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Sample records for underlying rock formations

  1. Representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas under consideration of geology and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas as far as safety and geological aspects are concerned. Nagra has to demonstrate the basic feasibility of the safe disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate-level waste (ILW) in a deep geological repository, The report shows which possibilities for the disposal of SF, HLW and ILW exist in Switzerland and summarises the current state of general academic and applied geo-scientific research as well as the project-specific knowledge base that has been developed by Nagra over the past 30 years. The descriptions and assessments of the potential host rocks and areas are based on attributes that take into account experience gained both in Switzerland and abroad and are in agreement with international practice. An assessment of potential siting areas is looked at, in view of the preparation of a General Licence application, Nagra will also have to consider land-use planning and socio-economic aspects. This will be carried out in the next step according to the Sectoral Plan for Geological Disposal under the guidance of the relevant Swiss authorities

  2. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Rock strength under explosive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimer, N.; Proffer, W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation emphasizes the importance of a detailed description of the nonlinear deviatoric (strength) response of the surrounding rock in the numerical simulation of underground nuclear explosion phenomenology to the late times needed for test ban monitoring applications. We will show how numerical simulations which match ground motion measurements in volcanic tuffs and in granite use the strength values obtained from laboratory measurements on small core samples of these rocks but also require much lower strength values after the ground motion has interacted with the rock. The underlying physical mechanisms for the implied strength reduction are not yet well understood, and in fact may depend on the particular rock type. However, constitutive models for shock damage and/or effective stress have been used successfully at S-Cubed in both the Geophysics Program (primarily for DARPA) and the Containment Support Program (for DNA) to simulate late time ground motions measured at NTS in many different rock types

  4. Geochemistry of the Oruatemanu Formation, Arrow Rocks, Northland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, R.S.; Higuchi, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Maeda, T.; Ikehara, M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the geochemical characteristics of sedimentary rocks from the Upper Permian - Middle Triassic Oruatemanu Formation on Arrow Rocks, Waipapa Terrane, New Zealand. The sedimentary rocks consist of limestone, tuffaceous shale, vari-coloured bedded chert, hemipelagic shale and green siliceous mudstone (= green argillite), in ascending order, a typical oceanic plate sequence. Shale and green argillite have higher Zr/Nb ratios than do chert and tuffaceous shales, and show similar REE patterns to PAAS (Post-Archean average Australian shale). In contrast, chert sequences from the basal part and intercalated tuff layers have high TiO 2 contents and Zr/Nb ratios similar to those of basaltic rocks from Arrow Rocks. These geochemical characteristics suggest that the sedimentary environment of the Oruatemanu Formation changed upward, from an open sea setting to the continental margin of Gondwanaland. Chemical compositions of bedded cherts from Arrow Rocks indicate a mixing of biogenic silica, detritus from continents and basaltic materials. In the interval from Upper Permian to Lower Middle Triassic this mixing shows remarkable secular variations. We detected geochemical signals of two Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs), one at the Permian/Triassic (P/T) boundary, and the other at the middle Upper Induan level. We name them the OAEα (P/T OAE) and OAEβ (Upper Induan OAE). These OAE horizons are enriched in S, U and other heavy metals (e.g. Mo and Cr), and also have high V/(V+Ni) ratios. Based on a comparison between enrichment factors of Cr and other redox-sensitive trace elements (e.g. Zn, Pb, Co, Cu), the Upper Induan OAEβ is considered to be more intense than the P/T boundary OAEα. This result is not in agreement with the superanoxia model previously proposed. In addition, OAEβ corresponds well with the radiolarian faunal turnover from Permian to Triassic forms documented from the Oruatemanu Formation in this volume. These results may suggest that peak time and

  5. Failure Mechanisms of Brittle Rocks under Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Taoying

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of a rock mass is determined not only by the properties of the rock matrix, but mostly by the presence and properties of discontinuities or fractures within the mass. The compression test on rock-like specimens with two prefabricated transfixion fissures, made by pulling out the embedded metal inserts in the pre-cured period was carried out on the servo control uniaxial loading tester. The influence of the geometry of pre-existing cracks on the cracking processes was analysed with reference to the experimental observation of crack initiation and propagation from pre-existing flaws. Based on the rock fracture mechanics and the stress-strain curves, the evolution failure mechanism of the fissure body was also analyzed on the basis of exploring the law of the compression-shear crack initiation, wing crack growth and rock bridge connection. Meanwhile, damage fracture mechanical models of a compression-shear rock mass are established when the rock bridge axial transfixion failure, tension-shear combined failure, or wing crack shear connection failure occurs on the specimen under axial compression. This research was of significance in studying the failure mechanism of fractured rock mass.

  6. Effect of crustal heterogeneities and effective rock strength on the formation of HP and UHP rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Schmalholz, Stefan; White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The formation of high pressure and ultra-high pressure rocks has been controversially discussed in recent years. Most existing petrological interpretations assume that pressure in the Earth is lithostatic and therefore HP and UHP rocks have to come from great depth, which usually involves going down a subduction channel and being exhumed again. Yet, an alternative explanation points out that pressure in the lithosphere is often non-lithostatic and can be either smaller or larger than lithostatic as a function of location and time. Whether this effect is tectonically significant or not depends on the magnitude of non-lithostatic pressure, and as a result a number of researchers have recently performed numerical simulations to address this. Somewhat disturbingly, they obtained widely differing results with some claiming that overpressures as large as a GPa can occur (Schmalholz et al. 2014), whereas others show that overpressures of exhumed rocks are generally less than 20% and thus insignificant (Li et al. 2010; Burov et al. 2014). In order to understand where these discrepancies come from, we reproduce the simulations of Li et al (2010) of a typical subduction and collision scenario, using an independently developed numerical code (MVEP2). For the same model setup and parameters, we confirm the earlier results of Li et al. (2010) and obtain no more than ~20% overpressure in exhumed rocks of the subduction channel. Yet, a critical assumption in their models is that the subducted crust is laterally homogeneous and that it has a low effective friction angle that is less than 7o. The friction angle of (dry) rocks is experimentally well-constrained to be around 30o, and low effective friction angles require, for example, high-fluid pressures. Whereas high fluid pressures might exist in the sediment-rich upper crust, they are likely to be much lower or absent in the lower crust from which melt has been extracted or in rocks that underwent a previous orogenic cycle. In a

  7. A 3-D wellbore simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) to determine the thermal diffusivity of rock-formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Loya, J. A.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.

    2017-06-01

    Acquiring thermophysical properties of rock-formations in geothermal systems is an essential task required for the well drilling and completion. Wellbore thermal simulators require such properties for predicting the thermal behavior of a wellbore and the formation under drilling and shut-in conditions. The estimation of static formation temperatures also needs the use of these properties for the wellbore and formation materials (drilling fluids and pipes, cements, casings, and rocks). A numerical simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) has been developed for modeling the drilling fluid circulation and shut-in processes of geothermal wellbores, and for the in-situ determination of thermal diffusivities of rocks. Bottomhole temperatures logged under shut-in conditions (BHTm), and thermophysical and transport properties of drilling fluids were used as main input data. To model the thermal disturbance and recovery processes in the wellbore and rock-formation, initial drilling fluid and static formation temperatures were used as initial and boundary conditions. WELLTHER-SIM uses these temperatures together with an initial thermal diffusivity for the rock-formation to solve the governing equations of the heat transfer model. WELLTHER-SIM was programmed using the finite volume technique to solve the heat conduction equations under 3-D and transient conditions. Thermal diffusivities of rock-formations were inversely computed by using an iterative and efficient numerical simulation, where simulated thermal recovery data sets (BHTs) were statistically compared with those temperature measurements (BHTm) logged in some geothermal wellbores. The simulator was validated using a well-documented case reported in the literature, where the thermophysical properties of the rock-formation are known with accuracy. The new numerical simulator has been successfully applied to two wellbores drilled in geothermal fields of Japan and Mexico. Details of the physical conceptual model, the numerical

  8. Porosity and Permeability Evolution in Cemented Rock Cores under Reactive Flowing Conditions: Comparative Analysis between Limestone and Sandstone Host Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, P.; Karpyn, Z.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2-brine has the potential to alter wellbore cement in depleted oil and gas reservoirs under geological CO2 sequestration conditions. A better understanding of CO2-brine-cement-rock interaction is needed to evaluate the seal integrity of candidate sequestration formation in the long run. This work investigates possible alteration of wellbore cement when bonded by different host formation rock upon exposure to CO2-saturated brine. Composite cement-sandstone and cement-limestone core samples were created to perform reactive coreflood experiments. After an eight-day dynamic flow-through period, both cores had a similar extent of porosity increase, while the cement-limestone core experienced a ten-fold higher increase in permeability. With the aid of X-ray Micro-CT imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy, it is observed that cement underwent greater degradation at the cement-sandstone interface. Degradation of cement-limestone core mainly took place on the host rock matrix. Worm holes were developed and a solution channel was formed in the limestone, creating a dominant flow path that altered both flow and reaction behavior. Limestone buffered the injected acidic brine preventing further deterioration of cement near the core outlet. Changes in fluid chemistry of limestone and sandstone coreflood effluents are compared. Results from this work are aimed at assisting the development and validation of robust reactive transport models through direct measurement of cemented rock core porosity and permeability evolution as well as the effluent aqueous chemistry change. This will subsequently improve predictive capabilities of reactive transport models associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic environments. Permeability Evolution of Cement-Rock Core Sample during Dynamic Flow of CO2-Brine

  9. Crack propagation of brittle rock under high geostress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Chu, Weijiang; Chen, Pingzhi

    2018-03-01

    Based on fracture mechanics and numerical methods, the characteristics and failure criterions of wall rock cracks including initiation, propagation, and coalescence are analyzed systematically under different conditions. In order to consider the interaction among cracks, adopt the sliding model of multi-cracks to simulate the splitting failure of rock in axial compress. The reinforcement of bolts and shotcrete supporting to rock mass can control the cracks propagation well. Adopt both theory analysis and simulation method to study the mechanism of controlling the propagation. The best fixed angle of bolts is calculated. Then use ansys to simulate the crack arrest function of bolt to crack. Analyze the influence of different factors on stress intensity factor. The method offer more scientific and rational criterion to evaluate the splitting failure of underground engineering under high geostress.

  10. Rock species formation due to deep-mantle melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Ilya; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Melting and melting migration are processes leading to chemically distinct rock species from a homogeneous substrate in the Earth mantle. Iron-rich melts and corresponding rock species are proposed to result from magma ocean progressive crystallization [Labrosse et al., 2007], and modern geophysical models of ULVZ (e.g. [Beuchert & Schmeling, 2013]) discuss their presence at around the CMB today. We perform long-term (tens of millions of years) numerical simulations of the Earth's mantle for a plausible range of CMB temperatures to understands the possibility of melting and it's consequences. Our model of melting is based on experimental data and ab initio simulations. Physical properties (liquid-solid density differences) are adjusted with data of [de Koker et al., 2013; Mosenfelder et al., 2007; Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2011; Thomas & Asimow, 2013]. This model is included in StagYY numerical code (e.g. [Tackley, 2008]) to simulate mass and thermal fluxes within the Earth mantle. Melt segregation (rocks' permeability and velocities) is considered using equations listed in [Abe, 1995; Solomatov, Stevenson, 1993; Martin & Nokes, 1989]. Thermal effects (adiabatic heating and viscous dissipation) are considered. Viscous dissipation term includes Darcy flux term, but omits highly non-linear Brinkman contribution [Nield, 2007]. Modeling predicts formation of melt if temperature at CMB exceeds 4000-4050K. It's segregation and reequilibration results in sufficient volumes of slightly iron-enriched melt lighter than solid counterpart and moving upward. However, it's propagation is strongly controlled by temperature. Partial melting atop the molten layer results in formation of refractory iron-poor restite which delaminates and sink down, so that a layer of iron-depleted material forms underneath the molten layer. Our model applied to homogeneous pyrolitic mantle results in formation of layers of iron-depleted material with average FeO around 4.6 mol.% and iron

  11. Investigating Microbial Biofilm Formations on Crustal Rock Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, M.; D'Angelo, T.; Carr, S. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean crust hosts microbial life that, in some cases, alter the component rocks as a means of obtaining energy. Variations in crust lithology, included trace metal and mineral content, as well as the chemistry of the fluids circulating through them, provide substrates for some microbes to metabolize, leading to formation of biofilm community structures. Microbes have different parameters for the situations in which they will form biofilms, but they must have some source of energy in excess at the site of biofilm formation for them to become stationary and form the carbohydrate-rich structures connecting the cells to one another and the substrate. Generally, the requirements for microbes to form biofilms on crustal minerals are unclear. We designed two experiments to test (1) mineral preference and biofilm formation rates by natural seawater microbial communities, and (2) biofilm development as a function of phosphate availability for an organism isolated from subseafloor ocean crust. In Experiment 1, we observed that phyric basalt groundmass is preferentially colonized over aphyric basalt or metal sulfides in a shallow water and oxic seawater environment. In experiment 2, tests of the anaerobic heterotroph Thalassospira bacteria isolated from oceanic crustal fluids showed that they preferentially form biofilms, lose motility, and increase exponentially in number over time in higher-PO4 treatments (50 micromolar), including with phosphate-doped basalts, than in treatments with low phosphate concentrations (0.5 micromolar) often found in crustal fluids. These observations suggest phosphate as a main driver of biofilm formation in subsurface crust. Overall, these data suggest that the drivers of microbial biofilm formation on crustal substrates are selective to the substrate conditions, which has important implications for estimating the global biomass of life harbored in oceanic crust.

  12. Whole-rock U-Pb dating of the Shuijingtuo formation sedimentary rocks in the Yangtze Gorge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.F. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Geochemisches Inst.); Zhou, H.F. (Tianjing Inst. of Geology and Mineral Resources, TJ (China)); Huang, B. (Guilin Inst. of Mineral Resources and Geology, GX (China))

    1990-01-01

    Black shale and enclosed limestone lenticule from Lower Cambrian Shuijingtuo Formation in the Yangtze Gorge is successfully dated by whole-rock U-Pb method. The results yield a concordant age of about 573+-14 Ma, in excellent agreement with both stratigraphic and palaeontologic evidence. The whole-rock U-Pb method can provide a reliable approach for age determination of sedimentary stratum. (orig.).

  13. Rapid formation of rock armour for soil - rock fragment mixture during simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultney, E.; McGrath, G. S.; Hinz, C.

    2009-04-01

    Preventing erosion is an important issue in disturbed semi-arid and arid landscapes. This is in particular of highest importance for mining companies while undertaking land rehabilitation. An onsite investigation of the impact of surface rock fragments on erosion was conducted at Telfer goldmine in the Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia. The study site is a waste rock dump designed to mimic the concave slope of a natural mesa to both discourage erosion and blend in with its natural surroundings. Four treatments were used to construct the slope: two are topsoil mixed with rock fragments, and two are unmixed topsoil. A field study investigating erosion rills, particle size distribution, rock fragment coverage surface roughness and vegetation was carried out to determine changes down and across slope. The treatments constructed by mixing topsoil and rock fragments are more stable and show rock fragment distributions that more closely resemble patterns found on natural mesas surrounding Telfer. A controlled study using trays of topsoil mixed with rock fragment volumes of 50%, 60%, 70% and 80% were used to investigate how varying mixtures of rock fragments and topsoil erode using rainfall intensities between 20 and 100 mm h-1. Two runs of 25 minutes each were used to assess the temporal evolution of rock armouring. Surface coverage results converged for the 50%, 60% and 70% mixtures after the first run to coverage of about 90%, suggesting that fine sediment proportion does not affect rate and degree of rock armouring.

  14. Uranium mineralization in tertiary volcanic rocks of the Los Frailes formation (Bolivia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, A.

    1981-01-01

    The Los Frailes Formation, a 9000 km 2 area of Miocene-Pliocene age, contains uranium mineralization in acid tuffs, ignimbrites and lavas. Uranium also occurs in sedimentary rocks of various types and ages which outcrop in adjacent areas. So far the most extensive mineralization seems to be confined in volcanic pyroclastic rocks. Although the surface mineralization varies in grade from 0.01% to more than 2.5%, the average grade in the only deposit being mined (Cotaje) is 0.05% of U 3 O 8 . On the basis of the available data it is believed that certain leaching processes, during the last erosion cycle (Pliocene-Pleistocene) and under very humid conditions, brought about the mobilization of the uranium from the volcanic rocks in aqueous alkaline and calco-alkaline solutions circulating on the surface and underground. Uranium minerals were deposited, generally by chemical reduction, in tectonic zones and/or zones of high porosity. The common metallogenetic model in the western area, defined as the 'Sevaruyo uraniferous district', is exogenic and is characterized by epigenetic uranium occurrences and deposits formed by supergene enrichment. On the basis of their mechanism of formation, control of mineralization and mineral associations, these deposits are classified according to: those with strictly tectonic control, those with sedimentary control and those of mixed genetics. Recent discoveries in the eastern area of the volcanic complex give evidence of epigenetic mineralization, apparently linked with hypogene hydrothermal processes, in addition to exogenic mineralizations contained in rocks stratigraphically subjacent to the Los Frailes Formation. There is no intention of making an evaluation of the recently discovered resources since the studies and exploration are still at too early a stage to warrant prediction of their real potential. (author)

  15. Understanding physical rock properties and their relation to fluid-rock interactions under supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Raab, Siegfried; Meyer, Romain

    2017-04-01

    The electrical conductivity of rocks is, in addition to lithological factors (mineralogy, porosity) and physical parameters (temperature, pressure) sensitive to the nature of pore fluids (phase, salinity), and thus may be an indicative measure for fluid-rock interactions. Especially near the critical point, which is at 374.21° C and 22.12 MPa for pure water, the physico-chemical properties of aqueous fluids change dramatically and mass transfer and diffusion-controlled chemical reactivity are enhanced, which in turn leads to the formation of element depletion/ enrichment patterns or cause mineral dissolution. At the same time, the reduction of the dielectric constant of water promotes ion association and consequently mineral precipitation. All this cause changes in the electrical conductivity of geothermal fluids and may have considerable effects on the porosity and hydraulic properties of the rocks with which they are in contact. In order to study the impact of fluid-rock interactions on the physical properties of fluids and rocks in near- and supercritical geological settings in more detail, in the framework of the EU-funded project "IMAGE" (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration) hydraulic and electrical properties of rock cores from different active and exhumed geothermal areas on Iceland were measured up to supercritical conditions (Tmax = 380° C, pfluid = 23 MPa) during long-term (2-3 weeks) flow-through experiments in an internally heated gas pressure vessel at a maximum confining pressure of 42 MPa. In a second flow-through facility both the intrinsic T-dependent electrical fluid properties as well as the effect of mineral dissolution/ precipitation on the fluid conductivity were measured for increasing temperatures in a range of 24 - 422° C at a constant fluid pressure of 31 MPa. Petro- and fluid physical measurements were supplemented by a number of additional tests, comprising microstructural investigations as well as the chemical

  16. ROCK is involved in vasculogenic mimicry formation in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Ras homolog family member A (RhoA and Rho-associated coiled coil-containing protein kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and 2 are key regulators of focal adhesion, actomyosin contraction and cell motility. RhoA/ROCK signaling has emerged as an attractive target for the development of new cancer therapeutics. Whether RhoA/ROCK is involved in regulating the formation of tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM is largely unknown. To confirm this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments using hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines. Firstly, we demonstrated that HCC cells with higher active RhoA/ROCK expression were prone to form VM channels, as compared with RhoA/ROCK low-expressing cells. Furthermore, Y27632 (a specific inhibitor of ROCK rather than exoenzyme C3 (a specific inhibitor of RhoA effectively inhibited the formation of tubular network structures in a dose-dependent manner. To elucidate the possible mechanism of ROCK on VM formation, real-time qPCR, western blot and immunofluorescence were used to detect changes of the key VM-related factors, including VE-cadherin, erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma-A2 (EphA2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14, MMP2, MMP9 and laminin 5γ2-chain (LAMC2, and epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT markers: E-cadherin and Vimentin. The results showed that all the expression profiles were attenuated by blockage of ROCK. In addition, in vitro cell migration and invasion assays showed that Y27632 inhibited the migration and invasion capacity of HCC cell lines in a dose-dependent manner markedly. These data indicate that ROCK is an important mediator in the formation of tumor cell VM, and suggest that ROCK inhibition may prove useful in the treatment of VM in HCC.

  17. Normal dynamic deformation characteristics of non-consecutive jointed rock masses under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sheng; Jiang, Bowei; Sun, Bing

    2017-08-01

    In order to study deformation characteristics of non-consecutive single jointed rock masses under impact loads, we used the cement mortar materials to make simulative jointed rock mass samples, and tested the samples under impact loads by the drop hammer. Through analyzing the time-history signal of the force and the displacement, first we find that the dynamic compression displacement of the jointed rock mass is significantly larger than that of the intact jointless rock mass, the compression displacement is positively correlated with the joint length and the impact height. Secondly, the vertical compressive displacement of the jointed rock mass is mainly due to the closure of opening joints under small impact loads. Finally, the peak intensity of the intact rock mass is larger than that of the non-consecutive jointed rock mass and negatively correlated with the joint length under the same impact energy.

  18. Development of a method for the comparison of final repository sites in different host rock formations; Weiterentwicklung einer Methode zum Vergleich von Endlagerstandorten in unterschiedlichen Wirtsgesteinsformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer-Appelt, Klaus; Frieling, Gerd; Kock, Ingo; and others

    2017-10-15

    The report on the development of a method for the comparison of final repository sites in different host rock formations covers the following issues: influence of the requirement of retrievability on the methodology, study on the possible extension of the methodology for repository sites with crystalline host rocks: boundary conditions in Germany, final disposal concept for crystalline host rocks, generic extension of the VerSi method, identification, classification and relevance weighting of safety functions, relevance of the safety functions for the crystalline host rock formation, review of the methodological need for changes for crystalline rock sites under low-permeability covering; study on the applicability of the methodology for the determination of site regions for surface exploitation (phase 1).

  19. Fluid control of deeply subducted carbonate rocks and diamond formations by Intraslab UHP metasomatism - Modeling by the Kokchetav Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Y.; Sakamaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Deep continental subductions are an input for material cycling from surface to deep mantle. The Kokchetav UHPM rocks are the best samples and evidence to understand chemical processes in subducting materials. Transportation of H2O and CO2, is the most important role of the deep continental subduction. Silicate rocks are H2O reservoirs as hydrate minerals and carbonate rocks are CO2 reservoirs during subduction. The timings of dehydrations in silicate rocks and decarbonations in carbonate rocks are different. Dehydrations precede decarbonations and H2O play as a trigger for decarbonations, which are difficult to occur under dry conditions in P-T range of UHP metamorphism. The amount of H2O infiltrating in carbonate rocks controls the amount of CO2 carried into the mantle. H2O-bearing fluid plays an important role for diamond formation during subduction of continental materials. Diamonds form and dissolve in subducting materials through H2O fluid. In UHP dolomite marble, diamonds formed at two different stages and 2nd stage growth was from H2O fluid. The diamond at 2nd stage growth has light carbon isotope compositions, -17 to -27 ‰, whereas 1st stage diamond has -8 to -15 ‰. The light carbon of 2nd stage could be organic carbon in gneisses carried by fluid; dissolution of diamond in gneisses had occurred. H2O fluid infiltration into dolomite marble caused the change of carbon solubility in fluid to precipitate abundant fine-grained (10-20 mm) diamonds quickly. During deep continental subductions, the abundant carbonate remains and are carried to the mantle. In the case of calc-silicate rocks, for example Grt-Cpx rock of the Kokchetav, the carbonate mode is small; therefore, even a small amount of H2O can decompose all amount of carbonate to form Grt and Cpx which contain several hundreds to 1,000 ppm order of water (OH and H2O), as new water reservoirs. UHP metasomatism with skarn mineral formation causes the swapping of H2O carrier from hydrate minerals in

  20. Initial discussion on the damage propagation of rock under the frost and thaw condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Pu, Y. [Xian University of Science and Technology, Xian (China). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2002-08-01

    Based on the experimental results obtained from CT scanning of rocks under the condition of frost-and-thaw cycle, the characteristics of damage propagation of three types of rock materials (sandstone, shale and coal) were studied under the conditions of frost-and-thaw cycles. The effect of the number of frost-and-thaw cycles on the damage propagation of rock is emphasised in the discussion. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown material weathered from shale, and 4 - the deposition of secondary-sulfate minerals can store trace metals and, during rainfall, result in increased

  2. Integrated system for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A system for investigating non-linear properties of a rock formation around a borehole is provided. The system includes a first sub-system configured to perform data acquisition, control and recording of data; a second subsystem in communication with the first sub-system and configured to perform non-linearity and velocity preliminary imaging; a third subsystem in communication with the first subsystem and configured to emit controlled acoustic broadcasts and receive acoustic energy; a fourth subsystem in communication with the first subsystem and the third subsystem and configured to generate a source signal directed towards the rock formation; and a fifth subsystem in communication with the third subsystem and the fourth subsystem and configured to perform detection of signals representative of the non-linear properties of the rock formation.

  3. Widespread evidences of hoarfrost formation at a rock glacier in the Seckauer Tauern, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, A.; Winkler, G.; Pauritsch, M.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of deep reversible air circulation (the so called "chimney effect" or "wind tube") is known to be a process of ground overcooling in the lower and deeper parts of porous sediments and related landforms such as scree slopes or intact and relict rock glaciers. Warm air outflow emerging from relatively small voids within these mostly coarse-grained sediment bodies is sometimes noticeable. However, easier to identify are associated phenomena such as snowmelt windows, snow cover depressions and hoarfrost formations. Generally, these indications for warm air outflow are found at the upper part of scree slopes or the rooting zone of rock glaciers. Here we present widespread field evidences of hoarfrost from the pseudo-relict Schöneben Rock Glacier in the Seckauer Tauern Range, Austria located at E14°40'26'' and N47°22'31''. Herewith, a pseudo-relict rock glacier is defined as an intermediate rock glacier type between a relict and a climatic-inactive rock glacier, hence a relict rock glacier with locally isolated patches of permafrost. The rock glacier covers an area of about 0.11km2, ranges from ca. 1720 to 1905 m a.s.l., and consists predominantly of coarse-grained gneissic sediments with blocks up to a size of several cubic metres at the surface. In particular the lower part and some ridges in the central and upper part are covered by dwarf pines (pinus mugo) mirroring the flow structure of the previously active rock glacier. Isolated permafrost occurs presumably at the rooting zone of the rock glacier as indicated by evidences from a neighbouring rock glacier in a comparable setting. Field observations in November 2011 showed widespread occurrences of hoarfrost crystals growing around the funnel edge indicating the sublimation of vapour from warm funnels. Such hoarfrost sites were found at more than 50 single locations distributed over the entire rock glacier from the tongue to the rooting zone generally. The occurrence of hoarfrost can get classified

  4. Subtidal stromatolites in Monterey Formation and other organic-rich rocks as suggested source contributors to petroleum formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.A.

    1984-12-01

    The Miocene Monterey Formation contains thin organic-rich laminations that mimic benthic mats forming today in coastal upwelling regimes of the eastern Pacific. Modern mats are comprised dominantly of filamentous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the family Beggiatoaceae. The characteristic spongy texture imparted to the sediments by these bacterial mats is most readily recognized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The spongy network becomes progressively compressed with increasing compaction and diagenesis, but is still distinguishable. Rock-Eval pyrolysis of modern mats reveals high S1 peaks and unusually high oxygen indices. Both parameters decrease gradually with diagenesis, as evidenced by mat-laminated Monterey Formation samples of different thermal grades. In addition, anomalously light nitrogen isotopic signatures of modern mats may be retained. The deltaN/sup 15/ values of mat-laminated Monterey Formation samples, although diagenetically enriched in /sup 15/N, are still lighter than would be expected for algally dominated organic matter in marine low-oxygen environments. On the basis of organic richness and high hydrogen indices of mat-laminated samples, and coincidence of mat-laminated rocks and oil in some fields in the San Joaquin Valley of California, the organic-matter assemblage contained within filamentous bacterial mats is suggested to be a significant contributor to petroleum formation. Additional evidence for this conclusion is provided by similar investigations of subtidal cyanobacterial mats in carbonate rocks such as the Green River Formation oil shales.

  5. A Damaged Constitutive Model for Rock under Dynamic and High Stress State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Long Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main research work of this paper focuses on the theoretical prediction of the constitutive relationship for rock, concrete, and other quasi-brittle materials under dynamic and complex stress state and the influence of dynamic mechanical behavior of rock on practical engineering problems was studied. A damaged elastoplastic model (DEPM is established for the investigation and prediction of static or dynamic mechanical behavior of rock material. The mechanical behavior (brittleness or plasticity and dynamic response (due to underground impact pressure and high-velocity impact of projectile of rock under high in situ stress were investigated via the DEPM combined with the explicit finite element method. This paper suggests the influence of the brittle or plastic mechanical behavior of rock material on deep underground rock engineering.

  6. Radioactivity of rocks from the geological formations belonging to the Tibagi River hydrographic basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This work is a study of the 40 K and the 238 U and 232 Th series radioactivity in rocks measured with high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The rocks were taken from the geologic formations in the region of the Tibagi river hydrographic basin. The course of this river cuts through the Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences of the Parana sedimentary basin. In order to take into account the background radiation attenuation by the samples, a technique was developed that eliminated the need to measure a blank sample. The effects of the radiation's self-attenuation in the sample matrix were taken into account by using a gamma ray direct transmission method. The results for 87 rock samples, taken from 14 distinct formations, and their corresponding radioactivity variations are presented and discussed according to the possible geological processes from which they originated. Among the most discussed results are: an outcrop that profiles shale, limestone and rhythmite in the Irati Formation; a sandstone and siltstone sequence from the Rio do Rasto Formation; and a profile sampled in a coal mine located in the Rio Bonito Formation. The calculations of the rocks' contributions to the outdoor gamma radiation dose rate agree with the values presented by other authors for similar rocks. The highest dose values were obtained from felsic rocks (rhyolite of the Castro group, 129.8 ± 3.7 nGy.h -1 , and Cunhaporanga granite, 167 ± 37 nGy.h -1 ). The other highest values correspond to the shale rocks from the Irati Formation (109 ± 16 nGy.h -1 ) and the siltic shale rocks from the Ponta Grossa Formation (107.9 ± 0.7 nGy.h -1 ). The most recent geological formations presented the lowest dose values (e.g. the Botucatu sandstone, 3.3 ± 0.6 nGy.h -1 ). The average value for sedimentary rocks from seven other formations is equal to 59 ± 26 nGy.h -1 . The Rio Bonito Formation presented the highest dose value (334 ± 193 nGy.h -1 ) mainly due to the anomalous 226 Ra

  7. A new-type flexible rock-shed under the impact of rock block: experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S.; Wang, M.; Peng, X.; Yang, Y.

    2013-08-01

    The main disadvantage of conventional concrete rock-shed is the need for a massive foundation due to the deadweight of the structure. In order to overcome such construction difficulty and to reduce costs, a new concept of flexible rock-shed is proposed in this paper. The flexible rock-shed is made of flexible nets held up by specially designed steel vaulted structure. An 1:1 prototype is manufactured and tested for functional evaluation with impact experiment. It is shown that the structure can stand for an impact energy of about 250 kJ without observable rupture of the flexible nets or cables and can be put into service again with some maintenances on the steel vaulted structure. Expermental data such as local strains, peak loads and impact times are recorded by dynamic strain gauges, load cells and high speed camera for structural analysis and some complementary suggestions of improving and designing are offered with respect to the joints and components.

  8. Geochemical evaluation of Pabdeh Formation in Nosrat field, southeast Persian Gulf using Rock- Eval VI pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad sadeghi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed on 59 drillhole cuttings from Pabdeh Formation in Nosrat oil field using Rock- Eval VI pryrolysis. Geochemical analysis indicated that Pabdeh Formation possesses poor to good hydrocarbon potential. Plotting S1 against TOC suggests that samples were not affected by polluting substances such as crude oil and lubricants while drilling operation. Jones organic fancies diagram shows B-BC area indicating that Pabdeh Formation was deposited in marine anoxic to oxic environments. HI vesus Tmax shows that most samples initially have had type II kerogen and now reflecting a mixture of type II to III kerogen (capable of generating oil that have already entered oil generation window. In addition, S1+S2 versus TOC plot also suggests that Pabdeh Formation can be considered as a capable hydrocarbon generating source rock in the study area.

  9. X-ray color maps of the zoned garnets from Silgará Formation metamorphic rocks,SantanderMassif, Eastern Cordillera (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasu Akira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The metamorphic rocks of the Lower Paleozoic Silgará Formation of the Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera (Colombia, were affected by a Barrovian-type metamorphism under low to high temperature and medium pressure conditions. These rocks contain garnet porphyroblasts, which show several kinds of chemical zoning patterns. The garnet grains behave as closed systems with respect to the rock matrix. Most of the observed zoning patterns are due to gradual changes in physicochemical conditions during growth. However, some garnet grains show complex zoning patterns during multiple deformation and metamorphic events.

  10. Hydrocarbon Source Rock Potential of the Sinamar Formation, Muara Bungo, Jambi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Heri Hermiyanto Zajuli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.175The Oligocene Sinamar Formation consists of shale, claystone, mudstone, sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, and intercalation of coal seams. The objective of study was to identify the hydrocarbon source rock potential of the Sinamar Formation based on geochemichal characteristics. The analyses were focused on fine sediments of the Sinamar Formation comprising shale, claystone, and mudstone. Primary data collected from the Sinamar Formation well and outcrops were analyzed according to TOC, pyrolisis analysis, and gas chromatography - mass spectometry of normal alkanes that include isoprenoids and sterane. The TOC value indicates a very well category. Based on TOC versus Pyrolysis Yields (PY diagram, the shales of Sinamar Formation are included into oil prone source rock potential with good to excellent categories. Fine sediments of the Sinamar Formation tend to produce oil and gas originated from kerogen types I and III. The shales tend to generate oil than claystone and mudstone and therefore they are included into a potential source rock

  11. The Eocene Rusayl Formation, Oman, carbonaceous rocks in calcareous shelf sediments: Environment of deposition, alteration and hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Wehner, H.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 510163, D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Botz, R. [University Kiel, Geological-Paleontological Department, Olshausenstrasse 40-60, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Berner, Z.; Stueben, D. [Technical University Karlsruhe, Institute for Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Fritz-Haber-Weg 2, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Al-Sayigh, A. [Sultan Qaboos University, Geological Dept. PO Box 36, Al-Khod (Oman)

    2007-10-01

    Paralic carbonaceous series intercalated among calcareous shelf sediments have seldom been investigated. During the early Eocene, calcareous and siliciclastic sediments were deposited on a wide shelf in front of low-reliefed hinterland in the Al Khawd region in NE Oman. The siliciclastic-calcareous sediments originated from strongly reworked debris of the Arabic Shield. The underlying Semail Ophiolite did not act as a direct source of debris but provided some heat to increase the maturity of carbonaceous rocks and modify the isotope signal of the calcareous minerals in the Rusayl Formation. A multidisciplinary approach involving sedimentology, mineralogy, chemistry, coal petrography and paleontology resulted in the establishment of nine stratigraphic lithofacies units and provides the reader with a full picture from deposition of the mixed carbonaceous-calcareous-siliciclastic rocks to the most recent stages of post-depositional alteration of the Paleogene formations. The calcareous Jafnayn Formation (lithofacies unit I) developed in a subtidal to intertidal regime, influenced episodically by storms. Deepening of the calcareous shelf towards younger series was ground to a halt by paleosols developing on a disconformity (lithofacies unit II) and heralding the onset of the Rusayl Formation. The stratigraphic lithofacies units III and IV reflect mangrove swamps which from time to time were flooded through washover fans from the open sea. The presence of Spinozonocolpites and the taxon Avicennia, which today belong to a coastal marsh vegetational community, furnish palynological evidence to the idea of extensive mangrove swamps in the Rusayl Formation [El Beialy, S.Y., 1998. Stratigraphic and palaeonenvironmental significance of Eocene palynomorphs from the Rusayl Shale Formation, Al Khawd, northern Oman. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 102, 249-258]. During the upper Rusayl Formation (lithofacies units V through VII) algal mats episodically flooded by marine

  12. A computer-assisted rock type data catalogue for gas formations; Ein rechnergestuetzter Gesteinsdatenkatalog fuer Gasformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitenbach, V.; Pusch, G.; Moeller, M.; Koll, S. [TU Clausthal (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdoel- und Erdgastechnik; Constantini, A.; Junker, A.; Anton, H. [RWE Dea AG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    Modern reservoir management commonly requires versatile reservoir data which are neces-sary for integrated reservoir characterization, evaluation and development planning. The rock data necessary for numerical reservoir simulation studies often have to be collected from different sources, analysed and sorted with a considerable effort. In a framework of DGMK research program (DGMK project 593-9/4), the Institute of Petro-leum Engineering (Clausthal University of Technology) and RWE DEA AG have developed a new tool named Rock Data Catalogue, which is capable of managing large amounts of rock data more efficiently and deriving new specific correlations for European rock types. The use of Rock Data Catalogue can facilitate the essential input data generation and proc-essing procedure for reservoir simulation studies. The Rock Data Catalogue is comprised of a Data Base Module of digitalized reservoir rock data and an interactive Data Correlation Module. Both modules are built-up as an interface to common reservoir simulation software. The universal structure of the software also makes it possible to exchange the data with other rock data information systems. The Data Correlation Module implements a ''Decision-Structure'' module, which helps the reservoir engineer to select the rock data for analysis and correlation depending on its litho-facial type and permeability class. The Data Base Module enables a quick search of appro-priated data sets and their export into the correlation module. The open source data of the North German Rotliegend gas formations as well as the data of measurements on Rotliegend core samples performed at the ITE in course of the DGMK tight gas projects were implemented in the rock data base. Correlations of poro/perm data, two-phase flow and capillary pressure functions of the Rotliegend sandstones with the per-meability range between 20 and 0.01 mD are implemented in the rock data base and serve for quality checking of the

  13. Development of micro-scale joints in volcanic rocks under thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    mal stress induced joints under varying cooling conditions. 2. Micro-scale joints in the Rajmahal volcanics. To study the micro-scale joints in rock systems, fresh samples of olivine basalt were chosen from the Rajmahal Trap of eastern India. The rocks consist of phenocrysts of olivine, clino-pyroxene. (augite) and plagioclase ...

  14. Stress–strain state of adjacent rock mass under slice mining of steeply dipping ore bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, VD; Gakhova, LN

    2018-03-01

    Under analysis is the stress state of rock mass surrounding stopes in the initial cutting layer displaced in plan relative to the above-lying extracted layer in the overcut rock mass. The authors determine the boundaries of the post-limiting deformation zones during stoping advance using the Mohr–Coulomb criterion. The sequence of stoping to ensure better support conditions is proposed.

  15. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Sedimentary Rocks Under High-Velocity Waterjet Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shouceng; Sheng, Mao; Li, Zhaokun; Ge, Hongkui; Li, Gensheng

    2017-10-01

    The success of waterjet drilling technology requires further insight into the rock failure mechanisms under waterjet impingement. By combining acoustic emission (AE) sensing and underwater sound recording techniques, an online system for monitoring submerged waterjet drilling has been developed. For four types of sedimentary rocks, their AE characteristics and correlations to the drilling performance have been obtained through time-frequency spectrum analysis. The area under the power spectrum density curve has been used as the indicator of AE energy. The results show that AE signals from the fluid dynamics and the rock failure are in different ranges of signal frequency. The main frequencies of the rock failure are within the higher range of 100-200 kHz, while the frequencies of the fluid dynamics are below 50 kHz. Further, there is a linear relationship between the AE energy and the drilling depth irrespective of rock type. The slope of the linear relationship is proportional to the rock strength and debris size. Furthermore, the AE-specific energy is a good indicator of the critical depth drilled by the waterjet. In conclusion, the AE characteristics on the power density and dominant frequency are capable of identifying the waterjet drilling performance on the rock materials and are correlated with the rock properties, i.e., rock strength and cutting size.

  16. Experimental Rock Deformation under micro-CT: ERDμ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, Nicola; Zhao, Qi; Biryukov, Anton; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Typically, the static elastic moduli of a rock differ from the corresponding dynamic rock-moduli. Such frequency-dependent characteristic, called modulus dispersion, implies also velocity dispersion (i.e. Vp- and Vs-dispersion). Velocity dispersion can be seen, in fact, as the result of a viscoelastic response of the geo-material to the externally imposed stress (e.g. seismic wave). Viscoelasticity can be conveniently expressed as attenuation (1/Q), which describes the loss of elastic energy for each stress cycle and comprises the measurement of the complex elastic modulus. As 1/Q at frequencies important seismic attribute as it can aid the subsurface imaging accuracy. For instance, the study of 1/Q is fundamental for the oil and gas industry as valuable natural resources, such as oil-sands or gas-shales, exhibit significant attenuation (e.g. 1/Q ~ 0.3 at 1 Hz), or for volcanic and earthquake related studies as fluids are often involved in those natural processes. In the last five years, employing the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel (BBAV), the attenuation of partially saturated rocks has been investigated along with the fluid pressure transient caused by a sudden increase of stress. In particular, those studies shed light on the relationships between 1/Q and i) saturation, ii) confining pressure, and iii) strain. The combination of laboratory and numerical results helped demonstrating that wave induced fluid flow (WIFF) on the mesoscopic scale is responsible for the large and frequency-dependent attenuation observed in the laboratory measurements of a partially saturated sandstone. However, these studies lay bare limitations: the behavior of attenuation as a function of i) the distribution of fluids in the pore space and ii) the role of dissolution-precipitation of new mineral phases are still unclear. For instance, when CO2 is injected in the Earth's crust to pursuit carbon sequestration it would be extremely useful understanding the impact of the gas-water-rock

  17. Evaluation of Uranium depositional system in sedimentary rocks of Sibolga formation, Tapanuli Tengah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I Gde Sukadana; Heri Syaeful

    2016-01-01

    Uranium in nature formed in various deposit type, depends on its sources, process, and depositional environments. Uranium occurrence in Sibolga, hosted in sedimentary rocks of Sibolga Formation, is properly potential to develop; nevertheless, the depositional pattern and uranium mineralization process so far had not been recognized. The research aim is to determine the rock distribution patterns and the existence of uranium grade anomalies based on surface geology and borehole log data. Mineralization occurrences from borehole log data distributed from basalt conglomerate unit (Kgl 1), sandstone 1 unit (Bp 1), conglomerate 2 unit (Kgl 2), and sandstone 2 unit (Bp 2) with their distribution and thickness are thinning to the top. Mineralization distribution in the eastern area, mainly on Kgl 1 unit, dominated by detritus materials from epi-genetic depositional in the form of monazite which is formed along with the formation of granite as its source rock. Meanwhile, mineralization on the upper rocks units formed a channel pattern trending northeast-southwest, which formed in syn-genetic process consist of uraninite, carnotite, and coffinite. Sibolga Formation deposition originated from east to west and uranium deposit formed because of the differences of depositional environment from oxidation in the east to the more reductive in the southwest. The increasing of organic materials in southwest basin caused the reduction condition of depositional environment. (author)

  18. Effect of Micro-Structure on Fatigue Behavior of Intact Rocks under Completely Reversed Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Jamali Zavareh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock formations and structures can be subjected to both static and dynamic loadings. Static loadings resulting from different sources such as gravity and tectonic forces and dynamic forces are intermittently transmitted via vibrations of the earth’s crust, through major earthquakes, rock bursts, rock blasting and drilling and also, traffic. Reaction of rocks to cyclic and repetitive stresses resulting from dynamic loads has been generally neglected with the exception of a few rather limited studies. In this study, , two crystalline quarry stones in Iran; (Natanz gabbro and Green onyx and one non-crystalline rock (Asmari limestone are used to evaluate the effect of micro-structure of intact rock on fatigue behavior. These rocks have different mineral compositions and formation conditions. A new apparatus based on rotating beam fatigue testing machine (R.R.Moore, which is commonly used for laboratory fatigue test in metals, is developed and fatigue behavior and existence of the endurance limit were evaluated for the mentioned rocks based on stress-life method. The obtained results in the variation of applied amplitude stress versus loading cycle number (S-N diagram followed common relationship in other materials. In addition, the endurance limit is perceived for all tested rocks. The results also illustrated that the endurance limits for all types of tested rocks in this study are ranged between 0.4 and 0.6 of their tensile strengths. The endurance limit to tensile strength fraction of green onyx and Natanz gabbro were approximated in a higher value compared to the Asmari limestone with non-crystalline micro-structure.

  19. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubo, H.

    2002-02-01

    The chemical conditions of TRU waste repository were estimated as alkaline conditions effected by cementitious materials. And, some TRU wastes include soluble nitrate salt, we have to consider the repository conditions might be high ionic strength condition leaching of nitrate salt. In this study, experimental studies were carried out to evaluate hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. The followings results were obtained for bentonite. 1) In the immersion experiments of bentonite in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, the disappearance of montmorillonite of bentonite was observed and CSH formation was found after 30 days. In hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate, minerals at θ=37 nm by XRD was identified. 2) Significant effects of hyper alkaline on hydraulic conductivity of compacted bentonite were not observed. However, hydraulic conductivities of hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate and ion exchanged bentonite increased. In hyper alkaline with nitrate, more higher hydraulic conductivities of exchanged bentonite were measured. The followings results were obtained for rock. 1) In the immersion experiments of crushed tuff in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, CSH and CASH phases were observed. 2) The hydraulic conductivity of tuff in hyper alkaline fluids decreased gradually. Finally, hyper alkaline flow in tuff stopped after 2 months and hyper alkaline flow with nitrate stopped shorter than without nitrate. In the results of analysis of tuff after experiment, we could identified secondary minerals, but we couldn't find the clogging evidence of pores in tuff by secondary minerals. (author)

  20. Rocking motion of structures under earthquakes. Overturning of 2-DOF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Kihachiro; Tomoda, Akinori

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, huge earthquakes happen, for example, The South Hyogo prefecture Earthquake in 1995, The Mid Niigata Prefecture Earthquake in 2004, The Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake in 2008. In The Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007, hundreds of drums fell down and water spilled out. A lot of studies about rocking behavior of rigid body had been performed from 1960's. However, these studies were only for a specific condition of the structure size or input vibration characteristics. Therefore, generalizes fall condition for earthquake is required. This paper deals with the analytical and the experimental study of the rocking vibration of 1-DOF rocking system, 2-DOF vibration-rocking system and 2-DOF rocking system under earthquakes. In this study, the equation of motion for each rocking systems are developed. The numerical model of 2-DOF rocking system is evaluated by free rocking experiment. In this paper, 'Overturning Map' which can distinguish whether structures falls or not is proposed. The overturning map of each rocking systems excited by the artificial earthquake wave calculated from the design spectrum is shown. As the result, overturning condition of structures is clarified. (author)

  1. Recent studies on radiation damage formation in synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt for radioactive waste disposal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Klaffky, R.W.; Levy, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation damage formation in natural rock salt is described as a function of irradiation temperature and plastic deformation. F-center formation decreases with increasing temperature while significant colloidal sodium formation occurs over a restricted temperature range around 150 0 C. Plastic deformation increases colloid formation; it is estimated that colloid concentrations may be increased by a factor of 3 if the rock salt near radioactive waste disposal canisters is heavily deformed. Optical bandshape analysis indicates systematic differences between the colloids formed in synthetic and natural rock salts

  2. A new model for the computation of the formation factor of core rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, A.; Chávez, O.; Zaldivar, J.; Godínez, F. A.; García, A.; Zenit, R.

    2017-04-01

    Among all the rock parameters measured by modern well logging tools, the formation factor is essential because it can be used to calculate the volume of oil- and/or gas in wellsite. A new mathematical model to calculate the formation factor is analytically derived from first principles. Given the electrical properties of both rock and brine (resistivities) and tortuosity (a key parameter of the model), it is possible to calculate the dependence of the formation factor with porosity with good accuracy. When the cementation exponent ceases to remain constant with porosity; the new model is capable of capturing both: the non-linear behavior (for small porosity values) and the typical linear one in log-log plots for the formation factor vs. porosity. Comparisons with experimental data from four different conventional core rock lithologies: sands, sandstone, limestone and volcanic are shown, for all of them a good agreement is observed. This new model is robust, simple and of easy implementation for practical applications. In some cases, it could substitute Archie's law replacing its empirical nature.

  3. Characteristics of the Triassic Source Rocks of the Aitutu Formation in the (West Timor Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Kurnia Permana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.v1i3.192The Triassic rocks of the (West Timor Basin have been identified that was mainly deposited in the  marine environment. The fine grained clastics and carbonate  rocks of this Triassic marine  facies are considered to be the most promising source rocks potential in this basin. In this paper we present geochemical and petrographic data from outcrop samples of the Triassic carbonate Aitutu Formation, due to emphasized the organic maturation, kerogen type of the organic matter and the origin of the organic matter.  A representative of selected sample were subjected to the Rock-Eval Pyrolisis, vitrinite reflectance and thermal alteration index, bitumen extraction, were analyzed on the GC-MS. The samples were collected from marine deposit of the Triassic Sequence. The TOC values of the analyzed sample range between rich and rich organic richness (0.51% - 9.16%, wt.%, TOC, which consists mainly of type II and III kerogen and the organic matter consider to be predominantly oil/gas prone and gas prone potential. The thermal maturity assessed from Tmax, TAI, and vitrinite reflectance shows an immature to early peak mature stage of the organic matter. The GC-MS analyses of the biomarkers indicate mainly the organic matter derived from mixed source rocks facies containing alga debris and higher plant terrestrial origin.

  4. Hydrocarbon source-rock evaluation - Solor Church Formation (middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup), southeastern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, J.R.; Morey, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the type section (Lonsdale 65-1 core, Rice County, Minnesota) the Solor Church Formation (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup) consists primarily of reddish-brown mudstone and siltstone and pale reddish-brown sandstone. The sandstone and siltstone are texturally and mineralogically immature. Hydrocarbon source-rock evaluation of bluish-gray, greenish-gray and medium-dark-gray to grayish-black beds, which primarily occur in the lower 104 m (340 ft) of this core, shows: (1) the rocks have low organic carbon contents (<0.5 percent for 22 of 25 samples); (2) the organic matter is thermally very mature (Tmax = 494°C, sample 19) and is probably near the transition between the wet gas phase of catagenesis and metagenesis (dry gas zone); and (3) the rocks have minimal potential for producing additional hydrocarbons (genetic potential <0.30 mgHC/gm rock). Although no direct evidence exists from which to determine maximum depths of burial, the observed thermal maturity of the organic matter requires significantly greater depths of burial and(or) higher geothermal gradients. It is likely, at least on the St. Croix horst, that thermal alteration of the organic matter in the Solor Church took place relatively early, and that any hydrocarbons generated during this early thermal alteration were probably lost prior to deposition of the overlying Fond du Lac Formation (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup).

  5. Hydrocarbon source rock evaluation: Solor Church Formation. (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup) southeastern Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, J.R.; Morey, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the type section (Lonsdale 65-1 core, Rice County, Minnesota) the Solar Church Formation (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup) consists primarily of reddish-brown mudstone and siltstone and pale reddish-brown sandstone. The sandstone and siltstone are texturally and mineralogically immature. Hydrocarbon source-rock evaluation of bluish-gray, greenish-gray and medium-dark-gray to grayish-black beds, which primarily occur in the lower 104 m (340 ft) of this core, shows: (1) the rocks have low organic carbon contents (<0.5% for 22 of 25 samples); (2) the organic matter is thermally very mature (T/sub max/ = 494/sup 0/C, sample 19) and is probably near the transition between the wet gas phase of catagenesis and metagenesis (dry gas zone); and (3) the rocks have minimal potential for producing additional hydrocarbons (genetic potential <0.30 mgHC/gm rock). Although no direct evidence exists from which to determine maximum depths of burial, the observed thermal maturity of the organic matter requires significantly greater depths of burial and(or) higher geothermal gradients. It is likely, at least on the St. Croix horst, that thermal alteration of the organic matter in the Solor Church took place relatively early, and that any hydrocarbons generated during this early thermal alteration were probably lost prior to deposition of the overlying Fond du Lac Formation (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup). 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Thermo-mechanical Properties of Upper Jurassic (Malm) Carbonate Rock Under Drained Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Liang; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Zimmermann, Günter; Sass, Ingo; Huenges, Ernst

    2018-01-01

    The present study aims to quantify the thermo-mechanical properties of Neuburger Bankkalk limestone, an outcrop analog of the Upper Jurassic carbonate formation (Germany), and to provide a reference for reservoir rock deformation within future enhanced geothermal systems located in the Southern German Molasse Basin. Experiments deriving the drained bulk compressibility C were performed by cycling confining pressure p c between 2 and 50 MPa at a constant pore pressure p p of 0.5 MPa after heating the samples to defined temperatures between 30 and 90 °C. Creep strain was then measured after each loading and unloading stage, and permeability k was obtained after each creep strain measurement. The drained bulk compressibility increased with increasing temperature and decreased with increasing differential pressure p d = p c - p p showing hysteresis between the loading and unloading stages above 30 °C. The apparent values of the indirectly calculated Biot coefficient α ind containing contributions from inelastic deformation displayed the same temperature and pressure dependencies. The permeability k increased immediately after heating and the creep rates were also temperature dependent. It is inferred that the alteration of the void space caused by temperature changes leads to the variation of rock properties measured under isothermal conditions while the load cycles applied under isothermal conditions yield additional changes in pore space microstructure. The experimental results were applied to a geothermal fluid production scenario to constrain drawdown and time-dependent effects on the reservoir, overall, to provide a reference for the hydromechanical behavior of geothermal systems in carbonate, and more specifically, in Upper Jurassic lithologies.

  7. Temporal evolution of a granitic rock under thermal loads generated by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.; Ferreri, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of the thermal history of a granitic mass under thermal loads originating in terminal subproducts of the fuel cycle is performed. Variations of the conductivity and density of the rock and the unit cell dimensions are considered. In this way it was tried to delimit (for short time intervals of the order of 100 years) the influence of possible uncertainties in the rock's knowledge on the results of interest for the engineering design. In the reasonable situations considered, the maximum temperature in the rock did not rise over 80 deg C. (Author) [es

  8. Mapping the productive sands of Lower Goru Formation by using seismic stratigraphy and rock physical studies in Sawan area, southern Pakistan: A case study

    KAUST Repository

    Munir, K.

    2011-02-24

    This study has been conducted in the Sawan gas field located in southern Pakistan. The aim of the study is to map the productive sands of the Lower Goru Formation of the study area. Rock physics parameters (bulk modulus, Poisson\\'s ratio) are analysed after a detailed sequence stratigraphic study. Sequence stratigraphy helps to comprehend the depositional model of sand and shale. Conformity has been established between seismic stratigraphy and the pattern achieved from rock physics investigations, which further helped in the identification of gas saturation zones for the reservoir. Rheological studies have been done to map the shear strain occurring in the area. This involves the contouring of shear strain values throughout the area under consideration. Contour maps give a picture of shear strain over the Lower Goru Formation. The identified and the productive zones are described by sands, high reflection strengths, rock physical anomalous areas and low shear strain.

