfaces are conditioned by a combination of baking at 150 deg. C, glow discharge cleaning, titanium gettering, and pulse-discharge cleaning with helium plasmas. In this way we achieve density control with n e ∼1-4x10 20 m -3 . However, gas input has only a weak effect on plasma density; injector current is the dominant factor. Conditioning reduces the impurity radiation to the point where it is no longer important to the energy balance, so that the lifetime of the spheromak discharge is ultimately governed by MHD activity, which grows rapidly about 1.5-2.0 ms after helicity injection ends

  13. Simulation study of stepwise relaxation in a spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Uchida, Masaya; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1991-10-01

    The energy relaxation process of a spheromak plasma in a flux conserver is investigated by means of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation. The resistive decay of an initial force-free profile brings the spheromak plasma to an m = 1/n = 2 ideal kink unstable region. It is found that the energy relaxation takes place in two steps; namely, the relaxation consists of two physically distinguished phases, and there exists an intermediate phase in between, during which the relaxation becomes inactive temporarily. The first relaxation corresponds to the transition from an axially symmetric force-free state to a helically symmetric one with an n = 2 crescent magnetic island structure via the helical kink instability. The n = 2 helical structure is nonlinearly sustained in the intermediate phase. The helical twisting of the flux tube creates a reconnection current in the vicinity of the geometrical axis. The second relaxation is triggered by the rapid growth of the n = 1 mode when the reconnection current exceeds a critical value. The helical twisting relaxes through magnetic reconnection toward an axially symmetric force-free state. It is also found that the poloidal flux reduces during the helical twisting in the first relaxation and the generation of the toroidal flux occurs through the magnetic reconnection process in the second relaxation. (author)

  14. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.; Rochester Univ., NY; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (β to ∼ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m 2 . The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Measurements of Plasma Jets and Collimated Flux Tubes that are the Precursors of Spheromak Self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, P. M.; You, S.; Yun, G. S.

    2007-06-01

    A magnetized planar coaxial plasma gun is used to study the physics of spheromak formation. Eight magnetic flux tubes spanning from the cathode to the anode electrode are first filled with plasma by a rapid MHD pumping mechanism which ingests plasma from nozzles at the wall. The ingested plasma convects toroidal flux and the pile-up of this flux in the flux tube causes the flux tube to become collimated. The eight collimated flux tubes first have the shape of spider legs, but then merge to form a central column jet. This jet lengthens, continuing to ingest plasma from the wall sources, and becomes kink unstable. At a later stage the root of the jet can break off from the electrode and this detachment has been identified as being associated with a sausage instability. The sausage instability takes place during the nonlinear stage of the kinking. The above statements are based on experimental observations and have been reconciled with MHD models.

  17. MHD stability analysis of axisymmetric surface current model tokamaks close to the spheromak regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Toshihisa; Kaji, Ikuo; Fukai, Ichiro; Kito, Masafumi.

    1984-01-01

    In the toroidal coordinates, a stability analysis is presented for very low-aspect-ratio tokamaks with circular cross section which is described by a surface current model (SCM) of axisymmetric equilibria. The energy principle determining the stability of plasma is treated without any expansion of aspect ratio. Numerical results show that, owing to the occurrence of the non-axisymmetric (n=1) unstable modes, there exists no MHD-stable ideal SCM spheromak characterized by zero external toroidal vacuum field. Instead, a stable spheromak-type plasma which comes to the ideal SCM spheromak is provided by the configuration with a very weak external toroidal field. Close to the spheromak regime (1.0 1 aspect ratio< = 1.1), the minimum safety factor and the critical β-values increase mo notonically with aspect ratio decreasing from a large value, and curves of βsub(p) versus β in the marginal stability approach to an ideal SCM spheromak line βsub(p)=β. (author)

  18. Three dimensional simulation study of spheromak injection into magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, T.H.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    The three dimensional dynamics of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasmoid, which is injected into a magnetized target plasma region, is investigated by using MHD numerical simulations. It is found that the process of SCT penetration into this region is much more complicated than that which has been analysed so far by using a conducting sphere (CS) model. The injected SCT suffers from a tilting instability, which grows with a similar timescale to that of the SCT penetration. The instability is accompanied by magnetic reconnection between the SCT magnetic field and the target magnetic field, which disrupts the magnetic configuration of the SCT. Magnetic reconnection plays a role in supplying the high density plasma, initially confined in the SCT magnetic field, to the target region. The penetration depth of the SCT high density plasma is also examined. It is shown to be shorter than that estimated from the CS model. The SCT high density plasma is decelerated mainly by the Lorentz force of the target magnetic field, which includes not only the magnetic pressure force but also the magnetic tension force. Furthermore, by comparing the SCT plasmoid injection with the bare plasmoid injection, magnetic reconnection is considered to relax the magnetic tension force, i.e. the deceleration of the SCT plasmoid. (author)

  19. Transport and fluctuations in high temperature spheromak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, H.S.; Wood, R.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Hill, D.N.; Moller, J.M.; Romero-Talamas, C.; Woodruff, S.

    2006-01-01

    Higher electron temperature (T e >350 eV) and reduced electron thermal diffusivity (χ e 2 /s) is achieved in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) by increasing the discharge current=I gun and gun bias flux=ψ gun in a prescribed manner. The internal current and q=safety factor profile derived from equilibrium reconstruction as well as the measured magnetic fluctuation amplitude can be controlled by programming the ratio λ gun =μ 0 I gun /ψ gun . Varying λ gun above and below the minimum energy eigenvalue=λ FC of the flux conserver (∇xB-vector=λ FC B-vector) varies the q profile and produces the m/n=poloidal/toroidal magnetic fluctuation mode spectrum expected from mode-rational surfaces with q=m/n. The highest T e is measured when the gun is driven with λ gun slightly less than λ FC , producing low fluctuation amplitudes ( e as T e increases, differing from Bohm or open field line transport models where χ e increases with T e . Detailed resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the NIMROD code support the analysis of energy confinement in terms of the causal link with the q profile, magnetic fluctuations associated with low-order mode-rational surfaces, and the quality of magnetic surfaces

  20. MATHEMATICS TEACHER: MOVING KNOWLEDGE UNDER FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselaine Machado Albernaz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay approaches the Mathematics teacher forming process from his/her experiences in the school system and the set of knowledge that hashistorical, philosophical and politically constituted him/her. This set of knowledge not only comprises academic knowledge, but also involves the subjective effects of knowledge it incorporates. Starting from a tale, the character, called ‘researcher-teacher’, conducts the text throughout questions about the forming processes of teachers of such a particular subject as Mathematics. The character seems to have an “interrogative something” which is peculiar to us, teachers, concerned about our disciplinary field. Having the objective of problematize the formation and knowledge of our character, her ways of being, thinking and perceiving, we intend to question, with and through her, the new requirements that have been demanded towards Mathematics teachers and the set of knowledge that constitute her, the way she is, her way of acting and taking  position in the school universe. The proposed essay seeks for an articulation between the fields of Art, Philosophy, Science and Education. It speaks about the intriguing school world, but not least, the ways we think to treat the forming process of Mathematics teachers from a set of logical, subjective and sensitive knowledge.  Key words: Forming process of teachers; mathematics; aesthetic experience; philosophy of difference.

  1. Nonlinear saturation of non-resonant internal instabilities in a straight spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Jardin, S.C.

    1982-04-01

    An initial value numerical solution of the time dependent nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations demonstrates that spheromak equilibria which are linearly unstable to nonresonant helical internal perturbations saturate at low amplitude without developing singularities. These instabilities thus represent the transition from an axisymmetric to a non-axisymmetric equilibrium state, caused by a peaking of the current density

  2. Investigation of spheromak configuration generated by inductive methods in the S-1 device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, M.; Janos, A.C.; Ellis, R.A. Jr.

    1988-08-01

    This paper summarizes the characteristics of the spheromak plasmas obtained during the past five-year operation period of S-1 experiments. The S-1 Spheromak device, which began operation in 1983, generates a compact toroid in which the self-generated toroidal field in the plasma is comparable to the poloidal field. The S-1 experiment is unique in that spheromak plasmas are formed by inductive transfer of magnetic flux from a toroidal-shaped ''flux core,'' and plasma stability is maintained by shaping of the externally applied equilibrium field and using loose-fitting passive conductors. The most important objective for the S-1 experiment is to investigate the confinement feature of the spheromak configuration. With a rather extensive diagnostic system for this size device, the transport characteristics of the S-1 spheromak have been measured for plasmas with 10 /approx lt/ T/sub e/ ≤ 130 eV and 2 /approx lt/ n/sub e/ /approx lt/ 15 /times/ 10 13 cm/sup /minus/3/. The scaling of electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/ with plasma current density has been obtained in a wide operation regime. The most important finding is that the peak electron pressure scales as n/sub eo/T/sub eo/ /proportional to/ j/sub o/ 2 (j/sub o/ = peak toroidal current density) with T/sub eo/ /proportinal to/ j/sub o/ 2 and n/sub eo/ ≅ constant. These scaling results, which are similar to those obtained in the reversed-field pinch device, suggest that β = constant. Energy and particle confinement times are determined. 44 refs., 35 figs

  3. Formation process of Malaysian modern architecture under influence of nationalism

    OpenAIRE

    宇高, 雄志; 山崎, 大智

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Formation Process of Malaysian Modern Architecture under Influence of Nationalism,through the process of independence of Malaysia. The national style as "Malaysian national architecture" which hasengaged on background of political environment under the post colonial situation. Malaysian urban design is alsodetermined under the balance of both of ethnic culture and the national culture. In Malaysia, they decided to choosethe Malay ethnic culture as the national culture....

  4. Formation of neutrophil extracellular traps under low oxygen level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Branitzki-Heinemann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs have been characterized as a fundamental host innate immune defense mechanism. Conversely, excessive NET release may have a variety of detrimental consequences for the host. A fine balance between NET formation and elimination is necessary to sustain a protective effect during an infectious challenge. Our own recently published data revealed that stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α by the iron chelating HIF-1α-agonist desferoxamine or AKB-4924 enhanced the release of phagocyte extracellular traps. Since HIF-1α is a global regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen, we hypothesized that NET formation may be similarly increased under low oxygen conditions. Hypoxia occurs in tissues during infection or inflammation, mostly due to overconsumption of oxygen by pathogens and recruited immune cells. Therefore, experiments were performed to characterize the formation of NETs under hypoxic oxygen conditions compared to normoxia. Human blood-derived neutrophils were isolated and incubated under normoxic (21% oxygen level and compared to hypoxic (1% conditions. Dissolved oxygen levels were monitored in the primary cell culture using a Fibox4-PSt3 measurement system. The formation of NETs was quantified by fluorescence microscopy in response to the known NET-inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA or S. aureus wildtype and a nuclease-deficient mutant. In contrast to our hypothesis, spontaneous NET formation of neutrophils incubated under hypoxia was distinctly reduced compared to control neutrophils incubated under normoxia. Furthermore, neutrophils incubated under hypoxia showed significantly reduced formation of NETs in response to PMA. Gene expression analysis revealed that mRNA level of hif-1α as well as hif-1α target genes was not altered. However, in good correlation to the decreased NET formation under hypoxia, the cholesterol content of the neutrophils was

  5. Subcontact Lens Bubble Formation under Low Atmospheric Pressure Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    of subcontact lens bubble formation under scleral lenses at altitudes greater than 18,000 ft. Later, after many advances in contact lens fitting and...Reported here are the results of contact lens bubble studies with soft hydrophilic nd rigid gas-permeable lenses . Testing was accomplished in simulated...ccurred at altitudes greater than 20,000 ft. For soft contact lenses , bubble formation was etected in 22 of 92 eyes tested, and occurred at altitudes

  6. Displacement defect formation in complex oxide crystals under irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubizskii, SB; Matkovskii, AO; Mironova-Ulmane, N; Skvortsova, [No Value; Suchocki, A; Zhydachevskii, YA; Potera, P

    The work is devoted to an analysis of formation processes of the radiation displacement defects (RDDs) and colour centres (CCs) in complex oxide crystals under irradiation. The calculation results on: the displacement process simulation as well as an analysis of the RDD and CC accumulation kinetics

  7. DBP formation and disinfection under current and future climates - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    How to predict and monitoring DBP formation under current and future climate is a challenge and important to water plant operations and water supply security. This presentation summarizes a system approach being developed at the EPA Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP).

  8. Controlled and spontaneous magnetic field generation in a gun-driven spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Mclean, H.S.; Stallard, B.W.; Hill, D.N.; Holcomb, C.T.; Romero-Talamas, C.; Wood, R.D.; Cone, G.; Sovinec, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX [E. B. Hooper, D. Pearlstein, and D. D. Ryutov, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)], progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that generate fields by helicity injection. SSPX injects helicity (linked magnetic flux) from 1 m diameter magnetized coaxial electrodes into a flux-conserving confinement region. Control of magnetic fluctuations (δB/B∼1% on the midplane edge) yields T e profiles peaked at >200 eV. Trends indicate a limiting beta (β e ∼4%-6%), and so we have been motivated to increase T e by operating with stronger magnetic field. Two new operating modes are observed to increase the magnetic field: (A) Operation with constant current and spontaneous gun voltage fluctuations. In this case, the gun is operated continuously at the threshold for ejection of plasma from the gun: stored magnetic energy of the spheromak increases gradually with δB/B∼2% and large voltage fluctuations (δV∼1 kV), giving a 50% increase in current amplification, I tor /I gun . (B) Operation with controlled current pulses. In this case, spheromak magnetic energy increases in a stepwise fashion by pulsing the gun, giving the highest magnetic fields observed for SSPX (∼0.7 T along the geometric axis). By increasing the time between pulses, a quasisteady sustainment is produced (with periodic good confinement), comparing well with resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In each case, the processes that transport the helicity into the spheromak are inductive and exhibit a scaling of field with current that exceeds those previously obtained. We use our newly found scaling to suggest how to achieve higher temperatures with a series of pulses

  9. Controlled and Spontaneous Magnetic Field Generation in a Gun-Driven Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Stallard, B W; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C T; Romero-Talamas, C; Wood, R D; Cone, G; Sovinec, C R

    2005-04-01

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that generate fields by helicity injection. SSPX injects helicity (linked magnetic flux) from 1-m diameter magnetized coaxial electrodes into a flux-conserving confinement region. Control of magnetic fluctuations ((delta)B/B∼1% on the midplane edge) yields T e profiles peaked at > 200eV. Trends indicate a limiting beta (β e ∼ 4-6%), and so we have been motivated to increase T e by operating with stronger magnetic field. Two new operating modes are observed to increase the magnetic field: (A) Operation with constant current and spontaneous gun voltage fluctuations. In this case, the gun is operated continuously at the threshold for ejection of plasma from the gun: stored magnetic energy of the spheromak increases gradually with (delta)B/B ∼2% and large voltage fluctuations ((delta)V ∼ 1kV), giving a 50% increase in current amplification, I tor /I gun . (B) Operation with controlled current pulses. In this case, spheromak magnetic energy increases in a stepwise fashion by pulsing the gun, giving the highest magnetic fields observed for SSPX (∼0.7T along the geometric axis). By increasing the time between pulses, a quasi-steady sustainment is produced (with periodic good confinement), comparing well with resistive MHD simulations. In each case, the processes that transport the helicity into the spheromak are inductive and exhibit a scaling of field with current that exceeds those previously obtained. We use our newly found scaling to suggest how to achieve higher temperatures with a series of pulses

  10. Instantaneous current and field structure of a gun-driven spheromak for two gun polarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S.; Nagata, M.

    2002-12-01

    The instantaneous plasma structure of the SPHEX spheromak is determined here by numerically processing data from insertable Rogowski and magnetic field probes. Data is presented and compared for two modes of gun operation: with the central electrode biased positively and negatively. It is found that while the mean-, or even instantaneous-, field structure would give the impression of a roughly axisymmetric spheromak, the instantaneous current structure does not. Hundred per cent variations in J measured at the magnetic axis can be explained by the rotation of a current filament that has a width equal to half of the radius of the flux-conserving first wall. In positive gun operation, current leaves the filament in the confinement region leading to high wall current there. In negative gun operation, wall current remains low as all injected current returns to the gun through the plasma. The plasma, in either instance, is strongly asymmetric. We discuss evidence for the existence of the current filament in other gun-driven spheromaks and coaxial plasma thrusters.

  11. Predicting hydrocarbon potential of an earth formation underlying water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damaison, G.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the on-site collection and examination of small concentrations of a carbonaceous gas, e.g. methane, dissolved in a body of water overlying an earth formation to predict hydrocarbon potential of the earth formation under the body of water, the formation being a source of carbonaceous gas, comprises at a known geographic location sampling the water at a selected flow rate and at a selected depth; continuously vacuum separating the water into liquid and gas phases; separating a selected carbonaceous gas from interfering gas species in the presence of an air carrier vented to atmosphere at a known flow rate; and quantitatively oxidizing the selected gas and then cryogenically trapping an oxidant thereof in the presence of said air carrier to provide for an accurate isotopic examination. (author)

  12. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  13. Endocannabinoids control platelet activation and limit aggregate formation under flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina De Angelis

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function.Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo.We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa.Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function may prove beneficial in the search

  14. Endocannabinoids control platelet activation and limit aggregate formation under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function may prove beneficial in the search for new

  15. Candida albicans survival and biofilm formation under starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Y; Hu, X; Ling, J; Du, Y; Liu, J; Liu, H; Peng, Z

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the survival and biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans in starvation and under anaerobic conditions. Candida albicans growth and survival were monitored in vitro for up to 8 months. Fungal suspensions from late exponential, stationary and starvation phases were incubated on human dentine, polystyrene and glass slides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the process of biofilm formation. 2,3-bis(2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) reduction assay was performed to quantify the biofilm formation capability, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study and make semi-quantitative comparisons of the ultrastructure of biofilms formed on human dentine. 'XTT bioactivity' and 'COMSTAT results' were analysed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and one-way ANOVA, respectively. Candida albicans survived for over six months. SEM demonstrated that starving C. albicans produced mature biofilms on different substrata. C. albicans of the same growth phase incubated on human dentine displayed significantly higher biofilm formation capability than on polystyrene or glass slides (P roughness coefficient and surface/volume ratio (P < 0.05). Candida albicans cells can survive and form biofilms in anaerobic and nutrient-limited conditions and may pose a treatment challenge. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  16. Methyl Iodide Formation Under Postulated Nuclear Reactor Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, J.F.; Barnes, R.H.

    1968-01-01

    The formation of methyl iodide under conditions of postulated nuclear reactor accidents is discussed. Although thermodynamic calculations indicate the equilibrium methyl iodide concentrations would be quite low, calculations based on a simple kinetic scheme involving reaction between small hydrocarbon species and iodine indicate that concentrations higher than equilibrium can occur during the course of the reaction. Such calculations were performed over a wide range of initial species concentrations and a range of temperatures representative of some reactor accident situations. These calculations suggest that little methyl iodide would be expected within the core volume where temperatures are maximum. As the gas leaves the core volume and expands into the plenum region, it cools and the concentration of methyl iodide increases. At the intermediate temperatures which might characterize this region, the formation of methyl iodide from thermally induced reactions could reach its maximum rate. The gas continues to cool, however, and it is probable that by the time it leaves the plenum region it has cooled to the point where thermally induced reactions may be of little importance. Although the thermally induced reactions will become slower as the gas expands and cools, the radiation-induced reactions will not be slowed to the same extent. The gases leaving the core carry fission products and hence a radiation source is available to initiate reaction by a temperature-independent process. An investigation of the radiation chemical formation and decomposition of methyl iodide in the presence of steam suggests that radiation-induced methyl iodide formation will generally be rapid under the postulated accident situations. Thus, in the plenum region where thermal reactions have become slow, the radiation-induced reaction can still proceed and may well become the dominant factor. The same situation probably pertains as well to the containment region. (author)

  17. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Amplification of S-1 Spheromak current by an inductive current transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Janos, A.; Yamada, M.

    1985-11-01

    We attempt to predict the consequences of adding an inductive current transformer (OH Transformer) to the present S-1 Spheromak experiment. Axisymmetric modeling with only classical dissipation shows an increase of toroidal current and a shrinking and hollowing of the current channel, conserving toroidal flux. These unstable profiles will undergo helical reconnection, conserving helicity K = ∫ A-vector x B-vector d tau while increasing the toroidal flux and decreasing the poloidal flux so that the plasma relaxes toward the Taylor state. This flux rearrangement is modeled by a new current viscosity term in the mean-field Ohm's law which conserves helicity and dissipates energy

  19. Tilt and shift mode stability in a spheromak with a flux core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, J.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-07-01

    The stability of spheromak equilibria with a flux core, or reversal coil, is studied by means of an ideal MHD code. Results depend critically upon whether the flux hole region (the current free area just inside the separatrix) is treated as perfectly conducting plasma or as vacuum. This indicates that the tilt and shift modes persist as resistive instabilities if they are stable in ideal MHD. Specifically, for nonoptimally shaped equilibria, the flux core must nearly touch the current channel if the flux hole is vacuum, whereas the core may be slightly outside the separatrix if the flux hole has conducting plasma. A larger margin exists for optimally shaped equilibria.

  20. Amplification of S-1 Spheromak current by an inductive current transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S.C.; Janos, A.; Yamada, M.

    1985-11-01

    We attempt to predict the consequences of adding an inductive current transformer (OH Transformer) to the present S-1 Spheromak experiment. Axisymmetric modeling with only classical dissipation shows an increase of toroidal current and a shrinking and hollowing of the current channel, conserving toroidal flux. These unstable profiles will undergo helical reconnection, conserving helicity K = ..integral.. A-vector x B-vector d tau while increasing the toroidal flux and decreasing the poloidal flux so that the plasma relaxes toward the Taylor state. This flux rearrangement is modeled by a new current viscosity term in the mean-field Ohm's law which conserves helicity and dissipates energy.

  1. Design of spheromak injector using conical accelerator for large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J.; Yamada, H.; Yasui, K.; Kato, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T. [Himeji Inst. of Tech., Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Optimization of CT injector for LHD has been carried out and conical electrode for adiabatic CT compression is adopted in the design. Point-model of CT acceleration in a co-axial electrode is solved to optimize the electrode geometry and the power supplies. Large acceleration efficiency of 34% is to be obtained with 3.2 m long conical accelerator and 40 kV - 42 kJ power supply. The operation scenario of a CT injector named SPICA mk. I (SPheromak Injector using Conical Accelerator) consisting of 0.8 m conical accelerator is discussed based on this design. (author)

  2. The first stars: formation under cosmic ray feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Jacob A.; Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2016-08-01

    We explore the impact of a cosmic ray (CR) background generated by supernova explosions from the first stars on star-forming metal-free gas in a minihalo at z ˜ 25. Starting from cosmological initial conditions, we use the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-2 to follow gas collapsing under the influence of a CR background up to densities of n = 1012 cm-3, at which point we form sink particles. Using a suite of simulations with two sets of initial conditions and employing a range of CR background models, we follow each simulation for 5000 yr after the first sink forms. CRs both heat and ionize the gas, boosting H2 formation. Additional H2 enhances the cooling efficiency of the gas, allowing it to fulfil the Rees-Ostriker criterion sooner and expediting the collapse, such that each simulation reaches high densities at a different epoch. As it exits the loitering phase, the thermodynamic path of the collapsing gas converges to that seen in the absence of any CR background. By the time the gas approaches sink formation densities, the thermodynamic state of the gas is thus remarkably similar across all simulations. This leads to a robust characteristic mass that is largely independent of the CR background, of order ˜ a few × 10 M⊙ even as the CR background strength varies by five orders of magnitude.

  3. Local drift parameter, j/n/sub e/ and resistivity anomaly measurements in CTX spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoida, H.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Knox, S.O.

    1985-01-01

    In a spheromak, the magnetic fields confining the plasma are generated primarily by internal currents rather than external coils. In order to provide information on the possible existence of current-driven microinstabilities, localized measurements of the ratio of the drift velocity of the electrons generating the internal current to their thermal velocity, V/sub d//V/sub th/ proportional to j/n/sub e/√T/sub e/ (known as the drift or streaming parameter), and j/n/sub e/ (proportional to V/sub d/) are needed. These microinstabilities are in some theories associated with an increase in the resistivity anomaly factor (eta/eta/sub Spitzer/). We present results on local measurements (at the magnetic axis) of the values of V/sub d//V/sub th/ and eta/eta/sub Spitzer/ by combining data from the spatially-resolved diagnostics employed on the CTX spheromak experiment, coupled with current density profile information from equilibrium measurements. The values of V/sub d//V/sub th/ and j/n/sub e/ appear to be correlated with local variations in eta/eta/sub Spitzer/, and can be changed by varying the plasma density. Data sets are presented for three values of n/sub e/

  4. Plume trajectory formation under stack tip self-enveloping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, A. M.; Zroichikov, N. A.; Prokhorov, V. B.

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon of stack tip self-enveloping and its influence upon the conditions of plume formation and on the trajectory of its motion are considered. Processes are described occurring in the initial part of the plume while the interaction between vertically directed flue gases outflowing from the stack and a horizontally directed moving air flow at high wind velocities that lead to the formation of a flag-like plume. Conditions responsible for the origin and evolution of interaction between these flows are demonstrated. For the first time, a plume formed under these conditions without bifurcation is registered. A photo image thereof is presented. A scheme for the calculation of the motion of a plume trajectory is proposed, the quantitative characteristics of which are obtained based on field observations. The wind velocity and direction, air temperature, and atmospheric turbulence at the level of the initial part of the trajectory have been obtained based on data obtained from an automatic meteorological system (mounted on the outer parts of a 250 m high stack no. 1 at the Naberezhnye Chelny TEPP plant) as well as based on the results of photographing and theodolite sighting of smoke puffs' trajectory taking into account their velocity within its initial part. The calculation scheme is supplemented with a new acting force—the force of self-enveloping. Based on the comparison of the new calculation scheme with the previous one, a significant contribution of this force to the development of the trajectory is revealed. A comparison of the natural full-scale data with the results of the calculation according to the proposed new scheme is made. The proposed calculation scheme has allowed us to extend the application of the existing technique to the range of high wind velocities. This approach would make it possible to simulate and investigate the trajectory and full rising height of the calculated the length above the mouth of flue-pipes, depending on various modal

  5. Electrical Tracking Formation on Silane Epoxy Resin under Various Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Rochmadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Contamination at the surface of the insulator becomes a serious problem in power system operation, especially for the tropical area. Humidity and rainfall play an important role in wetness by the water at the surface of the insulator, which result in the presence of contaminant and leakage current flowing at the surface of the insulator. This leakage current will generate heat which occurs at the surface of an insulator, so that dry band area will be formed. This ultimately leads to flashover. This paper presents the influence of contaminants to leakage current and formation of electrical tracking at the surface of epoxy resin compound wit silicon rubber. The test was based on Inclined-Planed Tracking method with NH4Cl as contaminants. The industrial and coastal contaminants are used to explain the effect of contaminant at surface tracking process. The flow rate of contaminant was 0.3 ml/min. The 3.5 kV AC high voltage 50 Hz was applied to the top electrodes. It is found that industrial contamination resulting in the smallest surface leakage current is 327.6 mA. Also it is found that coastal contaminant (1420 mS/cm showed the severest damage at surface of test sample. Therefore, special treatment of the sample are needed under these conditions so that the material performance can be improved, especially against the electrical tracking.

  6. Regional modeling of SOA formation under consideration of HOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzsche, Kathrin; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Tilgner, Andreas; Berndt, Torsten; Poulain, Laurent; Wolke, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the major burden of the atmospheric organic particulate matter with about 140 - 910 TgC/yr (Hallquist et al., 2009). SOA particles are formed via the oxidation of volatile organic carbons (VOCs), where the volatility of the VOCs is lowered. Therefore, gaseous compounds can either nucleate to form new particles or condense on existing particles. The framework of SOA formation under natural conditions is very complex, because there are a variety of gas-phase precursors, atmospheric degradation pathways and formed oxidation products. Up to now, atmospheric models underpredict the SOA mass. Therefore, improved regional scale model implementations are necessary to achieve a better agreement between model predictions and field measurements. Recently, highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) were found in the gas phase from laboratory and field studies (Jokinen et al., 2015, Mutzel et al., 2015, Berndt et al., 2016a,b). From box model studies, it is known that HOMs are important for the early aerosol growth, however they are not yet considered in mechanisms applied in regional models. The present study utilizes the state-of-the-art multiscale model system COSMO-MUSCAT (Wolke et al., 2012), which is qualified for process studies in local and regional areas. The established model system was enhanced by a kinetic partitioning approach (Zaveri et al., 2014) for the gas-to-particle transfer of oxidized VOCs. The framework of the partitioning approach and the gas-phase mechanism were tested in a box model and evaluated with chamber studies, before implementing in the 3D model system COSMO-MUSCAT. Moreover, HOMs are implemented in the same way for the regional SOA modeling. 3D simulations were performed with an equilibrium partitioning and diffusion dependent partitioning approach, respectively. The presentation will provide first 3D simulation results including comparisons with field measurements from the TROPOS field site

  7. Sustained spheromaks with ideal n = 1 kink stability and pressure confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, B. S., E-mail: bvictor@uw.edu; Jarboe, T. R.; Hansen, C. J.; Akcay, C.; Morgan, K. D.; Hossack, A. C.; Nelson, B. A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Increasing the helicity injector drive frequency up to 68.5 kHz on the Helicity Injected Torus-Steady Inductive (HIT-SI) experiment has produced spheromaks with current amplifications of 3.8, ideal n = 1 kink stability, improved toroidal symmetry and pressure confinement. Current centroid calculations from surface magnetic probes show an outward shift in the magnetic field at frequencies above 50 kHz. Grad-Shafranov equilibria indicate pressure confinement at higher injector operating frequencies. The minimum characteristic frequency needed to achieve this confining effect on HIT-SI plasmas is found to be approximately 30 kHz by analysis of the density fluctuations.

  8. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis, E-mail: pablogm@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Sede Andina—Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (UNRN), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche (CAB-CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  9. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis; Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  10. Parabolic Free Boundary Price Formation Models Under Market Size Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2016-10-04

    In this paper we propose an extension of the Lasry-Lions price formation model which includes uctuations of the numbers of buyers and vendors. We analyze the model in the case of deterministic and stochastic market size uctuations and present results on the long time asymptotic behavior and numerical evidence and conjectures on periodic, almost periodic, and stochastic uctuations. The numerical simulations extend the theoretical statements and give further insights into price formation dynamics.

  11. Nanodefect formation in LiF crystals under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussaeva, M.A.; Ibragimova, Eh.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Muminov, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    One studied the spectra of absorption and of photoluminescence, microhardness and performed X-ray structure analysis of gamma-irradiated LiF crystals in a shutdown reactor and in 60 Co source when gamma-radiation dose rate was equal to 7.65 Gy/s. In addition to formation of point and combined radiation defects one detected the presence of the gamma-irradiation induced 28 nm size nanoparticles of LiOH phase in Li sublattice. Formation of defects is shown to occur more efficiently in a shutdown reactor in contrast to 60 Co source [ru

  12. Sand ripples under sea waves. Part 4. Tile ripple formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Pieter C.; Blondeaux, P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the formation of small-scale three-dimensional bedforms due to interactions of an erodible bed with a sea wave that obliquely approaches the coast, being partially reflected at the beach. In this case the trajectories of fluid particles at the top of the bottom boundary layer are

  13. Controlling rigid formations of mobile agents under inconsistent measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia de Marina Peinado, Hector; Cao, Ming; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    —Despite the great success of using gradient-based controllers to stabilize rigid formations of autonomous agents in the past years, surprising yet intriguing undesirable collective motions have been reported recently, when inconsistent measurements are used in the agents’ local controllers. To make

  14. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespillo, M.L.; Agulló-López, F.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Extensive survey formation energies Frenkel pairs and electronic stopping thresholds. • Correlation: track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation. • Formation energies Frenkel pairs discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms. • Amorphous track formation mechanisms: defect accumulation models versus melting. • Advantages cumulative models to deal with new hot topics: nuclear-electronic synergy. - Abstract: An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO 3 crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  15. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespillo, M.L., E-mail: mcrespil@utk.edu [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Agulló-López, F., E-mail: fal@uam.es [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Extensive survey formation energies Frenkel pairs and electronic stopping thresholds. • Correlation: track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation. • Formation energies Frenkel pairs discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms. • Amorphous track formation mechanisms: defect accumulation models versus melting. • Advantages cumulative models to deal with new hot topics: nuclear-electronic synergy. - Abstract: An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO{sub 3} crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  16. Hydrogen formation under gamma and heavy ions irradiation of geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupin, F.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, J.B.; Ngono Ravache, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the behavior under irradiation of geo-polymer which is not yet well known and attempts to highlight the importance of water radiolysis. For their use as embedding matrices, stability under ionizing radiation as well as low hydrogen gas released must be demonstrated. Different formulations of geo-polymers have been irradiated either with γ-rays ( 60 Co sources) or 75 MeV 36 Ar ions beams and the production of hydrogen released has been quantified. This paper presents the results of gas analysis in order to identify important structural parameters that influence confined water radiolysis. Indeed, a correlation between pore size, water content on one side, and the hydrogen production radiolytic yield (G(H 2 )) on the other side, has been demonstrated. For the 75 MeV 36 Ar ions irradiation, the effect of porosity has not been well emphasized. For both, the results have revealed the water content influence. (authors)

  17. Emotional Memory Formation Under Lower Versus Higher Stress Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kogan, Inna; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2010-01-01

    An exposure to stress can enhance memory for emotionally arousing experiences. The phenomenon is suggested to be amygdala-dependent and in accordance with that view the amygdala was found to modulate mnemonic processes in other brain regions. Previously, we illustrated increased amygdala activation and reduced activation of CA1 following spatial learning under higher versus lower stress conditions. When spatial learning was followed by reversal training interference, impaired retention was de...

  18. Dynamics of spheromak-like compact toroids in a drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Hayashi, T.

    2001-01-01

    In order to supply plasma fuel confined in spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) to a fusion device, the SCTs must be successfully guided through a drift tube region, in which they might be influenced by the magnetic field leaking from the fusion device. To reveal the SCT dynamics in a drift tube, MHD numerical simulations, where the SCTs are accelerated in a co-axial perfectly conducting cylinder with an external magnetic field, are carried out. In addition, the effect of an extended central electrode is examined by changing the length of the inner conducting cylinder. It is revealed that the SCT penetration depth is shorter than that estimated from the conventional conducting sphere model and that the SCTs are further decelerated by extending the inner conducting cylinder. These results are consistent with the results of the compact toroid injection experiment performed on the TEXT Upgrade tokamak. Finally, the deceleration mechanism of the SCTs is discussed by comparing the simulation result with the proposed theoretical model. (author)

  19. Theoretical aspects of the use of pulsed reflectometry in a spheromak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B. J., LLNL

    1998-06-11

    Pulsed reflectometry using both ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) modes has the potential of providing time and space-resolved measurements of the electron density, the magnitude of the magnetic field, and the magnetic shear as a function of radius. Such a diagnostic also yields the current profile from the curl of the magnetic field. This research addresses theoretical issues associated with the use of reflectometry in the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We have extended a reflectometry simulation model to accommodate O and X-mode mixed polarization and linear mode conversion between the two polarizations. A Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) formula for linear mode conversion agrees reasonably well with direct numerical solutions of the wave equation, and we have reconstructed the magnetic pitch-angle profile by matching the results of the WKBJ formula with the mode conversion data observed in simulations using a least-squares determination of coefficients in trial functions for the profile. The reflectometry data also yield information on fluctuations. Instrumental issues, e.g., the effects of microwave mixers and filters on model reflectometry pulses, have been examined to optimize the performance of the reflectometry diagnostics.

  20. Configuration of gun-generated spheromak in effectively closed metal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yushi; Nishikawa, Masahiro; Honda, Yoshihide; Satomi, Norio; Watanabe, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    In the CTCC-II spheromak experiment, the gun-generated plasma is confined in a spheroidal aluminum flux conserver (FC) with a choking coil. This coil produces the additional magnetic field to close perfectly all magnetic surfaces into the FC, i.e. the entrance hole for plasma injection is enable to be closed by magnetic field. Hence the plasma is confined in the effectively closed metal FC. In this experiment the average life time is 1.2 msec, and electron density and temperature are n e = 2 x 10 13 /cc, T e = 30 eV, respectively. The configuration with a flux hole region in which the toroidal magnetic field vanishes around the geometrical axis has been observed in the FC. The radius of the flux hole depends on the condition how the external choking field is applied. The flux hole enhances the magnetic shear near the plasma surfaces and, therefore, has a stabilizing effect even without inserting the central conducting pole. (author)

  1. Dynamics of spheromak-like compact toroids in a drift tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2001-06-01

    In order to supply plasma fuel confined in spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) to a fusion device, the SCTs must be successfully guided through a drift tube region, in which they might be influenced by the magnetic field leaking from the fusion device. To reveal the SCT dynamics in a drift tube, MHD numerical simulations, where the SCTs are accelerated in a co-axial perfectly conducting cylinder with an external magnetic field, are carried out. In addition, the effect of an extended central electrode is examined by changing the length of the inner conducting cylinder. It is revealed that the SCT penetration depth is shorter than that estimated from the conventional conducting sphere model and that the SCTs are further decelerated by extending the inner conducting cylinder. These results are consistent with the results of the compact toroid injection experiment performed on the TEXT Upgrade tokamak. Finally, the deceleration mechanism of the SCTs is discussed by comparing the simulation result with the proposed theoretical model.

  2. Hydrogen formation and control under postulated LMFBR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.R.; Wierman, R.W.

    1976-09-01

    The objective of this study is to experimentally investigate the potential for autoignition and combustion of hydrogen-sodium mixtures which may be produced in LMFBR accidents. The purpose and ultimate usefulness of this work is to provide data that will establish the validity and acceptability of mechanisms inherent to the LMFBR that could either prevent or delay the accumulation of hydrogen gas to less than 4 percent (V) in the Reactor Containment Building (RCB) under accident conditions. The results to date indicate that sodium and sodium-hydrogen mixtures such as may be expected during LMFBR postulated accidents will ignite upon entering an air atmosphere and that the hydrogen present will be essentially all consumed until such time that the oxygen concentration is depleted

  3. Preparedness Formation of the Future Vocational Education Teachers to Occupational Adaptation under Conditions of Globalization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushentseva, Liliya

    2014-01-01

    The problem of the preparedness formation of future teachers of vocational training to the professional adaptation under conditions of globalization processes in society is considered. The analysis of scientific and educational literature devoted to the study of occupational adaptation and preparedness formation of specialists to it is carried…

  4. The engineering and final assembly of S-1 Spheromak Flux Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmich, R.C.; Dahlgren, F.; Mullaney, D.; Reilly, B.; Snook, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Flux Core of the S-1 Spheromak (Figure 1) is a torus with a major radius of 1m and a minor radius of 19 cm. The primary elements within it are the PF and TF (Poloidal and Toroidal) windings which are a water cooled copper cable, two turns of EF (equilibrium Field) coils, and an epoxy-glass mandrel to support them. Surrounding these are an aluminum shell, potting material, and a thin, highly resistive Inconel liner which is a vacuum boundary. After the winding of the TF cables (see previous report for 9th Symposium), a built-up layer of dry interwoven fiberglass tape was wound around the entire flux core. The fiberglass, when vacuum impregnated, provides structural support. Next, the four piece aluminum shell which also served as an enclosure for vacuum impregnation was applied. The epoxy used in this operation was cured at low temperature to insure integrity of the PF/TF polyethylene insulation. After impregnation, a wet layup of fiberglass/air cure epoxy was wound over the aluminum shell for further structural support. The Inconel liner, which had been spun, ground, and chem-milled to a 0.254 mm thickness, was welded in position about the circumference at the midplane. A midplane band of 2.286mm thickness was left for this purpose along with elements to provide for closure welding of vacuum feedthru assemblies. The annulus between the liner and fiberglass/ epoxy structural wrapping was then pressure potted with urethane. This material was chosen because it would bond to the Inconel and fiberglass yet would allow for thermal expansion. The completed flux core was then installed between the domes of the S-1 vacuum vessel. Initial testing of S-1 indicates that the fabrication techniques have proven successful. A detailed description of the fabrication, installation, and testing will follow

  5. Interaction of a spheromak-like compact toroid with a high beta spherical tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.Q.; McLean, H.S.; Baker, K.L.; Evans, R.W.; Horton, R.D.; Terry, S.D.; Howard, S.; Schmidt, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments using accelerated spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) to fuel tokamak plasmas have quantified the penetration mechanism in the low beta regime; i.e. external magnetic field pressure dominates plasma thermal pressure. However, fusion reactor designs require high beta plasma and, more importantly, the proper plasma pressure profile. Here, the effect of the plasma pressure profile on SCT penetration, specifically, the effect of diamagnetism, is addressed. It is estimated that magnetic field pressure dominates penetration even up to 50% local beta. The combination of the diamagnetic effect on the toroidal magnetic field and the strong poloidal field at the outer major radius of a spherical tokamak will result in a diamagnetic well in the total magnetic field. Therefore, the spherical tokamak is a good candidate to test the potential trapping of an SCT in a high beta diamagnetic well. The diamagnetic effects of a high beta spherical tokamak discharge (low aspect ratio) are computed. To test the penetration of an SCT into such a diamagnetic well, experiments have been conducted of SCT injection into a vacuum field structure which simulates the diamagnetic field effect of a high beta tokamak. The diamagnetic field gradient length is substantially shorter than that of the toroidal field of the tokamak, and the results show that it can still improve the penetration of the SCT. Finally, analytic results have been used to estimate the effect of plasma pressure on penetration, and the effect of plasma pressure was found to be small in comparison with the magnetic field pressure. The penetration condition for a vacuum field only is reported. To study the diamagnetic effect in a high beta plasma, additional experiments need to be carried out on a high beta spherical tokamak. (author)

  6. Pd-based alloy nanoclusters in ion-implanted silica: Formation and stability under thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglin, G.; Cattaruzza, E.; De Marchi, G.; Gonella, F.; Mattei, G. E-mail: mattei@padova.infm.it; Maurizio, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Parolin, M.; Sada, C.; Calliari, I

    2002-05-01

    In this work we report on the formation and stability under thermal annealing of Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag alloy nanoclusters obtained by sequential ion implantation in silica. The role of the annealing atmosphere on the alloy cluster formation and stability is investigated. A comparison is made with similar alloy-based systems obtained by sequential ion implantation in silica of Au-Ag or Au-Cu followed by annealing under similar conditions, in order to evidence the peculiar effect of the various metals in controlling the alloy evolution and/or decomposition.

  7. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even tho...

  8. Visualization of hot spot formation in energetic materials under periodic mechanical excitation using phosphor thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Alex; Fenoglio, Gabriel; Detrinidad, Humberto

    2017-06-01

    Under mechanical excitation, energy is known to localize within an energetic material resulting in `hot spot' formation. While many formation mechanisms have been proposed, additional insight to heat generation mechanisms, the effect of binder/crystal interfaces, and predication capabilities can be gained by quantifying the initiation and growth of the hot spots. Phosphor thermography is a well established temperature sensing technique wherein an object's temperature is obtained by collecting the temperature dependent luminescence of an optically excited phosphor. Herein, the phosphor thermography technique has been applied to Dow Corning Sylgard® 184/octahydro 1,3,5,7 tetranitro 1,3,5,7 tetrazocine (HMX) composite materials under mechanical excitation in order to visualize the evolution of the temperature field, and thus hot spot formation, within the binder. Funded by AFOSR. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  9. Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite studied by in situ X-ray diffraction under autoclave condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Matsui, Kunio; Sato, Masugu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite from a pre-cured cake has been investigated by transmission X-ray diffraction (XRD) using high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly designed autoclave cell. The autoclave cell has a large and thin beryllium window for wide-angle X-ray diffraction; nevertheless, it withstands a steam pressure of more than 1.2 MPa, which enables in situ XRD measurements in a temperature range of 373 to 463 K under a saturated steam pressure. Formation and/or decomposition of several components has been successfully observed during 7.5 h of reaction time. From the intensity changes of the intermediate materials, namely non-crystalline C-S-H and hydroxylellestadite, two pathways for tobermorite formation have been confirmed. Thus, the newly developed autoclave cell can be used for the analyses of reaction mechanisms under specific atmospheres and temperatures.

  10. CosmoBon for studying wood formation under exotic gravitational environment for future space agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Funada, Ryo; Nakamura, Teruko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Cosmobon, Jstwg

    We are proposing to raise woody plants in space for several applications and plant science. Japanese flowering cherry tree is one of a candidate for these studies. Mechanism behind sensing gravity and controlling shape of tree has been studied quite extensively. Even molecular mechanism for the response of plant against gravity has been investigated quite intensively for various species, woody plants are left behind. Morphology of woody branch growth is different from that of stem growth in herbs. Morphology in tree is strongly dominated by the secondary xylem formation. Nobody knows the tree shape grown under the space environment. If whole tree could be brought up to space as research materials, it might provide important scientific knowledge. Furthermore, trees produce excess oxygen, wooden materials for living cabin, and provide biomass for cultivating mushroom and insect as for the space agriculture. Excellent tree shapes which would be deeply related to wood formation improve quality of life under stressful environment in outer space. The serious problem would be their size. Bonsai is one of the Japanese traditional arts. We can study secondly xylem formation, wood formation, under exotic gravitational environment using Bonsai. "CosmoBon" is the small tree Bonsai for our space experiment. It has been recognized that the reaction wood in CosmoBon is formed similar to natural trees. Our goal is to examine feasibility to grow various species of trees in space as bioresource for space agriculture.

  11. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  12. Predicting hydrocarbon potential of an earth formation underlying a body of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.R.; Demaison, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for the on-site collection and examination of small concentrations of methane dissolved in water so as to predict hydrocarbon potential of an earth formation underlying a body of water, said formation being a source of said methane, comprises: (i) sampling the water; (ii) continuously vacuum separating said water into liquid and gas phases; (iii) quantitatively separating interfering gas species from methane; (iv) quantitatively oxidising said methane; (v) cryogenically trapping the resulting gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor at a trapping station, and (vi) isotopically examining said trapped carbon dioxide and water vapour for carbon and deuterium distribution. (author)

  13. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  14. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (Penterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Two-fluid (plasma-neutral) Extended-MHD simulations of spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experiment with PSI-Tet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    A self-consistent, two-fluid (plasma-neutral) dynamic neutral model has been implemented into the 3-D, Extended-MHD code PSI-Tet. A monatomic, hydrogenic neutral fluid reacts with a plasma fluid through elastic scattering collisions and three inelastic collision reactions: electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge-exchange. Density, momentum, and energy are evolved for both the plasma and neutral species. The implemented plasma-neutral model in PSI-Tet is being used to simulate decaying spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experimental geometry, which is being compare to two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements (TALIF) made on the HIT-SI3 experiment. TALIF is used to measure the absolute density and temperature of monatomic deuterium atoms. Neutral densities on the order of 1015 m-3 and neutral temperatures between 0.6-1.7 eV were measured towards the end of decay of spheromak configurations with initial toroidal currents between 10-12 kA. Validation results between TALIF measurements and PSI-Tet simulations with the implemented dynamic neutral model will be presented. Additionally, preliminary dynamic neutral simulations of the HIT-SI/HIT-SI3 spheromak plasmas sustained with inductive helicity injection will be presented. Lastly, potential benefits of an expansion of the two-fluid model into a multi-fluid model that includes multiple neutral species and tracking of charge states will be discussed.