  9. UNDER-REPORTING OF CATCHES OF SOUTH COAST ROCK ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The malpractice increased sharply between the 1997/98 and 2000/01 fishing seasons. The index of abundance for the resource (standardized catch per unit effort) increased by 2% for 1998/99, 12% for 1999/00 and 14% for 2000/01, after eliminating under-reported information from the input data. An agestructured ...

  10. Measuring Coupled Rock/Pore-Fluid Interaction in Volcanic Rock under Simulated Volcano- Tectonic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, P. M.; Vinciguerra, S.; Meredith, P. G.; Young, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a suite of laboratory experiments in which basalt from mount Etna volcano is deformed and fractured using a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were monitored using an array of piezoelectric transducers around the sample to permit full-waveform capture, microseismic (AE) location and analysis. A small conduit of 3.125 mm diameter was drilled axially to allow access of the pore water directly to and from the shear/damage zone. Location of AE events through time shows the formation of a classical ~30 degree fault plane and waveforms exhibit the typical high frequency characteristics of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes when experiments are conducted in dry samples. With water saturated samples, both VT events and some Hybrid events are observed (exhibiting a high frequency initial onset with lower frequency coda). A subsequent rapid decompression of the water-filled pore volume and damage zone triggered swarms of Low Frequency events, analogous to Volcanic Long Period seismicity. Analysis of the frequency component show characteristic low-frequencies (~90 kHz) associated with pore fluid decompression; first motion analysis reveals these events to exhibit a low percent component of shear (double-couple) slip, consistent with recent field data. By repeating these experiments at elevated temperatures (up to 175C), we additionally observe more complex, coupled hydro-mechanical behaviour and long-lasting seismic events analogous to volcanic tremor. Quasi-continuous waveforms are observed during the water steam phase change at approximately 0.8 MPa, as fluid/gas is vented through the damage zone to atmosphere. Frequencies during this stage of the experiment are lower still, at approximately 25 kHz. Using a simple size-frequency scaling relation, our laboratory-measured frequencies and crack dimensions can be shown to scale well to observations of sources of the order of hundred of metres to kilometers, typical of those in volcanic edifices. Our data

  11. Chapter 39 The Edwardsburg Formation and related rocks, Windermere Supergroup, central Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Karen; Evans, Karl V.; Alienikoff, John N.

    2011-01-01

    In central Idaho, Neoproterozoic stratified rocks are engulfed by the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith and by Eocene volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Challis event. Studied sections in the Gospel Peaks and Big Creek areas of west-central Idaho are in roof pendants of the Idaho batholith. A drill core section studied from near Challis, east-central Idaho, lies beneath the Challis Volcanic Group and is not exposed at the surface. Metamorphic and deformational overprinting, as well as widespread dismembering by the younger igneous rocks, conceals many primary details. Despite this, these rocks provide important links for regional correlations and have produced critical geochronological data for two Neoproterozoic glacial periods in the North American Cordillera. At the base of the section, the more than 700-m-thick Edwardsburg Formation (Fm.) contains interlayered diamictite and volcanic rocks. There are two diamictite-bearing members in the Edwardsburg Fm. that are closely related in time. Each of the diamictites is associated with intermediate composition tuff or flow rocks and the diamictites are separated by mafic volcanic rocks. SHRIMP U–Pb dating indicates that the lower diamictite is about 685±7 Ma, whereas the upper diamictite is 684±4 Ma. The diamictite units are part of a cycle of rocks from coarse clastic, to fine clastic, to carbonate rocks that, by correlation to better preserved sections, are thought to record an older Cryogenian glacial to interglacial period in the northern US Cordillera. The more than 75-m-thick diamictite of Daugherty Gulch is dated at 664±6 Ma. This unit is preserved only in drill core and the palaeoenvironmental interpretation and local stratigraphic relations are non-unique. Thus, the date for this diamictite may provide a date for a newly recognized glaciogenic horizon or may be a minimum age for the diamictite in the Edwardsburg Fm. The c. 1000-m-thick Moores Lake Fm. is an amphibolite facies diamictite in which glacial

  12. The Edwardsburg Formation and related rocks, Windermere Supergroup, central Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Karen; Aleinikoff, John N.; Evans, Karl V.

    2011-01-01

    In central Idaho, Neoproterozoic stratified rocks are engulfed by the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith and by Eocene volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Challis event. Studied sections in the Gospel Peaks and Big Creek areas of west-central Idaho are in roof pendants of the Idaho batholith. A drill core section studied from near Challis, east-central Idaho, lies beneath the Challis Volcanic Group and is not exposed at the surface. Metamorphic and deformational overprinting, as well as widespread dismembering by the younger igneous rocks, conceals many primary details. Despite this, these rocks provide important links for regional correlations and have produced critical geochronological data for two Neoproterozoic glacial periods in the North American Cordillera. At the base of the section, the more than 700-m-thick Edwardsburg Formation (Fm.) contains interlayered diamictite and volcanic rocks. There are two diamictite-bearing members in the Edwardsburg Fm. that are closely related in time. Each of the diamictites is associated with intermediate composition tuff or flow rocks and the diamictites are separated by mafic volcanic rocks. SHRIMP U–Pb dating indicates that the lower diamictite is about 685±7 Ma, whereas the upper diamictite is 684±4 Ma. The diamictite units are part of a cycle of rocks from coarse clastic, to fine clastic, to carbonate rocks that, by correlation to better preserved sections, are thought to record an older Cryogenian glacial to interglacial period in the northern US Cordillera. The more than 75-m-thick diamictite of Daugherty Gulch is dated at 664±6 Ma. This unit is preserved only in drill core and the palaeoenvironmental interpretation and local stratigraphic relations are non-unique. Thus, the date for this diamictite may provide a date for a newly recognized glaciogenic horizon or may be a minimum age for the diamictite in the Edwardsburg Fm. The c. 1000-m-thick Moores Lake Fm. is an amphibolite facies diamictite in which glacial

  13. Physical Modeling of Shear Behavior of Infilled Rock Joints Under CNL and CNS Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amit Kumar; Rao, K. Seshagiri

    2018-01-01

    Despite their frequent natural occurrence, filled discontinuities under constant normal stiffness (CNS) boundary conditions have been studied much less systematically, perhaps because of the difficulties arising from the increased number of variable parameters. Because of the lack of reliable and realistic theoretical or empirical relations and the difficulties in obtaining and testing representative samples, engineers rely on judgment and often consider the shear strength of the infilled material itself as shear strength of rock joints. This assumption leads to uneconomical and also sometimes the unsafe design of underground structures, slopes, rock-socketed piles and foundations. To study the effect of infill on the shear behavior of rock joints, tests were performed on the modeled infilled rock joint having different joint roughness under constant normal load (CNL) and CNS boundary conditions at various initial normal stress and varying thickness of the infilled material. The test results indicate that shear strength decreases with an increase in t/ a ratio for both CNL and CNS conditions, but the reduction in shear strength is more for CNL than for CNS condition for a given initial normal stress. The detailed account of the effect of thickness of infilled material on shear and deformation behavior of infilled rock joint is discussed in this paper, and a model is proposed to predict shear strength of infilled rock joint.

  14. NanoRocks: Design and performance of an experiment studying planet formation on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Julie; Colwell, Joshua; Dove, Adrienne; Maukonen, Doug

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to better understand the early stages of planet formation, we have developed a 1.5U payload that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) in the NanoRacks NanoLab facility between September 2014 and March 2016. This payload, named NanoRocks, ran a particle collision experiment under long-term microgravity conditions. The objectives of the experiment were (a) to observe collisions between mm-sized particles at relative velocities of experiment camera. During the 18 months the payload stayed on ISS, we obtained 158 videos, thus recording a great number of collisions. The average particle velocities in the sample cells after each shaking event were around 1 cm/s. After shaking stopped, the inter-particle collisions damped the particle kinetic energy in less than 20 s, reducing the average particle velocity to below 1 mm/s, and eventually slowing them to below our detection threshold. As the particle velocity decreased, we observed the transition from bouncing to sticking collisions. We recorded the formation of particle clusters at the end of each experiment run. This paper describes the design and performance of the NanoRocks ISS payload.

  15. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  16. Experimental studies of the deformation of carbonated rocks by dissolution crystallization under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubtsov, Sergey

    2003-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis reports the experimental investigation and the modelling of the deformation of poly-mineral rocks under the influence of mechanism of dissolution-crystallization under stress. This mechanism has a significant role in the compaction of sedimentary rocks, in the folding process of the earth's crust. The author notably reports the results of the experimental deformation of calcite in presence of water (calcite is present in marls in which the deposit of nuclear wastes in planned in France). The second part deals with the fact that healing is possible between two grains of similar mineralogy, and slows down or even stops deformation

  17. Palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter.

  18. Source rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakr F. Makky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro, and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members, Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history and calculate the levels of thermal maturity of the Fayoum-1X well based on calibration of measured %Ro and Tmax against calculated %Ro model. The calculated Total Organic Carbon (TOC content from well log data compared with the measured TOC from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis in Fayoum-1X well is shown to match against the shale source rock but gives high values against the limestone source rock. For that, a new model is derived from well log data to calculate accurately the TOC content against the limestone source rock in the study area. The organic matter existing in Abu Roash (F member is fair to excellent and capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbons (oil prone produced from (mixed type I/II kerogen. The generation potential of kerogen in Abu Roash (E and G members and Betty formations is ranging from poor to fair, and generating hydrocarbons of oil and gas prone (mixed type II/III kerogen. Eventually, kerogen (type III of Kharita Formation has poor to very good generation potential and mainly produces gas. Thermal maturation of the measured %Ro, calculated %Ro model, Tmax and Production index (PI indicates that Abu Roash (F member exciting in the onset of oil generation, whereas Abu Roash (E and G members, Kharita and Betty formations entered the peak of oil generation.

  19. A study on spalling in soft rock under low confining stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Atsunori; Ebina, Takahito; Toida, Masaru; Shirasagi, Suguru; Kishida, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Toshihisa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study spalling in soft rock excavation. During the test cavern excavation of the radioactive waste disposal project, spalling occurred. Therefore, it has been estimated performing the stress path simulation test and measuring the induced stress. In the stress path simulation test, the splitting failure has been confirmed under low confining stress. In the induced stress measurements, the rock mass around the cavern has shifted to the low radial confinement. Hence, spalling in soft rock was interpreted by the splitting failure caused by the induced stress under low confinement. Furthermore, the failure zone was proved by the numerical analysis applying the criterion based on the results of the above triaxial test. (author)

  20. Application of Discriminant Analysis for Studying the Source Rock Potential of Probable Formations in the Lorestan Basin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Negahdari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the performance and role of each formation in a petroleum play is crucial for the efficient and precise exploration and exploitation of trapped hydrocarbons in a sedimentary basin. The Lorestan basin is one of the most important hydrocarbon basins of Iran, and it includes various oil-prone potential source rocks and reservoir rocks. Previous geochemical studies of the basin were not accurate and there remain various uncertainties about the potential of the probable source rocks of the basin. In the present research, the geochemical characteristics of four probable source rocks of the Lorestan basin are studied using Rock-Eval pyrolysis and discriminant analysis. In achieving this goal, several discriminant functions are defined to evaluate the discriminant factor for the division of samples into two groups. The function with the highest discriminant factor was selected for the classification of probable source rocks into two groups: weak and strong. Among the studied formations, Garau and Pabdeh had the richest and poorest source rocks of the Lorestan basin, respectively. The comparison of the obtained results with the previous literature shows that the proposed model is more reliable for the recognition of the richness of source rock in the area.

  1. Rock Fracture Toughness Study Under Mixed Mode I/III Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliha, M. R. M.; Bahmani, A.

    2017-07-01

    Fracture growth in underground rock structures occurs under complex stress states, which typically include the in- and out-of-plane sliding deformation of jointed rock masses before catastrophic failure. However, the lack of a comprehensive theoretical and experimental fracture toughness study for rocks under contributions of out-of plane deformations (i.e. mode III) is one of the shortcomings of this field. Therefore, in this research the mixed mode I/III fracture toughness of a typical rock material is investigated experimentally by means of a novel cracked disc specimen subjected to bend loading. It was shown that the specimen can provide full combinations of modes I and III and consequently a complete set of mixed mode I/III fracture toughness data were determined for the tested marble rock. By moving from pure mode I towards pure mode III, fracture load was increased; however, the corresponding fracture toughness value became smaller. The obtained experimental fracture toughness results were finally predicted using theoretical and empirical fracture models.

  2. Stability of a horizontal well and hydraulic fracture initiation in rocks of the bazhenov formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.; Myasnikov, A. V.; Akhtyamova, A. I.; Romanov, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical modeling of the formation of the stress-strain state in the vicinity of a horizontal well in weakened rocks of the Bazhenov formation is carried out. The influence of the well orientation and plastic deformation on the stress-strain state and the possibility of hydraulic fracturing are considered. It is shown that the deviation of the well from the direction of maximum compression leads to an increase in plastic deformation and a discrepancy between tangential stresses around the well bore and principle stresses in the surrounding medium. In an elastoplastic medium, an increase in the pressure in the well can lead to a large-scale development of plastic deformation, at which no tensile stresses necessary for hydraulic fracturing according to the classical scheme arise. In this case, there occur plastic expansion and fracture of the well.

  3. Ground and Intermediate Water Equilibrium with Water-Bearing Rock Minerals (Moldova) under Anthropogenic Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenkova, A. N.; Moraru, C. Ye; Pasechnik, Ye Yu; Tokarenko, O. G.; Butoshina, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    The calculation results of ground water equilibrium with the major water-bearing rock minerals (Moldova) are presented under the condition of anthropogenic impact. As a calculation model the HydroGeo software is used. It is shown that both “ground water-rock” and “intermediate water-rock” systems are in equilibrium with a number of minerals.

  4. A theoretical and numerical consideration of rock mass behaviour under thermal loading of radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivinen, M.; Freund, J.; Eloranta, E.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the study is to model the geodynamic response of a ground rock block under horizontal stresses and also consider the thermal fields and deformations, especially on the ground surface, caused by the heat produced by nuclear waste. (12 refs.)

  5. Preliminary investigation on the sedimentary facies of the middle silurian uraniferous rock formations in western Qinling Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yunian; Min Yongming.

    1987-01-01

    The Middle Silurian stratabound uranium deposits in Western Qinling were formed due to hydrothermal modification of ground water and reconcentration of uranium from the sedimentary source rocks. The Silurian system consists of the sediments deposited in the marginal sea of the passive continent, to the south of which is the Ruoergai palaeocontinent. The Middle Silurian is divided into three formations. The lower members of each formation are composed of fine-grained clastic rocks with bay-lagoon facies, while the upper members of each formation are uraniferous rock formations consisted of carbonaceous-siliceous-limestone-argillaceous rocks. During the Middle Silurian period there occurred an island chain barrier which is roughly parallel to the palaeocoast and was formed by undersea uplifts. The uraniferous rock formations belong to the assemblage of lagoon-reef-back tidal flat-reef beach facies. Nearshore shallow water environment, abundant terrestrial fine detritus, local reduction facies and zones are three cardinal conditions for the formation of uranium-rich sediments. Uranium deposition mainly took place in the environments of the inner part of reef beach and reef-back tidal flat, which are characterized by having medium to slightly lower energy, the terrestrial fine detritus involved, and local reduction field resulting from the decomposition of organism after their massive death. Furing the process of relative slow deposition, UO 2 2+ in the sea water was formed by means of infiltration, diffusion and alternative absorption of water at the bottom into organic matter and clay

  6. Interaction Between Magma Fluids and Lithosphere Rocks Under Crest Zone of MAR: Mineralogical and Petrophysical Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V. N.; Mazurov, M. P.; Mysov, V. M.

    2004-12-01

    Using numerical and physical experiments dynamics of mass-change in the lithosphere under the zones joining rift valleys of MAR and transform faults was modeled. `Black smokers', methane gas flows, and bubbly carbon deposits, as products of hydrocarbon condensation, present in these zones. Numerical experiments were completed using flow-reactor scheme of PC Selector Win for gas flows of compositions: C (0.1-4), O (0-2), H (0.5-4), Cl (0.05-0.5), F (0.01-1), S (0.01-0.1), and N (0.02-0.1). Weight fraction of gas mixture in rocks was 1.5-0.01%, P from 45-10 kbar to 30-100 bar, T=1200-400° C. The fluid-rock interaction time was t=1-100 steps. Density change for new-formed rock in the lithosphere profile was estimated by virtual mineral composition recounting for each time step. Verification of physicochemical model was carried out by comparison of changed rocks and numerically obtained condensates, as well as minerals and solid, gas and liquid carbon phases, obtained experimentally using the equipment to study catalytic conversion of synthesis-gas flow (H2=65%, CO=34.8%, N2=0.2% vol.). It was shown that above the boiling boundary of basic liquids a field of convective mass transfer should form in the lithosphere. This field includes a number of zones of initial rock change with regions of solid phase depleting and condensing. The ranges of rock composition change due to `reduced' and oxidized' gas mixtures were studied. The density change for ultra-basic rock in the lithosphere is related to spatial and time change of oxygen potential, which current values at the beginning of the interaction process are buffering by rocks, and then - by the values at the system input. In the case when reduced gas mixtures exist, an oxidation roll is forming in the flow, for oxidized mixtures - a reduction roll. At the fluid output at the sea bottom their composition is the most oxidized. When fluids and initial rocks of the lithosphere interact, changed rock mixtures of anomalously

  7. Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L.

    1991-08-01

    Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Frequency-Based Precursory Acoustic Emission Failure Sequences In Sedimentary And Igneous Rocks Under Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, C.; Anderson, R. C.; Chasek, M. D.; Peters, G. H.; Carey, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Identifiable precursors to rock failure have been a long pursued and infrequently encountered phenomena in rock mechanics and acoustic emission studies. Since acoustic emissions in compressed rocks were found to follow the Gutenberg-Richter law, failure-prediction strategies based on temporal changes in b-value have been recurrent. In this study, we extend on the results of Ohnaka and Mogi [Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 87, No. B5, p. 3873-3884, (1982)], where the bulk frequency characteristics of rocks under incremental uniaxial compression were observed in relation to changes in b-value before and after failure. Based on the proposition that the number of low-frequency acoustic emissions is proportional to the number of high-amplitude acoustic emissions in compressed rocks, Ohnaka and Mogi (1982) demonstrated that b-value changes in granite and andesite cores under incremental uniaxial compression could be expressed in terms of the percent abundance of low-frequency events. In this study, we attempt to demonstrate that the results of Ohnaka and Mogi (1982) hold true for different rock types (basalt, sandstone, and limestone) and different sample geometries (rectangular prisms). In order to do so, the design of the compression tests was kept similar to that of Ohnaka and Mogi (1982). Two high frequency piezoelectric transducers of 1 MHz and a 500 kHz coupled to the sides of the samples detected higher and lower frequency acoustic emission signals. However, rather than gathering parametric data from an analog signal using a counter as per Ohnaka and Mogi (1982), we used an oscilloscope as an analog to digital converter interfacing with LabVIEW 2015 to record the complete waveforms. The digitally stored waveforms were then processed, detecting acoustic emission events using a statistical method, and filtered using a 2nd order Butterworth filter. In addition to calculating the percent abundance of low-frequency events over time, the peak frequency of the

  9. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 7. Baseline rock properties-basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/7 Baseline Rock Properties--Basalt, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This report contains an evaluation of the results of a literature survey to define the rock mass properties of a generic basalt, which could be considered as a geological medium for storing radioactive waste. The general formation and structure of basaltic rocks is described. This is followed by specific descriptions and rock property data for the Dresser Basalt, the Amchitka Island Basalt, the Nevada Test Site Basalt and the Columbia River Group Basalt. Engineering judgment has been used to derive the rock mass properties of a typical basalt from the relevant intact rock property data and the geological information pertaining to structural defects, such as joints and faults.

  10. Fracture Initiation of an Inhomogeneous Shale Rock under a Pressurized Supercritical CO2 Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the advantages of good fracture performance and the application of carbon capture and storage (CCS, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 is considered a promising alternative for hydraulic fracturing. However, the fracture initiation mechanism and its propagation under pressurized SC-CO2 jet are still unknown. To address these problems, a fluid–structure interaction (FSI-based numerical simulation model along with a user-defined code was used to investigate the fracture initiation in an inhomogeneous shale rock. The mechanism of fracturing under the effect of SC-CO2 jet was explored, and the effects of various influencing factors were analyzed and discussed. The results indicated that higher velocity jets of SC-CO2 not only caused hydraulic-fracturing ring, but also resulted in the increase of stress in the shale rock. It was found that, with the increase of perforation pressure, more cracks initiated at the tip. In contrast, the length of cracks at the root decreased. The length-to-diameter ratio and the aperture ratio distinctly affected the pressurization of SC-CO2 jet, and contributed to the non-linear distribution and various maximum values of the stress in shale rock. The results proved that Weibull probability distribution was appropriate for analysis of the fracture initiation. The studied parameters explain the distribution of weak elements, and they affect the stress field in shale rock.

  11. Experimental Research on Internal Behaviors of Caved Rocks under the Uniaxial Confined Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-jiang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As main composition of longwall gob, caved rocks’ behaviors and their impacts under compression crucially influence strata control, subsidence, associated resources extraction, and many other aspects. However, current researches are based on a whole sample, due to looseness of caved rocks and limitation of observation technology. In this paper, an experiment system was built to investigate internal behaviors of caved rocks’ sample, under the uniaxial confined compression, including movement and breakage behavior by the digital image processing technologies. The results show that the compression process of caved rocks could be divided into two stages by relative density. Boundary effect and changes of voids and contact pressure among caved rocks lead to different movement law in different position in sample’s interior. A stratification phenomenon of breakage was discovered, which presents breakage concentration in the middle of the sample. The nonlinear movement and shear dislocation induced by shifts among caved rocks are the reason of the breakage stratification phenomenon. This phenomenon would have an effect on the permeability and seepage research of similar medium.

  12. Analysis of gas migration patterns in fractured coal rocks under actual mining conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Mingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture fields in coal rocks are the main channels for gas seepage, migration, and extraction. The development, evolution, and spatial distribution of fractures in coal rocks directly affect the permeability of the coal rock as well as gas migration and flow. In this work, the Ji-15-14120 mining face at the No. 8 Coal Mine of Pingdingshan Tian’an Coal Mining Co. Ltd., Pingdingshan, China, was selected as the test site to develop a full-parameter fracture observation instrument and a dynamic fracture observation technique. The acquired video information of fractures in the walls of the boreholes was vectorized and converted to planarly expanded images on a computer-aided design platform. Based on the relative spatial distances between the openings of the boreholes, simultaneous planar images of isolated fractures in the walls of the boreholes along the mining direction were obtained from the boreholes located at various distances from the mining face. Using this information, a 3-D fracture network under mining conditions was established. The gas migration pattern was calculated using a COMSOL computation platform. The results showed that between 10 hours and 1 day the fracture network controlled the gas-flow, rather than the coal seam itself. After one day, the migration of gas was completely controlled by the fractures. The presence of fractures in the overlying rock enables the gas in coal seam to migrate more easily to the surrounding rocks or extraction tunnels situated relatively far away from the coal rock. These conclusions provide an important theoretical basis for gas extraction.

  13. Evidence of proterozoic crust under the coastal Cordillera of Central Chile: Grenville age xenocrystic zircons in cretaceous volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentilli, M; Pop, N; Heaman; L; Boric, R

    2001-01-01

    In the central Andes, Proterozoic basement rocks outcrop in isolated areas from beneath a Mesozoic and Cenozoic cover in southern Peru, northernmost Chile, Bolivia, and in northwestern Argentina. Their role in Andean magmatism and metallogenesis is well documented. In the southern Central Andes, Proterozoic rocks are so far known to outcrop in Argentina, east of the continental divide. In the course of U-Pb dating of the bimodal volcanic and sub-volcanic host rocks for Mesozoic manto-type copper deposits, we have encountered xenocrystic zircon with Proterozoic and Paleozoic ages. In the Punta del Cobre Cu-Fe (Au) District (27 o 30' S / 70 o 15' W) 22 km south of Copiapo xenocrystic zircon in the Lower Cretaceous host dacite yields ca. 1 Ga ages. In the El Soldado Cu District, (32 o 38' S /71 o 04' W), 120 km northwest of Santiago, scarce and strongly resorbed zircon crystals in the Lower Cretaceous host rhyodacite yield ages of 0.5 to 1.3 Ga. The early Cretaceous bimodal volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which consists of primitive calc-alkaline basalts and rhyodacites, display geochemical evidence of crustal contamination. Our results suggest that, during their formation and ascent, the felsic magmas picked up zircons in the Proterozoic and Paleozoic crystalline basement of the Coastal Cordillera. The presence of Proterozoic (Grenville age) basement underlying localities as close as 30 km from the Pacific coast has implications for the extent and age of the Chilenia Terrane and gives further credence to correlation models that juxtapose eastern North America (Laurentia) and southwestern South America (Gondwana) during the Late Proterozoic (au)

  14. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock lizard Darevskia dahlia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa.

  15. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Vergun

    Full Text Available The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa.

  16. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa.

  17. Evaluation of radiological safety assessment of a repository in a clay rock formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program excavated in a clay host rock formation. In this report three scenarios have been analysed in detail. The first scenario represents the normal in detail. The first scenario represents the normal evolution of the repository (Reference Scenario); and includes a set of variants to investigate the relative importance of the various repository components and examine the sensitivity of the performance to parameters variations. Two altered scenarios have also been considered: deep well construction and poor sealing of the repository. This document contains a detailed description of the repository system, the methodology adopted for the scenarios generation, the process modelling approach and the results of the consequences analysis. (Author)

  18. Hydrogeloogic characterization of fractured rock formations: A guide for groundwater remediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A.J.B.

    1995-10-01

    A field site was developed in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California to develop and test a multi-disciplinary approach to the characterization of ground water flow and transport in fractured rocks. Nine boreholes were drilled into the granitic bedrock, and a wide variety of new and traditional subsurface characterization tools were implemented. The hydrogeologic structure and properties of the field site were deduced by integrating results from the various geologic, geophysical, hydrologic, and other investigative methods. The findings of this work are synthesized into this report, which is structured in a guidebook format. The applications of the new and traditional technologies, suggestions on how best to use, integrate, and analyze field data, and comparisons of the shortcoming and benefits of the different methods are presented.

  19. Hydrogeloogic characterization of fractured rock formations: A guide for groundwater remediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.J.B.

    1995-10-01

    A field site was developed in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California to develop and test a multi-disciplinary approach to the characterization of ground water flow and transport in fractured rocks. Nine boreholes were drilled into the granitic bedrock, and a wide variety of new and traditional subsurface characterization tools were implemented. The hydrogeologic structure and properties of the field site were deduced by integrating results from the various geologic, geophysical, hydrologic, and other investigative methods. The findings of this work are synthesized into this report, which is structured in a guidebook format. The applications of the new and traditional technologies, suggestions on how best to use, integrate, and analyze field data, and comparisons of the shortcoming and benefits of the different methods are presented

  20. Temporal evolution of a granitic rock under thermal loads generated by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.; Ferreri, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal time history of a granitic mass under thermal loads, generated by the terminal subproducts arising from the Argentine nuclear programme is analyzed. This rock will be the final repository of those subproducts. The analysis is based on the consideration of a representative unit cell of the rock's centre using the Heating 5 programme. A preliminary analysis is made in order to obtain criteria with respect to the accuracy of the problem. Temporal evolution curves of the temperature on zones of interest of the unit cell considered are shown. Under the thermal loads considered, 500W by container, a maximum temperature of 55 deg C at the wall of the orifice subproducts' deposit is obtained. (Author) [es

  1. Numerical analysis on the crack propagation and failure characteristics of rocks with double fissures under the uniaxial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyong Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The fissures and rock bridges with different dips had different contributions to crack's initiation, propagation, convergence and penetration. In this paper, based on the rock fracture theory, the crack's propagation and evolution process on rock specimen with double fissures under uniaxial compression was simulated. As a result, the crack propagation and evolution law of rocks with different fissure dips (α = 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°; β = 45° and different rock bridge dips (β = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°; α = 45° was obtained by numerical tests. Meanwhile, the fissure and rock bridge dips influence on the macro mechanical properties of rock was analyzed. Besides, the paper investigated the influences of different fissure dips and different rock bridge dips on the bridge transfixion. The study is of great significance to reveal the impact of different dips on the mechanical mechanism of multiple-fissures rock under specific conditions, and it also has important theoretical significance for the research on multiple-fissure rock.

  2. Nonlinear Creep Model for Deep Rock under High Stress and High Pore Water Pressure Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yuanguang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional triaxial compression creep experiments for deep sandstone under high confining pressure and high pore water pressure were carried out, in order to predict the creep response of deep rock under these conditions. A nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic creep constitutive model was proposed based on the experimental results. The theory of component model was used as a basis for the formulation of this model. First, by using mathematical fitting and analogy, a new nonlinear viscous component was introduced based on the properties of the creep curves during the tertiary stage. Second, a timer component to judge whether the creep can get into the tertiary stage was presented. Finally, a nonlinear creep model was proposed. Results showed good agreement between theory curves from the nonlinear creep model and experimental data. This model can be applied to predict deep rock creep responses under high stress and high pore water pressure conditions. Hence, the obtained conclusions in this study are beneficial to deep rock engineering.

  3. The Pyhäntaka formation, southern Finland: a sequence of metasandstones and metavolcanic rocks upon an intra-orogenic unconformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Nironen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Detrital zircon studies suggest that the few quartzite occurrences in southern Finland are younger than 1.87 Ga and express sedimentation after 1.89–1.87 Ga accretional deformation and metamorphism in the Svecofennian orogenic belt. Detailed field work in the high-grade metamorphic Pyhäntaka area allowed to distinguish an overturnedformation within metagraywackes (cordierite paragneisses and psammites. The Pyhäntaka formation has a maximum thickness of 1000 meters and consists of quartzite overlain by meta-arkose, metatuff, and metabasalt on top. An uncorformity, expressed by aweathering surface, separates the quartzite from underlying metagraywacke. The metavolcanic rocks within, stratigraphically underlying and overlying the Pyhäntaka formation are mostly basalts and basaltic andesites, but a felsic volcanic rock and dacitic fragments in volcaniclastic rocks imply bimodal affinity. The quartzite was deposited during a stable intra-orogenic period probably after accretion but before 1.83–1.80 Ga collisionaldeformation and metamorphism in the Svecofennian orogen. Rifting during the intraorogenic period and accumulation of variable material in the rift from nearby sources by fluvial processes is a viable scenario for deposition and preservation of the Pyhäntakaformation. Geochemical diagrams of the metavolcanic rocks show a scatter that is best explained by source heterogeneity and crustal contamination. Despite their (likely postaccretion setting the basaltic rocks show arc-type characteristics due to subduction-modified lithospheric mantle sources. Because of recycling, also the paragneisses in the Pyhäntaka area are geochemically similar in spite that they represent different tectonic settings. The use of elemental geochemistry alone appears to be insufficient for discriminatingtectonic settings of basalts or graywackes in the Svecofennian of southern Finland where accretion and post-accretion settings were largely obliterated by late

  4. MATHEMATICS TEACHER: MOVING KNOWLEDGE UNDER FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselaine Machado Albernaz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay approaches the Mathematics teacher forming process from his/her experiences in the school system and the set of knowledge that hashistorical, philosophical and politically constituted him/her. This set of knowledge not only comprises academic knowledge, but also involves the subjective effects of knowledge it incorporates. Starting from a tale, the character, called ‘researcher-teacher’, conducts the text throughout questions about the forming processes of teachers of such a particular subject as Mathematics. The character seems to have an “interrogative something” which is peculiar to us, teachers, concerned about our disciplinary field. Having the objective of problematize the formation and knowledge of our character, her ways of being, thinking and perceiving, we intend to question, with and through her, the new requirements that have been demanded towards Mathematics teachers and the set of knowledge that constitute her, the way she is, her way of acting and taking  position in the school universe. The proposed essay seeks for an articulation between the fields of Art, Philosophy, Science and Education. It speaks about the intriguing school world, but not least, the ways we think to treat the forming process of Mathematics teachers from a set of logical, subjective and sensitive knowledge.  Key words: Forming process of teachers; mathematics; aesthetic experience; philosophy of difference.

  5. Formation of Ocean Sedimentary Rocks as Active Planets and Life-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Wet shocked rocks are discarded globally and enriched elements in ocean-sedimentary rocks, which is strong indicator of ocean water of other planets. Ocean-sedimentary rocks are strong indicator of water planets and possible exo-life on planet Mars.

  6. Variations in Os isotope ratios of pyrrhotite as a result of water-rock and magma-rock interaction: Constraints from Virginia Formation-Duluth Complex contact zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Curtis D.; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi

    2010-08-01

    Os isotope ratios in pyrrhotite-bearing pelitic rocks of the ˜1.85 Ga Virginia Formation are variable, with perturbations linked to the emplacement of the ˜1.1 Ga Duluth Complex. Pyrrhotite in footwall rocks of the contact aureole show evidence for a mixing event at 1.1 Ga involving a low 187Os/ 188Os fluid. However, because rocks with perturbed pyrrhotite Os isotope ratios occur 1½ km or more from the Duluth Complex, the fluid is unlikely to have been of magmatic origin. Fluid inclusions in layer-parallel quartz veins provide evidence of the involvement of a boiling fluid at temperatures between ˜300 and 400 °C. Analyses of fluid inclusions via LA-ICP-MS show that the fluids contain up to 1.7 wt% Na, 1.1 wt% K, 4330 ppm Fe, 2275 ppm Zn, and 415 ppm Mg. The veins also contain pyrite or pyrrhotite, plus minor amounts of chalcopyrite, bornite, pentlandite, and sphalerite. The Re-Os isotopic ratios of pyrite from the veins indicate that they crystallized from low 187Os/ 188Os fluids (pyrite to pyrrhotite, and where time-integrated water-rock ratios in the aureole were high enough to provide a supply of Os. Troctolitic and gabbroic rocks of the Partridge River Intrusion, Duluth Complex, are characterized by Os isotope ratios that are indicative of variable degrees of crustal contamination ( γOs values of ˜0-543). Xenoliths of carbonaceous and sulfidic pelitic rocks of the Virginia Formation found in the igneous rocks provide evidence that Os was released by organic matter and pyrite in the sedimentary rocks and assimilated by mantle-derived magma. However, residual pyrrhotite produced as a result of pyrite breakdown in the xenoliths is characterized by 187Os/ 188Os ratios that are much lower than anticipated and similar to those of pyrrhotite in the contact aureole. The Os exchange and addition shown by pyrrhotite in the xenoliths highlight an unusual cycle of Re-Os liberation during devolatilization, kerogen maturation, and pyrite to pyrrhotite conversion

  7. The Formation of Carbonate Minerals and the Mobility of Heavy Metals during Water-CO2-Mafic Rock Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Jonas

    CarbFix is a pilot project in Iceland created to lock away CO2 through in-situ mineralization in the subsurface. The goal is to dissolve CO2 from the geothermal power plant, Hellisheiði, in water and inject it into basaltic rock formation for permanent storage. The carbonated water dissolves...... the basaltic host rock and liberates cations. Ideally, the cations react with the dissolved CO2 and form long time stable carbonate minerals. However, dissolution of the basaltic rock can lead to mobility of toxic metals, which is a potential threat to groundwater supplies and surface waters. Besides carbonate...... minerals, the reaction products are known to be manifold and reflect the complex composition of the basaltic material. Formation of secondary products, such aluminium and iron (hydr)oxides, are considered undesirable, because (1) they consume the cations that could be used to sequester CO2, thus compete...

  8. HYDROCARBON SOURCE ROCK EVALUATION OF MIDDLE PROTEROZOIC SOLOR CHURCH FORMATION, NORTH AMERICAN MID-CONTINENT RIFT SYSTEM, RICE COUNTY, MINNESOTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, J.R.; Morey, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrocarbon source rock evaluation of the Middle Proterozoic Solor Church Formation (Keweenawan Supergroup) as sampled in the Lonsdale 65-1 well, Rice County, shows that: the rocks are organic matter lean; the organic matter is thermally post-mature, probably near the transition between the wet gas phase of catagenesis and metagenesis; and the rocks have minimal potential for producing additional hydrocarbons. The observed thermal maturity of the organic matter requires significantly greater burial depths, a higher geothermal gradient, or both. It is likely, that thermal maturation of the organic matter in the Solor Church took place relatively early, and that any hydrocarbons generated during this early phase were probably lost prior to deposition of the overlying formation.

  9. Paleoenvironments, organic petrology and Rock-Eval studies on source rock facies of the Lower Maastrichtian Patti Formation, southern Bida Basin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, S. O.; Ojo, O. J.; Erdtmann, B. D.; Hetenyi, M.

    2005-06-01

    The southern Bida Basin in central Nigeria forms a part of the larger Bida or Middle Niger Basin, which is contiguous with the south east trending (petroliferous) Anambra Basin. These basins were major depocenters for Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments in southern and central Nigeria prior to the build up of the Tertiary Niger delta. The successions in the southern Bida Basin consist of the basal Lokoja Formation, overlain by the Patti Formation and capped by the Agbaja Formation. The Lokoja Formation is a sequence of matrix supported conglomerates and sandstones overlying the Pre-Cambrian to Lower Paleozoic basement. Depositional environments are predominantly within fluvial systems of a continental setting. The Patti Formation consists of dark grey carbonaceous shales; mudstone and siltstones representing flood plains to shallow marine deposits with likely organic rich intervals. The overlying Agbaja Formation is made up of ferruginised oolitic and kaolinitic mudstone of a marginal marine environment. Twenty samples of shales of the Patti Formation were studied by incident light microscopy and geochemical analysis to determine the maceral components, geochemical type and potential yield of the pyrolysate. Maceral analysis indicate a large abundance of vitrinite (50-85%; mean = 66%); moderate abundance of liptinites (10-33%; mean = 18%) and lesser amounts of inertinite (9-40%; mean = 16%). Total organic carbon (TOC) values vary from 0.17 to 3.8 wt.% (mean = 2.1 wt.%) with most samples having greater than 2 wt.% TOC. Three of the samples yield greater than 2 kg (HC)/ton of rock suggesting a fair source rock potential. Most of the samples are thermally immature to marginally mature with vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.4 to 0.6% Rom and Tmax values of 407-426 °C. Given the prevalence of the humic Type III kerogen, maturity and hydrocarbon potential yields, we conclude that the Patti Formation source rock facies have moderate to fair potential for gaseous

  10. How big are different parts of pictures of the rock under us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, A.; Moulik, P.; Lekic, V.

    2017-12-01

    Waves from the ground shaking are used to make pictures of the world of rock deep under us. Different pictures are made with different ways. Many approaches have been used to study these pictures, but they do not allow us to look at pictures of the entire world and smaller pictures at the same time. We present a new approach that uses "little waves" to look at smaller parts of the full pictures, and see how these parts agree across different pictures. The use of these "little waves" lets us recognize how large the different parts of the pictures are and study them in a way that gets around problems with other approaches. This shows us that different pictures of the world of rock under us made with different ways are made of parts of different area. With these facts, we can understand how much better these pictures are at explaining the direction and trail of waves from the ground shaking, and use these little waves to make better pictures of the rock.

  11. Fracture Propagation Characteristic and Micromechanism of Rock-Like Specimens under Uniaxial and Biaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of uniaxial and biaxial compression tests on the rock-like material specimens with different fracture geometries through a rock mechanics servo-controlled testing system (RMT-150C. On the basis of experimental results, the characteristics of fracture propagation under different fracture geometries and loading conditions are firstly obtained. The newly formed fractures are observed propagating from or near the preexisting crack tips for different specimens, while the propagation paths are affected by the loading condition obviously. Then, by adopting acoustic emission (AE location technique, AE event localization characteristics in the process of loading are investigated. The locations of AE events are in good agreement with the macroscopic fracture propagation path. Finally, the micromechanism of macroscopic fracture propagation under uniaxial and biaxial compression conditions is analyzed, and the fracture propagation can be concluded as a result of microdamage accumulation inside the material. The results of this paper are helpful for theory and engineering design of the fractured rock mass.

  12. Drilling Performance of Rock Drill by High-Pressure Water Jet under Different Configuration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rock drilling progress, the resistant force results in tools failure and the low drilling efficiency; thus, it is necessary to reduce the tools failure and enhance the drilling efficiency. In this paper, different configuration modes of drilling performance assisted with water jet are explored based on the mechanism and experiment analysis of rock drilling assisted with water jet. Moreover, the rotary sealing device with high pressure is designed to achieve the axial and rotation movement simultaneously as well as good sealing effect under high-pressure water jet. The results indicate that the NDB and NFB have better effects on drilling performance compared with that of NSB. Moreover, the high-pressure water jet is helpful not only to reduce the drill rod deflection, but also to reduce the probability of drill rod bending and improve the drill rod service life.

  13. Experimental and numerical study on frost heave of saturated rock under uniform freezing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhitao; Xia, Caichu; Li, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    A series of freezing experiments are conducted on saturated sandstone and mortar specimens to investigate the frost heave of saturated rock under uniform freezing conditions. The experimental results show that the frost heave of saturated rock is isotropic under uniform freezing conditions. During the freezing process, three stages are observed in the curves of variation of total frost heaving strain versus time: the thermal contraction stage, the frost heaving stage and the steady stage. Moreover, the amount of final stable frost heave first increases and then decreases with decrease in freezing temperature, and the maximum final stable frost heave occurs at different freezing temperature in saturated sandstone and mortar. Furthermore, a coupled thermal-mechanical (TM) model of frost heave of saturated rock is proposed in which a constraint coefficient \\zeta is used to consider the susceptibility of the internal rock grain structure to the expansion of pore ice. Then, numerical simulations are implemented with COMSOL to solve the governing equations of the TM model. Comparisons of the numerical results with the experimental results are performed to demonstrate the reliability of the model. The influences of elastic modulus and porosity on frost heave are also investigated, and the results show that the total frost heaving strain decreases non-linearly with increasing elastic modulus, and the decrease is significant when the elastic modulus is less than 3000 MPa, or approximately five times the elastic modulus of ice. In addition, the total frost heaving strain increases linearly with increasing porosity. Finally, an empirical equation between total frost heaving strain and freezing temperature is proposed and the equation well describes the variation of total frost heaving strain with freezing temperature.

  14. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin; Smellie, John; Puigdomenech, Ignasi

    2010-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely ∼0.00073 mole fraction methane and ∼10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (∼20 deg C and ∼100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of satisfactory

  15. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin (Hydrafact Ltd, Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Puigdomenech, Ignasi (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely approx0.00073 mole fraction methane and approx10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (approx20 deg C and approx100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of

  16. Corrosion testing of selected packaging materials for disposal of high-level waste glass in rock-salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.; Fiehn, B.; Halm, G.

    1991-01-01

    In previous corrosion studies performed in salt brines, unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 have proved to be the most promising materials for long-term resistant packagings to be used in heat-generating waste (vitrified HLW, spent fuel) disposal in rock-salt formations. Investigations of the iron-base materials Ni-Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron have also been carried out in order to complete the results available to date. The three steels (fine-grained steel, low-carbon steel, cast steel) investigated and Ti 99.8-Pd resisted pitting and crevice corrosion as well as stress-corrosion cracking under all test conditions. Gamma dose-rates of 1 Gy/h - 100 Gy/h or H 2 S concentrations in the brines as well as welding and explosion plating did not influence noticeably the corrosion behaviour of the materials. Furthermore, the determined corrosion rates of the steels (50 μm/a-250 μm/a, depending on the test conditions) are intercomparable and imply technically acceptable corrosion allowances for the thick-walled containers discussed. For Ti 99.8-Pd no detectable corrosion was observed. By contrast, Hastelloy C4 proved susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion at gamme dose-rates higher than 1 Gy/h and in the presence of H 2 S (25 mg/l) in Q-brine. The materials Ni Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron corroded at negligible rates in the in-situ experiments performed in rock salt/limited amounts of NaCI-brine. Nevertheless, these materials must be ruled out as container materials because they have proved to be susceptible to pitting and intergranular corrosion in previous laboratory studies conducted with MgCI 2 -rich brine (Q-brine) in excess. 15 refs.; 29 figs.; 7 tabs

  17. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  18. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  19. Modeling and numerical analysis of granite rock specimen under mechanical loading and fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Leroy Ngueyep. Mambou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ISO 834 fire on the mechanical properties of granite rock specimen submitted to uniaxial loading is numerically investigated. Based on Newton's second law, the rate-equation model of granite rock specimen under mechanical load and fire is established. The effect of heat treatment on the mechanical performance of granite is analyzed at the center and the ends of specimen. At the free end of granite rock specimen, it is shown that from 20 °C to 500 °C, the internal stress and internal strain are weak; whereas above 500 °C, they start to increase rapidly, announcing the imminent collapse. At the center of specimen, the analysis of the internal stress and internal strain reveals that the fire reduces the mechanical performance of granite significantly. Moreover, it is found that after 3 min of exposure to fire, the mechanical energy necessary to fragment the granite can be reduced up to 80%.

  20. Fractal Characteristics of Rock Fracture Surface under Triaxial Compression after High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM test on 30 pieces of fractured granite has been researched by using S250MK III SEM under triaxial compression of different temperature (25~1000°C and confining pressure (0~40 MPa. Research results show that (1 the change of fractal dimension (FD of rock fracture with temperature is closely related to confining pressure, which can be divided into two categories. In the first category, when confining pressure is in 0~30 MPa, FD fits cubic polynomial fitting curve with temperature, reaching the maximum at 600°C. In the second category, when confining pressure is in 30~40 MPa, FD has volatility with temperature. (2 The FD of rock fracture varies with confining pressure and is also closely related to the temperature, which can be divided into three categories. In the first category, FD has volatility with confining pressure at 25°C, 400°C, and 800°C. In the second category, it increases exponentially at 200°C and 1000°C. In the third category, it decreases exponentially at 600°C. (3 It is found that 600°C is the critical temperature and 30 MPa is the critical confining pressure of granite. The rock transfers from brittle to plastic phase transition when temperature exceeds 600°C and confining pressure exceeds 30 MPa.

  1. Research on Formation Mechanisms of Hot Dry Rock Resources in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Xi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    As an important geothermal resource, hot dry rock(HDR) reserves have been studied in many countries. HDR resources in China have huge capacity and have become one of the most important resources for the potential replacement of fossil fuels. However, HDR resources are difficult to develop and utilise. Technologies for use with HDR, such as high-temperature drilling, reservoir characterisation, reservoir fracturing, microseismic monitoring and high-temperature power stations, originate from the field of oil and drilling. Addressing how to take advantage of these developed technologies is a key factor in the development of HDR reserves. Based on the thermal crustal structure in China, HDR resources can be divided into four types: high radioactive heat production, sedimentary basin, modern volcano and the inner-plate active tectonic belt. The prospective regions of HDR resources are located in South Tibet, West Yunnan, the southeast coast of China, Bohai Rim, Songliao Basin and Guanzhong Basin. The related essential technologies are relatively mature, and the prospect of HDR power generation is promising. Therefore, analysing the formation mechanisms of HDR resources and promoting the transformation of technological achievements, large-scale development and the utilisation of HDR resources can be achieved in China.

  2. Recreating Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R

    2008-01-01

    Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers.......Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers....

  3. REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-12-29

    An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide

  4. Chemo-Mechano Coupling Processes Inducing Evolution of Rock Permeability under Hydrothermal and Stressed Conditions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, H.; Takahashi, M.; Kishida, K.; Nakashima, S.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled thermo-hydro-mechano-chemo (THMC) processes prevailing within fractured rocks are of significant importance in case of a long-term geo-sequestration of anthropogenic wastes of high level radioactive materials and carbon dioxide, and an effective recovery of energy from petroleum and geothermal reservoirs typically located in deep underground. The THMC processes should change the mechanical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the host rocks. Under even moderate pressure and temperature conditions, geochemical processes such as mineral dissolution should be active and may induce the change of those properties. Therefore, the effects should be examined in detail. In this work, a suite of long-term permeability experiments using granite, sandstone, and mudstone with or without a single fracture has been conducted under moderate confining pressures ranging 3 - 15 MPa and temperatures of 20 and 90 °C, and monitors the evolution in rock permeability and effluent chemistry throughout the experimental periods. Under net reduction or augmentation of pore/fracture volumes, the net permeability should alternatively increase or decrease with time, depending on the prevailing mechanical and geochemical processes. In granite samples, At 20 °C the observed fracture permeabilities monotonically reduce and reach quasi-steady state in two weeks, but after the temperature is increased to 90 °C those resume decreasing throughout the rest of experiments - the ultimate reductions are roughly two orders of magnitude within 40 days. In mudstone samples, similar results to those in granite samples are obtained (i.e., monotonic reduction and subsequent quasi-steady state). In contrast, in sandstone samples, a monotonic augmentation in permeability has been observed throughout the experiments. A chemo-mechanical model that accounts for temperature-dependent mineral dissolutions at contacting areas and free walls of pore spaces is applied to replicating the experimental

  5. On the problem of studying physical properties of rock collectors under conditions modelling layer ones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkevich, G.I.

    1972-01-01

    A review is given of the state in studying physical properties of rock collectors under conditions modelling the layer ones. From the theoretical point of view, this direction is determined as petrophysics of multiphase systems and from the practical, as oil field petrophysics. The following aspects of the problem are considered: models of porous media, thermodynamic conditions of deformation process, parameters of stressed state of porous deformed media, and analysis of experimental data. To describe collector behavior under thermodynamic conditions of natural occurrence, it is necessary to construct the model of the porous deformed medium. In connection with heterogeneity and multiphase character of rock collectors, they may be considered as differential-elastic media, and to characterize the stressed state such indices as coefficients of compressibility of skeleton, solid and liquid phase, as well as coefficients of pore compressibility, relaxation, structural parameter, etc. may be used. It is emphasized that only reversable (elastic) parameter changes are studied under laboratory conditions. The results of laboratory measurements of collector parameters are summarized on the basis of different researcher data. (54 refs.)

  6. Sociality Affects REM Sleep Episode Duration Under Controlled Laboratory Conditions in the Rock Hyrax, Procavia capensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gravett

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The rock hyrax, Procavia capensis, is a highly social, diurnal mammal. In the current study several physiologically measurable parameters of sleep, as well as the accompanying behavior, were recorded continuously from five rock hyraxes, for 72 h under solitary (experimental animal alone in the recording chamber, and social conditions (experimental animal with 1 or 2 additional, non-implanted animals in the recording chamber. The results revealed no significant differences between solitary and social conditions for total sleep times, number of episodes, episode duration or slow wave activity (SWA for all states examined. The only significant difference observed between social and solitary conditions was the average duration of rapid eye movement (REM sleep episodes. REM sleep episode duration was on average 20 s and 40 s longer under social conditions daily and during the dark period, respectively. It is hypothesized that the increase in REM sleep episode duration under social conditions could possibly be attributed to improved thermoregulation strategies, however considering the limited sample size and design of the current study further investigations are needed to confirm this finding. Whether the conclusions and the observations made in this study can be generalized to all naturally socially sleeping mammals remains an open question.

  7. Correlation between Bieniawski’s RMR index and Barton’s Q index in fine-grained sedimentary rock formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Fernández-Gutiérrez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available From the XX century, various rock mass classification systems have been proposed. Among them, the Bieniawski’s RMR system and Barton’s Q system have emerged as the most used rock mass classification worldwide. Correlations between both indices have been proposed, usually with a wide scattering of the data used in deriving the equations. However, it has been observed that correlations established for a specific geological unit fit better. The aim of this paper is to propose a correlation between RMR and Q indices for fine-grained sedimentary rock formations, normally found in the area of Bilbao (Spain, by means of the collected data during the excavation of the tunnel Etxebarri-Casco Viejo of the line 3 of the Metropolitan Railway of Bilbao. Obtained equation shows a high correlation coefficient and a unique relationship between the two classification systems has been proposed, not depending on the choice of the independent variable.

  8. Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L. (eds.)

    1991-08-01

    Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Modeling of ventilation experiment in opalinus clay formation of Mont Terri argillaceous rock tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoyan; Liu Quansheng; Zhang Chengyuan

    2010-01-01

    Deep geological disposal is one of the most realistic methods of nuclear waste disposal, argillaceous rocks are being considered as potential host rocks for deep geological disposal. Our study starts with performing simulations of a laboratory drying test and a ventilation experiment for Mont Terri underground laboratory. It is an main interest of D2011, 5th stage of DECOVALEX. A 3-phase and 3-constituent hydraulic model is introduced to simulate the processes occurring during ventilation, including desaturation/resaturation in the rock, real phase change and air/rock interface, and to explore the Opalinus Clay parameter set There is a good agreement with experimental observations and calculation results from other D2011 participant teams. It means that the 3-phase and 2-constituent hydraulic model is accurate enough and it is a good start for full HMC understanding of the ventilation experiment on argillaceous rock. (authors)

  10. Chemical variations in Yellowknife Bay formation sedimentary rocks analyzed by ChemCam on board the Curiosity rover on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Nicolas; Forni, Olivier; Dromart, G.; Stack, K.M.; Wiens, Roger C.; Gasnault, Olivier; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Nachon, Marion; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Anderson, Ryan B.; Barraclough, Bruce; Bell, J.F.; Berger, G.; Blaney, D.L.; Bridges, J.C.; Calef, F.; Clark, Brian R.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Cousin, Agnes; Edgar, L.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ehlmann, B.L.; Fabre, Cecile; Fisk, M.; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, S.C.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Johnson, J. R.; Kah, Linda C.; Lanza, Nina L.; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Mouélic, S.; Lewin, Eric; Malin, Michael; McLennan, Scott M.; Maurice, S.; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Milliken, Ralph E.; Newsome, H.L.; Ollila, A.; Rowland, Scott K.; Sautter, Violaine; Schmidt, M.E.; Schroder, S.; D'Uston, C.; Vaniman, Dave; Williams, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Yellowknife Bay formation represents a ~5 m thick stratigraphic section of lithified fluvial and lacustrine sediments analyzed by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater, Mars. Previous works have mainly focused on the mudstones that were drilled by the rover at two locations. The present study focuses on the sedimentary rocks stratigraphically above the mudstones by studying their chemical variations in parallel with rock textures. Results show that differences in composition correlate with textures and both manifest subtle but significant variations through the stratigraphic column. Though the chemistry of the sediments does not vary much in the lower part of the stratigraphy, the variations in alkali elements indicate variations in the source material and/or physical sorting, as shown by the identification of alkali feldspars. The sandstones contain similar relative proportions of hydrogen to the mudstones below, suggesting the presence of hydrous minerals that may have contributed to their cementation. Slight variations in magnesium correlate with changes in textures suggesting that diagenesis through cementation and dissolution modified the initial rock composition and texture simultaneously. The upper part of the stratigraphy (~1 m thick) displays rocks with different compositions suggesting a strong change in the depositional system. The presence of float rocks with similar compositions found along the rover traverse suggests that some of these outcrops extend further away in the nearby hummocky plains.

  11. Microscale experimental investigation of deformation and damage of argillaceous rocks under cyclic hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Linlin; Yang, Diansen; Heripre, Eva; Chanchole, Serge; Bornert, Michel; Pouya, Ahmad; Halphen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Argillaceous rocks are possible host rocks for underground nuclear waste repositories. They exhibit complex coupled thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical behavior, the description of which would strongly benefit from an improved experimental insight on their deformation and damage mechanisms at microscale. We present some recent observations of the evolution of these rocks at the scale of their composite microstructure, essentially made of a clay matrix with embedded carbonates and quartz particles with sizes ranging from a few to several tens of micrometers, when they are subjected to cyclic variations of relative humidity and mechanical loading. They are based on the combination of high definition and high resolution imaging in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), in situ hydro-mechanical loading of the samples, and digital image correlation techniques. Samples, several millimeters in diameter, are held at a constant temperature of 2 deg. Celsius while the vapor pressure in the ESEM chamber is varied from a few to several hundreds of Pascals, generating a relative humidity ranging from about 10% up to 90%. Results show a strongly heterogeneous deformation field at microscale, which is the result of complex hydro-mechanical interactions. In particular, it can be shown that local swelling incompatibilities can generate irreversible deformations in the clay matrix, even if the overall hydric deformations seem reversible. In addition, local damage can be generated, in the form of a network of microcracks, located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the interface between clay and other mineral particles. The morphology of this network, described in terms of crack length, orientation and preferred location, has been observed to be dependent on the speed of the variation of the relative humidity, and is different in a saturation or desaturation process. Besides studying the deformation and damage under hydric

  12. Petrified lightning: the role of bubbles in the physical and chemical processes leading to formation of rock fulgurites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Elmi, C.; Goldsby, D. L.; Giere, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fulgurite is a vitrified soil, sand or rock resulting from lightning strikes. The thunderbolt, which can have an energy density of 3.3 ×106 J/m, is associated with air temperatures of up to 30,000 K and a current of up to 10 kA, which can heat the rock to >2000 K within tens of ms. The rapid fusing and subsequent quenching of the surface of the rock leaves a distinctive thin garbled coating comprised of glassy to fine-grained porous material. Similar materials and structures result from atomic bomb tests (trinitite) and from meteorite impacts (tektite). Chemical analysis of rock fulgurite samples on granites collected near Baveno, Italy reveals a glass composition of mainly SiO2 and Al2O3. A porosity of about 10% in the analyzed fulgurite was determined. The presence of newly-formed cristobalite and relict quartz in a relatively chemically homogenous glass matrix indicates induced temperatures >1700 ºC. The residual organic matter in the glass suggests that rapid cooling of the melt trapped NOx and COx gases vaporized during the lightning event. Tiny spheres mainly made of Fe and rich in Si point to reducing conditions. To better understand the formation of the porous glass matrix during intense Joule heating and subsequent rapid cooling, idealized physical models were developed to simulate bubble nucleation and redox reactions inside the bubbles. Preliminary results suggest that a weathered surface layer of higher electrical conductivity than the bulk rock results in strong Joule heating near the surface, facilitating the formation of a dense population of bubbles in the 10 mm-thick glass layer. Experiments to generate fulgurites in the laboratory, with well controlled energy input and sample properties, will aid our understanding of the physics of fulgurite formation and corroborate theoretical models. The results of such experiments, which are underway, will be presented.

  13. Development of in-situ rock shear test under low compressive to tensile normal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Takashi; Shin, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an in-situ rock shear testing method to evaluate the shear strength under low normal stress condition including tensile stress, which is usually ignored in the assessment of safety factor of the foundations for nuclear power plants against sliding. The results are as follows. (1) A new in-situ rock shear testing method is devised, in which tensile normal stress can be applied on the shear plane of a specimen by directly pulling up a steel box bonded to the specimen. By applying the counter shear load to cancel the moment induced by the main shear load, it can obtain shear strength under low normal stress. (2) Some model tests on Oya tuff and diatomaceous mudstone have been performed using the developed test method. The shear strength changed smoothly from low values at tensile normal stresses to higher values at compressive normal stresses. The failure criterion has been found to be bi-linear on the shear stress vs normal stress plane. (author)

  14. Rock Magnetic and Grain Size Variation Along A 50m Cretaceous Sedimentary Section of The Marilia Formation (bauru Basin), Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrat, E.; Ernesto, M.; Watanabe, J.; Saad, A. R.; Fulfaro, V. J.

    We present a detailed rock magnetic investigation of a sedimentary section from the Marilia Formation of the Bauru Basin (22.22S, 49.96W), Brasil. Sampling was con- ducted over 0.5m interval of a 50m Late Cretaceous sedimentary deposit. The deposits are consists of coarse to conglomeratic sandstones with abundant calciferous cement and nodules. A total of 81 samples from 67 sites have carried out using hysteresis loop and thermomagnetic curves in order to identify the magnetic mineral and distribution of their grain-size. Trends in rock magnetic parameters with remanent saturation be- low 300mT and moderate coercivity of remanence are consistent with a contribution of Pseudo-single domain to small Multi-domain magnetite. High temperature exper- iments of the magnetic susceptibility up to 700C indicate abundant magnetite with minor contribution of titanomaghemite. Changes in hysteresis parameters are consis- tent with changes in the relative amounts of the different magnetite size fractions. On the basis of rock magnetic investigation, a sample of the Marilia Formation appears to be a reliable recorder of the geomagnetic field during sediment deposition. Their straightforward mineralogy and minimal changes in magnetic concentration consti- tute an opportunity to examine not only rock magnetic and grain size variation, but directional changes and magnetostratigraphy data as well.

  15. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 5. Baseline rock properties-granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/5, Baseline Rock Properties--Granite, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This report, on the rock properties of typical granites, includes an evaluation of the various test results reported in the literature. Firstly, a literature survey was made in order to obtain a feel for the range of rock properties encountered. Then, granites representative of different geologic ages and from different parts of the United States were selected and studied in further detail. Some of the special characteristics of granite, such as anisotropy, creep and weathering were also investigated. Lastly, intact properties for a typical granite were selected and rock mass properties were derived using appropriate correction factors

  16. Formation process of Malaysian modern architecture under influence of nationalism

    OpenAIRE

    宇高, 雄志; 山崎, 大智

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Formation Process of Malaysian Modern Architecture under Influence of Nationalism,through the process of independence of Malaysia. The national style as "Malaysian national architecture" which hasengaged on background of political environment under the post colonial situation. Malaysian urban design is alsodetermined under the balance of both of ethnic culture and the national culture. In Malaysia, they decided to choosethe Malay ethnic culture as the national culture....

  17. Numerical Studies on the Failure Process of Heterogeneous Brittle Rocks or Rock-Like Materials under Uniaxial Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Songfeng; Qi, Shengwen; Zou, Yu; Zheng, Bowen

    2017-04-01

    In rocks or rock-like materials, the constituents, e.g. quartz, calcite and biotite, as well as the microdefects have considerably different mechanical properties that make such materials heterogeneous at different degrees. The failure of materials subjected to external loads is a cracking process accompanied with stress redistribution due to material heterogeneity. However, the latter cannot be observed from the experiments in laboratory directly. In this study, the cracking and stress features during uniaxial compression process are numerically studied based on a presented approach. A plastic strain dependent strength model is implemented into the continuous numerical tool-Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua in three Dimensions (FLAC 3D ), and the Gaussian statistical function is adopted to depict the heterogeneity of mechanical parameters including elastic modulus, friction angle, cohesion and tensile strength. The mean parameter μ and the coefficient of variance ( h cv , the ratio of mean parameter to standard deviation) in the function are used to define the mean value and heterogeneity degree of the parameters, respectively. The results show that this numerical approach can perfectly capture the general features of brittle materials including fracturing process, AE events as well as stress-strain curves. Furthermore, the local stress disturbance is analyzed and the crack initiation stress threshold is identified based on the AE events process and stress-strain curves. It is shown that the stress concentration always appears in the undamaged elements near the boundary of damaged sites. The peak stress and crack initiation stress are both heterogeneity dependent, i.e., a linear relation exists between the two stress thresholds and h cv . The range of h cv is suggested as 0.12 to 0.21 for most rocks. The stress concentration degree is represented by a stress concentration factor and found also heterogeneity dominant. Finally, it is found that there exists a

  18. Numerical Studies on the Failure Process of Heterogeneous Brittle Rocks or Rock-Like Materials under Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Songfeng; Qi, Shengwen; Zou, Yu; Zheng, Bowen

    2017-01-01

    In rocks or rock-like materials, the constituents, e.g. quartz, calcite and biotite, as well as the microdefects have considerably different mechanical properties that make such materials heterogeneous at different degrees. The failure of materials subjected to external loads is a cracking process accompanied with stress redistribution due to material heterogeneity. However, the latter cannot be observed from the experiments in laboratory directly. In this study, the cracking and stress features during uniaxial compression process are numerically studied based on a presented approach. A plastic strain dependent strength model is implemented into the continuous numerical tool—Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua in three Dimensions (FLAC3D), and the Gaussian statistical function is adopted to depict the heterogeneity of mechanical parameters including elastic modulus, friction angle, cohesion and tensile strength. The mean parameter μ and the coefficient of variance (hcv, the ratio of mean parameter to standard deviation) in the function are used to define the mean value and heterogeneity degree of the parameters, respectively. The results show that this numerical approach can perfectly capture the general features of brittle materials including fracturing process, AE events as well as stress-strain curves. Furthermore, the local stress disturbance is analyzed and the crack initiation stress threshold is identified based on the AE events process and stress-strain curves. It is shown that the stress concentration always appears in the undamaged elements near the boundary of damaged sites. The peak stress and crack initiation stress are both heterogeneity dependent, i.e., a linear relation exists between the two stress thresholds and hcv. The range of hcv is suggested as 0.12 to 0.21 for most rocks. The stress concentration degree is represented by a stress concentration factor and found also heterogeneity dominant. Finally, it is found that there exists a

  19. Formation of neutrophil extracellular traps under low oxygen level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Branitzki-Heinemann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs have been characterized as a fundamental host innate immune defense mechanism. Conversely, excessive NET release may have a variety of detrimental consequences for the host. A fine balance between NET formation and elimination is necessary to sustain a protective effect during an infectious challenge. Our own recently published data revealed that stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α by the iron chelating HIF-1α-agonist desferoxamine or AKB-4924 enhanced the release of phagocyte extracellular traps. Since HIF-1α is a global regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen, we hypothesized that NET formation may be similarly increased under low oxygen conditions. Hypoxia occurs in tissues during infection or inflammation, mostly due to overconsumption of oxygen by pathogens and recruited immune cells. Therefore, experiments were performed to characterize the formation of NETs under hypoxic oxygen conditions compared to normoxia. Human blood-derived neutrophils were isolated and incubated under normoxic (21% oxygen level and compared to hypoxic (1% conditions. Dissolved oxygen levels were monitored in the primary cell culture using a Fibox4-PSt3 measurement system. The formation of NETs was quantified by fluorescence microscopy in response to the known NET-inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA or S. aureus wildtype and a nuclease-deficient mutant. In contrast to our hypothesis, spontaneous NET formation of neutrophils incubated under hypoxia was distinctly reduced compared to control neutrophils incubated under normoxia. Furthermore, neutrophils incubated under hypoxia showed significantly reduced formation of NETs in response to PMA. Gene expression analysis revealed that mRNA level of hif-1α as well as hif-1α target genes was not altered. However, in good correlation to the decreased NET formation under hypoxia, the cholesterol content of the neutrophils was

  20. Subcontact Lens Bubble Formation under Low Atmospheric Pressure Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    of subcontact lens bubble formation under scleral lenses at altitudes greater than 18,000 ft. Later, after many advances in contact lens fitting and...Reported here are the results of contact lens bubble studies with soft hydrophilic nd rigid gas-permeable lenses . Testing was accomplished in simulated...ccurred at altitudes greater than 20,000 ft. For soft contact lenses , bubble formation was etected in 22 of 92 eyes tested, and occurred at altitudes

  1. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Mechanical Properties of Intermittently Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression with Different Loading Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Dong, Lu; Xu, Nuwen; Feng, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intermittently jointed rocks, widely existing in many mining and civil engineering structures, are quite susceptible to cyclic loading. Understanding the fatigue mechanism of jointed rocks is vital to the rational design and the long-term stability analysis of rock structures. In this study, the fatigue mechanical properties of synthetic jointed rock models under different cyclic conditions are systematically investigated in the laboratory, including four loading frequencies, four maximum stresses, and four amplitudes. Our experimental results reveal the influence of the three cyclic loading parameters on the mechanical properties of jointed rock models, regarding the fatigue deformation characteristics, the fatigue energy and damage evolution, and the fatigue failure and progressive failure behavior. Under lower loading frequency or higher maximum stress and amplitude, the jointed specimen is characterized by higher fatigue deformation moduli and higher dissipated hysteresis energy, resulting in higher cumulative damage and lower fatigue life. However, the fatigue failure modes of jointed specimens are independent of cyclic loading parameters; all tested jointed specimens exhibit a prominent tensile splitting failure mode. Three different crack coalescence patterns are classified between two adjacent joints. Furthermore, different from the progressive failure under static monotonic loading, the jointed rock specimens under cyclic compression fail more abruptly without evident preceding signs. The tensile cracks on the front surface of jointed specimens always initiate from the joint tips and then propagate at a certain angle with the joints toward the direction of maximum compression.

  2. Source rock formation evaluation using TOC & Ro log model based on well-log data procesing: study case of Ngimbang formation, North East Java basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatahillah Yosar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ngimbang Formation is known as one major source of hydrocarbon supply in the North Eastern Java Basin. Aged Mid-Eocene, Ngimbang is dominated by sedimentary clastic rocks mostly shale, shaly sandstone, and thick layers of limestone (CD Limestone, with thin layers of coal. Although, laboratory analyses show the Ngimbang Formation to be a relatively rich source-rocks, such data are typically too limited to regionally quantify the distribution of organic matter. To adequately sample the formation both horizontally and vertically on a basin–wide scale, large number of costly and time consuming laboratory analyses would be required. Such analyses are prone to errors from a number of sources, and core data are frequently not available at key locations. In this paper, the authors established four TOC (Total Organic Carbon Content logging calculation models; Passey, Schmoker-Hester, Meyer-Nederloff, and Decker/Density Model by considering the geology of Ngimbang. Well data along with its available core data was used to determine the most suitable model to be applied in the well AFA-1, as well as to compare the accuracy of these TOC model values. The result shows good correlation using Decker (TOC Model and Mallick-Raju (Ro- Vitrinite Reflectance Model. Two source rocks potential zones were detected by these log models.

  3. Study on Mechanical Characteristics of Fully Grouted Rock Bolts for Underground Caverns under Seismic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study establishes an analytical model for the interaction between the bolt and surrounding rock based on the bearing mechanism of fully grouted rock bolts. The corresponding controlled differential equation for load transfer is deduced. The stress distributions of the anchorage body are obtained by solving the equations. A dynamic algorithm for the bolt considering shear damage on the anchoring interface is proposed based on the dynamic finite element method. The rationality of the algorithm is verified by a pull-out test and excavation simulation of a rounded tunnel. Then, a case study on the mechanical characteristics of the bolts in underground caverns under seismic loads is conducted. The results indicate that the seismic load may lead to stress originating from the bolts and damage on the anchoring interface. The key positions of the antiseismic support can be determined using the numerical simulation. The calculated results can serve as a reference for the antiseismic optimal design of bolts in underground caverns.

  4. Acoustic and mechanical response of reservoir rocks under variable saturation and effective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzoli, C L; Santos, J E; Carcione, J M

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the acoustic and mechanical properties of a reservoir sandstone saturated by two immiscible hydrocarbon fluids, under different saturations and pressure conditions. The modeling of static and dynamic deformation processes in porous rocks saturated by immiscible fluids depends on many parameters such as, for instance, porosity, permeability, pore fluid, fluid saturation, fluid pressures, capillary pressure, and effective stress. We use a formulation based on an extension of Biot's theory, which allows us to compute the coefficients of the stress-strain relations and the equations of motion in terms of the properties of the single phases at the in situ conditions. The dry-rock moduli are obtained from laboratory measurements for variable confining pressures. We obtain the bulk compressibilities, the effective pressure, and the ultrasonic phase velocities and quality factors for different saturations and pore-fluid pressures ranging from normal to abnormally high values. The objective is to relate the seismic and ultrasonic velocity and attenuation to the microstructural properties and pressure conditions of the reservoir. The problem has an application in the field of seismic exploration for predicting pore-fluid pressures and saturation regimes.

  5. Hydrocarbon source rock characterization and thermal maturity of the upper Triassic Baldonnel and Pardonet formations, northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riediger, C.; Carrelli, G. G. [University of Calgary, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Calgary, AB (Canada); Zonneveld, J-P. [Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    The hydrocarbon source rock potential of Upper Triassic strata in northeastern British Columbia was assessed by geochemical analysis of samples taken from nine outcrops and seven drill cores. Geochemical data from the outcrop and cores suggest that the Pardonet Formation in northeastern British Columbia had good to very good initial hydrocarbon potential, capable of generating economically significant quantities of hydrocarbon. However, mass balance calculations based on the geochemical data for the Pardonet Formation suggests that current initial in-place reserve estimates for Upper Triassic reservoir strata are four or five times less than initially estimated, possibly due to a portion of the calculated volume of hydrocarbons having been retained within the Pardonet Formation itself, possibly due to a fractured shale pay. With respect to the Baldonnel Formation, the conclusion is that it had only poor to fair initial hydrocarbon potential, and is not a significant source of hydrocarbons. 27 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs,. 2 appendices.

  6. Displacement defect formation in complex oxide crystals under irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubizskii, SB; Matkovskii, AO; Mironova-Ulmane, N; Skvortsova, [No Value; Suchocki, A; Zhydachevskii, YA; Potera, P

    The work is devoted to an analysis of formation processes of the radiation displacement defects (RDDs) and colour centres (CCs) in complex oxide crystals under irradiation. The calculation results on: the displacement process simulation as well as an analysis of the RDD and CC accumulation kinetics

  7. DBP formation and disinfection under current and future climates - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    How to predict and monitoring DBP formation under current and future climate is a challenge and important to water plant operations and water supply security. This presentation summarizes a system approach being developed at the EPA Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP).

  8. Colloid and radionuclide retention mechanisms in fractured rock under near-natural flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delos, A.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H.; Guimera, J.; Carrera, J.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experiments in fractured host rock (Grimsel Test Site, GTS, Switzerland) revealed that the colloid relevance for actinide migration is high due to the specific geochemical groundwater conditions [1]. However, even under such conditions it is found that retention of colloids and colloid-borne actinides becomes significant under near-natural groundwater flow rates (1-10 m/a) [2]. Underlying mechanisms of colloid and radionuclide retention are not well understood up to now. The present study co-funded by the NoE ACTINET-6 focuses on (i) the kinetics of actinide-colloid interactions and (ii) the relevance of matrix diffusion as a competition process to other retention mechanisms which affect the actinides behavior in fractured rock systems such as the Grimsel granodiorite. Colloid migration is studied with well defined model colloids as e.g. fluorescence dyed carboxylated polystyrene particles, and natural colloids extracted from bentonite (FEBEX) and from fracture filling material (GTS). In order to study the influence of matrix porosity on actinides migration, those experiments are performed in columns of well defined geometry filled with microporous unmodified silica spheres, porous ceramic material and natural fracture filling material from the GTS. The behaviour of actinides (Pu(IV) and Am(III)) sorbed onto bentonite colloids is investigated in column and batch experiments. All experiments are performed under anoxic conditions. Colloid characterization methods used in this study include the combination of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD), fluorimetry and field flow fractionation (FFF). Experimental results and their application to the parametrisation of reactive colloid transport models are discussed. [1] Geckeis H, Schaefer T, Hauser W, Rabung T, Missana T, Degueldre C, Moeri A, Eikenberg J, Fierz T, Alexander WR (2004) Results of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retention experiment

  9. ROCK1 is associated with Alzheimer’s disease-specific plaques, as well as enhances autophagosome formation but not autophagic Aβ clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Bo Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent form of late-life dementia in the population, characterised by amyloid plaque formation and increased tau deposition, which is modulated by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase 1 (ROCK1. In this study, we further analyse whether ROCK1 regulates the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP. We show that ROCK1 is colocalised with mature Aβ plaques in patients with AD, in that ROCK1 enhances the amyloidogenic pathway, and that ROCK1 mediated autophagy enhances the intracellular buildup of Aβ in a cell model of AD, (confirmed by increased ROCK1 and decreased Beclin 1 protein levels, with neuronal autophagosome accumulation in prefrontal cortex of AD APP/PS1 mouse model. In vitro over-expression of ROCK1 leads to a decrease in Aβ secretion and an increase in the expression of autophagy-related molecules. ROCK1 interacts with Beclin1, an autophagy initiator, and enhances the intracellular accumulation of Aβ. Reciprocally, overexpression of APP/Aβ promotes ROCK1 expression. Our data suggest ROCK1 participates in regulating Aβ secretion, APP shedding and autophagosome accumulation, and that ROCK1, rather than other kinases, is more likely to be a targetable enzyme for AD therapy.

  10. The Formation of Carbonate Minerals and the Mobility of Heavy Metals during Water-CO2-Mafic Rock Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Jonas

    the basaltic host rock and liberates cations. Ideally, the cations react with the dissolved CO2 and form long time stable carbonate minerals. However, dissolution of the basaltic rock can lead to mobility of toxic metals, which is a potential threat to groundwater supplies and surface waters. Besides carbonate...... with the process of carbonation, and (2) they can form a passivating layer, which inhibit dissolution of the basaltic material and slow down the carbonation process. The purpose of this thesis was to identify formation products, relevant to CarbFix, and assess their ability to immobilize toxic metals released from...... are consistent with values of controlled laboratory experiments from the literature for Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sr and Zn. The calcium carbonates also scavenge other elements, including rare earth elements (REE) and the toxic metals As and Pb. This and the next study can be considered natural analogues...

  11. Deformation and damage modes of deep argillaceous rocks under hydro-mechanical stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vales, F.

    2008-12-01

    An experimental identification of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of an argillite rock is proposed within a multi-scale approach. In particular, interest is focused on the spatial and temporal localization of strain and damage in a specimen during hydro-mechanical loading. Firstly, we describe the techniques used to follow the rock evolutions under loading, and in particular Digital Images Correlation (DIC), Acoustic Emission, microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Measurement errors and device limitations are discussed. The studied material is the Callovo-Oxfordian indurated argillaceous rock (or argillite) of the Bure site where ANDRA has built an underground research laboratory to study the radioactive waste storage. Petrophysical characterizations and microstructural observations by optical and scanning electron microscopy provide an identification of the constitutive phase and a characterization of their spatial distribution and typical sizes. Argillite can be described as a composite structure with a continuous clay matrix and embedded mineral particles, essentially quartz and carbonates. The typical size of these particles ranges from a few micrometers to a few hundreds micrometers, with an average close to 50 μ.m. The general experimental procedure combines two steps: in a fist time, imposed suctions bring samples to a given degree of water saturation, and, in a second time, uniaxial mechanical compression tests are performed. To understand the evolutions of the material under hydric and mechanical loading, samples are instrumented with standard measurement techniques, but also with Digital Image Correlation, at both the global scale of the sample and the local scale of the composite microstructure, and with Acoustic Emissions recording. Moisture transfers are imposed by controlled suctions on the range of 150 to 2.8 MPa, corresponding to the relative humidity range of 32 to 98%RH. During pure hydric solicitation, the changes in physical parameters

  12. Depositional environments, provenance and paleoclimatic implications of Ordovician siliciclastic rocks of the Thango Formation, Spiti Valley, Tethys Himalaya, northern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Shaik A.; Ganai, Javid A.

    2018-05-01

    Recently published findings indicate that the Ordovician period has been much more dynamic than previously anticipated thus making this period significant in geological time. The Ordovician of India can best be studied in the Spiti region because the Spiti basin records the complete uninterrupted history of excellent marine sedimentary rocks starting from Cambrian to Paleogene which were deposited along the northern margin of India. Due to these reasons the geochemical data on the Ordovician rocks from the Spiti region is uncommon. The present geochemical study on the Ordovician Thango Formation (Sanugba Group) is mainly aimed to understand the provenance and the paleoclimatic conditions. The sandstones are the dominant lithology of the Thango Formation with intercalations of minor amount of shales. Detailed petrographic and sedimentological analysis of these rocks suggest that three major depositional environments, viz., fluvial, transitional and marine prevailed in the basin representing transgressive and regressive phases. The major and trace element ratios such as SiO2/Al2O3, K2O/Na2O and La-Th- Sc discrimination diagram suggest that these rocks were deposited in passive margin tectonic settings. Various geochemical discriminants and elemental ratios such as K2O/Na2O, Al2O3/TiO2, La/Sc, Th/Sc, Cr/Th, Zr/Sc, (Gd/Yb)N and pronounced negative Eu anomalies indicate the rocks to be the product of weathering of post-Archean granites. The striking similarities of the multi-elemental spider diagrams of the studied sediments and the Himalayan granitoids indicate that sediments are sourced from the Proterozoic orogenic belts of the Himalayan region. Chemical index of alteration (CIA) values of the studied sediments (55-72) suggest that the source rocks underwent low to moderate degree of chemical weathering. The span of the CIA values (55-72) recorded in the sediments from the Spiti region may have resulted from varying degrees of weathering conditions in the source area

  13. The process of ghost-rock karstification and its role in the formation of cave systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubois, C.; Quinif, Y.; Baele, J.-M.; Barriquand, L.; Bini, A.; Bruxelles, L.; Dandurand, G.; Havron, C.; Kaufmann, O.; Lans, B.; Maire, R.; Martin, J.; Rodet, J.; Rowberry, Matthew David; Tognini, P.; Vergari, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 131, APR (2014), s. 116-148 ISSN 0012-8252 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : chemical weathering * ghost-rock * karstification * limestone dissolution * speleogenesis Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 7.885, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012825214000154

  14. Numerical study of mechanism of fold formation in a laminated rock

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    compression rate and the change in stress distribution leading to rupture at high compression rates is discussed. Wavelength, limb length .... simulates laboratory testing environment for rock samples. A uniaxial compression and ..... a layered viscoelastic medium in compression; J. Applied. Mechanics 26 393–400. Biot M A ...

  15. Applications of electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) in the study of Venezuelan source rocks: La Luna and Querecual Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Lo Monaco; L. Lopez; H. Rojas; P. Lugo; D. Garcia; J. Gastiel [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela). Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra, Facultad de Ciencias

    2007-03-15

    This work presents the electron probe for microanalysis (EPMA) study of Venezuelan source rocks for stylolites (Querecual Formation), framboids (La Luna Formation), and kerogen (La Luna and Querecual Formations). Distributions of major and trace elements were studied to determine the elemental association with inorganic (minerals) and organic phases (kerogen). In the Querecual Formation an association of S with Fe, Cu, Zn, and Ni was observed in the stylolites, suggesting the presence of authigenic sulfides, whereas V and Ni are associated with organic matter. In the La Luna Formation, massive and framboidal pyrite was observed, in some cases surrounded by sphalerite; also an association of S with Fe (pyrite) and Ni with Zn (in a lower proportion) was observed. This suggests that Ni and Zn coprecipitate with pyrite, but that Zn also forms a separate phase (sphalerite). In these samples Ni is associated both with the sulfide phase and the organic matter, but V is only associated with the latter. In kerogen from La Luna and Querecual Formation, elemental mapping shows that V is associated with kerogen; it also demonstrates the presence of inorganic phases by elemental associations among C, Ca, and Mg (carbonates); Al, Si, and K (aluminosilicates); and S, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Ni (sulfides); these latter also seem to be associated with kerogen. This means that acidic attack on kerogen does not completely separate mineral phases, possibly because organic matter may be surrounding mineral phases, thus inhibiting this attack. These results demonstrate EPMA potential for studies on the distribution of major and trace elements in source rocks. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Predicting hydrocarbon potential of an earth formation underlying water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damaison, G.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the on-site collection and examination of small concentrations of a carbonaceous gas, e.g. methane, dissolved in a body of water overlying an earth formation to predict hydrocarbon potential of the earth formation under the body of water, the formation being a source of carbonaceous gas, comprises at a known geographic location sampling the water at a selected flow rate and at a selected depth; continuously vacuum separating the water into liquid and gas phases; separating a selected carbonaceous gas from interfering gas species in the presence of an air carrier vented to atmosphere at a known flow rate; and quantitatively oxidizing the selected gas and then cryogenically trapping an oxidant thereof in the presence of said air carrier to provide for an accurate isotopic examination. (author)

  17. Experimental Study of Damage Development in Salt Rock under Uniaxial Stress Using Ultrasonic Velocity and Acoustic Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoran Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic waves and acoustic emissions (AE are important technologies to reveal rock damage. However, few studies have simultaneously monitored both types of data in the same experiment because of limitations on the experimental apparatus. In this study, an integrated ultrasonic wave and AE testing device was developed to investigate the deformation characteristics and damage development of salt rock. Fracture experiments under uniaxial compression were carried out on three samples from the Jintan Salt Mine, Jiangsu Province, China. The deformation process can be divided into five stages. In the compression fissure and linear deformation stages, P- and S-waves rose slightly to stability, and acoustic emission activity was weak (0.04% and 2.66%, respectively. Subsequently, S-wave velocity slowly declined and AE events become more active, with about 13.8% of the total in the stabilized-growth cracks stage. When the salt rock entered the accelerated-growth cracks stage, AE events increased to 75.27%; with features of an earthquake swarm, the velocities of P- and S-waves began to fall significantly. After the peak stress, salt rock produced only a small number of AE events. The beginning stress of rock damage and dilatancy were about 42–50% and 62–67% of the uniaxial compressive strength, respectively. The ultrasonic wave velocity ratio, Ib-value, and r-value effectively predicted rock failure, but the r-value was superior owing to its sensitivity and ease of measurement.

  18. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 6. Baseline rock properties-shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM36/6 Baseline Rock Properties--Shale, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. The report is a result of a literature survey of the rock properties of shales occurring in the United States. Firstly, data were collected from a wide variety of sources in order to obtain a feel for the range of properties encountered. Secondly, some typical shales were selected for detailed review and these are written up as separate chapters in this report. Owing to the wide variability in lithology and properties of shales occurring in the United States, it became necessary to focus the study on consolidated illite shales. Using the specific information already generated, a consistent set of intact properties for a typical, consolidated illite shale was obtained. Correction factors, largely based on geological considerations, were then applied to the intact data in order to yield typical rock mass properties for this type of shale. Lastly, excavation problems in shale formations were reviewed and three tunnel jobs were written up as case histories

  19. An experimental study of velocities under pressure for ancient oceanic rocks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.

    Seismic velocities of Indus suture rock types from Dras-Sanko-Kargil, Kashmir Himalaya, as a function of pressure up to 10 kbar were studied. The high-pressure measurements on the rocks reflect the depthwise increase in velocity, and in general...

  20. Carbonate rock depositional models: A microfacies approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzi, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonate rocks contain more than 50% by weight carbonate minerals such as calcite, dolomite, and siderite. Understanding how these rocks form can lead to more efficient methods of petroleum exploration. Micofacies analysis techniques can be used as a method of predicting models of sedimentation for carbonate rocks. Micofacies in carbonate rocks can be seen clearly only in thin sections under a microscope. This section analysis of carbonate rocks is a tool that can be used to understand depositional environments, diagenetic evolution of carbonate rocks, and the formation of porosity and permeability in carbonate rocks. The use of micofacies analysis techniques is applied to understanding the origin and formation of carbonate ramps, carbonate platforms, and carbonate slopes and basins. This book will be of interest to students and professionals concerned with the disciplines of sedimentary petrology, sedimentology, petroleum geology, and palentology.

  1. Geological assessment of crystalline rock formations with a view to radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Field work has been concentrated at the Altnabreac Research Site on north-east Scotland, where three deep boreholes to approximately 300 m and 24 shallow boreholes to approximately 40 m were drilled. The movement of groundwater within 300 m of the surface was investigated using a specially developed straddle packer system. Geochemical studies have demonstrated that most groundwater is dominated by recent recharge but one borehole yielded water with an age of around 10 4 years. Geophysical borehole logging has shown that the full wave train sonic logs and the acoustic logs show most promise for the assessment of crystalline rocks. In the laboratory the interaction of rocks and groundwater at the temperature/pressure conditions to be expected in a repository has established the geochemical environment to which waste canisters and backfill materials would be subjected. Other generic studies reported include the characterization of geotechnical properties of rocks at elevated temperatures and pressures, the development of a new cross-hole sinusoidal pressure test for the measurement of hydraulic properties and the use of thermal infra-red imagery to detect groundwater discharge zones

  2. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  3. Endocannabinoids control platelet activation and limit aggregate formation under flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina De Angelis

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function.Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo.We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa.Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function may prove beneficial in the search

  4. Endocannabinoids control platelet activation and limit aggregate formation under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function may prove beneficial in the search for new

  5. Iodide behaviour in hard clay rocks under controlled physico-chemical conditions at different concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasca, B.; Savoye, S.; Wittebroodt, C.; Leupin, O.X.; Descostes, M.; Grenut, B.; Meier, P.; Michelot, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. With a half-life of 1.6 10 7 years, its high mobility and its potential to accumulate in the biosphere, iodine-129 is considered, from safety assessment calculations for radioactive waste repositories, to be one of the main radiological dose contributors. Based on the findings of previous studies, iodide, especially at low concentrations, seems to be migrating at a slower rate in clay rock than Cl-36. The cause of this retardation regarding the diffusion of iodide versus chloride is not yet understood but several hypotheses are point towards sorption on natural organic matter (NOM), pyrite or redox reactions. Oxidation of iodide would form IO 3 - which is known to have a higher sorption affinity on several soils and sediment samples than iodide. The present project aims at exploring the effect on the iodide behaviour of two parameters: (i) the initial concentration of iodide and (ii) the amount of NOM contained in the argillite samples. Such an investigation is carried out on Tournemire argillite by means of both batch and through-diffusion experiments. The main challenge is to exclude as much as possible the occurrence of any experimental artefact that could induce iodide uptake (oxygen contamination, dissolution/precipitation of carbonate phases). Regarding redox conditions and rock equilibrium, all the experiments were carried out under physico-chemical conditions as close as possible to those prevailing in field. Using a glove box with an atmosphere of N 2 /CO 2 (respectively 99.6% and 0.4%), we preserved the experiments from oxygen and maintained the calculated in-situ carbonate equilibrium. At first, four through-diffusion experiments with the non-sorbing tracers HTO and Cl-36 were performed to allow the diffusive parameters of each sample to be defined. Afterwards, iodide was injected in the diffusion cells at four different concentrations (10 -6 M to 10 -3 M). Thus, the comparison of the incoming fluxes of

  6. Candida albicans survival and biofilm formation under starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Y; Hu, X; Ling, J; Du, Y; Liu, J; Liu, H; Peng, Z

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the survival and biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans in starvation and under anaerobic conditions. Candida albicans growth and survival were monitored in vitro for up to 8 months. Fungal suspensions from late exponential, stationary and starvation phases were incubated on human dentine, polystyrene and glass slides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the process of biofilm formation. 2,3-bis(2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) reduction assay was performed to quantify the biofilm formation capability, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study and make semi-quantitative comparisons of the ultrastructure of biofilms formed on human dentine. 'XTT bioactivity' and 'COMSTAT results' were analysed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and one-way ANOVA, respectively. Candida albicans survived for over six months. SEM demonstrated that starving C. albicans produced mature biofilms on different substrata. C. albicans of the same growth phase incubated on human dentine displayed significantly higher biofilm formation capability than on polystyrene or glass slides (P roughness coefficient and surface/volume ratio (P < 0.05). Candida albicans cells can survive and form biofilms in anaerobic and nutrient-limited conditions and may pose a treatment challenge. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  7. Detection and cultivation of indigenous microorganisms in Mesozoic claystone core samples from the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mont Terri Rock Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauclaire, L.; McKenzie, J. A.; Schwyn, B.; Bossart, P.

    Although microorganisms have been isolated from various deep-subsurface environments, the persistence of microbial activity in claystones buried to great depths and on geological time scales has been poorly studied. The presence of in-situ microbial life in the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mesozoic claystone, 170 million years old) at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Canton Jura, Switzerland was investigated. Opalinus Clay is a host rock candidate for a radioactive waste repository. Particle tracer tests demonstrated the uncontaminated nature of the cored samples, showing their suitability for microbiological investigations. To determine whether microorganisms are a consistent and characteristic component of the Opalinus Clay Formation, two approaches were used: (i) the cultivation of indigenous micoorganisms focusing mainly on the cultivation of sulfate-reducing bacteria, and (ii) the direct detection of molecular biomarkers of bacteria. The goal of the first set of experiments was to assess the presence of cultivable microorganisms within the Opalinus Clay Formation. After few months of incubation, the number of cell ranged from 0.1 to 2 × 10 3 cells ml -1 media. The microorganisms were actively growing as confirmed by the observation of dividing cells, and detection of traces of sulfide. To avoid cultivation bias, quantification of molecular biomarkers (phospholipid fatty acids) was used to assess the presence of autochthonous microorganisms. These molecules are good indicators of the presence of living cells. The Opalinus Clay contained on average 64 ng of PLFA g -1 dry claystone. The detected microbial community comprises mainly Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria as indicated by the ratio of iso/anteiso phospholipids (about 2) and the detection of large amount of β-hydroxy substituted fatty acids. The PLFA composition reveals the presence of specific functional groups of microorganisms in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus, and

  8. Methyl Iodide Formation Under Postulated Nuclear Reactor Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, J.F.; Barnes, R.H.

    1968-01-01

    The formation of methyl iodide under conditions of postulated nuclear reactor accidents is discussed. Although thermodynamic calculations indicate the equilibrium methyl iodide concentrations would be quite low, calculations based on a simple kinetic scheme involving reaction between small hydrocarbon species and iodine indicate that concentrations higher than equilibrium can occur during the course of the reaction. Such calculations were performed over a wide range of initial species concentrations and a range of temperatures representative of some reactor accident situations. These calculations suggest that little methyl iodide would be expected within the core volume where temperatures are maximum. As the gas leaves the core volume and expands into the plenum region, it cools and the concentration of methyl iodide increases. At the intermediate temperatures which might characterize this region, the formation of methyl iodide from thermally induced reactions could reach its maximum rate. The gas continues to cool, however, and it is probable that by the time it leaves the plenum region it has cooled to the point where thermally induced reactions may be of little importance. Although the thermally induced reactions will become slower as the gas expands and cools, the radiation-induced reactions will not be slowed to the same extent. The gases leaving the core carry fission products and hence a radiation source is available to initiate reaction by a temperature-independent process. An investigation of the radiation chemical formation and decomposition of methyl iodide in the presence of steam suggests that radiation-induced methyl iodide formation will generally be rapid under the postulated accident situations. Thus, in the plenum region where thermal reactions have become slow, the radiation-induced reaction can still proceed and may well become the dominant factor. The same situation probably pertains as well to the containment region. (author)

  9. Strength criterion for rocks under compressive-tensile stresses and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqing You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating in-situ stress with hydraulic borehole fracturing involves tensile strength of rock. Several strength criteria with three parameters result in tensile strengths with great differences, although they may describe the relation between strength of rock and confining pressure with low misfits. The exponential criterion provides acceptable magnitudes of tensile strengths for granites and over-estimates that for other rocks, but the criterion with tension cut-off is applicable to all rocks. The breakdown pressure will be lower than the shut-in pressure during hydraulic borehole fracturing, when the maximum horizontal principal stress is 2 times larger than the minor one; and it is not the peak value in the first cycle, but the point where the slope of pressure-time curve begins to decline.

  10. Numerical modeling of rock fracture and fragmentation under impact loading using discrete element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enan Chi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fracture and fragmentation of rock materials are basic and important problem in geomechanics and blasting engineering. An approach, which can simulate the process of fracture and fragmentation of rock materials, is introduced in this work. A beam–particle model is first introduced in the frame of the discrete element method. In the beam–particle model, the neighboring elements are connected by beams. Consequently, a beam network is formed in the particle system. The strength characteristics of rock materials are reflected by the beam network. The strength criterion was then built to verify whether a beam exists or not. The process of rock fracture and fragmentation is described by the gradual disappearance of beams. Finally, two cases were presented to indicate the validity of the method proposed in this work.

  11. Performance of concrete backfilling materials for shafts and tunnels in rock formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, G.; Mistry, N.; Galliara, J.

    1985-10-01

    This report (Part 2) describes the mathematical modelling studies carried out within a research project into the performance of concrete backfilling materials for shafts and tunnels comprising a hard rock geological disposal repository for High Level, Heat Generating Wastes (HLW/HGW) or Intermediate Level Wastes (ILW) with long lived isotopes. A complementary volume (Part 1) describes laboratory research studies into the development, manufacture and testing of a pre-placed aggregate concrete (PAC). The ongoing objective is to demonstrate that concrete will serve as a beneficial engineered barrier, part of a multi-barrier system, in isolating potentially harmful radionuclides from the biosphere. The report recognises that the backfill cannot be considered in isolation and that there are many interactions between the primary repository elements of host rock, waste and backfill. The interactions considered include mechanical, thermal, creep and moisture movement. Analyses were carried out using the ADINA finite element system, by programmed analytical formulae and using the TEMPOR program (for thermally driven moisture migration in concrete). The emphasis has been directed at establishing basic mathematical approaches to the understanding and quantification of the phenomena involved and applying them to simplified and idealised repository scenarios. The methods devised lay foundations for future work on more defined disposal scenarios. (author)

  12. Litho- and biostratigraphy of the Opalinus Clay and bounding formations in the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostettler, B. [Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Reisdorf, A. G. [Geologisch-Paläontologisches InstitutUniversität Basle, Basle (Switzerland); Jaeggi, D. [Swisstopo, Federal Office of Topography, Wabern (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-15

    A 250 m-deep inclined well, the Mont Terri BDB-1, was drilled through the Jurassic Opalinus Clay and its bounding formations at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (NW Switzerland). For the first time, a continuous section from (oldest to youngest) the topmost members of the Staffelegg Formation to the basal layers of the Hauptrogenstein Formation is now available in the Mont Terri area. We extensively studied the drill core for lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy, drawing upon three sections from the Mont Terri area. The macropaleontological, micropaleontological, and palynostratigraphical data are complementary, not only spatially but they also cover almost all biozones from the Late Toarcian to the Early Bajocian. We ran a suite of geophysical logs to determine formational and intraformational boundaries based on clay content in the BDB-1 well. In the framework of an interdisciplinary study, analysis of the above-mentioned formations permitted us to process and derive new and substantial data for the Mont Terri area in a straightforward way. Some parts of the lithologic inventory, stratigraphic architecture, thickness variations, and biostratigraphic classification of the studied formations deviate considerably from occurrences in northern Switzerland that crop out further to the east. For instance, with the exception of the Sissach Member, no further lithostratigraphic subdivision in members is proposed for the Passwang Formation. Also noteworthy is that the ca. 130 m-thick Opalinus Clay in the BDB-1 core is 20 m thinner than that equivalent section found in the Mont Terri tunnel. The lowermost 38 m of the Opalinus Clay can be attributed chronostratigraphically solely to the Aalensis Zone (Late Toarcian). Deposition of the Opalinus Clay began at the same time farther east in northern Switzerland (Aalensis Subzone, Aalensis Zone), but in the Mont Terri area the sedimentation rate was two or three orders of magnitude higher. (authors)

  13. Processes involved in the formation of magnesian-suite plutonic rocks from the highlands of the Earth's Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Halliday, Alex N.

    1995-01-01

    The earliest evolution of the Moon likely included the formation of a magma ocean and the subsequent development of anorthositic flotation cumulates. This primary anorthositic crust was then intruded by mafic magmas which crystallized to form the lunar highlands magnesian suite. The present study is a compilation of petrologic, mineral-chemical, and geochemical information on all pristine magnesian-suite plutonic rocks and the interpretation of this data in light of 18 'new' samples. Of these 18 clasts taken from Apollo 14 breccias, 12 are probably pristine and include four dunites, two norites, four troctolites, and two anorthosites. Radiogenic isotopic whole rock data also are reported for one of the 'probably pristine' anorthositic troctolites, sample 14303,347. The relatively low Rb content and high Sm and Nd abundances of 14303,347 suggest that this cumulate rock was derived from a parental magma which had these chemical characteristics. Trace element, isotopic, and mineral-chemical data are used to interpret the total highlands magnesian suite as crustal precipitates of a primitive KREEP (possessing a K-, rare earth element (REE)-, and P-enriched chemical signature) basalt magma. This KREEP basalt was created by the mixing of ascending ultramafic melts from the lunar interior with urKREEP (the late, K-, REE-, and P-enriched residuum of the lunar magma ocean). A few samples of the magnesian suite with extremely elevated large-ion lithophile elements (5-10x other magnesian-suite rocks) cannot be explained by this model or any other model of autometasomatism, equilibrium crystallization, or 'local melt-pocket equilibrium' without recourse to an extremely large-ion lithophile element-enriched parent liquid. It is difficult to generate parental liquids which are 2-4 x higher in the REE than average lunar KREEP, unless the liquids are the basic complement of a liquid-liquid pair, i.e., the so-called 'REEP-fraction,' from the silicate liquid immiscibility of ur

  14. Numerical Study on Dynamic Response of a Horizontal Layered-Structure Rock Slope under a Normally Incident Sv Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifa Zhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several post-earthquake investigations have indicated that the slope structure plays a leading role in the stability of rock slopes under dynamic loads. In this paper, the dynamic response of a horizontal layered-structure rock slope under harmonic Sv wave is studied by making use of the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua method (FLAC. The suitability of FLAC for studying wave transmission across rock joints is validated through comparison with analytical solutions. After parametric studies on Sv wave transmission across the horizontal layered-structure rock slope, it is found that the acceleration amplification coefficient η, which is defined as the ratio of the acceleration at the monitoring point to the value at the toe, wavily increases with an increase of the height along the slope surface. Meanwhile, the fluctuation weakens with normalized joint stiffness K increasing and enhances with normalized joint spacing ξ increasing. The acceleration amplification coefficient of the slope crest ηcrest does not monotonously increase with the increase of ξ, but decreases with the increase of K. Additionally, ηcrest is more sensitive to ξ compared to K. From the contour figures, it can also be found that the contour figures of η take on rhythm, and the effects of ξ on the acceleration amplification coefficient are more obvious compared to the effects on K.

  15. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, Seth R.; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Adcock, Christopher T.; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L. (CIW); (UNLV); (CIT); (SBU)

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg2+. Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  16. Geohydrology of the climax stock granite and surrounding rock formations, NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.A.

    1981-05-01

    The location of the water table and the degree of saturation of the granitic rocks in the Climax stock are presently unknown. Based on existing knowledge and an extrapolation of available geohydrologic data, it appears that the water table may lie at about 1100 to 1200 m above mean sea level (MSL) in the northeastern part of the stock and at about 800 to 900 m in the southwest. A drilling program would be required to establish these levels precisely. The degree of saturation at a given underground elevation may be approximated by a detailed inventory of seeps at that level. More precise determination of degree of saturation will require a water budet. 27 figures, 2 tables

  17. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Rock removal under gas pipeline with expanded cement technique and repair with composite sleeve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Filho, Byron Goncalves de; Frota, Cristiane Souto [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Matsuo, Fabio Massatoshi Ferreira [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil (TBG), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Amid the great challenges of transporting natural gas to the major cities in Brazil, TBG (Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil), which owns and operates the largest pipeline in Latin America, with a length of approximately 2,600 km of pipelines (from 32 inches o 16 inches), built between 1998 and 2000 and started commercial operation in July 1999. During its maintenance inspection, using geometric pigs and pigs MFL / Inertial, located a dent in the pipe with approximately 4.7% of deformation with dimensions of 670 mm x 600 mm, caused by accommodation of the pipeline on a rock about 5 m of width. With the pipeline in operation and and 10% lowering the historic pressure, as the internal procedure of the TBG, the rock was removed using the technique of expansive cement, which is to perforate several roles on the rock and then apply the expansive cement which after 24 hours cause cracks, splitting the rock into slabs. The visual, ultrasonic and liquid penetrant inspections were made and repair with sleeve of composite material was achieved. This paper describes the whole methodology and experience of execution, including the results of inspection with pig, removal of the rock with the expansive cement, execution of repair and report photography. (author)

  19. A Cyclic Dissolution Test for Understanding Water Quality of Effluent from Rock Muck under Rain Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakoshi, T.; Kawagoe, T.; Ohta, T.

    2017-12-01

    Effluent from rock muck piles consisting of waste rock, as a by-product of construction, sometimes contains heavy metals that affects human health and environment. Rain is the key to estimate water quality of the effluent because infiltrated rain to piles reacts with minerals of rocks. Thus, we newly proposed a dissolution test, namely cyclic injection test, considering rain events, as the following steps: Firstly, we crushed rock sample to particles of size of between 2 and 20 mm, and filled them into the column with 54 mm in diameter and 300 mm in length. Secondly, we saturated void in the column with pure water. One hour after, we opened a valve of the bottom of the column, and collected effluent. Thirdly, we preserved the column for 14 days. After then, we injected 200 ml of pure water from the top of the column within about 15 minutes, and collected efflent. We repeated injection of pure water every 14 days. We conducted the cyclic injection test for altered volcanic rock sample, and observed that the effluent just after the injection showed highest concentration. This result indicated that dissolved chemicals were released from minerals to capillary water after an injection, and advected outside of the column at the next injection.

  20. Evaluation of Spalling Fallout on Excavation Disturbed Zone under Deep Hard Rock Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azit, Romziah; Ashraf Mohamaed Ismail, Mohd; You Jiang, Thang

    2017-08-01

    The prediction of compressive stress-induced failures is of concern when designing and constructing facilities in rock for deep underground excavation. The purpose of this study is to model compressive stress-induced failure and fallouts with appropriate material models and strength parameters for deep hard rock tunnel excavation. Three method of numerical modelling are used, which are Generalised Hoek-Brown; Mohr-Coulomb; and Mohr-Coulomb with Cohesion Softening Friction Hardening (CSFH) material models for capturing the observed rock behaviour. A parametric study was also carried out to verify that the peak friction angle of 10° used in CSFH model. The results show that numerical models used only Generalised Hoek-Brown and Mohr Coulomb strength parameters does not show a good agreement with the observed fallout. The comparison revealed that the numerical models using the Mohr-Coulomb with CSFH provides most realistic to the observation fallout length. This model is valid for prediction of failure and fallouts in hard rock masses with high quality (GSI >65 MPa; intact rock compressive strength >70MPa).

  1. Evolution of the Petrophysical and Mineralogical Properties of Two Reservoir Rocks Under Thermodynamic Conditions Relevant for CO2 Geological Storage at 3 km Depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmel, G.; Barlet-Gouedard, V.; Renard, F.

    2010-01-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) underground, for long-term geological storage purposes, is considered as an economically viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. The chemical interactions between supercritical CO 2 and the potential reservoir rock need to be thoroughly investigated under thermodynamic conditions relevant for geological storage. In the present study, 40 samples of Lavoux limestone and Adamswiller sandstone, both collected from reservoir rocks in the Paris basin, were experimentally exposed to CO 2 in laboratory autoclaves specially built to simulate CO 2 -storage-reservoir conditions. The two types of rock were exposed to wet supercritical CO 2 and CO 2 -saturated water for one month, at 28 MPa and 90 C, corresponding to conditions for a burial depth approximating 3 km. The changes in mineralogy and micro-texture of the samples were measured using X-ray diffraction analyses, Raman spectroscopy, scanning-electron microscopy, and energy-dispersion spectroscopy microanalysis. The petrophysical properties were monitored by measuring the weight, density, mechanical properties, permeability, global porosity, and local porosity gradients through the samples. Both rocks maintained their mechanical and mineralogical properties after CO 2 exposure despite an increase of porosity and permeability. Microscopic zones of calcite dissolution observed in the limestone are more likely to be responsible for such increase. In the sandstone, an alteration of the petro-fabric is assumed to have occurred due to clay minerals reacting with CO 2 . All samples of Lavoux limestone and Adamswiller sandstone showed a measurable alteration when immersed either in wet supercritical CO 2 or in CO 2 -saturated water. These batch experiments were performed using distilled water and thus simulate more severe conditions than using formation water (brine). (authors)

  2. Displacement Forecasting Method in Brittle Crack Surrounding Rock Under Excavation Unloading Incorporating Opening Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. J.; Yang, W. M.; Wang, L. G.; Butler, I. B.

    2014-11-01

    Splitting failure, which is recognized as a special engineering geology phenomenon, occurs continually in the brittle rock mass of caverns during underground excavation. In this paper, a splitting model of linear slippage crack groups is built with fracture mechanics, energy analysis, and crack extension theories. Considering intrinsic cracks in rock mass and change of outer stress, intrinsic cracks propagate into macroscopical splitting cracks that are approximately parallel to the side wall of caverns. The splitting criterion of cavern rock mass and the method for predicting displacement in view of splitting opening displacement are proposed. In the end, the forecasting method is applied to the Jinping-I Hydropower Station, underground caverns engineering in China, the splitting failure zone and forecasting displacement are accordant with the monitoring data. The new forecasting displacement method is proven to contribute to the construction of similar underground caverns.

  3. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  4. Numerical study of mechanism of fold formation in a laminated rock

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A set of large deformation experiments are presented to simulate folding pattern at various energy states during formation. In order to numerically simulate this phenomenon, a rectangular layer of shale is generated and compressed at various strain rates. The results reveal the variation in distribution of stress along the ...

  5. Corrosion testing of selected packaging materials for disposal of high-level waste glass in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.; Fiehn, B.; Halm, G.

    1990-05-01

    In previous corrosion studies performed in salt brines, unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 have proved to be the most promising materials for long-term resistant packagings to be used in heat-generating waste (vitrified HLW, spent fuel) disposal in rock-salt formations. To characterise the corrosion behaviour of these materials in more detail, further in-depth laboratory-scale and in-situ corrosion studies have been performed in the present study. Besides the above-mentioned materials, also some in-situ investigations of the iron-base materials Ni-Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron have been carried out in order to complete the results available to date. (orig.) [de

  6. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation using compressional acoustic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for investigating rock formations outside a borehole are provided. The method includes generating a first compressional acoustic wave at a first frequency by a first acoustic source; and generating a second compressional acoustic wave at a second frequency by a second acoustic source. The first and the second acoustic sources are arranged within a localized area of the borehole. The first and the second acoustic waves intersect in an intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving a third shear acoustic wave at a third frequency, the third shear acoustic wave returning to the borehole due to a non-linear mixing process in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume at a receiver arranged in the borehole. The third frequency is equal to a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency.

  7. Choosing the function of mechanical properties of grounds and rock formations due to their heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, Irina; Agakhanov, Murad

    2018-03-01

    The development of computing techniques to analyze underground structures, buildings in high-rise construction that would fully take account of the conditions of their design and operation, as well as the real material properties, is one of the important trends in structural mechanics. For the territory in high-rise construction it is necessary to monitor the deformations of the soil surface. When high-rise construction is recommended to take into account the rheological properties and temperature deformations of the soil, the effect of temperature on the mechanical characteristics of the surrounding massif. Similar tasks also arise in the creation and operation of underground parts of high-rise construction, which are used for various purposes. These parts of the structures are surrounded by rock massifs of various materials. The actual mechanical characteristics of such materials must be taken into account. The objective property of nearly all materials is their non-homogeneity, both natural and technological. The work addresses the matters of building nonhomogeneous media initial models based on the experimental evidence. This made it possible to approximate real dependencies and obtain the appropriate functions in a simple and convenient way.