  16. Fresh garlic extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panan Ratthawongjirakul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the leading aetiological pathogens of nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria form biofilms on both biotic and abiotic surfaces causing biofilm-associated infections. Within the biofilm, these bacteria might develop persistent and antimicrobial resistant characteristics resulting in chronic infections and treatment failures. Garlic exhibits broad pharmaceutical properties and inhibitory activities against S. aureus. We investigated the effects of aqueous fresh garlic extract on biofilm formation in S. aureus ATCC25923 and MRSA strains under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions. The viable bacteria and biofilm levels were quantified through colony count and crystal violet staining, respectively. The use of fresh garlic extract under both conditions significantly inhibited biofilm formation in S. aureus strains ATCC25923 and MRSA. Garlic could be developed as either a prophylactic or therapeutic agent to manage S. aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  17. The Formation of Carbon Nanostructures via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Naphthalene under Its Autogenic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, spherical carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and carbon spheres (CSs is accomplished by using the method of reactions under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures (RAPET. A powder mixture of naphthalene and nickel acetate tetrahydrate is dissociated under its autogenic pressure. The resultant CNTs and CNCs exhibit good graphitic quality, and the diameters range from 50~200 nm. Smooth and monodisperse CSs with the diameter ranging from 5~10 μm can be obtained by pyrolysis of pure naphthalene. Our results show that the reaction temperature and catalyst proportion play a key role in the formation of carbon nanostructures with RAPET method.

  18. Sclerotial formation of Polyporus umbellatus by low temperature treatment under artificial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Chun; Liang, Han-Qiao; Lv, Jing; Song, Chao; Guo, Shun-Xing; Wang, Chun-Lan; Lee, Tae-Soo; Lee, Min-Woong

    2013-01-01

    and inhibited sclerotial formation. Our findings may help to provide new insights into the biological mechanisms underlying sclerotial morphogenesis in P. umbellatus.

  19. Formation of amorphous carbon during microcrystalline graphite melting under the action of laser picosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranat, M.B.; Ashitkov, S.I.; Kirillin, A.V.; Kostanovskij, A.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Anisimov, S.I.; Kondratenko, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Formation of a liquid phase with a transition to a homogeneous amorphous state under the surface layer solidification is detected under picosecond laser pulse effect on the microcrystalline graphite. A periodic surface structure is produced in the heating region with the period of the order of the length of the heating pulse wave, its strokes following the direction of this pulse polarization. Study of the probing laser pulse reflection kinetics has shown, that the typical time of liquid phase and solidification life makes up ∼ 10 -10 s

  20. Crack formation of steel reinforced concrete structure under stress in construction period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To obtain deformation rules of steel reinforced concrete structure under stress, this study explored the crack formation in construction period. A novel structure system – steel reinforced concrete structure with shear wall and truss at the bottom was analyzed using on-the-spot test in combination with theoretical simulation analysis with SAP2000 software. It was found that, factors influencing crack formation of steel reinforced concrete structure in construction period included construction load, creep of concrete, shrinkage of concrete, displacement of bond of section steel and concrete as well as leveling. In the construction period, the simulated results and the measured results were highly fitted under the influence of time-variant characteristics such as compressive strength, elasticity modulus, creep and shrinkage. Through processing and analyzing the measured data, we obtained the development rules of crack formation of steel reinforced concrete structure with different strength grades as well as deformation rules of time-varying structure system in construction period, figured out the reason for the difference between the simulated results and the measured results, analyzed the deformation of structural components under stress in construction period and proposed some suggestions. This work is beneficial to ensure safe and high-efficient operation of construction

  1. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongyuan; Zhao, Shumin; Xia, Minggang; He, Siyu; Yang, Qifan; Yan, Yuming; Zhao, Hanqiao

    2017-01-01

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  2. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongyuan [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Shumin, E-mail: zhaosm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xia, Minggang [Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); He, Siyu [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yang, Qifan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yan, Yuming [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Hanqiao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2017-02-19

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  3. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  4. Photoinduced fibrils formation of chicken egg white lysozyme under native conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin-Bing; Cao, Yi; Pan, Hai; Qin, Meng; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Xiong, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Recent findings showed that transiently accessing structurally native-like yet energetically higher conformational states is sufficient to trigger the formation of protein fibrils. Typically, these conformational states are made available through changing solvent conditions or introducing mutations. Here we show a novel way to initialize fibril formation for Chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) under native conditions via controlled UV illumination. Through a cassette of tryptophan-based photochemistry, the two terminal disulfide bonds in CEWL can be selectively reduced. The reduced CEWL is then converted to conformational states with the C-terminal fragment floppy upon thermal fluctuation. These states serve as precursors for the fibrillar aggregation. Intriguingly, the CEWL fibrils are stabilized by intermolecular disulfide bonds instead of noncovalent β-sheet structures, distinct from the amyloid-like lysozyme fibrils reported before. Based on the experimental evidences and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, we proposed a "runaway domain-swapping" model for the structure of the CEWL fibrils, in which each CEWL molecule swaps the C-terminal fragment into the complementary position of the adjacent molecule along the fibrils. We anticipate that this fibrillation mechanism can be extended to many other disulfide-containing proteins. Our study stands for the first example of formation of protein fibrils under native conditions upon UV illumination and poses the potential danger of low UV dose to organisms at the protein level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Formation of nitric oxide under action of UV and visible light on S-nitrosocompounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepuro, Ivan I.; Adamchuk, Raisa I.; Anufrik, Slavomir S.; Stepuro, Vitali I.; Maskevich, Sergei A.

    2000-06-01

    It has been shown that NO is released under the exposure of the aqueous solutions of S-nitrosocompounds as well as blood plasma proteins and whole blood of healthy donors to UV and visible light. The NO release from degrading S- nitrosocompounds was monitored both spectrophotometrically (by nitrosohemoglobin formation) and using the quenching of pyrene fluorescence by nitric oxide. In addition to NO, thyil radicals which dismutate to disulfides, were formed under anaerobic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, peroxide compounds, cysteine acid derivatives and S-nitrocompounds are formed apart from disulfides, and NO is mainly converted to NO2-. It is suggested that NO releasing under the actin of UV and visible light from physiological depots induces vascular relaxation, which enhances the blood flow.

  6. Single- and multi-pulse formation of surface structures under static femtosecond irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermin, M.; Garrelie, F.; Sanner, N.; Audouard, E.; Soder, H.

    2007-07-01

    Femtosecond surface structure modifications are investigated under irradiation with laser pulses of 150 fs at 800 nm, on copper and silicon. We report sub-wavelength periodic structures formation (ripples) with a periodicity of 500 nm for both materials. These ripples are perpendicular to the laser polarization and can be obtained with only one pulse. The formation of these ripples corresponds to a fluence threshold of 1 J/cm 2 for copper and 0.15 J/cm 2 for silicon. We find several morphologies when more pulses are applied: larger ripples parallel to the polarization are formed with a periodicity of 1 μm and degenerate into a worm-like morphology with a higher number of pulses. In addition, walls of deep holes also show sub-wavelength and large ripples.

  7. Type IIA photosensitivity and formation of pores in optical fibers under intense ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Shlyagin, M. G.; Swart, P. L.; Chtcherbakov, A. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Formation of the type IIA Bragg gratings in germanosilicate optical fibers is studied. We report the observation of such a type of gratings in the standard single-mode fiber (Corning SMF-28) under different experimental conditions. A mechanism for the type IIA photosensitivity in optical fibers is proposed which is based on nucleation and evolution of pores from vacancy-type defects in fiber areas where a high level of mechanical stress is induced under intense ultraviolet (UV) light. Evolution of fiber core temperature under influence of a single 20 ns light pulse from a KrF excimer laser was measured and compared with theoretical calculations. It was shown that transient thermoinduced stress in the fiber core can achieve a level sufficient for effective nucleation of pores. A theory describing formation of pores in optical fibers has been developed and was used to estimate the pore nucleation rate, concentration, and other parameters of pore evolution for different levels of UV fluence and fiber core stress

  8. The role of stable α-synuclein oligomers in the molecular events underlying amyloid formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Nikolai; Nielsen, Søren Bang; Buell, Alexander K.

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The two types of oligomers are both formed under conditions where amyloid fibril formation is observed but differ in molecular weight by an order of magnitude. Both possess a degree of β......, either as precursors of fibrils or as species involved in the fibril elongation process or instead if they are associated with an aggregation process that is distinct from that generating mature fibrils. Here we describe and characterize in detail two well-defined oligomeric species formed by the protein...

  9. Nonequilibrium self-organization in alloys under irradiation leading to the formation of nano composites

    CERN Document Server

    Enrique, R A; Averback, R S; Bellon, P

    2003-01-01

    Alloys under irradiation are continuously driven away from equilibrium: Every time an external particle interacts with the atoms in the solid, a perturbation very localized in space and time is produced. Under this external forcing, phase and microstructural evolution depends ultimately on the dynamical interaction between the external perturbation and the internal recovery kinetics of the alloy. We consider the nonequilibrium steady state of an immiscible binary alloy subject to mixing by heavy-ion irradiation. It has been found that the range of the forced atomic relocations taking place during collision cascades plays an important role on the final microstructure: when this range is large enough, it can lead to the spontaneous formation of compositional patterns at the nanometer scale. These results were rationalized in the framework of a continuum model solved by deriving a nonequilibrium thermodynamic potential. Here we derive the nonequilibrium structure factor by including the role of fluctuations. In ...

  10. Coarsening and pattern formation during true morphological phase separation in unstable thin films under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avanish; Narayanam, Chaitanya; Khanna, Rajesh; Puri, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    We address in detail the problem of true morphological phase separation (MPS) in three-dimensional or (2 +1 )-dimensional unstable thin liquid films (>100 nm) under the influence of gravity. The free-energy functionals of these films are asymmetric and show two points of common tangency, which facilitates the formation of two equilibrium phases. Three distinct patterns formed by relative preponderance of these phases are clearly identified in "true MPS". Asymmetricity induces two different pathways of pattern formation, viz., defect and direct pathway for true MPS. The pattern formation and phase-ordering dynamics have been studied using statistical measures such as structure factor, correlation function, and growth laws. In the late stage of coarsening, the system reaches into a scaling regime for both pathways, and the characteristic domain size follows the Lifshitz-Slyozov growth law [L (t ) ˜t1 /3] . However, for the defect pathway, there is a crossover of domain growth behavior from L (t ) ˜t1 /4→t1 /3 in the dynamical scaling regime. We also underline the analogies and differences behind the mechanisms of MPS and true MPS in thin liquid films and generic spinodal phase separation in binary mixtures.

  11. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-04-23

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets.

  12. A model of social network formation under the impact of structural balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Cheng, Jiajun; Chen, Yingwen; Wang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Social networks have attracted remarkable attention from both academic and industrial societies and it is of great importance to understand the formation of social networks. However, most existing research cannot be applied directly to investigate social networks, where relationships are heterogeneous and structural balance is a common phenomenon. In this paper, we take both positive and negative relationships into consideration and propose a model to characterize the process of social network formation under the impact of structural balance. In this model, a new node first establishes a link with an existing node and then tries to connect to each of the newly connected node’s neighbors. If a new link is established, the type of this link is determined by structural balance. Then we analyze the degree distribution of the generated network theoretically, and estimate the fractions of positive and negative links. All analysis results are verified by simulations. These results are of importance to understand the formation of social networks, and the model can be easily extended to consider more realistic situations.

  13. Merging formation of FRC and its application to high-beta ST formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ueda, Y.; Matsuyama, T.; Ohshima, Y.; Katsurai, M.

    2001-01-01

    Merging formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) explored not only a new scenario of highly-efficient FRC formation/amplification experiment but also a new boundary research between FRC, spheromak and spherical tokamak (ST). A new finding is that the produced FRC is transformed stably into an ultra-high-β ST by applying external toroidal field B t,ext . The toroidal field was observed to vanish around magnetic axis after the B t,ext application to the FRC, indicating formation of diamagnetic ST. The hollow current profile of FRC was maintained during the equilibrium transition, eliminating a need for the difficult hollow-current-formation process of start-up discharge of high-β ST. The energy-conversion effect of merging transformed the force-free merging spheromaks with paramagnetic current into the FRC with diamagnetic current and the further application of B t,ext did the FRC into the ultra-high-β (>60%)/diamagnetic ST, indicating the close relationship between FRC and ST in second stability. (author)

  14. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, Seth R.; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Adcock, Christopher T.; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L. (CIW); (UNLV); (CIT); (SBU)

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg2+. Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  15. Neural mechanisms underlying migrating motor complex formation in mouse isolated colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Stuart M; Nichols, Kim; Grasby, Dallas J; Waterman, Sally A

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the intrinsic enteric reflex pathways associated with migrating motor complex (MMC) formation. Acetylcholine (ACh) mediates the rapid component of the MMC, however a non-cholinergic component also exists. The present study investigated the possible role of endogenous tachykinins (TKs) in the formation of colonic MMCs and the relative roles of excitatory and inhibitory pathways.MMCs were recorded from the circular muscle at four sites (proximal, proximal-mid, mid-distal and distal) along the mouse colon using force transducers.The tachykinin (NK1 and NK2) receptor antagonists SR-140 333 (250 nM) and SR-48 968 (250 nM) reduced the amplitude of MMCs at all recording sites, preferentially abolishing the long duration contraction. Residual MMCs were abolished by the subsequent addition of atropine (1 μM).The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nωnitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 μM), increased MMC amplitude in the distal region, whilst reducing the amplitude in the proximal region. In preparations where MMCs did not migrate to the distal colon, addition of L-NOARG resulted in the formation of MMCs. Subsequent addition of apamin (250 nM) or suramin (100 μM) further increased MMC amplitude in the distal region, whilst suramin increased MMC amplitude in the mid-distal region. Apamin but not suramin reduced MMC amplitude in the proximal region. Subsequent addition of SR-140 333 and SR-48 968 reduced MMC amplitude at all sites. Residual MMCs were abolished by atropine (1 μM).In conclusion, TKs, ACh, nitric oxide (NO) and ATP are involved in the neural mechanisms underlying the formation of MMCs in the mouse colon. Tachykinins mediate the long duration component of the MMC via NK1 and NK2 receptors. Inhibitory pathways may be involved in determining whether MMCs are formed. PMID:11159701

  16. Humic acid-induced silver nanoparticle formation under environmentally relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaighe, Nelson; Maccuspie, Robert I; Navarro, Divina A; Aga, Diana S; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sohn, Mary; Sharma, Virender K

    2011-05-01

    The formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) in the presence of humic acids (HAs) under various environmentally relevant conditions is described. HAs tested originated from the Suwannee River (SUW), and included samples of three sedimentary HAs (SHAs), and five soils obtained across the state of Florida. The time required to form AgNPs varied depending upon the type and concentration of HA, as well as temperature. SUW and all three SHAs reduced Ag(+) at 22 °C. However, none of the soil HAs formed absorbance-detectable AgNPs at room temperature when allowed to react for a period of 25 days, at which time experiments were halted. The appearance of the characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of AgNPs was observed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in as few as 2-4 days at 22 °C for SHAs and SUW. An elevated temperature of 90 °C resulted in the accelerated appearance of the SPR within 90 min for SUW and all SHAs. The formation of AgNPs at 90 °C was usually complete within 3 h. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images showed that the AgNPs formed were typically spherical and had a broad size distribution. Dynamic light scattering also revealed polydisperse particle size distributions. HAs appeared to colloidally stabilize AgNPs based on lack of any significant change in the spectral characteristics over a period of two months. The results suggest the potential for direct formation of AgNPs under environmental conditions from Ag(+) sources, implying that not all AgNPs observed in natural waters today may be of anthropogenic origin.

  17. Corrosion Behavior and Oxide Film Formation of T91 Steel under Different Water Chemistry Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. Q.; Shi, C.; Li, J.; Gao, L. X. [Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai (China); Lee, K. Y. [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-02-15

    The corrosion behavior of a ferritic/martensitic steel T91 exposed to an aqueous solution containing chloride and sulfate ions is investigated depending on the stimulated all-volatile treatment (AVT) and under oxygenated treatment (OT) conditions. The corrosion of T91 steel under OT condition is severe, while the corrosion under AVT condition is not. The co-existence of chloride and sulfate ions has antagonistic effect on the corrosion of T91 steel in both AVT and OT conditions. Unlike to corrosion resistance in the aqueous solution, OT pretreatment provides T91 steel lower oxidation-resistance than VAT pretreatment. From scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, the lower corrosion resistance in the aqueous solution by VAT conditions possibly is due to the formation of pits. In addition, the lower oxidation resistance of T91 steel pretreated by OT conditions is explained as follows: the cracks formed during the immersion under OT conditions accelerated peeling-off rate of the oxide film.

  18. A flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Madsen, Ian C.; Loan, Melissa J.; Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Wallwork, Kia S.

    2009-08-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of a stainless steel flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions is described. The use of the cell is demonstrated by a study of Al(OH)3 scale formation on a mild steel substrate from synthetic Bayer liquor at 70 °C. The cell design allows for interchangeable parts and substrates and would be suitable for the study of scale formation in other industrial processes.

  19. Physio-chemical hydrodynamic mechanism underlying the formation of thin adsorbed boundary films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, W W F; Teodorescu, M; Rahnejat, H

    2012-01-01

    The formation of low shear strength surface-adhered thin films mitigates excessive friction in mixed or boundary regimes of lubrication. Tribo-films are formed as a consequence of molecular chemical reactions with the surfaces. The process is best viewed in the context of a lubricant-surface system. Therefore, it is usually surmised that the adsorption of lubricant molecular species to the contact surfaces is underlying to the formation of ultra-thin lubricant films. The paper considers contact between smooth surfaces at close separation. This may be regarded as the contact of a pair of asperity summits, whose dimensions, however small, are far larger than the size of fluid molecules within the conjunction. In such diminishing separations the constraining effect of relatively smooth solid barriers causes oscillatory solvation of fluid molecules. This effect accounts for the conjunctional load capacity but does not contribute to mitigating friction, except when molecular adsorption is taken into account with long chain molecules which tend to inhibit solvation. The paper presents an analytical predictive model based on the Ornstein-Zernike method with the Percus-Yevick approximation of a narrow interaction potential between conjunctional composition. The predictions confirm the above stated physical facts in a fundamental manner.

  20. Formation of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock under saline water irrigation and nitrogen doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro de P. Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth and formation of fresh and dry weight of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock irrigated with waters of different saline levels and nitrogen (N doses, in an experiment conducted in plastic tubes under greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was randomized blocks, in a 5 x 4 factorial scheme with four replicates, and the treatments consisted of five levels of water electrical conductivity - ECw (0.3, 1.1, 1.9, 2.7 and 3.5 dS m-1 and four N doses (70, 100, 130 and 160% of the N dose recommended for the cultivation of guava seedlings, cv. ‘Paluma’. The dose referring to 100% corresponds to 773 mg of N dm-3. The highest growth of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock was obtained with ECw of 0.3 dS m-1 and fertilization of 541.1 mg N dm-3 of soil; increasing N doses did not reduce the deleterious effect of the salt stress on the growth and phytomass formation of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock; irrigation with water of up to 1.75 dS m-1, in the production of guava rootstocks, promotes acceptable reduction of 10% in growth and quality of the seedlings.

  1. Field measurements of key parameters associated with nocturnal OBT formation in vegetables grown under Canadian conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Workman, W.G.; Korolevych, V.; Davis, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide the parameter values required to model OBT formation in the edible parts of plants following a hypothetical accidental tritium release to the atmosphere at night. The parameters considered were leaf area index, stomatal resistance, photosynthesis rate, the photosynthetic production rate of starch, the nocturnal hydrolysis rate of starch, the fraction of starch produced daily by photosynthesis that appears in the fruits, and the mass of the fruit. Values of these parameters were obtained in the summer of 2002 for lettuce, radishes and tomatoes grown under typical Canadian environmental conditions. Based on the maximum observed photosynthetic rate and growth rate, the fraction of starch translocated to the fruit was calculated to be 17% for tomato fruit and 14% for radish root. - Highlights: ► Plant physiological parameters affecting nocturnal OBT formation have been investigated. ► The fraction of starch produced daily by photosynthesis in the leaves that appears in the fruit was calculated. ► Realistic estimates of OBT concentrations following a nighttime accidental HTO release to the atmosphere.

  2. The formation of cubic ice under conditions relevant to Earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Benjamin J; Knopf, Daniel A; Bertram, Allan K

    2005-03-10

    An important mechanism for ice cloud formation in the Earth's atmosphere is homogeneous nucleation of ice in aqueous droplets, and this process is generally assumed to produce hexagonal ice. However, there are some reports that the metastable crystalline phase of ice, cubic ice, may form in the Earth's atmosphere. Here we present laboratory experiments demonstrating that cubic ice forms when micrometre-sized droplets of pure water and aqueous solutions freeze homogeneously at cooling rates approaching those found in the atmosphere. We find that the formation of cubic ice is dominant when droplets freeze at temperatures below 190 K, which is in the temperature range relevant for polar stratospheric clouds and clouds in the tropical tropopause region. These results, together with heat transfer calculations, suggest that cubic ice will form in the Earth's atmosphere. If there were a significant fraction of cubic ice in some cold clouds this could increase their water vapour pressure, and modify their microphysics and ice particle size distributions. Under specific conditions this may lead to enhanced dehydration of the tropopause region.

  3. Texture formation in orthorhombic alpha-uranium under simple compression and rolling to high strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Miroslav; Knezevic, Marko; Beyerlein, Irene J.; McCabe, Rodney J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the mechanical response and texture evolution of alpha-uranium during simple compression and rolling at 573 K. In order to determine the underlying mechanisms governing plasticity and texture formation, we perform detailed characterizations using electron backscattered diffraction and constitutive modeling using a dislocation-density based hardening law within a visco-plastic self-consistent homogenization. We show that the model achieves good agreement with experimental measurements in terms of texture and stress-strain response. From detailed comparison of experimental and modeling results, we infer that in both through-thickness compression (TTC) and rolling at 573K, the active slip modes are floor slip (001)[100] and chimney slip 1 / 2 { 110 } with slightly different ratios. However, { 130 } twinning is not active in TTC compression but profuse during rolling. Further analysis indicates that during rolling, floor slip (001)[100] results in the formation of two pronounced (001) texture peaks tilted 10-15° away from the normal toward the rolling direction.

  4. Phase formation polycrystalline vanadium oxide via thermal annealing process under controlled nitrogen pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessadaluk, S.; Khemasiri, N.; Rahong, S.; Rangkasikorn, A.; Kayunkid, N.; Wirunchit, S.; Horprathum, M.; Chananonnawathron, C.; Klamchuen, A.; Nukeaw, J.

    2017-09-01

    This article provides an approach to improve and control crystal phases of the sputtering vanadium oxide (VxOy) thin films by post-thermal annealing process. Usually, as-deposited VxOy thin films at room temperature are amorphous phase: post-thermal annealing processes (400 °C, 2 hrs) under the various nitrogen (N2) pressures are applied to improve and control the crystal phase of VxOy thin films. The crystallinity of VxOy thin films changes from amorphous to α-V2O5 phase or V9O17 polycrystalline, which depend on the pressure of N2 carrier during annealing process. Moreover, the electrical resistivity of the VxOy thin films decrease from 105 Ω cm (amorphous) to 6×10-1 Ω cm (V9O17). Base on the results, our study show a simply method to improve and control phase formation of VxOy thin films.

  5. The mechanism for diamagnetic products formation under the radiolysis of alkali nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan' ev, Vladimir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Kemerovo State University, Krasnaya Street, 6, Kemerovo 650043 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: eprlab@kemsu.ru

    2009-06-15

    Based on optical measurements, the kinetics of peroxynitrite accumulation in alkali nitrate crystals {gamma}-irradiated at 310 K has been investigated. The initial radiation chemical yields were calculated to be 0.60{+-}0.05, 0.14{+-}0.03, 0.35{+-}0.03, 0.65{+-}0.04 (100 eV){sup -1} for NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, RbNO{sub 3}, and CsNO{sub 3}, respectively. The mechanism for the radiolysis of crystalline alkali nitrates is interpreted in terms of formation of the peroxynitrite ions and the nitrite ions from high-energy singlet and triplet excited states of the nitrate ions, respectively. These states can be generating under the radiationless transitions of electrons from the cation conductivity band into the anion conductivity band accompanied by the Auger excitation of the nitrate ions.

  6. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Jia

    Full Text Available Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined.

  7. Miniinvasive paracentetic drain surgical interventions under ultrasonic control concerning liquid formations of abdominal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.I. Ohrimenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Entry. Presently miniinvasive surgical interventions under ultrasonic control became the method of choice in treatment of quite a number of abdominal and retroperitoneal organs diseases, and their complications. These operations have a row of advantages, as compared to open and laparoscopic ones: comparative simplicity, insignificant infecting of abdominal region, least of intra- and postoperative complications. Actuality of problem is conditioned by that indications to the use of paracentetic drain surgical interventions, most optimal methods of preoperative diagnostic, features of postoperative treatment of patients remain not enough studied. Research aim. To study the results of diagnostics and treatment of patients with liquid formations of abdominal cavity that were exposed to miniinvasive surgical interventions under ultrasonic control and, on the basis of it, to work out an optimal curative diagnostic algorithm. Materials and research methods. The results of treatment of 25 patients with liquid formations of abdominal cavity are analyzed. They were submitted to miniinvasive paracentetic drain surgical interventions under ultrasonic control. The pseudocysts of pancreas were in 16 patients, abscesses of abdominal cavity – in 2 patients. Research results. Intraoperative complications were not marked. Postoperative complications were observed in 5 patients. Among them there were inadequate drainage of all cavities of multicamerate abscess of the liver in 2 patients, progress of sacculated uremic peritonitis developing in presence of ascites in one patient, and arrosive hemorrhage in the cavity of pancreas pseudocyst in 2 persons. It is determined that it is necessary to include the spiral computer tomography to the complex of preoperative inspection of patients that allows to diagnose multicamerate abscess of the liver in time and to drain all the additional cavities adequately. 2 patients after paracentetic drain surgical interventions

  8. Computational Study of Thrombus Formation and Clotting Factor Effects under Venous Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    generation biochemistry , and fibrin formation and function, and was able to predict essential dynamic features of the thrombus formation pro- cess observed in...Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, MarylandABSTRACT A comprehensive... biochemistry , structural biology, and rheology have been extensively investigated. Such studies provide in- formation about the biochemical reactions

  9. Modelling of fast jet formation under explosion collision of two-layer alumina/copper tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Balagansky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Under explosion collapse of two-layer tubes with an outer layer of high-modulus ceramics and an inner layer of copper, formation of a fast and dense copper jet is plausible. We have performed a numerical simulation of the explosion collapse of a two-layer alumina/copper tube using ANSYS AUTODYN software. The simulation was performed in a 2D-axis symmetry posting on an Eulerian mesh of 3900x1200 cells. The simulation results indicate two separate stages of the tube collapse process: the nonstationary and the stationary stage. At the initial stage, a non-stationary fragmented jet is moving with the velocity of leading elements up to 30 km/s. The collapse velocity of the tube to the symmetry axis is about 2 km/s, and the pressure in the contact zone exceeds 700 GPa. During the stationary stage, a dense jet is forming with the velocity of 20 km/s. Temperature of the dense jet is about 2000 K, jet failure occurs when the value of effective plastic deformation reaches 30.

  10. Representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas under consideration of geology and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas as far as safety and geological aspects are concerned. Nagra has to demonstrate the basic feasibility of the safe disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate-level waste (ILW) in a deep geological repository, The report shows which possibilities for the disposal of SF, HLW and ILW exist in Switzerland and summarises the current state of general academic and applied geo-scientific research as well as the project-specific knowledge base that has been developed by Nagra over the past 30 years. The descriptions and assessments of the potential host rocks and areas are based on attributes that take into account experience gained both in Switzerland and abroad and are in agreement with international practice. An assessment of potential siting areas is looked at, in view of the preparation of a General Licence application, Nagra will also have to consider land-use planning and socio-economic aspects. This will be carried out in the next step according to the Sectoral Plan for Geological Disposal under the guidance of the relevant Swiss authorities

  11. MD simulations of onset of tungsten fuzz formation under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, A.; Henriksson, K.O.E.; Nordlund, K.

    2013-01-01

    When helium (He) escapes a fusion reactor plasma, a tungsten (W)-based divertor may, under some conditions, form a fuzz-like nano-morphology. This is a highly undesired phenomenon for the divertor, and is not well understood. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of high fluence He and also C-seeded He (He+C) irradiation on W, focusing on the effect of the high fluence, the temperature and the impurities on the onset of the structure formation. We concluded that MD reproduces the experimentally found square root of time dependence of the surface growth. The He atomic density decreases when increasing the number of He atoms in the cell. A higher temperature causes a larger bubble growth and desorption activity, specially for the pure He irradiation cases. It also it leads to W recrystallization for the He+C irradiation cases. Carbon acts as a local He trap for small clusters or single atoms and causes a larger loss of crystallinity of the W surface

  12. Formation of sputtered silver clusters under bombardment with SF sub 5 sup + ions

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalab, S; Maksimov, S E; Mazarov, P; Tugushev, V I; Dzhemilev, N K; Wucher, A

    2002-01-01

    The formation of Ag sub n clusters and Ag sub n sup + cluster ions under bombardment of a silver surface with SF sub 5 sup + and Xe sup + projectile ions was investigated experimentally. In order to obtain information about the relative abundance of clusters among the flux of sputtered particles independent of their charge state, mass spectra of both secondary ions and sputtered neutral particles were recorded. The neutral species were post-ionized prior to mass analysis by means of photo-ionization using an intense UV laser at a wavelength of 193 nm. It is found that measured Ag sub n sup + signals increase significantly if SF sub 5 sup + projectiles are used instead of rare gas (Ar sup + or Xe sup +) ions of the same kinetic impact energy. The signals of neutral Ag atoms and Ag sub n clusters, on the other hand, exhibit only a relatively small increase, thus indicating that the enhancement observed for the secondary ions is predominantly caused by an increased ionization probability of sputtered particles u...

  13. CARBON STOCK IN SOIL UNDER DIFFERENT FOREST FORMATIONS, CHAPECÓ, SANTA CATARINA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Berenice Nicoloso Denardin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509813323The adoption of management practices that ensure the stability of soil organic matter also maintain the stabilityor quantitative increase of carbon (C in the lithosphere, reducing the amount of CO2 in theatmosphere. You can also minimize the losses of C to the atmosphere by using conservation practices,or using cover crops to keep the soil C stocks, and the forest cover are considered great abductionand forest systems considered large reservoirs of C. This work was performed on a property located inChapecó, Santa Catarina state, where soils were sampled from different forest formations distributedin a homogeneous soil range. The local climate is mesothermal, rainy, and the soil was characterizedas an association Cambissolo Háplico/Neossolo Litólico. The objectives were to estimate the C stocksin soils and estimate the C losses occurred due to the change of soil cover. It was evaluated soils undernatural forest (FN, of secondary stage, with a high degree of preservation; planted forest of eucalyptus(Eucalyptus saligna (PE, with eight years of cultivation, preceded by 17 years under crop conventionaltillage; and a planted forest of herb mate (Ilex paraguariensis (EM, with 25 years of cultivation underconventional system (cutting interval of 18 months, with removal of all waste produced and maintenanceof the ground without cover, with periodic use of herbicide - glyphosate. In each area were opened fourtrenches with 50 cm deep, where soil samples were collected in depths of: 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-20 cm,20-30 cm, 30-40 cm, and 40-50 cm, with kopeck rings. It was possible to determine the bulk density (Mgm-3, the soil volume per layer (depth and per hectare, and the concentration of soil C in the differentstudied areas. To quantify the C stocks equal amounts of soil were used for each depth evaluated. Itwas observed higher densities of soils and under PE and EM, to FN the lowest density are explained bythe

  14. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of two reference Belgian clay formations under non-isothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Two deep clay formations are being investigated in Belgium in connection with the design of a repository for 'High-Level Radioactive Waste': Boom clay BC at Mol (located between 160 and 270 m depths), considered the reference host formation, and Ypresian clay YC at Kallo (located between 300 and 450 m depths) as an alternative one. A comprehensive experimental programme has been carried out on these materials to explore water permeability at different temperatures and sample orientations, as well as to analyse volume change behaviour on loading/unloading at different temperatures and sample orientations (including pre and post-yield compressibility, yield properties and volume changes on drained thermal loading). Table 1 summarises some properties of BC and YC. Figure 1 presents the pore size distribution PSD curves of both clays obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry. They display contrasting features (bi-modal pore network in YP with larger dominant pore sizes). Larger water permeability values are expected on YC as indicated in Table 1 and Figure 2, not only as a consequence of its higher void ratio but also due to these double porosity features. Water retention properties, of particular concern on sample retrieval from large depths, are also affected due to desaturation processes that are associated with the double porosity network of YP and its effects on air-entry value (a lower initial suction is measured on YP, despite being retrieved from larger depths). Figure 2 shows vertical and horizontal water permeability results under constant volume conditions and different temperatures. BC and YC display small anisotropy at sample scale - permeability is slightly larger on horizontal direction-. With regard to temperature effects, the figure shows that water permeability dependency on temperature in YC is slightly higher than the water viscosity prediction for both orientations. Instead BC displayed a thermal

  15. Standard format and content of financial assurance mechanisms required for decommissioning under 10 CFR parts 30, 40, 70, and 72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this regulatory guide, ''Standard Format and Content of Financial Assurance Mechanisms Required for Decommissioning Under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72,'' is to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be provided for establishing financial assurance for decommissioning and to establish a standard format for presenting the information. Use of the standard format will help ensure that the financial instruments contain the information required by 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72; aid the applicant and NRC staff in ensuring that the information is complete; and help persons reading the financial instruments to locate information. This guide address financial assurance for decommissioning of facilities under materials licenses granted under Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72. These parts include licensees in the following categories: Part 30, Byproduct Material; Part 40, Source Material; Part 70, Special Nuclear Material; and Part 72, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations

  16. Formation of dwarf ellipticals and dwarf irregular galaxies by interaction of giant galaxies under environmental influence

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Debsarma, Suma; Karmakar, Pradip; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation of gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and gas-poor, rotating dwarf elliptical galaxies following the interaction between two giant galaxies as a function of space density. The formation of dwarf galaxies is considered to depend on a random variable, the tidal index theta, an environmental parameter defined by Karachentsev et al. (2004), such that for theta less than zero, the formation of dwarf irregular galaxy is assured whereas for theta greater than zer...

  17. Distributed Formation State Estimation Algorithms Under Resource and Multi-Tasking Constraints, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent work has developed a number of architectures and algorithms for accurately estimating spacecraft and formation states. The estimation accuracy achievable...

  18. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yépez, L.D.; Carrillo, J.L.; Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J.M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena. - Highlights: • A weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number is proposed. • The self-propelling clusters appear when a vertical rotating magnetic field is applied. • The largest average chain lengths are reached when frequencies are multiples one another. • Rotating and unidirectional alternating fields produce the largest average chain length values.

  19. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yépez, L.D.; Carrillo, J.L. [Instituto de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Edif. 110 A, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J.M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca 42090, Pachuca (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena. - Highlights: • A weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number is proposed. • The self-propelling clusters appear when a vertical rotating magnetic field is applied. • The largest average chain lengths are reached when frequencies are multiples one another. • Rotating and unidirectional alternating fields produce the largest average chain length values.

  20. Formation of Fine Structures in Uniform Suspension under Standing Waves Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, V. F.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    Structurization of initially uniform suspension in fields of standing gravity waves was studied in a rectangular tank oscillating in vertical direction. The tank with aspect ratio of 50:4 was placed at shaker table with a low level of horizontal components of acceleration during the motion. Diluted aluminum powder suspension in water filled in tank with was undergone wave action in frequency range corresponding to first and second modes of intrinsic oscillations. For visualizations and tracers velocity measurements a digital high-speed video camera was used. The formation of large and small scale structures in initially uniform suspension was registered. Experiments were performed in tanks with flat smooth and rough bottom as well as with water above stationary ripples and deformable sand riffles. Large and small scales irregularities of initially smooth field of concentration were observed in the whole volume of the fluid. Large voids with shapes reminding the bottom topography features were formed first. Later the fine extended filaments were observed. Their horizontal scales were determined by bed forms extension, and the vertical scale grows in time. Depending on the wave mode the filament structures arose from the bottom or sank from the free surface. The evolution of the structure geometrical parameters were measured both in vertical and horizontal directions. The difference of dynamical behaviour of suspension concentration in vicinity and far from free surface, flat bottom or bed topography was determined and discussed. In theoretical description of the flow compete fundamental set of governing equations. Complete solution of the set contains family of thin singular perturbed components which are characterized by singular perturbed functions. These flow components can accumulate of admixtures and maintain non-uniform pattern of admixture concentration. The presented experiments were performed on set-up USU "HPC IPMec RAS" under support of Ministry of

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation and its function under elevated atmospheric O3: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D

    2017-07-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the effects of elevated O 3 on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formation and on AM role in promoting plant growth in regard to several moderating variables (O 3 levels, O 3 exposure duration, plant types, AM fungi family, and additional stress) by means of meta-analysis of published data. The analysis consisted of 117 trials representing 20 peer-reviewed articles and 16 unpublished trials. Relative to non-mycorrhizal controls, AM inoculation did not significantly alter plant growth (shoot biomass, root biomass, total biomass and plant height) when O 3 concentration was less than 80 ppb, but at concentrations above 80 ppb symbiosis was associated with increases of 68% in shoot biomass and 131% in root biomass. AM effects on plant growth were affected by the duration of O 3 exposure but did not differ much with AM fungi taxa or plant type. AM symbiosis has also led to higher yields under O 3 stress, relative to the non-mycorrhizal plants, and the AM effects have been more pronounced as O 3 concentration increases. As with biomass, AM effects on yield have been affected by the duration of O 3 exposure, with the greatest increase (100%) occurring at 61-90 d. AM-induced promotion of yield differed with fungal species but not with plant type or other abiotic stress. Colonization of roots by AM fungi has been negatively affected by elevated O 3 compared to ambient O 3 ; total mycorrhizal colonization rate (MCR), arbuscular MCR, vesicular MCR and hyphal coil MCR declined as O 3 levels rose. AM colonization rates were affected by duration of O 3 exposure, plant type, AM fungal taxa and other concurrent stresses in most cases. The analysis showed that AM inoculation has the potential to ameliorate detrimental effects of elevated O 3 on plant growth and productivity, despite colonization rates being negatively affected by elevated O 3 . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Chemistry teacher initial formation under the eye of the coordinators of the courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guimarães Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recognition of the need for change and the constant production of studies on initial formation, the degree courses still have questions that need to be discussed. These issues are related to the difficulty to overcome the lack of teachers in basic education and the type of formation offered in undergraduate courses, which does not seem to meet the current Brazilian educational demands. This paper presents data from a qualitative study conducted with coordinators of seven higher education institutions in the state of São Paulo. Despite the different institutional realities presented in this work, the difficulty of effectively contribute to the formation of chemistry teachers is common to all the institutions. Lack of interest in initial formation teacher’s courses, evasion problems, relationship between the initial formation of chemical teachers and chemistry’s professionals and the lack of commitment of teachers marked the reports of the coordinators of the courses.

  3. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Højberg, O; Binnerup, S J; Sørensen, J

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria. The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a...

  4. Distributed Adaptive Finite-Time Approach for Formation-Containment Control of Networked Nonlinear Systems Under Directed Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujuan; Song, Yongduan; Ren, Wei

    2017-07-06

    This paper presents a distributed adaptive finite-time control solution to the formation-containment problem for multiple networked systems with uncertain nonlinear dynamics and directed communication constraints. By integrating the special topology feature of the new constructed symmetrical matrix, the technical difficulty in finite-time formation-containment control arising from the asymmetrical Laplacian matrix under single-way directed communication is circumvented. Based upon fractional power feedback of the local error, an adaptive distributed control scheme is established to drive the leaders into the prespecified formation configuration in finite time. Meanwhile, a distributed adaptive control scheme, independent of the unavailable inputs of the leaders, is designed to keep the followers within a bounded distance from the moving leaders and then to make the followers enter the convex hull shaped by the formation of the leaders in finite time. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is confirmed by the simulation.

  5. The Formation of Teacher Work Teams under Adverse Conditions: Towards a More Realistic Scenario for Schools in Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintrop, Rick; Charles, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Group formation studies are rare in the literature on teacher professional learning communities (PLCs). But they are needed to render realistic scenarios and design interventions for practitioners who work in schools where teachers encounter distress and social adversity. Under these conditions, we may need approaches to PLC development that are…

  6. Distributed Formation State Estimation Algorithms Under Resource and Multi-Tasking Constraints, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent work on distributed multi-spacecraft systems has resulted in a number of architectures and algorithms for accurate estimation of spacecraft and formation...

  7. Scale Formation under Blended Phosphate Treatment for a Utility with Lead Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional wisdom hypothesizes that the orthophosphate component of blended phosphate corrosion inhibitors causes the formation of low solubility lead-orthophosphate solids which inhibit lead release into drinking water. This study characterized the composition and morphology o...

  8. Evidence for the role of organics in aerosol particle formation under atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, A.; Dommen, J.; Duplissy, J.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Verheggen, B.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.; Spracklen, D.V.; Carslaw, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is an important parameter in governing the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. However, detailed nucleation mechanisms remain ambiguous, as laboratory data have so far not been successful in explaining atmospheric nucleation. We investigated the formation of new particles in a smog chamber simulating the photochemical formation of H2SO4 and organic condensable species. Nucleation occurs at H2SO4 concentrations similar to those found in the ambient atmosphere during nucleation events. The measured particle formation rates are proportional to the product of the concentrations of H2SO4 and an organic molecule. This suggests that only one H2SO4 molecule and one organic molecule are involved in the rate-limiting step of the observed nucleation process. Parameterizing this process in a global aerosol model results in substantially better agreement with ambient observations compared to control runs.

  9. Chemistry teacher initial formation under the eye of the coordinators of the courses

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Guimarães Corrêa; Rosebelly Nunes Marques

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recognition of the need for change and the constant production of studies on initial formation, the degree courses still have questions that need to be discussed. These issues are related to the difficulty to overcome the lack of teachers in basic education and the type of formation offered in undergraduate courses, which does not seem to meet the current Brazilian educational demands. This paper presents data from a qualitative study conducted with coordinators of seven higher ed...

  10. Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xijuan; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Furgal, Karolina

    2011-01-01

    of triclosan- methyl was investigated in activated sludge from a standard activated sludge WWTP equipped with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. The removal was found to occur mainly under aerobic conditions while under anoxic (nitrate reducing) and anaerobic conditions rather low removal rates were...... determined. In a laboratory-scale activated sludge reactor 75% of the triclosan was removed under aerobic conditions within 150 h, while no removal was observed under anaerobic or anoxic conditions. One percent of the triclosan was converted to triclosan-methyl under aerobic conditions, less under anoxic...

  11. Visible Spectrometer at the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment, the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment and the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak for Doppler Width and Shift Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, A; Howard, S; Horton, R; Hwang, D; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; McLean, H; Terry, J

    2006-05-15

    A novel Doppler spectrometer is currently being used for ion or neutral velocity and temperature measurements on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. The spectrometer has an f/No. of {approx}3.1 and is appropriate for visible light (3500-6700 {angstrom}). The full width at half maximum from a line emitting calibration source has been measured to be as small as 0.4 {angstrom}. The ultimate time resolution is line brightness light limited and on the order of ms. A new photon efficient detector is being used for the setup at C-Mod. Time resolution is achieved by moving the camera during a plasma discharge in a perpendicular direction through the dispersion plane of the spectrometer causing a vertical streaking across the camera face. Initial results from C-Mod as well as previous measurements from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) and the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) are presented.

  12. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  13. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, G.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Nordlund, K.; Lasa, A.; Björkas, C.; Safi, E.; Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  14. High-Burnup-Structure (HBS): Model Development in MARMOT for HBS Formation and Stability Under Radiation and High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, X. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A detailed phase field model for the formation of High Burnup Structure (HBS) was developed and implemented in MARMOT. The model treats the HBS formation as an irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model takes into consideration the stored energy associated with dislocations formed under irradiation. The accumulation of radiation damage, hence, increases the system free energy and triggers recrystallization. The increase in the free energy due to the formation of new grain boundaries is offset by the reduction in the free energy by creating dislocation-free grains at the expense of the deformed grains. The model was first used to study the growth of recrystallized flat and circular grains. The model reults were shown to agree well with theorrtical predictions. The case of HBS formation in UO2 was then investigated. It was found that a threshold dislocation density of (or equivalently a threshold burn-up of 33-40 GWd/t) is required for HBS formation at 1200K, which is in good agrrement with theory and experiments. In future studies, the presence of gas bubbles and their effect on the formation and evolution of HBS will be considered.

  15. High-Burnup-Structure (HBS): Model Development in MARMOT for HBS Formation and Stability Under Radiation and High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Bai, X.; Zhang, Y.; Biner, B.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed phase field model for the formation of High Burnup Structure (HBS) was developed and implemented in MARMOT. The model treats the HBS formation as an irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model takes into consideration the stored energy associated with dislocations formed under irradiation. The accumulation of radiation damage, hence, increases the system free energy and triggers recrystallization. The increase in the free energy due to the formation of new grain boundaries is offset by the reduction in the free energy by creating dislocation-free grains at the expense of the deformed grains. The model was first used to study the growth of recrystallized flat and circular grains. The model results were shown to agree well with theoretical predictions. The case of HBS formation in UO2 was then investigated. It was found that a threshold dislocation density of (or equivalently a threshold burn-up of 33-40 GWd/t) is required for HBS formation at 1200K, which is in good agreement with theory and experiments. In future studies, the presence of gas bubbles and their effect on the formation and evolution of HBS will be considered.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Link between Nuclear Receptor Function and Cholesterol Gallstone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Carmen Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol gallstone disease is highly prevalent in western countries, particularly in women and some specific ethnic groups. The formation of water-insoluble cholesterol crystals is due to a misbalance between the three major lipids present in the bile: cholesterol, bile salts, and phospholipids. Many proteins implicated in biliary lipid secretion in the liver are regulated by several transcription factors, including nuclear receptors LXR and FXR. Human and murine genetic, physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological evidence is consistent with the relevance of these nuclear receptors in gallstone formation. In addition, there is emerging data that also suggests a role for estrogen receptor ESR1 in abnormal cholesterol metabolism leading to gallstone disease. A better comprehension of the role of nuclear receptor function in gallstone formation may help to design new and more effective therapeutic strategies for this highly prevalent disease condition.

  17. Multishell structure formation in Ni nanowire under uniaxial strain along <0 0 1> crystallographic direction: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Li, E-mail: wanglihxf@sdu.edu.c [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University at Weihai, 180 Wenhuaxi Road, Weihai 264209 (China); Peng Chuanxiao [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Gong Jianhong [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University at Weihai, 180 Wenhuaxi Road, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based upon embedded-atom-method potential are employed to explore the fracture behavior of Ni nanowire along <0 0 1> crystallographic direction at temperature of 300 K. We find the formation of (5,5) multishell structure (MS), which is transformed from (6,5) MS at the necking region of nanowire under the strain rate of 0.02%ps{sup -1}. A reorientation transformation from <0 0 1> to <1 1 0> is first detected before formation of (6,5) MS. The formed (5,5) MS is more stable and can be tensioned longer as lower strain rate is loaded.

  18. Professional Motivation Formation of Future Specialists under the Conditions of Regional Educational Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargina, Elena Mikhaylovna

    2015-01-01

    Motivation plays the leading role in the organization of the personality structure. It is a driving force of the activity. Motivation accounts for the behavior and activity and has a great impact on professional self-determination and person's satisfaction with the work. The problem of professional motivation formation of a future specialist is…

  19. Forces of Change: Mechanics Underlying Formation of Functional 3D Organ Buds

    OpenAIRE

    Wrighton, Paul J.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    3D organ buds that can recapitulate organ function have myriad applications for regenerative and personalized medicine. Here, Takebe et al. (2015) describe a generalized method for organ bud formation, demonstrating that mechanosensitive mesenchymal stem cells drive condensation of heterotypic cell mixtures to create buds from diverse organs.

  20. Forces of Change: Mechanics Underlying Formation of Functional 3D Organ Buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrighton, Paul J; Kiessling, Laura L

    2015-05-07

    3D organ buds that can recapitulate organ function have myriad applications for regenerative and personalized medicine. Here, Takebe et al. (2015) describe a generalized method for organ bud formation, demonstrating that mechanosensitive mesenchymal stem cells drive condensation of heterotypic cell mixtures to create buds from diverse organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Formation of Ni/C based polyacrylonitrile nanocomposites under IR-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy G. Muratov

    2016-09-01

    By calculating the total Gibbs energy of possible reduction reactions of nickel chloride and oxide pyrolysis PAN products we have shown the possibility of the formation of nanocomposites comprising nickel oxide nanoparticles which can be reduced to zero-valence state at higher temperature IR heating (more than 5000 °C.

  2. Formation and adaptation of memory : Neurobiological mechanisms underlying learning and reversal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, Robbert

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain region that plays a critical role in memory formation. In addition, it has been suggested that this brain region is important for ‘updating’ information that is incorrect or outdated. The main goal of this thesis project was to investigate which neurobiological processes

  3. FORMATION OF PYROMORPHITE IN ANGLESITE-HYDROXYAPATITE SUSPENSIONS UNDER VARYING PH CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of phosphate to lead [Pb(II)] contaminated soil to immobilize soil Pb by formation of pyromorphite has been proposed as an alternative remediation technique. Lead sulfate (PbSO4, anglesite), a Pb-bearing form found in contaminated soils and wastes, was reacted with a sy...

  4. Nanotwin Formation in High-Manganese Austenitic Steels Under Explosive Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadinc, D.; Uzer, B.; Elmadagli, M.; Guner, F.

    2018-04-01

    The micro-deformation mechanisms active in a high-manganese austenitic steel were investigated upon explosive shock loading. Single system of nanotwins forming within primary twins were shown to govern the deformation despite the elevated temperatures attained during testing. The benefits of nanotwin formation for potential armor materials were demonstrated.

  5. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwager, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muller, R. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1981-06-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of and at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer resulting from the reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion or decomposition processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  6. Formation of imines by selective gold-catalysed aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols and amines under ambient conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegnæs, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2010-01-01

    The formation of imines by aerobic oxidative coupling of mixtures of alcohols and amines was studied using gold nanoparticles supported on titanium dioxide, TiO2, as a heterogeneous catalyst. The reactions were performed at ambient conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure) and occurr......-product represents a new green reaction protocol for imine formation.......The formation of imines by aerobic oxidative coupling of mixtures of alcohols and amines was studied using gold nanoparticles supported on titanium dioxide, TiO2, as a heterogeneous catalyst. The reactions were performed at ambient conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure) and occurred...... with excellent selectivity (above 98%) at moderate conversion under optimized conditions. The effect of catalytic amounts of different bases was studied, along with reaction temperature and time. Utilisation of a selective catalyst system that uses dioxygen as an oxidant and only produces water as by...

  7. Nod factor supply under water stress conditions modulates cytokinin biosynthesis and enhances nodule formation and N nutrition in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, Marion; Salon, Christophe; Smith, Donald L; Emery, R J Neil

    2016-09-01

    Nod factors (NF) are molecules produced by rhizobia which are involved in the N 2 -fixing symbiosis with legume plants, enabling the formation of specific organs called nodules. Under drought conditions, nitrogen acquisition by N 2 -fixation is depressed, resulting in low legume productivity. In this study, we evaluated the effects of NF supply on nitrogen acquisition and on cytokinin biosynthesis of soybean plants grown under drought. NF supply to water stressed soybeans increased the CK content of all organs. The profile of CK metabolites also shifted from t-Z to cis-Z and an accumulation of nucleotide and glucoside conjugates. The changes in CK coincided with enhanced nodule formation with sustained nodule specific activity, which ultimately increased the total nitrogen fixed by the plant.

  8. Response Surface Methodology Study on Magnetite Nanoparticle Formation under Hydrothermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Mizutani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a hydrothermal preparation of crystalline magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the influence of the experimental parameters (initial molar ratio of ferrous/ferric ions, initial concentration of ferrous ions, and heating time, and their interactions, on the particle formation was studied using response surface methodology (RSM, based on a statistical design of experiments (DOE. As indices indicating particle formation and crystallization, the variation in the particle diameter and crystallite size with the synthesis conditions was examined. The crystallite size was greatly affected by both the initial ferrous/ ferric ion molar ratio and the heating time, whereas the particle diameter strongly depended on the heating time, and on the interaction between the initial ferrous/ferric ion molar ratio and the initial concentration of ferrous ions. The results from a statistical analysis suggest that the polycrystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticles form via crystal growth and/or thermal aggregation, after nucleation during hydrothermal treatment.

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation and cluster formation at deposition of metals under inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorobets, O. Yu; Gorobets, Yu I.; Rospotniuk, V. P.; Grebinaha, V. I.; Kyba, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The formation and dynamic of expansion and deformation of the liquid-liquid interface of an electrolyte at deposition of metals at the surface of the magnetized steel ball is considered in this paper. The electrochemical processes were investigated in an external magnetic field directed at an arbitrary angle to the force of gravity. These processes are accompanied by the formation of effectively paramagnetic clusters of electrochemical products - magnions. Tyndall effect was used for detection of the presence of magnions near the magnetized steel electrode in a solution. The shape of the interface separating the regions with different concentration of magnions, i.e. different magnetic susceptibilities, was described theoretically based on the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium which takes into account magnetic, hydrostatic and osmotic pressures.

  10. Structural and energetic factors controlling the enantioselectivity of dinucleotide formation under prebiotic conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponer, Judit E.; Mládek, Arnošt; Šponer, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 17 (2013), s. 6235-6242 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/2302 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : APPROXIMATE COULOMB POTENTIALS * PEPTIDE-BOND FORMATION * ZETA VALENCE QUALITY Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.198, year: 2013

  11. Biofilm formation by Salmonella spp. in catfish mucus extract under industrial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhowlaghar, Nitin; De Abrew Abeysundara, Piumi; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, Mark W; Chang, Sam; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Sharma, Chander S

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of strain and temperature on the growth and biofilm formation of Salmonella spp. in high and low concentrations of catfish mucus extract on different food-contact surfaces at 22 °C and 10 °C. The second objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of disinfectants at recommended concentrations and contact times for removing Salmonella biofilms cells on a stainless steel surface containing catfish mucus extract. Growth and biofilm formation of all Salmonella strains increased with higher concentrations of catfish mucus extract at both 10 °C and 22 °C. In 15 μg/ml of catfish mucus extract inoculated with 3 log CFU/ml, the biofilm levels of Salmonella on stainless steel surface reached to 3.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 10 °C or 5.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 22 °C in 7 days. In 375 μg/ml of catfish mucus extract inoculated with 3 log CFU/ml, the biofilm levels of Salmonella on the stainless steel surface reached 4.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 10 °C and 6.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 22 °C in 7 days. No differences were observed between Salmonella strains tested for biofilm formation in catfish mucus extract on the stainless steel surface. The biofilm formation by Salmonella Blockley (7175) in catfish mucus extract was less (P Salmonella biofilm cells were not detectable on the stainless steel surface after treatment with a mixture of disinfectants but were still present when single compound disinfectants were used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y.; Schwager, F.; Muller, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of LiClO/sub 4/ and LiAsF/sub 6/ at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements and other techniques. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer of Li/sub 2/O by reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  13. Rons formation under restrictive reperfusion does not affect organ dysfunction early after hemorrhage and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zifko, Clara; Kozlov, Andrey V; Postl, Astrid; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl

    2010-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathophysiology of early reperfusion. We aimed to determine 1) reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) formation in organs of rats and 2) its pathophysiological relevance during a phase of restrictive reperfusion after hemorrhagic/traumatic shock (HTS). Fifty-seven male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a clinically relevant HTS model, featuring laparotomy, bleeding, and a phase of restrictive reperfusion. The RONS scavenger 1-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (continuous i.v. infusion) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied for RONS (primarily superoxide and peroxynitrite) detection. Compared with sham-operated animals, the organ-specific distribution of RONS changed during restrictive reperfusion after HTS. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation increased during restrictive reperfusion in red blood cells and ileum only but decreased in the kidney and remained unchanged in other organs. Hemorrhagic traumatic shock followed by restrictive reperfusion resulted in metabolic acidosis, dysfunction of liver and kidney, and increased oxidative burst capacity in circulating cells. Plasma RONS correlated with shock severity and organ dysfunction. However, RONS scavenging neither affected organ dysfunction nor oxidative burst capacity nor myeloperoxidase activity in lung when compared with the shock controls. In summary, a phase of restrictive reperfusion does not increase RONS formation in most organs except in intestine and red blood cells. Moreover, scavenging of RONS does not affect the early organ dysfunction manifested at the end of a phase of restrictive reperfusion.

  14. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Qasim, D.; Linnartz, H. [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ioppolo, S. [School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dishoeck, E. F. van, E-mail: gfedo@oact.inaf.it [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-06-10

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CH{sub 2}OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical–radical and radical–molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  15. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Ioppolo, S.; Qasim, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, I.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH2CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  16. Effect of a marginal inclination on pattern formation in a binary liquid mixture under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croccolo, Fabrizio; Scheffold, Frank; Vailati, Alberto

    2013-07-05

    Convective motions in a fluid layer are affected by its orientation with respect to the gravitational field. We investigate the long-term stability of a thermally stressed layer of a binary liquid mixture and show that pattern formation is strongly affected by marginal inclinations as small as a few milliradians. At small Rayleigh numbers, the mass transfer is dominated by the induced large scale shear flow, while at larger Rayleigh numbers, it is dominated by solutal convection. At the transition, the balance between the solutal and shear flows gives rise to drifting columnar flows moving in opposite directions along parallel lanes in a superhighway configuration.

  17. Formation of microspheres under the action of femtosecond laser radiation on titanium samples in hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuev, D. A.; Khorkov, K. S.; Ivashchenko, A. V.; Prokoshev, V. G.; Arakelian, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the original method of laser synthesis of microspheres which contain titanium carbide. The formation of microspheres is carried out by the action of femtosecond laser radiation on the surface of titanium in the reaction medium - the ultimate hydrocarbon. The resulting microspheres have a high surface smoothness, a narrow particle size distribution, an average size of 1-3 μm. They can be used in applications of additive engineering, powder metallurgy as the main raw material, or as an alloying additive.

  18. Anisotropy effect of crater formation on single crystal silicon surface under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Shahid, Ijaz; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yan, Sha; Le, Xiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Due to the induced extremely fast thermal and dynamic process, Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB) is widely applied in material processing, which can bring enhanced material performance and surface craters as well. To investigate the craters' formation mechanism, a specific model was built with Finite Element Methods (FEM) to simulate the thermal field on irradiated single crystal silicon. The direct evidence for the existence of the simulated 6-fold rotational symmetric thermal distribution was provided by electron microscope images obtained on single crystal silicon. The correlation of the experiment and simulation is of great importance to understand the interaction between IPIB and materials.

  19. Crack initiation and potential hot-spot formation around a cylindrical defect under dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Li, Xinguo; Zheng, Xianxu; Li, Kewu; Hu, Qiushi; Li, Jianling

    2017-11-01

    In recent decades, the hot-spot theory of condensed-phase explosives has been a compelling focus of scientific investigation attracting many researchers. The defect in the polymeric binder of the polymer-bonded explosive is called the intergranular defect. In this study, the real polymeric binder was substituted by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as it is transparent and has similar thermodynamic properties to some binders. A set of modified split Hopkinson pressure bars equipped with a time-resolved shadowgraph was used to study the process of crack initiation and potential hot-spot formation around a cylindrical defect in PMMA. The new and significant phenomenon that the opening-mode crack emerged earlier than the shearing-mode crack from the cylindrical defect has been published for the first time in this paper. Furthermore, a two-dimensional numerical simulation was performed to show the evolution of both the stress field and the temperature field. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experiment. Finally, the law of potential hot-spot formation is discussed in detail.

  20. In situ diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, N.; Madsen, I.; Loan, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Bayer process is used to extract alumina (A I 203) from bauxite ore. The efficiency of the proc severely compromised by the build-up of insoluble species (scale) on the surfaces of mild process equipment, which impedes the material flow through, and heat transfer to, the pr streams [1]. In precipitation areas operating at 60-8 C gibbsite, AI(OHh, scales predominate the spent liquor heaters which typically operate at 150-250 0 C, sodalite and cancrinite-type s aluminosilicate scales are formed (1). An improved understanding of the scale formation mechanism may lead to the development of a practical and economic method for scale prevention. Characterisation of the structure, composition and crystallographic orientation of phases present early stages of formation is crucial for this understanding, making x-ray and neutron diffraction important analytical techniques. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed Australian Synchrotron during AI(OHh deposition on mild steel substrates using a purpose built stainless steel flow cell (3). The high resolution data enabled identification of three polymors AI(OH)3 (gibbsite, bayerite and nordtsrandite) in the deposited material, each displaying ori growth along (001). Additional in situ synchrotron XRD experiments, where AI(OH)3 precipitatiol 'seeded' with various iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, have also been performed and some ' results will be discussed. Similar neutron diffraction experiments on Wombat are planned investigations of seeded aluminosilicate precipitation at 150-250 0 C using an Inconel hydrothermal cell.

  1. Deactivating Carbon Formation on a Ni/Al2O3 Catalyst under Methanation Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sine Ellemann; Andersson, Klas J.; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2017-01-01

    The carbon formation causing deactivation during CO methanation was studied for a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Sulfur-free methanation at low temperature (573 K) for various lengths of time was followed by temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH) providing information on carbon types involved in the deac......The carbon formation causing deactivation during CO methanation was studied for a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Sulfur-free methanation at low temperature (573 K) for various lengths of time was followed by temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH) providing information on carbon types involved...... in the deactivation of the catalyst.Three main carbon hydrogenation peaks were evident from TPHs following methanation: ∼460, ∼650, and ∼775 K. It is suggested that the ∼460 K TPH peak was composed of two peaks: a surface carbide peak at 445–460 K, and a peak due to carbon dissolved into the nickel at 485 K based...... on CO and CH4 adsorption measurements and XRD analysis. The 650 and 775 K temperature peaks are assigned to polymerized carbon structures and the ∼775K peak was found to be the primary cause of deactivation as judged by a linear correlation between its amount and the degree of catalyst deactivation...

  2. Dynamics of Plug Formation in a Circular Cylinder Under Low Bond Number Conditions: Experiment and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaby, Ghazi; Kizito, John P.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the current study is to investigate the dynamics of two phase interface under a low Bond number condition. Silicone oil is injected into a cylinder under a Bond number of about 0.47 via a side tube forming a T-junction with the former. The time evolution of the interface of silicon oil in a cylinder is captured using a high speed camera. The volume at which the plug is formed is then determined using an image processing tool to analyze the captured images. A numerical simulation is carried out where fluid is injected into a cylinder, under a less than unity Bond number condition, via a side tube. Numerical and experimental results are then compared.

  3. Formation and Characterization of TiO2/CNT Nanomaterials Dried under Supergravity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Vargas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The elaboration of bilayer TiO2/CNT films dried under terrestrial gravity conditions (g and on a centrifuge with 1.3g and 7g is reported. The changes in microstructure and thickness of these coatings under supergravity environment cause a red-shift tendency in the optical properties at increasing values of acceleration. Experiments of a drop under enhanced gravity force in the range of 3.7 < Bo (bond number < 51.5 suggest the incomplete elimination of surfactant-water molecules in the TiO2/CNT bilayer film. Increasing acceleration up to 14g will widen the optical differences found, proving the layer-by-layer solution-chemical method in combination with these drying protocols, an alternative to produce thickness-sensitive solar-selective absorbing coatings.

  4. Standard format and content of financial assurance mechanisms required for decommissioning under 10 CFR parts 30, 40, 70, and 72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established technical and financial regulations for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities (53 FR 24018, June 27, 1988). The regulations address decommissioning planning needs, timing, funding methods, and environmental review requirements for public and private facilities holding licenses under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 50, 70, and 72, with the exception of uranium mills. The intent of the regulations is to ensure that the decommissioning of all licensed facilities will be accomplished in a safe and timely manner and that licensees will provide adequate funds to cover all costs associated with decommissioning. The purpose of this regulatory guide, ''Standard Format and Content of Financial Assurance Mechanisms Required for Decommissioning Under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72,'' is to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be provided for establishing financial assurance for decommissioning and to establish a standard format for presenting the information. Use of the standard format will (1) help ensure that the financial instruments contain the information required by 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72, (2) aid the applicant and NRC staff in ensuring that the information is complete, and (3) help persons reading the financial instruments to locate information. 5 refs., 13 figs

  5. The thermodynamics of molecular cloud fragmentation : Star formation under non-Milky Way conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hocuk, S.; Spaans, M.

    Context. Properties of candidate stars, forming out of molecular clouds, depend on the ambient conditions of the parent cloud. We present a series of 2D and 3D simulations of fragmentation of molecular clouds in starburst regions, as well as of clouds under conditions in dwarf galaxies, leading to

  6. Effective Strategy Formation Models for Inventory Management under the Conditions of Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosorukov, Oleg Anatolyevich; Sviridova, Olga Alexandrovna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of modeling the commodity flows management of a trading company under the conditions of uncertain demand and long supply. The Author presents an analysis of modifications of diversified inventory management system with random demand, for which one can find the optimal inventory control strategies, including those…

  7. Monitoring of biofilm formation and activity in drinking water distribution networks under oligotrophic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Martiny, Adam Camillo; Arvin, Erik

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the construction a model distribution system suitable for studies of attached and suspended microbial activity in drinking water under controlled circumstances is outlined. The model system consisted of two loops connected in series with a total of 140 biofilm sampling points...

  8. Thin block copolymer films : film formation and corrugation under the AFM tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Fleer, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    The tip of an atomic force microscope was used to induce nanoscale ordering in thin films of polystyrene-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) block copolymers under low force. The AFM tip produces rims on a mesoscopic scale oriented perpendicularly to the scanning direction. A wide range of molecular weights of

  9. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone- immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria....... The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a sudden lack of oxygen. In contrast, nitrate-respiring, fermenting bacteria, e.g., Bacillus and Escherichia...... spp, formed microcolonies under anaerobic conditions with or without the presence of nitrate and irrespective of aerobic or anaerobic preculture conditions....

  10. Formation of Biogenic Amines in Chicken Meat Stored under Modified Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Gallas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of two modified atmospheres with a different combination of gases on selected groups of microorganisms and on concentrations of biogenic amines (BAs in samples of poultry breast muscle. The samples were packaged under modified atmosphere A (75% O2 a 25% CO2 or B (75% N2 and 25% CO2 and stored at temperatures from +2 to +4 °C for 14 days. During the storage period, O2 concentrations in modified atmosphere A (MA A decreased from the initial 74.8 ± 0.3% to 55.9 ± 6.6% at the end of the storage period. In all samples, counts of psychrotrophic bacteria counts, Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria and coliform microorganism were determined. The tests were made on the packaging day, and then after three, nine and fourteen days of storage. At the end of the storage period, higher numbers of psychrotrophic bacteria (6.5 ± 0.7 log10 cfu g-1, Brochothrix thermosphacta (4.8 ± 0.3 log10 cfu g-1 and lactic acid bacteria (1.7 ± 0.4 log10 cfu g-1 were found on samples packaged under MA A. Samples packaged under modified atmosphere B on the other hand contained higher numbers of coliform bacteria (4.1 ± 0.6 log10 cfu g-1 at the end of the storage period. In addition to microbiological indicators, concentrations of biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine, spermidine and β-phenylethylamine were also determined. In fresh samples and after three days of storage, only spermine and spermidine were found. After 9 and 14 days, also other BAs were detected. The biogenic amine totals at the end of the storage period was 60.0 ± 13.2 mg kg-1 in samples packaged under MA A and 129.0 ± 41.3 mg kg-1 in samples packaged under MA B. The most abundantly represented biogenic amines in samples packaged under MA A were putrescine and spermine (49.7 and 24.8%, respectively, at the end of the storage period, and putrescine and cadaverine in samples packaged under MA B (47.0 and 32

  11. A Model of Digital Payment Infrastructure Formation and Development Under a Emerging SEPA Regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staykova, Kalina; Damsgaard, Jan

    The Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA) is probably the most ambitious self-regulatory project aimed at creating a single integrated European digital payments market since the introduction of the Euro. SEPA aims to make EU more innovative and competitive. When considering the SEPA initiative...... and combining it with the disruptive and innovative nature the mobile phone permeates, the result is a market that is rapidly transforming from well-established into a state of flux. We build a model to understand and explain this transformation of the digital payment infrastructure. The model captures...... the formation and development of digital payment infrastructure with a particular emphasis on the regulator´s perspective. It consists of four stages characterized by slow incremental change following by short rapid bursts of discontinuity. Each stage is portrayed by its evolutionary dynamics, the nature...

  12. Surface modification and droplet formation of tungsten under hot plasma irradiation at the GOL-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Bataev, I. A.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Ivantsivsky, M. V.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Shoshin, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of tungsten surface modification after plasma loads at the multimirror trap GOL-3. Energy loads on tungsten surface varied from 2 up to 4 MJ/m2 per shot with sets from 1 to 9 repetitive irradiations that corresponds to loads higher than tungsten melting threshold and is close to ITER giant ELM loads. Targets surface modification and transverse microsections after irradiation was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and hardness tester. Formation on tungsten surface of three different crack networks with typical cell sizes of 1000, 10 and 0.3 μm and bubbles are identified. The network of large cracks extend perpendicularly to the irradiated sample surface to a depth of 50-350 μm. Erosion depth depends on energy loads - rises from 20 to 200 μm at 2 and 4 MJ/m2 correspondingly. Cracking, development of tungsten surface morphology and droplets splashing are discussed.

  13. Surface modification and droplet formation of tungsten under hot plasma irradiation at the GOL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Bataev, V.A.; Bataev, I.A.; Burdakov, A.V.; Ivanov, I.A.; Ivantsivsky, M.V.; Kuklin, K.N.; Mekler, K.I.; Rovenskikh, A.F.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Postupaev, V.V.; Sinitsky, S.L.; Shoshin, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of tungsten surface modification after plasma loads at the multimirror trap GOL-3. Energy loads on tungsten surface varied from 2 up to 4 MJ/m 2 per shot with sets from 1 to 9 repetitive irradiations that corresponds to loads higher than tungsten melting threshold and is close to ITER giant ELM loads. Targets surface modification and transverse microsections after irradiation was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and hardness tester. Formation on tungsten surface of three different crack networks with typical cell sizes of 1000, 10 and 0.3 μm and bubbles are identified. The network of large cracks extend perpendicularly to the irradiated sample surface to a depth of 50–350 μm. Erosion depth depends on energy loads – rises from 20 to 200 μm at 2 and 4 MJ/m 2 correspondingly. Cracking, development of tungsten surface morphology and droplets splashing are discussed

  14. Microstructure formation features of the V-4Ti-4Cr alloy under severe plastic deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditenberg, I.; Tyumentsev, A.; Pinzhin, Y.P.; Potapenko, M.M.; Korotaev, A.D.; Chernov, V.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure formed under severe deformations (ε≥93%) in V-4Ti-4Cr alloys rolled at room temperature. Micro-band nano-structured states and high-energy defect substructures have been detected that feature a high curvature (up to x ij ≅ 20 deg. μm -1 ) of the crystal lattice, a high density (δΘ/δr ≥ 20 deg. μm -1 ) of partial disclinations at the micro-band boundaries, and local internal stresses reaching σ ≅ E/30 (E being Young's modulus). It has been shown that important features of the micro-band structure are the prevailing reorientation of the micro-bands around type directions and the high density of large angle boundaries with reorientation vectors Θ = (50-60) deg. . It has been supposed that these features result from the plastic deformation and reorientation of the crystal lattice through mechanisms of local martensitic type reversible transformations (direct plus reverse transformations accompanied by a change of the reverse transformation system) in fields of high local stresses. The most important factors involved in the new deformation mechanism and the prerequisites to its realization are discussed, namely, the degree of phase instability of the material, the intensity of local internal stresses, and the possibility of the relaxation of these stresses by ordinary plastic flow mechanisms. Theoretical analysis of the atomic mechanisms and distortions of the above transformations has shown that the most important features of the carriers of this deformation mode are the absence of any effective obstacles, under severe deformations included, and the possibility of the high-defect structural states formed under these conditions to intensely relax. It is supposed that the combined effect of these two factors underlies the phenomenon of ultrahigh technological plasticity of the alloys under investigation: very high (practically unlimited) plastic

  15. Formation and deposition of platinum nanoparticles under boiling water reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundler, Pascal V.; Veleva, Lyubomira; Ritter, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a well-known degradation mechanism for components of boiling water reactors (BWRs). Therefore the mitigation of SCC is important for ensuring the integrity of the reactor system. Noble metal chemical application (NMCA) has been developed by General Electric to mitigate SCC and reduce the negative side-effects of hydrogen water chemistry used initially for SCC mitigation. NMCA is now widely applied as an online process (OLNC) during power operation. However, the understanding of the parameters that control the formation and deposition of the noble metal (Pt) particles in a BWR was still incomplete. To fill this knowledge gap, systematic studies on the formation and deposition behaviour of Pt particles in simulated and real BWR environment were performed in the framework of a research project at PSI. The present paper summarizes the most important findings. Experiments in a sophisticated high-temperature water loop revealed that the flow conditions, water chemistry, the Pt injection rate, and the pre-conditioning of the stainless steel surfaces have an impact on the Pt deposition behaviour. Slower Pt injection rates and stoichiometric excess of H2 over O2 produce smaller particles, which may increase the efficiency of the OLNC technique in mitigating SCC. Surfaces with a well-developed oxide layer retain more Pt particles. Furthermore, the pre- and post-OLNC exposure times play an important role for the Pt deposition on specimens exposed at the KKL power plant. Redistribution of Pt in the plant takes place, but most of the Pt apparently does not redeposit on the steel surfaces in the reactor system. Comparison of lab and plant results also demonstrated that plant OLNC applications can be simulated reasonably well on the lab scale.

  16. Mechanisms underlying reductant-induced reactive oxygen species formation by anticancer copper(II) compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kowol, Christian R.; Heffeter, Petra; Miklos, Walter; Gille, Lars; Trondl, Robert; Cappellacci, Loredana; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via thiol-mediated reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) has been assumed as the major mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer potential of copper(II) complexes of Triapine (3-amino-pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone; currently in phase II clinical trials) and its terminally dimethylated derivative with that of 2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone a...

  17. STRATEGIC ENERGY SECURITY OUTLOOK FORMATION OF UKRAINE UNDER EUROPEAN INTEGRATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Voynarenko, Mykhaylo Petrovych; Mykolyuk, Oksana Anatoliyivna

    2017-01-01

    Urgency of the research. Energy security affects the competitiveness of national production in the world markets and the competitiveness of the national economy under globalization. Target setting. Implementation of existing potential requires a deep reform of the regulatory and legal framework and the requirements of international agreements in full. Actual scientific researches and issues analysis. Some aspects of energy security in terms of European integration exploring Barannik V., V. Ge...

  18. Formation and dimensions of marketing culture under the contemporary conditions of competition

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanskienė, Rūta; Žostautienė, Daiva

    2002-01-01

    Companies seeking to retain their position in the market are in search for competitive advantages. Alas, under contemporary conditions only traditional advantages are not sufficient; such as price, nicer or more convenient package, as competitors rapidly emulate such advantages. The advantages that would not be immediately emulated and the consumer could evaluate them as an exclusive attribute of the company’s activities are necessary nowadays. Such advantages may be provided by marketing cul...

  19. Laboratory Experiments to Simulate and Investigate the Physics Underlying the Dynamics of Merging Solar Corona Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-05

    described analytic Grad-Shafranov toroidal equilibria where the pressure on the magnetic axis is lower than the pres- sure external to the toroid so...2015. Magnetic axis safety factor of finite beta spheromaks and transition from spheromaks to toroidal magnetic bubbles. Physics of Plasmas, 22(2...Paccagnella, Roberto. 2015. Magnetic axis safety factor of finite beta spheromaks and transition from spheromaks to toroidal magnetic bubbles

  20. Formation and coalescence of nanobubbles under controlled gas concentration and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenliang; Zhang, A.-Man; Wang, Shiping; Cui, Pu

    2018-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effects of gas concentration and species on the coalescence and growth of nanobubbles were systematically investigated. With increasing gas concentration, not only surface nanobubbles but also bulk nanobubbles are formed. The bulk nanobubble in water is less explored so far. Here, its coalescence, stability, movement trajectory and velocity are discussed. A comparison of the motion and coalescence of the bulk nanobubble to the surface nanobubble, directly demonstrates that the three-phase contact line plays a crucial role for surface nanobubble stability. Compared with the bubble size, the distance between surface nanobubbles is a more important factor to decide the merging order among three nanobubbles. The study also shows that three factors including the oversaturated gas concentration, the distance between surface nanobubbles, and the stronger solid-gas interactions influence the formation of the gas-enrichment layer at the solid-liquid interface. The result has an important significance to enhancing the boundary slip due to the presence of nanobubbles.

  1. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster. (paper)

  2. Effect of soil invertebrates on the formation of humic substances under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouz, J.; Li, X.; Brune, A.; Pizl, V.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2011-08-01

    The complete polymerization of phenols and proteins (one of the processes involved in the formation of humic substances) was explained. It was shown that fly ( Bibio marci) larvae and earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa) participate in the complete polymerization of phenols and proteins. In a laboratory experiment, invertebrates participated in the degradation of organic matter and the synthesis of humic substances, which was proved in experiments with 14C-labeled phenols and proteins. The same organic substances (phenols and proteins) without the impact of invertebrates were used as the control substances. The distributions of the 14C isotope in alkaline extracts separated by solubility in acids (humic and fulvic acids) was compared to those of the control substances. The portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids in the excrements of Bibio marci was higher than that in the control substances. The content of 14C-labeled humic substances in the excrements of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa exceeded the control values only in the experiment with proteins. When clay material was added to the organic substances, the portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids increased in both experiments with phenols and proteins. When these substrates passed through the digestive tracts of the invertebrates, the polymerization of organic substances and the inclusion of proteins and phenols into humic acids occurred.

  3. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d f . An important gauge is metal heating depth d T at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d f < d T (thin film) and d f ≫ d T (bulk target). Radius R L of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d f ) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d f < d T on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R L in the range from diffraction limit R L ∼ λ to high values of R L ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d f < d T , R L ∼ λ, and F abs > F m , gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F abs and F m are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed

  4. Still under the ancestors' shadow? Ancestor worship and family formation in contemporary China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anning Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ancestor worship in China used to be an indispensable component of marriage and family life because it fostered an orientation toward perpetuating the family line. However, whether or not ancestor worship still matters in contemporary China is an open question. Objective: This article presents a comprehensive study of the association between ancestor worship practices and 1 the timing of transition to first marriage, 2 the pattern of childbearing, and 3 the orientation toward son preference. Methods: Drawing on the adult sample from the Chinese Family Panel Studies 2010, several multivariate models (Cox proportional hazard model, probit regression model, negative binomial regression models, and ordered probit model were fitted, corresponding to different types of outcome. Results: All else being equal, involvement in ancestor worship practices is correlated with 1 an early transition to marriage, 2 a larger number of children, 3 a higher probability of having at least one son, and 4 a larger number of sons. Conclusions: The relevance of the kinship tradition to family formation persists in contemporary China and has not faded away. Contribution: By highlighting the demographic implications of ancestor worship, this study illustrates the ongoing connection between culture and demography.

  5. Final Technical Report - ''Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul M. Bellan

    2005-01-01

    This research program involved direct observation of the complicated plasma dynamics underlying spheromak formation. Spheromaks are self-organizing magnetically dominated plasma configurations which potentially offer a simple, low-cost means for confining the plasma in a controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor. The spheromak source used in these studies was a coaxial co-planar magnetized plasma gun which was specifically designed to have the simplest relevant geometry. The simplicity of the geometry facilitated understanding of the basic physics and minimized confusion that would otherwise have resulted from complexities due to the experimental geometry. The coaxial plasma gun was mounted on one end of a large vacuum tank that had excellent optical access so the spheromak formation process could be tracked in detail using ultra-high speed cameras. The main accomplishments of this research program were (1) obtaining experimental data characterizing the detailed physics underlying spheromak formation and the development of new theoretical models motivated by these observations, (2) determining the relationship between spheromak physics and astrophysical jets, (3) developing a new high-speed camera diagnostic for the SSPX spheromak at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and (4) training graduate students and postdoctoral fellows

  6. Spherical particles formation under biaxial cyclic loading due to mesotunneling effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shanyavskiy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue fracture surfaces of Al-based alloys with fatigue striations pattern and such wear debris pattern as spherical particles were investigated fractographically, on the bases of the OG’e spectroscopic analysis. The sequence of events during fatigue crack edges opening was discovered when the elliptical or spherical shapes of wear debris build up on the fracture surface in crosspieces between mesotunnels under mode III of mode I fatigue crack opening because of volume rotation. The cause of black colour of places with fretting patterns on the fracture surfaces of Al-based alloys is discussed.

  7. New measurements on water ice photodesorption and product formation under ultraviolet irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Martín-Doménech, Rafael; Moreno, Elena; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Chen, Yu-Jung

    2018-03-01

    The photodesorption of icy grain mantles has been claimed to be responsible for the abundance of gas-phase molecules towards cold regions. Being water a ubiquitous molecule, it is crucial to understand its role in photochemistry and its behaviour under an ultraviolet field. We report new measurements on the ultraviolet (UV) photodesorption of water ice and its H2, OH, and O2 photoproducts using a calibrated quadrupole mass spectrometer. Solid water was deposited under ultra-high-vacuum conditions and then UV-irradiated at various temperatures starting from 8 K with a microwave discharged hydrogen lamp. Deuterated water was used for confirmation of the results. We found a photodesorption yield of 1.3 × 10-3 molecules per incident photon for water and 0.7 × 10-3 molecules per incident photon for deuterated water at the lowest irradiation temperature, 8 K. The photodesorption yield per absorbed photon is given and comparison with astrophysical scenarios, where water ice photodesorption could account for the presence of gas-phase water towards cold regions in the absence of a thermal desorption process, is addressed.

  8. A model of disordered zone formation in Cu3Au under cascade-producing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapinos, V.G.; Bacon, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A model to describe the disordering of ordered Cu 3 Au under irradiation is proposed. For the thermal spike phase of a displacement cascade, the processes of heat evolution and conduction in the cascade region are modelled by solving the thermal conduction equation by a discretization method for a medium that can melt and solidify under appropriate conditions. The model considers disordering to result from cascade core melting, with the final disordered zone corresponding to the largest molten zone achieved. The initial conditions for this treatment are obtained by simulation of cascades by the MARLOWE code. The contrast of disordered zones imaged in a superlattice dark-field reflection and projected on the plane parallel to the surface of a thin foil was calculated. The average size of images from hundreds of cascades created by incident Cu + ions were calculated for different ion energies and compared with experimental transmission electron microscopy data. The model is in reasonable quantitative agreement with the experimentally observed trends. (author)

  9. Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozza, R.; Vanossi, A.; Benassi, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical charging of parallel plates confining a model ionic liquid down to nanoscale distances yields a variety of charge-induced changes in the structural features of the confined film. That includes even-odd switching of the structural layering and charging-induced solidification and melting, with important changes of local ordering between and within layers, and of squeezout behavior. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore this variety of phenomena in the simplest charged Lennard-Jones coarse-grained model including or excluding the effect a neutral tail giving an anisotropic shape to one of the model ions. Using these models and open conditions permitting the flow of ions in and out of the interplate gap, we simulate the liquid squeezout to obtain the distance dependent structure and forces between the plates during their adiabatic approach under load. Simulations at fixed applied force illustrate an effective electrical pumping of the ionic liquid, from a thick nearly solid film that withstands the interplate pressure for high plate charge to complete squeezout following melting near zero charge. Effective enthalpy curves obtained by integration of interplate forces versus distance show the local minima that correspond to layering and predict the switching between one minimum and another under squeezing and charging.

  10. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB112 Promotes Anthocyanin Formation during Salinity and under High Light Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkowska, Magda E; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Xue, Gang-Ping; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    MYB transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. Here, we report MYB112 as a formerly unknown regulator of anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Expression profiling after chemically induced overexpression of MYB112 identified 28 up- and 28 down-regulated genes 5 h after inducer treatment, including MYB7 and MYB32, which are both induced. In addition, upon extended induction, MYB112 also positively affects the expression of PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1, a key TF of anthocyanin biosynthesis, but acts negatively toward MYB12 and MYB111, which both control flavonol biosynthesis. MYB112 binds to an 8-bp DNA fragment containing the core sequence (A/T/G)(A/C)CC(A/T)(A/G/T)(A/C)(T/C). By electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that MYB112 binds in vitro and in vivo to MYB7 and MYB32 promoters, revealing them as direct downstream target genes. We further show that MYB112 expression is up-regulated by salinity and high light stress, environmental parameters that both require the MYB112 TF for anthocyanin accumulation under these stresses. In contrast to several other MYB TFs affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis, MYB112 expression is not controlled by nitrogen limitation or an excess of carbon. Thus, MYB112 constitutes a regulator that promotes anthocyanin accumulation under abiotic stress conditions. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  12. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inogamov, N. A., E-mail: nailinogamov@googlemail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V. V. [Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d{sub f}. An important gauge is metal heating depth d{sub T} at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d{sub f} < d{sub T} (thin film) and d{sub f} ≫ d{sub T} (bulk target). Radius R{sub L} of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d{sub f}) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d{sub f} < d{sub T} on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R{sub L} in the range from diffraction limit R{sub L} ∼ λ to high values of R{sub L} ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d{sub f} < d{sub T}, R{sub L} ∼ λ, and F{sub abs} > F{sub m}, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F{sub abs} and F{sub m} are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  13. Response of Xylella fastidiosa to zinc: decreased culturability, increased exopolysaccharide production, and formation of resilient biofilms under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa produces biofilm that accumulates in the host xylem vessels, affecting disease development in various crops and bacterial acquisition by insect vectors. Biofilms are sensitive to the chemical composition of the environment, and mineral elements being transported in the xylem are of special interest for this pathosystem. Here, X. fastidiosa liquid cultures were supplemented with zinc and compared with nonamended cultures to determine the effects of Zn on growth, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production under batch and flow culture conditions. The results show that Zn reduces growth and biofilm production under both conditions. However, in microfluidic chambers under liquid flow and with constant bacterial supplementation (closer to conditions inside the host), a dramatic increase in biofilm aggregates was seen in the Zn-amended medium. Biofilms formed under these conditions were strongly attached to surfaces and were not removed by medium flow. This phenomenon was correlated with increased EPS production in stationary-phase cells grown under high Zn concentrations. Zn did not cause greater adhesion to surfaces by individual cells. Additionally, viability analyses suggest that X. fastidiosa may be able to enter the viable but nonculturable state in vitro, and Zn can hasten the onset of this state. Together, these findings suggest that Zn can act as a stress factor with pleiotropic effects on X. fastidiosa and indicate that, although Zn could be used as a bactericide treatment, it could trigger the undesired effect of stronger biofilm formation upon reinoculation events.

  14. Simulation of Patterned Glass Film Formation in the Evaporating Colloidal Liquid under IR Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolegov, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    The paper theoretically studies the method of evaporative lithography in combination with external infrared heating. This method makes it possible to form solid microstructures of the required relief shape as a result of evaporation of the liquid film of the colloidal solution under the mask. The heated particles are sintered easier, so there are no cracks in the obtained structure, unlike the structure obtained employing the standard method of evaporative lithography. The paper puts forward a modification of the mathematical model which allows to describe not only heat and mass transfer at the initial stage of the process, but also the phase transition of colloidal solution into glass. Aqueous latex is taken as an example. The resulting final form of solid film is in good agreement with the experimental data of other authors.

  15. On the number of neurons and time scale of integration underlying the formation of percepts in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrer, Adrien; Machens, Christian K

    2015-03-01

    All of our perceptual experiences arise from the activity of neural populations. Here we study the formation of such percepts under the assumption that they emerge from a linear readout, i.e., a weighted sum of the neurons' firing rates. We show that this assumption constrains the trial-to-trial covariance structure of neural activities and animal behavior. The predicted covariance structure depends on the readout parameters, and in particular on the temporal integration window w and typical number of neurons K used in the formation of the percept. Using these predictions, we show how to infer the readout parameters from joint measurements of a subject's behavior and neural activities. We consider three such scenarios: (1) recordings from the complete neural population, (2) recordings of neuronal sub-ensembles whose size exceeds K, and (3) recordings of neuronal sub-ensembles that are smaller than K. Using theoretical arguments and artificially generated data, we show that the first two scenarios allow us to recover the typical spatial and temporal scales of the readout. In the third scenario, we show that the readout parameters can only be recovered by making additional assumptions about the structure of the full population activity. Our work provides the first thorough interpretation of (feed-forward) percept formation from a population of sensory neurons. We discuss applications to experimental recordings in classic sensory decision-making tasks, which will hopefully provide new insights into the nature of perceptual integration.

  16. Formation of Frenkel pairs and diffusion of self-interstitial in Si under normal and hydrostatic pressure: Quantumchemical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusakov, Vasilii; Belko, Victor; Dorozhkin, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical modeling of the formation of Frenkel pairs and the diffusion of a self-interstitial atom in silicon crystals at normal and high (hydrostatic) pressures has been performed using quantum-chemical (NDDO-PM5), methods. It is shown that, in a silicon crystal, the most stable configuration of a self-interstitial atom in the neutral charge state (I 0 ) is the split configuration . The tetrahedral configuration is not stable, an interstitial atom being shifted from T position in a new position T 1 on a distance Δd=0.2 A. The hexagonal configuration is not stable in NDDO approximation. The split interstitial configuration remains the more stable configuration under hydrostatic pressure (P a ( →T 1 )=0.59 eV, E a (T 1 →neighboring T 1 )=0.1 eV and E a (T 1 → )=0.23 eV. The hydrostatic pressure (P<80 kbar) increases the activation barrier for diffusion of self-interstitial atoms in silicon crystals. The energies of the formation of a separate Frenkel pair, a self-interstitial atom, and a vacancy are determined. It is demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure decreases the energy of the formation of Frenkel pairs.

  17. Experimental Behavior of Sulfur Under Primitive Planetary Differentiation Processes, the Sulfide Formations in Enstatite Meteorites and Implications for Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavergne, V.; Brunet, F.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Avril, C.; Borensztajn, S.; Berthet, S.

    2012-01-01

    Enstatite meteorites are the most reduced naturally-occuring materials of the solar system. The cubic monosulfide series with the general formula (Mg,Mn,Ca,Fe)S are common phases in these meteorite groups. The importance of such minerals, their formation, composition and textural relationships for understanding the genesis of enstatite chondrites (EC) and aubrites, has long been recognized (e.g. [1]). However, the mechanisms of formation of these sulfides is still not well constrained certainly because of possible multiple ways to produce them. We propose to simulate different models of formation in order to check their mineralogical, chemical and textural relevancies. The solubility of sulfur in silicate melts is of primary interest for planetary mantles, particularly for the Earth and Mercury. Indeed, these two planets could have formed, at least partly, from EC materials (e.g. [2, 3, 4]). The sulfur content in silicate melts depends on the melt composition but also on pressure (P), temperature (T) and oxygen fugacity fO2. Unfortunately, there is no model of general validity in a wide range of P-T-fO2-composition which describes precisely the evolution of sulfur content in silicate melts, even if the main trends are now known. The second goal of this study is to constrain the sulfur content in silicate melts under reducing conditions and different temperatures.

  18. Mechanisms for the Formations of the Thymine Under Astrophysical Conditions and Implications for the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleobases are the carriers of the genetic information in ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for all life on Earth. Their presence in meteorites clearly indicates that compounds of biological importance can form via non-biological processes in extraterrestrial environments. Recent experimental studies have shown that the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil and cytosine can be easily formed from the ultraviolet irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ice mixtures that simulate astrophysical processes. In contrast, thymine, which is found only in DNA, is more difficult to form under the same experimental conditions, as its formation usually requires a higher photon dose. Earlier quantum chemical studies confirmed that the reaction pathways were favorable provided that several H2O molecules surrounded the reactants. However, the present quantum chemical study shows that the formation of thymine is limited because of the inefficiency of the methylation of pyrimidine and its oxidized derivatives in an H2O ice, as supported by the laboratory studies. Our results constrain the formation of thymine in astrophysical environments and thus the inventory of organic molecules delivered to the early Earth and have implications for the role of thymine and DNA in the origin of life.