  8. Mass transport in low permeability rocks under the influence of coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1984-10-01

    The present paper gives a general overview of mass transport in low permeability rocks under the coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects associated with a nuclear waste repository. A classification of coupled processes is given. Then an ess is presented. example of a coupled process is presented. Discussions of coupled processes based on a recent LBL Panel meeting are summarized. 5 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  9. Statistical Characterization of the Mechanical Parameters of Intact Rock Under Triaxial Compression: An Experimental Proof of the Jinping Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhong, Shan; Cui, Jie; Feng, Xia-Ting; Song, Leibo

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the statistical characteristics and probability distribution of the mechanical parameters of natural rock using triaxial compression tests. Twenty cores of Jinping marble were tested under each different levels of confining stress (i.e., 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 MPa). From these full stress-strain data, we summarized the numerical characteristics and determined the probability distribution form of several important mechanical parameters, including deformational parameters, characteristic strength, characteristic strains, and failure angle. The statistical proofs relating to the mechanical parameters of rock presented new information about the marble's probabilistic distribution characteristics. The normal and log-normal distributions were appropriate for describing random strengths of rock; the coefficients of variation of the peak strengths had no relationship to the confining stress; the only acceptable random distribution for both Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio was the log-normal function; and the cohesive strength had a different probability distribution pattern than the frictional angle. The triaxial tests and statistical analysis also provided experimental evidence for deciding the minimum reliable number of experimental sample and for picking appropriate parameter distributions to use in reliability calculations for rock engineering.

  10. Experimental Study on Mechanical and Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Rock-Like Material Under Non-uniformly Distributed Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Wen, Zhijie; Jiang, Yujing; Huang, Hao

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical and acoustic emission characteristics of rock-like materials under non-uniform loads were investigated by means of a self-developed mining-induced stress testing system and acoustic emission monitoring system. In the experiments, the specimens were divided into three regions and different initial vertical stresses and stress loading rates were used to simulate different mining conditions. The mechanical and acoustic emission characteristics between regions were compared, and the effects of different initial vertical stresses and different stress loading rates were analysed. The results showed that the mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of rock-like materials can be notably localized. When the initial vertical stress and stress loading rate are fixed, the peak strength of region B is approximately two times that of region A, and the maximum acoustic emission hit value of region A is approximately 1-2 times that of region B. The effects of the initial vertical stress and stress loading rate on the peck strain, maximum hit value, and occurrence time of the maximum hit are similar in that when either of the former increase, the latter all decrease. However, peck strength will increase with the increase in loading rate and decrease with the increase in initial vertical stress. The acoustic emission hits can be used to analyse the damage in rock material, but the number of acoustic emission hits cannot be used alone to determine the degree of rock damage directly.

  11. The first stars: formation under cosmic ray feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Jacob A.; Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2016-08-01

    We explore the impact of a cosmic ray (CR) background generated by supernova explosions from the first stars on star-forming metal-free gas in a minihalo at z ˜ 25. Starting from cosmological initial conditions, we use the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-2 to follow gas collapsing under the influence of a CR background up to densities of n = 1012 cm-3, at which point we form sink particles. Using a suite of simulations with two sets of initial conditions and employing a range of CR background models, we follow each simulation for 5000 yr after the first sink forms. CRs both heat and ionize the gas, boosting H2 formation. Additional H2 enhances the cooling efficiency of the gas, allowing it to fulfil the Rees-Ostriker criterion sooner and expediting the collapse, such that each simulation reaches high densities at a different epoch. As it exits the loitering phase, the thermodynamic path of the collapsing gas converges to that seen in the absence of any CR background. By the time the gas approaches sink formation densities, the thermodynamic state of the gas is thus remarkably similar across all simulations. This leads to a robust characteristic mass that is largely independent of the CR background, of order ˜ a few × 10 M⊙ even as the CR background strength varies by five orders of magnitude.

  12. Wave-flume experiments of soft-rock cliff erosion under monochromatic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regard, Vincent; Astruc, Dominique; Caplain, Bastien

    2017-04-01

    We investigate how cliffs erode under wave attack. Rocky coast erosion works through cycles, each one corresponding to three successive phases: (i) notch creation at cliff toe by mechanical action of waves, (ii) cliff fracturation leading to collapse, and (iii) evacuation of scree aprons by waves and currents. We performed experiments in a 5m x 14cm x 25cm wave flume (15 cm water depth) to investigate how waves are eroding a rocky coast. The cliff is made of wet sand and models a relatively soft rock. We used 3 different grain size (D50 = 0.28-0.41-0.48 mm), changing the cliff rheology. Waves are monochromatic; their height and period differ for the various experiments. Actual wave parameters are estimated by capacitive probes located offshore. The experiments are monitored by two video cameras both on the side and above the flume. Pictures are taken at a rate of 1Hz during the first 4h and then the rate is decreased to 0.1Hz till the end of experiment (about 1 day). The monitoring ensure a confident characterization of experiments in terms of waves (surf similarity parameter ξ and the incident wave energy flux F) and in terms of sediment (Dean number Ω and Shields number θb at breakers). Experiments begin by an initial phase of quick cliff retreat. Then the system evolves with slower cliff retreat. We focus on bottom morphology which we characterize in function of wave forcing (ξ, F). We show that the bottom morphology mainly depends on ξ. For our reference sediment (Dm = 0.41 mm), we observed: (i) surging breakers on a steep terrace (type T1) for ξ > 0.65; (ii)collapsing breakers on a bared profile attached to the inner platform (type T2) for 0.55< ξ <0.6; (iii) spilling breakers on gentle terrace (type T3) for F < 1.3 W/m and 0.55< ξ <0.6. Another bottom morphology, type T4, displays two sub-systems, an outer system with a double-bar profile where breaking waves are plunging, and an inner system with a T1, T2 or T3 profile. Some of these bottom

  13. Experiments on rocks under high pressure conditions in GTA 20-32 triaxial press

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláček, J.; Kožušníková, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2012), s. 9-16 ISSN 1802-5420 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : triaxial stress * deformation * rocks Subject RIV: DH - Mining, incl. Coal Mining http://gse.vsb.cz/2012/LVIII-2012-1-09-16.pdf

  14. Theoretical and numerical studies of crack initiation and propagation in rock masses under freezing pressure and far-field stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshui Kang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Water-bearing rocks exposed to freezing temperature can be subjected to freeze–thaw cycles leading to crack initiation and propagation, which are the main causes of frost damage to rocks. Based on the Griffith theory of brittle fracture mechanics, the crack initiation criterion, propagation direction, and crack length under freezing pressure and far-field stress are analyzed. Furthermore, a calculation method is proposed for the stress intensity factor (SIF of the crack tip under non-uniformly distributed freezing pressure. The formulae for the crack/fracture propagation direction and length of the wing crack under freezing pressure are obtained, and the mechanism for coalescence of adjacent cracks is investigated. In addition, the necessary conditions for different coalescence modes of cracks are studied. Using the topology theory, a new algorithm for frost crack propagation is proposed, which has the capability to define the crack growth path and identify and update the cracked elements. A model that incorporates multiple cracks is built by ANSYS and then imported into FLAC3D. The SIFs are then calculated using a FISH procedure, and the growth path of the freezing cracks after several calculation steps is demonstrated using the new algorithm. The proposed method can be applied to rocks containing fillings such as detritus and slurry.

  15. Grains of Nonferrous and Noble Metals in Iron-Manganese Formations and Igneous Rocks of Submarine Elevations of the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnik, O. N.; Astakhova, N. V.

    2018-01-01

    Iron-manganese formations and igneous rocks of submarine elevations in the Sea of Japan contain overlapping mineral phases (grains) with quite identical morphology, localization, and chemical composition. Most of the grains conform to oxides, intermetallic compounds, native elements, sulfides, and sulfates in terms of the set of nonferrous, noble, and certain other metals (Cu, Zn, Sn, Pb, Ni, Mo, Ag, Pd, and Pt). The main conclusion that postvolcanic hydrothermal fluids are the key sources of metals is based upon a comparison of the data of electron microprobe analysis of iron-manganese formations and igneous rocks dredged at the same submarine elevations in the Sea of Japan.

  16. Study of a scenario with sealing failure at a disposal site in a crystalline rock formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, D.; Durin, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study of the sealing defect scenario is part of the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories in geological formations. It implies the determination of the minimum properties of access shafts, galleries and storage wells allowing to insure the efficiency of the geological barrier and to analyze the phenomena which would lead to a reduction of their performances or their deterioration. This communication presents the approach which has been followed and the first results concerning the optimum positioning of seals. 9 figs [fr

  17. micro-mechanical experimental investigation and modelling of strain and damage of argillaceous rocks under combined hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The hydro-mechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks, which are possible host rocks for underground radioactive nuclear waste storage, is investigated by means of micro-mechanical experimental investigations and modellings. Strain fields at the micrometric scale of the composite structure of this rock, are measured by the combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy, in situ testing and digital image correlation technique. The evolution of argillaceous rocks under pure hydric loading is first investigated. The strain field is strongly heterogeneous and manifests anisotropy. The observed nonlinear deformation at high relative humidity (RH) is related not only to damage, but also to the nonlinear swelling of the clay mineral itself, controlled by different local mechanisms depending on RH. Irreversible deformations are observed during hydric cycles, as well as a network of microcracks located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the inclusion-matrix interface. Second, the local deformation field of the material under combined hydric and mechanical loadings is quantified. Three types of deformation bands are evidenced under mechanical loading, either normal to stress direction (compaction), parallel (microcracking) or inclined (shear). Moreover, they are strongly controlled by the water content of the material: shear bands are in particular prone to appear at high RH states. In view of understanding the mechanical interactions a local scale, the material is modeled as a composite made of non-swelling elastic inclusions embedded in an elastic swelling clay matrix. The internal stress field induced by swelling strain incompatibilities between inclusions and matrix, as well as the overall deformation, is numerically computed at equilibrium but also during the transient stage associated with a moisture gradient. An analytical micro-mechanical model based on Eshelby's solution is proposed. In addition, 2D finite element computations are performed. Results

  18. Mixtures of Silica and Disulfide Rocks Can Explain the Coeval Formation of Mineral Sequences on a Cold and Wet Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairén, A. G.; Mateo, E.; Gago-Duport, L.; Losa-Adams, E.; Chevrier, V.; Gil-Lozano, C.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of Mg-Fe-phyllosilicate, carbonate and sulfate bearing rocks on Mars is consistent with a wide variety of aqueous environments ―from alkaline-neutral to acidic waters― existing in the past, which are usually explained assuming the existence of subsurface hydrothermal environments and a drastic climate change early on Mars' history. Here we present aqueous alteration experiments on different olivine and pyrite powdered mixtures, prepared by weight to analyze their weathering products under early Mars surface conditions: a CO2 atmosphere (PCO2 = 0.5 bar), low temperature (i.e., not hydrothermal conditions, <20º C), low fluid-to-rock ratio ( 10), and UV irradiation, recreating the geological setting of surface ponded water, to discuss the effect that the host-rock composition could have on the resulting mineral assemblage. We used mechanically active pyrite as the source of sulfur because it's ability to produce both acidic and oxidizing conditions through aqueous alteration without the addition of an external oxidizing agent. Consequently, pyrite is able to promoting the formation of iron hydroxides and sulfates even in oxygen limited conditions. In addition, we analyze the stability of the surface products after UV irradiation inside a simulation Planetary Atmosphere and Surface Chamber (PASC) at CAB. Preliminary results (time of aqueous reaction: 42 days, plus 5 days until total water evaporation) show appreciable differences in the altered samples, mostly related to sulfate and carbonate compounds. As the pyrite content increased, the most acidic and oxidizing conditions of the leaching solution caused the increase of the rate of olivine dissolution, modifying the formation pathways of secondary products. These results suggest that some of the alteration products identified on Mars could have formed on the surface coevally, without the necessity to invoke subsurface hydrothermalism, abrupt atmospheric changes or long periods of warming on early

  19. Measurements of the Suitability of Large Rock Salt Formations for Radio Detection of High-Energy Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odian, Allen C.

    2001-09-14

    We have investigated the possibility that large rock salt formations might be suitable as target masses for detection of neutrinos of energies about 10 PeV and above. In neutrino interactions at these energies, the secondary electromagnetic cascade produces a coherent radio pulse well above ambient thermal noise via the Askaryan effect. We describe measurements of radio-frequency attenuation lengths and ambient thermal noise in two salt formations. Measurements in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in an evaporite salt bed in Carlsbad, NM yielded short attenuation lengths, 3-7 m over 150-300 MHz. However, measurements at United Salt's Hockley mine, located in a salt dome near Houston, Texas yielded attenuation lengths in excess of 250 m at similar frequencies. We have also analyzed early ground-penetrating radar data at Hockley mine and have found additional evidence for attenuation lengths in excess of several hundred meters at 440 MHz. We conclude that salt domes, which may individually contain several hundred cubic kilometer water-equivalent mass, provide attractive sites for next-generation high-energy neutrino detectors.

  20. Measurements of the suitability of large rock salt formations for radio detection of high-energy neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorham, Peter; Saltzberg, David; Odian, Allen; Williams, Dawn; Besson, David; Frichter, George; Tantawi, Sami

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that large rock salt formations might be suitable as target masses for detection of neutrinos of energies about 10 PeV and above. In neutrino interactions at these energies, the secondary electromagnetic cascade produces a coherent radio pulse well above ambient thermal noise via the Askaryan effect. We describe measurements of radio-frequency attenuation lengths and ambient thermal noise in two salt formations. Measurements in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, located in an evaporite salt bed in Carlsbad, NM yielded short attenuation lengths, 3-7 m over 150-300 MHz. However, measurements at United Salt's Hockley mine, located in a salt dome near Houston, Texas yielded attenuation lengths in excess of 250 m at similar frequencies. We have also analyzed early ground-penetrating radar data at Hockley mine and have found additional evidence for attenuation lengths in excess of several hundred meters at 440 MHz. We conclude that salt domes, which may individually contain several hundred cubic kilometer water-equivalent mass, provide attractive sites for next-generation high-energy neutrino detectors

  1. Shales in the Qiongzhusi and Wufeng-Longmaxi Formations: a rock-physics model and analysis of the effective pore aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Qiang; He, Tao; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2017-09-01

    The shales of the Qiongzhusi Formation and Wufeng-Longmaxi Formations at Sichuan Basin and surrounding areas are presently the most important stratigraphic horizons for shale gas exploration and development in China. However, the regional characteristics of the seismic elastic properties need to be better determined. The ultrasonic velocities of shale samples were measured under dry conditions and the relations between elastic properties and petrology were systemically analyzed. The results suggest that 1) the effective porosity is positively correlated with clay content but negatively correlated with brittle minerals, 2) the dry shale matrix consists of clays, quartz, feldspars, and carbonates, and 3) organic matter and pyrite are in the pore spaces, weakly coupled with the shale matrix. Thus, by assuming that all connected pores are only present in the clay minerals and using the Gassmann substitution method to calculate the elastic effect of organic matter and pyrite in the pores, a relatively simple rock-physics model was constructed by combining the self-consistent approximation (SCA), the differential effective medium (DEM), and Gassmann's equation. In addition, the effective pore aspect ratio was adopted from the sample averages or estimated from the carbonate content. The proposed model was used to predict the P-wave velocities and generally matched the ultrasonic measurements very well.

  2. Mechanical Behavior of 3D Crack Growth in Transparent Rock-Like Material Containing Preexisting Flaws under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu-Dan Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behavior of 3D crack propagation and coalescence is investigated in rock-like material under uniaxial compression. A new transparent rock-like material is developed and a series of uniaxial compressive tests on low temperature transparent resin materials with preexisting 3D flaws are performed in laboratory, with changing values of bridge angle β (inclination between the inner tips of the two preexisting flaws of preexisting flaws in specimens. Furthermore, a theoretical peak strength prediction of 3D cracks coalescence is given. The results show that the coalescence modes of the specimens are varying according to different bridge angles. And the theoretical peak strength prediction agrees well with the experimental observation.

  3. Radioactivity of rocks from the geological formations belonging to the Tibagi River hydrographic basin; Radioatividade de rochas provenientes das formacoes geologicas pertencentes a bacia hidrografica do Rio Tibagi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2008-07-01

    This work is a study of the {sup 40}K and the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series radioactivity in rocks measured with high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The rocks were taken from the geologic formations in the region of the Tibagi river hydrographic basin. The course of this river cuts through the Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences of the Parana sedimentary basin. In order to take into account the background radiation attenuation by the samples, a technique was developed that eliminated the need to measure a blank sample. The effects of the radiation's self-attenuation in the sample matrix were taken into account by using a gamma ray direct transmission method. The results for 87 rock samples, taken from 14 distinct formations, and their corresponding radioactivity variations are presented and discussed according to the possible geological processes from which they originated. Among the most discussed results are: an outcrop that profiles shale, limestone and rhythmite in the Irati Formation; a sandstone and siltstone sequence from the Rio do Rasto Formation; and a profile sampled in a coal mine located in the Rio Bonito Formation. The calculations of the rocks' contributions to the outdoor gamma radiation dose rate agree with the values presented by other authors for similar rocks. The highest dose values were obtained from felsic rocks (rhyolite of the Castro group, 129.8 {+-} 3.7 nGy.h{sup -1}, and Cunhaporanga granite, 167 {+-} 37 nGy.h{sup -1}). The other highest values correspond to the shale rocks from the Irati Formation (109 {+-} 16 nGy.h{sup -1}) and the siltic shale rocks from the Ponta Grossa Formation (107.9 {+-} 0.7 nGy.h{sup -1}). The most recent geological formations presented the lowest dose values (e.g. the Botucatu sandstone, 3.3 {+-} 0.6 nGy.h{sup -1}). The average value for sedimentary rocks from seven other formations is equal to 59 {+-} 26 nGy.h{sup -1}. The Rio Bonito Formation presented the highest dose value (334

  4. Rock Mass Behavior Under Hydropower Embankment Dams: A Two-Dimensional Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarchuk, A.; Ask, M. V. S.; Dahlström, L.-O.; Nordlund, E.

    2012-09-01

    Sweden has more than 190 large hydropower dams, of which about 50 are pure embankment dams and over 100 are concrete/embankment dams. This paper presents results from conceptual analyses of the response of typical Swedish rock mass to the construction of a hydropower embankment dam and its first stages of operation. The aim is to identify locations and magnitudes of displacements that are occurring in the rock foundation and grout curtain after construction of the dam, the first filling of its water reservoir, and after one seasonal variation of the water table. Coupled hydro-mechanical analysis was conducted using the two-dimensional distinct element program UDEC. Series of the simulations have been performed and the results show that the first filling of the reservoir and variation of water table induce largest magnitudes of displacement, with the greatest values obtained from the two models with high differential horizontal stresses and smallest spacing of sub-vertical fractures. These results may help identifying the condition of the dam foundation and contribute to the development of proper maintenance measures, which guarantee the safety and functionality of the dam. Additionally, newly developed dams may use these results for the estimation of the possible response of the rock foundation to the construction.

  5. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (≤ 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and

  6. PETROGENESIS OF THE METACARBONATE AND RELATED ROCKS OF THE SILGARÁ FORMATION, CENTRAL SANTANDER MASSIF, COLOMBIAN ANDES: AN OVERVIEW OF A “REACTION CALCIC EXOSCARN”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellanos O.M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Metacarbonate rocks (pure and impure marbles, carbonate-silicate rocks, calc-silicate rocks and carbonate-bearing silicate rocks form a very complex group within the metamorphic sequence of the Silgará Formation at the central Santander Massif (CSM. These rocks are interpreted as derived from a sedimentary sequence (including limestones and dolostones, carbonate-bearing mudstones,  sandstones, tuffaceous and evaporitic sediments and marlstones overprinted by near-isochemical regional metamorphism. They usually appear as scarce intercalations from millimeter up to meter scale, within the high-grade pelitic rocks, in the lower part of the metamorphic section, although the proportion of metacarbonate rocks can be higher and different marble layers are exploited. We report for the first time the occurrence of a "reaction calcic exoskarn", which corresponds to
    such metacarbonate rocks, taking into account that a skarn can be developed during regional metamorphism and by different metasomatic processes, adjacent to intrusive bodies, along faults and shear zones, and what defines these rocks as a skarn is its mineralogy, which includes a variety of calc-silicate and associated minerals, usually dominated by garnet and pyroxene. Therefore, this paper focus attention to the occurrence of metacarbonate and
    related rocks, which occurs as small scale reactions zones that show a gradational contact from garnet-bearing pelitic rocks to marbles or carbonate-silicate rocks, giving particular interest to the calc-silicate rocks, which are characterized by the presence of elongated grains of banded clinopyroxene (diopside and scapolite and massive
    or scattered garnet. Several reaction-zones occur in the contact between impure calcite marble and garnet-bearing metapelite and the sequence of mineral assemblages in these reaction zones is: biotite + plagioclase K-feldspar garnet (Zone I, biotite + plagioclase K-feldspar garnet staurolite epidote

  7. Plume trajectory formation under stack tip self-enveloping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, A. M.; Zroichikov, N. A.; Prokhorov, V. B.

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon of stack tip self-enveloping and its influence upon the conditions of plume formation and on the trajectory of its motion are considered. Processes are described occurring in the initial part of the plume while the interaction between vertically directed flue gases outflowing from the stack and a horizontally directed moving air flow at high wind velocities that lead to the formation of a flag-like plume. Conditions responsible for the origin and evolution of interaction between these flows are demonstrated. For the first time, a plume formed under these conditions without bifurcation is registered. A photo image thereof is presented. A scheme for the calculation of the motion of a plume trajectory is proposed, the quantitative characteristics of which are obtained based on field observations. The wind velocity and direction, air temperature, and atmospheric turbulence at the level of the initial part of the trajectory have been obtained based on data obtained from an automatic meteorological system (mounted on the outer parts of a 250 m high stack no. 1 at the Naberezhnye Chelny TEPP plant) as well as based on the results of photographing and theodolite sighting of smoke puffs' trajectory taking into account their velocity within its initial part. The calculation scheme is supplemented with a new acting force—the force of self-enveloping. Based on the comparison of the new calculation scheme with the previous one, a significant contribution of this force to the development of the trajectory is revealed. A comparison of the natural full-scale data with the results of the calculation according to the proposed new scheme is made. The proposed calculation scheme has allowed us to extend the application of the existing technique to the range of high wind velocities. This approach would make it possible to simulate and investigate the trajectory and full rising height of the calculated the length above the mouth of flue-pipes, depending on various modal

  8. Diagenetic and compositional controls of wettability in siliceous sedimentary rocks, Monterey Formation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kristina M.

    Modified imbibition tests were performed on 69 subsurface samples from Monterey Formation reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley to measure wettability variation as a result of composition and silica phase change. Contact angle tests were also performed on 6 chert samples from outcrop and 3 nearly pure mineral samples. Understanding wettability is important because it is a key factor in reservoir fluid distribution and movement, and its significance rises as porosity and permeability decrease and fluid interactions with reservoir grain surface area increase. Although the low permeability siliceous reservoirs of the Monterey Formation are economically important and prolific, a greater understanding of factors that alter their wettability will help better develop them. Imbibition results revealed a strong trend of decreased wettability to oil with increased detrital content in opal-CT phase samples. Opal-A phase samples exhibited less wettability to oil than both opal-CT and quartz phase samples of similar detrital content. Subsurface reservoir samples from 3 oil fields were crushed to eliminate the effect of capillary pressure and cleansed of hydrocarbons to eliminate wettability alterations by asphaltene, then pressed into discs of controlled density. Powder discs were tested for wettability by dispensing a controlled volume of water and motor oil onto the surface and measuring the time required for each fluid to imbibe into the sample. The syringe and software of a CAM101 tensiometer were used to control the amount of fluid dispensed onto each sample, and imbibition completion times were determined by high-speed photography for water drops; oil drop imbibition was significantly slower and imbibition was timed and determined visually. Contact angle of water and oil drops on polished chert and mineral sample surfaces was determined by image analysis and the Young-Laplace equation. Oil imbibition was significantly slower with increased detrital composition and faster

  9. Electrical Tracking Formation on Silane Epoxy Resin under Various Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Rochmadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Contamination at the surface of the insulator becomes a serious problem in power system operation, especially for the tropical area. Humidity and rainfall play an important role in wetness by the water at the surface of the insulator, which result in the presence of contaminant and leakage current flowing at the surface of the insulator. This leakage current will generate heat which occurs at the surface of an insulator, so that dry band area will be formed. This ultimately leads to flashover. This paper presents the influence of contaminants to leakage current and formation of electrical tracking at the surface of epoxy resin compound wit silicon rubber. The test was based on Inclined-Planed Tracking method with NH4Cl as contaminants. The industrial and coastal contaminants are used to explain the effect of contaminant at surface tracking process. The flow rate of contaminant was 0.3 ml/min. The 3.5 kV AC high voltage 50 Hz was applied to the top electrodes. It is found that industrial contamination resulting in the smallest surface leakage current is 327.6 mA. Also it is found that coastal contaminant (1420 mS/cm showed the severest damage at surface of test sample. Therefore, special treatment of the sample are needed under these conditions so that the material performance can be improved, especially against the electrical tracking.

  10. Fracture Evolution Around a Cavity in Brittle Rock Under Uniaxial Compression and Coupled Static-Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lei; Li, Xibing; Taheri, Abbas; Wu, Qiuhong; Xie, Xiaofeng

    2018-02-01

    To experimentally investigate the stability of underground excavations under high in situ stress conditions, several rock samples with a mini-tunnel were prepared and subjected to monotonic axial and coupled static-dynamic loading until failure. Mini-tunnels were generated by drilling circular or cubic cavities in the centre of granite rock blocks. Strain gauges were used to monitor the deformation of the mini-tunnels at different locations, and a high-speed camera system was used to capture the cracking and failure process. We found that the dynamic crack initiation stress, failure mode and dynamic crack velocity of the specimen all depend on the pre-stress level when the sample is under otherwise similar dynamic disturbance conditions. The crack initiation stress threshold first increased slightly and then decreased dramatically with the increase in the pre-stress value. The specimens were mainly fractured by tensile cracks parallel to the compression line under lower pre-stress, while they were severely damaged with additional shear cracks under higher pre-stress. Furthermore, the propagation velocity of the primary crack was significantly larger than that of the subsequent cracks. The effect of applying different amounts of static pre-stresses on the velocity of the primary tensile crack was similar to that observed for the crack initiation stress threshold; however, it did not affect the velocity of the secondary and subsequent tensile cracks.

  11. Laboratory measurement of elastic anisotropy on spherical rock samples by longitudinal and transverse sounding under confining pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokajíček, Tomáš; Svitek, Tomáš

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of shear wave velocities in loaded rocks is important in describing elastic anisotropy. A new high-pressure measuring head was designed and constructed for longitudinal and traversal ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 independent directions under hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa. The velocity is measured using a pair of P-wave sensors and two pairs of S-wave sensors (TV/RV and TH/RH) with perpendicular polarization. An isotropic glass sphere was used to calibrate the experimental setup. A fine-grained anisotropic quartzite sample was examined using the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding. Waveforms are recorded by pairs of TP/RP, TV/RV and TH/RH transducers in a range of confining pressure between 0.1 and 60 MPa. The recorded data showed a shear wave splitting in three basic structural directions of the sample. The measurements proved to be useful in investigating oriented micro-cracks, lattice (LPO) and shape-preferred orientation (SPO) for the bulk elastic anisotropy of anisotropic rocks subjected to hydrostatic pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On the crack propagation analysis of rock like Brazilian disc specimens containing cracks under compressive line loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Haeri

    Full Text Available The pre-existing cracks in the brittle substances seem to be the main cause of their failure under various loading conditions. In this study, a simultaneous analytical, experimental and numerical analysis of crack propagation, cracks coalescence and failure process of brittle materials has been performed. Brazilian disc tests are being carried out to evaluate the cracks propagation paths in rock-like Brazilian disc specimens containing single and double cracks (using rock-like specimens which are specially prepared from Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, fine sands and water in a rock mechanics laboratory. The failure load of the pre-cracked disc specimens are measured showing the decreasing effects of the cracks and their orientation on the final failure load. The same specimens are numerically simulated by a higher order indirect boundary element method known as displacement discontinuity method. These numerical results are compared with the existing analytical and experimental results proving the accuracy and validity of the proposed numerical method. The numerical and experimental results obtained from the tested specimens are in good agreement and demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Regional modeling of SOA formation under consideration of HOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzsche, Kathrin; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Tilgner, Andreas; Berndt, Torsten; Poulain, Laurent; Wolke, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the major burden of the atmospheric organic particulate matter with about 140 - 910 TgC/yr (Hallquist et al., 2009). SOA particles are formed via the oxidation of volatile organic carbons (VOCs), where the volatility of the VOCs is lowered. Therefore, gaseous compounds can either nucleate to form new particles or condense on existing particles. The framework of SOA formation under natural conditions is very complex, because there are a variety of gas-phase precursors, atmospheric degradation pathways and formed oxidation products. Up to now, atmospheric models underpredict the SOA mass. Therefore, improved regional scale model implementations are necessary to achieve a better agreement between model predictions and field measurements. Recently, highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) were found in the gas phase from laboratory and field studies (Jokinen et al., 2015, Mutzel et al., 2015, Berndt et al., 2016a,b). From box model studies, it is known that HOMs are important for the early aerosol growth, however they are not yet considered in mechanisms applied in regional models. The present study utilizes the state-of-the-art multiscale model system COSMO-MUSCAT (Wolke et al., 2012), which is qualified for process studies in local and regional areas. The established model system was enhanced by a kinetic partitioning approach (Zaveri et al., 2014) for the gas-to-particle transfer of oxidized VOCs. The framework of the partitioning approach and the gas-phase mechanism were tested in a box model and evaluated with chamber studies, before implementing in the 3D model system COSMO-MUSCAT. Moreover, HOMs are implemented in the same way for the regional SOA modeling. 3D simulations were performed with an equilibrium partitioning and diffusion dependent partitioning approach, respectively. The presentation will provide first 3D simulation results including comparisons with field measurements from the TROPOS field site

  14. Postdecommissioning monitoring feasibility study for radioactive waste repositories in rock salt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the postdecommissioning monitoring of a radioactive waste repository facility established in bedded or domal salts has been performed. The results of the study indicate that while some general conclusions as to monitoring feasibility can be made, any detailed evaluation of monitoring program effectiveness must be based upon evaluations performed for a specific site. A wide range of presently available instrument packages could be deployed in surface, borehole, or buried locations to monitor key radiological, geological, and hydrological properties of the repository and its surroundings after decommissioning. If sufficient sensitivity can be obtained, these measurements, when correlated with analytical modeling results, could provide a description of repository integrity, allowing further extrapolations of expected behavior. Definitive projections of sensitivity and thus the applicability of presently available instrumentation cannot be made, however, without reference to specific site characteristics or without the benefit of regulatory criteria. Owing to reliability considerations and technological limitations, it appears that any monitoring program should be based upon sensors located either at the surface or in accessible boreholes or subsurface galleries which do not penetrate the repository containment strata. Because of this feature of retrievability of the sensing devices such a system could be maintained for an indefinite period of time. It is recommended that plans for postdecommissioning monitoring be given further consideration during the specification of site investigation and preoperation programs. Particular effort should be expended in (1) developing regulatory criteria appropriate to the decommissioned repository, (2) defining what constitutes a significant variation in monitorable parameters, and (3) comparing these variations and regulatory criteria with instrument sensitivities under actual site conditions.

  15. Disentangling Diagenesis From the Rock Record: An Example From the Permo-Triassic Wordie Creek Formation, East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J.; Turchyn, A. V.; Wignall, P. B.; Newton, R. J.; Vane, C. H.

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of isotope ratios in sedimentary rocks deposited over geological time can provide key insights to past environmental change over important intervals in the past. However, it is important to be aware that secondary alteration can overprint the original isotopic records. We demonstrate this principle using high-resolution carbon, sulfur, and oxygen isotope measurements in organic carbon, pyrite, and carbonate minerals (δ13Corg, δ34Spyr, δ34SCAS, δ13Ccarb, and δ18Ocarb) and kerogen analyses (HI and OI) from the Wordie Creek Formation, East Greenland. These sediments were initially deposited across the Permo-Triassic transition, but as we will show, the carbonate record has been altered by interaction with meteoric water significantly after initial deposition. Comparison of the better preserved organic carbon and pyrite records with a proximal Permo-Triassic sequence reveals significant pyrite-sulfur isotope variability across the Permo-Triassic transition. This regional heterogeneity argues against basin-wide euxinia and instead suggests localized changes in sulfur fractionation in response to variations in organic carbon flux. This hypothesis can be used to explain seemingly inconsistent regional trends in other sulfur isotopes across the Permo-Triassic transition.

  16. The development f high temperature triaxial compressive autoclave to investigate the change of rock properties under high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Eiji; Chigira, Masahiro

    2000-01-01

    The studies on mechanical properties at the high temperature unsaturated condition and saturated condition were rarely carried Out. Development of high temperature triaxial compressive machine combined with two fluid-flow hydrothermal equipments was required to investigate the hydrological and geochemical phenomenon under the deep ground. We developed the 'high temperature triaxial autoclave (HTTA)' to investigate the physical, mechanical and chemical behavior of sedimentary rocks at the high temperature. The HTTA is able to perform permeability test and triaxial compressive test between room temperature and 140 the maximum pore pressure of 10 MPa, the maximum confining pressure of 26 MPa, and the maximum axial stress of 370 MPa. We carried out uniaxial compressive test of dacite at 91.7degC under water saturated condition. The uniaxial compressive strength and the modulus of elasticity of dacite at 91.7degC under water saturated conditions were the lowest. (author)

  17. Environmental risk assessment of acid rock drainage under uncertainty: The probability bounds and PHREEQC approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrie, Getnet D; Sadiq, Rehan; Nichol, Craig; Morin, Kevin A; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2016-01-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a major environmental problem that poses significant environmental risks during and after mining activities. A new methodology for environmental risk assessment based on probability bounds and a geochemical speciation model (PHREEQC) is presented. The methodology provides conservative and non-conservative ways of estimating risk of heavy metals posed to selected endpoints probabilistically, while propagating data and parameter uncertainties throughout the risk assessment steps. The methodology is demonstrated at a minesite located in British Columbia, Canada. The result of the methodology for the case study minesite shows the fate-and-transport of heavy metals is well simulated in the mine environment. In addition, the results of risk characterization for the case study show that there is risk due to transport of heavy metals into the environment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Rock Fracture Toughness Under Mode II Loading: A Theoretical Model Based on Local Strain Energy Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Moghaddam, M.; Ayatollahi, M. R.; Berto, F.

    2018-01-01

    The values of mode II fracture toughness reported in the literature for several rocks are studied theoretically by using a modified criterion based on strain energy density averaged over a control volume around the crack tip. The modified criterion takes into account the effect of T-stress in addition to the singular terms of stresses/strains. The experimental results are related to mode II fracture tests performed on the semicircular bend and Brazilian disk specimens. There are good agreements between theoretical predictions using the generalized averaged strain energy density criterion and the experimental results. The theoretical results reveal that the value of mode II fracture toughness is affected by the size of control volume around the crack tip and also the magnitude and sign of T-stress.

  19. An evaluation of the x-ray-fluorescence analysis of rocks and silicates under routine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoch, H.

    1975-01-01

    This report correlates the analytical results obtained by four laboratories using X-ray-fluorescence analysis on ten reference silicate samples that were incorporated in the analytical programmes required by the Geological Survey of the Republic of South Africa over a five-year period. The results and their statistical treatment are given, together with a comparison of the results for similar material issued by the Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques and the British Ceramic Research Association using wet-chemical methods. This study shows that the analysis, by X-ray-fluorescence measurement, of rocks and silicate samples for the commonly determined constituents is more precise than analysis by classical wet-chemical procedures [af

  20. Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Tal formation of Garhwal Lesser Himalaya : Rb-Sr age evidence from black shales underlying phosphorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.K.; Rameshwar Rao, D.; Azmi, R.J.; Gopalan, K.; Pantulu, G.V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently reported faunal evidence for placing the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary within the main phosphorite unit of the Chert-Phosphorite Member of the Tal Formation, Garhwal Lesser Himalaya, is supported by the present report of 626 ± 13 myr for the whole-rock Rb-Sr isochron age of the black shales directly underlying the phosphorite band. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Sorption and diffusion of radionuclides (C, Tc, U, Pu, Np) in rock samples under oxic and anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suksi, S.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Hoelttae, P.; Jaakkola, T.; Lindberg, A.

    1989-11-01

    Interactions of redox sensitive elements with common Finnish rocks were studied in the laboratory under oxic and anoxic conditions. Sorption and diffusion of technetium, uranium, plutonium and neptunium were studied in drill cores of granites and gneiss. Also carbon was studied under oxic conditions. Cylindrical drill core cup samples and plane surfaces sawed from drill cores were exposed for periods from six to eighteen months to synthetic ground water to which Tc-99, U-233, Pu-236, Np-237 or C-14 as H 14 CO 3 - had been added. Synthetic granitic ground water was used in all experiments. In comparative studies for uranium also carbonate rich synthetic bentonite water was used under anoxic conditions. Technetium, uranium and neptunium were transported effectively under both oxic and anoxic conditions. Transported species of these elements were found throughout the rock matrices investigated. The measured apparent diffusivities for neptinium under oxic conditions were 2.7 x 10 14- m 2 /S for tonalite and 3.0 x 10 -13 m 2 /S for rapakivi granite. The range of D a -values for neptunium under anoxic conditions was (1.4-9.6) x 10 -14 m 2 /S. For uranium the range of D a -values under oxic conditions was (3.6-5.7) x 10 -14 m 2 /S; under anoxic conditions it was (1.1-4.3) x 10 -14 m 2 /S in granite ground water and (1.8-5.3) x 10 -14 m 2 /S in bentonite water. The ranges of measured D a -values for technetium varied 1.8x10 -15 -2.3x10 -13 m 2 /S under oxic conditions and 2.3x10 -15 -2.3x10 -14 m 2 /S under anoxic conditions. The migration of plutonium was slow in all samples. The range of measured apparent diffusivities of plutonium under oxic conditions was from 2.7x10 -15 to 2.4x10 -14 m 2 /S. Under anoxic conditions the measured D a -values were 2.7x10 -15 m 2 /S for rapakivi granite and 3.5x10 -15 m 2 /S for tonalite

  2. Detrital and Early Chemical Remanent Magnetization in redbeds and their rock magnetic signature: Zicapa Formation, southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Rojas, Maria Isabel; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2018-02-01

    Poles from continental redbeds are a large fraction of the world's palaeomagnetic database. Nonetheless, the time of acquisition and origin of the remanent magnetization of redbeds has been long debated. We report palaeomagnetic data, rock magnetic data, and microscope observations for Lower Cretaceous redbeds in southern Mexico. These data allow us to discriminate between the hysteresis properties of remanent magnetizations of detrital and chemical origin, and to establish the early origin of a chemical remanence. Red sandstones of the Zicapa Formation contain a multi-component remanence revealed by thermal demagnetization, and consisting of three stable components with partially overlapping laboratory unblocking-temperatures of 600°C, (low, intermediate, and high temperature, respectively). They are interpreted as a viscous remanence residing in detrital magnetite, a chemical remanence residing in authigenic hematite, and a depositional remanence residing in detrital hematite, respectively. The low-temperature component is nearly parallel to the recent dipole field. The tilt-corrected overall site means of the intermediate (chemical) and high temperature (depositional) components are indistinguishable (Dec = 282.0°, Inc = 12.4°, k = 13.33, α95 = 10.1°, N = 17, for the intermediate temperature; and Dec = 272.5°, Inc = 16.5°, k = 14.04, α95 = 11, N = 14, for the high temperature). Elongation/inclination analysis suggests that depositional and chemical components require applying a f = factor of approximately 0.4. Both of these components define a magnetic polarity zonation, but the polarity of the chemical and detrital components may or may not be the same. The chemical remanence coincides, more often than not, with the polarity of the depositional remanence of the overlying (younger) strata, suggesting a delay in remanence acquisition of tens to a few hundred ka for the chemical component. Pigmentary and detrital haematite were recognized with microscopic

  3. Formation of systems of incompact bands parallel to the compression axis in the unconsolidated sedimentary rocks: A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamediev, Sh. A.; Ul'Kin, D. A.

    2011-10-01

    Uniaxial compression of poorly lithified rocks leads to the formation of thin incompact layers (or bands, in the two-dimensional case) parallel to the compression axis, which are characterized by increased porosity. The standard model of the formation of such bands, as well as deformation bands of other types, associates them with the narrow zones of localization of plastic deformations. In the case of decompaction, it is assumed that transverse tensile deformations are localized within the band, which cause the band to dilate. Here, the formation of a band of localized deformations is treated as a loss-of-stability phenomenon. Based on observations, we propose a fundamentally different model of incompact bands formation, according to which the microdefects in sediment packing (pores) rather than the deformations are localized in the narrow zones. The localization of pores, which are initially randomly distributed in the medium, occurs as a result of their migration through the geomaterial. The migration and subsequent localization of pores are driven by a common mechanism, namely, a trend of a system to lower its total energy (small variations in total energy are equal to the increment of free energy minus the work of external forces). Migration of a single pore in a granular sedimentary rock is caused by the force f driving the defect. This force was introduced by J. Eshelby (1951; 1970). An important feature of our model is that the formation of an incompact band here does not have a sense of a loss of stability. Quite the contrary, the formation of incompact bands is treated as a gradual process spread over time. In this context, the origination of incompact band systems directly follows from our model itself, without any a priori assumptions postulating the existence of such systems and without any special tuning of the model parameters. Moreover, based on the proposed model, we can predict the incompact bands to always occur in the form of systems rather than

  4. Parabolic Free Boundary Price Formation Models Under Market Size Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2016-10-04

    In this paper we propose an extension of the Lasry-Lions price formation model which includes uctuations of the numbers of buyers and vendors. We analyze the model in the case of deterministic and stochastic market size uctuations and present results on the long time asymptotic behavior and numerical evidence and conjectures on periodic, almost periodic, and stochastic uctuations. The numerical simulations extend the theoretical statements and give further insights into price formation dynamics.

  5. Vertical Microbial Community Variability of Carbonate-based Cones may Provide Insight into Formation in the Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, C.; Bojanowski, C.; Daille, L. K.; Bradley, J.; Johnson, H.; Stamps, B. W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Berelson, W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood, and the process by which microbial mats become mineralized is a primary question in microbialite formation. Ancient conical stromatolites are primarily carbonate-based whereas the few modern analogues in hot springs are either non-mineralized or mineralized by silica. A team from the 2015 International GeoBiology Course investigated carbonate-rich microbial cones from near Little Hot Creek (LHC), Long Valley Caldera, California, to investigate how conical stromatolites might form in a hot spring carbonate system. The cones are up to 3 cm tall and are found in a calm, ~45° C pool near LHC that is 4 times super-saturated with respect to CaCO3. The cones rise from a flat, layered microbial mat at the edge of the pool. Scanning electron microscopy revealed filamentous bacteria associated with calcite crystals within the cone tips. Preliminary 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated variability of community composition between different vertical levels of the cone. The cone tip had comparatively greater abundance of filamentous cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya and Phormidium) and fewer heterotrophs (e.g. Chloroflexi) compared to the cone bottom. This supports the hypothesis that cone formation may depend on the differential abundance of the microbial community and their potential functional roles. Metagenomic analyses of the cones revealed potential genes related to chemotaxis and motility. Specifically, a genomic bin identified as a member of the genus Isosphaera contained an hmp chemotaxis operon implicated in gliding motility in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme [1]. Isosphaera is a Planctomycete shown to have phototactic capabilities [2], and may play a role in conjunction with cyanobacteria in the vertical formation of the cones. This analysis of actively growing cones indicates a complex interplay of geochemistry and microbiology that form structures which can serve as models for processes that occurred in the past and are

  6. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  7. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from calcareous-marly rock under stress: experimental tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Plescia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The identified emissions of abiogenic carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane are generally attributed to volcanic activity or to geochemical processes associated with thermometamorphic effects. In this paper we show another possible abiogenic source of emission, induced by mechanical, and not thermal, stresses. We investigated the mechanochemical production of carbon dioxide and methane when friction is applied to marly-type rock and studied the mechanisms determining the strong CO2 and CH4 emissions observed. A ring mill was used to apply friction and oriented pressure upon a synthetic calcite-clay mixture of varying proportions. We found that the CO2 and CH4 release versus the grinding action has a non-linear trend reflecting the behaviour of decreasing crystallinity, which indicates a close link between crystallinity and gas production. For the CO2 emission, we propose a release mechanism connected with the friction-induced fractures and the increase in structural disorders induced by creep in the lattice. The CH4 emission could be explained by a Sabatier reaction in which CO2 and hydrogen are involved to form CH4 and water.

  8. Nanodefect formation in LiF crystals under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussaeva, M.A.; Ibragimova, Eh.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Muminov, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    One studied the spectra of absorption and of photoluminescence, microhardness and performed X-ray structure analysis of gamma-irradiated LiF crystals in a shutdown reactor and in 60 Co source when gamma-radiation dose rate was equal to 7.65 Gy/s. In addition to formation of point and combined radiation defects one detected the presence of the gamma-irradiation induced 28 nm size nanoparticles of LiOH phase in Li sublattice. Formation of defects is shown to occur more efficiently in a shutdown reactor in contrast to 60 Co source [ru

  9. Microhyla laterite sp. nov., A New Species of Microhyla Tschudi, 1838 (Amphibia: Anura: Microhylidae) from a Laterite Rock Formation in South West India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikanth, G.; Vidisha, M. K.; Saurabh, S.; Pratik, M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, several new species of amphibians have been described from India. Many of these discoveries are from biodiversity hotspots or from within protected areas. We undertook amphibian surveys in human dominated landscapes outside of protected areas in south western region of India between years 2013–2015. We encountered a new species of Microhyla which is described here as Microhyla laterite sp. nov. It was delimited using molecular, morphometric and bioacoustics comparisons. Microhyla laterite sp. nov. appears to be restricted to areas of the West coast of India dominated by laterite rock formations. The laterite rock formations date as far back as the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary and are considered to be wastelands in-spite of their intriguing geological history. We identify knowledge gaps in our understanding of the genus Microhyla from the Indian subcontinent and suggest ways to bridge them. PMID:26960208

  10. Sand ripples under sea waves. Part 4. Tile ripple formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Pieter C.; Blondeaux, P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the formation of small-scale three-dimensional bedforms due to interactions of an erodible bed with a sea wave that obliquely approaches the coast, being partially reflected at the beach. In this case the trajectories of fluid particles at the top of the bottom boundary layer are

  11. Controlling rigid formations of mobile agents under inconsistent measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia de Marina Peinado, Hector; Cao, Ming; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    —Despite the great success of using gradient-based controllers to stabilize rigid formations of autonomous agents in the past years, surprising yet intriguing undesirable collective motions have been reported recently, when inconsistent measurements are used in the agents’ local controllers. To make

  12. Requirements of actual final repository concepts for different host rock formations. Final report; Anforderungen an aktuelle Endlagerkonzepte fuer unterschiedliche Wirtsgesteinsformationen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, Thorsten; Hartwig-Thurat, Eva; Krischer, Angelika; Lambers, Ludger; Larue, Juergen; Uhlmann, Stephan; Weyand, Torben

    2017-08-15

    In the frame of the research project the basic requirements and technical safety specifications with respect to the retrievability of stored radioactive wastes for the different final repository concepts based on the host rock formations occurring in Germany are presented. Existing international disposal concepts for clay/claystone, granite and salt are described and compared to the actual German regulatory requirements. The safety engineering relations between stock piling and possible retrieval are described and evaluated.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Joint Geometric Configurations on the Mechanical Properties of Intermittent Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Fan, Pengxian; Xu, Nuwen; Dong, Lu

    2017-06-01

    Intermittent joints in rock mass are quite sensitive to cyclic loading conditions. Understanding the fatigue mechanical properties of jointed rocks is beneficial for rational design and stability analysis of rock engineering projects. This study experimentally investigated the influences of joint geometry (i.e., dip angle, persistency, density and spacing) on the fatigue mechanism of synthetic jointed rock models. Our results revealed that the stress-strain curve of jointed rock under cyclic loadings is dominated by its curve under monotonic uniaxial loadings; the terminal strain in fatigue curve is equal to the post-peak strain corresponding to the maximum cyclic stress in the monotonic stress-strain curve. The four joint geometrical parameters studied significantly affect the fatigue properties of jointed rocks, including the irreversible strains, the fatigue deformation modulus, the energy evolution, the damage variable and the crack coalescence patterns. The higher the values of the geometrical parameters, the lower the elastic energy stores in this jointed rock, the higher the fatigue damage accumulates in the first few cycles, and the lower the fatigue life. The elastic energy has certain storage limitation, at which the fatigue failure occurs. Two basic micro-cracks, i.e., tensile wing crack and shear crack, are observed in cyclic loading and unloading tests, which are controlled principally by joint dip angle and persistency. In general, shear cracks only occur in the jointed rock with higher dip angle or higher persistency, and the jointed rock is characterized by lower fatigue strength, larger damage variable and lower fatigue life.

  14. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weislogel, Amy [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  15. A three-scale analysis of bacterial communities involved in rocks colonization and soil formation in high mountain environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Borruso, Luigimaria; Zerbe, Stefan; Daffonchio, Daniele; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Alpha and beta diversities of the bacterial communities growing on rock surfaces, proto-soils, riparian sediments, lichen thalli, and water springs biofilms in a glacier foreland were studied. We used three molecular based techniques to allow a deeper investigation at different taxonomic resolutions: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, length heterogeneity-PCR, and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Bacterial communities were mainly composed of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria with distinct variations among sites. Proteobacteria were more represented in sediments, biofilms, and lichens; Acidobacteria were mostly found in proto-soils; and Cyanobacteria on rocks. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were mainly found in biofilms. UniFrac P values confirmed a significant difference among different matrices. Significant differences (P rocks which shared a more similar community structure, while at deep taxonomic resolution two distinct bacterial communities between lichens and rocks were found.

  16. Discovery and basic characteristics of high-quality source rocks found in the Yuertusi Formation of the Cambrian in Tarim Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyou Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Paleozoic strata of the Tarim Basin have abundant resources of marine oil and gas. In the Tahe area, Halahatang area, and Tazhong area of the basin, many large-scale oilfields have been found. These oilfields have a confirmed oil and gas reserves worth more than 2.5 billion tons and have completed the annual output of more than 14 million tons of marine oil and gas equivalent. The belief that the only main hydrocarbon source rocks are of the Cambrian or Ordovician is still controversial. Chemists have made significant progress and have effectively lead the oil and gas exploration in Tarim Basin. Due to the complexity of the basin and the limitation of samples, the research work, and fine contrast is restricted. In this article, we investigated the Cambrian strata outcrop of Tarim Basin in detail. By analyzing a lot of outcrops, high-quality hydrocarbon source rocks of Yuertusi Formation have been found in more than 10 outcrop points in Aksu region. The source rocks' lithology is black shale with total organic carbon (TOC content that ranges between 2% and 16%. Total organic carbon (TOC of the black shale layer could be as much as 4%–16%, especially in the outcrops of the Yutixi and Shiairike. This by far is the best marine hydrocarbon source rock that was found in China. The source rocks were distributed consistently in the Aksu region, the thickness of which is about 10–15 m. It was formed in a sedimentary environment of a middle gentle slope to a low gentle slope. Organic matter enrichment is controlled by the upwelling currents. The thick strata of dolostone that developed in the Xiaoerblak Formation are considered to be good reservoirs of the beach and microbial reef in the upper strata of Yuertusi Formation. No hydrocarbon source rocks have been found in the outcrop of Xiaoerblak Formation. The thick strata of gyprock and mudstone development are a set of satisfactory cap layer in the Lower Cambrian. This hydrocarbon

  17. Origin and evolution of formation water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, Gulf of Mexico. Part 1: Chemical evolution and water-rock interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, Peter, E-mail: birkle@iie.org.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), Gerencia de Geotermia, Av. Reforma 113, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Garcia, Bernardo Martinez; Milland Padron, Carlos M. [PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion, Region Sur, Activo Integral Bellota-Jujo, Diseno de Explotacion, Cardenas, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    The origin and evolution of formation water from Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous mudstone-packstone-dolomite host rocks at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, located onshore in SE-Mexico at a depth from 5200 to 6200 m.b.s.l., have been investigated, using detailed water geochemistry from 12 producer wells and six closed wells, and related host rock mineralogy. Saline waters of Cl-Na type with total dissolved solids from 10 to 23 g/L are chemically distinct from hypersaline Cl-Ca-Na and Cl-Na-Ca type waters with TDS between 181 and 385 g/L. Bromine/Cl and Br/Na ratios suggest the subaerial evaporation of seawater beyond halite precipitation to explain the extreme hypersaline components, while less saline samples were formed by mixing of high salinity end members with surface-derived, low salinity water components. The dissolution of evaporites from adjacent salt domes has little impact on present formation water composition. Geochemical simulations with Harvie-M{phi}ller-Weare and PHRQPITZ thermodynamic data sets suggest secondary fluid enrichment in Ca, HCO{sub 3} and Sr by water-rock interaction. The volumetric mass balance between Ca enrichment and Mg depletion confirms dolomitization as the major alteration process. Potassium/Cl ratios below evaporation trajectory are attributed to minor precipitation of K feldspar and illitization without evidence for albitization at the Jujo-Tecominoacan reservoir. The abundance of secondary dolomite, illite and pyrite in drilling cores from reservoir host rock reconfirms the observed water-rock exchange processes. Sulfate concentrations are controlled by anhydrite solubility as indicated by positive SI-values, although anhydrite deposition is limited throughout the lithological reservoir column. The chemical variety of produced water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil field is related to a sequence of primary and secondary processes, including infiltration of evaporated seawater and original meteoric fluids, the subsequent

  18. Origin and evolution of formation water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, Gulf of Mexico. Part 1: Chemical evolution and water-rock interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkle, Peter; Garcia, Bernardo Martinez; Milland Padron, Carlos M.