  19. Induced leaf intercellular CO₂, photosynthesis, potassium and nitrate retention and strawberry early fruit formation under macronutrient limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Li, Tingxian; Fu, Gang; Katulanda, Panchali

    2013-07-01

    Relationships between induced high leaf intercellular CO₂ concentrations, leaf K⁺ and NO₃⁻ ion movement and early fruit formation under macronutrient limitation are not well understood. We examined the effects and interactions of reduced K/N input treatments on leaf intercellular CO₂, photosynthesis rate, carboxylation and water use efficiency, berry formation as well as leaf/fruit K⁺, NO₃⁻ and photosynthate retention of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) to enhance low-input agriculture. The field study was conducted in Nova Scotia, eastern Canada during 2009-2010. The experimental treatments consisted of five K₂O rates (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 kg ha(-1)) and five N rates (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kg ha(-1)), representing respectively, 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of regular macronutrient recommendations based on the soil testing. The treatments were arranged in a split-plot design with three blocks in the field. The cultivar was 'Mira', a June-bearing crop. The results showed that strawberry plants treated with 25 %-reduced inputs could induce significantly higher leaf intercellular CO₂ concentrations to improve plant photosynthesis, carboxylation and water use efficiency and translocation of leaf/fruit K⁺ and dissolved solids, which could advance berry formation by 6 days and produce significantly higher marketable yields (P < 0.05). Higher leaf intercellular CO₂ inhibited leaf/fruit NO₃⁻ ion retention, but this inhibition did not occur in leaf/fruit K⁺ retention. Linear interactions of the K/N treatments were significant on fruit marketable yields, intercellular CO₂, net photosynthesis, leaf transpiration rates, and leaf temperatures (P < 0.05). It was concluded that higher leaf CO₂ could enhance plant photosynthesis, promote plant carboxylation and water use efficiency, and advance berry formation, but it could inhibit leaf NO₃⁻ retention. This inhibition did not find in leaf K⁺ ion and dissolved solid retention. Overlay co

  20. Numerical Study of Field-reversed Configurations: The Formation and Ion Spin-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, E.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Cothran, C.D.; Brown, M.R.; Schaffer, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs, and the new FRC formation method by counter-helicity spheromak merging. Kinetic simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode, where n is the toroidal mode number. The n = 2 and n = 3 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to the ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. The ion toroidal spin-up is shown to be related to the resistive decay of the internal flux, and the resulting loss of particle confinement. Three-dimensional MHD simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging and FRC formation show good qualitative agreement with results from the SSX-FRC experiment. The simulations show formation of an FRC in about 20-30 Alfven times for typical experimental parameters. The growth rate of the n = 1 tilt mode is shown to be significantly reduced compared to the MHD growth rate due to the large plasma viscosity and field-line-tying effects

  1. Influence of Implant Neck Design on Bone Formation Under Mechanical Repetitive Loading: Histomorphometric and Microcomputed Tomographic Studies in Rabbit Tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Munenori; Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Ishimoto, Takuya; Nakano, Takayoshi; Sawase, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of implant neck design on the original concept of osseointegration and bone formation when applying mechanical repetitive loading by bone-integrated implants. Twenty-eight anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with +60° or -60° grooves in the implant neck were placed in the proximal tibial metaphysis of 14 rabbits. Fourteen implants received mechanical repetitive loading along the long axis of the implant for 8 weeks at 12 weeks after implant placement. The remaining 14 implants received no loading. Histomorphometric and microcomputed tomographic analyses were then performed. No effect of neck design was observed without mechanical loading, whereas osseointegration around the +60° grooves was upregulated with mechanical loading. Calculated load effects on bone structure around the implant neck with +60° grooves were larger when compared with the -60° grooves under mechanical loading. These findings indicate that the establishment of osseointegration and bone formation around the implant neck with +60° grooves is superior to those with -60° grooves under loaded conditions.

  2. Helium accumulation and bubble formation in FeCoNiCr alloy under high fluence He+ implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Tong, Y.; Li, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Y. L.; Hu, Alice; Kai, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Face-centered cubic (FCC) high-entropy alloys (HEA), as emerging alloys with equal-molar or near equal-molar constituents, show a promising radiation damage resistance under heavy ion bombardment, making them potential for structural material application in next-generation nuclear reactors, but the accumulation of light helium ions, a product of nuclear fission reaction, has not been studied. The present work experimentally studied the helium accumulation and bubble formation at implantation temperatures of 523 K, 573 K and 673 K in a homogenized FCC FeCoNiCr HEA, a HEA showing excellent radiation damage resistance under heavy ion irradiation. The size and population density of helium bubbles in FeCoNiCr samples were quantitatively analyzed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the helium content existing in bubbles were estimated from a high-pressure Equation of State (EOS). We found that the helium diffusion in such condition was dominated by the self-interstitial/He replacement mechanism, and the corresponding activation energy in FeCoNiCr is comparable with the vacancy migration energy in Ni and austenitic stainless steel but only 14.3%, 31.4% and 51.4% of the accumulated helium precipitated into helium bubbles at 523 K, 573 K and 673 K, respectively, smaller than the pure Ni case. Importantly, the small bubble size suggested that FeCoNiCr HEA has a high resistance of helium bubble formation compared with Ni and steels.

  3. Lipid peroxidation is another potential mechanism besides pore-formation underlying hemolysis of tentacle extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Mei, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Qian-Qian; He, Qian; Zheng, Jie-Min; Zhao, Jie; Xiao, Liang; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2013-01-09

    This study was performed to explore other potential mechanisms underlying hemolysis in addition to pore-formation of tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. A dose-dependent increase of hemolysis was observed in rat erythrocyte suspensions and the hemolytic activity of TE was enhanced in the presence of Ca2+, which was attenuated by Ca2+ channel blockers (Diltiazem, Verapamil and Nifedipine). Direct intracellular Ca2+ increase was observed after TE treatment by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the Ca2+ increase could be depressed by Diltiazem. The osmotic protectant polyethylenglycol (PEG) significantly blocked hemolysis with a molecular mass exceeding 4000 Da. These results support a pore-forming mechanism of TE in the erythrocyte membrane, which is consistent with previous studies by us and other groups. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), an important marker of lipid peroxidation, increased dose-dependently in rat erythrocytes after TE treatment, while in vitro hemolysis of TE was inhibited by the antioxidants ascorbic acid-Vitamin C (Vc)-and reduced glutathione (GSH). Furthermore, in vivo hemolysis and electrolyte change after TE administration could be partly recovered by Vc. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation is another potential mechanism besides pore-formation underlying the hemolysis of TE, and both Ca2+ channel blockers and antioxidants could be useful candidates against the hemolytic activity of jellyfish venoms.

  4. Lipid Peroxidation Is another Potential Mechanism besides Pore-Formation Underlying Hemolysis of Tentacle Extract from the Jellyfish Cyanea capillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to explore other potential mechanisms underlying hemolysis in addition to pore-formation of tentacle extract (TE from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. A dose-dependent increase of hemolysis was observed in rat erythrocyte suspensions and the hemolytic activity of TE was enhanced in the presence of Ca2+, which was attenuated by Ca2+ channel blockers (Diltiazem, Verapamil and Nifedipine. Direct intracellular Ca2+ increase was observed after TE treatment by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the Ca2+ increase could be depressed by Diltiazem. The osmotic protectant polyethylenglycol (PEG significantly blocked hemolysis with a molecular mass exceeding 4000 Da. These results support a pore-forming mechanism of TE in the erythrocyte membrane, which is consistent with previous studies by us and other groups. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA, an important marker of lipid peroxidation, increased dose-dependently in rat erythrocytes after TE treatment, while in vitro hemolysis of TE was inhibited by the antioxidants ascorbic acid—Vitamin C (Vc—and reduced glutathione (GSH. Furthermore, in vivo hemolysis and electrolyte change after TE administration could be partly recovered by Vc. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation is another potential mechanism besides pore-formation underlying the hemolysis of TE, and both Ca2+ channel blockers and antioxidants could be useful candidates against the hemolytic activity of jellyfish venoms.

  5. Cellular inhibitory behavior underlying the formation of retinal direction selectivity in the starburst network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, R R

    2010-09-01

    Optical imaging of dendritic calcium signals provided evidence of starburst amacrine cells exhibiting calcium bias to somatofugal motion. In contrast, it has been impractical to use a dual-patch clamp technique to record membrane potentials from both proximal dendrites and distal varicosities of starburst amacrine cells in order to unequivocally prove that they are directionally sensitive to voltage, as was first suggested almost two decades ago. This paper aims to extend the passive cable model to an active cable model of a starburst amacrine cell that is intrinsically dependent on the electrical properties of starburst amacrine cells, whose various macroscopic currents are described quantitatively. The coupling between voltage and calcium just below the membrane results in a voltage-calcium system of coupled nonlinear Volterra integral equations whose solutions must be integrated into a prescribed model for example, for a synaptic couplet of starburst amacrine cells. Networks of starburst amacrine cells play a fundamental role in the retinal circuitry underlying directional selectivity. It is suggested that the dendritic plexus of starburst amacrine cells provides the substrate for the property of directional selectivity, while directional selectivity is a property of the exclusive layerings and confinement of their interconnections within the sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer involving cone bipolar cells and directionally selective ganglion cells.

  6. Mechanisms underlying reductant-induced reactive oxygen species formation by anticancer copper(II) compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowol, Christian R; Heffeter, Petra; Miklos, Walter; Gille, Lars; Trondl, Robert; Cappellacci, Loredana; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2012-03-01

    Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via thiol-mediated reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) has been assumed as the major mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer potential of copper(II) complexes of Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone; currently in phase II clinical trials) and its terminally dimethylated derivative with that of 2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone and that of 2,2'-bipyridyl-6-carbothioamide. Experiments on generation of oxidative stress and the influence of biologically relevant reductants (glutathione, ascorbic acid) on the anticancer activity of the copper complexes revealed that reductant-dependent redox cycling occurred mainly outside the cells, leading to generation and dismutation of superoxide radicals resulting in cytotoxic amounts of H(2)O(2). However, without extracellular reductants only weak intracellular ROS generation was observed at IC(50) levels, suggesting that cellular thiols are not involved in copper-complex-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, thiol-induced intracellular ROS generation might contribute to the anticancer activity of copper thiosemicarbazone complexes but is not the determining factor.

  7. NdFeO3 nanocrystals under glycine nitrate combustion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugova, Ekaterina; Yastrebov, Sergey; Karpov, Oleg; Smith, Roger

    2017-06-01

    Nanocrystalline perovskite NdFeO3 with the orthorhombic structure was prepared by a glycine nitrate combustion method under different technological conditions. The starting materials Fe(NO3)3 · 9H2O,Nd(NO3)3 · 6H2O in stoichiometric amounts and H2NCH2COOH were used. These quantities were varied by changing the ratio of glycine moles to metal nitrate moles (G/N) in the range between 0.25 and 0.75. The prepared NdFeO3 nanocrystals were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microscopy. Decomposition of the XRD diffraction profile using Voigt contours was exploited for analysis of the pattern in the area where the most prominent diffraction peak was situated. We demonstrate that Voigt functions reduce to Lorentzians for G / N = 0.75 and 0.55 . A volume-weighted diameter distribution function was derived using the width of the Lorentzians. The log-normal shape of the distribution is discussed in terms of the model, assuming exponential growth of cluster size in the time available for the NdFeO3 nanograin to grow.

  8. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Soo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer size openings with its size less than 10 nm on the diffused membrane on the 200 nm Au pyramid were fabricated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM electron beam irradiations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, etc. After the sample was being kept under a room environment for several months, several Au (111 clusters with ~6 nm diameter formed via Ostwald ripening are observed using a high resolution TEM imaging. The nanopore with Au nanoclusters on the diffused membrane can be utilized as an optical nanopore device. Keywords: Electron beam irradiation, Surface diffusion, Carbon contamination, Au cluster, Ostwald ripening

  9. Investigation of fracture conductivity under in situ conditions as a function of frac- and formation parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyn, V.; Lajcsak, I.

    1998-10-01

    Because of their low permeability, deep-lying gas fields are often developed by the fracturing technique. Essential for the economy of this measure is a high fracture conductivity which persists over a long period. The objective of the project was the investigation of the various factors influencing the fracture conductivity under reservoir conditions. Besides the breaking strength of proppants, which is decisive for the conductivity attainable at high confining pressure, the long-term stability, the embedment and the transport of fragments, which results in plugging, were examined. With the proppants Superprop and Carboprop HC, fracture conductivity exhibits only a slight dependence on the closure pressure. Transport of fragments and embedment play no important role. With resin-coated proppants, conductivity is not improved appreciably. The resin-coating doesn`t resist reservoir conditions. After only one week, aquathermolytic products were detected. (orig.) [Deutsch] Tiefliegende Erdgasfelder werden aufgrund ihrer niedrigen Permeabilitaet haeufig durch eine Frac-Behandlung erschlossen. Eine wesentliche Voraussetzung fuer die Wirtschaftlichkeit einer solchen Massnahme ist eine hohe Rissleitfaehigkeit, die ueber einen langen Zeitraum bestehen bleibt. Ziel des Projektes war die Untersuchung der verschiedenen Faktoren, die die Rissleitfaehigkeit unter Lagerstaettenbedingungen beeinflussen. Neben der Bruchfestigkeit des Stuetzmittels, die fuer die bei hohen Schliessdrucken erreichbaren Rissleitfaehigkeiten entscheidend ist, wurde die Langzeitstabilitaet, das Embedment und der zu Verstopfung fuehrende Transport von Bruchstuecken untersucht. Die Stuetzmittel Superprop und Carboprop HC weisen nur eine geringe Abhaengigkeit der Rissleitfaehigkeit vom Schliessdruck auf. Der Bruchstuecktransport sowie das Embedment spielen nur eine untergeordnete Rolle. Durch die Verwendung von beschichtetem Stuetzmittel wird die Rissleitfaehigkeit nicht wesentlich erhoeht. Die Beschichtung

  10. Suppressing of γ-crystal formation in metallocene-based isotactic polypropylene during isothermal crystallization under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Chen; Xu, Jia-Zhuang; Lei, Jun; Mao, Yimin; Li, Zhong-Ming; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2012-04-26

    The effect of shear flow on isothermal crystallization behavior of γ-crystals in metallocene-based isotactic polypropylene melt was investigated by in situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). In the sample under weak shear (at strain of 300% for 30 s duration), simultaneous evolution of α- and γ-crystals occurred, and the final fraction of γ-crystals (fγ) was 0.66, which was identical to the undeformed sample (PP-Static). In this scenario, α-crystals probably served as effective seeds for nucleation of γ-crystals. In the samples under strong shear (at strain of 500% for 30 s duration or long-time continuous shear at strains of 100% and 500%), the sequential emergence of α- and γ-crystals was observed. In this case, molten polymer chains were probably constrained by the surrounding crystals after intense short-time shear and/or maintained their extended chain conformation after long-time shear. These oriented chains had little chance to form the γ-crystals directly, behaving very differently from the relaxed chains. Under strong shear fields, the emergence of γ-crystals was delayed or inhibited, whereas the fγ value was also decreased rapidly. A simple model for the possible pathway of γ-crystal formation in the strong shear environment was proposed.

  11. Monitoring Microstructural Evolution and Crack Formation in a Solid Propellant under Incremental Strain Condition- Using Digital Radiography X-Ray Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, C

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the change of microstructure and the formation of cracks in a solid propellant under an incremental strain loading condition were investigated using digital radiography x-ray techniques...

  12. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  13. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India); Raha, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Computational and Data Sciences (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  14. Fusion of blastomeres in mouse embryos under the action of femtosecond laser radiation. Efficiency of blastocyst formation and embryo development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osychenko, A A; Zalesskii, A D; Krivokharchenko, A S; Zhakhbazyan, A K; Nadtochenko, V A [N N Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ryabova, A V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-31

    Using the method of femtosecond laser surgery we study the fusion of two-cell mouse embryos under the action of tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with the fusion efficiency reaching 60%. The detailed statistical analysis of the efficiency of blastomere fusion and development of the embryo up to the blastocyst stage after exposure of the embryos from different mice to a femtosecond pulse is presented. It is shown that the efficiency of blastocyst formation essentially depends on the biological characteristics of the embryo, namely, the strain and age of the donor mouse. The possibility of obtaining hexaploid embryonal cells using the methods of femtosecond laser surgery is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. Social goal-objective formation, democracy and national interest a theory of political economy under fuzzy rationality

    CERN Document Server

    Dompere, Kofi Kissi

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the development of a theory of social goal-objective formation and its relationship to national interest and social vision under a democratic decision-choice system with imperfect information structure. It provides a framework for the application of fuzzy logic and its mathematics to the analysis in resolving conflicts in individual preferences in the collective decision-choice space without violence. The book demonstrates how to use fuzzy logic and its mathematics in the study of economics, social sciences and other complex systems. It also presents the use of collaborative tools of opposites, duality, polarity, continuum in fuzzy paradigm with its logic, laws of thought and mathematics in developing a new approach to the theory of political economy in order to enhance the constructs of social decision-choice theory.

  16. Observations of CO{sub 2} clathrate hydrate formation and dissolution under deep-ocean disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Holder, G.D. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Disposal of anthropogenic emissions of CO{sub 2} may be required to mitigate rises in atmospheric levels of this greenhouse gas if other measures are ineffective and the worst global warming scenarios begin to occur. Long-term storage of large quantities of CO{sub 2} has been proposed, but the feasibility of large land and ocean disposal options remains to be established. Determining the fate of liquid CO{sub 2} injected into the ocean at depths greater than 500 m is complicated by uncertainties associated with the physical behavior of CO{sub 2} under these conditions, in particular the possible formation of the ice-like CO{sub 2} clathrate hydrate. Resolving this issue is key to establishing the technical feasibility of this option. Experimental and theoretical work in this area is reported.

  17. Modeling the photochemical transformation of nitrobenzene under conditions relevant to sunlit surface waters: Reaction pathways and formation of intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vione, Davide; De Laurentiis, Elisa; Berto, Silvia; Minero, Claudio; Hatipoglu, Arzu; Cinar, Zekiye

    2016-02-01

    Nitrobenzene (NB) would undergo photodegradation in sunlit surface waters, mainly by direct photolysis and triplet-sensitized oxidation, with a secondary role of the *OH reaction. Its photochemical half-life time would range from a few days to a couple of months under fair-weather summertime irradiation, depending on water chemistry and depth. NB phototransformation gives phenol and the three nitrophenol isomers, in different yields depending on the considered pathway. The minor *OH role in degradation would make NB unsuitable as *OH probe in irradiated natural water samples, but the selectivity towards *OH could be increased by monitoring the formation of phenol from NB+*OH. The relevant reaction would proceed through ipso-addition of *OH on the carbon atom bearing the nitro-group, forming a pre-reactive complex that would evolve into a transition state (and then into a radical addition intermediate) with very low activation energy barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravenous curcumin efficacy on healing and scar formation in rabbit ear wounds under nonischemic, ischemic, and ischemia-reperfusion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shengxian; Xie, Ping; Hong, Seok Jong; Galiano, Robert; Singer, Adam; Clark, Richard A F; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a spice found in turmeric, is widely used in alternative medicine for its purported anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The goal of this study was to test the curcumin efficacy on rabbit ear wounds under nonischemic, ischemic, and ischemia-reperfusion conditions. Previously described models were utilized in 58 New Zealand White rabbits. Immediately before wounding, rabbits were given intravenous crude or pure curcumin (6 μg/kg, 30 μg/kg, or 60 μg/kg) dissolved in 1% ethanol. Specimens were collected at 7-8 days to evaluate the effects on wound healing and at 28 days to evaluate the effects on hypertrophic scarring. Student's t test was applied to screen difference between any treatment and control group, whereas analysis of variance was applied to further analyze for all treatment groups in aggregate in some specific experiments. Treatment with crude curcumin suggested accelerated wound healing that reached significance for reepithelialization in lower and medium doses and granulation tissue formation in lower dose. Purified curcumin became available and was used for all later experiments. Treatment with pure curcumin suggested accelerated wound healing that reached significance for reepithelialization in lower and medium doses and granulation tissue formation in lower dose. Treatment with pure curcumin significantly promoted nonischemic wound healing in a dose-response fashion compared with controls as judged by increased reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation. Improved wound healing was associated with significant decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 as well as the chemokine IL-8. Curcumin also significantly reduced hypertrophic scarring. The effects of curcumin were examined under conditions of impaired healing including ischemic and ischemia-reperfusion wound healing, and beneficial effects were also seen, although the dose response was less clear. Systemically administrated pure

  19. [Formation of geochemistry in underground river under rainfall conditions: an examule for underground river at Xueyu Cave, Chongqing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Kang; Liang, Zuo-Bing; Yu, Zheng-Liang; Jiang, Ze-Li

    2014-10-01

    Through the monitoring of geochemical indexes in underground river of Xueyu Cave in Chongqing under rainfall conditions, we found that all indexes responded quickly to rainfall, and there was a correlation among them. Each index was analyzed with the principal component analysis, three main components were extracted which can represent 82.761% of the information to reflect the formation of geochemistry in underground river under rainfall conditions. The results showed that the contribution rates of soil leaching represented as increased concentration of total Fe, total Mn, and Al3+, and dilution effect represented as reduced concentration of K+, Na+ and Sr2+ to the change of geochemical characteristics were 41.718%, which should be paid more attentions for its great damage to karst soil and safety of drinking water. Karst water dissolution of dolomite and recharge area of agricultural activities, caverns were 29.958%, as for karst water on limestone dissolution represented, as increased concentration of Ca2+ the contribution rate was 11.084%.

  20. Standard format and content guide for financial assurance mechanisms required for decommissioning under 10 CFR parts 30, 40, 70, and 72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    The Standard Format and Content Guide for Financial Assurance Mechanisms Required for Decommissioning under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72, discusses the information to be provided in a license application and established a uniform format for presenting the information required to meet the decommissioning licensing requirements. The use of the Standard Format and Content Guide will (1) help ensure that the license application contains the information required by the regulations, (2) aid the applicant in ensuring that the information is complete, (3) help persons reading the Standard Format and Content Guide to locate information, and (4) contribute to shortening the time required for the review process. The Standard Format and Content Guide ensures that the information required to perform the review is provided, and in a useable format

  1. Interim guidance on the standard format and content of financial assurance mechanisms required for decommissioning under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, and 70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Interim Guidance on the Standard Format and Content of Financial Assurance Mechanisms Required for Decommissioning under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, and 70, NUREG-1336, discusses the information to be provided in a license application and established a uniform format for presenting the information required to meet the decommissioning licensing requirements. The use of the Standard Format will (1) help ensure that the license application contains the information required by the regulations, (2) aid the applicant in ensuring that the information is complete, (3) help persons reading the Standard Format to locate information, and (4) contribute to shortening the time required for the review process. The Standard Format and Content (NUREG-1336) ensures that the information required to perform the review is provided, and in a useable format

  2. The yield condition strongly influences the formation of Dugdale plastic strips ahead of crack tips under tensile plane stress loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, David J.

    2012-11-01

    A finite element analysis indicates a good correlation between the Dugdale plastic strip model and a linear elastic/perfectly plastic material under plane stress loading conditions for a flow theory of plasticity based on the Tresca yield condition. A similar analysis under the von Mises yield condition reveals no plastic strip formation.

  3. Molecular and Ultrastructural Mechanisms Underlying Yellow Dwarf Symptom Formation in Wheat after Infection of Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Wei; Wang, Xindong; Wang, Xifeng; Massart, Sebastien; Zhang, Zengyan

    2018-04-13

    Wheat ( Tritium aestivum L.) production is essential for global food security. Infection of barley yellow dwarf virus-GAV (BYDV-GAV) results in wheat showing leaf yellowing and plant dwarfism symptom. To explore the molecular and ultrastructural mechanisms underlying yellow dwarf symptom formation in BYDV-GAV-infected wheat, we investigated the chloroplast ultrastructure via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), examined the contents of the virus, H₂O₂, and chlorophyll in Zhong8601, and studied the comparative transcriptome through microarray analyses in the susceptible wheat line Zhong8601 after virus infection. TEM images indicated that chloroplasts in BYDV-GAV-infected Zhong8601 leaf cells were fragmentized. Where thylakoids were not well developed, starch granules and plastoglobules were rare. Compared with mock-inoculated Zhong8601, chlorophyll content was markedly reduced, but the virus and H₂O₂ contents were significantly higher in BYDV-GAV-infected Zhong8601. The transcriptomic analyses revealed that chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast related transcripts, encoding chlorophyll a/b binding protein, glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator 2, and glutamyl-tRNA reductase 1, were down-regulated in BYDV-GAV-infected Zhong8601. Some phytohormone signaling-related transcripts, including abscisic acid (ABA) signaling factors (phospholipase D alpha 1 and calcineurin B-like protein 9) and nine ethylene response factors, were up-regulated. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related genes were transcriptionally regulated in BYDV-GAV infected Zhong8601, including three up-regulated transcripts encoding germin-like proteins (promoting ROS accumulation) and four down-regulated transcripts encoding peroxides (scavenging ROS). These results clearly suggest that the yellow dwarf symptom formation is mainly attributed to reduced chlorophyll content and fragmentized chloroplasts caused by down-regulation of the chlorophyll and chloroplast biosynthesis

  4. Physiology, Fe(II oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D. Swanner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for Fe(II oxidation and deposition of Fe(III-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF. While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II-rich waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III (oxyhydroxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Fe(II toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II. These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  5. A novel bioreactor for mechanobiological studies of engineered heart valve tissue formation under pulmonary arterial physiological flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Boronyak, Steven M; Le, Trung; Holmes, Andrew; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Sacks, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The ability to replicate physiological hemodynamic conditions during in vitro tissue development has been recognized as an important aspect in the development and in vitro assessment of engineered heart valve tissues. Moreover, we have demonstrated that studies aiming to understand mechanical conditioning require separation of the major heart valve deformation loading modes: flow, stretch, and flexure (FSF) (Sacks et al., 2009, "Bioengineering Challenges for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering," Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 11(1), pp. 289-313). To achieve these goals in a novel bioreactor design, we utilized a cylindrical conduit configuration for the conditioning chamber to allow for higher fluid velocities, translating to higher shear stresses on the in situ tissue specimens while retaining laminar flow conditions. Moving boundary computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the flow field under combined cyclic flexure and steady flow (cyclic-flex-flow) states using various combinations of flow rate, and media viscosity. The device was successfully constructed and tested for incubator housing, gas exchange, and sterility. In addition, we performed a pilot experiment using biodegradable polymer scaffolds seeded with bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) at a seeding density of 5 × 10(6) cells/cm(2). The constructs were subjected to combined cyclic flexure (1 Hz frequency) and steady flow (Re = 1376; flow rate of 1.06 l/min (LPM); shear stress in the range of 0-9 dynes/cm(2) for 2 weeks to permit physiological shear stress conditions. Assays revealed significantly (P Engineered Tissue Formation: Implications for Engineered Heart Valve Tissues," Biomaterials, 27(36), pp. 6083-6095). The implications of this novel design are that fully coupled or decoupled physiological flow, flexure, and stretch modes of engineered tissue conditioning investigations can be readily accomplished with the inclusion of this device in experimental protocols on

  6. Numerical Study of the Formation, Ion Spin-up and Nonlinear Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, E.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Cothran, C.D.; Brown, M.R.; Schaffer, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs and the new FRC formation method by the counter-helicity spheromak merging. Kinetic simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode, where n is the toroidal mode number. The n = 2 and n = 3 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to the ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. The ion toroidal spin-up is shown to be related to the resistive decay of the internal flux, and the resulting loss of particle confinement. Three-dimensional MHD simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging and FRC formation show good agreement with results from the SSX-FRC experiment. Simulations show formation of an FRC in about 30 Alfven times for typical experimental parameters. The growth rate of the n = 1 tilt mode is shown to be significantly reduced compared to the MHD growth rate due to the large plasma viscosity and field-line-tying effects

  7. Topology Control Algorithms for Spacecraft Formation Flying Networks Under Connectivity and Time-Delay Constraints, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI is proposing to develop a set of topology control algorithms for a formation flying spacecraft that can be used to design and evaluate candidate formation...

  8. Effects of Calcination on the Crystallography and Nonbiogenic Aragonite Formation of Ark Clam Shell under Ambient Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wah Loy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of crystallographic evolution of disposed ark clam shell (ACS after calcination at 400–1400°C which was kept at room temperature under ambient condition in Malaysia during nine months. A better understanding of hydration and recarbonation of ACS powder (≤63 μm after calcination was discovered by PXRD and FTIR. The research focuses on the crystallographic transformation, biogenic calcite decomposition, and unusual atmospheric aragonite formation in ACS after calcination and atmospheric air exposure. Ex situ PXRD showed calcite present in ACS at ≤900°C. ACS transformed to pyrogenic fcc CaO at ≥800°C after three months. Long term atmospheric air exposure of decarbonized ACS caused nucleation of nonbiogenic aragonite, vaterite, calcite, and portlandite. However, in situ PXRD analysis of ACS at instantaneous temperature without cooling process does not indicate the presence of aragonite, vaterite, and portlandite crystals. FTIR spectra revealed CaO–CO2 bond in ACS dissociated with temperature (600–900°C to form CaO and CO2. Ca–OH bond was also traced in FTIR spectra of ≥700°C. It resulted by hydroadsorption of CaO with H2O in atmospheric air.

  9. Diamond-like carbon coating under oleic acid lubrication: Evidence for graphene oxide formation in superlow friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Bouchet, Maria Isabel; Martin, Jean Michel; Avila, José; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tsuruda, Takeshi; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-04-01

    The achievement of the superlubricity regime, with a friction coefficient below 0.01, is the Holy Grail of many tribological applications, with the potential to have a remarkable impact on economic and environmental issues. Based on a combined high-resolution photoemission and soft X-ray absorption study, we report that superlubricity can be realized for engineering applications in bearing steel coated with ultra-smooth tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) under oleic acid lubrication. The results show that tribochemical reactions promoted by the oil lubrication generate strong structural changes in the carbon hybridization of the ta-C hydrogen-free carbon, with initially high sp3 content. Interestingly, the macroscopic superlow friction regime of moving mechanical assemblies coated with ta-C can be attributed to a few partially oxidized graphene-like sheets, with a thickness of not more than 1 nm, formed at the surface inside the wear scar. The sp2 planar carbon and oxygen-derived species are the hallmark of these mesoscopic surface structures created on top of colliding asperities as a result of the tribochemical reactions induced by the oleic acid lubrication. Atomistic simulations elucidate the tribo-formation of such graphene-like structures, providing the link between the overall atomistic mechanism and the macroscopic experimental observations of green superlubricity in the investigated ta-C/oleic acid tribological systems.

  10. Formation of Combustible Hydrocarbons and H2 during Photocatalytic Decomposition of Various Organic Compounds under Aerated and Deaerated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Mozia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of photocatalytic production of useful aliphatic hydrocarbons and H2 from various organic compounds, including acetic acid, methanol, ethanol and glucose, over Fe-modified TiO2 is discussed. In particular, the influence of the reaction atmosphere (N2, air was investigated. Different gases were identified in the headspace volume of the reactor depending on the substrate. In general, the evolution of the gases was more effective in air compared to a N2 atmosphere. In the presence of air, the gaseous phase contained CO2, CH4 and H2, regardless of the substrate used. Moreover, formation of C2H6 and C3H8 in the case of acetic acid and C2H6 in the case of ethanol was observed. In case of acetic acid and methanol an increase in H2 evolution under aerated conditions was observed. It was concluded that the photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds with simultaneous generation of combustible hydrocarbons and hydrogen could be a promising method of “green energy” production.

  11. The role of eggshell and underlying vitelline membrane for normal pattern formation in the early C. elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenberg, Einhard; Junkersdorf, Bernd

    1992-12-01

    The embryo of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is surrounded by an inconspicuous inner vitelline membrane and a prominent outer chitinous eggshell proper. We demonstrate that the complete removal of the chitinous eggshell does not interfere with successful development to yield a normal worm. The same result can be obtained when the vitelline membrane is penetrated with laser microbeam irradiation of only the eggshell proper, gently enough to permit its resealing after a while. However, when large holes are made into the eggshell the concomitantly penetrated vitelline membrane does not reseal. While early development is quite normal under these conditions, gastrulation is defective in that gut precursor cells do not migrate in properly, eventually leading to embryonic arrest. This suggests a crucial role for pattern formation of the "micro-environment" around the embryo preserved by the intact vitelline membrane. Removing both eggshell and vitelline membrane results in a string-like arrangement of founder cells and subsequent grossly abnormal cell patterns. Our experiments support the idea that the prominent eggshell proper just functions as a mechanical protection while the thin vitelline membrane directly or indirectly serves as a necessary control element affecting the positions of cells which to begin with are determined by the orientation of the cleavage spindle.

  12. Numeracy as a precursor to pro-social behavior: The impact of numeracy and presentation format on the cognitive mechanisms underlying donation decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Dickert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Donation requests often convey numerical information about the people in need. In two studies we investigated the effects of numeracy and presentation format on the underlying affective and cognitive mechanisms of donation decisions. In Study 1, participants were presented with information about a victim in need, either in a frequency format or in a percentage format. In Study 2, we manipulated the identifiability and number of target victims. Our results demonstrate that donations of individuals lower in numeracy were more susceptible to changes in numeric presentation format than those higher in numeracy. Importantly, the underlying mechanisms for donations differed by numeracy. Whereas the mental image of the victim influenced donation decisions of less numerate people only, the estimated impact of a donation was positively correlated with donation amounts for both more and less numerate individuals.

  13. Geochemical characterisation of kerogen from the Boom Clay Formation (Mol, Belgium) and evolution under different thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniau, I.

    2002-12-01

    The Boom clay formation in Belgium has been chosen as test site for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The organic matter present in the clay (kerogen) is sensible to the thermal stress and can generate a huge number of gaseous and liquid compounds leading to local pH changes and to fracturing processes. In particular, some polar compounds can complex radionuclides. The samples analyzed in this work were taken in the underground laboratory of Mol at a 223 m depth. They have been analyzed in detail using geochemical methods (Rock-Eval pyrolysis, element analysis, transmission and scanning electron microscopy), spectroscopic methods (Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, solid state 13 C NMR, Raman) and pyrolytic methods (off-line, on-line and in sealed tubes combined with coupled CG/SM analyses). The study of a representative sample of this formation has permitted to characterize the organic matter at the molecular scale, to determine its fossilization mechanisms and the nature of the organic compounds trapped inside the kerogen. The organic matter of the Boom clays comes mainly from phyto-planktonic matter with an important contribution of terrestrial and bacterial matter. The degradation-recondensation played an important role in its preservation but the presence of numerous oxygenated molecules implies that oxidative incorporation also participated to this preservation. Finally, various products (hydrocarbons, oxygenated and nitrogenous polar compounds) trapped in significant amount inside the macro-molecular structure are released under a relatively weak thermal stress. Moreover several small polar organic molecules are released and can play a significant role in the retention or migration of radionuclides inside the geologic barrier. A sample submitted to a in-situ thermal stress of 80 deg. C during 5 years (Cerberus experiment) do not show any significant change in its kerogen structure with respect to the non-heated reference sample

  14. Inhibition of Hb Binding to GP1bα Abrogates Hb-Mediated Thrombus Formation on Immobilized VWF and Collagen under Physiological Shear Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annarapu, Gowtham K; Singhal, Rashi; Peng, Yuandong; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Reports including our own describe that intravascular hemolysis increases the risk of thrombosis in hemolytic disorders. Our recent study shows that plasma Hb concentrations correlate directly with platelet activation in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). The binding of Hb to glycoprotein1bα (GP1bα) increases platelet activation. A peptide AA1-50, designed from N-terminal amino acid sequence of GP1bα significantly inhibits the Hb binding to GP1bα as well as Hb-induced platelet activation. This study further examined if the Hb-mediated platelet activation plays any significant role in thrombus formation on subendothelium matrix under physiological flow shear stresses and the inhibition of Hb-platelet interaction can abrogate the above effects of Hb. Study performed thrombus formation assay in vitro by perfusing whole blood over immobilized VWF or collagen type I in presence of Hb under shear stresses simulating arterial or venous flow. The Hb concentrations ranging from 5 to 10 μM, commonly observed level in plasma of the hemolytic patients including PNH, dose-dependently increased thrombus formation on immobilized VWF under higher shear stress of 25 dyne/cm2, but not at 5 dyne/cm2. The above Hb concentrations also increased thrombus formation on immobilized collagen under both shear stresses of 5 and 25 dyne/cm2. The peptide AA1-50 abrogated invariably the above effects of Hb on thrombus formation. This study therefore indicates that the Hb-induced platelet activation plays a crucial role in thrombus formation on immobilized VWF or collagen under physiological flow shear stresses. Thus suggesting a probable role of this mechanism in facilitating thrombosis under hemolytic conditions.

  15. The effect of pre-plasma formation under nonlocal transport conditions for ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec, M.; Nikl, J.; Vranic, M.; Weber, S.

    2018-04-01

    Interaction of high-power lasers with solid targets is in general strongly affected by the limited contrast available. The laser pre-pulse ionizes the target and produces a pre-plasma which can strongly modify the interaction of the main part of the laser pulse with the target. This is of particular importance for future experiments which will use laser intensities above 1021 W cm-2 and which are subject to the limited contrast. As a consequence the main part of the laser pulse will be modified while traversing the pre-plasma, interacting with it partially. A further complication arises from the fact that the interaction of a high-power pre-pulse with solid targets very often takes place under nonlocal transport conditions, i.e. the characteristic mean-free-path of the particles and photons is larger than the characteristic scale-lengths of density and temperature. The classical diffusion treatment of radiation and heat transport in the hydrodynamic model is then insufficient for the description of the pre-pulse physics. These phenomena also strongly modify the formation of the pre-plasma which in turn affects the propagation of the main laser pulse. In this paper nonlocal radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are carried out and serve as input for subsequent kinetic simulations of ultra-high intensity laser pulses interacting with the plasma in the ultra-relativistic regime. It is shown that the results of the kinetic simulations differ considerably whether a diffusive or nonlocal transport is used for the radiation-hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. The effects of synthesis parameters on the formation of PbI2 particles under DTAB-assisted hydrothermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Gangqiang; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Liu Peng; Peng Jianhong; Zhou Jianping; Bian Xiaobin; Huang Xijin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Submicron- and micron-sized PbI 2 particles were hydrothermally synthesized. ► Structural transformation form belt-like to rod- and microtube-like was observed. ► Phase-pure PbI 2 particles could be hydrothermally obtained at pH 2 particles. ► The optical band gap energy of PbI 2 was slightly affected by morphology. - Abstract: Submicron- and micron-sized lead iodide (PbI 2 ) particles with well-controlled morphologies were successfully fabricated via a low-temperature hydrothermal process assisted by dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) as cationic surfactant. The as-synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The effects of synthesis parameters (temperature, time, pH, and surfactant amount) were systematically investigated. The obtained results showed that the submicron structure was belt-like at 100–120 °C, transformed to rod-like by increasing temperature to 140 °C and it became a microtube-like at 160–200 °C. By changing the pH of the synthesizing solution, it was found that a pure PbI 2 phase could be obtained below 7. With the addition of increasing amount of surfactant, microparticles were converted to microrods → submicron belts → microtubes. The time-dependent experimental results revealed that the dissolution–recrystallization and dissolution–recrystallization–self-oriented-attachment were considered to be the possible mechanisms for the formation of the belt- and tube-like PbI 2 submicron- and micron-sized particles, respectively. The optical properties of the PbI 2 particles synthesized at 100–200 °C for 8 h under hydrothermal conditions were also studied.

  17. Intragastric formation and modulation of N-nitrosodimethylamine in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model under human physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Zeilmaker, M.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Havenaar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposure to carcinogenic N-alkylnitrosamines can occur exogenously via food consumption or endogenously by formation of these compounds through nitrosation of amine precursors. Information on the intragastric formation of NDMA from complex mixtures of precursors and inhibitors in humans is not

  18. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals,

  19. On the formation of nanostructures on a CdTe surface, stimulated by surface acoustic waves under nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasenko, A. I.; Baidullaeva, A.; Veleschuk, V. P., E-mail: vvvit@ukr.net; Mozol, P. E.; Boiko, N. I.; Litvin, O. S. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductors Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-02-15

    The formation of nanoscale structures in the unirradiated part of a p-CdTe crystal surface irradiated by a nanosecond ruby laser is revealed and investigated. It is shown that their formation is caused by the effect of the long-range action of a laser pulse with an intensity of I = 20 MW/cm{sup 2}. Nanoscale-structure formation is explained by the influence of the pressure gradient of the surface acoustic wave, in particular, within the “vacancy-pump” mechanism on the surface.

  20. Formation of Nanodroplets in N2/H2O/SO2 under Irradiation of Fast Proton Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Youchi; Shigeoka, Tomita; Funada, Shuhei

    The droplet formation induced by cosmic ray in the terrestrial atmosphere attract certainattention in recent decades because this process could be important to understand thepossible relationship between cosmic ray and climate on the earth. The role of energetic ionsfor the droplet formation would...... measured with adifferential mobility analyzer. We found that the mass yield of generated droplets showedlinear dependence on the amount of SO2 oxidation. This behavior is different from binarynucleation theory of water and H2SO4. The difference might indicates importance ofconsidering the droplet formation...

  1. [Impact of biologically important anions on reactive oxygen species formation in water under the effect of non-ionizing physical agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, S V; Ivanov, V E; Karp, O É; Chernikov, A V; Belosludtsev, K N; Bobylev, A G; Astashev, M E; Gapeev, A B; Bruskov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The influence of biologically relevant anions (succinate, acetate, citrate, chloride, bicarbonate, hydroorthophosphate, dihydroorthophosphate, nitrite, nitrate) on the formation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals in water was studied under the effect of non-ionizing radiation: heat, laser light with a wavelength of 632.8 nm, corresponding to the maximum absorption of molecular oxygen, and electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequencies. It has been established that various anions may both inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase it. Bicarbonate and sulfate anions included in the biological fluids' and medicinal mineral waters have significant, but opposite effects on reactive oxygen species production. Different molecular mechanisms of reactive oxygen species formation are considered under the action of the investigated physical factors involving these anions, which may influence the biological processes by signal-regulatory manner and provide a healing effect in physical therapy.

  2. Effect of in situ hypothermic perfusion on intrahepatic pO(2) and reactive oxygen species formation after partial hepatectomy under total hepatic vascular exclusion in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Bob H. M.; Straatsburg, Irene H.; Kager, Liesbeth M.; van der Kleij, Ad J.; Gouma, Dirk J.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: This study examined attenuation of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) induced liver injury during liver resections by hypothermic perfusion of the liver under total hepatic vascular exclusion (THVE). Method: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, microcirculatory integrity and endothelial cell

  3. Effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on motility, rosette formation, and antioxidant state of leukocytes under modification of G-proteins by cholera and pertussis toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhirnov, V.V.; Luik, A.I.; Metelitsa, L.A.; Mogilevich, S.E.; Charochkina, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    The responses of motility and rosette formation of leukocytes to small radioactive doses (from 6 centre dot 10 -10 to 6 centre dot 10 -4 Gy) are studied. The influence of these doses on cell functions and oxidative homeostasis are investigated under the modification of transducing components of membrane signal pathways (adenylate cyclase and polyphosphoinositide cascades) with pertussis and cholera toxins

  4. Short communication: Roles of outer membrane protein W (OmpW) on survival and biofilm formation of Cronobacter sakazakii under neomycin sulfate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yingwang; Ling, Na; Gao, Jina; Zhang, Maofeng; Zhang, Xiyan; Tong, Liaowang; Ou, Dexin; Wang, Yaping; Zhang, Jumei; Wu, Qingping

    2018-04-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is associated with severe infections including sepsis, neonatal meningitis, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Antibiotic resistance in Cronobacter species has been documented in recent years, but the genes involved in resistance in Cronobacter strains are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the role of outer membrane protein W (OmpW) on survival rates, morphologic changes, and biofilm formation between wild type (WT) and an OmpW mutant strain (ΔOmpW) under neomycin sulfate stress. Results indicated that the survival rates of ΔOmpW were significantly reduced after half minimum inhibitory concentration (½ MIC) treatment compared with the WT strain. Filamentation of C. sakazakii cells was observed after ½ MIC treatment in WT and ΔOmpW, and morphologic injury, including cell disruption and leakage of cells, was more predominant in ΔOmpW. Under ½ MIC stress, the biofilms of WT and ΔOmpW were significantly decreased, but decreasing rates of biofilm formation in mutant strain were more predominant compared with WT strain. This is the first report to determine the role of OmpW on survival, morphological changes, and biofilm formation in C. sakazakii under neomycin sulfate stress. The findings indicated that OmpW contributed to survival and reduction of morphological injury under neomycin sulfate stress. In addition, enhancing biofilm formation in ΔOmpW may be an alternative advantage for adaptation to neomycin sulfate stress. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Topology Control Algorithms for Spacecraft Formation Flying Networks Under Connectivity and Time-Delay Constraints, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI is proposing to develop, test and deliver a set of topology control algorithms and software for a formation flying spacecraft that can be used to design and...

  6. Research regarding the formation of micropores in a Ni-Ti-C alloy during directional solidification under vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Daoxin, J.; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the origin and formation of microporosities in a Ni-5% Ti-0.2% C alloy which has been solidified and quenched, and to compare it to the previously developed mathematical model. In the selected alloy, the porosity may result from gases formed during solidification (for example by chemical reaction). The results show that solidification conditions influence microporosity formation through the fraction eutectic and this suggests that it is possible to rela...

  7. Reticular Formation Connections Underlying Horizontal Gaze: The Central Mesencephalic Reticular Formation (cMRF as a Conduit for the Collicular Saccade Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. May

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF occupies much of the core of the midbrain tegmentum. Physiological studies indicate that it is involved in controlling gaze changes, particularly horizontal saccades. Anatomically, it receives input from the ipsilateral superior colliculus (SC and it has downstream projections to the brainstem, including the horizontal gaze center located in the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that the cMRF plays a role in the spatiotemporal transformation needed to convert spatially coded collicular saccade signals into the temporally coded signals utilized by the premotor neurons of the horizontal gaze center. In this study, we used neuroanatomical tracers to examine the patterns of connectivity of the cMRF in macaque monkeys in order to determine whether the circuit organization supports this hypothesis. Since stimulation of the cMRF produces contraversive horizontal saccades and stimulation of the horizontal gaze center produces ipsiversive saccades, this would require an excitatory cMRF projection to the contralateral PPRF. Injections of anterograde tracers into the cMRF did produce labeled terminals within the PPRF. However, the terminations were denser ipsilaterally. Since the PPRF located contralateral to the movement direction is generally considered to be silent during a horizontal saccade, we then tested the hypothesis that this ipsilateral reticuloreticular pathway might be inhibitory. The ultrastructure of ipsilateral terminals was heterogeneous, with some displaying more extensive postsynaptic densities than others. Postembedding immunohistochemistry for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA indicated that only a portion (35% of these cMRF terminals are GABAergic. Dual tracer experiments were undertaken to determine whether the SC provides input to cMRF reticuloreticular neurons projecting to the ipsilateral pons. Retrogradely labeled reticuloreticular

  8. Potential of select intermediate-volatility organic compounds and consumer products for secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation under relevant urban conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihua; Li, Lijie; Chen, Chia-li; Kacarab, Mary; Peng, Weihan; Price, Derek; Xu, Jin; Cocker, David R.

    2018-04-01

    Emissions of certain low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) are considered exempt to volatile organic compounds (VOC) regulations due to their low evaporation rates. However, these compounds may still play a role in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone formation. The LVP-VOCs selected for this work are categorized as intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) according to their vapor pressures and molecular formulas. In this study, the evaporation rates of 14 select IVOCs are investigated with half of them losing more than 95% of their mass in less than one month. Further, SOA and ozone formation are presented from 11 select IVOCs and 5 IVOC-containing generic consumer products under atmospherically relevant conditions using varying radical sources (NOx and/or H2O2) and a surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixture. Benzyl alcohol (0.41), n-heptadecane (0.38), and diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (0.16) are determined to have SOA yields greater than 0.1 in the presence of NOx and a surrogate urban hydrocarbon mixture. IVOCs also influence ozone formation from the surrogate urban mixture by impacting radical levels and NOx availability. The addition of lab created generic consumer products has a weak influence on ozone formation from the surrogate mixture but strongly affects SOA formation. The overall SOA and ozone formation of the generic consumer products could not be explained solely by the results of the pure IVOC experiments.

  9. Living on the edge: contrasted wood-formation dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edurne eMartinez Del Castillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e. in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for Pinus sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for Pinus sylvestris.

  10. Rapid formation of nanocrystalline HfO2 powders from amorphous hafnium hydroxide under ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskin, Pavel E.; Sharikov, Felix Yu.; Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Churagulov, Bulat R.; Tretyakov, Yury D.

    2007-01-01

    Peculiarities of hafnium hydroxide hydrothermal decomposition were studied by in situ heat flux calorimetry for the first time. It was shown that this process occurs in one exothermal stage (ΔH = -17.95 kJ mol -1 ) at 180-250 deg. C resulting in complete crystallization of amorphous phase with formation of pure monoclinic HfO 2 . It was found that the rate of m-HfO 2 formation can be significantly increased by combining hydrothermal treatment with simultaneous ultrasonic activation

  11. Formation of discrete solitons as a function of waveguide array geometry under the well-confined mode condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara-Betancourt, A; Martí-Panameño, E; Luis-Ramos, A; Parada-Alfonso, R

    2013-01-01

    Based on numerical techniques, in this paper, we study light propagation in two types of waveguide arrays. One array contains hexagonal cells, and the second contains honeycomb cells. The waveguides demonstrate the well-confined mode condition and possess Kerr nonlinearity. The mathematical model is based on the modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which allows us to evaluate the influence of the array geometry on nonlinear light propagation, primarily the process of discrete soliton formation. The main conclusion involves the role of the coupling length; the greater the coupling length, the lower the power threshold required for discrete soliton formation. (paper)

  12. Estimation of maximum burial depth of Neogene-Quaternary fore-arc basin formation based on laboratory porosity measurements under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shin-ichi; Tamura, Yukie; Marumo, Haruna; Mitsuhashi, Shunsuke

    2016-05-01

    Estimating the maximum effective stress that rocks have experienced, Pe,max, or the maximum burial depth for sedimentary rocks, Dmax, is important for many types of research, ranging from engineering applications to estimation of tectonic evolution. We estimated Pe,max and Dmax for the Kazusa fore-arc basin formations (the Kazusa Group) in the Boso Peninsula of Japan using a laboratory-based method. We carried out measurements of porosity n with siltstone specimens from the Kazusa Group formations (the Umegase, Otadai, Kiwada, Ohara, and Katsuura formations) under various effective pressure Pe conditions and estimated Pe,max from the inflection points of the log Pe-log n curve on the Pe increasing path. Except for the specimens from the Ohara Formation, estimated values of Pe,max ranged from approximately 13-24 MPa. This range corresponded to approximately 1.3-3.2 km of Dmax. Differences in Dmax among the specimens were at least four times smaller than distances normal to bedding planes among the sampling locations. This suggests that the formations were not deposited horizontally, but that deposition proceeded as the subsidence center of the fore-arc basin moved in a northwestward (NW) direction, and that formations were then uplifted almost horizontally. The Pe,max of the specimens from the Ohara Formation were 6-10 MPa smaller than the others. Thus, it is possible that pore pressure at the sampling location was more than 6 MPa larger than the hydrostatic condition when the sediments were deposited and lithified. Previous studies reported the center of a high-porosity zone at the Ohara Formation, and this high-porosity zone probably developed due to Pp over-pressurization. These results support the applicability of this method to estimation of tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins and magnitude of over-pressurization.

  13. SO3 Formation and the Effect of Fly Ash in a Bubbling Fluidised Bed under Oxy-Fuel Combustion Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarbassov, Y.; Duan, L.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, DEC 1 (2017), s. 314-321 ISSN 0378-3820 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SO3 formation * oxy-fuel combustion * fluidised bed Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuels Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Formation of Long-Term Reward Memories and Extinction Memories in the Honeybee ("Apis Mellifera")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    The honeybee ("Apis mellifera") has long served as an invertebrate model organism for reward learning and memory research. Its capacity for learning and memory formation is rooted in the ecological need to efficiently collect nectar and pollen during summer to ensure survival of the hive during winter. Foraging bees learn to associate a…

  15. Root iron plaque formation and characteristics under N2 flushing and its effects on translocation of Zn and Cd in paddy rice seedlings (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Yu, Shen

    2013-06-01

    Anoxic conditions are seldom considered in root iron plaque induction of wetland plants in hydroponic experiments, but such conditions are essential for root iron plaque formation in the field. Although ferrous ion availability and root radial oxygen loss capacity are generally taken into account, neglect of anoxic conditions in root iron plaque formation might lead to an under- or over-estimate of their functional effects, such as blocking toxic metal uptake. This study hypothesized that anoxic conditions would influence root iron plaque formation characteristics and translocation of Zn and Cd by rice seedlings. A hydroponic culture was used to grow rice seedlings and a non-disruptive approach for blocking air exchange between the atmosphere and the induction solution matrix was applied for root iron plaque formation, namely flushing the headspace of the induction solution with N2 during root iron plaque induction. Zn and Cd were spiked into the solution after root iron plaque formation, and translocation of both metals was determined. Blocking air exchange between the atmosphere and the nutrient solution by N2 flushing increased root plaque Fe content by between 11 and 77 % (average 31 %). The N2 flushing treatment generated root iron plaques with a smoother surface than the non-N2 flushing treatment, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, but Fe oxyhydroxides coating the rice seedling roots were amorphous. The root iron plaques sequestrated Zn and Cd and the N2 flushing enhanced this effect by approx. 17 % for Zn and 71 % for Cd, calculated by both single and combined additions of Zn and Cd. Blocking of oxygen intrusion into the nutrient solution via N2 flushing enhanced root iron plaque formation and increased Cd and Zn sequestration in the iron plaques of rice seedlings. This study suggests that hydroponic studies that do not consider redox potential in the induction matrices might lead to an under-estimate of metal sequestration by root iron plaques of

  16. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.-H., E-mail: martin.evans@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M{sub 3}C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M{sub 3}C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism.

  17. Formation of environmentally persistent free radicals as the mechanism for reduced catechol degradation on hematite-silica surface under UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Pan, Bo; Liao, Shaohua; Zhang, Di; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-05-01

    Iron is rich in soils, and is recently reported to form stable complexes with organic free radicals, generating environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs). The observation may challenge the common viewpoint that iron is an effective catalyst to facilitate the degradation of various organic chemicals. But no study was specifically designed to investigate the possible inhibited degradation of organic chemicals because of the formation of EPFRs in dry environment. We observed that catechol degradation under UV irradiation was decreased over 20% in silica particles coated with 1% hematite in comparison to uncoated silica particles. Stabilized semiquinone or quinine and phenol radicals were involved in HMT-silica system. EPFR formation was thus the reason for the reduced catechol degradation on HMT-silica surface under UV irradiation at ambient temperature. EPFRs should be incorporated in the studies of organic contaminants geochemical behavior, and will be a new input in their environmental fate modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. S-Nitrosomycothiol Reductase and Mycothiol Are Required for Survival Under Aldehyde Stress and Biofilm Formation in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Derek; Hageman, Samantha; Gulati, Megha; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Rawat, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    We show that Mycobacterium smegmatis mutants disrupted in mscR, coding for a dual function S-nitrosomycothiol reductase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase, and mshC, coding for a mycothiol ligase and lacking mycothiol (MSH), are more susceptible to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and aldehydes than wild type. MSH is a cofactor for MscR, and both mshC and mscR are induced by GSNO and aldehydes. We also show that a mutant disrupted in egtA, coding for a γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase and lacking in ergothioneine, is sensitive to nitrosative stress but not to aldehydes. In addition, we find that MSH and S-nitrosomycothiol reductase are required for normal biofilm formation in M. smegmatis, suggesting potential new therapeutic pathways to target to inhibit or disrupt biofilm formation. PMID:27321674

  19. Prevention of melanin formation during aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using an Aspergillus nidulans cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-11-01

    An Aspergillus nidulans cell factory was genetically engineered to produce an aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO). The cell factory initiated production of melanin when growth-limited conditions were established using stationary plates and shaken flasks. This phenomenon was more pronounced when the strain was cultured in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). This study investigated different approaches to reduce melanin formation in fungal mycelia and liquid medium in order to increase the enzyme production yield. Removal of copper from the medium recipe reduced melanin formation in agar cultures and increased enzyme activities by 48% in agitated liquid cultures. Copper has been reported as a key element for tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Ascorbic acid (0.44g/L) stopped melanin accumulation, did not affect growth parameters and resulted in AAO activity that was more than two-fold greater than a control treatment with no ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thrombin generation and fibrin clot formation under hypothermic conditions: an in vitro evaluation of tissue factor initiated whole blood coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelihan, Matthew F; Kiankhooy, Armin; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E

    2014-02-01

    Despite trauma-induced hypothermic coagulopathy being familiar in the clinical setting, empirical experimentation concerning this phenomenon is lacking. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothermia on thrombin generation, clot formation, and global hemostatic functions in an in vitro environment using a whole blood model and thromboelastography, which can recapitulate hypothermia. Blood was collected from healthy individuals through venipuncture and treated with corn trypsin inhibitor, to block the contact pathway. Coagulation was initiated with 5pM tissue factor at temperatures 37°C, 32°C, and 27°C. Reactions were quenched over time, with soluble and insoluble components analyzed for thrombin generation, fibrinogen consumption, factor (f)XIII activation, and fibrin deposition. Global coagulation potential was evaluated through thromboelastography. Data showed that thrombin generation in samples at 37°C and 32°C had comparable rates, whereas 27°C had a much lower rate (39.2 ± 1.1 and 43 ± 2.4 nM/min vs 28.6 ± 4.4 nM/min, respectively). Fibrinogen consumption and fXIII activation were highest at 37°C, followed by 32°C and 27°C. Fibrin formation as seen through clot weights also followed this trend. Thromboelastography data showed that clot formation was fastest in samples at 37°C and lowest at 27°C. Maximum clot strength was similar for each temperature. Also, percent lysis of clots was highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and then 27°C. Induced hypothermic conditions directly affect the rate of thrombin generation and clot formation, whereas global clot stability remains intact. © 2013.

  1. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open-circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y.; Schwager, F.; Muller, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of LiClO/sub 4/ and LiAsF/sub 6/ at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer resulting from the reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion or decomposition processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  2. Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Tal formation of Garhwal Lesser Himalaya : Rb-Sr age evidence from black shales underlying phosphorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.K.; Rameshwar Rao, D.; Azmi, R.J.; Gopalan, K.; Pantulu, G.V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently reported faunal evidence for placing the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary within the main phosphorite unit of the Chert-Phosphorite Member of the Tal Formation, Garhwal Lesser Himalaya, is supported by the present report of 626 ± 13 myr for the whole-rock Rb-Sr isochron age of the black shales directly underlying the phosphorite band. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. SIRT6 reduces macrophage foam cell formation by inducing autophagy and cholesterol efflux under ox-LDL condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangping; Zhang, Guangya; Pang, Qi; Yu, Cong; Xiong, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Fengling

    2017-05-01

    SIRT6 is a pivotal regulator of lipid metabolism. It is also closely connected to cardiovascular diseases, which are the main cause of death in diabetic patients. We observed a decrease in the expression of SIRT6 and key autophagy effectors (ATG5, LC3B, and LAMP1) in ox-LDL-induced foam cells, a special form of lipid-laden macrophages. In these cells, SIRT6 WT but not SIRT6 H133Y overexpression markedly reduced foam cell formation, as shown by Oil Red O staining, while inducing autophagy flux, as determined by both mRFP-GFP-LC3 labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Silencing the key autophagy initiation gene ATG5, reversed the autophagy-promoting effect of SIRT6 in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in foam cells. Cholesterol efflux assays indicated that SIRT6 overexpression in foam cells promoted cholesterol efflux, increased the levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, and reduced miR-33 levels. By transfecting miR-33 into cells overexpressing SIRT6, we observed that reduced foam cell formation and autophagy flux induction were largely reversed. These data imply that SIRT6 plays an essential role in protecting against atherosclerosis by reducing foam cell formation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Investigating the molecular underpinnings underlying morphology and changes in carbon partitioning during tension wood formation in Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrachi, Eshchar; Maloney, Victoria J; Silberbauer, Janine; Hefer, Charles A; Berger, Dave K; Mansfield, Shawn D; Myburg, Alexander A

    2015-06-01

    Tension wood has distinct physical and chemical properties, including altered fibre properties, cell wall composition and ultrastructure. It serves as a good system for investigating the genetic regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis and wood formation. The reference genome sequence for Eucalyptus grandis allows investigation of the global transcriptional reprogramming that accompanies tension wood formation in this global wood fibre crop. We report the first comprehensive analysis of physicochemical wood property changes in tension wood of Eucalyptus measured in a hybrid (E. grandis × Eucalyptus urophylla) clone, as well as genome-wide gene expression changes in xylem tissues 3 wk post-induction using RNA sequencing. We found that Eucalyptus tension wood in field-grown trees is characterized by an increase in cellulose, a reduction in lignin, xylose and mannose, and a marked increase in galactose. Gene expression profiling in tension wood-forming tissue showed corresponding down-regulation of monolignol biosynthetic genes, and differential expression of several carbohydrate active enzymes. We conclude that alterations of cell wall traits induced by tension wood formation in Eucalyptus are a consequence of a combination of down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis and hemicellulose remodelling, rather than the often proposed up-regulation of the cellulose biosynthetic pathway. © 2014 University of Pretoria New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Gold nanoshell photomodification under a single-nanosecond laser pulse accompanied by color-shifting and bubble formation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, Garif; Khlebtsov, Boris; Akchurin, Georgy; Tuchin, Valery; Zharov, Vladimir; Khlebtsov, Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    Laser-nanoparticle interaction is crucial for biomedical applications of lasers and nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or pathogenic microorganisms. We report on the first observation of laser-induced coloring of gold nanoshell solution after a one nanosecond pulse and an unprecedentedly low bubble formation (as the main mechanism of cancer cell killing) threshold at a laser fluence of about 4 mJ cm -2 , which is safe for normal tissue. Specifically, silica/gold nanoshell (140/15 nm) suspensions were irradiated with a single 4 ns (1064 nm) or 8 ns (900 nm) laser pulse at fluences ranging from 0.1 mJ cm -2 to 50 J cm -2 . Solution red coloring was observed by the naked eye confirmed by blue-shifting of the absorption spectrum maximum from the initial 900 nm for nanoshells to 530 nm for conventional colloidal gold nanospheres. TEM images revealed significant photomodification of nanoparticles including complete fragmentation of gold shells, changes in silica core structure, formation of small 20-30 nm isolated spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanoshells with central holes, and large and small spherical gold particles attached to a silica core. The time-resolved monitoring of bubble formation phenomena with the photothermal (PT) thermolens technique demonstrated that after application of a single 8 ns pulse at fluences 5-10 mJ cm -2 and higher the next pulse did not produce any PT response, indicating a dramatic decrease in absorption because of gold shell modification. We also observed a dependence of the bubble expansion time on the laser energy with unusually very fast PT signal rising (∼3.5 ns scale at 0.2 J cm -2 ). Application of the observed phenomena to medical applications is discussed, including a simple visual color test for laser-nanoparticle interaction

  6. THE FORMATION OF READINESS FOR PERSONAL SELF-DETERMINATION WITH DEVIANT TEENAGERS UNDER THE CONDITIONS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopovaya Oksana Vladimirovna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of introduction of a practice-oriented model of a pedagogical system into the educational process of a school and a vocational school. The system stimulates the process of the formation of readiness for personal self-determination of a modern teenager as an integration of external influences on a forming personality and his or her active internal self-development. The result of the research can be used in the work of psychologists, pedagogue-psychologists, social pedagogues in institutions of general, primary professional and specialized secondary education.

  7. Formation of a supersaturated carbon solution in a metal under the process of carbon nano fibers obtaining by PECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takopulo, D. A.; Fisenko, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes in a highly porous carbon layer appeared on a catalytic surface of a plasma chemical reactor during carbon nano fibers obtaining by PECVD (plasma enhanced CVD) are considered. Nano fibers formation in such a process is carried out as a result of the catalytic decomposition of the carbon contained plasma pyrolysis yields followed by carbon atoms diffusion into the catalyst bulk with a subsequent formation of carbon in a metal solid solution. The results of the numerical investigation of the transfer processes in the porous layer have shown that the layer thickness growth significantly reduces the catalytic surface temperature. This effect causes the carbon solid solution supersaturation, which is an obligatory condition of the carbon clusters nucleation. The transfer problems initial data have been obtained in a result of experimental investigations of thin porous carbon layers gathered from the catalytic surface of the plasma chemical reactor. It have been determined that the layer porosity has an average value of about 70%, and it's effective heat conductivity in the temperature range of 600-1000 C is about 10 -1 W/(m*K) and slightly depends on the temperature. A numerical modeling has been made for a steady state approximation. The correctness of this approximation is based on the comparison of the steady stale stabilization characteristic time with the porous layer growth characteristic time. The latter appeared to be much longer than the former one. (authors).

  8. Leaf surface wax is a source of plant methane formation under UV radiation and in the presence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, D; Mikkelsen, T N; Rolsted, M M M; Egsgaard, H; Ambus, P

    2014-03-01

    The terrestrial vegetation is a source of UV radiation-induced aerobic methane (CH4 ) release to the atmosphere. Hitherto pectin, a plant structural component, has been considered as the most likely precursor for this CH4 release. However, most of the leaf pectin is situated below the surface wax layer, and UV transmittance of the cuticle differs among plant species. In some species, the cuticle effectively absorbs and/or reflects UV radiation. Thus, pectin may not necessarily contribute substantially to the UV radiation-induced CH4 emission measured at surface level in all species. Here, we investigated the potential of the leaf surface wax itself as a source of UV radiation-induced leaf aerobic CH4 formation. Isolated leaf surface wax emitted CH4 at substantial rates in response to UV radiation. This discovery has implications for how the phenomenon should be scaled to global levels. In relation to this, we demonstrated that the UV radiation-induced CH4 emission is independent of leaf area index above unity. Further, we observed that the presence of O2 in the atmosphere was necessary for achieving the highest rates of CH4 emission. Methane formation from leaf surface wax is supposedly a two-step process initiated by a photolytic rearrangement reaction of the major component followed by an α-cleavage of the generated ketone. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Enzyme mediated silicon-oxygen bond formation; the use of Rhizopus oryzae lipase, lysozyme and phytase under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Vincenzo; Bassindale, Alan R; Brandstadt, Kurt F; Lawson, Rachel; Taylor, Peter G

    2010-10-21

    The potential for expanding the variety of enzymic methods for siloxane bond formation is explored. Three enzymes, Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL), lysozyme and phytase are reported to catalyse the condensation of the model compound, trimethylsilanol, formed in situ from trimethylethoxysilane, to produce hexamethyldisiloxane in aqueous media at 25 °C and pH 7. Thermal denaturation and reactant inhibition experiments were conducted to better understand the catalytic role of these enzyme candidates. It was found that enzyme activities were significantly reduced following thermal treatment, suggesting a potential key-role of the enzyme active sites in the catalysis. Similarly, residue-specific modification of the key-amino acids believed to participate in the ROL catalysis also had a significant effect on the silicon bio-catalysis, indicating that the catalytic triad of the lipase may be involved during the enzyme-mediated formation of the silicon-oxygen bond. E. coli phytase was found to be particularly effective at catalysing the condensation of trimethylsilanol in a predominantly organic medium consisting of 95% acetonitrile and 5% water. Whereas the use of enzymes in silicon chemistry is still very much a developing and frontier activity, the results presented herein give some grounds for optimism that the variety of enzyme mediated reactions will continue to increase and may one day become a routine element in the portfolio of the synthetic silicon chemist.

  10. Formation and coalescence of strain localized regions in ferrite phase of DP600 steels under uniaxial tensile deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaie, A., E-mail: amir_alaie@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kadkhodapour, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Ziaei Rad, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadi Asadabad, M. [Materials Research School, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Schmauder, S. [Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-01-19

    In this study the key factors in the creation and coalescence of strain localization regions in dual-phase steels were investigated. An in-situ tensile setup was used to follow the microscopic deformation of ferrite phase inside the microstructure of DP600 steel. The test was continued until the specimen was very close to final failure. The captured scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs enabled us to directly observe the evolution of deformation bands as a contour of strain distribution in the ferrite matrix. The image processing method was used to quantify the ferrite microscopic strains; the obtained strain maps were superimposed onto the SEM micrographs. The results revealed important deformational characteristics of the microstructure at the microscopic level. It was observed that despite the formation of slip bands inside the large grains during the early stages of deformation, the large ferrite grains did not contribute to the formation of high-strain bands until the final stages of severe necking. The behavior of voids and initial defects inside the localization bands was also studied. In the final stages of deformation, cracks were observed to preferentially propagate in the direction of local deformation bands and to coalescence with each other to form the final failure lines in the microstructure. It was observed that in the final stages of deformation, the defects or voids outside the deformation bands do not contribute to the final failure mechanisms and could be considered to be of minor importance.

  11. Nicotine promotes vascular endothelial growth factor secretion by human trophoblast cells under hypoxic conditions and improves the proliferation and tube formation capacity of human umbilical endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongbo; Wu, Lanxiang; Wang, Yahui; Zhou, Jiayi; Li, Ruixia; Zhou, Jiabing; Wang, Zehua; Xu, Congjian

    2017-04-01

    Pre-eclampsia, characterized as defective uteroplacental vascularization, remains the major cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated that cigarette smoking reduced the risk of pre-eclampsia. However, the molecular mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, it is demonstrated that a low dose of nicotine decreased soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sFlt1) secretion in human trophoblast cells under hypoxic conditions. Nicotine was then observed to promote vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by reducing sFlt1 secretion and increasing VEGF mRNA transcription. Further data showed that nicotine enhanced hypoxia-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and HIF-1α small interfering RNA abrogated nicotine-induced VEGF secretion, indicating that HIF-1α may be responsible for nicotine-mediated VEGF transcription under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, conditioned medium from human trophoblast cells treated with nicotine under hypoxic conditions promoted the proliferation and tube formation capacity of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) by promoting VEGF secretion. These findings indicate that nicotine may promote VEGF secretion in human trophoblast cells under hypoxic conditions by reducing sFlt1 secretion and up-regulating VEGF transcription and improve the proliferation and tube formation of HUVEC cells, which may contribute to elucidate the protective effect of cigarette smoking against pre-eclampsia. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biogenic amine formation in turkey meat under modified atmosphere packaging with extended shelf life: Index of freshness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Alfaia, C M; Barreto, A S

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on biogenic amine production in turkey meat according to its shelf life period, determining an index of freshness. Sliced meat samples of different meat quality categories (according to color and pH₂₄) were individually packaged under aerobiosis (aerobic package) and in 6 different modified atmospheres containing different gas mixtures: MAP1, 50% N₂/50% CO₂; MAP2, 0.5% CO/50% CO₂/49.5% N₂; MAP3, 50% Ar/50% N₂; MAP4, 0.5% CO/80% CO₂/19.5% N₂; MAP5, 100% N₂; and MAP6, 50% Ar/50% CO₂. All samples were stored at 0 ± 1°C in the dark for between 12 and 25 d. Meat samples packaged in aerobic packaging were analyzed for their microbial and physicochemical characteristics on d 0, 5, and 12 of storage, and then extended to 19 and 25 d when samples were under MAP. The production of biogenic amines analyzed in turkey meat increased over time. The values of putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine increased significantly (P < 0.05) during storage time in samples packaged under aerobiosis, MAP3, and MAP5. Histamine was not detected in turkey meat packaged under study conditions, or when present, the levels were below the limit of quantification (1.03 mg/kg). Tyramine in turkey meat under MAP was not the best amine indicator of meat deterioration, with cadaverine being suggested instead, or the sum of the amines putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine, to characterize and quantify meat freshness. After 25 d of storage, the meat packaged under MAP with a mixture containing a higher concentration of CO₂ and with CO was the one with a lower index value (11.36 mg/kg), although not significantly different from the indices provided by the meat packaged with MAP1, 2, and 6.

  13. Effect of Sodium Chloride on α-Dicarbonyl Compound and 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural Formations from Glucose under Caramelization Conditions: A Multiresponse Kinetic Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-08-17

    This study aimed to investigate the kinetics of α-dicarbonyl compound formation in glucose and glucose-sodium chloride mixture during heating under caramelization conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and diacetyl were determined. A comprehensive reaction network was built, and the multiresponse model was compared to the experimentally observed data. Interconversion between glucose and fructose became 2.5 times faster in the presence of NaCl at 180 and 200 °C. The effect of NaCl on the rate constants of α-dicarbonyl compound formation varied across the precursor and the compound itself and temperature. A decrease in rate constants of 3-deoxyglucosone and 1-deoxyglucosone formations by the presence of NaCl was observed. HMF formation was revealed to be mainly via isomerization to fructose and dehydration over cyclic intermediates, and the rate constants increase 4-fold in the presence of NaCl.

  14. A theoretical insight into H accumulation and bubble formation by applying isotropic strain on the W-H system under a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Quan-Fu; Liu, Yue-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Fang; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2018-04-01

    The solubility and bubble formation of hydrogen (H) in tungsten (W) are crucial factors for the application of W as a plasma-facing component under a fusion environment, but the data and mechanism are presently scattered, indicating some important factors might be neglected. High-energy neutron-irradiated W inevitably causes a local strain, which may change the solubility of H in W. Here, we performed first-principles calculations to predict the H solution behaviors under isotropic strain combined with temperature effect in W and found that the H solubility in interstitial lattice can be promoted/impeded by isotropic tensile/compressive strain over the temperature range 300-1800 K. The calculated H solubility presents good agreement with the experiment. Together, our previous results of anisotropic strain, except for isotropic compression, both isotropic tension and anisotropic tension/compression enhance H solution so as to reveal an important physical implication for H accumulation and bubble formation in W: strain can enhance H solubility, resulting in the preliminary nucleation of H bubble that further causes the local strain of W lattice around H bubble, which in turn improves the H solubility at the strained region that promotes continuous growth of the H bubble via a chain-reaction effect in W. This result can also interpret the H bubble formation even if no radiation damage is produced in W exposed to low-energy H plasma.

  15. Formation of metabolites during biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor under thermophilic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) was shown in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor under thermophilic conditions. The reactor was inoculated with granular biomass and fed with a synthetic medium and 3 mumol/L of a mixture of LAS with alkylchain length of 10 to 13 carbon...

  16. Leaf surface wax is a source of plant methane formation under UV radiation and in the presence of oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Rolsted, M. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The terrestrial vegetation is a source of UV radiation-induced aerobic methane (CH4) release to the atmosphere. Hitherto pectin, a plant structural component, has been considered as the most likely precursor for this CH4 release. However, most of the leaf pectin is situated below the surface wax...... layer, and UV transmittance of the cuticle differs among plant species. In some species, the cuticle effectively absorbs and/or reflects UV radiation. Thus, pectin may not necessarily contribute substantially to the UV radiation-induced CH4 emission measured at surface level in all species. Here, we...... investigated the potential of the leaf surface wax itself as a source of UV radiationinduced leaf aerobic CH4 formation. Isolated leaf surface wax emitted CH4 at substantial rates in response to UV radiation. This discovery has implications for how the phenomenon should be scaled to global levels. In relation...

  17. Planktonic replication is essential for biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in a complex medium under static and dynamic flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mampel, J.; Spirig, T.; Weber, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila persists for a long time in aquatic habitats, where the bacteria associate with biofilms and replicate within protozoan predators. While L. pneumophila serves as a paradigm for intracellular growth within protozoa, it is less clear whether the bacteria form or replicate......A mutant lacking the alternative sigma factor sigma(28) was reduced, which demonstrated that bacterial factors are required. Accumulation of biomass coincided with an increase in the optical density at 600 nm and ceased when the bacteria reached the stationary growth phase. L. pneumophila neither grew nor......, and no sizeable patches of clonally growing bacteria were observed. Our findings indicate that biofilm formation by L. pneumophila in a rich medium is due to growth of planktonic bacteria rather than to growth of sessile bacteria. In agreement with this conclusion, GFP-labeled L. pneumophila initially adhered...

  18. The mechanisms underlying corrosion product formation and deposition in nuclear power plant circuits through the action of galvanic and thermal electromotive forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusakov, V.P.; Sedov, V.M.; Khitrov, Yu.A.; Brusov, K.N.; Razmashkin, N.V.; Versin, V.V.; Rybalchenko, I.L.

    1983-01-01

    From a theoretical standpoint, the processes of formation of corrosion products in nuclear power plant circuits, deposition of corrosion products on the circuit surfaces, formation of an equilibrium concentration of corrosion products in the coolant, and distribution of radionuclides resulting from corrosion in different parts of the circuit are considered. It is shown that the main driving forces for the mass-transfer processes in the circuits are the thermal and galvanic electromotive forces (EMF) of the microcouples. On the basis of the theoretical concepts developed the authors have obtained analytical dependences for calculating the individual stages of the process of corrosion product transfer in the circuits. The mechanisms underlying the processes which occur as a result of thermal and galvanic EMFs are considered, together with the factors influencing these processes. The results of verification of the dependences by computational methods are given and they are compared with operational data from nuclear and conventional thermal power plants and with experimental data. (author)

  19. Optimisation of Surface-Initiated Photoiniferter-Mediated Polymerisation under Confinement, and the Formation of Block Copolymers in Mesoporous Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C. Tom

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nature as the ultimate inspiration can direct, gate, and selectively transport species across channels to fulfil a specific targeted function. Harnessing such precision over local structure and functionality at the nanoscale is expected to lead to indispensable developments in synthetic channels for application in catalysis, filtration and sensing, and in drug delivery. By combining mesoporous materials with localised charge-switchable poly(2-(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA brushes, precisely controlling pore filling and exploring the possibility of incorporating two different responsive polymers, we hope to approach the precision control of natural systems in the absence of an external force. Here, we report a simple one-step approach to prepare a mesoporous silica thin film with ~8 nm pores functionalised with a photoiniferter by combining sol–gel chemistry and evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA. We show that surface-initiated photoiniferter-mediated polymerisation (SI-PIMP allows the incorporation of a high polymer content up to geometrical pore blocking by the simple application of UV light in the presence of a monomer and solvent, proceeding in a controlled manner in pore sizes below 10 nm, with the potential to tune the material properties through the formation of surface-grafted block copolymers.

  20. Size-controlled synthesis and formation mechanism of manganese oxide OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Cheng, Xiaodi; Qiu, Guohong; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a simplified approach for size-controlled synthesis of manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) nanowires using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4) under reflux conditions. The morphology and nanostructure of the synthesized products are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Ar adsorption, and electron microscopy analysis, in order to elucidate the controlling effects of acid concentration and type as well as the formation mechanism of OMS-2 nanowires. The concentration of inorganic acid is a crucial factor controlling the phase of the synthesized products. OMS-2 nanowires are obtained with HCl at the concentration ≥0.96 mol/L or with HNO3 and H2SO4 at the concentrations ≥0.72 mol/L. Differently, the type of inorganic acid effectively determines the particle size of OMS-2 nanowires. When the acid is changed from HCl to HNO3 and H2SO4 in the reflux system, the average length of OMS-2 declines significantly by 60-70% (1104-442 and 339 nm), with minor decreased in the average width (43-39 and 34 nm). The formation of OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids involves a two-step process, i.e., the initial formation of layered manganese oxides, and subsequent transformation to OMS-2 via a dissolution-recrystallization process under acidic conditions. The proposed reflux route provides an alternative approach for synthesizing OMS-2 nanowires as well as other porous nano-crystalline OMS materials.

  1. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB112 Promotes Anthocyanin Formation during Salinity and under High Light Stress1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkowska, Magda E.; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Xue, Gang-Ping; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. Here, we report MYB112 as a formerly unknown regulator of anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Expression profiling after chemically induced overexpression of MYB112 identified 28 up- and 28 down-regulated genes 5 h after inducer treatment, including MYB7 and MYB32, which are both induced. In addition, upon extended induction, MYB112 also positively affects the expression of PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1, a key TF of anthocyanin biosynthesis, but acts negatively toward MYB12 and MYB111, which both control flavonol biosynthesis. MYB112 binds to an 8-bp DNA fragment containing the core sequence (A/T/G)(A/C)CC(A/T)(A/G/T)(A/C)(T/C). By electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that MYB112 binds in vitro and in vivo to MYB7 and MYB32 promoters, revealing them as direct downstream target genes. We further show that MYB112 expression is up-regulated by salinity and high light stress, environmental parameters that both require the MYB112 TF for anthocyanin accumulation under these stresses. In contrast to several other MYB TFs affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis, MYB112 expression is not controlled by nitrogen limitation or an excess of carbon. Thus, MYB112 constitutes a regulator that promotes anthocyanin accumulation under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26378103

  2. Formation mechanism of 3D macroporous graphene aerogel in alcohol-water media under gamma-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weikang; Wu, Yihu; Jiang, Zhiwen; Wang, Mozhen; Wu, Qichao; Zhou, Xiao; Ge, Xuewu

    2018-01-01

    The subtle control on the self-assembly behavior of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets is one of effective ways for the preparation of high-performance macroscopic graphene-based materials. In this work, detailed characterizations and discussion on the morphological and compositional changes on the solid products in various alcohol-water dispersions of GO under γ-ray radiation were carried out, proving the concurrent hydroxyalkylation and reduction processes of GO nanosheets in the system, which triggered the spontaneous self-assembly of the hydroxyalkylated and reduced GO nanosheets (HA-rGO). The pH and the volume ratio of alcohol to water (ϕa/w) are the key factors to control the self-assembly of the HA-rGO sheets. A free-standing graphene hydrogel (GH) only forms in the strong acid alcohol-water media with an appropriate ϕa/w. After the freeze-drying of the GH, a macroporous graphene aerogel (GA) was obtained, which exhibited a high absorption performance for not only nonpolar molecules (cyclohexane and kerosene), but also most polar molecules (toluene, chloroform, glycol, etc). This work demonstrates a comprehensive self-assembly mechanism of GO nanosheets in an aqueous media under γ-ray radiation and reveals that GA produced from the reduction of GO can be used as potential super-adsorbents for not only waste oil, but also the polar alcohols.

  3. An Experimental and Computational Study on Soot Formation in a Coflow Jet Flame Under Microgravity and Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Cao, Su; Giassi, Davide; Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Bennett, Beth Anne V.; Smooke, Mitchell D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the completion of the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) in March 2012, a comprehensive and unique set of microgravity coflow diffusion flame data was obtained. This data covers a range of conditions from weak flames near extinction to strong, highly sooting flames, and enabled the study of gravitational effects on phenomena such as liftoff, blowout and soot formation. The microgravity experiment was carried out in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS), while the normal gravity experiment was performed at Yale utilizing a copy of the flight hardware. Computational simulations of microgravity and normal gravity flames were also carried out to facilitate understanding of the experimental observations. This paper focuses on the different sooting behaviors of CH4 coflow jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. The unique set of data serves as an excellent test case for developing more accurate computational models.Experimentally, the flame shape and size, lift-off height, and soot temperature were determined from line-of-sight flame emission images taken with a color digital camera. Soot volume fraction was determined by performing an absolute light calibration using the incandescence from a flame-heated thermocouple. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the chemically reacting flow, and the soot evolution was modeled by the sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on an axisymmetric computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting system of fully coupled, highly nonlinear equations was solved by a damped, modified Newtons method. The microgravity sooting flames were found to have lower soot temperatures and higher volume fraction than their normal gravity counterparts. The soot distribution tends to shift from the centerline of the flame to the wings from normal gravity to

  4. Formation of metabolites during biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor under thermophilic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    , the removal of LAS in the reactor inoculated with active granular biomass exceeded the removal in the sterile reactor inoculated with sterile granular biomass. The effect of sorption ceased after 185 to 555 h depending on the LAS homologs. 40% of the LAS was biodegraded, and the removal rate was 0.5 x 10......Biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) was shown in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor under thermophilic conditions. The reactor was inoculated with granular biomass and fed with a synthetic medium and 3 mumol/L of a mixture of LAS with alkylchain length of 10 to 13 carbon...... atoms. The reactor was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 12 h with effluent recirculation in an effluent to influent ratio of 5 to 1. A sterile reactor operated in parallel revealed that sorption to sludge particles initially accounted for a major LAS removal. After 8 days of reactor operation...

  5. Formation of Acetylene in the Reaction of Methane with Iron Carbide Cluster Anions FeC3- under High-Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Fang; Jiang, Li-Xue; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Ting; He, Sheng-Gui

    2018-03-01

    The underlying mechanism for non-oxidative methane aromatization remains controversial owing to the lack of experimental evidence for the formation of the first C-C bond. For the first time, the elementary reaction of methane with atomic clusters (FeC 3 - ) under high-temperature conditions to produce C-C coupling products has been characterized by mass spectrometry. With the elevation of temperature from 300 K to 610 K, the production of acetylene, the important intermediate proposed in a monofunctional mechanism of methane aromatization, was significantly enhanced, which can be well-rationalized by quantum chemistry calculations. This study narrows the gap between gas-phase and condensed-phase studies on methane conversion and suggests that the monofunctional mechanism probably operates in non-oxidative methane aromatization. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The Role of Carbon in Core Formation Under Highly Reducing Conditions With Implications for the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E..; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Draper, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have shown elevated abundances of carbon on the surface of Mercury. Furthermore, the X-Ray Spectrometer on board MESSENGER measured elevated abundances of sulfur and low abundances of iron, suggesting the planet's oxygen fugacity (fO2) is several log10 units below the Iron-Wüstite (IW) buffer. Similar to the role of other volatiles (e.g. sulfur) on highly reducing planetary bodies, carbon is expected to behave differently than it would under higher fO2. As discussed by Nittler et al. and Hauck et al., under such highly reducing conditions, the majority of the iron partitions into the core. On Mercury, this resulted in a relatively large core and a thin mantle. Using a composition similar to the largest volcanic field on the planet (the northern volcanic plains), Vander Kaaden and McCubbin conducted sink-float experiments to determine the density of melts and minerals on Mercury. They showed that graphite would be the only buoyant mineral in a mercurian magma ocean. Therefore, Vander Kaaden and McCubbin proposed a possible primary flotation crust on the planet composed of graphite. Concurrently, Peplowski et al. used GRS data from MESSENGER to show an average northern hemisphere abundance of C on the planet of 1.4 +/- 0.9 wt%. However, as this result was only at the one-sigma detection limit, possible carbon abundances at the three-sigma detection limit for Mercury range from 0 to 4.1 wt% carbon. Additionally, Murchie et al. investigated the possible darkening agent on Mercury and concluded that coarse-grained graphite could darken high reflectance plains to the low reflectance material. To further test the possibility of elevated abundances of carbon in Mercury's crust, Peplowski et al. used the low-altitude MESSENGER data to show that carbon is the only material consistent with both the visible to near-infrared spectra and the neutron measurements of low

  7. Pipette-based Method to Study Embryoid Body Formation Derived from Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Partially Recapitulating Early Embryonic Development Under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Brungs, Sonja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-06-01

    The in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells partially recapitulates early in vivo embryonic development. More recently, embryonic development under the influence of microgravity has become a primary focus of space life sciences. In order to integrate the technique of pluripotent stem cell differentiation with simulated microgravity approaches, the 2-D clinostat compatible pipette-based method was experimentally investigated and adapted for investigating stem cell differentiation processes under simulated microgravity conditions. In order to keep residual accelerations as low as possible during clinorotation, while also guaranteeing enough material for further analysis, stem cells were exposed in 1-mL pipettes with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The differentiation of mouse and human pluripotent stem cells inside the pipettes resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies at normal gravity (1 g) after 24 h and 3 days. Differentiation of the mouse pluripotent stem cells on a 2-D pipette-clinostat for 3 days also resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies. Interestingly, the expression of myosin heavy chain was downregulated when cultivation was continued for an additional 7 days at normal gravity. This paper describes the techniques for culturing and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and exposure to simulated microgravity during culturing or differentiation on a 2-D pipette clinostat. The implementation of these methodologies along with -omics technologies will contribute to understand the mechanisms regulating how microgravity influences early embryonic development.

  8. Microbial mediated soil structure formation under wetting and drying cycles along a climate gradient (arid to humid) on hillslopes in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Nadine; Moskwa, Lisa-Marie; Kühn, Peter; Mueller, Carsten W.; Wagner, Dirk; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that the land surface resistance against erosion is largely controlled by the structure stability of the soil given by its inherent properties. Microbial activity plays a vital role in soil structure development, and thus affecting soil physical parameters. Accordingly the influence of biota shaping the earth's surface has been described through mechanisms such as mineral weathering, formation of ions and biofilms controlling land surface resistance against erosion. However the role of microorganisms for the development of soil stabilizing properties is still unclear and a precise quantitative understanding of the mechanisms under different climate conditions is widely missing. The objectives of our study are to examine to which extend microbiological processes control soil structure formation and stability and whether this is influenced by climate and topographic position. Soil samples were taken along a climate gradient and from different topographic positions of hillslopes in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera in austral autumn 2016. The variables of lithology, human disturbances and relief were held as far as possible constant whereas climate varies along the transect. We implemented 10 wet-dry cycles on air dried and sieved natural and sterile samples to enhance particle aggregation and increase structure stability. Throughout the entire experiment temperature is held constant at 20 °C to avoid changes in microbial activity. Samples are moistened and dried and each kept at the same respective pF-values for the same duration to add the same stress to each sample. Aggregate stability will be measured using wet sieving, ultrasonic dispersion and simulated rainfall. The results will be compared with on-site rainfall simulation experiments on hillslopes in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera to link laboratory results with natural field conditions. The experiment gives first insight into the aggregate formation process over time with and without

  9. Experimental evidence of formation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and POC export provoked by dust addition under current and high pCO2 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Justine; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Gazeau, Frédéric; Guieu, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of organic carbon export to the deep ocean, under anthropogenic forcing such as ocean warming and acidification, needs to be investigated in order to evaluate potential positive or negative feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and therefore on climate. As such, modifications of aggregation processes driven by transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) formation have the potential to affect carbon export. The objectives of this study were to experimentally assess the dynamics of organic matter, after the simulation of a Saharan dust deposition event, through the measurement over one week of TEP abundance and size, and to evaluate the effects of ocean acidification on TEP formation and carbon export following a dust deposition event. Three experiments were performed in the laboratory using 300 L tanks filled with filtered seawater collected in the Mediterranean Sea, during two 'no bloom' periods (spring at the start of the stratification period and autumn at the end of this stratification period) and during the winter bloom period. For each experiment, one of the two tanks was acidified to reach pH conditions slightly below values projected for 2100 (~ 7.6-7.8). In both tanks, a dust deposition event of 10 g m-2 was simulated at the surface. Our results suggest that Saharan dust deposition triggered the abiotic formation of TEP, leading to the formation of organic-mineral aggregates. The amount of particulate organic carbon (POC) exported was proportional to the flux of lithogenic particles to the sediment traps. Depending on the season, the POC flux following artificial dust deposition ranged between 38 and 90 mg m-2 over six experimental days. Such variability is likely linked to the seasonal differences in the quality and quantity of TEP-precursors initially present in seawater. Finally, these export fluxes were not significantly different at the completion of the three experiments between the two pH conditions.

  10. SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Todd C.

    2014-06-09

    Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

  11. Formation of N-nitrosamine and N-nitrosamino acids from food products and nitrite under simulated gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenen, P J; de Cock-Bethbeder, M W; Bouwman, J; Dhont, J H

    1980-01-01

    Average-sized portions of a variety of food products were reacted with nitrite under realistically simulated gastric conditions. The aqueous incubation medium contained sodium nitrite (10 mg/l) and potassium thiocyanate to mimic the incoming flux of saliva, as well as pepsin, sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid, reflecting the composition of gastric juice. After incubation for 2 hr at 37 degrees C, volatile N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosamino acids were determined in the reaction mixtures. Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was present in the incubation mixtures of smoked mackerel (8.5 micrograms per portion), canned herring (0.66 micrograms per portion) and beer (0.70 micrograms per 'portion'). Smaller amounts per portion, sometimes of other nitrosamines as well, were observed with canned salmon and anchovy, mustard, yoghurt and coffee brew. Negative results were obtained for canned tuna, soya sauce, ketchup, white bread, 'nasi goreng', tea brew and cocoa milk. Nitrosamino acids were detected in the reaction mixtures of smoked mackerel (58 micrograms per portion), soya sauce (24 micrograms per portion) and canned salmon (6.9 micrograms per portion) and in smaller amounts in those of canned herring, anchovy and cocoa milk. In order to reduce the number of analyses to be performed, most products have been studied only after incubation, so that the nitrosamines and nitrosamino acids found may already have been present -- wholly or partly -- in the original products, before incubation. Such is the case for part of the NDMA in the reaction mixture of smoked mackerel and for all the NDMA in beer. The toxicological implications of these findings remain to be established.

  12. Biological soil crust formation under artificial vegetation effect and its properties in the Mugetan sandy land, northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. W.; Jia, Y. H.; Zhang, K.

    2016-08-01

    Mugetan sandy land is an inland desertification area of about 2,065 km2 in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. In the ecological restoration region of the Mugetan sandy land, different crusts have formed under the action of vegetation in three types of sandy soil (i.e. semi-fixed sand dune, fixed sand dune and ancient fixed aeolian sandy soil). The surface sand particle distribution, mineral component and vegetation composition of moving sand dunes and three types of sandy soil were studied in 2010-2014 to analyze the biological crust formation properties in the Mugetan sandy land and the effects of artificial vegetation. Results from this study revealed that artificial vegetation increases the clay content and encourages the development of biological curst. The fine particles (i.e. clay and humus) of the surface layer of the sand dunes increased more than 15% ten years after the artificial vegetation planting, and further increased up to 20% after one hundred years. The interaction of clay, humus, and other fine particles formed the soil aggregate structure. Meanwhile, under the vegetation effect from the microbes, algae, and moss, the sand particles stuck together and a biological crust formed. The interconnection of the partial crusts caused the sand dunes to gradually be fixed as a whole. Maintaining the integrity of the biological crust plays a vital role in fixing the sand under the crust. The precipitation and temperature conditions in the Mugetan sandy land could satisfy the demand of biological crust formation and development. If rational vegetation measures are adopted in the region with moving sand dunes, the lichen-moss-algae biological curst will form after ten years, but it still takes more time for the sand dunes to reach the nutrient enrichment state. If the biological curst is partly broken due to human activities, reasonable closure and restoration measures can shorten the restoration time of the biological crust.