    2009-01-01

    The origin and evolution of formation water from Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous mudstone-packstone-dolomite host rocks at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, located onshore in SE-Mexico at a depth from 5200 to 6200 m.b.s.l., have been investigated, using detailed water geochemistry from 12 producer wells and six closed wells, and related host rock mineralogy. Saline waters of Cl-Na type with total dissolved solids from 10 to 23 g/L are chemically distinct from hypersaline Cl-Ca-Na and Cl-Na-Ca type waters with TDS between 181 and 385 g/L. Bromine/Cl and Br/Na ratios suggest the subaerial evaporation of seawater beyond halite precipitation to explain the extreme hypersaline components, while less saline samples were formed by mixing of high salinity end members with surface-derived, low salinity water components. The dissolution of evaporites from adjacent salt domes has little impact on present formation water composition. Geochemical simulations with Harvie-Mφller-Weare and PHRQPITZ thermodynamic data sets suggest secondary fluid enrichment in Ca, HCO 3 and Sr by water-rock interaction. The volumetric mass balance between Ca enrichment and Mg depletion confirms dolomitization as the major alteration process. Potassium/Cl ratios below evaporation trajectory are attributed to minor precipitation of K feldspar and illitization without evidence for albitization at the Jujo-Tecominoacan reservoir. The abundance of secondary dolomite, illite and pyrite in drilling cores from reservoir host rock reconfirms the observed water-rock exchange processes. Sulfate concentrations are controlled by anhydrite solubility as indicated by positive SI-values, although anhydrite deposition is limited throughout the lithological reservoir column. The chemical variety of produced water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil field is related to a sequence of primary and secondary processes, including infiltration of evaporated seawater and original meteoric fluids, the subsequent mixing of

  19. Two-phase flow visualization under reservoir conditions for highly heterogeneous conglomerate rock: A core-scale study for geologic carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kue-Young; Oh, Junho; Han, Weon Shik; Park, Kwon Gyu; Shinn, Young Jae; Park, Eungyu

    2018-03-20

    Geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing anthropogenic CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere; however, understanding the flow mechanisms in various geological formations is essential for safe storage using this technique. This study presents, for the first time, a two-phase (CO 2 and brine) flow visualization under reservoir conditions (10 MPa, 50 °C) for a highly heterogeneous conglomerate core obtained from a real CO 2 storage site. Rock heterogeneity and the porosity variation characteristics were evaluated using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Multiphase flow tests with an in-situ imaging technology revealed three distinct CO 2 saturation distributions (from homogeneous to non-uniform) dependent on compositional complexity. Dense discontinuity networks within clasts provided well-connected pathways for CO 2 flow, potentially helping to reduce overpressure. Two flow tests, one under capillary-dominated conditions and the other in a transition regime between the capillary and viscous limits, indicated that greater injection rates (potential causes of reservoir overpressure) could be significantly reduced without substantially altering the total stored CO 2 mass. Finally, the capillary storage capacity of the reservoir was calculated. Capacity ranged between 0.5 and 4.5%, depending on the initial CO 2 saturation.

  20. Development of micro-scale joints in volcanic rocks under thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    thermal stresses develop in a system only under unsteady state of cooling,. • the stresses responsible for the development of joints are tensile in nature, and. • the magnitude of stresses increases with increasing rates of cooling. In order to understand the effects of cooling rate on the mode of jointing, analogue model exper-.

  1. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespillo, M.L.; Agulló-López, F.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Extensive survey formation energies Frenkel pairs and electronic stopping thresholds. • Correlation: track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation. • Formation energies Frenkel pairs discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms. • Amorphous track formation mechanisms: defect accumulation models versus melting. • Advantages cumulative models to deal with new hot topics: nuclear-electronic synergy. - Abstract: An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO 3 crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  2. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespillo, M.L., E-mail: mcrespil@utk.edu [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Agulló-López, F., E-mail: fal@uam.es [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Extensive survey formation energies Frenkel pairs and electronic stopping thresholds. • Correlation: track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation. • Formation energies Frenkel pairs discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms. • Amorphous track formation mechanisms: defect accumulation models versus melting. • Advantages cumulative models to deal with new hot topics: nuclear-electronic synergy. - Abstract: An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO{sub 3} crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  3. Formation of heterocyclic amines in Chinese marinated meat: effects of animal species and ingredients (rock candy, soy sauce and rice wine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Hong, Yanting; Ke, Weixin; Hu, Xiaosong; Chen, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are one type of neo-formed contaminants in protein-rich foods during heat processing. Recently, accumulative studies have focused on the formation of HAs in Western foods. However, there is little knowledge about the occurrence of HAAs in traditional Chinese foods. The objective of this study was to determinate the contents of main HAs in traditional marinated meat products by UPLC-MS/MS, and to investigate the effects of animal species and the ingredients (soy sauce, rock candy, and rice wine) on the formation of HAAs in marinated meats. Five HAs - 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]-quinolone (IQ), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQ), 9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole (Norharman) and l-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole (Harman) - were detected in 12 marinated meats, but 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) was only found in three chicken marinates. The animal species and ingredients (soy sauce, rock candy and rice wine) have significant influence on the formation of HAAs in meat marinates. Beef had the highest content of total HAAs compared with pork, mutton and chicken. Meanwhile, soy sauce contributed to the formation of HAAs more greatly than rock candy, soy sauce, and rice wine. Choice of raw materials and optimisation of ingredients recipe should be become a critical point to control the HAAs formation in marinated meats. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A. [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  5. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  6. A new state-of-the-art tool to investigate rock friction under extreme slip velocities and accelerations: SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, André; di Toro, Giulio; Nielsen, Stefan; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Romeo, Gianni; di Stefano, Giuseppe; Smith, Steven; di Felice, Fabio; Mariano, Sofia

    2010-05-01

    interseismic periods. Moreover, experiments will be run where we control the shear stress rather than the shear displacement. By doing so, we will be able to simulate the transient load variation expected during seismic failure on natural faults and measure the related dynamic weakening, frictional evolution and slip velocity on the sample. The characterization of rock frictional behavior under combined conditions of low to high slip velocity and extreme and rapidly variable load, is expected to provide important insights into the mechanics of earthquakes.

  7. Detrital zircon without detritus: a result of 496-Ma-old fluid-rock interaction during the gold-lode formation of Passagem, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Zeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Zircon and xenotime occur in tourmaline-rich hydrothermal pockets in the auriferous lode of Passagem de Mariana, a world-class gold deposit. Zircon grains show pristine oscillatory zoning, but many of them are altered, exhibiting porous domains filled with graphite. Uranium-Pb dating of zircon, using in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, yields ages between 3.2 and 2.65 Ga, which match those for detrital zircon of the footwall quartzite of the > 2.65-Ga-old Moeda Formation. Discordant analyses point to zircon-age resetting during the Brasiliano orogeny at ca. 500 Ma. This interpretation is supported by U-Pb dating of euhedral xenotime immediately adjacent to altered zircon within the same tourmaline pocket. The xenotime grains give a Concordia age of 496.3 ± 2.0 Ma, which is identical to that determined for monazite of a quartz-hematite vein-type deposit (i.e., jacutinga lode) in the region (Itabira), another important mineralisation style of gold. The occurrence of relatively abundant inherited detrital zircon, but absence of rock fragments in the tourmaline pocket investigated here, implies that detrital material was completely replaced by tourmaline. The graphite overprint on the altered detrital zircon attests to a reducing fluid, which was likely formed by fluid-rock interaction with carbonaceous phyllite of the Batatal Formation, the host rock of the Passagem lode.

  8. Hydrogen formation under gamma and heavy ions irradiation of geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupin, F.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, J.B.; Ngono Ravache, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the behavior under irradiation of geo-polymer which is not yet well known and attempts to highlight the importance of water radiolysis. For their use as embedding matrices, stability under ionizing radiation as well as low hydrogen gas released must be demonstrated. Different formulations of geo-polymers have been irradiated either with γ-rays ( 60 Co sources) or 75 MeV 36 Ar ions beams and the production of hydrogen released has been quantified. This paper presents the results of gas analysis in order to identify important structural parameters that influence confined water radiolysis. Indeed, a correlation between pore size, water content on one side, and the hydrogen production radiolytic yield (G(H 2 )) on the other side, has been demonstrated. For the 75 MeV 36 Ar ions irradiation, the effect of porosity has not been well emphasized. For both, the results have revealed the water content influence. (authors)

  9. Ti-Zr placer mineralization in Neoproterozoic (Uppe r Riphean rocks of Kildin Formation and in contemporary beach sands of Sredny and Rybachy Peninsulas, Kola Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chickiryov I. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration mechanisms of titanium-zirconium placer mineralizat ion in Neoproterozoic terrigenous rocks of Zemlepakhtinskaya Formation, Kildin Group, and in contempo rary beach deposits from Sredny Peninsula and Motka Cape from Rybachy Peninsula (Kola region have been considered i n the paper. It has been shown that the rocks of Zemlepakhtinskaya Formation are facially variable. The shallow littoral facies are confined to the western and central parts of Sredny Peninsula, the deeper sublitt oral facies are confined to the eastern part of Sredny Peninsula and to Motka Cape of Rybachy Peninsula. It has b een established that lenses and beds with titanium-zirconium placer mineralization occur solely in littoral facies. The ore minerals in aleurite-psamite of Zemlepakhtinskaya Formation are represented by leucoxene, rutile and zircon, and in contemporary beach deposits – by ilmenite, rutile and minor zircon. Paleogeograp hic reconstruction indicates that almost all deposits of Neoproterozoic (Upper Riphean Kildin Group were accumulated in shallow (littoral and sublittoral environment during dominant humid climate and intense weat hering of source area. Thus, not only deposits of Zemlepakhtinskaya Formation, but also the whole succession of Kildin Group can be regarded perspective for placers' accumulation. The low grade of heavy minerals (mainly Ti an d Zr minerals in contemporary beach deposits from Sredny Peninsula and Motka Cape from Rybachy Peninsu la is related to weak weathering of the Baltic Shield during Quaternary and to accumulation of coarse debris in littoral zone, preventing the differentiation of sand by wave action.

  10. 40Ar/39Ar dating of single muscovite grains in Jurassic siliciclastic rocks (San Cayetano Formation): Constraints on the paleoposition of western Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Frederick; Mann, Paul; Renne, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The San Cayetano Formation of western Cuba is the thickest and most extensive subaerial exposure of Jurassic siliciclastic rocks between the southeastern United States and northern South America. Previous workers have speculated that siliciclastic rocks of the San Cayetano Formation were derived from one of the following sources: (1) Yucatan Peninsula, (2) Florida, and (3) northern South America. To address the problem of the provenance of the San Cayetano Formation and the Mesozoic position of western Cuba, we present the results of 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dates from 67 single detrital mica grains from four samples of the San Cayetano Formation. These mica grains have ages that fall within the age ranges of well-known Precambrian crustal-age provinces and Paleozoic orogenic belts in eastern North America and the Yucatan Peninsula. The lack of grains with ages in the 700 550 Ma range suggests that Pan African Brasiliano orogenic belts that exist in northern South America, northwestern Africa, and beneath Florida did not contribute significant amounts of detritus to the San Cayetano basin. We propose that the Late Jurassic San Cayetano basin formed as a post-rift deltaic complex along the southeastern margin of the Yucatan Peninsula and was detached and transported to its present position in western Cuba in Paleogene time by the northeastward migration of the Caribbean arc.

  11. Emotional Memory Formation Under Lower Versus Higher Stress Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kogan, Inna; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2010-01-01

    An exposure to stress can enhance memory for emotionally arousing experiences. The phenomenon is suggested to be amygdala-dependent and in accordance with that view the amygdala was found to modulate mnemonic processes in other brain regions. Previously, we illustrated increased amygdala activation and reduced activation of CA1 following spatial learning under higher versus lower stress conditions. When spatial learning was followed by reversal training interference, impaired retention was de...

  12. Strain-dependent partial slip on rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of nonlinear modulus and attenuation of fractures provide the opportunity to probe their mechanical state. We have adapted a low-frequency torsional apparatus to explore the seismic signature of fractures under low normal stress, simulating low effective stress environments such as shallow or high pore pressure reservoirs. We report strain-dependent modulus and attenuation for fractured samples of Duperow dolomite (a carbon sequestration target reservoir in Montana), Blue Canyon Dome rhyolite (a geothermal analog reservoir in New Mexico), and Montello granite (a deep basement disposal analog from Wisconsin). We use a simple single effective asperity partial slip model to fit our measured stress-strain curves and solve for the friction coefficient, contact radius, and full slip condition. These observations have the potential to develop into new field techniques for measuring differences in frictional properties during reservoir engineering manipulations and estimate the stress conditions where reservoir fractures and faults begin to fully slip.

  13. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 18. Facility construction feasibility and costs by rock type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The results of a study that compared the general engineering feasibility and unit costs associated with sinking shafts and mining storage rooms in the four rock types (salt, granite, shale, basalt) are presented in this volume. The report includes a discussion of the general effects of rock characteristics on shaft and mine design, the application of these design considerations to the specific designs developed for the Draft GEIS, shaft and mine construction techniques, and the unit cost comparison. The repository designs upon which this comparison was based are presented in other volumes of this series

  14. Analysis of the distributions of stress in natural ridge forms: implications for the deformation mechanisms of rock slopes and the formation of sackung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinakin, D.; Stead, D.

    2005-02-01

    Stress distributions in general asymmetric ridge forms, derived from 13 ridges in British Columbia and Colorado, are modelled in two dimensions with a finite difference method. In each of the 13 ridges, sackung (scarps, tension cracks, trenches) can be found. Spatial correlations between stress concentrations and these sackungen landforms are investigated for the mean ridge forms. Rock mass properties for the modelled ridges are developed using the Hoek-Brown criterion and the Geological Strength Index (GSI). Gravity loading and combined gravity-tectonic loading on the ridge forms are considered. The importance of representing in situ rock masses with an elastoplastic (as opposed to elastic) constitutive criterion is discussed. The resulting stress distributions for the three general ridge classes indicate that different processes are responsible for the formation of sackungen landforms and slope deformations in each type of ridge.

  15. Formation And Exhumation Of High Pressure Metamorphic Rocks From Oman: New Constraints From U-Pb Dating Of Zircon And Rutile

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shazly, A. K.; Walker, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    Basement and continental shelf units structurally underlying the Semail ophiolite in Saih Hatat, NE Oman were metamorphosed under high pressure, low temperature (high P/T) conditions, and occur in two plates. The lower plate consists of eclogite facies rocks that grade westward into garnet blueschists and crossite epidote schists. The upper plate consists of thrust sheets of lower grade metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks formed under pumpellyite - actinolite to lawsonite albite facies conditions. The eclogite facies rocks had a clockwise P-T path, with peak conditions of 12 12 kbar to ˜ 4 kbar, and a stage of near isobaric cooling followed by cooling and decompression. High P/T rocks from the upper plate are also characterized by clockwise P-T paths with a segment of near isothermal decompression, and reached peak conditions that ranged from ˜ 310° C, P pile. A distinct pressure gap of > 3 kbar results from the juxtaposition of the lower and upper plates. U-Pb dating of zircon and rutile grains from two lower plate blueschists yield ages ranging from Proterozoic to Late Cretaceous: data cluster near a Late Creatceous age on the younger end of the array and spread to Mesoproterozoic values at the older end. A weighted mean of the 238U/206Pb ages from the youngest and most concordant fractions (one zircon and 2 rutile crystals) yields 80.1 +/- 5 Ma. These results are consistent with Rb/Sr isochron ages of 78 +/- 2 Ma obtained using phengite, clinopyroxene, and epidote from seven eclogite facies samples, and suggest that high P/T metamorphism in Saih Hatat was almost coeval with the emplacement of the Semail ophiolite. We conclude that the lower plate blueschists and eclogites formed by intracontinental thrusting and subduction of the thinned leading edge of the Oman continental margin in an east dipping subduction zone. The upper plate rocks which were part of the hanging wall of this subduction zone, were metamorphosed by tectonic loading by the ophiolite

  16. An experimental investigation of geochromatography during secondary migration of petroleum performed under subsurface conditions with a real rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larter Steve

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the size of petroleum secondary migration systems is vital for successful exploration for petroleum reserves. Geochemists have suggested that compositional fractionation of petroleum accompanying the migration process (geochromatography can potentially be used to infer distances petroleum may have travelled and the ratio of oil in the reservoir to that lost in the carrier. To date, this has been attempted by measuring concentrations and distributions of specific steranes, and aromatic oxygen and nitrogen compounds in reservoired oils which have been proposed to respond to migration rather than to source maturity or other effects. We report here an experiment involving oil migration through an initially water wet siltstone under realistic subsurface carrier bed or reservoir conditions (48 MPa, 70°C where source facies and maturity effects are eliminated. We show that geochromatography does indeed occur even for initially water-saturated rocks and that the migration fractionations observed for alkylcarbazoles, benzocarbazoles and alkylphenols are very similar to those seen in field data sets. In contrast, sterane based migration parameters show no compositional fractionation under these conditions.

  17. Experimental study of chemical-mechanical coupling during percolation of reactive fluid through rocks under stress, in the context of the CO2 geological sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, Y.

    2006-10-01

    CO 2 injection into geological repositories will induce chemical and mechanical instabilities. The study of these instabilities is based on experimental deformation of natural rock samples under stress, in the presence of fluids containing, or not, dissolved CO 2 . Triaxial cells used for the experiments permitted an independent control and measurement of stress, temperature, fluid pressure and composition. Vertical strains were measured during several months, with a resolution of 1.10 -12 s -1 on the strain rate. Simultaneously, fluids were analysed in order to quantify fluid-rock interactions. For limestone samples, percolation of CO 2 -rich fluids increases strain rate by a factor 1.7 up to 5; on the other hand, sandstone deformation remained almost the same. Increase in strain rate with limestone samples was explained by injected water acidification by the CO 2 which increases rock solubility and reaction kinetics. On the opposite, small effect of CO 2 on quartz explains the absence of deformation. X-ray observations confirmed the importance of rock composition and structure on the porosity evolution. Numerical simulations of rock elastic properties showed increasing shear stress into the sample. Measured deformation showed an evolution of reservoir rocks mechanical properties. It was interpreted as the consequence of pressure solution mechanisms both at grains contacts and on grain free surfaces. (author)

  18. In situ investigations on the impact of heat production and gamma radiation with regard to high-level radioactive waste disposal in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.

    1986-01-01

    Deep geological formations especially rock salt formations, are considered worldwide as suitable media for the final disposal of radioactive high-level waste (HLW). In the Federal Republic of Germany, the Institut fur Tieflagerung of the Gesellschaft fur Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Munchen operates the Asse Salt Mine as a pilot facility for testing the behavior of an underground nuclear waste repository. The tests are performed using heat and radiation sources to simulate disposed HLW canisters. The measured data obtained since 1965 show that the thermomechanical response of the salt formation and the physical/chemical changes in the vicinity of disposal boreholes are not a serious concern and that their long-term consequences can be estimated based on theoretical considerations and in-situ investigations

  19. Hydrogen formation and control under postulated LMFBR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.R.; Wierman, R.W.

    1976-09-01

    The objective of this study is to experimentally investigate the potential for autoignition and combustion of hydrogen-sodium mixtures which may be produced in LMFBR accidents. The purpose and ultimate usefulness of this work is to provide data that will establish the validity and acceptability of mechanisms inherent to the LMFBR that could either prevent or delay the accumulation of hydrogen gas to less than 4 percent (V) in the Reactor Containment Building (RCB) under accident conditions. The results to date indicate that sodium and sodium-hydrogen mixtures such as may be expected during LMFBR postulated accidents will ignite upon entering an air atmosphere and that the hydrogen present will be essentially all consumed until such time that the oxygen concentration is depleted

  20. Leaf Physiological and Proteomic Analysis to Elucidate Silicon Induced Adaptive Response under Salt Stress in Rosa hybrida 'Rock Fire'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Manivannan, Abinaya; Ko, Chung Ho; Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2017-08-14

    Beneficial effects of silicon (Si) on growth and development have been witnessed in several plants. Nevertheless, studies on roses are merely reported. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to illustrate the impact of Si on photosynthesis, antioxidant defense and leaf proteome of rose under salinity stress. In vitro-grown, acclimatized Rosa hybrida 'Rock Fire' were hydroponically treated with four treatments, such as control, Si (1.8 mM), NaCl (50 mM), and Si+NaCl. After 15 days, the consequences of salinity stress and the response of Si addition were analyzed. Scorching of leaf edges and stomatal damages occurred due to salt stress was ameliorated under Si supplementation. Similarly, reduction of gas exchange, photosynthetic pigments, higher lipid peroxidation rate, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species under salinity stress were mitigated in Si treatment. Lesser oxidative stress observed was correlated with the enhanced activity and expression of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase in Si+NaCl treatment. Importantly, sodium transportation was synergistically restricted with the stimulated counter-uptake of potassium in Si+NaCl treatment. Furthermore, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) results showed that out of 40 identified proteins, on comparison with control 34 proteins were down-accumulated and six proteins were up-accumulated due to salinity stress. Meanwhile, addition of Si with NaCl treatment enhanced the abundance of 30 proteins and downregulated five proteins. Differentially-expressed proteins were functionally classified into six groups, such as photosynthesis (22%), carbohydrate/energy metabolism (20%), transcription/translation (20%), stress/redox homeostasis (12%), ion binding (13%), and ubiquitination (8%). Hence, the findings reported in this work could facilitate a deeper

  1. Disentangling Diagenesis From the Rock Record: An Example From the Permo-Triassic Wordie Creek Formation, East Greenland

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, J; Turchyn, AV; Wignall, PB; Newton, RJ; Vane, CH

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of isotope ratios in sedimentary rocks deposited over geological time can provide key insights to past environmental change over important intervals in the past. However, it is important to be aware that secondary alteration can overprint the original isotopic records. We demonstrate this principle using high-resolution carbon, sulfur, and oxygen isotope measurements in organic carbon, pyrite, and carbonate minerals (δ 13 C org , δ 34 S pyr , δ 34 S CAS , δ 13 C carb , and δ 1...

  2. Fracture system influence on the reservoirs rock formation of Ordovician-Devonian carbonates in West Siberia tectonic depression

    OpenAIRE

    Koveshnikov, Aleksandr Evgenievich; Nesterova, A. C.; Dolgaya, Tatiana Fedorovna

    2016-01-01

    During the Paleozoic period from the beginning of the Cambrian to the end of the Carboniferous in the boundaries of the West Siberia tectonic depression there occurred the sea, where the carbonate platforms were formed by the limestones accumulation. All the area at the end of the Carboniferous period was turned to land. Resulting from Gertsynskaya folding in the times of Permian - Triassic the formed deposits were folded and denudated to a considerable extent. Besides, the reservoir rocks of...

  3. Trace elements and radioactivity in lunar rocks: implications for meteorite infall, solar-wind flux, and formation conditions of moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, R R; Ganapathy, R; Laul, J C; Anders, E; Herzog, G F; Jeffery, P M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar soil and type C breccias are enriched 3-to 100-fold in Ir, Au, Zn, Cd, Ag, Br, Bi, and Tl, relative to type A, B rocks. Smaller enrichments were found for Co, Cu, Ga, Pd, Rb, and Cs. The solar wind at present intensity can account for only 3 percent of this enrichment; an upper limit to the average proton flux during the last 4.5 x 109 years thus is 8 x 10(9) cm(-2) yr(-1). The remaining enrichment seems to be due to a 1.5 to 2 percent admixture of carbonaceous-chondritelike material, corresponding to an average influx rate of meteoritic and cometary matter of 2.9 x 10(-9) g cm(-2) yr(-1) at Tranquility Base. This is about one-quarter the terrestrial rate. Type A, B rocks are depleted 10-to 100-fold in Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, In, Tl, and Bi, relative to terrestrial basalts. This suggests loss by high-temperature volatilization, before or after accretion of the moon. Positron activities due mainly to (22)Na and (26)Al range from 90 to 220 beta(+) min(-1) kg(-1) in five small rocks or fragments (9 to 29 g). The higher activities presumably indicate surface locations. Th and U contents generally agree with those found by the preliminary examination team.

  4. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, water and whole rock samples from hydraulically fractured wells in the Marcellus Shale (Middle Devonian), and water from conventional wells producing from Upper Devonian sandstones were analyzed for lithium concentrations and isotope ratios (δ7Li). The distribution of lithium concentrations in different mineral groups was determined using sequential extraction. Structurally bound Li, predominantly in clays, accounted for 75-91 wt. % of total Li, whereas exchangeable sites and carbonate cement contain negligible Li (< 3%). Up to 20% of the Li is present in the oxidizable fraction (organic matter and sulfides). The δ7Li values for whole rock shale in Greene Co., Pennsylvania, and Tioga Co., New York, ranged from -2.3 to + 4.3‰, similar to values reported for other shales in the literature. The δ7Li values in shale rocks with stratigraphic depth record progressive weathering of the source region; the most weathered and clay-rich strata with isotopically light Li are found closest to the top of the stratigraphic section. Diagenetic illite-smectite transition could also have partially affected the bulk Li content and isotope ratios of the Marcellus Shale.

  5. Precise measurement of remanent magnetism of rocks under non-magnetic fields; Mujikaika deno ganseki zanryu jiki no seimitsu sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Y.; Nakatsuka, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Various magnetic information data from solidification or deposition up to date are contained in rocks. For the analysis of remanent magnetism, in general, the stable thermal remanent magnetization and the secondary magnetization are separately evaluated using vector variations determined by the location changes of magnetic pole from ac demagnetization or thermal demagnetization. Especially, in geothermal fields, the remanent magnetism in rocks is complicated due to the predominant alteration. When the remanent magnetism of rocks can be precisely measured and the primary and secondary magnetization can be evaluated, important data can be obtained, which represent oriented core samples required for evaluating the geothermal reservoirs. A rock remanent magnetism measuring system using superconductive magnetic shield has been developed, to evaluate the location of magnetic pole. This system can distinguish the remanent magnetization in rocks, and can be applied to the remanent magnetism in rocks in which the location of dipole model is shifted from the center of core. Important basic data of orientation information in rocks can be provided. 6 figs.

  6. Whole rock and discrete pyrite geochemistry as complementary tracers of ancient ocean chemistry: An example from the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Daniel D.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Large, Ross R.; Jiang, Ganqing; Stepanov, Aleksandr S.; Diamond, Charles W.; Figueroa, Maria C.; Olin, Paul

    2017-11-01

    The trace element content of pyrite is a recently developed proxy for metal abundance in paleo-oceans. Previous studies have shown that the results broadly match those of whole rock studies through geologic time. However, no detailed study has evaluated the more traditional proxies for ocean chemistry for comparison to pyrite trace element data from the same samples. In this study we compare pyrite trace element data from 14 samples from the Wuhe section of the Ediacaran-age Doushantuo Formation, south China, measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with new and existing whole rock trace element concentrations; total organic carbon; Fe mineral speciation; S isotope ratios; and pyrite textural relationships. This approach allows for comparison of data for individual trace elements within the broader environmental context defined by the other chemical parameters. The results for discrete pyrite analyses show that several chalcophile and siderophile elements (Ag, Sb, Se, Pb, Cd, Te, Bi, Mo, Ni, and Au) vary among the samples with patterns that mirror those of the independent whole rock data. A comparison with existing databases for sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite allows us to discriminate between signatures of changing ocean conditions and those of known hydrothermal sources. In the case of the Wuhe samples, the observed patterns for trace element variation point to primary marine controls rather than higher temperature processes. Specifically, our new data are consistent with previous arguments for pulses of redox sensitive trace elements interpreted to be due to marine oxygenation against a backdrop of mostly O2-poor conditions in the Ediacaran ocean-with important implications for the availability of bioessential elements. The agreement between the pyrite and whole rock data supports the use of trace element content of pyrite as a tracer of ocean chemistry in ways that complement existing approaches, while also opening additional

  7. Fault rocks and veins formation in the crystalline Palaeozoic basement of the N margin of the Littoral Chain (Catalan Coastal Ranges, NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alías, Gemma; Belmonte, Alba; Cantarero, Irene; Inglés, Montserrat; Travé, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The Littoral Chain corresponds to a horst of NE-SW direction formed during the Neogene extension which in the studied area (Collserola-Montnegre massif) is mainly composed by Paleozoic materials. At the northern margin the horst limits with the Vallès basin which is infilled by Miocene detrital materials. In the Forques Hill, two km to the est of Martorell, an excellent outcrop of Ordovician phyllites summarise an spread tectonic evolution from Hercynian to Neogene deformation. This work evaluates the behaviour of phyllites during the Hercynian ductile deformation and later during the fragile Mesozoic and Neogene tectonics. The weakness of these rocks together with the situation very close to the Vallès Fault favour that this area concentrates many deformation structures related to extensional tectonics, such as veins, cataclasites and gouges. Phyllites present a pervasive regional hercynian foliation oriented WNW-ESE and dipping moderately to the NNE; a huge amount of quartz veins, up to 20% of the rock volume, were injected during and immediately after the main foliation development. Two groups of fractures cutting the phyllites can be distinguished in the field according to the fault rock products, the vein infilling, the orientation and the geometry. The first one corresponds to Mesozoic fractures that have a NE-SW trend and dip indistinctly to the NW or SE, in a conjugate system. They are characterized by the formation of a broad zone of 0,2 m up to 1,5 m formed either by cataclasites or en echelon veins that indicate a normal movement. The cataclasites are cohesive greenish rocks, with 50% of clasts of wall rock from mm to dm in size. Neoformed minerals in the matrix are chlorite - albite - barite ± titanite and rutile. Veins are white to pinkish in colour and two types of infill have been identified: albite - chlorite - iron oxides± rutile and dolomite - chlorite. The second group belongs to Neogene fractures which although similar orientation than those

  8. Preparedness Formation of the Future Vocational Education Teachers to Occupational Adaptation under Conditions of Globalization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushentseva, Liliya

    2014-01-01

    The problem of the preparedness formation of future teachers of vocational training to the professional adaptation under conditions of globalization processes in society is considered. The analysis of scientific and educational literature devoted to the study of occupational adaptation and preparedness formation of specialists to it is carried…

  9. Estimation of maximum burial depth of Neogene-Quaternary fore-arc basin formation based on laboratory porosity measurements under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shin-ichi; Tamura, Yukie; Marumo, Haruna; Mitsuhashi, Shunsuke

    2016-05-01

    Estimating the maximum effective stress that rocks have experienced, Pe,max, or the maximum burial depth for sedimentary rocks, Dmax, is important for many types of research, ranging from engineering applications to estimation of tectonic evolution. We estimated Pe,max and Dmax for the Kazusa fore-arc basin formations (the Kazusa Group) in the Boso Peninsula of Japan using a laboratory-based method. We carried out measurements of porosity n with siltstone specimens from the Kazusa Group formations (the Umegase, Otadai, Kiwada, Ohara, and Katsuura formations) under various effective pressure Pe conditions and estimated Pe,max from the inflection points of the log Pe-log n curve on the Pe increasing path. Except for the specimens from the Ohara Formation, estimated values of Pe,max ranged from approximately 13-24 MPa. This range corresponded to approximately 1.3-3.2 km of Dmax. Differences in Dmax among the specimens were at least four times smaller than distances normal to bedding planes among the sampling locations. This suggests that the formations were not deposited horizontally, but that deposition proceeded as the subsidence center of the fore-arc basin moved in a northwestward (NW) direction, and that formations were then uplifted almost horizontally. The Pe,max of the specimens from the Ohara Formation were 6-10 MPa smaller than the others. Thus, it is possible that pore pressure at the sampling location was more than 6 MPa larger than the hydrostatic condition when the sediments were deposited and lithified. Previous studies reported the center of a high-porosity zone at the Ohara Formation, and this high-porosity zone probably developed due to Pp over-pressurization. These results support the applicability of this method to estimation of tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins and magnitude of over-pressurization.

  10. Water-rock interaction under peri-glacial conditions: example of the secondary carbonates of the Broegger Peninsula (Spitzbergen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlin, C.; Dever, L.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of the isotopic and chemical contents of soil water and carbonates at different field sites in Spitzbergen were undertaken to study the precipitation conditions of soil secondary calcites under the current peri-glacial climate. A main experimental site ('cote 80') has been established located on a fluvio-glacial terrasse at 80 m.a.s.l. near Ny Alesund (79 deg N, 12 deg. E). The active layer is at around 1.2 m depth on a continuous permafrost. The soil temperatures measured every 5 cm from the surface to the permafrost show that the freezing fronts move both the surface and permafrost, converging at around 0.6 m depth where the system is closed. During the beginning of the freezing period, the solute content increases in the residual water according to the distribution coefficient between water and ice. Calcite precipitation occurs in a second stage as indicated by the simultaneous decrease of the calcite saturation index and increase of the concentration of non-interactive elements. Chemical and isotopic ( 18 O, 2 H, 13 C et 14 C) analyses have been made on the different samples with a mineralogical description of the carbonate coatings obtained by SEM and microprobe analyses. The isotopic values result from a mixing between recent calcites and 'old' calcites. The recent calcites are probably in isotopic equilibrium with the present day solutions. The 'old calcites' have precipitated under colder conditions than today. The low radiocarbon activities (10.2 to 24.8 pcm) of the 'cote 80' site indicate that the 'old calcites' have precipitated during the last interglacial period or an inter-stadial period of the Pleistocene. The good relationship between the carbon- 14 activity and the carbon- 13 content indicates that the beginning of the pedogenesis is not identical at all sites and is dependent on the timing of deglaciation and vulnerability of rocks to frost-weathering. (authors)

  11. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Lower Cretaceous siliciclastic rocks of the Morita Formation, Sierra San José section, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavaraju, J.; Pacheco-Olivas, S. A.; González-León, Carlos M.; Espinoza-Maldonado, Inocente G.; Sanchez-Medrano, P. A.; Villanueva-Amadoz, U.; Monreal, Rogelio; Pi-Puig, T.; Ramírez-Montoya, Erik; Grijalva-Noriega, Francisco J.

    2017-07-01

    Clay mineralogy and geochemical studies were carried out on sandstone and shale samples collected from the Sierra San José section of the Morita Formation to infer the paleoclimate and paleoweathering conditions that prevailed in the source region during the deposition of these sediments. The clay mineral assemblages (fraction earth elements (LREE), flat heavy rare earth elements (HREE) patterns and negative Eu anomalies. The CIA and PIA values and A-CN-K plot of shales indicate low to moderate degree of weathering in the source regions. However, the sandstones have moderate to high values of CIA and PIA suggesting a moderate to intense weathering in the source regions. The SiO2/Al2O3 ratios, bivariate and ternary plots, discriminant function diagram and elemental ratios indicate the felsic source rocks for sandstone and shale of the Morita Formation.

  12. Designing vertical mine shafts under conditions of increasing shaft depth with rock hoisting to the operating mining level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.M.

    1983-05-01

    A system for shaft excavation in deep coal mines with mining depth exceeding 1,000 m is discussed. During mine sinking rocks are removed to the ground surface. When depth of a deep mine shaft is increased rocks are removed to the operating mining level, causing lower investment costs than the system with rock hoisting to the ground surface. The Yuzhgiproshakht design firm carries out investigations on the optimum methods for increasing shaft depth in coal mines. Coal mines with the following coal output are included in evaluations: 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 Mt/year. Mine shaft depth of 600, 800, 1000, 1200, 1400 and 1600 m is analyzed. Shaft depth is increased by 100, 200, 300 or 400 m. Shaft sinking rate ranges from 10 to 70 m/month. Effects of rock hoisting from the shaft bottom on the hoisting scheme in a mine shaft are analyzed. Position of hoisting bucket in relation to cages or skips moving in a shaft is investigated. Investigation results are given in 5 schemes. Analyses show that use of a shaft sinking system with rock hoisting to the ground surface during shaft excavation and with rock hoisting to the operating mining level during shaft depth increasing is economical when a shaft with skips is from 7 to 8 m in diameter or when a cage shaft is 6 m, 7 m or 8 m in diameter. Use of standardized shaft excavation systems is recommended. (In Russian)

  13. A paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of the Manicouagan impact structure: Implications for crater formation and geodynamo effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Michael; Gilder, Stuart A.; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Pohl, Jean

    2016-02-01

    We report rock magnetic and paleomagnetic data from the ~214 Ma Manicouagan (Canada) impact crater based on 25 widely distributed sites of impact melt and basement rocks collected at the surface as well as from boreholes drilled to depths ≤1.5 km. Titanomagnetite and titanohematite carry the magnetic remanence in impact melts above 320 m elevation and in most basement rocks. Impact melts below 320 m contain solely titanomagnetite. Magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization, proxies for titanomagnetite concentration, increase more than tenfold toward the base of the thickest impact melt that underwent fractional crystallization. The titanomagnetite-enriched zone partially contributes to a 2000 nT magnetic anomaly in the crater's center. Stepwise demagnetization reveals a single, normal polarity magnetization component in all samples regardless of the magnetic phases present. Coeval lock-in remanence times for titanomagnetite and titanohematite indicate that the titanohematite formed >570°C during oxi-exsolution. The average paleomagnetic direction and intensity coincide well with 214 Ma reference values. We find no evidence for an aberration of the geomagnetic field over the several thousands of years it took to cool a 481 m thick portion of the impact melt body. Hence, the energy released by the Manicouagan impact that created one of the 10 largest known craters on Earth provoked no measurable disturbance of the geodynamo. Magnetic anisotropy of clast-free impact melts define magnetic lineation directions that are, in places, radially oriented with respect to the crater's center. Centrifugal flow of the melt within the evolving transient crater probably generated the fabric.

  14. Effect of Rock Fragment Cover on Hydraulics Properties of Surface Flows and Rill Initiation with Simulating Runoff under Natural Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sara kalbali

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rock fragments on soil surfaces can also have several contrasting effects on the hydraulics of overland flow and soil erosion processes. Many investigators have found that a cover of rock fragments on a soil surface can decrease its erosion potential compared to bare soil surface (1, 12 and 18. This has mainly been attributed to the protection of the soil surface by rock fragments against the beating action of rain. This leads to a decrease in the intensity of surface sealing, an increase in the infiltration rate, a decrease in the runoff volume and rate, and, hence, a decrease in sediment generation and production for soils covered by rock fragments. Parameters that have been reported to be important for explaining the degree of runoff or soil loss from soils containing rock fragments include the position and size (15, geometry (18, and percentage cover (11 and 12 of rock fragments and the structure of fine earth (16. Surface rock fragment cover is a more important factor for hydroulic properties of surface flows such as flow depth, flow velocity, Manning’s roughness coefficient (n parameter and flow shear stress and geometrics properties of formed rill such as time, location, number, length, width and depth of rill. Surface rock fragment cover is directly affected soil erosion processes in dry area specially in areas that plant can not grow because of sever dryness and salinity. Also, Surface rock fragment prevent the contact of rain drops to aggregates, decreasing physical degradation by decreasing flow velocity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface rock fragment cover on hydraulic properties of surface flows and geometrics properties of formed rill. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 36 field plots of 20 meter length and 0.5 meter width with 3% slope were established in research field of agricultural faculty, Shahrekord University. Before each erosion event, topsoil was tilled

  15. Evaluation of the Catahoula Formation as a source rock for uranium mineralization, with emphasis on East Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledger, E.B. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Oligocene/Miocene Catahoula Formation of the Texas coastal plain is a fluvial and lacustrine volcaniclastic unit composed of normal fluvial material mixed with distal rhyolitic air-fall ash and, in the lower coastal plain, also stream-transported erosion detritus from the volcanic source area in Trans-Pecos Texas and adjacent northern Mexico, the nearest source of appropriate age and chemical affinity. Pedogenic and shallow-burial alteration of the labile volcanic glass component of the sediment resulted in ubiquitous secondary montmorillonite and solubilization of elements which are mobile in a HCO 3 -rich, near-surface environment. Primary uranium present in the glass at 5 to 6 ppMU was similarly mobilized and, under favorable conditions, accumulated by precipitation of tetravalent uranium phases at sites of lower Eh. Known economic deposits are restricted to the lower coastal plain where there has been uranium production for more than twenty years. Although there are differences between the productive lower coastal plain and the middle and upper as to stratigraphy, mineralogical composition, and weathering history, labile volcaniclastic material and its alteration products are abundant throughout the Catahoula outcrop and shallow subsurface in Texas. To provide a geochemical basis of comparison, samples from the upper, middle, and lower Texas coastal plain and the Trans-Pecos source area were analyzed for uranium, thorium, potassium, rubidium, strontium, zirconium, and titanium. These include both labile and immobile elements. Typical levels of these elements in the source material and relatively unaltered Catahoula volcanic glass allows estimation of uranium loss from highly altered sections based on their immobile element content

  16. Corrosion studies on selected packaging materials for disposal of heat-generating radioactive wastes in rock-salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Gago, J.A.; Azkarate, I.

    1992-04-01

    In previous corrosion studies, carbon steels and the alloy Ti 99.8-Pd were identified as promising materials for heat-generating nuclear waste packagings that could act as a barrier in a rock-salt repository. To characterize the corrosion behaviour of these materials in more detail, a research programme including laboratory-scale and in-situ corrosion studies has been undertaken jointly by KfK and ENRESA/INASMET. Besides carbon steels and Ti 99.8-Pd, also Hastelloy C4 and some Fe-base materials are being examined in order to complete the results available to date. (orig.) [de

  17. Petrogenesis of meta-volcanic rocks from the Maimón Formation (Dominican Republic): Geochemical record of the nascent Greater Antilles paleo-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torró, Lisard; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Marchesi, Claudio; Garcia-Casco, Antonio; Lewis, John F.

    2017-05-01

    Metamorphosed basalts, basaltic andesites, andesites and plagiorhyolites of the Early Cretaceous, probably pre-Albian, Maimón Formation, located in the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic, are some of the earliest products of the Greater Antilles arc magmatism. In this article, new whole-rock element and Nd-Pb radiogenic isotope data are used to give new insights into the petrogenesis of the Maimón meta-volcanic rocks and constrain the early evolution of the Greater Antilles paleo-arc system. Three different groups of mafic volcanic rocks are recognized on the basis of their immobile element contents. Group 1 comprises basalts with compositions similar to low-Ti island arc tholeiites (IAT), which are depleted in light rare earth elements (LREE) and resemble the forearc basalts (FAB) and transitional FAB-boninitic basalts of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana forearc. Group 2 rocks have boninite-like compositions relatively rich in Cr and poor in TiO2. Group 3 comprises low-Ti island arc tholeiitic basalts with near-flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns. Plagiorhyolites and rare andesites present near-flat to subtly LREE-depleted chondrite normalized patterns typical of tholeiitic affinity. Nd and Pb isotopic ratios of plagiorhyolites, which are similar to those of Groups 1 and 3 basalts, support that these felsic lavas formed by anatexis of the arc lower crust. Geochemical modelling points that the parental basic magmas of the Maimón meta-volcanic rocks formed by hydrous melting of a heterogeneous spinel-facies mantle source, similar to depleted MORB mantle (DMM) or depleted DMM (D-DMM), fluxed by fluids from subducted oceanic crust and Atlantic Cretaceous pelagic sediments. Variations of subduction-sensitive element concentrations and ratios from Group 1 to the younger rocks of Groups 2 and 3 generally match the geochemical progression from FAB-like to boninite and IAT lavas described in subduction-initiation ophiolites. Group 1 basalts likely formed at magmatic

  18. Maximization of permanent trapping of CO{sub 2} and co-contaminants in the highest-porosity formations of the Rock Springs Uplift (Southwest Wyoming): experimentation and multi-scale modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piri, Mohammad

    2014-03-31

    Under this project, a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Wyoming combined state-of-the-art experimental studies, numerical pore- and reservoir-scale modeling, and high performance computing to investigate trapping mechanisms relevant to geologic storage of mixed scCO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. The research included investigations in three fundamental areas: (i) the experimental determination of two-phase flow relative permeability functions, relative permeability hysteresis, and residual trapping under reservoir conditions for mixed scCO{sub 2}-­brine systems; (ii) improved understanding of permanent trapping mechanisms; (iii) scientifically correct, fine grid numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline aquifers taking into account the underlying rock heterogeneity. The specific activities included: (1) Measurement of reservoir-­conditions drainage and imbibition relative permeabilities, irreducible brine and residual mixed scCO{sub 2} saturations, and relative permeability scanning curves (hysteresis) in rock samples from RSU; (2) Characterization of wettability through measurements of contact angles and interfacial tensions under reservoir conditions; (3) Development of physically-­based dynamic core-­scale pore network model; (4) Development of new, improved high-­performance modules for the UW-­team simulator to provide new capabilities to the existing model to include hysteresis in the relative permeability functions, geomechanical deformation and an equilibrium calculation (Both pore-­ and core-­scale models were rigorously validated against well-­characterized core-­ flooding experiments); and (5) An analysis of long term permanent trapping of mixed scCO{sub 2} through high-­resolution numerical experiments and analytical solutions. The analysis takes into account formation heterogeneity, capillary trapping, and relative permeability hysteresis.

  19. Investigations into selection of temporary shaft design under conditions of rock freezing in the Lublin coal basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichur, A.; Wojtusiak, A.; Menzel, B.; Leszczynski, J. (Zaklad Badawczo-Rozwojowy Budownictwa Gorniczego BUDOKOP, Myslowice (Poland))

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates stratification of coal bearing strata in the Lublin basin, effects of rock freezing and types of shaft liners used in shafts excavated in frozen strata. Jurassic and Cretaceous strata, prone to water influx and quicksand inflows, were frozen using a system of 45 freezing holes to a depth of 755 m. The freezing ring was 6.5 m thick; freezing time was 12 months. Freezing improved mechanical properties of sedimentary strata. The following materials were used for construction of shaft liners: bricks, B25 class concrete 40 to 60 cm thick, elements made of B25 concrete, tubbings, monolithic concrete. Displacement of rock strata surrounding temporary liners was most intensive 7 to 12 days after excavation. Maximum rock displacement ranged from 30 to 35 mm. Timber boards placed between the liners and surrounding strata were used as a yielding layer. 13 refs.

  20. Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, K.

    1980-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: a synthesis of seismic experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot-Dry-Rock System; attenuation of high-frequency shear waves in the lithosphere; a new kinematic source model for deep volcanic tremors; ground motion in the near-field of a fluid-driven crack and its interpretation in the study of shallow volcanic tremor; low-velocity bodies under geothermal areas; and operation of event recorders in Mt. St. Helens and Newberry Peak with preliminary results from them. (MHR)

  1. Geochemistry and origin of metamorphosed mafic rocks from the Lower Paleozoic Moretown and Cram Hill Formations of North-Central Vermont: Delamination magmatism in the western New England appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coish, Raymond; Kim, Jonathan; Twelker, Evan; Zolkos, Scott P.; Walsh, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The Moretown Formation, exposed as a north-trending unit that extends from northern Vermont to Connecticut, is located along a critical Appalachian litho-tectonic zone between the paleomargin of Laurentia and accreted oceanic terranes. Remnants of magmatic activity, in part preserved as metamorphosed mafic rocks in the Moretown Formation and the overlying Cram Hill Formation, are a key to further understanding the tectonic history of the northern Appalachians. Field relationships suggest that the metamorphosed mafic rocks might have formed during and after Taconian deformation, which occurred at ca. 470 to 460 Ma. Geochemistry indicates that the sampled metamorphosed mafic rocks were mostly basalts or basaltic andesites. The rocks have moderate TiO2 contents (1–2.5 wt %), are slightly enriched in the light-rare earth elements relative to the heavy rare earths, and have negative Nb-Ta anomalies in MORB-normalized extended rare earth element diagrams. Their chemistry is similar to compositions of basalts from western Pacific extensional basins near volcanic arcs. The metamorphosed mafic rocks of this study are similar in chemistry to both the pre-Silurian Mount Norris Intrusive Suite of northern Vermont, and also to some of Late Silurian rocks within the Lake Memphremagog Intrusive Suite, particularly the Comerford Intrusive Complex of Vermont and New Hampshire. Both suites may be represented among the samples of this study. The geochemistry of all samples indicates that parental magmas were generated in supra-subduction extensional environments during lithospheric delamination.

  2. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  3. Oceanic anoxic events of the Cretaceous period and their role in the formation of source rocks in the basins of continental margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Konyukhov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cretaceous period was marked not only by the dominance of warm climate, vast transgressions of the sea and widespread occurrence of carbonate deposits, but also by the formation of the richest petroleum formations, which are associated with the generation of a huge amount of hydrocarbons in the largest oil and gas basins of modern continental margins. Both early and late Cretaceous epochs were marked by several oceanic anoxic events (OAE of global and regional scale, accompanied by the accumulation of sediments enriched in organic matter, and by significant shifts in the ratios of stable isotopes C, O, and Sr. Various aspects of these events are considered in a huge number of articles published in recent years in major scientific publications. Unfortunately, their role in the formation of oil reservoirs has remained outside the scope of scientific analysis. Meanwhile Cretaceous OAE’s had led to the spreading of black shale and other sediments with high content of organic matter on the floor of Tethys ocean, central part of Atlantic and on the seamounts in the Pacific ocean. Among them only OAE 1a (Selli and OAE 2 (Bonarelli are known as more large anoxic events. The first occurred in the middle of Aptian time, the second near the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (CTB. The analysis of the spreading of source rocks in the largest oil-and-gas bearing basins on the continental margins at that time – the Persian Gulf, Maracaibo, Middle and Upper Magdalena river, Putumayo and other basins – showed that episodes of OAE’s had not always found a reflection in the succession of major source rock’s formations. In the Persian Gulf a list of source rocks includes Hanifa, Garau, Gadvan, Kazhdumi, Ahmadi member and Gurpi formations of Cretaceous age. Thus it is certain that OAE’s were only separate parts of more complex history of accumulation of black shale and carbonate deposits with high content of total organic carbon on the continental margins

  4. Fracture corridors as seal-bypass systems in siliciclastic reservoir-cap rock successions: Field-based insights from the Jurassic Entrada Formation (SE Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kei; Senger, Kim; Braathen, Alvar; Tveranger, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Closely spaced, sub-parallel fracture networks contained within localized tabular zones that are fracture corridors may compromise top seal integrity and form pathways for vertical fluid flow between reservoirs at different stratigraphic levels. This geometry is exemplified by fracture corridors found in outcrops of the Jurassic Entrada Formation in Utah (USA). These fracture corridors exhibit discolored (bleached) zones, interpreted as evidence of ancient fracture-enhanced circulation of reducing fluids within an exhumed siliciclastic reservoir-cap rock succession. Extensive structural and stratigraphic mapping and logging provided fracture data for analysis with respect to their occurrence and relationships to larger faults and folds. Three types of fracture corridors, representing end-members of a continuum of possibly interrelated structures were identified: 1) fault damage zone including segment relays; 2) fault-tip process zone; and 3) fold-related crestal-zone fracture corridors. The three types exhibit intrinsic orientations and patterns, which in sum define a local- to regional network of inferred vertical and lateral, high-permeability conduits. The results from our analysis may provide improved basis for the evaluation of trap integrity and flow paths across the reservoir-cap rock interface, applicable to both CO2 storage operations and the hydrocarbon industry.

  5. Studies of thermal and radiation effects on water-rock systems related to envisaged isolation of high level radioactive wastes in crystalline formations of the Ukrainian shield (Ukraine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovchenko, A.; Kalinichenko, E.; Ivanitsky, V.; Bagmut, M.; Plastinina, M.; Zlobenko, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this work there are presented the general data on the study of thermal and radiation effects in minerals separated from rocks of the Ukrainian shield. These minerals (quartz, feldspar, amphiboles, apatite, biotite, kaolinite, etc.), exposed by doses 10 4 , 10 6 , 10 8 Gy by Co 60 source, were studied by a complex of physical methods. Special attention was given to the study of radiation defects formation (electron-hole paramagnetic centres, OH- groups destruction, changes in a charge state of ions) in a mineral structure. The mentioned radiation defects were used in the extrapolation method. The connection between structural peculiarities of minerals (containing uranium and thorium) and processes of their metamyctization are considered. It is demonstrated that the minerals, which have large channels or interlayer spaces in their structure, as a rule, are not metamyct. Using the spectroscopic methods of the extrapolation it is shown that the crystalline massifs, which do not have detectable amounts of hydroxyl containing minerals (biotite, amphibole, etc.) and ions Fe 2- , are perspective for long-lived radioactive wastes (RAW) dumping. As it follows from obtained results, the rocks, containing minerals with OH- groups and gas-liquid inclusions, should be considered as the 'mineral-water' system. (author)

  6. 76 FR 771 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 14 Under Alternative Site Framework; Little Rock, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trade Zones..., Montgomery, Nevada, Pike, Pulaski, Pope, Saline, Yell and White Counties, Arkansas, within and adjacent to the Little Rock Customs and Border [[Page 772

  7. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of lithium’s possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. We predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDβ , β =0.25 , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid-solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. We also observe formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  8. Evaluation of radiological safety assessment of a repository in a clay rock formation. Evaluacion del comportamiento y de la seguridad de un almacenamiento profundo en arcilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-12-15

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program excavated in a clay host rock formation. In this report three scenarios have been analysed in detail. The first scenario represents the normal in detail. The first scenario represents the normal evolution of the repository (Reference Scenario); and includes a set of variants to investigate the relative importance of the various repository components and examine the sensitivity of the performance to parameters variations. Two altered scenarios have also been considered: deep well construction and poor sealing of the repository. This document contains a detailed description of the repository system, the methodology adopted for the scenarios generation, the process modelling approach and the results of the consequences analysis. (Author)

  9. Pd-based alloy nanoclusters in ion-implanted silica: Formation and stability under thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglin, G.; Cattaruzza, E.; De Marchi, G.; Gonella, F.; Mattei, G. E-mail: mattei@padova.infm.it; Maurizio, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Parolin, M.; Sada, C.; Calliari, I

    2002-05-01

    In this work we report on the formation and stability under thermal annealing of Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag alloy nanoclusters obtained by sequential ion implantation in silica. The role of the annealing atmosphere on the alloy cluster formation and stability is investigated. A comparison is made with similar alloy-based systems obtained by sequential ion implantation in silica of Au-Ag or Au-Cu followed by annealing under similar conditions, in order to evidence the peculiar effect of the various metals in controlling the alloy evolution and/or decomposition.

  10. Evaluation of source rocks in the 5th member of the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation in the Xinchang Gas Field, the Western Sichuan Depression, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The 5th member of the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation (T3x5 is one of the important targets for terrigenous natural gas exploration in the Xinchang Gas Field in the Western Sichuan Depression, however, the quality of the T3x5 source rocks is poorly studied and the understanding of it is controversial. Studies have been conducted on the development and organic geochemical characteristics of the T3x5 mudstone in the Xinchang Gas Field, and the results indicate that, the T3x5 mudstone in the Xinchang Gas Field display an average thickness of 285.3 m, and the thickness of each submember increases from north to south. The average TOC content, hydrocarbon potential (S1+S2 and chloroform bitumen “A” content of T3x5 mudstone are 2.17%, 2.26 mg/g and 0.264‰, respectively, with the organic abundance mainly reaching the standard of medium source rocks. The kerogen type index (TI is lower than 0 with the mean δ13C value of −25.0‰, indicating mainly humic and sapropelic-humic types of organic matters. The average vitrinite reflectance (RO value is 1.17%, indicating the stage after the peak of oil generation. The gas generation intensity of T3x5 mudstone is generally in the range of (3–16 × 108 m3/km2, which suggests the resource basis for the generation of medium-small gas fields. The total amount of natural gas generated by T3x5 mudstone in the Xinchang Gas Field is relatively low, and the generated gas cannot completely displace the water in the formation, therefore, the fullness of gas in the reservoirs is generally low, which causes the simultaneous production of gas and water and the low gas production in the process of production test.