  13. The formation of different Mg-Al LDHs (Mg/Al=2:1 under hydrothermal conditions and their application for Zn2+ ions removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankauskaite A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of different Mg-Al LDHs (Mg/Al = 2:1 under hydrothermal conditions (200°C; 4-24 h was investigated in the 4MgCO3⋅Mg(OH2⋅5H2O - γ-Al2O3/Al(OH3 - H2O and Mg5(CO34(OH2•4H2O - γ-Al2O3 - H2O systems. It was determined that chemical nature of the initial Mg containing components changes the formation mechanism of the synthesis products during isothermal curing. Magnesium aluminum hydroxide hydrate is crystallized by using 4MgCO3⋅Mg(OH2⋅5H2O as starting material while hydroxide hydrate in the Mg5(CO34(OH2•4H2O presence. The sequence of the compounds formation is presented. It should be noted that different modifications of Al containing components have only a slight influence on the meixnerite-type LDH hydrothermal synthesis. It was determined that after 45 min of sorption all Zn2+ ions are incorporated into the crystal structure of hydrotalcite. It should be underlined that crystallinity of the latter compound do not change during ion exchange experiments. Thus, the latter compound can be used as adsorbent for Zn2+ ion removal. Synthesized samples were characterized by powder X-Ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, simultaneous thermal analysis (STA and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.

  14. Formation and release of non-extractable {sup 14}C-Dicamba residues in soil under sterile and non-sterile regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevao, Bondi; Jones, Kevin C.; Semple, Kirk T

    2005-01-01

    The role of native soil microorganisms in the formation and release of non-extractable {sup 14}C-residues, previously treated with {sup 14}C-Dicamba, was investigated to examine their significance to the longer-term environmental effects on non-extractable pesticide residues. A 90 d study compared the fate of Dicamba under sterile and non-sterile regimes. In addition, soils were aged for 30 d and repeatedly extracted with a 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} solution, to an extraction end point, to produce non-extractable residues. The extracted soil containing non-extractable residues was mixed with clean soil that had been freshly spiked with non-labeled Dicamba at 0.2 mg kg{sup -1} to increase the bulk volume of the soil and stimulate microbial activity. Sub-samples were then introduced into microcosms to compare the extent of microbially facilitated release and mineralisation with release rates in sterile microcosms. The results show that microorganisms play a significant role in the formation and release of non-extractable Dicamba residues. The release of {sup 14}C-activity in sterile microcosms was linked to physical mixing of the extracted soil with field soil prior to the beginning of the incubations. The released {sup 14}C-activity may be further mineralized, reincorporated into humus, or taken up by plants or other soil inhabiting biota.

  15. Formation and release of non-extractable 14C-Dicamba residues in soil under sterile and non-sterile regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevao, Bondi; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T

    2005-01-01

    The role of native soil microorganisms in the formation and release of non-extractable (14)C-residues, previously treated with (14)C-Dicamba, was investigated to examine their significance to the longer-term environmental effects on non-extractable pesticide residues. A 90 d study compared the fate of Dicamba under sterile and non-sterile regimes. In addition, soils were aged for 30 d and repeatedly extracted with a 0.01 M CaCl(2) solution, to an extraction end point, to produce non-extractable residues. The extracted soil containing non-extractable residues was mixed with clean soil that had been freshly spiked with non-labeled Dicamba at 0.2 mg kg(-1) to increase the bulk volume of the soil and stimulate microbial activity. Sub-samples were then introduced into microcosms to compare the extent of microbially facilitated release and mineralisation with release rates in sterile microcosms. The results show that microorganisms play a significant role in the formation and release of non-extractable Dicamba residues. The release of (14)C-activity in sterile microcosms was linked to physical mixing of the extracted soil with field soil prior to the beginning of the incubations. The released (14)C-activity may be further mineralized, reincorporated into humus, or taken up by plants or other soil inhabiting biota.

  16. The effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ö. Aydan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that some sinkholes or subsidence take place from time to time in the areas where abandoned room and pillar type mines exist. The author has been involved with the stability of abandoned mines beneath urbanized residential areas in Tokai region and there is a great concern about the stability of these abandoned mines during large earthquakes as well as in the long term. The 2003 Miyagi Hokubu and 2011 Great East Japan earthquakes caused great damage to abandoned mines and resulted in many collapses. The author presents the effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions and discusses the implications on the areas above abandoned lignite mines in this paper.

  17. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  18. Formation of 6-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene in the reaction of the p-tolyl radical with 1,3-butadiene under single-collision conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dorian S N; Dangi, Beni B; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Ryazantsev, Mikhail; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-12-26

    Crossed molecular beam reactions of p-tolyl (C7H7) plus 1,3-butadiene (C4H6), p-tolyl (C7H7) plus 1,3-butadiene-d6 (C4D6), and p-tolyl-d7 (C7D7) plus 1,3-butadiene (C4H6) were carried out under single-collision conditions at collision energies of about 55 kJ mol(-1). 6-Methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene was identified as the major reaction product formed at fractions of about 94% with the monocyclic isomer (trans-1-p-tolyl-1,3-butadiene) contributing only about 6%. The reaction is initiated by barrierless addition of the p-tolyl radical to the terminal carbon atom of the 1,3-butadiene via a van der Waals complex. The collision complex isomerizes via cyclization to a bicyclic intermediate, which then ejects a hydrogen atom from the bridging carbon to form 6-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene through a tight exit transition state located about 27 kJ mol(-1) above the separated products. This is the dominant channel under the present experimental conditions. Alternatively, the collision complex can also undergo hydrogen ejection to form trans-1-p-tolyl-1,3-butadiene; this is a minor contributor to the present experiment. The de facto barrierless formation of a methyl-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons by dehydrogenation via a single event represents an important step in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their partially hydrogenated analogues in combustion flames and the interstellar medium.

  19. Fast formation of supergene Mn oxides/hydroxides under acidic conditions in the oxic/anoxic transition zone of a shallow aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffner, F; Merten, D; Pollok, K; Wagner, S; Knoblauch, S; Langenhorst, F; Büchel, G

    2015-12-01

    Extensive uranium mining in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) in eastern Thuringia and Saxony took place during the period of 1946-1990. During mining activities, pelitic sediments rich in organic carbon and uranium were processed and exposed to oxygen. Subsequent pyrite oxidation and acidic leaching lead to partial contamination of the area with heavy metals and acid mine drainage (AMD) even few years after completion of remediation. One of those areas is the former heap Gessen (Ronneburg, Germany) were the residual contamination can be found 10 m under the base of the former heap containing partly permeable drainage channels. Actually, in such a system, a rapid but locally restricted mineralization of Mn oxides takes place under acidic conditions. This formation can be classified as a natural attenuation process as certain heavy metals, e.g., Cd (up to 6 μg/g), Ni (up to 311 μg/g), Co (up to 133 μg/g), and Zn (up to 104 μg/g) are bound to this phases. The secondary minerals occur as colored layers close to the shallow aquifer in glacial sediments and could be identified as birnessite and todorokite as Mn phase. The thermodynamic model shows that even small changes in the system are sufficient to shift either the pH or the Eh in the direction of stable Mn oxide phases in this acidic system. As a consequence of 9-15-year-long formation process (or even less), the supergene mineralization provides a cost-efficient contribution for remediation (natural attenuation) strategies of residual with heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Co, Ni, Zn) contaminated substrates.

  20. Restoration of Impaired Metabolic Energy Balance (ATP Pool and Tube Formation Potential of Endothelial Cells under “high glucose”, Diabetic Conditions by the Bioinorganic Polymer Polyphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro-vascularization is a fast, energy-dependent process that is compromised by elevated glucose concentrations such as in diabetes mellitus disease. Here, we studied the effect of the physiological bioinorganic polymer, polyphosphate (polyP, on the reduced ATP content and impaired function of endothelial cells cultivated under “high glucose” (35 mM diabetes mellitus conditions concentrations. This high-energy biopolymer has been shown to provide a source of metabolic energy, stored in its phosphoanhydride bonds. We show that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC cells to “high glucose” levels results in reduced cell viability, increased apoptotic cell death, and a decline in intracellular ATP level. As a consequence, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tube-like structures in the in vitro cell tube formation assay was almost completely abolished under “high glucose” conditions. Those cells were grown onto a physiological collagen scaffold (collagen/basement membrane extract. We demonstrate that these adverse effects of increased glucose levels can be reversed by administration of polyP to almost normal values. Using Na-polyP, complexed in a stoichiometric (molar ratio to Ca2+ ions and in the physiological concentration range between 30 and 300 µM, an almost complete restoration of the reduced ATP pool of cells exposed to “high glucose” was found, as well as a normalization of the number of apoptotic cells and energy-dependent tube formation. It is concluded that the adverse effects on endothelial cells caused by the metabolic energy imbalance at elevated glucose concentrations can be counterbalanced by polyP, potentially opening new strategies for treatment of the micro-vascular complications in diabetic patients.

  1. PAH formation under single collision conditions: reaction of phenyl radical and 1,3-butadiene to form 1,4-dihydronaphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R I; Parker, D S N; Zhang, F; Landera, A; Kislov, V V; Mebel, A M

    2012-05-03

    The crossed beam reactions of the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5), X(2)A(1)) with 1,3-butadiene (C(4)H(6), X(1)A(g)) and D6-1,3-butadiene (C(4)D(6), X(1)A(g)) as well as of the D5-phenyl radical (C(6)D(5), X(2)A(1)) with 2,3-D2-1,3-butadiene and 1,1,4,4-D4-1,3-butadiene were carried out under single collision conditions at collision energies of about 55 kJ mol(-1). Experimentally, the bicyclic 1,4-dihydronaphthalene molecule was identified as a major product of this reaction (58 ± 15%) with the 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene contributing 34 ± 10%. The reaction is initiated by a barrierless addition of the phenyl radical to the terminal carbon atom of the 1,3-butadiene (C1/C4) to form a bound intermediate; the latter underwent hydrogen elimination from the terminal CH(2) group of the 1,3-butadiene molecule leading to 1-phenyl-trans-1,3-butadiene through a submerged barrier. The dominant product, 1,4-dihydronaphthalene, is formed via an isomerization of the adduct by ring closure and emission of the hydrogen atom from the phenyl moiety at the bridging carbon atom through a tight exit transition state located about 31 kJ mol(-1) above the separated products. The hydrogen atom was found to leave the decomposing complex almost parallel to the total angular momentum vector and perpendicularly to the rotation plane of the decomposing intermediate. The defacto barrierless formation of the 1,4-dihydronaphthalene molecule involving a single collision between a phenyl radical and 1,3-butadiene represents an important step in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their partially hydrogenated counterparts in combustion and interstellar chemistry.

  2. Influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate tribofilm formation on the tribological performance of self-mated diamond-like carbon contacts under boundary lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah Tasdemir, H.; Tokoroyama, Takayuki; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Mabuchi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings offer excellent mechanical and tribological properties that make them suitable protective coatings for various industrial applications. In recent years, several engine and power train components in passenger cars, which work under boundary lubricated conditions, have been coated with DLC coatings. Since conventional lubricants and lubricant additives are formulated for metal surfaces, there are still controversial questions concerning chemical reactivity between DLC surfaces and common lubricant additives owing to the chemical inertness of DLC coatings. In this work, we present the influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZnDTP) anti-wear additives on the tribological performance of various self-mated DLC coatings under boundary lubrication conditions. The effects of hydrogen, doping elements, and surface morphology on the reactivity of DLC coatings to form a ZnDTP-derived tribofilm were investigated by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that ZnDTP-derived pad-like or patchy tribofilm forms on the surfaces depending on the DLC coating. It is seen that hydrogen content and doping elements increase pad-like tribofilm formation. Doped DLC coatings are found to give better wear resistance than non-doped DLC coatings. Furthermore, the addition of ZnDTP additives to the base oil significantly improves the wear resistance of hydrogenated DLC, silicon-doped hydrogenated DLC, and chromium-doped hydrogenated DLC. Hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous DLC coatings provide the lowest friction coefficient both in PAO (poly-alpha-olefin) and PAO + ZnDTP oils. - Highlights: • Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (DTP) tribofilm formation on various DLC surfaces was evidenced. • Pad-like tribofilm was found on a-C:H, a-C, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC. • Pad-like tribofilm on DLC surfaces greatly increased the wear resistance. • Hydrogenated and doped DLC coatings are

  3. Influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate tribofilm formation on the tribological performance of self-mated diamond-like carbon contacts under boundary lubrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah Tasdemir, H., E-mail: habdullah46@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tokoroyama, Takayuki; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Mabuchi, Yutaka [Nissan Motor Co. (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings offer excellent mechanical and tribological properties that make them suitable protective coatings for various industrial applications. In recent years, several engine and power train components in passenger cars, which work under boundary lubricated conditions, have been coated with DLC coatings. Since conventional lubricants and lubricant additives are formulated for metal surfaces, there are still controversial questions concerning chemical reactivity between DLC surfaces and common lubricant additives owing to the chemical inertness of DLC coatings. In this work, we present the influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZnDTP) anti-wear additives on the tribological performance of various self-mated DLC coatings under boundary lubrication conditions. The effects of hydrogen, doping elements, and surface morphology on the reactivity of DLC coatings to form a ZnDTP-derived tribofilm were investigated by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that ZnDTP-derived pad-like or patchy tribofilm forms on the surfaces depending on the DLC coating. It is seen that hydrogen content and doping elements increase pad-like tribofilm formation. Doped DLC coatings are found to give better wear resistance than non-doped DLC coatings. Furthermore, the addition of ZnDTP additives to the base oil significantly improves the wear resistance of hydrogenated DLC, silicon-doped hydrogenated DLC, and chromium-doped hydrogenated DLC. Hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous DLC coatings provide the lowest friction coefficient both in PAO (poly-alpha-olefin) and PAO + ZnDTP oils. - Highlights: • Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (DTP) tribofilm formation on various DLC surfaces was evidenced. • Pad-like tribofilm was found on a-C:H, a-C, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC. • Pad-like tribofilm on DLC surfaces greatly increased the wear resistance. • Hydrogenated and doped DLC coatings are

  4. Defect formation in aqueous environment: Theoretical assessment of boron incorporation in nickel ferrite under conditions of an operating pressurized-water nuclear reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rák, Zs.; Bucholz, E. W.; Brenner, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    A serious concern in the safety and economy of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is related to the accumulation of boron inside the metal oxide (mostly NiFe2O4 spinel) deposits on the upper regions of the fuel rods. Boron, being a potent neutron absorber, can alter the neutron flux causing anomalous shifts and fluctuations in the power output of the reactor core. This phenomenon reduces the operational flexibility of the plant and may force the down-rating of the reactor. In this work an innovative approach is used to combine first-principles calculations with thermodynamic data to evaluate the possibility of B incorporation into the crystal structure of NiFe2O4 , under conditions typical to operating nuclear pressurized water nuclear reactors. Analyses of temperature and pH dependence of the defect formation energies indicate that B can accumulate in NiFe2O4 as an interstitial impurity and may therefore be a major contributor to the anomalous axial power shift observed in nuclear reactors. This computational approach is quite general and applicable to a large variety of solids in equilibrium with aqueous solutions.

  5. Interactions of nitric oxide with lipid peroxidation products under aerobic conditions: inhibitory effects on the formation of malondialdehyde and related thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ischia, M; Palumbo, A; Buzzo, F

    2000-02-01

    Under aerobic conditions, exposure of peroxidized lipids to nitric oxide (NO) was found to result in a rapid decrease in the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Addition of 10-100 microM NO to rat brain homogenates preincubated for 2 h at 37 degrees C caused up to a 20% decrease in the levels of TBARS compared to controls. A similar inhibitory effect was observed on TBARS produced by Fe(2+)-induced decomposition of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HPETE), due apparently to NO-induced decomposition of the hydroperoxide (ferrous oxidation/xylenol orange assay). Prostaglandin G(2) (PGG(2), 35 microM), as a model bicyclic endoperoxide, and malondialdehyde (MDA, 20 microM), the main component of TBARS, proved also susceptible to degradation by NO or NO donors (diethylamine NONOate, DEA/NO) at concentrations of 100 microM or higher in 0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, and at 37 degrees C, as indicated by the reduced response to the TBA assay. No significant effect on TBARS determination was caused by nitrite ions. These and other data indicate that NO can inhibit TBARS formation by decomposing primary lipid peroxidation products, chiefly 15-HPETE and related hydroperoxides, and, to a lesser extent, later stage TBARS precursors, including bicyclic endoperoxides and MDA, via nitrosation and other oxidative routes, without however affecting chromogenic reactions during the assay. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Isotopologue profiling of triterpene formation under physiological conditions. Biosynthesis of lupeol-3-(3'-R-hydroxy)-stearate in Pentalinon andrieuxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M; Yam-Puc, Alejandro; Knispel, Nihat; Schramek, Nicholas; Huber, Claudia; Graßberger, Christoph; Ramírez-Torres, Fabiola G; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Hiebert-Giesbrecht, Mickel R; Chan-Bacab, Manuel J; Godoy-Hernández, Gregorio; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2014-04-04

    The biosynthesis of lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxy)-stearate (procrim b, 1) was investigated in the Mexican medicinal plant Pentalinon andrieuxii by (13)CO2 pulse-chase experiments. NMR analyses revealed positional enrichments of (13)C2-isotopologues in both the triterpenoid and the hydroxystearate moieties of 1. Five of the six isoprene units reflected a pattern with [1,2-(13)C2]- and [3,5-(13)C2]-isotopologues from the respective C5-precursors, IPP and DMAPP, whereas one isoprene unit in the ring E of 1 showed only the [3,5-(13)C2]-connectivity of the original C5-precursor, due to rearrangement of the dammarenyl cation intermediate during the cyclization process. The presence of (13)C2-isotopologues was indicative of [(13)C2]acetyl-CoA being the precursor units in the formation of the fatty acid moiety and of the triterpene via the mevalonate route. The observed labeling pattern was in agreement with a chair-chair-chair-boat conformation of the (S)-2,3-oxidosqualene precursor during the cyclization process, suggesting that the lupeol synthase from P. andrieuxii is of the same type as that from Olea europea and Taraxacum officinale, but different from that of Arabidopsis thaliana. The study shows that (13)CO2 pulse-chase experiments are powerful in elucidating, under in vivo conditions and in a single experiment, the biosynthesis of complex plant products including higher terpenes.

  7. Control of the Helicity Content of a Gun-Generated Spheromak by Incorporating a Conducting Shell into a Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko

    In the formation of magnetized plasmoid by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the magnetic helicity content of the generated plasmoid is one of the critical parameters. Typically, the bias coil to generate a poloidal flux is mounted either on the outer electrode or inside the inner electrode. However, most of the flux generated in the conventional method spreads even radially outside of the formation region. Thus, only a fraction of the total magnetic flux is actually exploited for helicity generation in the plasmoid. In the proposed system, the plasma gun incorporates a copper shell mounted on the outer electrode. By changing the rise time of the discharge bias coil current and the geometrical structure of the shell, the magnetic field structure and its time evolution can be controlled. The effect of the copper shell has been numerically simulated for the actual gun structure, and experimentally confirmed. This may increase the magnetic helicity content results, through increased poloidal magnetic field.

  8. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  9. Influence of turbulence-chemistry interaction for n-heptane spray combustion under diesel engine conditions with emphasis on soot formation and oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michele; Farrace, Daniele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) for n-heptane sprays under diesel engine conditions has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The conditional moment closure approach, which has been previously validated thoroughly for such flows, and the homogeneous reactor (i.e. no turbulent combustion model) approach have been compared, in view of the recent resurgence of the latter approaches for diesel engine CFD. Experimental data available from a constant-volume combustion chamber have been used for model validation purposes for a broad range of conditions including variations in ambient oxygen (8-21% by vol.), ambient temperature (900 and 1000 K) and ambient density (14.8 and 30 kg/m3). The results from both numerical approaches have been compared to the experimental values of ignition delay (ID), flame lift-off length (LOL), and soot volume fraction distributions. TCI was found to have a weak influence on ignition delay for the conditions simulated, attributed to the low values of the scalar dissipation relative to the critical value above which auto-ignition does not occur. In contrast, the flame LOL was considerably affected, in particular at low oxygen concentrations. Quasi-steady soot formation was similar; however, pronounced differences in soot oxidation behaviour are reported. The differences were further emphasised for a case with short injection duration: in such conditions, TCI was found to play a major role concerning the soot oxidation behaviour because of the importance of soot-oxidiser structure in mixture fraction space. Neglecting TCI leads to a strong over-estimation of soot oxidation after the end of injection. The results suggest that for some engines, and for some phenomena, the neglect of turbulent fluctuations may lead to predictions of acceptable engineering accuracy, but that a proper turbulent combustion model is needed for more reliable results.

  10. Conceptual Approach to Formation of Competitiveness of the Leading International Airports under Conditions of the World Trajectory of the Airline Market Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydorenko Kateryna V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Potential of competitiveness of the airport, as any other enterprise of the service sphere, is determined by the corporate power of the producer of these values. The issue of development of the infrastructure development strategy of leading international airports, which sets the goal of solution of the problem of complete, timely, uninterrupted and high quality satisfaction of the fast growing demand of services consumers with minimal costs, becomes extremely urgent under conditions of dynamic development of the world aviation. However, the airport infrastructure is rather wasteful and requires permanent investments into renovation of the infrastructure objects and technological systems. The airport infrastructure is a set of objects, which are divided, by their functional purpose, into objects that directly service the technological process of air conveyance (sphere of aviation activity and objects that create additional services. Increase of competitiveness of the airport in the world economic environment envisages timely modernisation and harmonious development of its objects in accordance with requirements of the airport services market on the basis of rational resource provision and efficient management of the property complex at all stages of functioning and development. The author studies aspects of formation of the competitive strategy of the airport, identifies strategic priorities of development of the airport infrastructure, including through the mechanism of state-private partnership, use of transit potential, strengthening of the logistical component, increase of quality of servicing, and diversification of activity by means of strengthening its non-aviation component with consideration of goals of efficient integration in the national and global environment.

  11. Special Features of Structure Formation in Pipes from Medium-Carbon Low-Alloy Steel 32G2F Under Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. I.; Belikov, S. V.; Musikhin, S. A.; Burmasov, S. P.; Popov, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Special features of formation of structure and properties of seamless pipes from medium-carbon low-alloy steel for oil and gas applications are considered and associated with chemical inhomogeneity of the metal of the pipes.

  12. Formation of double ring patterns on Co2MnSi Heusler alloy thin film by anodic oxidation under scanning probe microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Toutam, Vijaykumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Singh, Sandeep; Budhani, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Double ring formation on Co2MnSi (CMS) films is observed at electrical breakdown voltage during local anodic oxidation (LAO) using atomic force microscope (AFM). Corona effect and segregation of cobalt in the vicinity of the rings is studied using magnetic force microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Double ring formation is attributed to the interaction of ablated material with the induced magnetic field during LAO. Steepness of forward bias transport characteristics from the unpertu...

  13. Standard partial molar heat capacities and enthalpies of formation of aqueous aluminate under hydrothermal conditions from integral heat of solution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulier, Yohann; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Heats of solution of NaAlO 2 (s) were measured at five temperatures up to 250 °C. • Standard molar enthalpies of solution were determined from the measured heats of solution. • Standard molar enthalpies of solution were correlated with the density model. • The density model allows us to determine the standard molar heat capacities of reaction. - Abstract: Heats of solution of sodium aluminum oxide, NaAlO 2 (s), were measured in aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions using a Tian–Calvet heat-flow calorimeter (Setaram, Model C80) with high pressure “batch cells” made of hastelloy C-276, at five temperatures from (373.15 to 523.15) K, steam saturation pressure, and concentrations from (0.02 to 0.09) mol · kg −1 . Standard molar enthalpies of solution, Δ soln H ∘ , and relative standard molar enthalpies, [H ∘ (T) − H ∘ (298.15 K)], of NaAl(OH) 4 (aq) were determined from the measured heats of solution. The results were fitted with the “density” model. The temperature dependence of Δ soln H ∘ from the model yielded the standard molar heat capacities of reaction, Δ soln C p ∘ , from which standard partial molar heat capacities for aqueous aluminate, C p ∘ [A1(OH) 4 − ,aq], were calculated. Standard partial molar enthalpies of formation, Δ f H ∘ , and entropies, S ∘ , of A1(OH) 4 − (aq) were also determined. The values for C p ∘ [A1(OH) 4 − ,aq] agree with literature data determined up to T = 413 K from enthalpy of solution and heat capacity measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainties. They are consistent with differential heat capacity measurements up to T = 573 K from Schrödle et al. (2010) [29] using the same calorimeter, but this method has the advantage that measurements could be made at much lower concentrations in the presence of an excess concentration of ligand. To our knowledge, these are the first standard partial molar heat capacities measured under hydrothermal conditions by the

  14. Formation of fused-ring 2'-deoxycytidine adducts from 1-chloro-3-buten-2-one, an in vitro 1,3-butadiene metabolite, under in vitro physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Pelah, Avishay; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhong, Yu-Fang; An, Jing; Yu, Ying-Xin; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2013-10-21

    1-Chloro-3-buten-2-one (CBO) is a potential metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), a carcinogenic air pollutant. CBO is a bifunctional alkylating agent that readily reacts with glutathione (GSH) to form mono-GSH and di-GSH adducts. Recently, CBO and its precursor 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene (CHB) were found to be cytotoxic and genotoxic in human liver cells in culture with CBO being approximately 100-fold more potent than CHB. In the present study, CBO was shown to react readily with 2'-deoxycytidine (dC) under in vitro physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C) to form four dC adducts with the CBO moieties forming fused rings with the N3 and N(4) atoms of dC. The four products were structurally characterized as 2-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-7-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-1 and dC-2, a pair of diastereomers), 4-chloromethyl-4-hydroxy-7-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-3), and 2-chloromethyl-2-hydroxy-7-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-4). Interestingly, dC-1 and dC-2 were stable under our experimental conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C, and 6 h) and existed in equilibrium as indicated by HPLC analysis, whereas dC-3 and dC-4 were labile with the half-lives being 3.0 ± 0.36 and 1.7 ± 0.06 h, respectively. Decomposition of dC-4 produced both dC-1 and dC-2, whereas acid hydrolysis of dC-1/dC-2 and dC-4 in 1 M HCl at 100 °C for 30 min yielded the deribosylated adducts dC-1H/dC-2H and dC-4H, respectively. Because fused-ring dC adducts of other chemicals are mutagenic, the characterized CBO-dC adducts could be mutagenic and play a role in the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of CBO and its precursors, CHB and BD. The CBO-dC adducts may also be used as standards to characterize CBO-DNA adducts and to develop potential biomarkers for CBO formation in vivo.

  15. Formation of double ring patterns on Co2MnSi Heusler alloy thin film by anodic oxidation under scanning probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toutam, Vijaykumar; Singh, Sandeep; Pandey, Himanshu; Budhani, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Double ring formation on Co 2 MnSi (CMS) films is observed at electrical breakdown voltage during local anodic oxidation (LAO) using atomic force microscope (AFM). Corona effect and segregation of cobalt in the vicinity of the rings is studied using magnetic force microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Double ring formation is attributed to the interaction of ablated material with the induced magnetic field during LAO. Steepness of forward bias transport characteristics from the unperturbed region of the CMS film suggest a non equilibrium spin contribution. Such mesoscopic textures in magnetic films by AFM tip can be potentially used for memory storage applications.

  16. Formation of double ring patterns on Co2MnSi Heusler alloy thin film by anodic oxidation under scanning probe microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaykumar Toutam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Double ring formation on Co2MnSi (CMS films is observed at electrical breakdown voltage during local anodic oxidation (LAO using atomic force microscope (AFM. Corona effect and segregation of cobalt in the vicinity of the rings is studied using magnetic force microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Double ring formation is attributed to the interaction of ablated material with the induced magnetic field during LAO. Steepness of forward bias transport characteristics from the unperturbed region of the CMS film suggest a non equilibrium spin contribution. Such mesoscopic textures in magnetic films by AFM tip can be potentially used for memory storage applications.

  17. Formation of double ring patterns on Co2MnSi Heusler alloy thin film by anodic oxidation under scanning probe microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutam, Vijaykumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Singh, Sandeep; Budhani, R. C.

    2013-02-01

    Double ring formation on Co2MnSi (CMS) films is observed at electrical breakdown voltage during local anodic oxidation (LAO) using atomic force microscope (AFM). Corona effect and segregation of cobalt in the vicinity of the rings is studied using magnetic force microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Double ring formation is attributed to the interaction of ablated material with the induced magnetic field during LAO. Steepness of forward bias transport characteristics from the unperturbed region of the CMS film suggest a non equilibrium spin contribution. Such mesoscopic textures in magnetic films by AFM tip can be potentially used for memory storage applications.

  18. Formation of double ring patterns on Co{sub 2}MnSi Heusler alloy thin film by anodic oxidation under scanning probe microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutam, Vijaykumar; Singh, Sandeep [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi - 110012 (India); Pandey, Himanshu [Condensed Matter - Low Dimensional Systems Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur - 208016 (India); Budhani, R. C. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi - 110012 (India); Condensed Matter - Low Dimensional Systems Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur - 208016 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Double ring formation on Co{sub 2}MnSi (CMS) films is observed at electrical breakdown voltage during local anodic oxidation (LAO) using atomic force microscope (AFM). Corona effect and segregation of cobalt in the vicinity of the rings is studied using magnetic force microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Double ring formation is attributed to the interaction of ablated material with the induced magnetic field during LAO. Steepness of forward bias transport characteristics from the unperturbed region of the CMS film suggest a non equilibrium spin contribution. Such mesoscopic textures in magnetic films by AFM tip can be potentially used for memory storage applications.

  19. Oxidation of SO2 and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20MeV protons in N2/H2O/SO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, Shigeo; Nakai, Yoichi; Funada, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an experiment on charged droplet formation in a humidified N2 gas with trace SO2 concentration and induced by 20MeV proton irradiation. It is thought that SO2 reacts with the chemical species, such as OH radicals, generated through the reactions triggered by N2+ production. Both...... droplets contributes to the formation of the droplets. The charged droplet volume detected per unit time is proportional to the SO2 consumption, which indicates that a constant amount of sulfur atoms is contained in a unit volume of droplet, regardless of different droplet-size distributions depending...

  20. Carer and Healthcare Worker Perspectives on Community Management of Acute Malnutrition in Infants Aged Under 6 Months: A Formative Study from Malawi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugaletta, Concetta; Kerac, Marko; Chigwiya, Mirriam; Chipasula, Tamara; Moyo, Elvis; Newberry, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background and aim: Over the last decade, community based treatments have revolutionized the treatment of acute malnutrition in childhood. Of an estimated 38 million children aged <5 years with MAM (Moderate Acute Malnutrition) worldwide, 4.7 million are infants aged <6 months; of 20 million with SAM (Severe Acute Malnutrition), 3.8 million are infants <6 m. Recent WHO guidelines on SAM for the first time given international guidance on infants aged <6 m – but they are based on very weak evidence. What to do for infant MAM remains unknown and poorly described. In this study, we aimed to explore what carers and healthcare-worker perspectives thought about the new WHO proposals for community-based care for infant SAM. Since community-based care for infants is also highly relevant to infant MAM, this study has much wider relevance and implications. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study based on 12 interviews and 20 focus group discussions in two rural and three urban centres of Southern Malawi. In total, 143 people were interviewed. Participants included mothers, fathers, grandparents and healthcare workers. Purposive sampling were applied. Data were analysed using Excel. Thematic analysis deduced 6 major themes and 29 codes. Results: Infant malnutrition was a sensitive topic raising emotional and instinctive responses, involving family relationships and taboos. Six themes emerging from the data were: understanding of causes and symptoms of infant malnutrition; perception of management of infant malnutrition in hospitals; Perception of management of infant malnutrition in the community; care giving resources (mother and household); care giving resources (community level); perceived priorities for management of infant malnutrition. Participants instinctively preferred inpatient-based treatments for infant malnutrition. However, this was based on a superficial risk-benefit judgment and high expectations from inpatient-care and food and medicine

  1. Bioinspired seeding of biomaterials using three dimensional microtissues induces chondrogenic stem cell differentiation and cartilage formation under growth factor free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; Bolander, J.; Ji, W.; Vanspauwen, B.; Lammertyn, J.; Schrooten, J.; Luyten, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Cell laden biomaterials are archetypically seeded with individual cells and steered into the desired behavior using exogenous stimuli to control growth and differentiation. In contrast, direct cell-cell contact is instructive and even essential for natural tissue formation. Namely, microaggregation

  2. FORMATION OF CLOSED REVOLUTION SURFACE MICRORELIEF UNDER CONDITIONS OF KINEMATIC INSTABILITY OF CUTTING PROCESS AT NUMERICALLY AND PROGRAM CONTROLLED MACHINE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kashtalyan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers peculiar features concerning a microrelief formation of grooves, turnings and chutes while executing «in widening» machining at numerically and program controlled machine tools. Some results of the experimental research are presented in the paper.

  3. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  4. Comparing Psychology Undergraduates' Performance in Probabilistic Reasoning under Verbal-Numerical and Graphical-Pictorial Problem Presentation Format: What Is the Role of Individual and Contextual Dimensions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Mirian; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel; Penna, Maria Pietronilla; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate about the existence of a graphical facilitation effect on probabilistic reasoning. Measures of undergraduates' performances on problems presented in both verbal-numerical and graphical-pictorial formats have been related to visuo-spatial and numerical prerequisites, to statistical anxiety, to attitudes towards…

  5. Modeling the kinetics of hydrates formation using phase field method under similar conditions of petroleum pipelines; Modelagem da cinetica de formacao de hidratos utilizando o Modelo do Campo de Fase em condicoes similares a dutos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mabelle Biancardi; Castro, Jose Adilson de; Silva, Alexandre Jose da [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Metalurgica], e-mails: mabelle@metal.eeimvr.uff.br; adilson@metal.eeimvr.uff.br; ajs@metal.eeimvr.uff.br

    2008-10-15

    Natural hydrates are crystalline compounds that are ice-like formed under oil extraction transportation and processing. This paper deals with the kinetics of hydrate formation by using the phase field approach coupled with the transport equation of energy. The kinetic parameters of the hydrate formation were obtained by adjusting the proposed model to experimental results in similar conditions of oil extraction. The effect of thermal and nucleation conditions were investigated while the rate of formation and morphology were obtained by numerical computation. Model results of kinetics growth and morphology presented good agreement with the experimental ones. Simulation results indicated that super-cooling and pressure were decisive parameters for hydrates growth, morphology and interface thickness. (author)

  6. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Mukherjee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal–organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters.

  7. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel; Fontaine, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal-organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters.

  8. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Evaporation of targets and formation of absorption waves in air under the influence of ultraviolet laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, E. O.; Danilychev, V. A.; Dolgikh, V. A.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Zemskov, M. E.; Kerimov, O. M.; Metreveli, G. E.; Tamanyan, G. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An investigation was made of gasdynamic regimes of interaction of KrF laser radiation pulses with a graphite target in air at various pressures. At radiation flux densities up to 1 GW/cm2 the dominant process was target evaporation initiating a shock wave in the surrounding air. Formation of an optical detonation wave partly absorbing laser radiation was observed at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Molecular pathways underlying inhibitory effect of antimicrobial peptide Nal-P-113 on bacteria biofilms formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 by DNA microarray

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong-yan; Lin, Li; Tan, Li-si; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Pan, Ya-ping

    2017-01-01

    Background Wound-related infection remains a major challenge for health professionals. One disadvantage in conventional antibiotics is their inability to penetrate biofilms, the main protective strategy for bacteria to evade irradiation. Previously, we have shown that synthetic antimicrobial peptides could inhibit bacterial biofilms formation. Results In this study, we first delineated how Nal-P-113, a novel antimicrobial peptide, exerted its inhibitory effects on Porphyromonas gingivalis W83...

  10. Defect formation and desorption of metal atoms from alkali halide crystals under low energy electron bombardment studied by optical absorption and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, N.R.

    1993-04-01

    This work presents an extensive investigation of electronically induced desorption of ground-state alkali atoms from alkali halides and for the first time correlates directly the desorption with the stability and spatial distribution of the defects formed during bombardment. The electron impact results in the formation of stable F-centers and F-center clusters in the bulk of the crystals. In striking contrast a significant metallization of the surface is observed. Even at temperatures as low as 90 deg C the metallization is achieved within the time resolution of our detection system, which can only be explained by the rapid diffusion of hot holes. Superimposed to the fast and short diffusion of hot holes is the slow F-center diffusion. Measuring the distribution of defects with low energy ion sputtering techniques indicates that at least in the case of LiF the observed diffusion constant of F-centers agrees with values derived by using methods different from that applied here. At low temperatures the formation of F-center clusters and metal on the surface dominates. Colloid formation clearly requires higher temperatures (typically around 200 deg C). This is a strong evidence that efficient F-center diffusion is necessary for the formation of metallic particles (colloids) in the bulk of the crystals. Desorption of alkali atoms from alkali halides at temperatures around room temperature is due to weakly bound alkali atoms. For elevated temperatures the stability of the metallic clusters in the bulk of the crystals (i.e. colloids) are the rate limiting process. (author)

  11. Molecular pathways underlying inhibitory effect of antimicrobial peptide Nal-P-113 on bacteria biofilms formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 by DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Lin, Li; Tan, Li-Si; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Pan, Ya-Ping

    2017-02-17

    Wound-related infection remains a major challenge for health professionals. One disadvantage in conventional antibiotics is their inability to penetrate biofilms, the main protective strategy for bacteria to evade irradiation. Previously, we have shown that synthetic antimicrobial peptides could inhibit bacterial biofilms formation. In this study, we first delineated how Nal-P-113, a novel antimicrobial peptide, exerted its inhibitory effects on Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 biofilms formation at a low concentration. Secondly, we performed gene expression profiling and validated that Nal-P-113 at a low dose significantly down-regulated genes related to mobile and extrachromosomal element functions, transport and binding proteins in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83. These findings suggest that Nal-P-113 at low dose is sufficient to inhibit the formation of biofilms although Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 may maintain its survival in the oral cavity. The newly discovered molecular pathways may add the knowledge of developing a new strategy to target bacterial infections in combination with current first-line treatment in periodontitis.

  12. Sedimentation of the basal Kombolgie Formation (Upper Precambrian-Carpentarian) Northern Territory, Australia: possible significance in the genesis of the underlying Alligator Rivers unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojakangas, R.W.

    1979-10-01

    The 1400 to 1500 My old Kombolgie Formation of the MacArthur Basin of the Northern Territory overlies or has overlain unconformity-type uranium deposits including Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra, Nabarlek and the small deposits of the South Alligator River Valley. A brief study of the basal portion of the formation showed it to consist entirely of mature conglomerates and quartzose sandstones. Analysis of the bedding types (planar cross beds, trough cross beds and parallel beds) and other sedimentary structures (mainly ripple marks and parting lineation) fit a braided alluvial plain model. A paleocurrent study utilizing about 400 measurements from nine localities located along the westward-facing 250 kilometer-long erosional escarpment of the Arnhem Land Plateau showed the dominant paleocurrent trend to be from west and northwest towards the east and southeast, with local divergence. The data and interpretation presented are relevant to the supergene model of uranium deposition at the unconformity, for they add to the suggestion that additional uranium deposits similar to Jabiluka Two may underlie the Kombolgie Formation eastward from the present escarpment

  13. Influence of temperature and rooting-promoter on the formation of root-primodia and on the rooting of chrysanthemum cuttings under storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, J.; Fukuda, M.

    1998-01-01

    In order to promote rooting for direct planting cuttings in a lighting cultivation of chrysanthemum, we clarified the effects of light, temperature and term of storage of the cuttings, and analyzed ways of using rooting promoters as a pre-treatment of cuttings for root-primodia formation and rooting. Light as a pre-treatment had little effect, so it seemed to be not necessary for the formation of root primodia. The formation of the root-primodia was most hastened at 25 degrees C; inversely, it was slowed down at low temperatures, that is, the root-primodia were formed in four days at 25 degrees C, five days at 20 degrees C, and seven days at 15 degrees C. With the use of rooting promoters as a pre-treatment for the rooting of cuttings, the root-primodia were formed faster when the whole of cuttings were dipped in 40 mg/L solution of indelebutyric acid (IBA) than when the base of cuttings were dipped or sprayed 400 mg/L solution of IBA. It was appropriate that cuttings were dipped in IBA then put in in plastic-pots (7.5cm) vertically, packed in polyethylene-bags and stored in a corrugated carton box

  14. Integrated combined effects of temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentration on biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis and Typhimurium under low nutrient food-related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadis, Ioannis; Daskalopoulou, Aikaterini; Simões, Manuel; Giaouris, Efstathios

    2018-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is a major foodborne bacterial pathogen. This forms biofilms on surfaces and persists, depending on the strain and the environment. The integrative interaction of temperature (T; 13-39 °C), pH (5-8) and sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration (0.5-8.5%) on biofilm formation by two S. enterica strains (ser. Enteritidis and Typhimurium) was here evaluated under low nutrient conditions. This was achieved using response surface methodology to model the combined effect of each factor on the response, through mathematical quadratic fitting of the outcomes of a sequence of designed experiments. These last were executed by incubating stainless steel coupons carrying sessile bacteria, for 24 h, in 1:10 diluted tryptone soya broth, under 15 different combinations of three independent factors (T, pH and NaCl). For each strain, a second order polynomial model, describing the relationship between biofilm formation (log CFU/cm 2 ) and the factors (T, pH and NaCl), was developed using least square regression analysis. Both derived models predicted the combined influences of these factors on biofilm formation, with agreement between predictions and experimental observations (R 2  ≥ 0.96, P ≤ 0.0001). For both strains, the increase of NaCl content restricted their sessile growth, while under low salinity conditions (NaCl formation was favored as pH increased, regardless of T. Interestingly, under low salt content, and depending on the strain, biofilm formation was either favored or hindered by increasing T. Thus, 34.5 and 13 °C were the T predicted to maximize biofilm formation by strains Enteritidis and Typhimurium, respectively, something which was also experimentally verified. To sum, these models can predict the interactive influences of crucial food-related factors on biofilm growth of a significant foodborne pathogen towards the efforts to limit its persistence in food industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MHD modeling for Formation Process of Coronal Mass Ejections: Interaction between Ejecting Flux Rope and Ambient Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Daikou; Kusano, Kanya; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), in which large amount of magnetic flux is launched into the interplanetary space, are most explosive phenomena in the solar corona. Due to their large influences to the space environment near the Earth, it is very important to make cleat how CMEs are formed and how determine the field orientations within CMEs. In order to examine the sufficient conditions, we performed three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of formation processes of CMEs, focusing on interaction (reconnection) between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field. We examined three cases with different ambient fields: no ambient field, and cases with dipole field of two opposite directions which are parallel and anti-parallel to that of the flux rope surface. As the results, while the flux rope disappears in the anti-parallel case, in other cases the flux ropes can evolve to CMEs and however shows different amount of rotation of the flux rope. The results mean that the interaction between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field is a significant process for determining CME formation and CME orientation, and also show that the amount and direction of magnetic flux within the flux rope and the ambient field are key parameters for CME formation. Especially, the interaction (reconnection) plays a significant role to the rotation of the flux rope, with a process similar to "tilting instability" in a spheromak-type experiment of laboratory plasma.

  16. Nanoparticle formation in H2O/N-2 and H2O/Ar mixtures under irradiation by 20 MeV protons and positive corona discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imanaka, M.; Tomita, S.; Kanda, S.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of ions to gas nucleation, we have performed experiments on the formation of water droplets in H2O/N-2 and H2O/Ar gas mixtures by irradiation with a 20 MeV proton beam and by positive corona discharge. The size of the formed nanoparticles was measured using...... a differential mobility analyzer equipped with a Faraday cup electrometer. Using the proton beam, droplets around 10 nm in diameter were observed for both positively and negatively charged particles, but none were found when the corona discharge was used. This implies the importance of the presence of both...

  17. Stress-Strain Curves and Crack Formation in an Ingot of Stainless Steel 21-4N Under High-Temperature Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ho Kyun; Kim, In Won; Park, Sang Min; Hong, Sun Ig

    2017-05-01

    Ingots from stainless steel 21-4N are studied in the initial condition and after 7-h homogenizing at 1200°C. Compressive tests of specimens cut from surface layers and from the cores of the ingots are performed at 900 - 1250°C. The effect of the initial condition of the steel and of the test conditions on the critical stress of the start of dynamic recrystallization is determined. The conditions of formation of dangerous cracks in the ingots are considered.

  18. Formation of stable cell-cell contact without a solid/gel scaffold: Non-invasive manipulation by laser under depletion interaction with a polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shu; Yoshida, Aoi; Ohta, Taeko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Sadakane, Koichiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We report a novel method for constructing a stable three-dimensional cellular assembly in the absence of a solid or gel scaffold. A targeted cell was transferred to another cell, and the two were kept in contact for a few minutes by optical manipulation in an aqueous medium containing a hydrophilic polymer. Interestingly, this cell-cell adhesion was maintained even after elimination of the polymer. We discuss the mechanism of the formation of stable multi-cellular adhesion in terms of spontaneous rearrangement of the components embedded in the pair of facing membranes.

  19. MULTITEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF LAND COVERING AND VEGETATION AREAS UNDER QUATERNARY SUPERFICIAL FORMATION – A STUDY OF THE HYDROGRAPHIC BASIN STREAM PUITÃ, RIO GRANDE DO SUL – BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Lacerda Martins

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The hydrographic basin of stream Puitã, located in the southwest of the state of Rio Grande do Sul – Brazil, is characterized by quaternary superficial formation. These formations are dominated by erosive features and sand strands located in the geological compartment of hills as well by bushes located on the hillside and ciliary’s bushes located along the course of the water together with the campestre vegetation. The use of the land stands out with plots of land used to agriculture, intensified in the last decades. Theagricultural activities left the soil fragile, causing erosive features. This study aims to identify the existent relationship between the type of vegetation and the soil degradation in the regionof the hydrographic basin. The methodology is based on digital classification of Landsat-TM satellite images, data acquired between 1984 e 2004, on the correlation analysis between degraded areas, classes of land use and vegetation’s types.The results showed thematic maps that allowed identifying the different fragilities and susceptible areas to the sandification process. The multitemporal approach allowed to evaluate the modifications of the mapping classes and to identify the expansion or retracting of sand strands and erosive processes. It was detected that the agricultural use is the responsible agent for the amplification of the soil fragility.