  11. Palaeoenvironmental study and sequence stratigraphy of Sanghaneh Formation in Qalehjegh section (North of Bojnord using organic matter contents of the rock unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   Kopeh-Dagh basin is located northeast of Iran and in this basin the sedimentary beds began from middle Jurassic. The Sanghaneh Formation is one of the lower Cretaceous rock units in sections. One of the important fossils group are palynomorphs that described very abundant in this formation. Dinocysts diversity on this formation is more than other palynomorph groups. Palynological studies are done by keshmiry et al. (2014, davtalab et al. (2007 and etc. This formation here is laying on Sarcheshmeh Formation and is covered by Aitamir Formation. The age of this formation in the Qalehjegh section based on the dinoflagellate assemblage, is Late Aptian – Early Albian. Purpose of this research is palaeoenvironmental study base on palynofacies interprets and to separate sedimentary sequence Kopeh-Dagh sedimentary basin. Qalehjegh section is located between 57 ˚ 23 ’ 03 ” E and 37 ˚ 43 ’ 17 ” N. The formation comprises mainly calcareous shale and shale with siltstone and interlaminations of limestone and argillaceous limestone. The Sanghaneh Formation is studied base on several group of fossils in other using organic matter contents of the rock unit.     Material & Methods   For palaeoenvironmental and sequence stratigraphy purposes, 127 rock samples collected from the formation and prepared in the palynology laboratory.Standard preparation methods were used (Traverse 2007. Cold hydrochloric (30% and hydrofluoric (30% acids were used to dissolve carbonates and silicates. No oxidants or alkalis were used. The residue was neutralized and centrifuged in ZnCl2 (specific gravity 1.9, then sieved at 20 µm using a nylon mesh, and mounted on microscope slides using liquid Canada balsam and then the slides were examined in the transmittal microscope.     Discussion of Results & Conclusions   Palaeoenvironmental interpretation: Three main groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM can be distinguished: (1 amorphous organic

  12. Palaeoenvironmental study and sequence stratigraphy of Sanghaneh Formation in Qalehjegh section (North of Bojnord using organic matter contents of the rock unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction   Kopeh-Dagh basin is located northeast of Iran and in this basin the sedimentary beds began from middle Jurassic. The Sanghaneh Formation is one of the lower Cretaceous rock units in sections. One of the important fossils group are palynomorphs that described very abundant in this formation. Dinocysts diversity on this formation is more than other palynomorph groups. Palynological studies are done by keshmiry et al. (2014, davtalab et al. (2007 and etc. This formation here is laying on Sarcheshmeh Formation and is covered by Aitamir Formation. The age of this formation in the Qalehjegh section based on the dinoflagellate assemblage, is Late Aptian – Early Albian. Purpose of this research is palaeoenvironmental study base on palynofacies interprets and to separate sedimentary sequence Kopeh-Dagh sedimentary basin. Qalehjegh section is located between 57 ˚ 23 ’ 03 ” E and 37 ˚ 43 ’ 17 ” N. The formation comprises mainly calcareous shale and shale with siltstone and interlaminations of limestone and argillaceous limestone. The Sanghaneh Formation is studied base on several group of fossils in other using organic matter contents of the rock unit.     Material & Methods   For palaeoenvironmental and sequence stratigraphy purposes, 127 rock samples collected from the formation and prepared in the palynology laboratory.Standard preparation methods were used (Traverse 2007. Cold hydrochloric (30% and hydrofluoric (30% acids were used to dissolve carbonates and silicates. No oxidants or alkalis were used. The residue was neutralized and centrifuged in ZnCl2 (specific gravity 1.9, then sieved at 20 µm using a nylon mesh, and mounted on microscope slides using liquid Canada balsam and then the slides were examined in the transmittal microscope.     Discussion of Results & Conclusions   Palaeoenvironmental interpretation: Three main groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM

  13. Simultaneous leaching of arsenite, arsenate, selenite and selenate, and their migration in tunnel-excavated sedimentary rocks: I. Column experiments under intermittent and unsaturated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Park, Ilhwan; Tamoto, Shuichi; Arima, Takahiko; Ito, Mayumi; Hiroyoshi, Naoki

    2017-11-01

    Rocks excavated in tunnel construction projects for roads and railways throughout Japan often leached out hazardous trace elements like arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) upon their exposure to the environment. In nature, the various oxyanionic species of As and Se not only coexist but also exhibit contrasting adsorption-desorption behaviors, so speciation is a crucial factor in their migration through natural geologic media. In this study, the leaching and transport of arsenite (As III ), arsenate (As V ), selenite (Se IV ) and selenate (Se VI ) in four tunnel-excavated rocks from the Cretaceous-Paleocene Yezo forearc basin were investigated using laboratory column experiments supplemented by batch leaching experiments. The single- and consecutive-batch leaching results revealed that As III , As V , Se IV and Se VI were released simultaneously, which could be attributed to the rapid dissolution of trace evaporite salts found in the rocks. Arsenic in the leachates was also predominated by As V while Se IV and Se VI concentrations were nearly equal, which are both consistent with predictions of equilibrium Eh-pH diagrams. Under intermittent and unsaturated flow, however, periods when As III and Se VI predominated in the effluents were observed. Spatial distributions of As and Se species with depth at the end of the column experiments suggest that migrations of As III , As V and Se IV were delayed, the extent of which depended on the rock. These results indicate that migration and speciation of As and Se in the rocks are controlled by preferential adsorption-desorption reactions, the effects of which were most probably magnified by changes in the pH and concentrations of coexisting ions due to intermittent and unsaturated flow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting the Sources and Formation Mechanisms of Evolved Lunar Crust by Linking K/Ca Ratios of Lunar Granites to Analogous Terrestrial Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    Although silicic rocks (i.e. granites and rhyolites) comprise a minor component of the sampled portion of the lunar crust, recent remote sensing studies [e.g., 1-4] indicate that several un-sampled regions of the Moon have significantly higher concentrations of silicic material (also high in [K], [U], and [Th]) than sampled regions. Within these areas are morphological features that are best explained by the existence of chemically evolved volcanic rocks. Observations of silicic domes [e.g., 1-5] suggest that sizable networks of silicic melt were present during crust formation. Isotopic data indicate that silicic melts were generated over a prolonged timespan from 4.3 to 3.9 Ga [e.g., 6-8]. The protracted age range and broad distribution of silicic rocks on the Moon indicate that their petrogenesis was an important mechanism for secondary crust formation. Understanding the origin and evolution of such silicic magmas is critical to determining the composition of the lunar crustal highlands and will help to distinguish between opposing ideas for the Moon's bulk composition and differentiation. The two main hypotheses for generating silicic melts on Earth are fractional crystallization or partial melting. On the Moon silicic melts are thought to have been generated during extreme fractional crystallization involving end-stage silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI) [e.g. 9, 10]. However, SLI cannot account for the production of significant volumes of silicic melt and its wide distribution, as reported by the remote global surveys [1, 2, 3]. In addition, experimental and natural products of SLI show that U and Th, which are abundant in the lunar granites and seen in the remote sensing data of the domes, are preferentially partitioned into the depolymerized ferrobasaltic magma and not the silicic portion [11, 12]. If SLI is not the mechanism that generated silicic magmas on the Moon then alternative processes such as fractional crystallization (only crystal

  15. A whole rock absolute paleointensity determination of dacites from the Duffer Formation (ca. 3.467 Ga) of the Pilbara Craton, Australia: An impossible task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Krasa, David; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2016-09-01

    We have conducted a whole-rock type magnetic and absolute paleointensity determination of the red dacite of the Duffer Formation from the Pilbara Craton, Australia. The age of the dated rock unit is 3467 ± 5 Ma (95% confidence). Vector analyses results of the step-wise alternating field demagnetization (NRM up to 100 mT) and thermal demagnetization (from NRM up to 650 °C) yield three components of magnetization. Curie point determinations indicate three characteristic temperatures, one at 150-200 °C, a second one at ∼450 °C and a third one at ∼580 °C. Magnetic grain-size experiments were performed on small specimens with a variable field translation balance (VFTB). The coercivity of remanence (Hcr) suggests that the NRM is carried by low-coercivity grains that are associated with a magnetite fraction as is shown by the high-temperature component with blocking temperatures above 450 °C and up to at least 580 °C. The ratios of the hysteresis parameters plotted as a modified Day diagram show that most grain sizes are scattered within the Single Domain (SD) and the Superparamagnetic and Single Domain SP-SD domain ranges. In addition to the rock magnetic experiments we have performed absolute paleointensity experiments on the samples using the modified Thellier-Coe double heating method to determine the paleointensities. Partial-TRM (p-TRM) checks were performed systematically to document magnetomineralogical changes during heating. The temperature was incremented by steps of 50 °C between room temperature and 590 °C. The paleointensity determinations were obtained from the slope of Arai diagrams. Our paleointensity results indicate that the paleofield obtained was ∼6.4 ± 0.68 (N = 11) micro-Teslas with a Virtual Dipole Moment (VDM) of 1.51 ± 0.81 × 1022 Am2, from a medium-to high-temperature component ranging from 300 to 590 °C that has been interpreted to be the oldest magnetization yet recorded in paleomagnetic studies of the Duffer Formation. The

  16. Alteration processes and residual deposits affecting rock formations in Asturias and its socioeconomic impact; Procesos y productos de alteracion de formaciones rocosas en Asturias y su repercusion socio-economica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Clverol, M.; Pando, L.; Garcia-Ramos, J. C.

    2008-07-01

    Phenomena of alteration affecting different rock formations in Asturias are described in this paper; several of them have generated significant accumulations of residual materials along its geological history, and they have metric thicknesses while covering vast extensions, so that at times have been interpreted as lithostratigraphic formations. On the other hand, they have a great social interest related to the economic benefit derived from mining of materials which proceeding from the degradation of Palaeozoic units. Also, many geotechnical difficulties located in urban areas or civil constructions are caused by decalcification clays and sand. They are originated from the dissolution of Mesozoic carbonate rocks. (Author) 24 refs.

  17. ROCK2 and MYLK variants under hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude associate with high altitude pulmonary edema and adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Pandey,1,2 Ghulam Mohammad,1,3 Yogendra Singh,1,2 MA Qadar Pasha1,2 1Functional Genomics Unit, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, 2Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 3Department of Medicine, SNM Hospital, Leh, Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir, IndiaObjective: To date, a major class of kinases, serine–threonine kinase, has been scantly investigated in stress-induced rare, fatal (if not treated early, and morbid disorder, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. This study examined three major serine–threonine kinases, ROCK2, MYLK, and JNK1, along with six other genes, tyrosine hydroxylase, G-protein subunits GNA11 and GNB3, and alpha1 adrenergic receptor isoforms 1A, 1B, and 1D as candidate gene markers of HAPE and adaptation.Methods: For this, 57 variants across these nine genes were genotyped in HAPE patients (n=225, HAPE controls (n=210, and highlanders (n=259 by Sequenom MS (TOF-based MassARRAY® platform using iPLEX™ Gold technology. In addition, to study the gene expression, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the three study groups.Results: A significant association was observed for C allele (ROCK2 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs10929728 with HAPE (P=0.03 and C, T, and A alleles (MYLK single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs11717814, rs40305, and rs820336 with both HAPE and adaptation (P=0.001, P=0.006, and P=0.02, respectively. ROCK2 88 kb GGGTTGGT haplotype was associated with lower risk of HAPE (P=0.0009. MYLK 7 kb haplotype CTA, composed of variant alleles, was associated with higher risk of HAPE (P=0.0006 and lower association with adaptation (P=1E–06, whereas haplotype GCG, composed of wild-type alleles, was associated with lower risk of HAPE (P=0.001 and higher association with adaptation (P=1E–06. Haplotype–haplotype and gene–gene interactions demonstrated a correlation in working

  18. Authigenic albite formation due to water-rock interactions - Case study: Magnus oilfield (UK, Northern North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nana; Fu, Yunjiao; Schulz, Hans-Martin; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this contribution to test whether organic-inorganic interactions could induce the formation of authigenic albite. This concept and related results are being compared with modelling scenarios which are purely based on inorganic geochemical reactions. In order to unravel the pathway of authigenic albite formation, this paper presents results of a multidisciplinary study from imaging, geochemistry, mineralogy, and hydrogeochemical modelling. The Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield (UK, North Sea) were chosen as a test site. Albite occurs with 4-18 wt.% in the Magnus sandstones and its contents vary with depth. However, albite contents increase with increasing K-feldspar contents and decreasing grain size. It occurs in three forms: (1) as lamellae in perthite, (2) as overgrowth on/in corroded feldspar, and, (3) as cloudy replacing albite patches in K-feldspar. The albite overgrowth has the highest chemical purity (100% albite) whilst albite lamellae and replacing albite patches are slightly less pure (containing 1-4% anorthite). Albite appears non-altered, and has a euhedral morphology and dull cathodoluminescence. It commonly co-occurs with corroded K-feldspar grains. The precipitation of diagenetic albite in the Magnus sandstones is attributed to deep burial 80 Ma ago and may have continued until today at temperatures between 90-120 °C. The results of hydrogeochemical modelling offer two possible pathways for the authigenic albite formation: (1) Dissolution of unstable minerals (such as kaolinite and chalcedony) coupled to reduction of ferric iron minerals by products generated during oil generation, migration and degradation; (2) Dissolution of non-end member feldspar, such as K-feldspar with 10% albite, coupled to illite formation can account for trace amounts of albite due to an elevated Na+/K+ activity ratio in the pore water.

  19. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  20. Interstratified arkosic and volcanic rocks of the Miocene Spanish Canyon Formation, Alvord Mountain area, California: descriptions and interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Spanish Canyon Foundation in the Alvord Mountain area, California, varies from about 50 to 120 m thick and records the interstratification of arkosic sandstone and conglomerate with tuffaceous deposits and lava flows. In the lower third of the formation, arkosic sandstone and conglomerate are interstratified with tuffaceous deposits. Some tuffs might have been deposited as primary, nonwelded to partially welded ignimbrites or fallout tephra. Many of the tuffaceous deposits represent redeposited material that formed tuffaceous sandstone, and many of these deposits contain arkosic grains that represent mixing of different source matieral. Arkosic sandstone, and especially conglomerate (some with maximum clast lengths up to 1 m), represent intermittent incursions of coarser plutoniclastic fan deposits into other finer grained and mostly volcaniclastic basin deposits. After deposition of the 18.78 Ma Peach Spring Tuff, the amount of tuffaceous material decreased. The upper two-thirds of the formation has arkosic sandstone and conglomerate interstratified with two olivine basalt lave flows. locally, conglomerate clasts in this part of the section have maximum lengths up to 1 m. Many tuffaceous and arkosic sandstone beds of the Spanish Canyon Formation have tabular to broad (low-relief) lenticular geometry, and locally, some arkosic conglomerate fills channels as much as 1.5 m deep. These bedforms are consistent with deposition in medial to distal alluvial-fan or fluvial environments; some finer-grained deposits might have formed in lacustrine environments.

  1. Integrated rock properties and fluid distribution determination using core and log data, Oficina Formation, Ayacucho area, Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Useche, F.; Bejarano, C. [Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. (Venezuela); Didanloo, A.; Shahbazian, S. [Petropars Ltd. (Venezuela)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented the results of an integrated study of the Ayacucho area in the southern flank of Eastern Venezuela Basin in which the flow behaviour in different parts of the central Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt was investigated. The thickest and most extensive oil bearing sand bodies were studied in an effort to maximize the recovery of hydrocarbons in the area. The sedimentology of the Oficina Formation was presented along with a review of pore types and sizes, core descriptions, thin-sections and SEM photomicrographs. Three-dimensional modeling of the Oficina Formation in Ayacucho area was carried out through geological and reservoir engineering studies. All core description information was digitized and taken quantitatively into account during the studies, particularly the lithotyping. All relevant core and log data were loaded and analyzed in Geolog6 software, which was also used for the geological correlation and petrophysical evaluation. Eleven major lithofacies were identified in the lower to middle sections of the Oficina Formation. Three additional lithofacies were only observed in the middle to upper sections. The Flow Zone Indicator method was used to predict permeability. Seven different flow units were compared and further validated with the capillary measurements and pore throat size distributions. All the relevant properties were propagated in the 3D geological models, through most representative relationships established between the core and log data. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs.

  2. Influence of deformation on the fluid transport properties of salt rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peach, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    While the fluid transport properties of rocks are well understood under hydrostatic conditions, little is known regarding these properties in rocks undergoing crystal plastic deformation. However, such data are needed as input in the field of radioactive waste disposal in salt formations. They

  3. Influence of deformation on the fluid transport properties of salt rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peach, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    While the fluid transport properties of rocks are well understood under hydrostatic conditions, little is known regarding these properties in rocks undergoing crystal plastic deformation. However, such data are needed as input in the field of radioactive waste disposal in salt formations. They are

  4. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even tho...

  5. Visualization of hot spot formation in energetic materials under periodic mechanical excitation using phosphor thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Alex; Fenoglio, Gabriel; Detrinidad, Humberto

    2017-06-01

    Under mechanical excitation, energy is known to localize within an energetic material resulting in `hot spot' formation. While many formation mechanisms have been proposed, additional insight to heat generation mechanisms, the effect of binder/crystal interfaces, and predication capabilities can be gained by quantifying the initiation and growth of the hot spots. Phosphor thermography is a well established temperature sensing technique wherein an object's temperature is obtained by collecting the temperature dependent luminescence of an optically excited phosphor. Herein, the phosphor thermography technique has been applied to Dow Corning Sylgard® 184/octahydro 1,3,5,7 tetranitro 1,3,5,7 tetrazocine (HMX) composite materials under mechanical excitation in order to visualize the evolution of the temperature field, and thus hot spot formation, within the binder. Funded by AFOSR. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  6. Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite studied by in situ X-ray diffraction under autoclave condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Matsui, Kunio; Sato, Masugu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite from a pre-cured cake has been investigated by transmission X-ray diffraction (XRD) using high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly designed autoclave cell. The autoclave cell has a large and thin beryllium window for wide-angle X-ray diffraction; nevertheless, it withstands a steam pressure of more than 1.2 MPa, which enables in situ XRD measurements in a temperature range of 373 to 463 K under a saturated steam pressure. Formation and/or decomposition of several components has been successfully observed during 7.5 h of reaction time. From the intensity changes of the intermediate materials, namely non-crystalline C-S-H and hydroxylellestadite, two pathways for tobermorite formation have been confirmed. Thus, the newly developed autoclave cell can be used for the analyses of reaction mechanisms under specific atmospheres and temperatures.

  7. New Insights into an Old Cycle: The Marine Phosphorus Cycle and the Formation of Critical Phosphate Rock Resources (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    The cycling and geochemistry of phosphorus (P) in the marine environment is a critical component of biological productivity and of resource availability: P control the long-term carbon cycle via its role as a limiting nutrient, and the burial and concentration of P within marine sediments dictates the quality and availability of P as a fertilizer component from a resources standpoint. Given the projections of severe P fertilizer limitation over the next several centuries, understanding the controls on P geochemistry and concentration into a minable resource is critical in sustaining global populations. Several critical aspects of the marine P cycle have been uncovered over the past few decades which have clarified our understanding of P burial and concentration. First, the initial authigenic process of P mineralization within marine sediments, termed phosphogenesis, seems to occur regardless of marine setting. Phosphogenesis results from the release of P into sedimentary pore waters from organic and oxide-bound fractions, and the subsequent supersaturation with respect to carbonate fluorapatite. In sediment-starved basins with significant upwelling-driven productivity, the supply of P into sedimentary pore waters can be so high that visibly apparent layers of carbonate fluorapatite can be formed. Even in such environments, however, the mineral P content is too low to be of economic value unless it has undergone concentration via sediment reworking, a common occurrence in some dynamic continental margin environments. Thus, a combination of phosphogenesis in a high productivity setting plus sediment starvation plus condensation via reworking are necessary to produce phosphorites, sedimentary rocks with high P contents which are ideal as fertilizer-grade P resources. Given these special marine conditions, phosphorites are largely distributed along ancient marine environments (with the exception of the nearly-depleted atoll guano reserves). The largest currently

  8. Geothermal properties of deep crystalline rock formations in the Rhone valley - Preliminary study; Geothermie du cristallin profond de la vallee du Rhone - Etude preliminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, G.; Crestin, G. [Alpgeo Sarl, Sierre (Switzerland); Kohl, T. [Geowatt AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Graf, G. [Bureau de service et d' ingenierie BSI SA, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    This report prepared for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the possibility of cogenerating electric power and heat from geothermal energy stored in deep aquifers in the southwestern Swiss Alps. The project AGEPP (Alpine Geothermal Power Production) investigates an alternative to the well known Hot-Dry-Rock systems by looking at the crystalline formations in the alpine Rhone valley. Since centuries, these formations have been utilized for thermal spas. Two locations, Brigerbad and Lavey-les-Bains have been evaluated in the present report by the companies ALPGEO Sarl, GEOWATT AG and BSI SA. Existing boreholes at both locations show ample flow and substantial temperature gradients down to 600 meters, suggesting possible reservoir temperatures above 110 {sup o}C and a low mineralization (below 5 grams per liter). Flow rates of 50 to 75 liters/s at 110 {sup o}C seem possible and could be utilized in an ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) for power production up to 1.3 MW. The power production costs are estimated at 0.08 CHF/kWh (singlet system) and 0.27 CHF/kWh (doublet system) respectively. The study implies that cogenerated heat is sold at a price of 0.08 CHF/kWh. These prices could compete with other alternative energies. Phase 2 of the project will evaluate the feasibility at the location of Lavey-les-Bains.

  9. Distinguishing major lithologic types in rocks of precambrian age in central Wyoming using multilevel sensing, with a chapter on possible economic significance of iron formation discovered by use of aircraft images in the Granite Mountains of Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Information obtained by remote sensing from three altitude levels: ERTS-1 (565 miles), U-2 (60,000 feet), and C-130 aircraft (15,000 feet) illustrates the possible application of multilevel sensing in mineral exploration. Distinction can be made between rocks of greenstone belts and rocks of granite-granite gneiss areas by using ERTS-1 imagery in portions of the Precambrian of central Wyoming. Study of low altitude color and color infrared photographs of the mafic terrain revealed the presence of metasedimentary rocks with distinct layers that were interpreted as amphibolite by photogeologic techniques. Some of the amphibolite layers were found to be iron formation when examined in the field. To our knowledge this occurrence of iron formation has not been previously reported in the literature.

  10. Science Rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  11. CosmoBon for studying wood formation under exotic gravitational environment for future space agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Funada, Ryo; Nakamura, Teruko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Cosmobon, Jstwg

    We are proposing to raise woody plants in space for several applications and plant science. Japanese flowering cherry tree is one of a candidate for these studies. Mechanism behind sensing gravity and controlling shape of tree has been studied quite extensively. Even molecular mechanism for the response of plant against gravity has been investigated quite intensively for various species, woody plants are left behind. Morphology of woody branch growth is different from that of stem growth in herbs. Morphology in tree is strongly dominated by the secondary xylem formation. Nobody knows the tree shape grown under the space environment. If whole tree could be brought up to space as research materials, it might provide important scientific knowledge. Furthermore, trees produce excess oxygen, wooden materials for living cabin, and provide biomass for cultivating mushroom and insect as for the space agriculture. Excellent tree shapes which would be deeply related to wood formation improve quality of life under stressful environment in outer space. The serious problem would be their size. Bonsai is one of the Japanese traditional arts. We can study secondly xylem formation, wood formation, under exotic gravitational environment using Bonsai. "CosmoBon" is the small tree Bonsai for our space experiment. It has been recognized that the reaction wood in CosmoBon is formed similar to natural trees. Our goal is to examine feasibility to grow various species of trees in space as bioresource for space agriculture.

  12. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  13. Predicting hydrocarbon potential of an earth formation underlying a body of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.R.; Demaison, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for the on-site collection and examination of small concentrations of methane dissolved in water so as to predict hydrocarbon potential of an earth formation underlying a body of water, said formation being a source of said methane, comprises: (i) sampling the water; (ii) continuously vacuum separating said water into liquid and gas phases; (iii) quantitatively separating interfering gas species from methane; (iv) quantitatively oxidising said methane; (v) cryogenically trapping the resulting gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor at a trapping station, and (vi) isotopically examining said trapped carbon dioxide and water vapour for carbon and deuterium distribution. (author)

  14. Clay under the magnifier. Scientists are investigating the properties of claystone in the international Mont Terri rock laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In the present report of the Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources whose activities and projects are presented. Among the issues: securing supplies of raw materials; Receive livelihoods; Develop and link Knowledge of Geosciences. Use deep underground, protected against geological hazards, assist developing countries, monitor Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban. Described are also studies of clay-mineral processes in barrier systems, studies of the long-term safety of the Morsleben repository, as well as international research of clay in the Swiss Mont Terri Rock Loboratory on the suitability of claystone as repository for secure high-level radioactive waste. [de

  15. Requirements for a long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances stored in a final storage facility for high radioactive and heat-generating radioactive waste in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholen, M.; Hippler, J.; Herzog, C.

    2007-01-01

    Within the scope of a project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technologie, BMWi), a safety certification concept for a future permanent final storage for high radioactive and heat-generating radioactive waste (HAW disposal facility) in rock salt formations is being prepared. For a reference concept, compliance with safety requirements in regard to operational safety as well as radiological and non-radiological protection objectives related to long-term safety, including ground water protection, will be evaluated. This paper deals with the requirements for a long-term safety certification for the purpose of protecting ground water from chemotoxic substances. In particular, longterm safety certifications for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste in a HAW disposal facility in rock salt formations and for the dumping of hazardous waste in underground storage facilities in rock salt formations are first discussed, followed by an evaluation as to whether these methods can be applied to the long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances. The authors find it advisable to apply the long-term safety certification for underground storage facilities to the long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances stored in a HAW disposal facility in rock salt formations. In conclusion, a corresponding certification concept is introduced. (orig.)

  16. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  17. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (Penterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fresh garlic extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panan Ratthawongjirakul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the leading aetiological pathogens of nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria form biofilms on both biotic and abiotic surfaces causing biofilm-associated infections. Within the biofilm, these bacteria might develop persistent and antimicrobial resistant characteristics resulting in chronic infections and treatment failures. Garlic exhibits broad pharmaceutical properties and inhibitory activities against S. aureus. We investigated the effects of aqueous fresh garlic extract on biofilm formation in S. aureus ATCC25923 and MRSA strains under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions. The viable bacteria and biofilm levels were quantified through colony count and crystal violet staining, respectively. The use of fresh garlic extract under both conditions significantly inhibited biofilm formation in S. aureus strains ATCC25923 and MRSA. Garlic could be developed as either a prophylactic or therapeutic agent to manage S. aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  19. The Formation of Carbon Nanostructures via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Naphthalene under Its Autogenic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, spherical carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and carbon spheres (CSs is accomplished by using the method of reactions under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures (RAPET. A powder mixture of naphthalene and nickel acetate tetrahydrate is dissociated under its autogenic pressure. The resultant CNTs and CNCs exhibit good graphitic quality, and the diameters range from 50~200 nm. Smooth and monodisperse CSs with the diameter ranging from 5~10 μm can be obtained by pyrolysis of pure naphthalene. Our results show that the reaction temperature and catalyst proportion play a key role in the formation of carbon nanostructures with RAPET method.

  20. Sclerotial formation of Polyporus umbellatus by low temperature treatment under artificial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Chun; Liang, Han-Qiao; Lv, Jing; Song, Chao; Guo, Shun-Xing; Wang, Chun-Lan; Lee, Tae-Soo; Lee, Min-Woong

    2013-01-01

    and inhibited sclerotial formation. Our findings may help to provide new insights into the biological mechanisms underlying sclerotial morphogenesis in P. umbellatus.

  1. Vertical Profiles Of 226Ra, 232Th And 40K Activities In Rocks From The Irati Formation Of The Paraná Sedimentary Basin, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ademar de O.; Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R.

    2008-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioisotopes are present in different concentrations in sedimentary rocks, reflecting the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment, and more recent events such as weathering and erosion. Using a high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry methodology, sedimentary rocks were measured to assess the concentration activities of the natural radioisotopes. The surveyed rocks are from the Irati formation in the Paraná sedimentary basin, which are exposed by an abandoned, open-pit limestone mine, in the city of Sapopema, southern Brazil. The exposed vertical profile is 5 m, and its stratigraphy is represented by an alternation of limestone and bituminous shale (layers being a few decimeters thick), and some millimeter rhythm layers with limestone and bituminous shale laminas. Eleven samples were collected along this profile, each of them dried in the open air during 48 hours, sieved through 4 mm mesh and sealed in cylindrical recipients. Measurements were accomplished using a 66% relative efficiency HPGE detector connected to a standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic chain. The detector efficiency in the range of 60 to 1800 keV was carried out with the certified IAEA-385 sediment sample. The Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) to the system is 2.40 Bqṡkg-1 for 226Ra, 1.84 Bqṡkg-1 for 232Th and 4.20 Bqṡkg-1 for 40K. Activity concentrations were determined for 226Ra (from 16.22 to 151.55 Bqṡkg-1), 232Th (from 2.93 to 56.12 Bqṡkg-1) and 40K (from 38.45 to 644.63 Bqṡkg-1). The layers enriched with organic matter presented the higher values of activity. The measured concentrations of the natural radioisotopes were lower for limestone samples (average values and respective deviations were 22.81±0.22 Bqṡkg-1 for 226Ra, 4.21±0.07 Bqṡkg-1 for 232Th, and 50.11±0.82 Bqṡkg-1 for 40K). Higher concentrations were measured for the bituminous shale samples (average values and respective deviations were 108.10±12.17 Bqṡkg-1 for 226Ra, 43.69

  2. Formation of amorphous carbon during microcrystalline graphite melting under the action of laser picosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranat, M.B.; Ashitkov, S.I.; Kirillin, A.V.; Kostanovskij, A.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Anisimov, S.I.; Kondratenko, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Formation of a liquid phase with a transition to a homogeneous amorphous state under the surface layer solidification is detected under picosecond laser pulse effect on the microcrystalline graphite. A periodic surface structure is produced in the heating region with the period of the order of the length of the heating pulse wave, its strokes following the direction of this pulse polarization. Study of the probing laser pulse reflection kinetics has shown, that the typical time of liquid phase and solidification life makes up ∼ 10 -10 s

  3. Crack formation of steel reinforced concrete structure under stress in construction period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To obtain deformation rules of steel reinforced concrete structure under stress, this study explored the crack formation in construction period. A novel structure system – steel reinforced concrete structure with shear wall and truss at the bottom was analyzed using on-the-spot test in combination with theoretical simulation analysis with SAP2000 software. It was found that, factors influencing crack formation of steel reinforced concrete structure in construction period included construction load, creep of concrete, shrinkage of concrete, displacement of bond of section steel and concrete as well as leveling. In the construction period, the simulated results and the measured results were highly fitted under the influence of time-variant characteristics such as compressive strength, elasticity modulus, creep and shrinkage. Through processing and analyzing the measured data, we obtained the development rules of crack formation of steel reinforced concrete structure with different strength grades as well as deformation rules of time-varying structure system in construction period, figured out the reason for the difference between the simulated results and the measured results, analyzed the deformation of structural components under stress in construction period and proposed some suggestions. This work is beneficial to ensure safe and high-efficient operation of construction

  4. Intercellular Adhesion-Dependent Cell Survival and ROCK-Regulated Actomyosin-Driven Forces Mediate Self-Formation of a Retinal Organoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lowe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we dissected retinal organoid morphogenesis in human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived cultures and established a convenient method for isolating large quantities of retinal organoids for modeling human retinal development and disease. Epithelialized cysts were generated via floating culture of clumps of Matrigel/hESCs. Upon spontaneous attachment and spreading of the cysts, patterned retinal monolayers with tight junctions formed. Dispase-mediated detachment of the monolayers and subsequent floating culture led to self-formation of retinal organoids comprising patterned neuroretina, ciliary margin, and retinal pigment epithelium. Intercellular adhesion-dependent cell survival and ROCK-regulated actomyosin-driven forces are required for the self-organization. Our data supports a hypothesis that newly specified neuroretina progenitors form characteristic structures in equilibrium through minimization of cell surface tension. In long-term culture, the retinal organoids autonomously generated stratified retinal tissues, including photoreceptors with ultrastructure of outer segments. Our system requires minimal manual manipulation, has been validated in two lines of human pluripotent stem cells, and provides insight into optic cup invagination in vivo.

  5. A new model for the formation of a spaced crenulation (shear band) cleavage in the Dalradian rocks of the Tay Nappe, SW Highlands, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoff Tanner, P. W.

    2016-03-01

    The main conclusion of this study is that non-coaxial strain acting parallel to a flat-lying D1 spaced cleavage was responsible for the formation of the D2 spaced crenulation (shear band) cleavage in Dalradian rocks of Neoproterozoic-Lower Ordovician age in the SW Highlands, Scotland. The cm-dm-scale D2 microlithons are asymmetric; have a geometrically distinctive nose and tail; and show a thickened central portion resulting from back-rotation of the constituent D1 microlithons. The current terminology used to describe crenulation cleavages is reviewed and updated. Aided by exceptional 3D exposures, it is shown how embryonic D2 flexural-slip folds developed into a spaced cleavage comprising fold-pair domains wrapped by anastomosing cleavage seams. The bulk strain was partitioned into low-strain domains separated by zones of high non-coaxial strain. This new model provides a template for determining the sense of shear in both low-strain situations and in ductile, higher strain zones where other indicators, such as shear folds, give ambiguous results. Analogous structures include tectonic lozenges in shear zones, and flexural-slip duplexes. Disputes over the sense and direction of shear during emplacement of the Tay Nappe, and the apparently intractable conflict between minor fold asymmetry and shear sense, appear to be resolved.

  6. Acid Rock Drainage Treatment Using Membrane Distillation: Impacts of Chemical-Free Pretreatment on Scale Formation, Pore Wetting, and Product Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Eric J; Zodrow, Katherine R

    2017-10-17

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a metal-rich wastewater that forms upon oxidation of sulfidic minerals. Although ARD impacts >12,000 miles of rivers in the U.S. and has an estimated cleanup cost of $32-$72 billion, the low pH and high metal concentrations in ARD make rapid, high volume treatment without chemical addition difficult. This research focuses on a novel method of ARD treatment, membrane distillation (MD). In MD, heated ARD is separated from a cooled distillate by a hydrophobic, water-excluding membrane. Because water only passes through the membrane in the vapor phase, nonvolatile sulfate and heavy metals are retained in the concentrate stream. A preliminary in silico analysis using an electrolyte thermodynamic model indicated that MD of 10 different mine wastes yields product water containing no contaminants at concentrations >0.2 ppm. MD tests of synthetic ARD used a ∼34 °C temperature difference, operated at 80% recovery, and produced an initial flux of 38.4 ± 1.1 L·m -2 ·h -1 . This flux decreased slightly after scaling by iron oxyhydroxide; however, membranes maintained >99% dissolved solids rejection. Both flux decline and membrane scale formation decreased after a chemical-free, thermal precipitation pretreatment. These results indicate that MD can purify contaminated, acidic wastewater using low-grade heat sources, such as geothermal energy, without chemical addition.

  7. A genetic meta-algorithm-assisted inversion approach: hydrogeological study for the determination of volumetric rock properties and matrix and fluid parameters in unsaturated formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Norbert Péter

    2018-03-01

    An evolutionary inversion approach is suggested for the interpretation of nuclear and resistivity logs measured by direct-push tools in shallow unsaturated sediments. The efficiency of formation evaluation is improved by estimating simultaneously (1) the petrophysical properties that vary rapidly along a drill hole with depth and (2) the zone parameters that can be treated as constant, in one inversion procedure. In the workflow, the fractional volumes of water, air, matrix and clay are estimated in adjacent depths by linearized inversion, whereas the clay and matrix properties are updated using a float-encoded genetic meta-algorithm. The proposed inversion method provides an objective estimate of the zone parameters that appear in the tool response equations applied to solve the forward problem, which can significantly increase the reliability of the petrophysical model as opposed to setting these parameters arbitrarily. The global optimization meta-algorithm not only assures the best fit between the measured and calculated data but also gives a reliable solution, practically independent of the initial model, as laboratory data are unnecessary in the inversion procedure. The feasibility test uses engineering geophysical sounding logs observed in an unsaturated loessy-sandy formation in Hungary. The multi-borehole extension of the inversion technique is developed to determine the petrophysical properties and their estimation errors along a profile of drill holes. The genetic meta-algorithmic inversion method is recommended for hydrogeophysical logging applications of various kinds to automatically extract the volumetric ratios of rock and fluid constituents as well as the most important zone parameters in a reliable inversion procedure.

  8. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongyuan; Zhao, Shumin; Xia, Minggang; He, Siyu; Yang, Qifan; Yan, Yuming; Zhao, Hanqiao

    2017-01-01

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  9. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongyuan [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Shumin, E-mail: zhaosm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xia, Minggang [Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); He, Siyu [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yang, Qifan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yan, Yuming [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Hanqiao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2017-02-19

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  10. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  11. Photoinduced fibrils formation of chicken egg white lysozyme under native conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin-Bing; Cao, Yi; Pan, Hai; Qin, Meng; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Xiong, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Recent findings showed that transiently accessing structurally native-like yet energetically higher conformational states is sufficient to trigger the formation of protein fibrils. Typically, these conformational states are made available through changing solvent conditions or introducing mutations. Here we show a novel way to initialize fibril formation for Chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) under native conditions via controlled UV illumination. Through a cassette of tryptophan-based photochemistry, the two terminal disulfide bonds in CEWL can be selectively reduced. The reduced CEWL is then converted to conformational states with the C-terminal fragment floppy upon thermal fluctuation. These states serve as precursors for the fibrillar aggregation. Intriguingly, the CEWL fibrils are stabilized by intermolecular disulfide bonds instead of noncovalent β-sheet structures, distinct from the amyloid-like lysozyme fibrils reported before. Based on the experimental evidences and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, we proposed a "runaway domain-swapping" model for the structure of the CEWL fibrils, in which each CEWL molecule swaps the C-terminal fragment into the complementary position of the adjacent molecule along the fibrils. We anticipate that this fibrillation mechanism can be extended to many other disulfide-containing proteins. Our study stands for the first example of formation of protein fibrils under native conditions upon UV illumination and poses the potential danger of low UV dose to organisms at the protein level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Formation of nitric oxide under action of UV and visible light on S-nitrosocompounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepuro, Ivan I.; Adamchuk, Raisa I.; Anufrik, Slavomir S.; Stepuro, Vitali I.; Maskevich, Sergei A.

    2000-06-01

    It has been shown that NO is released under the exposure of the aqueous solutions of S-nitrosocompounds as well as blood plasma proteins and whole blood of healthy donors to UV and visible light. The NO release from degrading S- nitrosocompounds was monitored both spectrophotometrically (by nitrosohemoglobin formation) and using the quenching of pyrene fluorescence by nitric oxide. In addition to NO, thyil radicals which dismutate to disulfides, were formed under anaerobic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, peroxide compounds, cysteine acid derivatives and S-nitrocompounds are formed apart from disulfides, and NO is mainly converted to NO2-. It is suggested that NO releasing under the actin of UV and visible light from physiological depots induces vascular relaxation, which enhances the blood flow.

  13. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    heat-balance constraints, we can utilize the 18O 16O data on natural mineral assemblages to calculate the kinetic rate constants (k's) and the effective diffusion constants (D's) for mineral-H2O exchange: these calculated values (kqtz ??? 10-14, kfeld ??? 10-13-10-12) agree with experimental determinations of such constants. In nature, once the driving force or energy source for the external infiltrating fluid phase is removed, the disequilibrium mineral-pair arrays will either: (1) remain "frozen" in their existing state, if the temperatures are low enough, or (2) re-equilibrate along specific closed-system exchange vectors determined solely by the temperature path and the mineral modal proportions. Thus, modal mineralogical information is a particularly important parameter in both the open- and closed-system scenarios, and should in general always be reported in stable-isotopic studies of mineral assemblages. These concepts are applied to an analysis of 18O 16O systematics of gabbros (Plagioclase-clinopyroxene and plagioclase-amphibole pairs), granitic plutons (quartz-feldspar pairs), and Precambrian siliceous iron formations (quartz-magnetite pairs). In all these examples, striking regularities are observed on ??-?? and ??-?? plots, but we point out that ??-?? plots have many advantages over their equivalent ??-?? diagrams, as the latter are more susceptible to misinterpretation. Using the equations developed in this study, these regularities can be interpreted to give semiquantitative information on the exchange histories of these rocks subsequent to their formation. In particular, we present a new interpretation indicating that Precambrian cherty iron formations have in general undergone a complex fluid exchange history in which the iron oxide (magnetite precursor?) has exchanged much faster with low-temperature (< 400??C) fluids than has the relatively inert quartz. ?? 1989.

  14. Single- and multi-pulse formation of surface structures under static femtosecond irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermin, M.; Garrelie, F.; Sanner, N.; Audouard, E.; Soder, H.

    2007-07-01

    Femtosecond surface structure modifications are investigated under irradiation with laser pulses of 150 fs at 800 nm, on copper and silicon. We report sub-wavelength periodic structures formation (ripples) with a periodicity of 500 nm for both materials. These ripples are perpendicular to the laser polarization and can be obtained with only one pulse. The formation of these ripples corresponds to a fluence threshold of 1 J/cm 2 for copper and 0.15 J/cm 2 for silicon. We find several morphologies when more pulses are applied: larger ripples parallel to the polarization are formed with a periodicity of 1 μm and degenerate into a worm-like morphology with a higher number of pulses. In addition, walls of deep holes also show sub-wavelength and large ripples.

  15. Type IIA photosensitivity and formation of pores in optical fibers under intense ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Shlyagin, M. G.; Swart, P. L.; Chtcherbakov, A. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Formation of the type IIA Bragg gratings in germanosilicate optical fibers is studied. We report the observation of such a type of gratings in the standard single-mode fiber (Corning SMF-28) under different experimental conditions. A mechanism for the type IIA photosensitivity in optical fibers is proposed which is based on nucleation and evolution of pores from vacancy-type defects in fiber areas where a high level of mechanical stress is induced under intense ultraviolet (UV) light. Evolution of fiber core temperature under influence of a single 20 ns light pulse from a KrF excimer laser was measured and compared with theoretical calculations. It was shown that transient thermoinduced stress in the fiber core can achieve a level sufficient for effective nucleation of pores. A theory describing formation of pores in optical fibers has been developed and was used to estimate the pore nucleation rate, concentration, and other parameters of pore evolution for different levels of UV fluence and fiber core stress

  16. Geochemical characterisation of kerogen from the Boom Clay Formation (Mol, Belgium) and evolution under different thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniau, I.

    2002-12-01

    The Boom clay formation in Belgium has been chosen as test site for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The organic matter present in the clay (kerogen) is sensible to the thermal stress and can generate a huge number of gaseous and liquid compounds leading to local pH changes and to fracturing processes. In particular, some polar compounds can complex radionuclides. The samples analyzed in this work were taken in the underground laboratory of Mol at a 223 m depth. They have been analyzed in detail using geochemical methods (Rock-Eval pyrolysis, element analysis, transmission and scanning electron microscopy), spectroscopic methods (Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, solid state 13 C NMR, Raman) and pyrolytic methods (off-line, on-line and in sealed tubes combined with coupled CG/SM analyses). The study of a representative sample of this formation has permitted to characterize the organic matter at the molecular scale, to determine its fossilization mechanisms and the nature of the organic compounds trapped inside the kerogen. The organic matter of the Boom clays comes mainly from phyto-planktonic matter with an important contribution of terrestrial and bacterial matter. The degradation-recondensation played an important role in its preservation but the presence of numerous oxygenated molecules implies that oxidative incorporation also participated to this preservation. Finally, various products (hydrocarbons, oxygenated and nitrogenous polar compounds) trapped in significant amount inside the macro-molecular structure are released under a relatively weak thermal stress. Moreover several small polar organic molecules are released and can play a significant role in the retention or migration of radionuclides inside the geologic barrier. A sample submitted to a in-situ thermal stress of 80 deg. C during 5 years (Cerberus experiment) do not show any significant change in its kerogen structure with respect to the non-heated reference sample

  17. The role of stable α-synuclein oligomers in the molecular events underlying amyloid formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Nikolai; Nielsen, Søren Bang; Buell, Alexander K.

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The two types of oligomers are both formed under conditions where amyloid fibril formation is observed but differ in molecular weight by an order of magnitude. Both possess a degree of β......, either as precursors of fibrils or as species involved in the fibril elongation process or instead if they are associated with an aggregation process that is distinct from that generating mature fibrils. Here we describe and characterize in detail two well-defined oligomeric species formed by the protein...

  18. Radiation induced F-center and colloid formation in synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt: applications to radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.; Loman, J.M.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation damage, particularly Na metal colloid formation, has been studied in synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt using unique equipment for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements during irradiation with 1 to 3 MeV electrons. Previous studies have established the F-center and colloid growth phenomenology. At temperatures where colloids form most rapidly, 100 to 250 C, F-centers appear when the irradiation is initiated and increase at a decreasing rate to a plateau, reached at doses of 10 6 to 10 7 rad. Concomitant colloid growth is described by classical nucleation and growth curves with the transition to rapid growth occurring at 10 6 to 10 7 rad. The colloid growth rate is low at 100 C, increases markedly to a maximum at 150 to 175 C and decreases to a negligible rate at 225 C. At 1.2x10 8 rad/h the induction period is >10 4 sec at 100 C, 10 4 sec at 275 C. The colloid growth in salt from 14 localities is well described by C(dose)/sup n/ relations. Data on WIPP site salt (Los Medanos, NM, USA) has been used to estimate roughly the colloid expected in radioactive waste repositories. Doses of 1 to 2x10 10 rad, which will accumulate in salt adjacent to lightly shielded high level canisters in 200 to 500 years, will convert between 1 and 100% of the salt to Na colloids (and Cl) if back reactions or other limiting reactions do not occur. Each high level lightly shielded canister may ultimately be surrounded by 200 to 300 kg of colloid sodium. Low level or heavily shielded canisters may produce as little as 1 kg sodium

  19. Hematite Spherules in Basaltic Tephra Altered Under Aqueous, Acid-Sulfate Conditions on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Possible Clues for the Occurrence of Hematite-Rich Spherules in the Burns Formation at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Graff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Squyres, S. W.; Mertzman, S. A.; Gruener, J. E.; Golden, D. C.; Robinson, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Iron-rich spherules (>90% Fe2O3 from electron microprobe analyses) approx.10-100 microns in diameter are found within sulfate-rich rocks formed by aqueous, acid-sulfate alteration of basaltic tephra on Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii. Although some spherules are nearly pure Fe, most have two concentric compositional zones, with the core having a higher Fe/Al ratio than the rim. Oxide totals less than 100% (93-99%) suggest structural H2O and/or /OH. The transmission Moessbauer spectrum of a spherule-rich separate is dominated by a hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) sextet whose peaks are skewed toward zero velocity. Skewing is consistent with Al(3+) for Fe(3+) substitution and structural H2O and/or /OH. The grey color of the spherules implies specular hematite. Whole-rock powder X-ray diffraction spectra are dominated by peaks from smectite and the hydroxy sulfate mineral natroalunite as alteration products and plagioclase feldspar that was present in the precursor basaltic tephra. Whether spherule formation proceeded directly from basaltic material in one event (dissolution of basaltic material and precipitation of hematite spherules) or whether spherule formation required more than one event (formation of Fe-bearing sulfate rock and subsequent hydrolysis to hematite) is not currently constrained. By analogy, a formation pathway for the hematite spherules in sulfate-rich outcrops at Meridiani Planum on Mars (the Burns formation) is aqueous alteration of basaltic precursor material under acid-sulfate conditions. Although hydrothermal conditions are present on Mauna Kea, such conditions may not be required for spherule formation on Mars if the time interval for hydrolysis at lower temperatures is sufficiently long.

  20. Nonequilibrium self-organization in alloys under irradiation leading to the formation of nano composites

    CERN Document Server

    Enrique, R A; Averback, R S; Bellon, P

    2003-01-01

    Alloys under irradiation are continuously driven away from equilibrium: Every time an external particle interacts with the atoms in the solid, a perturbation very localized in space and time is produced. Under this external forcing, phase and microstructural evolution depends ultimately on the dynamical interaction between the external perturbation and the internal recovery kinetics of the alloy. We consider the nonequilibrium steady state of an immiscible binary alloy subject to mixing by heavy-ion irradiation. It has been found that the range of the forced atomic relocations taking place during collision cascades plays an important role on the final microstructure: when this range is large enough, it can lead to the spontaneous formation of compositional patterns at the nanometer scale. These results were rationalized in the framework of a continuum model solved by deriving a nonequilibrium thermodynamic potential. Here we derive the nonequilibrium structure factor by including the role of fluctuations. In ...

  1. Coarsening and pattern formation during true morphological phase separation in unstable thin films under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avanish; Narayanam, Chaitanya; Khanna, Rajesh; Puri, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    We address in detail the problem of true morphological phase separation (MPS) in three-dimensional or (2 +1 )-dimensional unstable thin liquid films (>100 nm) under the influence of gravity. The free-energy functionals of these films are asymmetric and show two points of common tangency, which facilitates the formation of two equilibrium phases. Three distinct patterns formed by relative preponderance of these phases are clearly identified in "true MPS". Asymmetricity induces two different pathways of pattern formation, viz., defect and direct pathway for true MPS. The pattern formation and phase-ordering dynamics have been studied using statistical measures such as structure factor, correlation function, and growth laws. In the late stage of coarsening, the system reaches into a scaling regime for both pathways, and the characteristic domain size follows the Lifshitz-Slyozov growth law [L (t ) ˜t1 /3] . However, for the defect pathway, there is a crossover of domain growth behavior from L (t ) ˜t1 /4→t1 /3 in the dynamical scaling regime. We also underline the analogies and differences behind the mechanisms of MPS and true MPS in thin liquid films and generic spinodal phase separation in binary mixtures.

  2. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-04-23

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets.

  3. A model of social network formation under the impact of structural balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Cheng, Jiajun; Chen, Yingwen; Wang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Social networks have attracted remarkable attention from both academic and industrial societies and it is of great importance to understand the formation of social networks. However, most existing research cannot be applied directly to investigate social networks, where relationships are heterogeneous and structural balance is a common phenomenon. In this paper, we take both positive and negative relationships into consideration and propose a model to characterize the process of social network formation under the impact of structural balance. In this model, a new node first establishes a link with an existing node and then tries to connect to each of the newly connected node’s neighbors. If a new link is established, the type of this link is determined by structural balance. Then we analyze the degree distribution of the generated network theoretically, and estimate the fractions of positive and negative links. All analysis results are verified by simulations. These results are of importance to understand the formation of social networks, and the model can be easily extended to consider more realistic situations.

  4. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  5. CERN Rocks

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  6. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  7. Neural mechanisms underlying migrating motor complex formation in mouse isolated colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Stuart M; Nichols, Kim; Grasby, Dallas J; Waterman, Sally A

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the intrinsic enteric reflex pathways associated with migrating motor complex (MMC) formation. Acetylcholine (ACh) mediates the rapid component of the MMC, however a non-cholinergic component also exists. The present study investigated the possible role of endogenous tachykinins (TKs) in the formation of colonic MMCs and the relative roles of excitatory and inhibitory pathways.MMCs were recorded from the circular muscle at four sites (proximal, proximal-mid, mid-distal and distal) along the mouse colon using force transducers.The tachykinin (NK1 and NK2) receptor antagonists SR-140 333 (250 nM) and SR-48 968 (250 nM) reduced the amplitude of MMCs at all recording sites, preferentially abolishing the long duration contraction. Residual MMCs were abolished by the subsequent addition of atropine (1 μM).The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nωnitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 μM), increased MMC amplitude in the distal region, whilst reducing the amplitude in the proximal region. In preparations where MMCs did not migrate to the distal colon, addition of L-NOARG resulted in the formation of MMCs. Subsequent addition of apamin (250 nM) or suramin (100 μM) further increased MMC amplitude in the distal region, whilst suramin increased MMC amplitude in the mid-distal region. Apamin but not suramin reduced MMC amplitude in the proximal region. Subsequent addition of SR-140 333 and SR-48 968 reduced MMC amplitude at all sites. Residual MMCs were abolished by atropine (1 μM).In conclusion, TKs, ACh, nitric oxide (NO) and ATP are involved in the neural mechanisms underlying the formation of MMCs in the mouse colon. Tachykinins mediate the long duration component of the MMC via NK1 and NK2 receptors. Inhibitory pathways may be involved in determining whether MMCs are formed. PMID:11159701

  8. Humic acid-induced silver nanoparticle formation under environmentally relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaighe, Nelson; Maccuspie, Robert I; Navarro, Divina A; Aga, Diana S; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sohn, Mary; Sharma, Virender K

    2011-05-01

    The formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) in the presence of humic acids (HAs) under various environmentally relevant conditions is described. HAs tested originated from the Suwannee River (SUW), and included samples of three sedimentary HAs (SHAs), and five soils obtained across the state of Florida. The time required to form AgNPs varied depending upon the type and concentration of HA, as well as temperature. SUW and all three SHAs reduced Ag(+) at 22 °C. However, none of the soil HAs formed absorbance-detectable AgNPs at room temperature when allowed to react for a period of 25 days, at which time experiments were halted. The appearance of the characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of AgNPs was observed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in as few as 2-4 days at 22 °C for SHAs and SUW. An elevated temperature of 90 °C resulted in the accelerated appearance of the SPR within 90 min for SUW and all SHAs. The formation of AgNPs at 90 °C was usually complete within 3 h. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images showed that the AgNPs formed were typically spherical and had a broad size distribution. Dynamic light scattering also revealed polydisperse particle size distributions. HAs appeared to colloidally stabilize AgNPs based on lack of any significant change in the spectral characteristics over a period of two months. The results suggest the potential for direct formation of AgNPs under environmental conditions from Ag(+) sources, implying that not all AgNPs observed in natural waters today may be of anthropogenic origin.

  9. Rock Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Rock physics is the discipline linking petrophysical properties as derived from borehole data to surface based geophysical exploration data. It can involve interpretation of both elastic wave propagation and electrical conductivity, but in this chapter focus is on elasticity. Rock physics is based...... on continuum mechanics, and the theory of elasticity developed for statics becomes the key to petrophysical interpretation of velocity of elastic waves. In practice, rock physics involves interpretation of well logs including vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and analysis of core samples. The results...

  10. Corrosion Behavior and Oxide Film Formation of T91 Steel under Different Water Chemistry Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. Q.; Shi, C.; Li, J.; Gao, L. X. [Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai (China); Lee, K. Y. [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-02-15

    The corrosion behavior of a ferritic/martensitic steel T91 exposed to an aqueous solution containing chloride and sulfate ions is investigated depending on the stimulated all-volatile treatment (AVT) and under oxygenated treatment (OT) conditions. The corrosion of T91 steel under OT condition is severe, while the corrosion under AVT condition is not. The co-existence of chloride and sulfate ions has antagonistic effect on the corrosion of T91 steel in both AVT and OT conditions. Unlike to corrosion resistance in the aqueous solution, OT pretreatment provides T91 steel lower oxidation-resistance than VAT pretreatment. From scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, the lower corrosion resistance in the aqueous solution by VAT conditions possibly is due to the formation of pits. In addition, the lower oxidation resistance of T91 steel pretreated by OT conditions is explained as follows: the cracks formed during the immersion under OT conditions accelerated peeling-off rate of the oxide film.