  20. Mechanism of formation of a zone without vacancy pores along a surface under electron irradiation of a metal in the high-volt electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V.; Ryabov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Formation mechanism of zones free of vacancy pores near the vacant surface of a metal preliminary irradiated at a high neutron dose when irradiating with electrons in a high-voltage electron microscope has been suggested. It was assumed to explain experimentally observed values of width and time of such zone formation that interstitial atoms are reflected from foil surface while boundary serves as an ideal sink for the vacancies. The carried out calculation of stationary equations of vacancy and interstitial diffusion with the mentioned boundary condition has shown that determination of a stable zone width is possible only in assumption on a variable in a depth of dislocation density. Theoretical evaluations of a zone width being in good agreement with an experiment and with the results of numerical calculations have been obtained in negligence of recombination of point defects as well as for the case of total reflection of interstitials. Discussed are different mechanisms of weak capture of proper interstitial atoms diffusing to it with the metal surface [ru

  1. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Z.H.; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, IK

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examined the co-formation of hydrogen peroxide and other hydroperoxides (collectively presented as H2O2*) as well as submicron particles, including ultra-fine particles (UFP), resulting from the reactions of ozone (O-3) with a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs...... higher than typical indoor levels. When O-3 was added to a 25-m(3) controlled environmental facility (CEF) containing the 23 VOC mixture, both H2O2* and submicron particles were formed. The 2-h average concentration of H2O2* was 1.89 +/- 0.30ppb, and the average total particle number concentration was 46...... to achieve saturated concentrations of the condensable organics. When the 2 terpenes were removed from the O-3/23 VOCs mixture, no H2O2* or particles were formed, indicating that the reactions of O-3 With the two terpenes were the key processes contributing to the formation of H2O2* and submicron particles...

  2. Hematite Spherules in Basaltic Tephra Altered Under Aqueous, Acid-Sulfate Conditions on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Possible Clues for the Occurrence of Hematite-Rich Spherules in the Burns Formation at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Graff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Squyres, S. W.; Mertzman, S. A.; Gruener, J. E.; Golden, D. C.; Robinson, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Iron-rich spherules (>90% Fe2O3 from electron microprobe analyses) approx.10-100 microns in diameter are found within sulfate-rich rocks formed by aqueous, acid-sulfate alteration of basaltic tephra on Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii. Although some spherules are nearly pure Fe, most have two concentric compositional zones, with the core having a higher Fe/Al ratio than the rim. Oxide totals less than 100% (93-99%) suggest structural H2O and/or /OH. The transmission Moessbauer spectrum of a spherule-rich separate is dominated by a hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) sextet whose peaks are skewed toward zero velocity. Skewing is consistent with Al(3+) for Fe(3+) substitution and structural H2O and/or /OH. The grey color of the spherules implies specular hematite. Whole-rock powder X-ray diffraction spectra are dominated by peaks from smectite and the hydroxy sulfate mineral natroalunite as alteration products and plagioclase feldspar that was present in the precursor basaltic tephra. Whether spherule formation proceeded directly from basaltic material in one event (dissolution of basaltic material and precipitation of hematite spherules) or whether spherule formation required more than one event (formation of Fe-bearing sulfate rock and subsequent hydrolysis to hematite) is not currently constrained. By analogy, a formation pathway for the hematite spherules in sulfate-rich outcrops at Meridiani Planum on Mars (the Burns formation) is aqueous alteration of basaltic precursor material under acid-sulfate conditions. Although hydrothermal conditions are present on Mauna Kea, such conditions may not be required for spherule formation on Mars if the time interval for hydrolysis at lower temperatures is sufficiently long.

  3. Formation of a derivative of 3,3,5-tricarbonyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyridine under the conditions of the Hantzsch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekavichus, B.S.; Sausin' , A.E.; Zolotoyabko, R.M.; Liepin' sh, E.E.; Mazheika, I.B.; Dubur, G.Ya.

    1986-10-01

    An ester of p-nitrobenzoylacetic acid is cyclized under the action of hexamethylenetetramine and ammonium acetate to 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-3-p-nitrobenzoyl-6-p-nitrophenyl-1,2,3,4-tetra-hydropyridine, the structure of which has been established by NMR, UV, IR, and mass spectra and also by its chemical reactions.

  4. The Effect of Team Training Strategies on Team Mental Model Formation and Team Performance under Routine and Non-Routine Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined how the type of training a team receives (team coordination training vs. cross-training) influences the type of team mental model structures that form and how those mental models in turn impact team performance under different environmental condition (routine vs. non-routine). Three-hundred and fifty-two undergraduate…

  5. Formation of dislocations and hardening of LiF under high-dose irradiation with 5-21 MeV {sup 12}C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabels, R.; Manika, I.; Maniks, J.; Grants, R. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Schwartz, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Dauletbekova, A.; Baizhumanov, M. [L.N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Zdorovets, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2017-05-15

    The emergence of dislocations and hardening of LiF crystals irradiated to high doses with {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using chemical etching, AFM, nanoindentation, and thermal annealing. At fluences ensuring the overlapping of tracks (Φ ≥6 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}), the formation of dislocation-rich structure and ion-induced hardening is observed. High-fluence (10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) irradiation with {sup 12}C ions causes accumulation of extended defects and induces hardening comparable to that reached by heavy ions despite of large differences in ion mass, energy, energy loss, and track morphology. The depth profiles of hardness indicate on a notable contribution of elastic collision mechanism (nuclear loss) in the damage production and hardening. The effect manifests at the end part of the ion range and becomes significant at high fluences (≥10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}). (orig.)

  6. Numerical investigation of soot formation and oxidation processes under large two-stroke marine diesel engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    skeletal model are close to those produced by the larger and more comprehensive chemical mechanisms, apart from those at the low pressure condition. The current study also demonstrates that the variation of averaged soot volume fraction with respect to the change of combustion chamber pressure captured...... using the revised soot model agrees reasonably well with the measurements in terms of peak values. The numerical model is subsequently applied to investigate the flame development, soot/nitrogen monoxide formation and heat transfer in a two-stroke, low-speed uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engine......% higher compared to that when only convective heat loss is considered. The averaged nitrogen monoxide concentration is 7.7% lower when both convective and soot radiative heat losses are accounted for but the net soot mass production is less sensitive to soot radiation. A sensitivity study reveals...

  7. A rare case of aortic sinuses of valsalva fistula to multiple cardiac chambers secondary to periannular aortic abscess formation from underlying Brucella endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant presence of abnormal connection from three aortic valsalva sinuses to cardiac chambers is a rare complication of native aortic endocarditis. This case report presents a 37-year-old Iranian female patient who had native aortic valve endocarditis complicated by periannular abscess formation and subsequent perforation to multi-cardiac chambers associated with congestive heart failure and left bundle branch block. Multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas to right atrium, main pulmonary artery, and formation of a pocket over left atrial roof were detected by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE. She had received a full course of antibiotics therapy in a local hospital and was referred to our center for further surgery. TTE not only detected multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas but also revealed large vegetation in aortic and mitral valve leaflets and also small vegetation in the entrance of fistula to right atrium. However, the tricuspid valve was not involved in infective endocarditis. She underwent open cardiac surgery with double valve replacement with biologic valves and reconstruction of left sinus of valsalva fistula to supra left atrial pocket by pericardial patch repair. The two other fistulas to main pulmonary artery and right atrium were closed via related chambers. The post-operative course was complicated by renal failure and prolonged dependency to ventilator that was managed accordingly with peritoneal dialysis and tracheostomy. The patient was discharged on the 25 day after admission in relatively good condition. The TTE follow-up one year after discharge revealed mild paravalvular leakage in aortic valve position, but the function of mitral valve was normal and no residual fistulas were detected.

  8. Uniting ripple-formation theory under water and winds: A universal scaling relation for the wavelength of fluid-drag ripples across fluids and planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotre, M. G. A.; Lamb, M. P.; Ewing, R. C.; McElroy, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Current ripples form on riverbeds and on the seafloor from viscous drag exerted by water flow over sand and are thought to be absent in subaerial systems, where ripple formation is dominated by a mechanism involving the impacting and splashing of sand grains. A fluid-drag mechanism, however, is not precluded in subaerial conditions and was originally hypothesized by R. A. Bagnold. Despite decades of observations in the field and in the laboratory, no universal scaling relation exists to predict the size of fluid-drag ripples. We combine dimensional analysis and a new extensive data compilation to develop a relationship and predict the equilibrium wavelength of current ripples. Our analysis shows that ripples are spaced farther apart when formed by more viscous fluids, smaller bed shear velocities, in coarser grains, or for smaller sediment specific gravity. Our scaling relation also highlights the abrupt transition between current ripples and subaqueous dunes, and thus allows for a process-based segregation of ripples from dunes. When adjusting for subaerial conditions, we predict the formation of decimeter-scale wind-drag ripples on Earth and meter-scale wind-drag ripples on Mars. The latter are ubiquitous on the Red Planet, and are found to co-exist with smaller decimeter-scale ripples, which we interpret as impact ripples. Because the predicted scale of terrestrial wind-drag ripples overlaps with that of impact ripples, it is possible that wind-drag ripples exist on Earth too, but are not recognized as such. When preserved in rocks, fluid-drag ripple stratification records flow directions and fluid properties that are crucial to constrain paleo-environments. Our new theory allows for predictions of ripple size, perhaps in both fluvial and eolian settings, and thus potentially represents a powerful tool for paleo-environmental reconstructions on different planetary bodies.

  9. Safety assessment for the S-1 Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R. Jr.; Stencel, J.R.

    1984-02-01

    The S-1 machine is part of the Magnetic Fusion Program. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. S-1 is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power

  10. Pb 2+ –Calcite Interactions under Far-from-Equilibrium Conditions: Formation of Micropyramids and Pseudomorphic Growth of Cerussite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ke; De Andrade, Vincent; Feng, Zhange; Sturchio, Neil C. [Department; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul

    2018-01-22

    The presence of impurity ions is known to significantly influence mineral surface morphology during crystal growth from aqueous solution, but knowledge on impurity ion-mineral interactions during dissolution under far-from equilibrium conditions remains limited. Here we show that calcite (CaCO3) exhibits a rich array of dissolution features in the presence of Pb. During the initial stage, calcite exhibits non-classical surface features characterized as micro pyramids developed spontaneously in acidic Pb-bearing solutions. Subsequent pseudomorphic growth of cerussite (PbCO3) was observed, where nucleation occurred entirely within a pore space created by dissolution at the calcite/substrate interface. Uneven growth rates yielded a cerussite shell made of lath- or dendritic-shaped crystals. The cerussite phase was separated from the calcite by pores of less than 200 nm under transmission X-ray microscopy, consistent with the interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism. These results show that impurity metal ions exert significant control over the microscale dissolution features found on mineral surfaces and provide new insights into interpreting and designing micro structures observed in naturally-occurring and synthetic carbonate minerals by dissolution. In addition, heterogeneous micro-environments created in transport limited reactions under pore spaces may lead to unusual growth forms during crystal nucleation and precipitation.

  11. Formation of Titan's Lakes by Episodic Dissolution and Precipitation of a Surface Layer Under Semi-Arid Conditions: Comparison with the Pans and Calcretes of Etosha (Namibia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, O.; Lopez, T.; Le Mouélic, S.; Fleurant, C.; Tobie, G.; Cornet, T.

    2009-12-01

    Radar images from the Cassini spacecraft reveal closed, smooth and flat depressions above northern and southern latitudes of 60° on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. These depressions have been interpreted as lakes of liquid hydro-carbons and dissolved nitrogen, resting on the icy crust that covers this moon. The depressions include large (over 100,000 square kilometers) seas with dendritic or poorly defined contours, small (1-10 km wide) circular steep-sided depressions, and medium-sized (20-50 km wide) depressions, the contours of which are composed of adjacent circular segments. Some depressions are completely filled with radar-dark material, while others are partially filled and some are empty. Most of these depressions lie in flat plains. By comparison with a terrestrial analogue located in the Etosha Basin (Namibia), we introduce here a dissolution-precipitation model for the formation of these lakes at the expense of a superficial soluble layer. The Etosha Basin is a flat sedimentary basin located at the western border of the Kalahari desert. The climate is semi-arid, with an average annual precipitation rate of 400 mm/yr and an average annual potential evaporation rate of 2200 mm/yr. Sediments in the basin include clays and silts; they are covered by a layer of soluble calcrete a few meters in thickness. The calcrete has formed by precipitation, in the subsurface, of calcium carbonate dissolved in groundwater. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from groundwater is due to the average annual dominance of groundwater evaporation over precipitation. The calcrete layer is dotted with dozens of so-called pans: these are closed, steep-sided, flat and smooth depressions, 1 to 200 km wide and a few meters deep. Relict boulders of calcrete rest on the silty, clayey and evaporitic floors of the pans and provide evidence that the pans grow by radial regressive dissolution of the calcrete layer. By comparison with the development of pans at the expense of the calcrete

  12. In situ observation of initial rust formation process on carbon steel under Na2SO4 and NaCl solution films with wet/dry cycles using synchrotron radiation X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Konishi, H.; Kozakura, T.; Mizuki, J.; Uchida, H.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of steel proceeds under thin electrolyte film formed by rain and dew condensation followed by wet and dry cycles. It is said that rust layer formed on steel as a result of atmospheric corrosion strongly affects the corrosion behavior of steel. The effect of environmental corrosiveness on the formation process and structure of the rust layer is, however, not clear to date. In this study, in situ observation of the rusting process of a carbon steel covered with a thin film of Na 2 SO 4 or NaCl solution was performed under a wet/dry repeating condition by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy with white X-rays obtained from synchrotron radiation. The present in situ experiments successfully detected initial process of the rust formation. In the early cycles, the rust constituents were not well crystallized yet, but the presence of Fe(OH) 2 and Fe(OH) 3 was confirmed. In the subsequent cycles, two different solutions resulted in difference in preferential phase of the rust constituents. α-FeOOH was preferentially formed in the case of the Na 2 SO 4 solution film, whereas β-FeOOH appeared only under the NaCl solution film

  13. Formation of nano-laminated structures in a dry sliding wear-induced layer under different wear mechanisms of 20CrNi2Mo steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cun-hong; Liang, Yi-long; Jiang, Yun; Yang, Ming; Long, Shao-lei

    2017-11-01

    The microstructures of 20CrNi2Mo steel underneath the contact surface were examined after dry sliding. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and an ultra-micro-hardness tester were used to characterize the worn surface and dry sliding wear-induced layer. Martensite laths were ultra-refined due to cumulative strains and a large strain gradient that occurred during cyclic loading in wear near the surface. The microstructure evolution in dominant abrasive wear differs from that in adhesive wear. In dominant abrasive wear, only bent martensite laths with high-density deformation dislocations were observed. In contrast, in dominant adhesive wear, gradient structures were formed along the depth from the wear surface. Cross-sectional TEM foils were prepared in a focused ion beam (FIB) to observe the gradient structures in a dry sliding wear-induced layer at depths of approximately 1-5 μm and 5-20 μm. The gradient structures contained nano-laminated structures with an average thickness of 30-50 nm and bent martensite laths. We found that the original martensite laths coordinated with the strain energy and provided origin boundaries for the formation of gradient structures. Geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs) and isolated dislocation boundaries (IDBs) play important roles in forming the nano-laminated structures.

  14. The formation of the two-way shape memory effect in rapidly quenched TiNiCu alloy under laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelyakov, A V; Sitnikov, N N; Borodako, K A; Menushenkov, A P; Fominski, V Yu; Sheyfer, D V

    2015-01-01

    The effect of pulsed laser radiation (λ = 248 nm, τ = 20 ns) on structural properties and shape memory behavior of the rapidly quenched Ti 50 Ni 25 Cu 25 alloy ribbon was studied. The radiation energy density was varied from 2 to 20 mJ mm −2 . The samples were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, microhardness measurements and shape memory bending tests. It was ascertained that the action of the laser radiation leads to the formation of a structural composite material due to amorphization or martensite modification in the surface layer of the ribbon. Two methods are proposed which allow one to generate the pronounced two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) in a local area of the ribbon by using only a single pulse of the laser radiation. With increasing energy density of laser treatment, the magnitude of the reversible angular displacement with realization of the TWSME increases. The developed techniques can be used for the creation of various micromechanical devices. (paper)

  15. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  16. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation under high-temperature conditions affects growth of rice (cv. Koshihikari) after a young panicle formation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, K.

    2005-01-01

    A japonica rice (cv. Koshihikari) was used to test the effects on blooming and ripening of UV-B radiation treatment combined with high temperature treatments (day/night, 35 / 30 deg C). Strong UV-B radiation (60.4 kJ/m(2) . day) slightly increased sterility. High temperatures and weak UV-B radiation (18.1 kJ/m(2) . day) applied together from two weeks before heading and from the heading day increased sterility and those applied from two weeks after heading decreased sterility. High temperature combined with strong UV-B radiation applied from two weeks before heading increased sterility and decreased the size of unhulled grain and anther length. The same treatment given from the heading stage greatly increased sterility and decreased anther length and pollen production, and that given two weeks after heading decreased unhulled grain weight. It also decreased photosynthetic rate in Flag leaves. A high temperature applied together with strong UV-B radiation had a synergistic effect causing poor growth; it increased the harmful effects of a high temperature and strong UV-B given separately, on the sterility and pollen formation

  17. Mechanical intermixing of components in (CoMoNi)-based systems and the formation of (CoMoNi)/WC nanocomposite layers on Ti sheets under ball collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romankov, S.; Park, Y. C.; Shchetinin, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    Cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and nickel (Ni) components were simultaneously introduced onto titanium (Ti) surfaces from a composed target using ball collisions. Tungsten carbide (WC) balls were selected for processing as the source of a cemented carbide reinforcement phase. During processing, ball collisions continuously introduced components from the target and the grinding media onto the Ti surface and induced mechanical intermixing of the elements, resulting in formation of a complex nanocomposite structure onto the Ti surface. The as-fabricated microstructure consisted of uniformly dispersed WC particles embedded within an integrated metallic matrix composed of an amorphous phase with nanocrystalline grains. The phase composition of the alloyed layers, atomic reactions, and the matrix grain sizes depended on the combination of components introduced onto the Ti surface during milling. The as-fabricated layer exhibited a very high hardness compared to industrial metallic alloys and tool steel materials. This approach could be used for the manufacture of both cemented carbides and amorphous matrix composite layers.

  18. Analysis of the Effect of Cooling Intensity Under Volume-Surface Hardening on Formation of Hardened Structures in Steel 20GL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseev, D. G.; Savrukhin, A. V.; Neklyudov, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Computer simulation of the kinetics of thermal processes and structural and phase transformations in the wall of a bogie side frame produced from steel 20GL is performed with allowance for the differences in the cooling intensity under volume-surface hardening. The simulation is based on the developed method employing the diagram of decomposition of austenite at different cooling rates. The data obtained are used to make conclusion on the effect of the cooling intensity on propagation of martensite structure over the wall section.

  19. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  20. Star Formation Under the Outflow: The Discovery of a Non-thermal Jet from OMC-2 FIR 3 and Its Relationship to the Deeply Embedded FIR 4 Protostar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Mayra; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ana K.; Anglada, Guillem; Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC) Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n E-18008 Granada (Spain); Megeath, S. Thomas [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Toledo 2801 West Bancroft Street Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Carrasco-González, Carlos [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Tobin, John J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Stutz, Amelia M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Concepción Concepción (Chile); Furlan, Elise [IPAC, Mail Code 314-6, Caltech 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fischer, William J. [Space Telescope Science Institute 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); González-García, Beatriz; Vavrek, Roland [European Space Astronomy Center, ESA P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Stanke, Thomas [European Southern Observatory Garching bei München (Germany); Watson, Dan M., E-mail: osorio@iaa.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We carried out multiwavelength (0.7–5 cm), multi-epoch (1994–2015) Very Large Array (VLA) observations toward the region enclosing the bright far-IR sources FIR 3 (HOPS 370) and FIR 4 (HOPS 108) in OMC-2. We report the detection of 10 radio sources, 7 of them identified as young stellar objects. We image a well-collimated radio jet with a thermal free–free core (VLA 11) associated with the Class I intermediate-mass protostar HOPS 370. The jet features several knots (VLA 12N, 12C, 12S) of non-thermal radio emission (likely synchrotron from shock-accelerated relativistic electrons) at distances of ∼7500–12,500 au from the protostar, in a region where other shock tracers have been previously identified. These knots are moving away from the HOPS 370 protostar at ∼100 km s{sup −1}. The Class 0 protostar HOPS 108, which itself is detected as an independent, kinematically decoupled radio source, falls in the path of these non-thermal radio knots. These results favor the previously proposed scenario in which the formation of HOPS 108 is triggered by the impact of the HOPS 370 outflow with a dense clump. However, HOPS 108 has a large proper motion velocity of ∼30 km s{sup −1}, similar to that of other runaway stars in Orion, whose origin would be puzzling within this scenario. Alternatively, an apparent proper motion could result because of changes in the position of the centroid of the source due to blending with nearby extended emission, variations in the source shape, and/or opacity effects.

  1. Star Formation Under the Outflow: The Discovery of a Non-thermal Jet from OMC-2 FIR 3 and Its Relationship to the Deeply Embedded FIR 4 Protostar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Mayra; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ana K.; Anglada, Guillem; Gómez, José F.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Furlan, Elise; Fischer, William J.; Manoj, P.; González-García, Beatriz; Vavrek, Roland; Stanke, Thomas; Watson, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    We carried out multiwavelength (0.7–5 cm), multi-epoch (1994–2015) Very Large Array (VLA) observations toward the region enclosing the bright far-IR sources FIR 3 (HOPS 370) and FIR 4 (HOPS 108) in OMC-2. We report the detection of 10 radio sources, 7 of them identified as young stellar objects. We image a well-collimated radio jet with a thermal free–free core (VLA 11) associated with the Class I intermediate-mass protostar HOPS 370. The jet features several knots (VLA 12N, 12C, 12S) of non-thermal radio emission (likely synchrotron from shock-accelerated relativistic electrons) at distances of ∼7500–12,500 au from the protostar, in a region where other shock tracers have been previously identified. These knots are moving away from the HOPS 370 protostar at ∼100 km s −1 . The Class 0 protostar HOPS 108, which itself is detected as an independent, kinematically decoupled radio source, falls in the path of these non-thermal radio knots. These results favor the previously proposed scenario in which the formation of HOPS 108 is triggered by the impact of the HOPS 370 outflow with a dense clump. However, HOPS 108 has a large proper motion velocity of ∼30 km s −1 , similar to that of other runaway stars in Orion, whose origin would be puzzling within this scenario. Alternatively, an apparent proper motion could result because of changes in the position of the centroid of the source due to blending with nearby extended emission, variations in the source shape, and/or opacity effects.

  2. Star Formation Under the Outflow: The Discovery of a Non-thermal Jet from OMC-2 FIR 3 and Its Relationship to the Deeply Embedded FIR 4 Protostar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Mayra; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ana K.; Anglada, Guillem; Megeath, S. Thomas; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Furlan, Elise; Fischer, William J.; Manoj, P.; Gómez, José F.; González-García, Beatriz; Stanke, Thomas; Watson, Dan M.; Loinard, Laurent; Vavrek, Roland; Carrasco-González, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    We carried out multiwavelength (0.7-5 cm), multi-epoch (1994-2015) Very Large Array (VLA) observations toward the region enclosing the bright far-IR sources FIR 3 (HOPS 370) and FIR 4 (HOPS 108) in OMC-2. We report the detection of 10 radio sources, 7 of them identified as young stellar objects. We image a well-collimated radio jet with a thermal free-free core (VLA 11) associated with the Class I intermediate-mass protostar HOPS 370. The jet features several knots (VLA 12N, 12C, 12S) of non-thermal radio emission (likely synchrotron from shock-accelerated relativistic electrons) at distances of ˜7500-12,500 au from the protostar, in a region where other shock tracers have been previously identified. These knots are moving away from the HOPS 370 protostar at ˜100 km s-1. The Class 0 protostar HOPS 108, which itself is detected as an independent, kinematically decoupled radio source, falls in the path of these non-thermal radio knots. These results favor the previously proposed scenario in which the formation of HOPS 108 is triggered by the impact of the HOPS 370 outflow with a dense clump. However, HOPS 108 has a large proper motion velocity of ˜30 km s-1, similar to that of other runaway stars in Orion, whose origin would be puzzling within this scenario. Alternatively, an apparent proper motion could result because of changes in the position of the centroid of the source due to blending with nearby extended emission, variations in the source shape, and/or opacity effects.

  3. Formation of distinctive structures of GaN by inductively-coupled-plasma and reactive ion etching under optimized chemical etching conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Okada

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We focused on inductively coupled plasma and reactive ion etching (ICP–RIE for etching GaN and tried to fabricate distinctive GaN structures under optimized chemical etching conditions. To determine the optimum chemical etching conditions, the flow rates of Ar and Cl2, ICP power, and chamber pressure were varied in the etching of c-plane GaN layers with stripe patterns. It was determined that the combination of Ar and Cl2 flow rates of 100 sccm, chamber pressure of 7 Pa, and ICP power of 800 W resulted in the most enhanced reaction, yielding distinctive GaN structures such as pillars with inverted mesa structures for c-plane GaN and a semipolar GaN layer with asymmetric inclined sidewalls. The selectivity and etching rate were also investigated.

  4. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids on Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation in vitro under stationary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Andrzejczuk, Sylwia; Plech, Tomasz; Malm, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus influenzae, upper respiratory tract microbiota representatives, are able to colonize natural and artificial surfaces as biofilm. The aim of the present study was to assay the effect of ten 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids on planktonic or biofilm-forming haemophili cells in vitro under stationary conditions on the basis of MICs (minimal inhibitory concentrations) and MBICs (minimal biofilm inhibitory concentrations). In addition, anti-adhesive properties of these compounds were examined. The reference strains of H. parainfluenzae and H. influenzae were included. The broth microdilution microtiter plate (MTP) method with twofold dilution of the compounds, or ciprofloxacin (reference agent) in 96-well polystyrene microplates, was used. The optical density (OD) reading was made spectrophotometrically at a wavelength of 570 nm (OD570) both to measure bacterial growth and to detect biofilm-forming cells under the same conditions with 0.1% crystal violet. The following values of parameters were estimated for 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids - MIC = 0.03-15.63 mg/L, MBIC = 0.03-15.63 mg/L, MBIC/MIC = 0.125-8, depending on the compound, and for ciprofloxacin - MIC = 0.03-0.06 mg/L, MBIC = 0.03-0.12 mg/L, MBIC/MIC = 1-2. The observed strong anti-adhesive properties (95-100% inhibition) of the tested compounds were reversible during long-term incubation at subinhibitory concentrations. Thus, 1,2,4-triazole-ciprofloxacin hybrids may be considered as starting compounds for designing improved agents not only against planktonic but also against biofilm-forming Haemophilus spp. cells. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Main factors in the formation of socio-cultural identity under the conditions of incomplete modernization (case study of the Republic of Bashkortostan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al’fira Raisovna Mazhitova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modernization caused deep and extensive socio-cultural changes in the Russian society. According to the research conducted by the Centre for the Study of Social and Cultural Change of the Institute of Philosophy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, modernization processes in Russia are different on the national and regional levels. The republic studies show that indexes and phase values of modernization in the Republic of Bashkortostan are lower than in Russia as a whole. Like Russia, the Republic is now in the phase of mature primary modernization. With regard to secondary modernization, Russia has entered the phase of high medium development and Bashkortostan – a phase of medium medium development. The processes of integrated modernization in Russia are already at the medium medium level, in the Republic – at the low medium level. The secondary modernization leads to the formation of the society that is based on knowledge, and on information and communication systems. Combining the means of communication, radio, television and computer in a coherent system resulted in emergence of a single socio-cultural space. Modern people live in a world of signs and symbols, which largely determine their behavior. Since that time it is not only people that create signs and symbols, but, in a sense, it is the signs and symbols that form people. If modernization implies the transition from a traditional society to a modern information society, then in the field of culture it is the transition from a national culture to the global culture. Currently, mass culture is the major factor determining people’s way of life, outlook, habits and behavior. Such influence aligns the personality in a way, and forms an average individual. Recent years have seen the increase in the number of people advocating the preservation and development of national culture, traditions, folk crafts and the sense of uniqueness of the nation. The author is convinced that it is the

  6. REACTIONS OF PEROXYNITRITE WITH URIC ACID: FORMATION OF REACTIVE INTERMEDIATES, ALKYLATED PRODUCTS AND TRIURET, AND IN VIVO PRODUCTION OF TRIURET UNDER CONDITIONS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Christine; Palii, Sergiu P.; Imaram, Witcha; Kim, Kyung Mee; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Angerhofer, Alexander; Johnson, Richard J.; Henderson, George N.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is associated with hypertension, metabolic syndrome, preeclampsia, cardiovascular disease and renal disease, all conditions associated with oxidative stress. We hypothesized that uric acid, a known antioxidant, might become prooxidative following its reaction with oxidants; and, thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Uric acid and 1,3-15N2-uric acid were reacted with peroxynitrite in different buffers and in the presence of alcohols, antioxidants and in human plasma. The reaction products were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses. The reactions generate reactive intermediates that yielded triuret as their final product. We also found that the antioxidant, ascorbate, could partially prevent this reaction. Whereas triuret was preferentially generated by the reactions in aqueous buffers, when uric acid or 1,3-15N2-uric acid was reacted with peroxynitrite in the presence of alcohols, it yielded alkylated alcohols as the final product. By extension, this reaction can alkylate other biomolecules containing OH groups and others containing labile hydrogens. Triuret was also found to be elevated in the urine of subjects with preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific hypertensive syndrome that is associated with oxidative stress, whereas very little triuret is produced in normal healthy volunteers. We conclude that under conditions of oxidative stress, uric acid can form reactive intermediates, including potential alkylating species, by reacting with peroxynitrite. These reactive intermediates could possibly explain how uric acid contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases such as the metabolic syndrome and hypertension. PMID:19219741

  7. The Market Size Effect оn Formation оf Business Sector аnd Inequality Level Among Individuals Under Inelastic Production of Each Firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Aleksandrovich Pokrovskiy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is addressed to explanation of impact of market size on selection into entrepreneurship and inequality within two-sector economy with secluded good, populated by individuals with additively-separable preferences, defined by power specification of utility function. Individuals are differentiated by two characteristics: productivity and type of variety, which can be potentially produced by given individual if he or she chooses entrepreneurial activity instead of salaried work. Each entrepreneur can produce only one unit of givenindividual characteristics specific variety. The specific variety are produced not unique producer, but for any type of entrepreneurial ability there are individuals with given ability, who produce the same variety. Number of such producers is defined by distribution of entrepreneurial abilities. Anyone of entrepreneurs producing the given type of variety has no market power and sells the variety by market price. From the other side, under giventype of entrepreneurial abilitywhole range of varieties are produced by different entrepreneurs with given entrepreneurial ability. As far cost of production depends on entreprenurial ability, the prices charged by entrepreneurs with the same ability are equal. Such specification of market structure allows consider symmetric equilibrium in terms of prices. The main result oаthe model is nontrivial impact of market size on outcome: the bigger number of population, the less share of salaried workers, the hire prices and the economy is more unequal

  8. Nitric oxide generated by nitrate reductase increases nitrogen uptake capacity by inducing lateral root formation and inorganic nitrogen uptake under partial nitrate nutrition in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huwei; Li, Jiao; Song, Wenjing; Tao, Jinyuan; Huang, Shuangjie; Chen, Si; Hou, Mengmeng; Xu, Guohua; Zhang, Yali

    2015-05-01

    Increasing evidence shows that partial nitrate nutrition (PNN) can be attributed to improved plant growth and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) in rice. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signalling molecule involved in many physiological processes during plant development and nitrogen (N) assimilation. It remains unclear whether molecular NO improves NUE through PNN. Two rice cultivars (cvs Nanguang and Elio), with high and low NUE, respectively, were used in the analysis of NO production, nitrate reductase (NR) activity, lateral root (LR) density, and (15)N uptake under PNN, with or without NO production donor and inhibitors. PNN increased NO accumulation in cv. Nanguang possibly through the NIA2-dependent NR pathway. PNN-mediated NO increases contributed to LR initiation, (15)NH₄(+)/(15)NO₃(-) influx into the root, and levels of ammonium and nitrate transporters in cv. Nanguang but not cv. Elio. Further results revealed marked and specific induction of LR initiation and (15)NH₄(+)/(15)NO₃(-) influx into the roots of plants supplied with NH₄(+)+sodium nitroprusside (SNP) relative to those supplied with NH₄(+) alone, and considerable inhibition upon the application of cPTIO or tungstate (NR inhibitor) in addition to PNN, which is in agreement with the change in NO fluorescence in the two rice cultivars. The findings suggest that NO generated by the NR pathway plays a pivotal role in improving the N acquisition capacity by increasing LR initiation and the inorganic N uptake rate, which may represent a strategy for rice plants to adapt to a fluctuating nitrate supply and increase NUE. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Measures to influence nitric oxide formation and alkali release in coal dust combustion under pressure; Massnahmen zur Beeinflussung der Stickoxidbildung und Alkalienfreisetzung bei der Kohlenstaubdruckverbrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielen, W.; Niepel, H. [Steinmueller (L.u.C.) GmbH, Gummersbach (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    Messrs. Steinmueller are making the following contributions to the Dorsten experimental plant: Development of pressure burner and combustion chamber, fuel supply and flue gas analysis, especially the development of a high-temperature flue gas tapping unit at the end of the hot reaction zone. Burner development should always aim at complete converstion of the fuel and minimal pollutant emissions, as well as stable combustion over a wide range of operating conditons and maximum reliability in case of disturbances. Tools for development and experiment analysis are flow measurements in isothermal models, numerical flow and radiation excchange calculation programs, and reference data from the hot operation under pressure of the small-scale Dorsten pilot plant. The contribution presents the results of the burner experiments with a view to nitric oxide and alkali emissions; finally, the effects of different influencing parameters on combustion control and on the still unresolved fields of investigation are indicated. [Deutsch] Die Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung erschliesst fuer den Brennstoff Kohle durch Nutzung des Gas- und Dampfturbinenprozesses Kraftwerkswirkungsgrade im Bereich von 50 % und mehr. Dabei soll das unter Druck verbrannte Rauchgas nach Abscheidung aller schaedlichen Bestandteile, insbesondere der Asche, die in diesem Temperaturbereich durchweg schmelzfluessig vorliegt, direkt auf die Gasturbine geleitet werden. Mit Foerderung des Bundes (seinerzeit BMFT) wurde unter Beteiligung der GHS Essen, mehrerer Industriepartner und Energieversorger am Zechenstandort Dorsten eine Kleinpilotanlage mit einer thermischen Leistung von ca 1 MW errichtet und seither betrieben. Der Forschungsschwerpunkt der L. und C. Steinmueller GmbH richtete sich darin auf die Thematik Kohleumwandlung. Die Aktivitaeten umfssten die Bereiche Druckbrenner- und Brennkammerentwicklung, die Brennstoffversorgung und die Rauchgasanalytik, hier insbesondere die Entwicklung einer Hochtemperatur

  10. Germinação e formação de mudas de arroz irrigado sob estresse salino Germination and formation of rice seedlings under saline stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis N. Rodrigues

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi instalado em condições de casa-de-vegetação com o objetivo de se estudar os efeitos da salinidade da água de irrigação sobre a germinação e formação de mudas da cultivar de arroz 'Formoso' (Oryza sativa L., lançada recentemente pela EMBRAPA para áreas irrigadas. Para os estudos de germinação adotou-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com 5 níveis de salinidade da água de irrigação (N1 = 0,5, N2 = 2,5, N3 = 4,5, N4 = 6,5 e N5 = 8,5 dS m-1 e 5 repetições. Para o vigor de plântulas foi adotado um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial (5 x 2 envolvendo 5 níveis de salinidade e 2 épocas de avaliação, com 5 repetições; os níveis de salinidade foram os mesmos e o vigor foi avaliado em duas épocas, aos 8 (E1 e aos 13 (E2 dias após semeadura (DAS, através de fitomassa seca das raízes, peso das matérias verde e seca da parte aérea, relação raiz/parte aérea, altura de plântula, comprimento radicular e número de folhas. A maior parte das sementes germinou aos 4 DAS. A cultivar 'Formoso' é tolerante à salinidade na fase de germinação, atingindo percentual superior a 87%, em todos os tratamentos. O efeito da salinidade foi intensificado na fase de plântula, reduzindo o seu desenvolvimento inicial.A study was carried out under greenhouse conditions with the objective of verifying the effects of salinity of irrigation water on the germination and seedling vigor of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar 'Formoso'. Germination and vigor were evaluated adopting a completely randomized experimental design with 5 levels of water salinity - (ECw: 0.5, 2.5, 4.5, 6.5 and 8.5 dS m-1 - and 5 replications. Most of the seeds germinated 4 days after sowing (DAS. The 'Formoso' cultivar was found to be tolerant to the tested salinity levels in the germination stage, reaching a germination level of above 87% (14 DAS in all the treatments. For the seedling vigor, a completely

  11. Under Under Under / Merit Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Merit

    2006-01-01

    20. nov. esietendub Kumu auditooriumis MTÜ Ühenduse R.A.A.A.M teatriprojekt "Under" poetess Marie Underist. Lavastajad Merle Karusoo ja Raimo Pass, kunstnik Jaagup Roomet, helilooja Urmas Lattikas, peaosas Katrin Saukas

  12. Interventional bleeding, hematoma and scar-formation after vacuum-biopsy under stereotactic guidance: Mammotome®-system 11g/8g vs. ATEC®-system 12g/9g

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Order, B.M.; Eckmann-Scholz, C.; Strauss, A.; Hilpert, F.; Kroj, K.; Biernath-Wüpping, J.; Heller, M.; Jonat, W.; Schaefer, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the correlation of scar-formations after vacuum-assisted biopsy with different systems and needle-sizes and interventional bleeding/post-interventional hematoma. Methods and materials: Between 01/2008 and 12/2009, 479 patients underwent vacuum-assisted biopsy under stereotactic-guidance, using the Mammotome ® -system with 11/8-gauge and ATEC ® -system with 12/9-gauge, whereas in 178 cases with representative benign histology no surgical-biopsy after vacuum-assisted biopsy was performed and at least a 2-plane-follow-up-mammogram after 6 month post-vacuum-assisted biopsy was available. Bleeding during intervention, hematoma post-intervention and scar-tissue was scored as minimal and moderate/severe. Statistical analysis included Chi-Square-trend-test, p-value ® -system vs. 11-gauge-Mammotome ® -system (41.9% vs. 8.4%, p ® -systems 9-gauge vs. 12-gauge (26.9% vs. 29.7%, p = 0.799/42.3% vs. 43.2%, p = 0.596). 11-gauge-Mammotome ® -system vs. ATEC ® -12-gauge-system revealed significantly less bleedings/hematomas (8.4% vs. 29.7%, p = 0.015/16.7% vs. 43.2%, p = 0.001), no significant differences for the large-systems (p = 0.135/p = 0.352). Follow-up of Mammotome ® -11/8-gauge-system system has shown 13.1/16.1% minimal scar-formation and 1.2/3.2% moderate/severe scars, whereas ATEC ® -12/9-gauge-system has shown 10.8/3.8% minimal scar-formation and 0/11.5% moderate/severe scars, no significant differences. No significant difference was found when comparing Mammotome ® -11/8-g-systems vs. ATEC ® -12/9-g-systems (p = 0.609/p = 0.823). There was also no correlation between risk of scar-formation after occurrence of bleeding or hematoma with any examined VAB-system or any needle size in this study (p = 0.800). Conclusion: Using larger needle-sizes significantly (Mammotome ®) /not significant for ATEC ® ) more interventional bleedings and post-interventional hematomas were detected, only a tendency concerning scar-formation.

  13. Kinetic studies of the radical oxidation in gaseous phase of organic iodides and of the formation of iodine oxide particles under the simulated conditions of a nuclear reactor containment submitted to a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the research in the nuclear reactor safety field, the iodine oxides formation by organic iodides destruction in the containment has been studied with the means of the atmospheric chemistry field. The destruction kinetics and their activation energy of organic iodides by . OH and . O radical has been quantified by a Flash Photolysis system able to monitor the oxidant radicals by resonance fluorescence. Those results have been published and some of them for the first time in the literature. The mechanisms leading to the organic iodides destruction are either by a hydrogen atom abstraction, either by the formation of a complex, depending on the organic iodide involved. Then, certain kinetics reactions have been updated in the IODAIR code. Other reactions have been added based on the recent literature available. A comparison of the kinetics destruction of CH 3 I by . OH and . O with IODAIR and the global kinetics of destruction in ASTEC/IODE showed a difference of about 2 which shows the importance of these two radicals (and mainly . O) in those destruction processes. The other main path of destruction would be by electron radiation. Other radicals like . H and . N would not contribute significantly to organic iodides destruction. A sensitivity analysis highlighted that organic iodides would mostly be destroyed into iodine oxides with a almost complete conversion within a few hours. Finally, an atmospheric chamber has been used to quantify iodine oxides growth, density and composition. Under the conditions studied, their formation is fast. Particles sizes of about 200-400 nm are formed within a few hours. The main parameters influencing their growth are the relative humidity and the presence of ozone (whose function is to create . O and . OH radicals). (author)

  14. Assessing Hydrate Formation in Natural Gas Pipelines Under Transient Operation / Ocena zjawiska tworzenia się hydratów w warunkach nieustalonego przepływu gazu w gazociągach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiadacz, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    This work presents a transient, non-isothermal compressible gas flow model that is combined with a hydrate phase equilibrium model. It enables, to determine whether hydrates could form under existing operating conditions in natural gas pipelines. In particular, to determine the time and location at which the natural gas enters the hydrate formation region. The gas flow is described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Real gas effects are determined by the predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong group contribution method. By means of statistical mechanics, the hydrate model is formulated combined with classical thermodynamics of phase equilibria for systems that contain water and both hydrate forming and non-hydrate forming gases as function of pressure, temperature, and gas composition. To demonstrate the applicability a case study is conducted.

  15. Temperature controlled 'void' formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, P.; Sharma, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of voids in structural materials during high temperature deformation or irradiation is essentially dependent upon the existence of 'vacancy supersaturation'. The role of temperature dependent diffusion processes in 'void' formation under varying conditions, and the mechanical property changes associated with this microstructure are briefly reviewed. (author)

  16. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  17. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... is important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function...

  18. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  19. Oxidative dimerization of (E)- and (Z)-2-propenylsesamol with O2 in the presence and absence of laccases and other catalysts: selective formation of carpanones and benzopyrans under different reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Mihaela-Anca; Conrad, Jürgen; Merişor, Elena; Koschorreck, Katja; Urlacher, Vlada B; Beifuss, Uwe

    2012-05-18

    The oxidative dimerization of 2-propenylsesamol to carpanone with O(2) as the oxidant, which probably proceeds as a domino phenol oxidation/anti-β,β-radical coupling/intramolecular hetero Diels-Alder reaction, can be efficiently catalyzed by laccases. Experiments with laccases and other catalysts like a Co(salen) type catalyst and PdCl(2) clearly demonstrate that the diastereoselectivity of the carpanone formation does not depend on the catalyst but on the double-bond geometry of the substrate. With (E)-2-propenylsesamol as the substrate, carpanone and a so far unknown carpanone diastereoisomer are formed in a 9:1 ratio. When (Z)-2-propenylsesamol is used as starting material, carpanone is accompanied by two carpanone diastereoisomers unknown so far in a 5:1:4 ratio. All three carpanone diastereoisomers have been separated by HPLC, and their structures have been elucidated unambiguously by NMR spectroscopy, DFT calculations, and spin work analysis. When the oxidation of 2-propenylsesamol with O(2) is performed in the absence of any catalyst two diastereoisomeric benzopyrans are formed, probably as the result of a domino oxidation/intermolecular hetero Diels-Alder reaction. Under these conditions, carpanone is formed in trace amounts only.

  20. Galaxy formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Houjun; White, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of galaxy formation lies at the interface between astronomy, particle physics, and cosmology. Covering diverse topics from these disciplines, all of which are needed to understand how galaxies form and evolve, this book is ideal for researchers entering the field. Individual chapters explore the evolution of the Universe as a whole and its particle and radiation content; linear and nonlinear growth of cosmic structure; processes affecting the gaseous and dark matter components of galaxies and their stellar populations; the formation of spiral and elliptical galaxies; central supermassive black holes and the activity associated with them; galaxy interactions; and the intergalactic medium. Emphasizing both observational and theoretical aspects, this book provides a coherent introduction for astronomers, cosmologists, and astroparticle physicists to the broad range of science underlying the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  1. Formation of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberg, P.A. (2833 Lawton Drive, Amarillo, Texas (USA))

    A plasma continuum model for the formation of ball lightning is developed based on a substantial number of reports that the ball is often in the discharge column of a previous lightning stroke. The usual method of setting up the plasma equation for a one-component electron plasma is used. An approximate equation for the plasma is derived from the describing equation which is then solved exactly in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions. The formation of the ball is based on a nonlinearity of the plasma equation which under certain circumstances permits the field to collapse into a small region. This collapse is interpreted to be ball lightning. The approximate equation derived for the plasma has the same form as a previous equation used to describe the formation of the fireball plasma.

  2. Principles of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bodenheimer, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding star formation is one of the key fields in present-day astrophysics. This book treats a wide variety of the physical processes involved, as well as the main observational discoveries, with key points being discussed in detail. The current star formation in our galaxy is emphasized, because the most detailed observations are available for this case. The book presents a comparison of the various scenarios for star formation, discusses the basic physics underlying each one, and follows in detail the history of a star from its initial state in the interstellar gas to its becoming a condensed object in equilibrium. Both theoretical and observational evidence to support the validity of the general evolutionary path are presented, and methods for comparing the two are emphasized. The author is a recognized expert in calculations of the evolution of protostars, the structure and evolution of disks, and stellar evolution in general. This book will be of value to graduate students in astronomy and astroph...

  3. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  4. Digtets formater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Kallesøe; Rasmussen, Krista Stinne Greve; Skriver, Svend

    2017-01-01

    definition of text and work can be supplemented by a hermeneutical dimension, thus taking various versions of works and the influence of their respective media (blog, book etc.) on the percipient into account. In connection with the theoretical considerations, a handful of recent works by Lea Marie...... Løppenthin, Olga Ravn, Mikkel Thykier, Caspar Eric, and Simon Grotrian are discussed. By using the format as a point of departure rather than applying a more conventional practice of close reading, the authors argue for a broad-spectred approach to literary analysis which focuses on aspects of the conception...