  11. Basic rocks in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piirainen, T.; Gehoer, S.; Iljina, M.; Kaerki, A.; Paakkola, J.; Vuollo, J.

    1992-10-01

    Basic igneous rocks, containing less than 52% SiO 2 , constitute an important part of the Finnish Archaean and Proterozoic crust. In the Archaean crust exist two units which contain the majority of the basic rocks. The Arcaean basic rocks are metavolcanics and situated in the Greenstone Belts of Eastern Finland. They are divided into two units. The greenstones of the lower one are tholeiites, komatiites and basaltic komatiites. The upper consists of bimodal series of volcanics and the basic rocks of which are Fe-tholeiites, basaltic komatiites and komatiites. Proterozoic basic rocks are divided into seven groups according to their ages. The Proterozoic igneous activity started by the volominous basic magmatism 2.44 Ga ago. During this stage formed the layered intrusions and related dykes in the Northern Finland. 2.2 Ga old basic rocks are situated at the margins of Karelian formations. 2.1 Ga aged Fe-tholeiitic magmatic activity is widespread in Eastern and Northern Finland. The basic rocks of 1.97 Ga age group are met within the Karelian Schist Belts as obducted ophiolite complexes but they occur also as tholeiitic diabase dykes cutting the Karelian schists and Archean basement. The intrusions and the volcanics of the 1.9 Ga old basic igneous activity are mostly encountered around the Granitoid Complex of Central Finland. Subjotnian, 1.6 Ga aged tholeiitic diabases are situated around the Rapakivi massifs of Southern Finland, and postjotnian, 1.2 Ga diabases in Western Finland where they form dykes cutting Svecofennian rocks

  12. Rock Foundations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1994-01-01

    .... Chapter 4 provides guidance on rock mass characterization and classification schemes. Chapters 5 and 6 provide guidance on related topic areas of foundation deformation and settlement and foundation bearing capacity, respectively...

  13. A flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Madsen, Ian C.; Loan, Melissa J.; Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Wallwork, Kia S.

    2009-08-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of a stainless steel flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions is described. The use of the cell is demonstrated by a study of Al(OH)3 scale formation on a mild steel substrate from synthetic Bayer liquor at 70 °C. The cell design allows for interchangeable parts and substrates and would be suitable for the study of scale formation in other industrial processes.

  14. Role of hydrous iron oxide formation in attenuation and diel cycling of dissolved trace metals in a stream affected by acid rock drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, S.R.; Gammons, C.H.; Jones, Clain A.; Nimick, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mining-impacted streams have been shown to undergo diel (24-h) fluctuations in concentrations of major and trace elements. Fisher Creek in south-central Montana, USA receives acid rock drainage (ARD) from natural and mining-related sources. A previous diel field study found substantial changes in dissolved metal concentrations at three sites with differing pH regimes during a 24-h period in August 2002. The current work discusses follow-up field sampling of Fisher Creek as well as field and laboratory experiments that examine in greater detail the underlying processes involved in the observed diel concentration changes. The field experiments employed in-stream chambers that were either transparent or opaque to light, filled with stream water and sediment (cobbles coated with hydrous Fe and Al oxides), and placed in the stream to maintain the same temperature. Three sets of laboratory experiments were performed: (1) equilibration of a Cu(II) and Zn(II) containing solution with Fisher Creek stream sediment at pH 6.9 and different temperatures; (2) titration of Fisher Creek water from pH 3.1 to 7 under four different isothermal conditions; and (3) analysis of the effects of temperature on the interaction of an Fe(II) containing solution with Fisher Creek stream sediment under non-oxidizing conditions. Results of these studies are consistent with a model in which Cu, Fe(II), and to a lesser extent Zn, are adsorbed or co-precipitated with hydrous Fe and Al oxides as the pH of Fisher Creek increases from 5.3 to 7.0. The extent of metal attenuation is strongly temperature-dependent, being more pronounced in warm vs. cold water. Furthermore, the sorption/co-precipitation process is shown to be irreversible; once the Cu, Zn, and Fe(II) are removed from solution in warm water, a decrease in temperature does not release the metals back to the water column. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Physio-chemical hydrodynamic mechanism underlying the formation of thin adsorbed boundary films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, W W F; Teodorescu, M; Rahnejat, H

    2012-01-01

    The formation of low shear strength surface-adhered thin films mitigates excessive friction in mixed or boundary regimes of lubrication. Tribo-films are formed as a consequence of molecular chemical reactions with the surfaces. The process is best viewed in the context of a lubricant-surface system. Therefore, it is usually surmised that the adsorption of lubricant molecular species to the contact surfaces is underlying to the formation of ultra-thin lubricant films. The paper considers contact between smooth surfaces at close separation. This may be regarded as the contact of a pair of asperity summits, whose dimensions, however small, are far larger than the size of fluid molecules within the conjunction. In such diminishing separations the constraining effect of relatively smooth solid barriers causes oscillatory solvation of fluid molecules. This effect accounts for the conjunctional load capacity but does not contribute to mitigating friction, except when molecular adsorption is taken into account with long chain molecules which tend to inhibit solvation. The paper presents an analytical predictive model based on the Ornstein-Zernike method with the Percus-Yevick approximation of a narrow interaction potential between conjunctional composition. The predictions confirm the above stated physical facts in a fundamental manner.

  16. Formation of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock under saline water irrigation and nitrogen doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro de P. Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth and formation of fresh and dry weight of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock irrigated with waters of different saline levels and nitrogen (N doses, in an experiment conducted in plastic tubes under greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was randomized blocks, in a 5 x 4 factorial scheme with four replicates, and the treatments consisted of five levels of water electrical conductivity - ECw (0.3, 1.1, 1.9, 2.7 and 3.5 dS m-1 and four N doses (70, 100, 130 and 160% of the N dose recommended for the cultivation of guava seedlings, cv. ‘Paluma’. The dose referring to 100% corresponds to 773 mg of N dm-3. The highest growth of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock was obtained with ECw of 0.3 dS m-1 and fertilization of 541.1 mg N dm-3 of soil; increasing N doses did not reduce the deleterious effect of the salt stress on the growth and phytomass formation of ‘Crioula’ guava rootstock; irrigation with water of up to 1.75 dS m-1, in the production of guava rootstocks, promotes acceptable reduction of 10% in growth and quality of the seedlings.

  17. Field measurements of key parameters associated with nocturnal OBT formation in vegetables grown under Canadian conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Workman, W.G.; Korolevych, V.; Davis, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide the parameter values required to model OBT formation in the edible parts of plants following a hypothetical accidental tritium release to the atmosphere at night. The parameters considered were leaf area index, stomatal resistance, photosynthesis rate, the photosynthetic production rate of starch, the nocturnal hydrolysis rate of starch, the fraction of starch produced daily by photosynthesis that appears in the fruits, and the mass of the fruit. Values of these parameters were obtained in the summer of 2002 for lettuce, radishes and tomatoes grown under typical Canadian environmental conditions. Based on the maximum observed photosynthetic rate and growth rate, the fraction of starch translocated to the fruit was calculated to be 17% for tomato fruit and 14% for radish root. - Highlights: ► Plant physiological parameters affecting nocturnal OBT formation have been investigated. ► The fraction of starch produced daily by photosynthesis in the leaves that appears in the fruit was calculated. ► Realistic estimates of OBT concentrations following a nighttime accidental HTO release to the atmosphere.

  18. The formation of cubic ice under conditions relevant to Earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Benjamin J; Knopf, Daniel A; Bertram, Allan K

    2005-03-10

    An important mechanism for ice cloud formation in the Earth's atmosphere is homogeneous nucleation of ice in aqueous droplets, and this process is generally assumed to produce hexagonal ice. However, there are some reports that the metastable crystalline phase of ice, cubic ice, may form in the Earth's atmosphere. Here we present laboratory experiments demonstrating that cubic ice forms when micrometre-sized droplets of pure water and aqueous solutions freeze homogeneously at cooling rates approaching those found in the atmosphere. We find that the formation of cubic ice is dominant when droplets freeze at temperatures below 190 K, which is in the temperature range relevant for polar stratospheric clouds and clouds in the tropical tropopause region. These results, together with heat transfer calculations, suggest that cubic ice will form in the Earth's atmosphere. If there were a significant fraction of cubic ice in some cold clouds this could increase their water vapour pressure, and modify their microphysics and ice particle size distributions. Under specific conditions this may lead to enhanced dehydration of the tropopause region.

  19. Texture formation in orthorhombic alpha-uranium under simple compression and rolling to high strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Miroslav; Knezevic, Marko; Beyerlein, Irene J.; McCabe, Rodney J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the mechanical response and texture evolution of alpha-uranium during simple compression and rolling at 573 K. In order to determine the underlying mechanisms governing plasticity and texture formation, we perform detailed characterizations using electron backscattered diffraction and constitutive modeling using a dislocation-density based hardening law within a visco-plastic self-consistent homogenization. We show that the model achieves good agreement with experimental measurements in terms of texture and stress-strain response. From detailed comparison of experimental and modeling results, we infer that in both through-thickness compression (TTC) and rolling at 573K, the active slip modes are floor slip (001)[100] and chimney slip 1 / 2 { 110 } with slightly different ratios. However, { 130 } twinning is not active in TTC compression but profuse during rolling. Further analysis indicates that during rolling, floor slip (001)[100] results in the formation of two pronounced (001) texture peaks tilted 10-15° away from the normal toward the rolling direction.

  20. Phase formation polycrystalline vanadium oxide via thermal annealing process under controlled nitrogen pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessadaluk, S.; Khemasiri, N.; Rahong, S.; Rangkasikorn, A.; Kayunkid, N.; Wirunchit, S.; Horprathum, M.; Chananonnawathron, C.; Klamchuen, A.; Nukeaw, J.

    2017-09-01

    This article provides an approach to improve and control crystal phases of the sputtering vanadium oxide (VxOy) thin films by post-thermal annealing process. Usually, as-deposited VxOy thin films at room temperature are amorphous phase: post-thermal annealing processes (400 °C, 2 hrs) under the various nitrogen (N2) pressures are applied to improve and control the crystal phase of VxOy thin films. The crystallinity of VxOy thin films changes from amorphous to α-V2O5 phase or V9O17 polycrystalline, which depend on the pressure of N2 carrier during annealing process. Moreover, the electrical resistivity of the VxOy thin films decrease from 105 Ω cm (amorphous) to 6×10-1 Ω cm (V9O17). Base on the results, our study show a simply method to improve and control phase formation of VxOy thin films.

  1. The mechanism for diamagnetic products formation under the radiolysis of alkali nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan' ev, Vladimir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Kemerovo State University, Krasnaya Street, 6, Kemerovo 650043 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: eprlab@kemsu.ru

    2009-06-15

    Based on optical measurements, the kinetics of peroxynitrite accumulation in alkali nitrate crystals {gamma}-irradiated at 310 K has been investigated. The initial radiation chemical yields were calculated to be 0.60{+-}0.05, 0.14{+-}0.03, 0.35{+-}0.03, 0.65{+-}0.04 (100 eV){sup -1} for NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, RbNO{sub 3}, and CsNO{sub 3}, respectively. The mechanism for the radiolysis of crystalline alkali nitrates is interpreted in terms of formation of the peroxynitrite ions and the nitrite ions from high-energy singlet and triplet excited states of the nitrate ions, respectively. These states can be generating under the radiationless transitions of electrons from the cation conductivity band into the anion conductivity band accompanied by the Auger excitation of the nitrate ions.

  2. River-spring connectivity and hydrogeochemical interactions in a shallow fractured rock formation. The case study of Fuensanta river valley (Southern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberá, J. A.; Andreo, B.

    2017-04-01

    In upland catchments, the hydrology and hydrochemistry of streams are largely influenced by groundwater inflows, at both regional and local scale. However, reverse conditions (groundwater dynamics conditioned by surface water interferences), although less described, may also occur. In this research, the local river-spring connectivity and induced hydrogeochemical interactions in intensely folded, fractured and layered Cretaceous marls and marly-limestones (Fuensanta river valley, S Spain) are discussed based on field observations, tracer tests and hydrodynamic and hydrochemical data. The differential flow measurements and tracing experiments performed in the Fuensanta river permitted us to quantify the surface water losses and to verify its direct hydraulic connection with the Fuensanta spring. The numerical simulations of tracer breakthrough curves suggest the existence of a groundwater flow system through well-connected master and tributary fractures, with fast and multi-source flow components. Furthermore, the multivariate statistical analysis conducted using chemical data from the sampled waters, the geochemical study of water-rock interactions and the proposed water mixing approach allowed the spatial characterization of the chemistry of the springs and river/stream waters draining low permeable Cretaceous formations. Results corroborated that the mixing of surface waters, as well as calcite dissolution and CO2 dissolution/exsolution, are the main geochemical processes constraining Fuensanta spring hydrochemistry. The estimated contribution of the tributary surface waters to the spring flow during the research period was approximately 26-53% (Fuensanta river) and 47-74% (Convento stream), being predominant the first component during high flow and the second one during the dry season. The identification of secondary geochemical processes (dolomite and gypsum dissolution and dedolomitization) in Fuensanta spring waters evidences the induced hydrogeochemical

  3. Fractionation of rhenium from osmium during noble metal alloy formation in association with sulfides: Implications for the interpretation of model ages in alloy-bearing magmatic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Brückel, Karoline; Bragagni, Alessandro; Leitzke, Felipe P.; Speelmanns, Iris M.; Wainwright, Ashlea N.

    2017-11-01

    Although Earth's continental crust is thought to derive from melting of the Earth's mantle, how the crust has formed and the timing of its formation are not well understood. The main difficulty in understanding how the crust was extracted from the Earth's mantle is that most isotope systems recorded in mantle rocks have been disturbed by crustal recycling, metasomatic activity and dilution of the signal by mantle convection. In this regard, important age constraints can be obtained from Re-Os model ages in platinum group minerals (PGM), as Re-poor and Os-rich PGM show evidence of melting events up to 4.1 Ga. To constrain the origin of the Re-Os fractionation and Os isotope systematics of natural PGM, we have investigated the linkage between sulfide and PGM grains of variable composition via a series of high-temperature experiments carried out at 1 bar. We show that with the exception of laurite, all experimentally-produced PGM, in particular Pt3Fe (isoferroplatinum) and Pt-Ir metal grains, are systematically richer in Re than their sulfide precursors and will develop radiogenic 187Os /188Os signatures over time relative to their host base metal sulfides. Cooling of an PGM-saturated sulfide assemblage shows a tendency to amplify the extent of Re-Os fractionation between PGM and the different sulfide phases present during cooling. Conversely, laurite grains (RuS2) are shown to accept little to no Re in them and their Os isotope composition changes little over time as a result. Laurite is therefore the PGM that provides the most robust Re-depletion ages in mantle lithologies. Our results are broadly consistent with observations made on natural PGM, where laurites are systematically less radiogenic than Pt-rich PGM. These experimental results highlight the need for the acquisition of large datasets for both mantle materials and ophiolite-derived detrital grains that include measurements of the Os isotope composition of minerals rich in highly siderophile elements at

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectra of rock powders at variable ablation and collection angles under Mars-analog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, E. A.; Lepore, K.; Dyar, M. D.; Bender, S. C.; Tokar, R. L.; Boucher, T.

    2017-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has become a popular tool for rapid elemental analysis of geological materials. However, quantitative applications of LIBS are plagued by variability in collected spectra that cannot be attributed to differences in geochemical composition. Even under ideal laboratory conditions, variability in LIBS spectra creates a host of difficulties for quantitative analysis. This is only exacerbated during field work, when both the laser-sample distance and the angle of ablation/collection are constantly changing. A primary goal of this study is to use empirical evidence to provide a more accurate assessment of uncertainty in LIBS-derived element predictions. We hope to provide practical guidance regarding the angles of ablation and collection that can be tolerated without substantially increasing prediction uncertainty beyond that which already exists under ideal laboratory conditions. Spectra were collected from ten geochemically diverse samples at angles of ablation and collection ranging from 0° to ± 60°. Ablation and collection angles were changed independently and simultaneously in order to isolate spectral changes caused by differences in ablation angle from those due to differences in collection angle. Most of the variability in atomic and continuum spectra is attributed to changes in the ablation angle, rather than the collection angle. At higher angles, the irradiance of the laser beam is lower and produces smaller, possibly less dense plasmas. Simultaneous changes in the collection angle do not appear to affect the collected spectra, possibly because smaller plasmas are still within the viewing area of the collection optics, even though this area is reduced at higher collection angles. A key observation is that changes in the magnitude of atomic and total emission are team is using lab data acquired under normal incidence and collection angles to predict the compositions of Mars targets at varying angles. Thus, the increased

  5. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  6. Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra of Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step-heating and their bearing on the history of lunar basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, Graham

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported on 26 high-resolution (16-51 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra obtained on 12 Apollo-15 melt rocks of different composition using a continuous laser system on submg fragments of recrystallized melt and single-crystal plagioclase clasts from impact melt rocks collected at the Apennine Front where the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins intersect. A table is presented with the summary of the Ar-40/Ar-39 spectrum data, which represent 891 individual temperature step analyses. Also presented are 20 of the 26 age spectra along with their respective K/Ca plots. Melt rock fragments and plagioclase clasts from seven of the 12 samples analyzed yielded reproducible, intermediate-T Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateaus, which were interpreted as crystallization ages that represent the times of impact of bolides onto the lunar surface.

  7. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Jia

    Full Text Available Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined.

  8. Miniinvasive paracentetic drain surgical interventions under ultrasonic control concerning liquid formations of abdominal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.I. Ohrimenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Entry. Presently miniinvasive surgical interventions under ultrasonic control became the method of choice in treatment of quite a number of abdominal and retroperitoneal organs diseases, and their complications. These operations have a row of advantages, as compared to open and laparoscopic ones: comparative simplicity, insignificant infecting of abdominal region, least of intra- and postoperative complications. Actuality of problem is conditioned by that indications to the use of paracentetic drain surgical interventions, most optimal methods of preoperative diagnostic, features of postoperative treatment of patients remain not enough studied. Research aim. To study the results of diagnostics and treatment of patients with liquid formations of abdominal cavity that were exposed to miniinvasive surgical interventions under ultrasonic control and, on the basis of it, to work out an optimal curative diagnostic algorithm. Materials and research methods. The results of treatment of 25 patients with liquid formations of abdominal cavity are analyzed. They were submitted to miniinvasive paracentetic drain surgical interventions under ultrasonic control. The pseudocysts of pancreas were in 16 patients, abscesses of abdominal cavity – in 2 patients. Research results. Intraoperative complications were not marked. Postoperative complications were observed in 5 patients. Among them there were inadequate drainage of all cavities of multicamerate abscess of the liver in 2 patients, progress of sacculated uremic peritonitis developing in presence of ascites in one patient, and arrosive hemorrhage in the cavity of pancreas pseudocyst in 2 persons. It is determined that it is necessary to include the spiral computer tomography to the complex of preoperative inspection of patients that allows to diagnose multicamerate abscess of the liver in time and to drain all the additional cavities adequately. 2 patients after paracentetic drain surgical interventions

  9. Rocking pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Ger T; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term "rocking pneumonia" in his 1956 song "Roll over Beethoven", pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is caused mainly by the cold and rain and that treatment is hardly possible, aside from a shot of rhythm and blues.

  10. Computational Study of Thrombus Formation and Clotting Factor Effects under Venous Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    generation biochemistry , and fibrin formation and function, and was able to predict essential dynamic features of the thrombus formation pro- cess observed in...Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, MarylandABSTRACT A comprehensive... biochemistry , structural biology, and rheology have been extensively investigated. Such studies provide in- formation about the biochemical reactions

  11. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  12. Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Bruce R.

    “Igneous Rocks was written for undergraduate geology majors who have had a year of college-level chemistry and a course in mineralogy … and for beginning graduate students. Geologists working in industry, government, or academia should find this text useful as a guide to the technical literature up to 1981 and as an overview of topics with which they have not worked but which may have unanticipated pertinence to their own projects.” So starts the preface to this textbook.As one who works part time in research on igneous rocks, especially as they relate to mineral deposits, I have been looking for such a book with this avowed purpose in a field that has a choking richness of evolving terminology and a bewildering volume of interdisciplinary literature. In addition to the standard topics of igneous petrology, the book contains a chapter on the role of igneous activity in the genesis of mineral deposits, its value to geothermal energy, and the potential of igneous rocks as an environment for nuclear waste disposal. These topics are presented rather apologetically in the preface, but the author is to be applauded for including this chapter. The apology shows just how new these interests are to petrology. Recognition is finally coming that, for example, mineral deposits are not “sports of nature,” a view held even by many economic geologists as recently as the early 1960's; instead they are perfectly ordinary geochemical features formed by perfectly ordinary geologic processes. In fact, the mineral deposits and their attendant alteration zones probably have as much to tell us about igneous rocks as the igneous rocks have to tell us about mineral deposits.

  13. Modelling of fast jet formation under explosion collision of two-layer alumina/copper tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Balagansky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Under explosion collapse of two-layer tubes with an outer layer of high-modulus ceramics and an inner layer of copper, formation of a fast and dense copper jet is plausible. We have performed a numerical simulation of the explosion collapse of a two-layer alumina/copper tube using ANSYS AUTODYN software. The simulation was performed in a 2D-axis symmetry posting on an Eulerian mesh of 3900x1200 cells. The simulation results indicate two separate stages of the tube collapse process: the nonstationary and the stationary stage. At the initial stage, a non-stationary fragmented jet is moving with the velocity of leading elements up to 30 km/s. The collapse velocity of the tube to the symmetry axis is about 2 km/s, and the pressure in the contact zone exceeds 700 GPa. During the stationary stage, a dense jet is forming with the velocity of 20 km/s. Temperature of the dense jet is about 2000 K, jet failure occurs when the value of effective plastic deformation reaches 30.

  14. MD simulations of onset of tungsten fuzz formation under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, A.; Henriksson, K.O.E.; Nordlund, K.

    2013-01-01

    When helium (He) escapes a fusion reactor plasma, a tungsten (W)-based divertor may, under some conditions, form a fuzz-like nano-morphology. This is a highly undesired phenomenon for the divertor, and is not well understood. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of high fluence He and also C-seeded He (He+C) irradiation on W, focusing on the effect of the high fluence, the temperature and the impurities on the onset of the structure formation. We concluded that MD reproduces the experimentally found square root of time dependence of the surface growth. The He atomic density decreases when increasing the number of He atoms in the cell. A higher temperature causes a larger bubble growth and desorption activity, specially for the pure He irradiation cases. It also it leads to W recrystallization for the He+C irradiation cases. Carbon acts as a local He trap for small clusters or single atoms and causes a larger loss of crystallinity of the W surface

  15. Formation of sputtered silver clusters under bombardment with SF sub 5 sup + ions

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalab, S; Maksimov, S E; Mazarov, P; Tugushev, V I; Dzhemilev, N K; Wucher, A

    2002-01-01

    The formation of Ag sub n clusters and Ag sub n sup + cluster ions under bombardment of a silver surface with SF sub 5 sup + and Xe sup + projectile ions was investigated experimentally. In order to obtain information about the relative abundance of clusters among the flux of sputtered particles independent of their charge state, mass spectra of both secondary ions and sputtered neutral particles were recorded. The neutral species were post-ionized prior to mass analysis by means of photo-ionization using an intense UV laser at a wavelength of 193 nm. It is found that measured Ag sub n sup + signals increase significantly if SF sub 5 sup + projectiles are used instead of rare gas (Ar sup + or Xe sup +) ions of the same kinetic impact energy. The signals of neutral Ag atoms and Ag sub n clusters, on the other hand, exhibit only a relatively small increase, thus indicating that the enhancement observed for the secondary ions is predominantly caused by an increased ionization probability of sputtered particles u...

  16. Petrographic characterization to build an accurate rock model using micro-CT: Case study on low-permeable to tight turbidite sandstone from Eocene Shahejie Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar, Muhammad Jawad; Lin, Chengyan; Cnudde, Veerle; Bultreys, Tom; Dong, Chunmei; Zhang, Xianguo; De Boever, Wesley; Zahid, Muhammad Aleem; Wu, Yuqi

    2018-03-26

    Pore scale flow simulations heavily depend on petrographic characterizing and modeling of reservoir rocks. Mineral phase segmentation and pore network modeling are crucial stages in micro-CT based rock modeling. The success of the pore network model (PNM) to predict petrophysical properties relies on image segmentation, image resolution and most importantly nature of rock (homogenous, complex or microporous). The pore network modeling has experienced extensive research and development during last decade, however the application of these models to a variety of naturally heterogenous reservoir rock is still a challenge. In this paper, four samples from a low permeable to tight sandstone reservoir were used to characterize their petrographic and petrophysical properties using high-resolution micro-CT imaging. The phase segmentation analysis from micro-CT images shows that 5-6% microporous regions are present in kaolinite rich sandstone (E3 and E4), while 1.7-1.8% are present in illite rich sandstone (E1 and E2). The pore system percolates without micropores in E1 and E2 while it does not percolate without micropores in E3 and E4. In E1 and E2, total MICP porosity is equal to the volume percent of macrospores determined from micro-CT images, which indicate that the macropores are well connected and microspores do not play any role in non-wetting fluid (mercury) displacement process. Whereas in E3 and E4 sandstones, the volume percent of micropores is far less (almost 50%) than the total MICP porosity which means that almost half of the pore space was not detected by the micro-CT scan. PNM behaved well in E1 and E2 where better agreement exists in PNM and MICP measurements. While E3 and E4 exhibit multiscale pore space which cannot be addressed with single scale PNM method, a multiscale approach is needed to characterize such complex rocks. This study provides helpful insights towards the application of existing micro-CT based petrographic characterization methodology

  17. From regolith to rock by shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1975-01-01

    A model for shock-lithification of terrestrial and lunar regolith is proposed. In this model it is proposed that air or an air-water mixture initially in the pores of terrestrial soil affects the behaviour of the soil-air-water system under shock-loading. Shock lithified rocks found at Meteor Crater are classified as 'strongly lithified' and 'weakly lithified' on the basis of their strength in hand specimen; only weakly lithified rocks are found at the missile impact craters. These qualitative strength properties are related to the mechanisms of bonding in the rocks. The densities of weakly lithified samples are directly related to the pressures to which they were shock-loaded. A comparison of the petrographic textures and densities of weakly lithified samples with textures and densities of 'regolith' shock-loaded to known pressures suggests that weakly lithified terrestrial samples formed at pressures well under 100kb., probably under 50 kb. If terrestrial soils are shock-loaded to pressures between 100 and 200 kb by impact events of short duration, the pore pressure due to hot air or air-water mixtures exceeds the strength of the weak lithification mechanisms and fragmentation rather than lithifications, occurs. At pressures above 200 kb, lithification can occur because the formation of glass provides a lithification mechanism which has sufficient strength to withstand the pore pressure. (Auth.)

  18. CARBON STOCK IN SOIL UNDER DIFFERENT FOREST FORMATIONS, CHAPECÓ, SANTA CATARINA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Berenice Nicoloso Denardin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509813323The adoption of management practices that ensure the stability of soil organic matter also maintain the stabilityor quantitative increase of carbon (C in the lithosphere, reducing the amount of CO2 in theatmosphere. You can also minimize the losses of C to the atmosphere by using conservation practices,or using cover crops to keep the soil C stocks, and the forest cover are considered great abductionand forest systems considered large reservoirs of C. This work was performed on a property located inChapecó, Santa Catarina state, where soils were sampled from different forest formations distributedin a homogeneous soil range. The local climate is mesothermal, rainy, and the soil was characterizedas an association Cambissolo Háplico/Neossolo Litólico. The objectives were to estimate the C stocksin soils and estimate the C losses occurred due to the change of soil cover. It was evaluated soils undernatural forest (FN, of secondary stage, with a high degree of preservation; planted forest of eucalyptus(Eucalyptus saligna (PE, with eight years of cultivation, preceded by 17 years under crop conventionaltillage; and a planted forest of herb mate (Ilex paraguariensis (EM, with 25 years of cultivation underconventional system (cutting interval of 18 months, with removal of all waste produced and maintenanceof the ground without cover, with periodic use of herbicide - glyphosate. In each area were opened fourtrenches with 50 cm deep, where soil samples were collected in depths of: 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-20 cm,20-30 cm, 30-40 cm, and 40-50 cm, with kopeck rings. It was possible to determine the bulk density (Mgm-3, the soil volume per layer (depth and per hectare, and the concentration of soil C in the differentstudied areas. To quantify the C stocks equal amounts of soil were used for each depth evaluated. Itwas observed higher densities of soils and under PE and EM, to FN the lowest density are explained bythe

  19. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of two reference Belgian clay formations under non-isothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Two deep clay formations are being investigated in Belgium in connection with the design of a repository for 'High-Level Radioactive Waste': Boom clay BC at Mol (located between 160 and 270 m depths), considered the reference host formation, and Ypresian clay YC at Kallo (located between 300 and 450 m depths) as an alternative one. A comprehensive experimental programme has been carried out on these materials to explore water permeability at different temperatures and sample orientations, as well as to analyse volume change behaviour on loading/unloading at different temperatures and sample orientations (including pre and post-yield compressibility, yield properties and volume changes on drained thermal loading). Table 1 summarises some properties of BC and YC. Figure 1 presents the pore size distribution PSD curves of both clays obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry. They display contrasting features (bi-modal pore network in YP with larger dominant pore sizes). Larger water permeability values are expected on YC as indicated in Table 1 and Figure 2, not only as a consequence of its higher void ratio but also due to these double porosity features. Water retention properties, of particular concern on sample retrieval from large depths, are also affected due to desaturation processes that are associated with the double porosity network of YP and its effects on air-entry value (a lower initial suction is measured on YP, despite being retrieved from larger depths). Figure 2 shows vertical and horizontal water permeability results under constant volume conditions and different temperatures. BC and YC display small anisotropy at sample scale - permeability is slightly larger on horizontal direction-. With regard to temperature effects, the figure shows that water permeability dependency on temperature in YC is slightly higher than the water viscosity prediction for both orientations. Instead BC displayed a thermal

  20. Standard format and content of financial assurance mechanisms required for decommissioning under 10 CFR parts 30, 40, 70, and 72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this regulatory guide, ''Standard Format and Content of Financial Assurance Mechanisms Required for Decommissioning Under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72,'' is to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be provided for establishing financial assurance for decommissioning and to establish a standard format for presenting the information. Use of the standard format will help ensure that the financial instruments contain the information required by 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72; aid the applicant and NRC staff in ensuring that the information is complete; and help persons reading the financial instruments to locate information. This guide address financial assurance for decommissioning of facilities under materials licenses granted under Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72. These parts include licensees in the following categories: Part 30, Byproduct Material; Part 40, Source Material; Part 70, Special Nuclear Material; and Part 72, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations

  1. PRINCIPLE ROCK TYPES FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Borojević Šostarić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Underground geological storage of high- and intermediate/low radioactive waste is aimed to represent a barrier between the surface environment and potentially hazardous radioactive elements. Permeability, behavior against external stresses, chemical reacatibility and absorption are the key geological parameters for the geological storage of radioactive waste. Three principal rock types were discussed and applied to the Dinarides: (1 evaporites in general, (2 shale, and (3 crystalline basement rocks. (1 Within the Dinarides, evaporite formations are located within the central part of a Carbonate platform and are inappropriate for storage. Offshore evaporites are located within diapiric structures of the central and southern part of the Adriatic Sea and are covered by thick Mesozoic to Cenozoic clastic sediment. Under very specific circumstances they can be considered as potential site locations for further investigation for the storage of low/intermediate level radioactive wast e. (2 Thick flysch type formation of shale to phyllite rocks are exposed at the basement units of the Petrova and Trgovska gora regions whereas (3 crystalline magmatic to metamorphic basement is exposed at the Moslavačka Gora and Slavonian Mts. regions. For high-level radioactive waste, basement phyllites and granites may represent the only realistic potential option in the NW Dinarides.

  2. Study of C13/C12 and O18/O16 variations on environments of beach rocks formation in Itaparica island - Bahia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, H.S.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium carbonate-cemented beach sands or beach rocks have been observed to occur in the inter tidal zone of many tropical beaches. Near Salvador (Brazil) occurrences are found in several locations on the island of Itaparica. A study of the stable isotope composition (C 13 / C 12 and O 18 / O 16 ) of the cement and the local groundwater was carried out to determine the origin of the carbonate cement. (author)

  3. Formation of dwarf ellipticals and dwarf irregular galaxies by interaction of giant galaxies under environmental influence

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Debsarma, Suma; Karmakar, Pradip; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation of gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and gas-poor, rotating dwarf elliptical galaxies following the interaction between two giant galaxies as a function of space density. The formation of dwarf galaxies is considered to depend on a random variable, the tidal index theta, an environmental parameter defined by Karachentsev et al. (2004), such that for theta less than zero, the formation of dwarf irregular galaxy is assured whereas for theta greater than zer...

  4. Petrogenesis of the western highlands of the moon - Evidence from a diverse group of whitlockite-rich rocks from the Fra Mauro formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1992-01-01

    A group of KREEPy basalts has been discovered in Apollo 14 soils. These samples exhibit similarities to both HA and VHK basalts, albeit with much higher REE abundances, and contain up to 2 vol pct whitlockite and can be explained by assimilation of a K-, REE- and P-rich fluids by an original HA or VHK basalt. This KREEP component could have been produced late in the evolution of the lunar magma ocean and is similar in composition to QMD at Apollo 14. Two rocks have trace element compositions that are representative of actual KREEP. One of the samples appears to be petrographically pristine and could represent an actual KREEP basalt rock. Five subophitic high-Al basalts represent sampling of either a slowly cooled impact melt sheet or, more likely, the same basalt flow. Two 'quasi-pristine' highland rocks confirm the postulate of a connection between KREEP and the alkali suite. A newly discovered alkali anorthosite is a plagioclase cumulate with about 15 percent trapped KREEPy liquid.

  5. Distributed Formation State Estimation Algorithms Under Resource and Multi-Tasking Constraints, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent work has developed a number of architectures and algorithms for accurately estimating spacecraft and formation states. The estimation accuracy achievable...

  6. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples. Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  7. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yépez, L.D.; Carrillo, J.L.; Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J.M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena. - Highlights: • A weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number is proposed. • The self-propelling clusters appear when a vertical rotating magnetic field is applied. • The largest average chain lengths are reached when frequencies are multiples one another. • Rotating and unidirectional alternating fields produce the largest average chain length values.

  8. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yépez, L.D.; Carrillo, J.L. [Instituto de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Edif. 110 A, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J.M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca 42090, Pachuca (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena. - Highlights: • A weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number is proposed. • The self-propelling clusters appear when a vertical rotating magnetic field is applied. • The largest average chain lengths are reached when frequencies are multiples one another. • Rotating and unidirectional alternating fields produce the largest average chain length values.

  9. Formation of Fine Structures in Uniform Suspension under Standing Waves Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, V. F.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    Structurization of initially uniform suspension in fields of standing gravity waves was studied in a rectangular tank oscillating in vertical direction. The tank with aspect ratio of 50:4 was placed at shaker table with a low level of horizontal components of acceleration during the motion. Diluted aluminum powder suspension in water filled in tank with was undergone wave action in frequency range corresponding to first and second modes of intrinsic oscillations. For visualizations and tracers velocity measurements a digital high-speed video camera was used. The formation of large and small scale structures in initially uniform suspension was registered. Experiments were performed in tanks with flat smooth and rough bottom as well as with water above stationary ripples and deformable sand riffles. Large and small scales irregularities of initially smooth field of concentration were observed in the whole volume of the fluid. Large voids with shapes reminding the bottom topography features were formed first. Later the fine extended filaments were observed. Their horizontal scales were determined by bed forms extension, and the vertical scale grows in time. Depending on the wave mode the filament structures arose from the bottom or sank from the free surface. The evolution of the structure geometrical parameters were measured both in vertical and horizontal directions. The difference of dynamical behaviour of suspension concentration in vicinity and far from free surface, flat bottom or bed topography was determined and discussed. In theoretical description of the flow compete fundamental set of governing equations. Complete solution of the set contains family of thin singular perturbed components which are characterized by singular perturbed functions. These flow components can accumulate of admixtures and maintain non-uniform pattern of admixture concentration. The presented experiments were performed on set-up USU "HPC IPMec RAS" under support of Ministry of

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation and its function under elevated atmospheric O3: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D

    2017-07-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the effects of elevated O 3 on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formation and on AM role in promoting plant growth in regard to several moderating variables (O 3 levels, O 3 exposure duration, plant types, AM fungi family, and additional stress) by means of meta-analysis of published data. The analysis consisted of 117 trials representing 20 peer-reviewed articles and 16 unpublished trials. Relative to non-mycorrhizal controls, AM inoculation did not significantly alter plant growth (shoot biomass, root biomass, total biomass and plant height) when O 3 concentration was less than 80 ppb, but at concentrations above 80 ppb symbiosis was associated with increases of 68% in shoot biomass and 131% in root biomass. AM effects on plant growth were affected by the duration of O 3 exposure but did not differ much with AM fungi taxa or plant type. AM symbiosis has also led to higher yields under O 3 stress, relative to the non-mycorrhizal plants, and the AM effects have been more pronounced as O 3 concentration increases. As with biomass, AM effects on yield have been affected by the duration of O 3 exposure, with the greatest increase (100%) occurring at 61-90 d. AM-induced promotion of yield differed with fungal species but not with plant type or other abiotic stress. Colonization of roots by AM fungi has been negatively affected by elevated O 3 compared to ambient O 3 ; total mycorrhizal colonization rate (MCR), arbuscular MCR, vesicular MCR and hyphal coil MCR declined as O 3 levels rose. AM colonization rates were affected by duration of O 3 exposure, plant type, AM fungal taxa and other concurrent stresses in most cases. The analysis showed that AM inoculation has the potential to ameliorate detrimental effects of elevated O 3 on plant growth and productivity, despite colonization rates being negatively affected by elevated O 3 . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Confinement properties evolution of the cap-rocks argillite-type under CO2 enriched-fluids: impact of the natural and artificial discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthe, G.

    2012-01-01

    This research is part of the studies of feasibility of CO 2 storage in deep geological strata, focusing more particularly on the evolution of the confinement properties of cap-rocks type argillite subjected to CO 2 enriched fluids. The argillite of Tournemire (Aveyron, France) were used as analog rocks, having identified what their weak points could be face to storage, namely their mineralogy, natural fractures filled with calcite and the presence of interfaces cement/argillite expected in filled injection wells. The 'through diffusion' experimental setup has been adapted to estimate (i) the possible modification of diffusive transport parameters recorded before and after acid attack for different radioactive tracers (tritium and chlorine-36) and non-radioactive tracers (deuterium and bromide) used to characterize samples of argillite of Tournemire and cement paste and (ii) the evolution of the chemical compositions of the solutions in the upstream and downstream reservoirs of diffusion cells during acid attacks. Finally, the analysis of solids was carried out in part by SEM-EDS, XRD and X-μTomography. Firstly, for all the samples studied, the values of the transport parameters determined before acid attack (effective diffusion coefficient and porosity) are consistent with those of the literature. In addition, it appears that all materials have reacted strongly to acid attacks. Thus, argillites saw their diffusion parameters increase up to a factor of two, especially for anionic tracers, and, whatever the proportion of carbonate minerals initially present in samples of argillite. The post-mortem observations have led to the identification of a zone of dissolution of carbonate minerals in them, but whose extension (400 microns or less) can not alone explain the significant degradation of the containment properties. Only unobservable phenomena during investigation scale, such as wormhole effects in porous network could be the cause. In addition, the samples of

  12. Chemistry teacher initial formation under the eye of the coordinators of the courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guimarães Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recognition of the need for change and the constant production of studies on initial formation, the degree courses still have questions that need to be discussed. These issues are related to the difficulty to overcome the lack of teachers in basic education and the type of formation offered in undergraduate courses, which does not seem to meet the current Brazilian educational demands. This paper presents data from a qualitative study conducted with coordinators of seven higher education institutions in the state of São Paulo. Despite the different institutional realities presented in this work, the difficulty of effectively contribute to the formation of chemistry teachers is common to all the institutions. Lack of interest in initial formation teacher’s courses, evasion problems, relationship between the initial formation of chemical teachers and chemistry’s professionals and the lack of commitment of teachers marked the reports of the coordinators of the courses.

  13. Oil source rocks in the Adiyaman area, southeast Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Cengiz

    In the Adiyaman area, southeast Turkey, two carbonate source rock units, the Karababa-A Member and the Karabogaz Formation, are identified. The maturity levels of the source rock units increase towards the north and the west. Both the Karababa-A Member and the Karabogaz Formation are good to excellent oil-source rocks with widespread "kitchen areas".

  14. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Højberg, O; Binnerup, S J; Sørensen, J

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria. The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a...

  15. Distributed Adaptive Finite-Time Approach for Formation-Containment Control of Networked Nonlinear Systems Under Directed Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujuan; Song, Yongduan; Ren, Wei

    2017-07-06

    This paper presents a distributed adaptive finite-time control solution to the formation-containment problem for multiple networked systems with uncertain nonlinear dynamics and directed communication constraints. By integrating the special topology feature of the new constructed symmetrical matrix, the technical difficulty in finite-time formation-containment control arising from the asymmetrical Laplacian matrix under single-way directed communication is circumvented. Based upon fractional power feedback of the local error, an adaptive distributed control scheme is established to drive the leaders into the prespecified formation configuration in finite time. Meanwhile, a distributed adaptive control scheme, independent of the unavailable inputs of the leaders, is designed to keep the followers within a bounded distance from the moving leaders and then to make the followers enter the convex hull shaped by the formation of the leaders in finite time. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is confirmed by the simulation.

  16. Mechano-chemical coupling in stressed rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewers, Thomas; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    1989-06-01

    The free energy of a grain in a rock at depth varies as a function of the texture of its surroundings, either due to fluctuations in stress, strain energy, or interfacial factors. Herein we discuss methods Used to estimate the contribution by texture to grain free energy in deforming rocks, as well as implications for textural evolution when included in kinetic reaction-transport models. A key feature is the introduction of a formalism coupling rock flow and mineral reaction by means of a Navier-Stokes equation. The resulting set of equations describes mechano-chemical interactions under a wide range of conditions and may pose constraints on more descriptive models. Under certain circumstances, this free energy may lead to the autonomous enhancement of spatial ihhomogeneities in texture when coupled to reaction and transport in an intergranular fluid. We hold that such phenomena as metamorphic layering, spaced (solution) cleavage, geodes, and certain types of concretions are examples of mechano-chemical selforganization. The dynamics leading to formation of such texture may thus be understood in analogy with other examples of geochemical self-organization and may be quantified accordingly.

  17. The Formation of Teacher Work Teams under Adverse Conditions: Towards a More Realistic Scenario for Schools in Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintrop, Rick; Charles, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Group formation studies are rare in the literature on teacher professional learning communities (PLCs). But they are needed to render realistic scenarios and design interventions for practitioners who work in schools where teachers encounter distress and social adversity. Under these conditions, we may need approaches to PLC development that are…

  18. Distributed Formation State Estimation Algorithms Under Resource and Multi-Tasking Constraints, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent work on distributed multi-spacecraft systems has resulted in a number of architectures and algorithms for accurate estimation of spacecraft and formation...

  19. Scale Formation under Blended Phosphate Treatment for a Utility with Lead Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional wisdom hypothesizes that the orthophosphate component of blended phosphate corrosion inhibitors causes the formation of low solubility lead-orthophosphate solids which inhibit lead release into drinking water. This study characterized the composition and morphology o...

  20. Evidence for the role of organics in aerosol particle formation under atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, A.; Dommen, J.; Duplissy, J.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Verheggen, B.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.; Spracklen, D.V.; Carslaw, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is an important parameter in governing the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. However, detailed nucleation mechanisms remain ambiguous, as laboratory data have so far not been successful in explaining atmospheric nucleation. We investigated the formation of new particles in a smog chamber simulating the photochemical formation of H2SO4 and organic condensable species. Nucleation occurs at H2SO4 concentrations similar to those found in the ambient atmosphere during nucleation events. The measured particle formation rates are proportional to the product of the concentrations of H2SO4 and an organic molecule. This suggests that only one H2SO4 molecule and one organic molecule are involved in the rate-limiting step of the observed nucleation process. Parameterizing this process in a global aerosol model results in substantially better agreement with ambient observations compared to control runs.

  1. Chemistry teacher initial formation under the eye of the coordinators of the courses

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Guimarães Corrêa; Rosebelly Nunes Marques

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recognition of the need for change and the constant production of studies on initial formation, the degree courses still have questions that need to be discussed. These issues are related to the difficulty to overcome the lack of teachers in basic education and the type of formation offered in undergraduate courses, which does not seem to meet the current Brazilian educational demands. This paper presents data from a qualitative study conducted with coordinators of seven higher ed...

  2. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. ROCK inhibitors in ocular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Halasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rho kinases (ROCKs have a crucial role in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization and thus are involved in broad aspects of cell motility, from smooth muscle contraction to neurite outgrowth. The first marketed ROCK inhibitor, called fasudil, has been used safely for treatment of cerebral vasospasm since 1995 in Japan. During the succeeding decades ROCK inhibitors have been applied in many pathological conditions from central nervous system disorders to cardiovascular disease as potential therapeutic agents or experimental tools to help understand the underlying (pathomechanisms. In 2014, a fasudil derivate named ripasudil was accepted for clinical use in glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Since ROCK kinases are widely expressed in ocular tissues, they have been implicated in the pathology of many ocular conditions such as corneal dysfunction, glaucoma, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal detachment. This paper aims to provide an overview of the most recent status/application of ROCK inhibitors in the field of eye disease.

  4. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications

  5. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  6. Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xijuan; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Furgal, Karolina

    2011-01-01

    of triclosan- methyl was investigated in activated sludge from a standard activated sludge WWTP equipped with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. The removal was found to occur mainly under aerobic conditions while under anoxic (nitrate reducing) and anaerobic conditions rather low removal rates were...... determined. In a laboratory-scale activated sludge reactor 75% of the triclosan was removed under aerobic conditions within 150 h, while no removal was observed under anaerobic or anoxic conditions. One percent of the triclosan was converted to triclosan-methyl under aerobic conditions, less under anoxic...

  7. Nanggulan Formation and Its Problem As a Basement in Kulonprogo Basin, Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Gendoet Hartono

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.2.71-80Nanggulan Formation consists of the oldest clastic rock sequence exposed in Kulonprogo area, Yogyakarta. This paper discusses the position of Nanggulan Formation as a basement. The method used in this research is surface and subsurface investigations based on gravity surveys. The rock assemblage is exposed and distributed partly in the east flank of Kulonprogo Mountains with weak undulated morphology. The rock sequence is composed of sand to clay grain sizes such as sandstone, quartz sandstone, calcareous sandstone, claystone, fossiliferous claystone, calcareous claystone, siltstone, and coal seam intercalations. The total thickness of the sequence is less than 200 m. Based on the fossil and palynology investigations, previous investigators concluded the age of the rock was Eocene to Middle Miocene. The geological structures developed in the rocks are the lithological stratification, fractures, folding, and faulting. The subsurface interpretation based on gravity data revealed the rock was located under the andesite breccias with 2.44 g/cc density. The density of the rock sequence was 2.63 g/cc. The gravity interpretation shows a strong indication that Nanggulan Formation underlies the andesitic breccias presumably associated with Old Andesite Formation exposed in Kulonprogo Mountains. The limited distribution, the thickness, and the closed environmental deposition of Nanggulan Formation found in the present investigation raised problems on the position of the formation as the basement of Old Andesite Formation occurring in the Kulonprogo Mountain.

  8. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  9. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, G.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Nordlund, K.; Lasa, A.; Björkas, C.; Safi, E.; Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  10. Deformations of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1977-09-01

    Results of the DBM and FEM analysis in this study indicate that a suitable rock mass for repository of radioactive waste should be moderately jointed (about 1 joint/m 2 ) and surrounded by shear zones of the first order. This allowes for a gentle and flexible deformation under tectonic stresses and prevent the development of large cross-cutting failures in the repository area. (author)

  11. High-Burnup-Structure (HBS): Model Development in MARMOT for HBS Formation and Stability Under Radiation and High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, X. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A detailed phase field model for the formation of High Burnup Structure (HBS) was developed and implemented in MARMOT. The model treats the HBS formation as an irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model takes into consideration the stored energy associated with dislocations formed under irradiation. The accumulation of radiation damage, hence, increases the system free energy and triggers recrystallization. The increase in the free energy due to the formation of new grain boundaries is offset by the reduction in the free energy by creating dislocation-free grains at the expense of the deformed grains. The model was first used to study the growth of recrystallized flat and circular grains. The model reults were shown to agree well with theorrtical predictions. The case of HBS formation in UO2 was then investigated. It was found that a threshold dislocation density of (or equivalently a threshold burn-up of 33-40 GWd/t) is required for HBS formation at 1200K, which is in good agrrement with theory and experiments. In future studies, the presence of gas bubbles and their effect on the formation and evolution of HBS will be considered.

  12. High-Burnup-Structure (HBS): Model Development in MARMOT for HBS Formation and Stability Under Radiation and High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Bai, X.; Zhang, Y.; Biner, B.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed phase field model for the formation of High Burnup Structure (HBS) was developed and implemented in MARMOT. The model treats the HBS formation as an irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model takes into consideration the stored energy associated with dislocations formed under irradiation. The accumulation of radiation damage, hence, increases the system free energy and triggers recrystallization. The increase in the free energy due to the formation of new grain boundaries is offset by the reduction in the free energy by creating dislocation-free grains at the expense of the deformed grains. The model was first used to study the growth of recrystallized flat and circular grains. The model results were shown to agree well with theoretical predictions. The case of HBS formation in UO2 was then investigated. It was found that a threshold dislocation density of (or equivalently a threshold burn-up of 33-40 GWd/t) is required for HBS formation at 1200K, which is in good agreement with theory and experiments. In future studies, the presence of gas bubbles and their effect on the formation and evolution of HBS will be considered.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Link between Nuclear Receptor Function and Cholesterol Gallstone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Carmen Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol gallstone disease is highly prevalent in western countries, particularly in women and some specific ethnic groups. The formation of water-insoluble cholesterol crystals is due to a misbalance between the three major lipids present in the bile: cholesterol, bile salts, and phospholipids. Many proteins implicated in biliary lipid secretion in the liver are regulated by several transcription factors, including nuclear receptors LXR and FXR. Human and murine genetic, physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological evidence is consistent with the relevance of these nuclear receptors in gallstone formation. In addition, there is emerging data that also suggests a role for estrogen receptor ESR1 in abnormal cholesterol metabolism leading to gallstone disease. A better comprehension of the role of nuclear receptor function in gallstone formation may help to design new and more effective therapeutic strategies for this highly prevalent disease condition.

  14. Multishell structure formation in Ni nanowire under uniaxial strain along <0 0 1> crystallographic direction: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Li, E-mail: wanglihxf@sdu.edu.c [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University at Weihai, 180 Wenhuaxi Road, Weihai 264209 (China); Peng Chuanxiao [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Gong Jianhong [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University at Weihai, 180 Wenhuaxi Road, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based upon embedded-atom-method potential are employed to explore the fracture behavior of Ni nanowire along <0 0 1> crystallographic direction at temperature of 300 K. We find the formation of (5,5) multishell structure (MS), which is transformed from (6,5) MS at the necking region of nanowire under the strain rate of 0.02%ps{sup -1}. A reorientation transformation from <0 0 1> to <1 1 0> is first detected before formation of (6,5) MS. The formed (5,5) MS is more stable and can be tensioned longer as lower strain rate is loaded.

  15. Processes Governing Alkaline Groundwater Chemistry within a Fractured Rock (Ophiolitic Mélange Aquifer Underlying a Seasonally Inhabited Headwater Area in the Aladağlar Range (Adana, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Güler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate natural and anthropogenic processes governing the chemical composition of alkaline groundwater within a fractured rock (ophiolitic mélange aquifer underlying a seasonally inhabited headwater area in the Aladağlar Range (Adana, Turkey. In this aquifer, spatiotemporal patterns of groundwater flow and chemistry were investigated during dry (October 2011 and wet (May 2012 seasons utilizing 25 shallow hand-dug wells. In addition, representative samples of snow, rock, and soil were collected and analyzed to constrain the PHREEQC inverse geochemical models used for simulating water-rock interaction (WRI processes. Hydrochemistry of the aquifer shows a strong interseasonal variability where Mg–HCO3 and Mg–Ca–HCO3 water types are prevalent, reflecting the influence of ophiolitic and carbonate rocks on local groundwater chemistry. R-mode factor analysis of hydrochemical data hints at geochemical processes taking place in the groundwater system, that is, WRI involving Ca- and Si-bearing phases; WRI involving amorphous oxyhydroxides and clay minerals; WRI involving Mg-bearing phases; and atmospheric/anthropogenic inputs. Results from the PHREEQC modeling suggested that hydrogeochemical evolution is governed by weathering of primary minerals (calcite, chrysotile, forsterite, and chromite, precipitation of secondary minerals (dolomite, quartz, clinochlore, and Fe/Cr oxides, atmospheric/anthropogenic inputs (halite, and seasonal dilution from recharge.

  16. Basement and cover-rock deformation during Laramide contraction in the Northern Madison Range (Montana) and its influence on Cenozoic basin formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellogg, K.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Schmidt, C.J. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Young, S.W. [Conoco, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Two major Laramide fault systems converge in the northwestern Madison Range: the northwest-striking, southwest-vergent Spanish Peaks reverse fault and the north-striking, east-vergent Hilgard thrust system. Analysis of foliation attitudes in basement gneiss north and south of the Spanish Peaks fault indicates that the basement in thrusted blocks of the Hilgard thrust system has been rotated by an amount similar to that of the basement-cover contact. In most places along the Hilgard thrust system, a large basement overhang, produced by thrusting of Archean blocks above rocks as young as Late Cretaceous, overlies a tight footwall syncline. This tight folding is largely concentric and was accommodated by flexural slip, resulting in severe crowding in synclinal hinges that resulted in observed or inferred features such as bedding-plane slip, imbricate and out-of-syncline thrusting, and hinge collapse. This paired fault system (the Madison normal fault system and the Hilgard thrust system) of the northern Madison Range is strikingly similar to other paired systems in southwestern Montana along and adjacent to the western margins of the Ruby Range, Snowcrest Range, Greenhorn Range, Tobacco Root Mountains, and Bridger Range. No hydrocarbon discoveries have been made in this unique structural province. However, petroleum exploration here has focused on basement-cored anticlines, both surface and subthrust, related to the two major Laramide fault systems and on the fault-bounded blocks of Tertiary rocks within the post-Laramide extensional basins. The interplay of the two Laramide fault systems during both Laramide shortening and Tertiary extension has produced a variety of possible structural traps in the Madison Range that have not yet been thoroughly investigated.