  5. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  6. Rentabilidade econômica do cultivo do maracujazeiro-amarelo sob diferentes podas de formação Economic rentability of yellow passion fruit crop under different formation prunings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Mariano Hafle

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a rentabilidade econômica do maracujazeiro-amarelo, sob diferentes formações da planta. O experimento foi conduzido em pomar comercial no Município de Lavras-MG (21º 14' S; 45º 58' W; 910 m de altitude, durante dois ciclos de produção (2006/2007. Os tratamentos constituíram na formação das plantas com diferente número de ramos terciários (T1=40, T2=30, T3=24, T4=20 e T5=14 por planta. O delineamento utilizado foi em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições, sendo a parcela composta por três plantas. Os custos econômicos e operacionais médios foram maiores para os sistemas de podas mais drásticas (manutenção de 20 e 14 ramos por planta, por apresentarem maior custo de produção e menor produtividade. A receita líquida foi negativa para os sistemas de condução com menor quantidade de ramos terciários (T4 e T5. Os sistemas com podas menos drásticas apresentaram receita líquida positiva variando de R$ 1.861,06/ha no T3 a R$ 3.895,74/ha (2006/2007 no T2. Nos tratamentos T1, T2 e T3, o resultado da situação econômica foi de lucro supernormal, indicando que a atividade está obtendo retornos maiores que as melhores alternativas possíveis de emprego do capital. Porém, nos tratamentos T4 e T5, os resultados foram de resíduos positivo e negativo, respectivamente, cobrindo apenas parte dos custos da lavoura, com a tendência do produtor de maracujá de buscar melhores alternativas de aplicação do seu capital, com abandono da atividade.The objective was to analyze the economic profitability of yellow passion fruit under different plant formations. The experiment was conducted in commercial orchard in the city of Lavras, MG (21º 14' S, 45º 58' W, 910 m altitude, for two production cycles (2006 and 2007. The treatments were the formation of plants with different number of tertiary branches (T1= 40, T2= 30, T3= 24, T4= 20 and T5= 14 per plant. The design was randomized blocks with

  7. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  8. Sustained induction of cytochrome P4501A1 in human hepatoma cells by co-exposure to benzo[a]pyrene and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole underlies the synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gábelová, Alena, E-mail: alena.gabelova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Poláková, Veronika [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Prochazka, Gabriela [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kretová, Miroslava; Poloncová, Katarína; Regendová, Eva; Luciaková, Katarína [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Segerbäck, Dan [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    To gain a deeper insight into the potential interactions between individual aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture, several benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) binary mixtures were studied. The biological activity of the binary mixtures was investigated in the HepG2 and WB-F344 liver cell lines and the Chinese hamster V79 cell line that stably expresses the human cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1). In the V79 cells, binary mixtures, in contrast to individual carcinogens, caused a significant decrease in the levels of micronuclei, DNA adducts and gene mutations, but not in cell survival. Similarly, a lower frequency of micronuclei and levels of DNA adducts were found in rat liver WB-F344 cells treated with a binary mixture, regardless of the exposure time. The observed antagonism between B[a]P and DBC may be due to an inhibition of Cyp1a1 expression because cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC showed a decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA levels. In human liver HepG2 cells exposed to binary mixtures for 2 h, a reduction in micronuclei frequency was also found. However, after a 24 h treatment, synergism between B[a]P and DBC was determined based on DNA adduct formation. Accordingly, the up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression was detected in HepG2 cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC. Our results show significant differences in the response of human and rat cells to B[a]P:DBC mixtures and stress the need to use multiple experimental systems when evaluating the potential risk of environmental pollutants. Our data also indicate that an increased expression of CYP1A1 results in a synergistic effect of B[a]P and DBC in human cells. As humans are exposed to a plethora of noxious chemicals, our results have important implications for human carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • B[a]P:DBC mixtures were less genotoxic in V79MZh1A1 cells than B[a]P and DBC alone. • An antagonism between B[a]P and DBC was determined in rat liver WB-F344 cells. • The inhibition of CYP1a1 expression by B[a]P:DBC mixture

  9. Identidade judaica: formação, manutenção e possível modificação à luz da Psicologia Social Jewish identity: Formation, maintenance and possible modification under Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Epelboim

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa examinou a configuração de ser judeu, a partir da Psicologia Social. Tal proposta reuniu considerações teóricas e observações empíricas. Quanto àquelas, foram elaborados comentários sobre identidades psicossociais, judaísmo, entre outras questões. Quanto aos aspectos empíricos, foi desenvolvido estudo de campo, com aplicação de questionário com perguntas abertas, cujas respostas foram examinadas com base na análise de conteúdo. Participaram da pesquisa 80 israelitas, sendo 40 ashkenazim e 40 sefaradim, cujas idades variaram entre 15 e 81 anos. Estes grupos foram compostos, respectivamente, por 20 homens e mulheres, dos quais 10 apresentavam nível médio e 10 superior de escolaridade. Resultados indicaram presença comum de categorias entre ashkenazim e sefaradim. Concluiu-se que ser judeu compreendia, sobretudo, aspectos religiosos e culturais. Quanto aos processos de formação, manutenção e modificação, houve predominância de fatores culturais e educacionais; culturais, religiosos, emocionais e sociais; e socioculturais.The research examined the configuration of being Jewish, under Social Psychology. This research made theoretical considerations and empirical observation. As regards the theoretical considerations, commentaries were made concerning psychosocial identity and Judaism. The empirical observations were based on a field study, with the application of a questionnaire, whose answers were examined through analyses of the content. The participants were 80 Israelis, being 40 ashkenazim and 40 sefaradim, with ages ranged from 15 to 81 years old. These groups were composed, respectively, by 20 men and women, each one with 10 participants with medium level of education and ten with high level. Results showed the common presence of categories. Being Jewish included, above all, religious and cultural aspects. As regards the processes of formation, maintenance and modification the predominance of cultural and

  10. Taxonomia de solos desenvolvidos sobre depósitos sedimentares da Formação Solimões no Estado do Acre Taxonomy of soils developed under sedimentary deposits from Solimões Formation in Acre state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Andrade Bernini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Os solos do Estado do Acre na maioria são formados sobre material de origem com grande influência da orogênese Andina, com elevados teores de Ca2+, Mg2+ e Al3+ concomitantemente, associado às combinações diferenciadas dos valores da CTC, V e m. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar e classificar os solos de uma topossequência sobre material sedimentar da Formação Solimões, no município de Feijó, Acre. Foram abertas trincheiras em três pontos de uma topossequência: terço superior (P1, terço médio (P2 e terço inferior (P3. Os solos foram analisados quanto a morfologia, granulometria (areia, silte e argila, complexo sortivo (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ e Al3+, acidez potencial (H+Al, P assimilável, pH (água e KCl, superfície específica, ataque sulfúrico (óxidos de Fe, Al, Ti e Si, mineralogia (frações areia, silte e argila. Os solos foram classificados segundo o Sistema Brasileiro de Classificação de Solos (SiBCS, 2006 e apresentada uma proposta de classificação considerando as peculiaridades do solos da região. Os solos têm baixo grau de desenvolvimento pedogenético, com minerais da fração argila de alta atividade, além da presença de minerais primários, como feldspatos e plagioclásios, nas frações areia e silte. Os solos foram classificados segundo o SiBCS atual como Argissolo Vermelho Álitico plíntico (P1, Argissolo Acinzentado Distrófico plíntico (P2 e Cambissolo Háplico Ta Eutrófico típico (P3.The soils from the State of Acre (Brazil are mostly formed under parent material with influence of Andean orogeny, showing high Ca2+, Mg2+and Al3+ contents concomitantly associated with different combinations of CEC, V and m values. This study aimed to characterize and classify soils of a topossequence under sedimentary material from Solimões Formation, in the county of Feijó, State of Acre, Brazil. Trenches were opened in three points on a topossequence: shoulder (P1, backslope (P2 and footslope (P3. The

  11. Taxonomia de solos desenvolvidos sobre depósitos sedimentares da formação Solimões no estado do Acre Taxonomy of soils developed under sedimentary deposits from Solimões formation in Acre state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Andrade Bernini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Os solos do Estado do Acre na maioria são formados sobre material de origem com grande influência da orogênese Andina, com elevados teores de Ca2+, Mg2+ e Al3+ concomitantemente, associado às combinações diferenciadas dos valores da CTC, V e m. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar e classificar os solos de uma topossequência sobre material sedimentar da Formação Solimões, no município de Feijó, Acre. Foram abertas trincheiras em três pontos de uma topossequência: terço superior (P1, terço médio (P2 e terço inferior (P3. Os solos foram analisados quanto a morfologia, granulometria (areia, silte e argila, complexo sortivo (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ e Al3+, acidez potencial (H+Al, P assimilável, pH (água e KCl, superfície específica, ataque sulfúrico (óxidos de Fe, Al, Ti e Si, mineralogia (frações areia, silte e argila. Os solos foram classificados segundo o Sistema Brasileiro de Classificação de Solos (SiBCS, 2006 e apresentada uma proposta de classificação considerando as peculiaridades do solos da região. Os solos têm baixo grau de desenvolvimento pedogenético, com minerais da fração argila de alta atividade, além da presença de minerais primários, como feldspatos e plagioclásios, nas frações areia e silte. Os solos foram classificados segundo o SiBCS atual como Argissolo Vermelho Álitico plíntico (P1, Argissolo Acinzentado Distrófico plíntico (P2 e Cambissolo Háplico Ta Eutrófico típico (P3.The soils from the State of Acre (Brazil are mostly formed under parent material with influence of Andean orogeny, showing high Ca2+, Mg2+and Al3+ contents concomitantly associated with different combinations of CEC, V and m values. This study aimed to characterize and classify soils of a topossequence under sedimentary material from Solimões Formation, in the county of Feijó, State of Acre, Brazil. Trenches were opened in three points on a topossequence: shoulder (P1, backslope (P2 and footslope (P3. The

  12. Formação de cobertura vegetal e manejo de plantas daninhas na cultura da soja em sistema plantio direto Straw cover formation and weed management in soybean under no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S Nunes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a formação de cobertura vegetal por Brachiaria brizantha e B. decumbens, bem como as interações entre as coberturas vegetais, as dosagens do herbicida glifosato e a aplicação da mistura fluazifop-p-butil + fomesafen, no manejo das plantas daninhas e na produção da soja MG/BR 46 - Conquista em sistema plantio direto. Utilizou-se delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso, num esquema de parcelas subsubdivididas, com quatro repetições. Testaram-se duas espécies de braquiária (B. brizantha e B. decumbens, duas dosagens do herbicida glifosato (1,44 e 2,16 kg e.a. ha-1 e duas dosagens da mistura fluazifop-p-butil + fomesafen (0 e 0,25 + 0,25 kg i.a. ha-1. Foram realizadas avaliações de matéria seca das coberturas, eficácia do glifosato, rebrote das coberturas, altura das plantas de soja, número de vagens, altura de inserção da primeira vagem, acamamento, dificuldade de colheita, massa de 100 grãos e produtividade. Concluiu-se que B. decumbens e B. brizantha proporcionaram adequada cobertura do solo durante todo o ciclo da cultura, que a dosagem de 1,44 kg e.a. ha-1 de glifosato foi suficiente para o controle das duas espécies de braquiária e que a produtividade da cultura da soja não foi alterada significativamente pela palhada das duas espécies estudadas nem pela dosagem do glifosato, enquanto a aplicação de fluazifop-p-butil + fomesafen como controle complementar refletiu em maior produtividade e em menor dificuldade de colheita.This work aimed to evaluate straw cover formation by Brachiaria brizantha and B. decumbens, and the interactions between straw cover, glyphosate rate and fluazifop-butyl-p + fomesafen application in weed management and soybean MG/BR 46-Conquista production under no-tillage. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design in split-plot, with four repetitions. Two Brachiaria species (B. brizantha and B. decumbens, two glyphosate rates (1.44 and 2

  13. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  14. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, R.; Hatori, T.; Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  15. Robust Decentralized Formation Flight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the idea of multiplexed model predictive control (MMPC, this paper introduces a new framework for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs formation flight and coordination. Formulated using MMPC approach, the whole centralized formation flight system is considered as a linear periodic system with control inputs of each UAV subsystem as its periodic inputs. Divided into decentralized subsystems, the whole formation flight system is guaranteed stable if proper terminal cost and terminal constraints are added to each decentralized MPC formulation of the UAV subsystem. The decentralized robust MPC formulation for each UAV subsystem with bounded input disturbances and model uncertainties is also presented. Furthermore, an obstacle avoidance control scheme for any shape and size of obstacles, including the nonapriorily known ones, is integrated under the unified MPC framework. The results from simulations demonstrate that the proposed framework can successfully achieve robust collision-free formation flights.

  16. Hydroxyl radical formation by dithranol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K; Kappus, H

    1988-11-15

    Ethene formation from 2-keto-thiomethyl-butyric acid (KMBA) was used to measure hydroxyl radical generation from the antipsoriatic drug dithranol in phosphate buffer pH 7.8. Because the singlet oxygen (1O2) sensitizer, rose bengale, showed enlarged production of ethene when irradiated in the presence of KMBA, experiments were performed in the dark in order to avoid 1O2 production by dithranol. KMBA was converted to ethene by dithranol under aerobic conditions, whereas ethene formation was negligible in the absence of oxygen. Addition of catalytic amounts of FeCl3 resulted in increased ethene formation, indicating the catalysis of a superoxide-driven Fenton-reaction. O2- - and .OH-scavengers such as rutin, catechin, dimethyl sulfoxide, mannitol, ethanol, sodium salicylate and propyl gallate as well as catalase and superoxide dismutase inhibited ethene formation.

  17. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Close Formation Flight Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Proud, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    ... in the formation's drag is achieved. A controller, i.e., a formation-hold autopilot for the wing aircraft, is designed such that the formation's geometry is maintained in the face of lead aircraft maneuvers...

  19. Formation of quasicrystals and amorphous-to-quasicrystalline phase transformation kinetics in Zr65Al7.5Ni10Cu7.5Ag10 metallic glass under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Zhuang, Yanxin; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl

    2001-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the formation of quasicrystals and the amorphous-to-quasicrystalline phase transformation kinetics in the supercooled liquid region for a Zr65Al7.5Ni10Cu7.5Ag10 metallic glass have been investigated by in situ high-pressure and high-temperature nonisothermal and isothermal...... and growth models together with the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model. The Avrami exponent was found to be near I at all four temperatures, also indicating that atomic diffusion might involve in the amorphous-to-quasicrystalline phase transformation for the Zr65Cu7.5Al7.5Ni10Ag10 metallic glass. It is found...

  20. Influence of CO2 exposure on pH value, electrochemical properties, and the formation of calcium-phosphate on Ti-6Al-4V under adjusted in vitro conditions in DMEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, Sarah; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2015-06-01

    Immersion tests for studying biomaterials surface reactions should be carried out at a pH value of 7.4 and an adjusted blood physiological electrolyte to simulate as far as possible in vivo conditions. The present work deals with surface reactivity of the biocompatible Ti-6Al-4V alloy in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) and the influence of different immersion conditions on the pH value of solution and thus on the surface charge and calcium-phosphate formation on the oxide covered alloy surface. More specifically, the influence of the temperature (room temperature vs. 37 °C) and atmospheric exposure (solution open-to-air vs. solution exposed to 5% CO2 in air) was investigated. Electrochemical measurements, XPS and ATR-IR studies were carried out for interface characterization. Precipitations of calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) on Ti-6Al-4V in DMEM are formed depending on the atmospheric conditions (presence or absence of CO2). In the absence of CO2 strong coverage of the surface by a Ca-P layer takes place; in solution exposed to 5% CO2, however, only minor amounts of Ca-P are found on the surface. This drastically different behavior can be explained by different surface terminations of OH and TiO2, induced by atmosphere-dependent pH change in solution. In consequence, different surface charges on Ti-6Al-4V can be formed at the interface depending on the type of hydroxides after contact with the electrolyte. Hence, the surface charge influences the interaction with adsorption of charged species and further modifies the oxide properties. The adsorption of the charged cations (Ca2 +) and anions (PO43 -, HPO42 -, H2PO4 -) leads to the formation of additional calcium phosphate layers. The pH of the solution is also important. At higher pH the titanium surface is more negatively charged leading to an increased electrostatic interaction with Ca2 + and reduced solubility of the calcium phosphates. Additional experiments indicate that the CO2 content in the atmosphere is

  1. Melatonin, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid and N-acetyltransferase in the pineal of the European hamster (Cricetus cricetus) kept under natural environmental conditions: lack of a day/night rhythm in melatonin formation in spring and early summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pévet, P; Vivien-Roels, B; Masson-Pévet, M; Steinlechner, S; Skene, D; Canguilhem, B

    1989-01-01

    In female European hamsters killed in spring and early summer, pineal melatonin content exhibited no day/night rhythm. Absolute levels measured were relatively low, being on the order of daytime levels detected in other hamster species. An absence of day/night changes in the activity of N-acetyltransferase was also observed. However, a marked rhythm in pineal serotonin (5-HT) was found, an abrupt large increase being observed at the beginning of the light period. The day/night rhythm of pineal 5-HIAA content is similar to that of 5-HT. This absence of rhythm in pineal melatonin formation might mean that in the European hamster it is not melatonin but another substance that is of importance in photoperiodism. An absence of melatonin rhythm, however, could also be simply a peculiar pattern of melatonin production observed at a given period of the year. In this case, melatonin would be able to transduce photoperiodic information in the European hamster, as in other photoperiodic species.

  2. Biological Mechanisms Underlying the Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Formation of Skin Wrinkling and Sagging I: Reduced Skin Elasticity, Highly Associated with Enhanced Dermal Elastase Activity, Triggers Wrinkling and Sagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imokawa, Genji; Ishida, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The repetitive exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) preferentially elicits wrinkling while ultraviolet A (UVA) predominantly elicits sagging. In chronically UVB or UVA-exposed rat skin there is a similar tortuous deformation of elastic fibers together with decreased skin elasticity, whose magnitudes are greater in UVB-exposed skin than in UVA-exposed skin. Comparison of skin elasticity with the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dermis of ovariectomized rats after UVB or UVA irradiation demonstrates that skin elasticity is more significantly decreased in ovariectomized rats than in sham-operated rats, which is accompanied by a reciprocal increase in elastase activity but not in the activities of collagenases I or IV. Clinical studies using animal skin and human facial skin demonstrated that topical treatment with a specific inhibitor or an inhibitory extract of skin fibroblast-derived elastase distinctly attenuates UVB and sunlight-induced formation of wrinkling. Our results strongly indicated that the upregulated activity of skin fibroblast-derived elastase plays a pivotal role in wrinkling and/or sagging of the skin via the impairment of elastic fiber configuration and the subsequent loss of skin elasticity. PMID:25856675

  3. Modeling Chondrule Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhour, D. D.; Buseck, P. R.

    1995-09-01

    Over the last several decades considerable data on chondrule sizes, compositions, and textures has been collected [1]; experimental studies have greatly improved our understanding of the conditions required to produce chondrule compositions and textures [2]; and models of energetic nebular processes have provided insight into mechanisms by which chondrules may have formed [3]. While much work remains in each of these areas, the information presently available is sufficient to allow the construction of simple numerical models of chondrule formation. We have constructed a computer algorithm to investigate the consequences of forming chondrules under a variety of conditions. Variables that are considered include: 1) the mechanism of heating (e.g., EM radiation, aerodynamic drag, collisions with energetic particles), 2) peak chondrule temperature, 3) heat-source geometry, 4) pre-chondrule dust aggregate size distributions, 5) dust aggregate compositional distributions, 6) chondrule solidus and liquidus temperatures, 7) kinetic barriers to melting, and 8) the duration of heating. Output includes the size distributions and relative abundances of PO, PP, POP, BO, and NP chondrules. Given the uncertainties in the input variables, the primary purpose of the code is not to construct a single (and necessarily somewhat arbitrary) model of chondrule formation, but rather to elucidate the differences in chondrule properties associated with various sets of formation conditions. Results from a number of simulations using a variety of input parameters illustrate the importance of both composition and peak temperature on the proportion of porphyritic to non-porphyritic chondrules produced. Also apparent is the influence of the mechanism of heating on the relative size distributions of chondrule textural types. Results indicate that specific heating mechanisms require unique sets of associated conditions to account for the observed properties of chondrules. These unique sets of

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of spheromak plasma in flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Takimoto, Akio; Taguchi, Masayoshi; Miyazaki, Takeshi.

    1983-08-01

    The Green-function method is applied to the Grad-Shafranov equation for the plasma in a flux conserver with a rectangular cross section. The linear and the nonlinear MHD equilibrium configurations for various strengths of the toroidal magnetic field B are determined by this method. The average beta value and the safety factor are also evaluated. When B is increased from zero, decreases and vanishes at a force-free configuration. The safety factor takes a maximum value on the magnetic axis. A sufficient condition for stability to symmetric perturbations is derived by use of Edenstrasser's condition. This sufficient condition holds for the flux conserver of any shape. As an example, the region, in which this sufficient condition is fulfilled, is shown graphically for the flux conserver with rectangular cross section. (author)

  5. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  6. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    OpenAIRE

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is...

  7. THE USE OF THE ELEMENTS OF MORPHOECOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS OF ORGANISMS TO THE ENVIRONMENT UNDER PALEOGEOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTIONS OF BIOTAS OF TETIYSKY DESERT-STEPPE REGION (BUILDING SCHEMES OF HISTORICAL FORMATION OF FLORA AND FAUNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abdurakhmanov

    2016-01-01

    of this biota during the time required for the formation of structural units of the community, the individual species, subspecies and supra species taxa. The analysis of the life forms of individual taxonomic groups, species, communities, modern biological diversity of coastal and island ecosystems does not confirm the periods of "strong" transgressions flooding vast areas of the Caspian and the islands of Turan. They contradict these assumptions.

  8. Concurrent suppression of NF-κB, p38 MAPK and reactive oxygen species formation underlies the effect of a novel compound isolated from Curcuma comosa Roxb. in LPS-activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamvoraphong, Nittaya; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Sanvarinda, Pantip; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Thampithak, Anusorn; Sanvarinda, Pimtip

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of (3S)-1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-7-phenyl-(6E)-6-hepten-3-ol, also known as compound 092, isolated from Curcuma comosa Roxb on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated highly aggressive proliferating immortalized (HAPI) microglial cell lines. Nitric oxide (NO) production was determined using the Griess reaction, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA. Western blotting was used to determine the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and their related upstream proteins. Compound 092 suppressed NO production and iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated HAPI cells. These effects originated from the ability of compound 092 to attenuate the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as determined by the reduction in p-NF-κB and p-IκB kinase (IKK) protein levels. Compound 092 also significantly lowered LPS-activated intracellular reactive oxygen species production and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Compound 092 suppresses microglial activation through attenuation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation. Compound 092 thus holds the potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders associated with neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. In situ formation of the amino sugars 1-amino-1-deoxy-fructose and 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucose under Maillard reaction conditions in the absence of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2016-04-15

    Replacing amino acids with their binary metal complexes during the Maillard reaction can initiate various processes, including the oxidative degradation of their glucose conjugates, generating 1-amino-1-deoxy-fructose and its derivatives. These reactive amino sugars are not easily accessible under Maillard reaction conditions and are only formed in the presence of ammonia. To explore the generality of this observation and to study in particular the ability of fructose to generate glucosamine, the amino acid-metal complexes were heated in aqueous solutions with three aldohexoses and two ketohexoses at 110°C for 2 h and the dry residues were analysed by ESI/qTOF/MS/MS. All the sugars generated relatively intense ions at [M+H](+) 180 (C6H14NO5); those ions originating from ketohexoses exhibited MS/MS fragmentations identical to glucosamine and those originating form aldohexoses showed ions identical to fructosamine. Furthermore, the amino sugars were found to form fructosazine, react with other sugars and undergo dehydration reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Format Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  11. Role of domain in pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin-Lee, Sungrim

    2017-06-01

    Pattern formation during development is one of the elegant self-organized phenomena that allow cells to regulate their functions. At all levels, from DNA to a tissue or organ, many developmental processes include the determination of cellular functions through pattern formation. To elucidate the mechanism underlying pattern formation, numerous mathematical models have been developed and applied. However, model simplification has resulted in the role of domains not being seriously considered in pattern formation. Here, we introduce a novel application of the phase-field method for analysis of chromatin dynamics, and a mathematical approach that includes domain information into a biochemical model of pattern formation. Using this new modeling method, here, we consider the role of nuclear and cellular cell shapes on pattern formation. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  12. Formation of colloids of the tetravalent uranium under influence of silicate in neutral and low alkaline aqueous systems; Bildung von Kolloiden des tetravalenten Urans unter Einfluss von Silikat in neutralen und schwachalkalischen waessrigen Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Isabell

    2016-03-30

    This work includes the preparation and characterization of new uranium(IV) colloids which are formed and stabilized in the near neutral pH range and under environmentally relevant conditions. Conclusions on stability behavior and particle size distributions were drawn based on results obtained by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, as well as ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation in combination with element analyzes. Spectroscopic methodes confirmed the tetravalent state of uranium in the experiments. Unlike empirical data, it is possible to generate long-term stable uranium(IV) colloids at higher concentrations. By addition of geochemical components such as carbonate and silicate, they are stable and resistant in the near neutral pH range over a long period. It was found that dissolved silica plays an essential role in the preparation of colloids. Colloid-borne uranium(IV) up to a concentration of 10{sup -3} mol/L, corresponding to 0,238 g/L, is stabilized in solutions. This concentration is about three orders of magnitude higher than so far known silicate-free aqueous uranium(IV) colloids. Through the use of different analytical methods (invasive and non-invasive) it could be shown that the resulting uranium(IV) colloids are in the nanoscalar range. A high mobility can be assumed in aquatic systems. Evidence is provided by photon correlation spectroscopy, ultrafiltration, and ultracentrifugation that uranium(IV) can form silicate-containing colloids of a size lower than 20 nm. The particles are generated in near neutral to slightly alkaline solutions containing geochemical relevant components (carbonate, silicate, sodium ions). They remain stable in aqueous suspension over years. Electrostatic repulsion due to a negative zeta potential in the near-neutral to alkaline pH range caused by the silicate stabilizes the uranium(IV) colloids. The isoelectric point of the nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH values by the silicate. The higher the

  13. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crable, B.R.; Plugge, C.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the

  14. Simulation of Kinkband Formation in Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badri; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2010-01-01

    subroutine in ABAQUS/Standard for analyzing the kinkband formation in the fiber composites under compressive loading within the framework of large deformation kinematics. This computational model analyses the effects of misalignment on elastic plastic deformation under plane strain conditions based...

  15. Cosmic Star-Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero; Dickinson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, an avalanche of new data from multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic surveys has revolutionized our view of galaxy formation and evolution. Here we review the range of complementary techniques and theoretical tools that allow astronomers to map the cosmic history of star formation, heavy element production, and reionization of the Universe from the cosmic “dark ages” to the present epoch. A consistent picture is emerging, whereby the star-formation rate density peaked approximately 3.5 Gyr after the Big Bang, at z≈1.9, and declined exponentially at later times, with an e-folding timescale of 3.9 Gyr. Half of the stellar mass observed today was formed before a redshift z = 1.3. About 25% formed before the peak of the cosmic star-formation rate density, and another 25% formed after z = 0.7. Less than ˜1% of today's stars formed during the epoch of reionization. Under the assumption of a universal initial mass function, the global stellar mass density inferred at any epoch matches reasonably well the time integral of all the preceding star-formation activity. The comoving rates of star formation and central black hole accretion follow a similar rise and fall, offering evidence for coevolution of black holes and their host galaxies. The rise of the mean metallicity of the Universe to about 0.001 solar by z = 6, one Gyr after the Big Bang, appears to have been accompanied by the production of fewer than ten hydrogen Lyman-continuum photons per baryon, a rather tight budget for cosmological reionization.

  16. Prediction of tar ball formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of small tar balls ranging in size from less than a millimetre to 60 centimetres have been observed during cleanup assessment operations following accidental oil spills on water. The tar balls are composed of heavy oil residues and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the water column. They can be found on shorelines, settled on the seafloor and floating at or near the water surface. Their abundance on the shorelines varies from site to site and depends on the conditions of the spill and mixing conditions. Aggregation between SPM and micro-sized oil droplets occurs naturally in coastal waters and enhances the dispersion of spilled oil. Although tar balls are among the important end states of spilled oil in the marine environment, no model exists to estimate the percentage of the spilled oil that becomes tar balls. This paper offered some insight into the modeling of tar ball formation. Current modeling understanding of oil-SPM aggregate formation was used to predict tar ball formation. The formation of oil droplets was examined with respect to a range of conditions under which the formation of large droplets is expected. The role of aggregation was then presented to demonstrate the effects of concentration and type of SPM on the buoyancy of tar balls. Good agreement was found between modeling results and field data reported in the literature regarding the size and density of tar balls. Oil viscosity and mixing energy were found to be the main factors controlling the formation of tar balls. The aggregation of tar balls with SPM and shoreline material results in significant increases or decreases in density, depending on the type and concentration of SPM. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  17. Formation Flying Concept Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Palkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “formation flying” implies coordinated movement of at least two satellites on coplanar and non-coplanar orbits with a maximum distance between them being much less than the length of the orbit. Peculiarities of formation flying concept also include:- automatic coordination of satellites;- sub-group specialization of formation flying satellites;- equipment and data exchange technology unification in each specialized group or subgroup.Formation flying satellites can be classified according to the configuration stability level (order (array, cluster («swarm», intergroup specialization rules («central satellite», «leader», «slave», manoeuvrability («active» and «passive» satellites.Tasks of formation flying include:- experiments with payload, distributed in formation flying satellites;- various near-earth space and earth-surface research;- super-sized aperture antenna development;- land-based telescope calibration;- «space advertisement» (earth-surface observable satellite compositions of a logotype, word, etc.;- orbital satellite maintenance, etc.Main issues of formation flying satellite system design are:- development of an autonomous satellite group manoeuvring technology;- providing a sufficient characteristic velocity of formation flying satellites;- ballistic and navigation maintenance for satellite formation flying;- technical and economic assessment of formation flying orbital delivery and deployment;- standardization, unification, miniaturization and integration of equipment;- intergroup and intersatellite function redistribution.

  18. Consensus formation on coevolving networks: groups' formation and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, Balazs; Barrat, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of adaptivity on a social model of opinion dynamics and consensus formation. We analyse how the adaptivity of the network of contacts between agents to the underlying social dynamics affects the size and topological properties of groups and the convergence time to the stable final state. We find that, while on static networks these properties are determined by percolation phenomena, on adaptive networks the rewiring process leads to different behaviors: adaptive rewiring fosters group formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, though it also makes possible the division of clusters. We show how the convergence time is determined by the characteristic time of link rearrangement. We finally investigate how the adaptivity yields nontrivial correlations between the internal topology and the size of the groups of agreeing agents

  19. Evolutionary dynamics of group formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Group formation is a quite ubiquitous phenomenon across different animal species, whose individuals cluster together forming communities of diverse size. Previous investigations suggest that, in general, this phenomenon might have similar underlying reasons across the interested species, despite genetic and behavioral differences. For instance improving the individual safety (e.g. from predators), and increasing the probability to get food resources. Remarkably, the group size might strongly vary from species to species, e.g. shoals of fishes and herds of lions, and sometimes even within the same species, e.g. tribes and families in human societies. Here we build on previous theories stating that the dynamics of group formation may have evolutionary roots, and we explore this fascinating hypothesis from a purely theoretical perspective, with a model using the framework of Evolutionary Game Theory. In our model we hypothesize that homogeneity constitutes a fundamental ingredient in these dynamics. Accordingly, we study a population that tries to form homogeneous groups, i.e. composed of similar agents. The formation of a group can be interpreted as a strategy. Notably, agents can form a group (receiving a 'group payoff'), or can act individually (receiving an 'individual payoff'). The phase diagram of the modeled population shows a sharp transition between the 'group phase' and the 'individual phase', characterized by a critical 'individual payoff'. Our results then support the hypothesis that the phenomenon of group formation has evolutionary roots.

  20. From Sermon Formation to Preacher Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaarden, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    today is less about exercising the authority of an office and more about embodying authenticity. I argue that traditional homiletic education can benefit from implementing a learner-centered approach to teaching moving from sermon formation towards preacher formation, in order to develop and train...... judged, evaluated, or critiqued. In this paper, I explain how a learner-centered approach to education works in practice and show how pastors experience the teaching method and the congregations’ positive response to their improvements. I shall present the results of a focus-group interview with pastors...

  1. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  2. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    might take a different trend in different eras, in which it is either positive, leading to a bigger chance of alliance formation , or negative, leading...of war and peace with regard to systemic analysis. Therefore, it is reasonable that there is a deviation in the trends of alliance formation during...ALLIANCE FORMATION PATTERNS by Wael Abbas Zoltan Schneider December 2015 Thesis Advisor: William P. Fox Second Reader: Heather S. Gregg

  3. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...... for nanoscale visualisation and measurement of interaction forces of living cells under physiological conditions. The new immobilisation technique provides the practical platform needed to apply AFM for analysis of living bacteria....

  4. Coevolutionary modeling in network formation

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shyoukh, Ibrahim

    2014-12-03

    Network coevolution, the process of network topology evolution in feedback with dynamical processes over the network nodes, is a common feature of many engineered and natural networks. In such settings, the change in network topology occurs at a comparable time scale to nodal dynamics. Coevolutionary modeling offers the possibility to better understand how and why network structures emerge. For example, social networks can exhibit a variety of structures, ranging from almost uniform to scale-free degree distributions. While current models of network formation can reproduce these structures, coevolutionary modeling can offer a better understanding of the underlying dynamics. This paper presents an overview of recent work on coevolutionary models of network formation, with an emphasis on the following three settings: (i) dynamic flow of benefits and costs, (ii) transient link establishment costs, and (iii) latent preferential attachment.

  5. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  6. Exploring Opponent Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    of how the opponent format and relationships impact a game are almost absent in current research. Thus, this paper aims to elucidate how the perception of a competition differs, depending on the opponent format, by presenting a game mechanic framework. The paper furthermore presents an interactive...... football-training platform, as well as games designed to explore the different opponent formats. The games are qualitatively evaluated to illuminate the qualities of and distinctions between different types of opponent formats, proposed by the framework terminology....

  7. ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-09-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B. This format, originally designed for the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File, is recommended for international use. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-NCS-50496 (ENDF 102) should be consulted. An Appendix to the present document gives a summary of the format differences between ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5. (author)

  8. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  9. Mechanisms underlying the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Federico; Huangfu, Danwei

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer unique opportunities for studying human biology, modeling diseases and for therapeutic applications. The simplest approach so far to generate human PSCs lines is through reprogramming of somatic cells from an individual by defined factors, referred to simply as reprogramming. Reprogramming circumvents the ethical issues associated with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and nuclear transfer hESCs (nt-hESCs), and the resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) retain the same basic genetic makeup as the somatic cell used for reprogramming. Since the first report of iPSCs by Takahashi and Yamanaka, the molecular mechanisms of reprogramming have been extensively investigated. A better mechanistic understanding of reprogramming is fundamental not only to iPSC biology and improving the quality of iPSCs for therapeutic use, but also to our understanding of the molecular basis of cell identity, pluripotency and plasticity. Here we summarize the genetic, epigenetic and cellular events during reprogramming, and the roles of various factors identified thus far in the reprogramming process. PMID:26383234

  10. Formation Dynamics under a Class of Control Laws

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Fumin; Krishnaprasad, P. S

    2002-01-01

    A system of two earth satellites is analyzed as a controlled mechanical system. The orbit of an earth satellite can be represented by a point in the vector space of ordered pairs of angular momentum and Laplace vectors...

  11. Formation of drug nanocrystals under nanoconfinement afforded by liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cipolla, D.; Wu, H.; Salentinig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals of drug substances have important therapeutic applications, but their preparation is often difficult due to size control in bottom up approaches, or energetic milling and surface activation in top down processing. In this study, confinement within liposome nanocompartments is demonst...... physical means (e.g., freeze/thaw) is an attractive possibility, especially in highly regulated industries such as pharmaceuticals where qualitative and quantitative changes of composition would require extensive safety evaluations....

  12. Structure Formation of Thermoresponsive Microgels Suspensions Under Shear Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Lindner, P.; Richtering, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shear-induced structures of concentrated temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgel suspensions have been studied employing small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS). The interaction potential of swollen PNiPAM microgels could be varied from repulsive at temperatures below

  13. Exciton formation and stability in semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siggelkow, S.; Hoyer, W.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.

    2004-02-01

    The formation and stability of excitons in semiconductors is studied on the basis of a microscopic model that includes Coulomb interacting fermionic electrons and holes as well as phonons. Whereas quasiequilibrium calculations predict substantial exciton fractions coexisting with an electron-hole plasma at low temperatures and densities, dynamic calculations reveal that the exciton formation times under these conditions exceed the characteristic lifetimes. At elevated densities, good agreement between dynamical and quasiequilibrium calculations is obtained.

  14. Origin, age and physico-chemical processes of fluid circulations in fractures: example of under-cover basement (Vienne) and of clay-rich formations (Gard, East); Origine, age et processus physico-chimiques des circulations de fluides dans les fractures: exemple de socle sous couverture (Vienne) et de formations riches en argiles (Gard, Est)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschaert, St

    2001-10-01

    The study of minerals sealing the discontinuities and the cavities by past to recent fluid circulations is the only method to assess the paleo -hydrological and -hydrogeochemical behavior of both sedimentary or granitic systems. Petrographic, mineralogic, isotopic (C, O, H) and geochemical (K/Ar) tools provide the opportunity: i) to identify the source and the nature of sealing (carbonates and quartz) -forming waters and ii) to precise the physical and chemical mechanisms occurring during fluid circulations. This study is focused on 3 sites selected in the framework of a survey managed by Andra for the feasibility of an underground laboratory: in the covered plutonites of Charroux Civray (Vienne), 3 major fluid circulations (Hercynian fluids, Mesozoic brines, diagenetic waters) have been identified. The carbonates deposited in discontinuities or pervasively inside the granitic rocks have been formed from an unique C source ({delta}{sup 13}C ranging from -9 and -14 0/00). C stock has been early introduced during retrograde metamorphism, and afterwards, re-mobilized by successive fluid inputs. This confers on the Ca-rich plutonic rocks an efficient self-sealing capacity during later fracturing and fluid flow. In Cretaceous siltstones and surrounding limestones and sandstones of Marcoule (South-eastern Basin), calcites from fracture formed during Eocene compression and/or Oligocene extension have been deposited under low temperature conditions (T <50-55 deg C). C and O sources of fracture calcites differ as a function of stratigraphical levels. Fracture sealing occurs: i) either in close system, by redistribution of the nearby host-rock cements, or ii) in open system with introduction of C and O from external sources. These late events have contributed to reduce the global permeability of the rocks trough the sealing of the fractures. In the Eastern part of the Paris basin, circulations of meteoric fluids have occurred at a regional scale during Tertiary, both in the

  15. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures

  16. Nuclear heating of oil-bearing formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alspaw, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    The invention reported consists of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel to obtain fission products which are packaged and emplaced in salt water underlying viscous oil formations. The heat generated is transferred to the oil formation by convection and the viscosity of the oil is decreased enabling recovery from a productioon well. Improvement over prior art consists in emplacing the fission-product packages in the water formation, hence preventing charring of the oil near the heat source. If charring does occur, recovery of petroleum becomes even more difficult than prior to the application of heat. (O.T.)

  17. ENDF/B Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B, the evaluated neutron nuclear data library of the US National Nuclear Data Center. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-50274 (ENDF-102) should be consulted. (author)

  18. Diminutive formations in Xitsonga

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Introduction. In Xitsonga diminutive formation, the juncture between the root and the suffix undergoes various phonological processes: glide formation, velarisation and vowel deletion. We argue that these seemingly disjointed processes are results of repair strategies that apply in order to avoid a sequence of labial sounds.

  19. Divisions-ST Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Henny, L

    2001-01-01

    Au CERN la formation est une partie intégrante des activités de l'Organisation. Mentionnée dans le Statut du Personnel depuis l'origine, elle figure au Règlement depuis 1981 et est largement explicitée dans la Circulaire Administrative N° 16. L'organe réglementaire est constitué par la Commission Paritaire de Formation (Joint Training Board dont le sigle est JTB) qui a pour but de conseiller le Directeur Général en matière de formation, de définir la politique de formation et d'en faire l'évaluation. Des organes spécifiques ont été mis en place pour organiser les différents programmes : le Groupe Formation et Développement, le Comité exécutif de formation (sigle TEC), le Comité d'enseignement académique. Des délégués divisionnaires à la formation (sigle DTO) servent de courroie de transmission entre ces organes, le personnel et le Service de l'Enseignement (Div. HR). La Division ST dont les activités présentent une grande variété se doit de poursuivre une politique de formation s...

  20. Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, P.; Ladd, A. J. C.

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The effects of flow rate, mineral dissolution rate, and geometrical properties of the fracture were investigated, and the optimal conditions for wormhole formation were determined.

  1. Manuel UNIMARC format bibliographique

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This manual is the French translation of the second edition of UNIMARC Manual: bibliographic format published in English in 1994 and completed by 5 updates published from 1996 to 2005. This 5th French edition is composite. It reproduces identically a part of the 4th edition published in 2002 and, for the fields of the format modified in the Update 5, it offers a new more structured presentation. This is a handbook dedicated to French-speaking users of the UNIMARC format for bibliographic descriptions.

  2. Cosmology and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Implications of the massive halos and ''missing mass'' for galaxy formation are addressed; it is suggested that this mass consists of ''Population III'' stars that formed before the galaxies did. 19 references

  3. PCF File Format.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoreson, Gregory G [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    PCF files are binary files designed to contain gamma spectra and neutron count rates from radiation sensors. It is the native format for the GAmma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) package [1]. It can contain multiple spectra and information about each spectrum such as energy calibration. This document outlines the format of the file that would allow one to write a computer program to parse and write such files.

  4. Mechanics of formation of sawtooth chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Amitabh

    Formation of sawtooth chips was studied while machining case carburized 8620 steel (of varying degrees of hardness--upto Rc62), Titanium and Brass. Cutting forces were measured and an attempt was made to measure temperature during machining of case carburized 8620 steel. Conventional tool-chip thermocouple technique was modified to accommodate the effects due to design of Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) cutting inserts. The chips produced were examined under Optical Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope and Transmission Electron Microscope. A technique was developed for specimen preparation to study the microstructure of a non-etching white layer under a transmission electron microscope. All the experiments done during this study for an investigation into the root cause of a sawtooth chip formation suggest that a cyclic crack formation on the free surface side of the chip is responsible for the formation of the sawtooth chips; contrary to the widely accepted view of adiabatic shear being the root cause of the sawtooth chip formation. A Quick-Stop device was also used to determine the mechanism of the sawtooth chip formation. A new method of evaluating cutting ratio for the sawtooth chips is proposed and was verified experimentally.

  5. Autonomous Formation Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  6. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated usi...

  7. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Coalition Formation in Games with Externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montero, M.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies an extensive form game of coalition formation with random proposers in a situation where coalitions impose externalities on other players. It is shown that an agreement will be reached without delay provided that any set of coalitions profit from merging. Even under this strong

  9. Formation of multiple dark photovoltaic spatial solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We theoretically study the formation of multiple dark photovoltaic soliton splitting in the quasi-steady-state and steady-state regimes under open-circuit conditions. We find that the initial width of the dark notch at the entrance face of the crystal is a key parameter for generating an even (or odd) number sequence of dark ...

  10. Formation of multiple dark photovoltaic spatial solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We theoretically study the formation of multiple dark photovoltaic soliton splitting in the quasi-steady-state and steady-state regimes under open-circuit conditions. We find that the initial width of the dark notch at the entrance face of the crystal is a key parameter for generating an even (or odd) number sequence of ...

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of Memory Formation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovkic, Iva B.; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C.; Sweatt, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and maintenance of memories is a central goal of the neuroscience community. It is well regarded that an organism's ability to lastingly adapt its behavior in response to a transient environmental stimulus relies on the central nervous system's capability for structural…

  12. 48 CFR 333.212-70 - Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... under Rule 4. The Government Trial Attorney for this case is ______ (insert General Law Division, Office... Section 333.212-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Disputes and Appeals 333.212-70 Formats. (a) Contracting...

  13. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes that organizational strategy formation should be characterized theoretically as a process that is subject to several interacting forces, rather than represented by separate discrete decisionmodels or theoretic perspectives, as is commonly done in the strategic management...... literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social...... - are identified as interacting in and having significant influence on the strategy formation process. It is further argued that by applying a holistic ''forces-view'' of the significant and interacting influences on strategy formation, we can better understand the dynamics and challenges in managing the process...

  14. Tritiated ammonia formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    When nitrogen was selected as the glovebox atmosphere for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a concern was raised as to the possibility of tritiated ammonia formation in the gloveboxes. Experimental data were produced to study the tritiated ammonia formation rate in a tritium and nitrogen mixture. A rate equation that closely simulates the experimental data was developed. This rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T 2 and N 2 to form NT 3 is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach radiochemical equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  15. Double layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.

    1982-01-01

    Results from several numerical simulations of the formation of double layers in plasmas with a constant potential drop across them are presented. Here the emphasis is mainly on plasma processes during the formation of double layers. The recurring formation of double layers, their propagation and associated current interruptions are observed when the electron current injected into the simulation region from the low potential side exceeds the electron thermal current. This recurring process is stopped (or delayed) when the electron current recuperation is inhibited by a small magnetic force on the electrons. The motion of double layers is examined and it is found that the motion is caused by the interruption of the ion current from the high potential side. The subsequent recovery of this current renders the double layer stationary. (author)

  16. Planetesimals and Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John

    The first step in the standard model for planet formation is the growth of gravitationally bound bodies called ``planetesimals'' from dust grains in a protoplanetary disk. Currently, we do not know how planetesimals form, how long they take to form, or what their sizes and mechanical properties are. The goal of this proposal is to assess how these uncertainties affect subsequent stages of planetary growth and the kind of planetary systems that form. The work will address three particular questions: (i) Can the properties of small body populations in the modern Solar System constrain the properties of planetesimals? (ii) How do the properties of planetesimals affect the formation of giant planets? (iii) How does the presence of a water ice condensation front (the ``snow line'') in a disk affect planetesimal formation and the later stages of planetary growth? These questions will be examined with computer simulations of planet formation using new computer codes to be developed as part of the proposal. The first question will be addressed using a statistical model for planetesimal coagulation and fragmentation. This code will be merged with the proposer's Mercury N-body integrator code to model the dynamics of large protoplanets in order to address the second question. Finally, a self- consistent model of disk evolution and the radial transport of water ice and vapour will be added to examine the third question. A theoretical understanding of how planets form is one of the key goals of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems programme. Researchers have carried out many studies designed to address this goal, but the questions of how planetesimals form and how their properties affect planet formation have received relatively little attention. The proposed work will help address these unsolved questions, and place other research in context by assessing the importance of planetesimal origins and properties for planet formation.

  17. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...... a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means of the GC...

  18. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  19. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  20. Tea aroma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Tang Ho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides water, tea is one of the most popular beverages around the world. The chemical ingredients and biological activities of tea have been summarized recently. The current review summarizes tea aroma compounds and their formation in green, black, and oolong tea. The flavor of tea can be divided into two categories: taste (non-volatile compounds and aroma (volatile compounds. All of these aroma molecules are generated from carotenoids, lipids, glycosides, etc. precursors, and also from Maillard reaction. In the current review, we focus on the formation mechanism of main aromas during the tea manufacturing process.