  17. Physical Properties Data for Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    foreign substances, such as oil . Other characteristics of Rock salt is a coarsely crystalline, sedimentary rock rock salt, specifically porosity and...225Permian """ 280 - , Pennsyl vani an-. ’, ~320---.. Mississippian 345 Paleozoic Devonian 395- . Silurian 430... Silurian salt-bearing Salina Formation of Michi- well into the Gulf of Mexico to the Sigsbee knolls, which gan, northern Ohio, Ontario, New York

  18. Professional Motivation Formation of Future Specialists under the Conditions of Regional Educational Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargina, Elena Mikhaylovna

    2015-01-01

    Motivation plays the leading role in the organization of the personality structure. It is a driving force of the activity. Motivation accounts for the behavior and activity and has a great impact on professional self-determination and person's satisfaction with the work. The problem of professional motivation formation of a future specialist is…

  19. Forces of Change: Mechanics Underlying Formation of Functional 3D Organ Buds

    OpenAIRE

    Wrighton, Paul J.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    3D organ buds that can recapitulate organ function have myriad applications for regenerative and personalized medicine. Here, Takebe et al. (2015) describe a generalized method for organ bud formation, demonstrating that mechanosensitive mesenchymal stem cells drive condensation of heterotypic cell mixtures to create buds from diverse organs.

  20. Forces of Change: Mechanics Underlying Formation of Functional 3D Organ Buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrighton, Paul J; Kiessling, Laura L

    2015-05-07

    3D organ buds that can recapitulate organ function have myriad applications for regenerative and personalized medicine. Here, Takebe et al. (2015) describe a generalized method for organ bud formation, demonstrating that mechanosensitive mesenchymal stem cells drive condensation of heterotypic cell mixtures to create buds from diverse organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Formation of Ni/C based polyacrylonitrile nanocomposites under IR-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy G. Muratov

    2016-09-01

    By calculating the total Gibbs energy of possible reduction reactions of nickel chloride and oxide pyrolysis PAN products we have shown the possibility of the formation of nanocomposites comprising nickel oxide nanoparticles which can be reduced to zero-valence state at higher temperature IR heating (more than 5000 °C.

  2. Formation and adaptation of memory : Neurobiological mechanisms underlying learning and reversal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, Robbert

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain region that plays a critical role in memory formation. In addition, it has been suggested that this brain region is important for ‘updating’ information that is incorrect or outdated. The main goal of this thesis project was to investigate which neurobiological processes

  3. FORMATION OF PYROMORPHITE IN ANGLESITE-HYDROXYAPATITE SUSPENSIONS UNDER VARYING PH CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of phosphate to lead [Pb(II)] contaminated soil to immobilize soil Pb by formation of pyromorphite has been proposed as an alternative remediation technique. Lead sulfate (PbSO4, anglesite), a Pb-bearing form found in contaminated soils and wastes, was reacted with a sy...

  4. Nanotwin Formation in High-Manganese Austenitic Steels Under Explosive Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadinc, D.; Uzer, B.; Elmadagli, M.; Guner, F.

    2018-04-01

    The micro-deformation mechanisms active in a high-manganese austenitic steel were investigated upon explosive shock loading. Single system of nanotwins forming within primary twins were shown to govern the deformation despite the elevated temperatures attained during testing. The benefits of nanotwin formation for potential armor materials were demonstrated.

  5. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwager, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muller, R. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1981-06-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of and at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer resulting from the reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion or decomposition processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  6. Formation of imines by selective gold-catalysed aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols and amines under ambient conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegnæs, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2010-01-01

    The formation of imines by aerobic oxidative coupling of mixtures of alcohols and amines was studied using gold nanoparticles supported on titanium dioxide, TiO2, as a heterogeneous catalyst. The reactions were performed at ambient conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure) and occurr......-product represents a new green reaction protocol for imine formation.......The formation of imines by aerobic oxidative coupling of mixtures of alcohols and amines was studied using gold nanoparticles supported on titanium dioxide, TiO2, as a heterogeneous catalyst. The reactions were performed at ambient conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure) and occurred...... with excellent selectivity (above 98%) at moderate conversion under optimized conditions. The effect of catalytic amounts of different bases was studied, along with reaction temperature and time. Utilisation of a selective catalyst system that uses dioxygen as an oxidant and only produces water as by...

  7. RockIT: A Graphical Program for Labeling and Analyzing Rock Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, B.; Castano, A.; Anderson, R. C.; Castano, R.

    2005-12-01

    We have developed the Rock Identification Toolkit (RockIT), a mature, cross-platform, graphical program designed to help geologists rapidly and accurately label rocks and particles in images. As images are labeled, RockIT reports both individual rock (or particle) statistics and overall scene statistics. Basic statistics include 2D rock (image) area and average albedo. A more involved set of statistics uses a direct least squares technique to fit a rock trace to an ellipse and report the semimajor and semiminor axes, orientation, eccentricity, and quality of fit. When range data (e.g. derived from a stereo image pair) is available, RockIT provides both 3D rock size and overall scene area estimates. All statistics may be manipulated interactively and later exported to plain, tab-delimited text for easy import into tools like Excel or Matlab for further sophisticated analysis, summarization, and visualization. RockIT can read and display both image and, when available, corresponding range data. Although it supports several popular graphics file formats (e.g. JPEG, TIFF, etc.) our focus has been on more domain-specific file formats, particularly the MER Planetary Data System (PDS) formats. Images, once displayed, may be enhanced in continually, in real-time, throughout the analysis process. Examples of image enhancement include increasing or decreasing brightness and contrast, performing simple min/max intensity normalizations or more complicated histogram equalizations. Several scientists and students at JPL, NASA, Cornell, and PSI use RockIT to identify and characterize rock shape, size, and distribution in MER microscopic imager and panoramic images. Recently, Golombek et al. (2005) used RockIT to compare rock size distributions and calculate cumulative fractional area coverage at several locations along the Spirit traverse. We have a laptop computer running RockIT to demonstrate its capabilities and allow people to experiment on their own.

  8. Some geological and geophysical aspects in electric rock breaking

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henry, G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This presentation looks at the way rocks break and the geological and geophysical aspects thereof. It it important to know that rocks are much weaker under tension (10 times) than under compression. Geological and geophysical factors play...

  9. Nod factor supply under water stress conditions modulates cytokinin biosynthesis and enhances nodule formation and N nutrition in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, Marion; Salon, Christophe; Smith, Donald L; Emery, R J Neil

    2016-09-01

    Nod factors (NF) are molecules produced by rhizobia which are involved in the N 2 -fixing symbiosis with legume plants, enabling the formation of specific organs called nodules. Under drought conditions, nitrogen acquisition by N 2 -fixation is depressed, resulting in low legume productivity. In this study, we evaluated the effects of NF supply on nitrogen acquisition and on cytokinin biosynthesis of soybean plants grown under drought. NF supply to water stressed soybeans increased the CK content of all organs. The profile of CK metabolites also shifted from t-Z to cis-Z and an accumulation of nucleotide and glucoside conjugates. The changes in CK coincided with enhanced nodule formation with sustained nodule specific activity, which ultimately increased the total nitrogen fixed by the plant.

  10. Response Surface Methodology Study on Magnetite Nanoparticle Formation under Hydrothermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Mizutani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a hydrothermal preparation of crystalline magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the influence of the experimental parameters (initial molar ratio of ferrous/ferric ions, initial concentration of ferrous ions, and heating time, and their interactions, on the particle formation was studied using response surface methodology (RSM, based on a statistical design of experiments (DOE. As indices indicating particle formation and crystallization, the variation in the particle diameter and crystallite size with the synthesis conditions was examined. The crystallite size was greatly affected by both the initial ferrous/ ferric ion molar ratio and the heating time, whereas the particle diameter strongly depended on the heating time, and on the interaction between the initial ferrous/ferric ion molar ratio and the initial concentration of ferrous ions. The results from a statistical analysis suggest that the polycrystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticles form via crystal growth and/or thermal aggregation, after nucleation during hydrothermal treatment.

  11. Liquid-liquid phase separation and cluster formation at deposition of metals under inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorobets, O. Yu; Gorobets, Yu I.; Rospotniuk, V. P.; Grebinaha, V. I.; Kyba, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The formation and dynamic of expansion and deformation of the liquid-liquid interface of an electrolyte at deposition of metals at the surface of the magnetized steel ball is considered in this paper. The electrochemical processes were investigated in an external magnetic field directed at an arbitrary angle to the force of gravity. These processes are accompanied by the formation of effectively paramagnetic clusters of electrochemical products - magnions. Tyndall effect was used for detection of the presence of magnions near the magnetized steel electrode in a solution. The shape of the interface separating the regions with different concentration of magnions, i.e. different magnetic susceptibilities, was described theoretically based on the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium which takes into account magnetic, hydrostatic and osmotic pressures.

  12. Structural and energetic factors controlling the enantioselectivity of dinucleotide formation under prebiotic conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponer, Judit E.; Mládek, Arnošt; Šponer, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 17 (2013), s. 6235-6242 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/2302 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : APPROXIMATE COULOMB POTENTIALS * PEPTIDE-BOND FORMATION * ZETA VALENCE QUALITY Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.198, year: 2013

  13. Biofilm formation by Salmonella spp. in catfish mucus extract under industrial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhowlaghar, Nitin; De Abrew Abeysundara, Piumi; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, Mark W; Chang, Sam; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Sharma, Chander S

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of strain and temperature on the growth and biofilm formation of Salmonella spp. in high and low concentrations of catfish mucus extract on different food-contact surfaces at 22 °C and 10 °C. The second objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of disinfectants at recommended concentrations and contact times for removing Salmonella biofilms cells on a stainless steel surface containing catfish mucus extract. Growth and biofilm formation of all Salmonella strains increased with higher concentrations of catfish mucus extract at both 10 °C and 22 °C. In 15 μg/ml of catfish mucus extract inoculated with 3 log CFU/ml, the biofilm levels of Salmonella on stainless steel surface reached to 3.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 10 °C or 5.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 22 °C in 7 days. In 375 μg/ml of catfish mucus extract inoculated with 3 log CFU/ml, the biofilm levels of Salmonella on the stainless steel surface reached 4.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 10 °C and 6.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 22 °C in 7 days. No differences were observed between Salmonella strains tested for biofilm formation in catfish mucus extract on the stainless steel surface. The biofilm formation by Salmonella Blockley (7175) in catfish mucus extract was less (P Salmonella biofilm cells were not detectable on the stainless steel surface after treatment with a mixture of disinfectants but were still present when single compound disinfectants were used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y.; Schwager, F.; Muller, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of LiClO/sub 4/ and LiAsF/sub 6/ at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements and other techniques. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer of Li/sub 2/O by reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  15. Rons formation under restrictive reperfusion does not affect organ dysfunction early after hemorrhage and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zifko, Clara; Kozlov, Andrey V; Postl, Astrid; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl

    2010-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathophysiology of early reperfusion. We aimed to determine 1) reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) formation in organs of rats and 2) its pathophysiological relevance during a phase of restrictive reperfusion after hemorrhagic/traumatic shock (HTS). Fifty-seven male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a clinically relevant HTS model, featuring laparotomy, bleeding, and a phase of restrictive reperfusion. The RONS scavenger 1-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (continuous i.v. infusion) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied for RONS (primarily superoxide and peroxynitrite) detection. Compared with sham-operated animals, the organ-specific distribution of RONS changed during restrictive reperfusion after HTS. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation increased during restrictive reperfusion in red blood cells and ileum only but decreased in the kidney and remained unchanged in other organs. Hemorrhagic traumatic shock followed by restrictive reperfusion resulted in metabolic acidosis, dysfunction of liver and kidney, and increased oxidative burst capacity in circulating cells. Plasma RONS correlated with shock severity and organ dysfunction. However, RONS scavenging neither affected organ dysfunction nor oxidative burst capacity nor myeloperoxidase activity in lung when compared with the shock controls. In summary, a phase of restrictive reperfusion does not increase RONS formation in most organs except in intestine and red blood cells. Moreover, scavenging of RONS does not affect the early organ dysfunction manifested at the end of a phase of restrictive reperfusion.

  16. Geology and petrography of the basaltic rocks (Arapey formation) cropping out in toad 4 between Arapey river (92 km) and Artigas (200 Km)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyhantcabal, P.; Pineiro, G.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution presents a geological map of the basaltic flows of Arapey formation (Mezosoic) cropping out in Road 4 between the Arapey river (92 Km) and Artigas city (200 Km) together with the description of the petrographic features of the different portions of the 13 recognized flow units. (author)

  17. Geology and petrography in basaltic rocks (Arapey formation) cropping out in road 30 between the Bella Union round point (27 km) and Penas cuesta (225 Km)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyhantcabal, P.; Pineiro, G.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution presents a geological map of the basaltic flows of Arapey formation (Mezosoic) cropping out in Road 30 between the Bella Union round point (27 Km) and Pena s cuesta (225 Km) together with the description of the petrographic features of the different portions of the 20 recognized flow units

  18. Waste-rock interactions in the immediate repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.

    1977-01-01

    The high level wastes (HLW's) to be placed underground in rock formations will contain significant amounts of radioactive decay heat for the first hundred-or-so years of isolation. Several physical-chemical changes analogous to natural geochemical processes can occur during this ''thermal period.'' The waste canister can act as a heat source and cause changes in the mineralogy and properties of the surrounding rocks. Geochemically, this is ''contact metamorphism.'' In the event that the canister is corroded and breached, chemical reactions can occur between the HLW, the surrounding rock and possibly the remains of the canister. In a dry repository which has not been backfilled (and thus pressurized) these interactions could be slow at best and with rates decreasing rapidly as the HLW cools. However, significant interactions can occur in years, months or even days under hydrothermal conditions. These conditions could be created by the combination of HLW heat, overburden pressure and water mobilized from the rocks or derived from groundwater intrusion. At the end of the thermal period these interaction products would constitute the actual HLW form (or ''source term'') subject to the low temperature leaching and migration processes under investigation in other laboratories. It is quite possible that these interaction product waste forms will have superior properties compared to the original HLW. Experimental programs initiated at Penn State during the last year aim at determining the nature of any chemical or mineralogical changes in, or interactions between, HLW solids and host rocks under various repository ambients. The accompanying figures describe the simulated HLW forms and the experimental approach and techniques. Studies with basalts as the repository rock are supported by Rockwell Hanford Operations and with shales by the Office of Waste Isolation

  19. RhoA/rock signaling mediates peroxynitrite-induced functional impairment of Rat coronary vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhijun; Wu, Xing; Li, Weiping; Peng, Hui; Shen, Xuhua; Ma, Lu; Liu, Huirong; Li, Hongwei

    2016-10-11

    Diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction may arise from reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability, following interaction with superoxide to form peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite can induce formation of 3-nitrotyrosine-modified proteins. RhoA/ROCK signaling is also involved in diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. The study aimed to investigate possible links between Rho/ROCK signaling, hyperglycemia, and peroxynitrite in small coronary arteries. Rat small coronary arteries were exposed to normal (NG; 5.5 mM) or high (HG; 23 mM) D-glucose. Vascular ring constriction to 3 mM 4-aminopyridine and dilation to 1 μM forskolin were measured. Protein expression (immunohistochemistry and western blot), mRNA expression (real-time PCR), and protein activity (luminescence-based G-LISA and kinase activity spectroscopy assays) of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2 were determined. Vascular ring constriction and dilation were smaller in the HG group than in the NG group (P Peroxynitrite impaired vascular ring constriction/dilation; this was partially reversed by inhibition of RhoA or ROCK. Protein and mRNA expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2 were higher under HG than NG (P Peroxynitrite also enhanced RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2 activity; these actions were partially inhibited by 100 μM urate (peroxynitrite scavenger). Exogenous peroxynitrite had no effect on the expression of the voltage-dependent K + channels 1.2 and 1.5. Peroxynitrite-induced coronary vascular dysfunction may be mediated, at least in part, through increased expressions and activities of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2.

  20. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Qasim, D.; Linnartz, H. [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ioppolo, S. [School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dishoeck, E. F. van, E-mail: gfedo@oact.inaf.it [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-06-10

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CH{sub 2}OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical–radical and radical–molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  1. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Ioppolo, S.; Qasim, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, I.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH2CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  2. Effect of a marginal inclination on pattern formation in a binary liquid mixture under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croccolo, Fabrizio; Scheffold, Frank; Vailati, Alberto

    2013-07-05

    Convective motions in a fluid layer are affected by its orientation with respect to the gravitational field. We investigate the long-term stability of a thermally stressed layer of a binary liquid mixture and show that pattern formation is strongly affected by marginal inclinations as small as a few milliradians. At small Rayleigh numbers, the mass transfer is dominated by the induced large scale shear flow, while at larger Rayleigh numbers, it is dominated by solutal convection. At the transition, the balance between the solutal and shear flows gives rise to drifting columnar flows moving in opposite directions along parallel lanes in a superhighway configuration.

  3. Formation of microspheres under the action of femtosecond laser radiation on titanium samples in hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuev, D. A.; Khorkov, K. S.; Ivashchenko, A. V.; Prokoshev, V. G.; Arakelian, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the original method of laser synthesis of microspheres which contain titanium carbide. The formation of microspheres is carried out by the action of femtosecond laser radiation on the surface of titanium in the reaction medium - the ultimate hydrocarbon. The resulting microspheres have a high surface smoothness, a narrow particle size distribution, an average size of 1-3 μm. They can be used in applications of additive engineering, powder metallurgy as the main raw material, or as an alloying additive.

  4. Anisotropy effect of crater formation on single crystal silicon surface under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Shahid, Ijaz; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yan, Sha; Le, Xiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Due to the induced extremely fast thermal and dynamic process, Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB) is widely applied in material processing, which can bring enhanced material performance and surface craters as well. To investigate the craters' formation mechanism, a specific model was built with Finite Element Methods (FEM) to simulate the thermal field on irradiated single crystal silicon. The direct evidence for the existence of the simulated 6-fold rotational symmetric thermal distribution was provided by electron microscope images obtained on single crystal silicon. The correlation of the experiment and simulation is of great importance to understand the interaction between IPIB and materials.

  5. Crack initiation and potential hot-spot formation around a cylindrical defect under dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Li, Xinguo; Zheng, Xianxu; Li, Kewu; Hu, Qiushi; Li, Jianling

    2017-11-01

    In recent decades, the hot-spot theory of condensed-phase explosives has been a compelling focus of scientific investigation attracting many researchers. The defect in the polymeric binder of the polymer-bonded explosive is called the intergranular defect. In this study, the real polymeric binder was substituted by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as it is transparent and has similar thermodynamic properties to some binders. A set of modified split Hopkinson pressure bars equipped with a time-resolved shadowgraph was used to study the process of crack initiation and potential hot-spot formation around a cylindrical defect in PMMA. The new and significant phenomenon that the opening-mode crack emerged earlier than the shearing-mode crack from the cylindrical defect has been published for the first time in this paper. Furthermore, a two-dimensional numerical simulation was performed to show the evolution of both the stress field and the temperature field. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experiment. Finally, the law of potential hot-spot formation is discussed in detail.

  6. In situ diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, N.; Madsen, I.; Loan, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Bayer process is used to extract alumina (A I 203) from bauxite ore. The efficiency of the proc severely compromised by the build-up of insoluble species (scale) on the surfaces of mild process equipment, which impedes the material flow through, and heat transfer to, the pr streams [1]. In precipitation areas operating at 60-8 C gibbsite, AI(OHh, scales predominate the spent liquor heaters which typically operate at 150-250 0 C, sodalite and cancrinite-type s aluminosilicate scales are formed (1). An improved understanding of the scale formation mechanism may lead to the development of a practical and economic method for scale prevention. Characterisation of the structure, composition and crystallographic orientation of phases present early stages of formation is crucial for this understanding, making x-ray and neutron diffraction important analytical techniques. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed Australian Synchrotron during AI(OHh deposition on mild steel substrates using a purpose built stainless steel flow cell (3). The high resolution data enabled identification of three polymors AI(OH)3 (gibbsite, bayerite and nordtsrandite) in the deposited material, each displaying ori growth along (001). Additional in situ synchrotron XRD experiments, where AI(OH)3 precipitatiol 'seeded' with various iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, have also been performed and some ' results will be discussed. Similar neutron diffraction experiments on Wombat are planned investigations of seeded aluminosilicate precipitation at 150-250 0 C using an Inconel hydrothermal cell.

  7. Deactivating Carbon Formation on a Ni/Al2O3 Catalyst under Methanation Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sine Ellemann; Andersson, Klas J.; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2017-01-01

    The carbon formation causing deactivation during CO methanation was studied for a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Sulfur-free methanation at low temperature (573 K) for various lengths of time was followed by temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH) providing information on carbon types involved in the deac......The carbon formation causing deactivation during CO methanation was studied for a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Sulfur-free methanation at low temperature (573 K) for various lengths of time was followed by temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH) providing information on carbon types involved...... in the deactivation of the catalyst.Three main carbon hydrogenation peaks were evident from TPHs following methanation: ∼460, ∼650, and ∼775 K. It is suggested that the ∼460 K TPH peak was composed of two peaks: a surface carbide peak at 445–460 K, and a peak due to carbon dissolved into the nickel at 485 K based...... on CO and CH4 adsorption measurements and XRD analysis. The 650 and 775 K temperature peaks are assigned to polymerized carbon structures and the ∼775K peak was found to be the primary cause of deactivation as judged by a linear correlation between its amount and the degree of catalyst deactivation...

  8. Dynamics of Plug Formation in a Circular Cylinder Under Low Bond Number Conditions: Experiment and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaby, Ghazi; Kizito, John P.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the current study is to investigate the dynamics of two phase interface under a low Bond number condition. Silicone oil is injected into a cylinder under a Bond number of about 0.47 via a side tube forming a T-junction with the former. The time evolution of the interface of silicon oil in a cylinder is captured using a high speed camera. The volume at which the plug is formed is then determined using an image processing tool to analyze the captured images. A numerical simulation is carried out where fluid is injected into a cylinder, under a less than unity Bond number condition, via a side tube. Numerical and experimental results are then compared.

  9. Formation and Characterization of TiO2/CNT Nanomaterials Dried under Supergravity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Vargas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The elaboration of bilayer TiO2/CNT films dried under terrestrial gravity conditions (g and on a centrifuge with 1.3g and 7g is reported. The changes in microstructure and thickness of these coatings under supergravity environment cause a red-shift tendency in the optical properties at increasing values of acceleration. Experiments of a drop under enhanced gravity force in the range of 3.7 < Bo (bond number < 51.5 suggest the incomplete elimination of surfactant-water molecules in the TiO2/CNT bilayer film. Increasing acceleration up to 14g will widen the optical differences found, proving the layer-by-layer solution-chemical method in combination with these drying protocols, an alternative to produce thickness-sensitive solar-selective absorbing coatings.

  10. Standard format and content of financial assurance mechanisms required for decommissioning under 10 CFR parts 30, 40, 70, and 72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established technical and financial regulations for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities (53 FR 24018, June 27, 1988). The regulations address decommissioning planning needs, timing, funding methods, and environmental review requirements for public and private facilities holding licenses under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 50, 70, and 72, with the exception of uranium mills. The intent of the regulations is to ensure that the decommissioning of all licensed facilities will be accomplished in a safe and timely manner and that licensees will provide adequate funds to cover all costs associated with decommissioning. The purpose of this regulatory guide, ''Standard Format and Content of Financial Assurance Mechanisms Required for Decommissioning Under 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72,'' is to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be provided for establishing financial assurance for decommissioning and to establish a standard format for presenting the information. Use of the standard format will (1) help ensure that the financial instruments contain the information required by 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, 70, and 72, (2) aid the applicant and NRC staff in ensuring that the information is complete, and (3) help persons reading the financial instruments to locate information. 5 refs., 13 figs

  11. The thermodynamics of molecular cloud fragmentation : Star formation under non-Milky Way conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hocuk, S.; Spaans, M.

    Context. Properties of candidate stars, forming out of molecular clouds, depend on the ambient conditions of the parent cloud. We present a series of 2D and 3D simulations of fragmentation of molecular clouds in starburst regions, as well as of clouds under conditions in dwarf galaxies, leading to

  12. Effective Strategy Formation Models for Inventory Management under the Conditions of Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosorukov, Oleg Anatolyevich; Sviridova, Olga Alexandrovna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of modeling the commodity flows management of a trading company under the conditions of uncertain demand and long supply. The Author presents an analysis of modifications of diversified inventory management system with random demand, for which one can find the optimal inventory control strategies, including those…

  13. Monitoring of biofilm formation and activity in drinking water distribution networks under oligotrophic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Martiny, Adam Camillo; Arvin, Erik

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the construction a model distribution system suitable for studies of attached and suspended microbial activity in drinking water under controlled circumstances is outlined. The model system consisted of two loops connected in series with a total of 140 biofilm sampling points...

  14. Thin block copolymer films : film formation and corrugation under the AFM tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Fleer, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    The tip of an atomic force microscope was used to induce nanoscale ordering in thin films of polystyrene-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) block copolymers under low force. The AFM tip produces rims on a mesoscopic scale oriented perpendicularly to the scanning direction. A wide range of molecular weights of

  15. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone- immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria....... The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a sudden lack of oxygen. In contrast, nitrate-respiring, fermenting bacteria, e.g., Bacillus and Escherichia...... spp, formed microcolonies under anaerobic conditions with or without the presence of nitrate and irrespective of aerobic or anaerobic preculture conditions....

  16. Formation of Biogenic Amines in Chicken Meat Stored under Modified Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Gallas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of two modified atmospheres with a different combination of gases on selected groups of microorganisms and on concentrations of biogenic amines (BAs in samples of poultry breast muscle. The samples were packaged under modified atmosphere A (75% O2 a 25% CO2 or B (75% N2 and 25% CO2 and stored at temperatures from +2 to +4 °C for 14 days. During the storage period, O2 concentrations in modified atmosphere A (MA A decreased from the initial 74.8 ± 0.3% to 55.9 ± 6.6% at the end of the storage period. In all samples, counts of psychrotrophic bacteria counts, Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria and coliform microorganism were determined. The tests were made on the packaging day, and then after three, nine and fourteen days of storage. At the end of the storage period, higher numbers of psychrotrophic bacteria (6.5 ± 0.7 log10 cfu g-1, Brochothrix thermosphacta (4.8 ± 0.3 log10 cfu g-1 and lactic acid bacteria (1.7 ± 0.4 log10 cfu g-1 were found on samples packaged under MA A. Samples packaged under modified atmosphere B on the other hand contained higher numbers of coliform bacteria (4.1 ± 0.6 log10 cfu g-1 at the end of the storage period. In addition to microbiological indicators, concentrations of biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine, spermidine and β-phenylethylamine were also determined. In fresh samples and after three days of storage, only spermine and spermidine were found. After 9 and 14 days, also other BAs were detected. The biogenic amine totals at the end of the storage period was 60.0 ± 13.2 mg kg-1 in samples packaged under MA A and 129.0 ± 41.3 mg kg-1 in samples packaged under MA B. The most abundantly represented biogenic amines in samples packaged under MA A were putrescine and spermine (49.7 and 24.8%, respectively, at the end of the storage period, and putrescine and cadaverine in samples packaged under MA B (47.0 and 32

  17. A Model of Digital Payment Infrastructure Formation and Development Under a Emerging SEPA Regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staykova, Kalina; Damsgaard, Jan

    The Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA) is probably the most ambitious self-regulatory project aimed at creating a single integrated European digital payments market since the introduction of the Euro. SEPA aims to make EU more innovative and competitive. When considering the SEPA initiative...... and combining it with the disruptive and innovative nature the mobile phone permeates, the result is a market that is rapidly transforming from well-established into a state of flux. We build a model to understand and explain this transformation of the digital payment infrastructure. The model captures...... the formation and development of digital payment infrastructure with a particular emphasis on the regulator´s perspective. It consists of four stages characterized by slow incremental change following by short rapid bursts of discontinuity. Each stage is portrayed by its evolutionary dynamics, the nature...

  18. Surface modification and droplet formation of tungsten under hot plasma irradiation at the GOL-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Bataev, I. A.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Ivantsivsky, M. V.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Shoshin, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of tungsten surface modification after plasma loads at the multimirror trap GOL-3. Energy loads on tungsten surface varied from 2 up to 4 MJ/m2 per shot with sets from 1 to 9 repetitive irradiations that corresponds to loads higher than tungsten melting threshold and is close to ITER giant ELM loads. Targets surface modification and transverse microsections after irradiation was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and hardness tester. Formation on tungsten surface of three different crack networks with typical cell sizes of 1000, 10 and 0.3 μm and bubbles are identified. The network of large cracks extend perpendicularly to the irradiated sample surface to a depth of 50-350 μm. Erosion depth depends on energy loads - rises from 20 to 200 μm at 2 and 4 MJ/m2 correspondingly. Cracking, development of tungsten surface morphology and droplets splashing are discussed.

  19. Surface modification and droplet formation of tungsten under hot plasma irradiation at the GOL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Bataev, V.A.; Bataev, I.A.; Burdakov, A.V.; Ivanov, I.A.; Ivantsivsky, M.V.; Kuklin, K.N.; Mekler, K.I.; Rovenskikh, A.F.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Postupaev, V.V.; Sinitsky, S.L.; Shoshin, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of tungsten surface modification after plasma loads at the multimirror trap GOL-3. Energy loads on tungsten surface varied from 2 up to 4 MJ/m 2 per shot with sets from 1 to 9 repetitive irradiations that corresponds to loads higher than tungsten melting threshold and is close to ITER giant ELM loads. Targets surface modification and transverse microsections after irradiation was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and hardness tester. Formation on tungsten surface of three different crack networks with typical cell sizes of 1000, 10 and 0.3 μm and bubbles are identified. The network of large cracks extend perpendicularly to the irradiated sample surface to a depth of 50–350 μm. Erosion depth depends on energy loads – rises from 20 to 200 μm at 2 and 4 MJ/m 2 correspondingly. Cracking, development of tungsten surface morphology and droplets splashing are discussed

  20. Microstructure formation features of the V-4Ti-4Cr alloy under severe plastic deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditenberg, I.; Tyumentsev, A.; Pinzhin, Y.P.; Potapenko, M.M.; Korotaev, A.D.; Chernov, V.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure formed under severe deformations (ε≥93%) in V-4Ti-4Cr alloys rolled at room temperature. Micro-band nano-structured states and high-energy defect substructures have been detected that feature a high curvature (up to x ij ≅ 20 deg. μm -1 ) of the crystal lattice, a high density (δΘ/δr ≥ 20 deg. μm -1 ) of partial disclinations at the micro-band boundaries, and local internal stresses reaching σ ≅ E/30 (E being Young's modulus). It has been shown that important features of the micro-band structure are the prevailing reorientation of the micro-bands around type directions and the high density of large angle boundaries with reorientation vectors Θ = (50-60) deg. . It has been supposed that these features result from the plastic deformation and reorientation of the crystal lattice through mechanisms of local martensitic type reversible transformations (direct plus reverse transformations accompanied by a change of the reverse transformation system) in fields of high local stresses. The most important factors involved in the new deformation mechanism and the prerequisites to its realization are discussed, namely, the degree of phase instability of the material, the intensity of local internal stresses, and the possibility of the relaxation of these stresses by ordinary plastic flow mechanisms. Theoretical analysis of the atomic mechanisms and distortions of the above transformations has shown that the most important features of the carriers of this deformation mode are the absence of any effective obstacles, under severe deformations included, and the possibility of the high-defect structural states formed under these conditions to intensely relax. It is supposed that the combined effect of these two factors underlies the phenomenon of ultrahigh technological plasticity of the alloys under investigation: very high (practically unlimited) plastic

  1. Formation and deposition of platinum nanoparticles under boiling water reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundler, Pascal V.; Veleva, Lyubomira; Ritter, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a well-known degradation mechanism for components of boiling water reactors (BWRs). Therefore the mitigation of SCC is important for ensuring the integrity of the reactor system. Noble metal chemical application (NMCA) has been developed by General Electric to mitigate SCC and reduce the negative side-effects of hydrogen water chemistry used initially for SCC mitigation. NMCA is now widely applied as an online process (OLNC) during power operation. However, the understanding of the parameters that control the formation and deposition of the noble metal (Pt) particles in a BWR was still incomplete. To fill this knowledge gap, systematic studies on the formation and deposition behaviour of Pt particles in simulated and real BWR environment were performed in the framework of a research project at PSI. The present paper summarizes the most important findings. Experiments in a sophisticated high-temperature water loop revealed that the flow conditions, water chemistry, the Pt injection rate, and the pre-conditioning of the stainless steel surfaces have an impact on the Pt deposition behaviour. Slower Pt injection rates and stoichiometric excess of H2 over O2 produce smaller particles, which may increase the efficiency of the OLNC technique in mitigating SCC. Surfaces with a well-developed oxide layer retain more Pt particles. Furthermore, the pre- and post-OLNC exposure times play an important role for the Pt deposition on specimens exposed at the KKL power plant. Redistribution of Pt in the plant takes place, but most of the Pt apparently does not redeposit on the steel surfaces in the reactor system. Comparison of lab and plant results also demonstrated that plant OLNC applications can be simulated reasonably well on the lab scale.

  2. The 2002 rock/ice avalanche at Kolka/Karmadon, Russian Caucasus: assessment of extraordinary avalanche formation and mobility, and application of QuickBird satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, C.; Zgraggen-Oswald, S.; Haeberli, W.; Kääb, A.; Polkvoj, A.; Galushkin, I.; Evans, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    A massive rock/ice avalanche of about 100x106m3 volume took place on the northern slope of the Kazbek massif, North Ossetia, Russian Caucasus, on 20 September 2002. The avalanche started as a slope failure, that almost completely entrained Kolka glacier, traveled down the Genaldon valley for 20km, was stopped at the entrance of the Karmadon gorge, and was finally succeeded by a distal mudflow which continued for another 15km. The event caused the death of ca. 140 people and massive destruction. Several aspects of the event are extraordinary, i.e. the large ice volume involved, the extreme initial acceleration, the high flow velocity, the long travel distance and particularly the erosion of a valley-type glacier, a process not known so far. The analysis of these aspects is essential for process understanding and worldwide glacial hazard assessments. This study is therefore concerned with the analysis of processes and the evaluation of the most likely interpretations. The analysis is based on QuickBird satellite images, field observations, and ice-, flow- and thermo-mechanical considerations. QuickBird is currently the best available satellite sensor in terms of ground resolution (0.6 m) and opens new perspectives for assessment of natural hazards. Evaluation of the potential of QuickBird images for assessment of high-mountain hazards shows the feasibility for detailed avalanche mapping and analysis of flow dynamics, far beyond the capabilities of conventional satellite remote sensing. It is shown that the avalanche was characterized by two different flows. The first one was comparable to a hyperconcentrated flow and was immediately followed by a flow with a much lower concentration of water involving massive volumes of ice. The high mobility of the avalanche is likely related to fluidization effects at the base of the moving ice/debris mass with high pore pressures and a continuous supply of water due to frictional melting of ice. The paper concludes with

  3. The 2002 rock/ice avalanche at Kolka/Karmadon, Russian Caucasus: assessment of extraordinary avalanche formation and mobility, and application of QuickBird satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Huggel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A massive rock/ice avalanche of about 100x106m3 volume took place on the northern slope of the Kazbek massif, North Ossetia, Russian Caucasus, on 20 September 2002. The avalanche started as a slope failure, that almost completely entrained Kolka glacier, traveled down the Genaldon valley for 20km, was stopped at the entrance of the Karmadon gorge, and was finally succeeded by a distal mudflow which continued for another 15km. The event caused the death of ca. 140 people and massive destruction. Several aspects of the event are extraordinary, i.e. the large ice volume involved, the extreme initial acceleration, the high flow velocity, the long travel distance and particularly the erosion of a valley-type glacier, a process not known so far. The analysis of these aspects is essential for process understanding and worldwide glacial hazard assessments. This study is therefore concerned with the analysis of processes and the evaluation of the most likely interpretations. The analysis is based on QuickBird satellite images, field observations, and ice-, flow- and thermo-mechanical considerations. QuickBird is currently the best available satellite sensor in terms of ground resolution (0.6 m and opens new perspectives for assessment of natural hazards. Evaluation of the potential of QuickBird images for assessment of high-mountain hazards shows the feasibility for detailed avalanche mapping and analysis of flow dynamics, far beyond the capabilities of conventional satellite remote sensing. It is shown that the avalanche was characterized by two different flows. The first one was comparable to a hyperconcentrated flow and was immediately followed by a flow with a much lower concentration of water involving massive volumes of ice. The high mobility of the avalanche is likely related to fluidization effects at the base of the moving ice/debris mass with high pore pressures and a continuous supply of water due to frictional melting of ice. The paper

  4. Rock glaciers originating from mass movements: A new model based on field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitner, J. M.; Gruber, A.

    2009-04-01

    The morphological and geological conditions for the formation of rock glaciers in Alpine environments seem to be clear according to our present knowledge (BARSCH, 1996; HAEBERLI et al. 2006). All known examples derive from porous more or less coarse grained sedimentary bodies, either from moraines or, in most cases, from talus fans. In the latter case the debris accumulation originates overwhelmingly from physical weathering, rock falls or rock avalanches in proximity to rockwalls. However, in the course of geological mapping in the crystalline areas of Eastern and Northern Tyrol (Schober Gruppe, Tuxer Alpen) we found an additional setting. Some relict rock glaciers occur directly at the bulging toe of bedrock slopes, which had been affected by deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (REITNER, 2003; GRUBER, 2005). Furthermore rock glaciers are also present in ridge-top depressions and similar graben-like features that originated from gravitational processes in jointed bedrock. In all these cases talus fans with debris accumulation are missing in the source area of those rock glaciers. According to our model the disintegration of jointed rocks by creeping mass movements resulted in an increased volume of joint space. This enabled the formation of interstitial ice under permafrost conditions. Increased ice saturation led to the reduction of the angle of internal friction and finally to the initial formation of a rock glacier. Abundant material was provided for the further movement and thus for formation of quite large rock glaciers due to the previous and maybe still ongoing slope deformation. Most rock glaciers of this type originated from mass movements of sagging -type (Sackung sensu ZISCHINSKY, 1966), which illustrates the continuous transition from gravitational to periglacial creep process in high Alpine areas. All studied examples are of Lateglacial age according to the altitude in correspondence to the known amount of permafrost depression compared to

  5. Experimental study on influence of carbon dioxide on porous structure and mechanical properties of shale rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Miedzińska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shale rocks are geological formations which can be unconventional gas reservoirs. During their interaction with carbon dioxide, which can be used as a fracturing fluid in shale gas recovery process, many phenomena take place that can influence rock structure and mechanical properties. The research on changes in rock structure under super critical carbon dioxide interaction and their influence of shale properties were presented in the paper. The structural tests were carried out with the use of microscopic techniques with different resolutions of visualization. The uniaxial compression test was applied as a mechanical properties’ assessment experiment. As a result of research, some dependence was observed. The bigger decrease was in porosity after infiltration in lower zooms, the bigger increase in porosity in high zooms and mechanical properties was noticed. Keywords: geomechanics, shale rock, carbon dioxide

  6. Mechanisms underlying reductant-induced reactive oxygen species formation by anticancer copper(II) compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kowol, Christian R.; Heffeter, Petra; Miklos, Walter; Gille, Lars; Trondl, Robert; Cappellacci, Loredana; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via thiol-mediated reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) has been assumed as the major mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer potential of copper(II) complexes of Triapine (3-amino-pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone; currently in phase II clinical trials) and its terminally dimethylated derivative with that of 2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone a...

  7. STRATEGIC ENERGY SECURITY OUTLOOK FORMATION OF UKRAINE UNDER EUROPEAN INTEGRATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Voynarenko, Mykhaylo Petrovych; Mykolyuk, Oksana Anatoliyivna

    2017-01-01

    Urgency of the research. Energy security affects the competitiveness of national production in the world markets and the competitiveness of the national economy under globalization. Target setting. Implementation of existing potential requires a deep reform of the regulatory and legal framework and the requirements of international agreements in full. Actual scientific researches and issues analysis. Some aspects of energy security in terms of European integration exploring Barannik V., V. Ge...

  8. Formation and dimensions of marketing culture under the contemporary conditions of competition

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanskienė, Rūta; Žostautienė, Daiva

    2002-01-01

    Companies seeking to retain their position in the market are in search for competitive advantages. Alas, under contemporary conditions only traditional advantages are not sufficient; such as price, nicer or more convenient package, as competitors rapidly emulate such advantages. The advantages that would not be immediately emulated and the consumer could evaluate them as an exclusive attribute of the company’s activities are necessary nowadays. Such advantages may be provided by marketing cul...

  9. Equilibrium of Groundwater with Carbonate Minerals of the Water-Bearing Rocks under Anthropogenic Impact (by the example of Kishinev, Moldova)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenkova, A. N.; Pasechnik, E. Yu; Tokarenko, O. G.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents calculation results of equilibrium of groundwater in Kishenev with a variety of secondary carbonate minerals. It is shown that the groundwater-rock system is in equilibrium with some minerals, such as calcite, magnesite, dolomite, siderite, but at the same time is not in equilibrium with strontianite. It indicates that secondary mineral precipitation is possible. Specific nitrate chemical water type, which is rarely observed in nature and characterized by the presence of anthropogenic impact in this territory, in some cases is of higher saturation as compared to calcite, dolomite and magnesite due to the fact that nitrate ion content increases with the increase of calcium content.

  10. Formation and coalescence of nanobubbles under controlled gas concentration and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenliang; Zhang, A.-Man; Wang, Shiping; Cui, Pu

    2018-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effects of gas concentration and species on the coalescence and growth of nanobubbles were systematically investigated. With increasing gas concentration, not only surface nanobubbles but also bulk nanobubbles are formed. The bulk nanobubble in water is less explored so far. Here, its coalescence, stability, movement trajectory and velocity are discussed. A comparison of the motion and coalescence of the bulk nanobubble to the surface nanobubble, directly demonstrates that the three-phase contact line plays a crucial role for surface nanobubble stability. Compared with the bubble size, the distance between surface nanobubbles is a more important factor to decide the merging order among three nanobubbles. The study also shows that three factors including the oversaturated gas concentration, the distance between surface nanobubbles, and the stronger solid-gas interactions influence the formation of the gas-enrichment layer at the solid-liquid interface. The result has an important significance to enhancing the boundary slip due to the presence of nanobubbles.

  11. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster. (paper)

  12. Effect of soil invertebrates on the formation of humic substances under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouz, J.; Li, X.; Brune, A.; Pizl, V.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2011-08-01

    The complete polymerization of phenols and proteins (one of the processes involved in the formation of humic substances) was explained. It was shown that fly ( Bibio marci) larvae and earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa) participate in the complete polymerization of phenols and proteins. In a laboratory experiment, invertebrates participated in the degradation of organic matter and the synthesis of humic substances, which was proved in experiments with 14C-labeled phenols and proteins. The same organic substances (phenols and proteins) without the impact of invertebrates were used as the control substances. The distributions of the 14C isotope in alkaline extracts separated by solubility in acids (humic and fulvic acids) was compared to those of the control substances. The portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids in the excrements of Bibio marci was higher than that in the control substances. The content of 14C-labeled humic substances in the excrements of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa exceeded the control values only in the experiment with proteins. When clay material was added to the organic substances, the portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids increased in both experiments with phenols and proteins. When these substrates passed through the digestive tracts of the invertebrates, the polymerization of organic substances and the inclusion of proteins and phenols into humic acids occurred.

  13. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d f . An important gauge is metal heating depth d T at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d f < d T (thin film) and d f ≫ d T (bulk target). Radius R L of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d f ) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d f < d T on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R L in the range from diffraction limit R L ∼ λ to high values of R L ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d f < d T , R L ∼ λ, and F abs > F m , gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F abs and F m are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed

  14. Still under the ancestors' shadow? Ancestor worship and family formation in contemporary China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anning Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ancestor worship in China used to be an indispensable component of marriage and family life because it fostered an orientation toward perpetuating the family line. However, whether or not ancestor worship still matters in contemporary China is an open question. Objective: This article presents a comprehensive study of the association between ancestor worship practices and 1 the timing of transition to first marriage, 2 the pattern of childbearing, and 3 the orientation toward son preference. Methods: Drawing on the adult sample from the Chinese Family Panel Studies 2010, several multivariate models (Cox proportional hazard model, probit regression model, negative binomial regression models, and ordered probit model were fitted, corresponding to different types of outcome. Results: All else being equal, involvement in ancestor worship practices is correlated with 1 an early transition to marriage, 2 a larger number of children, 3 a higher probability of having at least one son, and 4 a larger number of sons. Conclusions: The relevance of the kinship tradition to family formation persists in contemporary China and has not faded away. Contribution: By highlighting the demographic implications of ancestor worship, this study illustrates the ongoing connection between culture and demography.

  15. Petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and paleo environmental characterization of radioactive anomaly associated to carbonate rocks from Jandaira formation of high cretaceous from Potiguar basin - Rio Grande do Norte - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Jandaira Formation (Turonian/Maastrichtian - Potiguar Basin, Brazil) presents an anomalous radioactive marker in the upper part of its carbonatic section. This marker of 3-20 m in thickness, comprises an area of about 3500 Km 2 and shows a radioactivity of 470 UAPI, against a background of 20 UAPI on the Gamma Ray Log. In the effort of characterizing this marker, petrological, mineralogical, geological and paleontological, analyses were made in ditch samples of selected 23 wells. This marker is composed by bioclastics packstones to mudstones, mainly constituted of planktonic and bentonic forams, deposited in relatively deep water. Chemical analysis of the P 205 richest samples, the ones show that they are also enriched on U, F, As, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Se, V, Y, Yb and on all rare-earth elements. The origin of the radioactive anomaly is due to the presence of sedimentary phosphates (phosphorite) made-up of uraniferous coloform apatite. (author)

  16. Spherical particles formation under biaxial cyclic loading due to mesotunneling effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shanyavskiy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue fracture surfaces of Al-based alloys with fatigue striations pattern and such wear debris pattern as spherical particles were investigated fractographically, on the bases of the OG’e spectroscopic analysis. The sequence of events during fatigue crack edges opening was discovered when the elliptical or spherical shapes of wear debris build up on the fracture surface in crosspieces between mesotunnels under mode III of mode I fatigue crack opening because of volume rotation. The cause of black colour of places with fretting patterns on the fracture surfaces of Al-based alloys is discussed.

  17. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  18. FEM Analyses for T-H-M-M Coupling Processes in Dual-Porosity Rock Mass under Stress Corrosion and Pressure Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The models of stress corrosion and pressure solution established by Yasuhara et al. were introduced into the 2D FEM code of thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory coupling analysis for dual-porosity medium developed by the authors. Aiming at a hypothetical model for geological disposal of nuclear waste in an unsaturated rock mass from which there is a nuclide leak, two computation conditions were designed. Then the corresponding two-dimensional numerical simulation for the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory processes were carried out, and the states of temperatures, rates and magnitudes of aperture closure, pore and fracture pressures, flow velocities, nuclide concentrations and stresses in the rock mass were investigated. The results show: the aperture closure rates caused by stress corrosion are almost six orders higher than those caused by pressure solution, and the two kinds of closure rates climb up and then decline, furthermore tend towards stability; when the effects of stress corrosion and pressure solution are considered, the negative fracture pressures in near field rise very highly; the fracture aperture and porosity are decreases in the case 1, so the relative permeability coefficients reduce, therefore the nuclide concentrations in pore and fracture in this case are higher than those in case 2.

  19. Seepage safety monitoring model for an earth rock dam under influence of high-impact typhoons based on particle swarm optimization algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme hydrological events induced by typhoons in reservoir areas have presented severe challenges to the safe operation of hydraulic structures. Based on analysis of the seepage characteristics of an earth rock dam, a novel seepage safety monitoring model was constructed in this study. The nonlinear influence processes of the antecedent reservoir water level and rainfall were assumed to follow normal distributions. The particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm was used to optimize the model parameters so as to raise the fitting accuracy. In addition, a mutation factor was introduced to simulate the sudden increase in the piezometric level induced by short-duration heavy rainfall and the possible historical extreme reservoir water level during a typhoon. In order to verify the efficacy of this model, the earth rock dam of the Siminghu Reservoir was used as an example. The piezometric level at the SW1-2 measuring point during Typhoon Fitow in 2013 was fitted with the present model, and a corresponding theoretical expression was established. Comparison of fitting results of the piezometric level obtained from the present statistical model and traditional statistical model with monitored values during the typhoon shows that the present model has a higher fitting accuracy and can simulate the uprush feature of the seepage pressure during the typhoon perfectly.

  20. New measurements on water ice photodesorption and product formation under ultraviolet irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Martín-Doménech, Rafael; Moreno, Elena; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Chen, Yu-Jung

    2018-03-01

    The photodesorption of icy grain mantles has been claimed to be responsible for the abundance of gas-phase molecules towards cold regions. Being water a ubiquitous molecule, it is crucial to understand its role in photochemistry and its behaviour under an ultraviolet field. We report new measurements on the ultraviolet (UV) photodesorption of water ice and its H2, OH, and O2 photoproducts using a calibrated quadrupole mass spectrometer. Solid water was deposited under ultra-high-vacuum conditions and then UV-irradiated at various temperatures starting from 8 K with a microwave discharged hydrogen lamp. Deuterated water was used for confirmation of the results. We found a photodesorption yield of 1.3 × 10-3 molecules per incident photon for water and 0.7 × 10-3 molecules per incident photon for deuterated water at the lowest irradiation temperature, 8 K. The photodesorption yield per absorbed photon is given and comparison with astrophysical scenarios, where water ice photodesorption could account for the presence of gas-phase water towards cold regions in the absence of a thermal desorption process, is addressed.

  1. A model of disordered zone formation in Cu3Au under cascade-producing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapinos, V.G.; Bacon, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A model to describe the disordering of ordered Cu 3 Au under irradiation is proposed. For the thermal spike phase of a displacement cascade, the processes of heat evolution and conduction in the cascade region are modelled by solving the thermal conduction equation by a discretization method for a medium that can melt and solidify under appropriate conditions. The model considers disordering to result from cascade core melting, with the final disordered zone corresponding to the largest molten zone achieved. The initial conditions for this treatment are obtained by simulation of cascades by the MARLOWE code. The contrast of disordered zones imaged in a superlattice dark-field reflection and projected on the plane parallel to the surface of a thin foil was calculated. The average size of images from hundreds of cascades created by incident Cu + ions were calculated for different ion energies and compared with experimental transmission electron microscopy data. The model is in reasonable quantitative agreement with the experimentally observed trends. (author)

  2. Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozza, R.; Vanossi, A.; Benassi, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical charging of parallel plates confining a model ionic liquid down to nanoscale distances yields a variety of charge-induced changes in the structural features of the confined film. That includes even-odd switching of the structural layering and charging-induced solidification and melting, with important changes of local ordering between and within layers, and of squeezout behavior. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore this variety of phenomena in the simplest charged Lennard-Jones coarse-grained model including or excluding the effect a neutral tail giving an anisotropic shape to one of the model ions. Using these models and open conditions permitting the flow of ions in and out of the interplate gap, we simulate the liquid squeezout to obtain the distance dependent structure and forces between the plates during their adiabatic approach under load. Simulations at fixed applied force illustrate an effective electrical pumping of the ionic liquid, from a thick nearly solid film that withstands the interplate pressure for high plate charge to complete squeezout following melting near zero charge. Effective enthalpy curves obtained by integration of interplate forces versus distance show the local minima that correspond to layering and predict the switching between one minimum and another under squeezing and charging.

  3. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB112 Promotes Anthocyanin Formation during Salinity and under High Light Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkowska, Magda E; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Xue, Gang-Ping; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    MYB transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. Here, we report MYB112 as a formerly unknown regulator of anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Expression profiling after chemically induced overexpression of MYB112 identified 28 up- and 28 down-regulated genes 5 h after inducer treatment, including MYB7 and MYB32, which are both induced. In addition, upon extended induction, MYB112 also positively affects the expression of PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1, a key TF of anthocyanin biosynthesis, but acts negatively toward MYB12 and MYB111, which both control flavonol biosynthesis. MYB112 binds to an 8-bp DNA fragment containing the core sequence (A/T/G)(A/C)CC(A/T)(A/G/T)(A/C)(T/C). By electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that MYB112 binds in vitro and in vivo to MYB7 and MYB32 promoters, revealing them as direct downstream target genes. We further show that MYB112 expression is up-regulated by salinity and high light stress, environmental parameters that both require the MYB112 TF for anthocyanin accumulation under these stresses. In contrast to several other MYB TFs affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis, MYB112 expression is not controlled by nitrogen limitation or an excess of carbon. Thus, MYB112 constitutes a regulator that promotes anthocyanin accumulation under abiotic stress conditions. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  5. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inogamov, N. A., E-mail: nailinogamov@googlemail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V. V. [Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d{sub f}. An important gauge is metal heating depth d{sub T} at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d{sub f} < d{sub T} (thin film) and d{sub f} ≫ d{sub T} (bulk target). Radius R{sub L} of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d{sub f}) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d{sub f} < d{sub T} on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R{sub L} in the range from diffraction limit R{sub L} ∼ λ to high values of R{sub L} ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d{sub f} < d{sub T}, R{sub L} ∼ λ, and F{sub abs} > F{sub m}, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F{sub abs} and F{sub m} are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  6. Response of Xylella fastidiosa to zinc: decreased culturability, increased exopolysaccharide production, and formation of resilient biofilms under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa produces biofilm that accumulates in the host xylem vessels, affecting disease development in various crops and bacterial acquisition by insect vectors. Biofilms are sensitive to the chemical composition of the environment, and mineral elements being transported in the xylem are of special interest for this pathosystem. Here, X. fastidiosa liquid cultures were supplemented with zinc and compared with nonamended cultures to determine the effects of Zn on growth, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production under batch and flow culture conditions. The results show that Zn reduces growth and biofilm production under both conditions. However, in microfluidic chambers under liquid flow and with constant bacterial supplementation (closer to conditions inside the host), a dramatic increase in biofilm aggregates was seen in the Zn-amended medium. Biofilms formed under these conditions were strongly attached to surfaces and were not removed by medium flow. This phenomenon was correlated with increased EPS production in stationary-phase cells grown under high Zn concentrations. Zn did not cause greater adhesion to surfaces by individual cells. Additionally, viability analyses suggest that X. fastidiosa may be able to enter the viable but nonculturable state in vitro, and Zn can hasten the onset of this state. Together, these findings suggest that Zn can act as a stress factor with pleiotropic effects on X. fastidiosa and indicate that, although Zn could be used as a bactericide treatment, it could trigger the undesired effect of stronger biofilm formation upon reinoculation events.

  7. Thermal properties of rock salt and quartz monzonite to 5730K and 50-MPa confining pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal linear expansion have been made on two rock types, a rock salt and a quartz monzonite, at temperatures from 300 to 573 0 K and confining pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. The samples were taken from deep rock formations under consideration as possible sites for a nuclear waste repository - the rock salt from a domal salt formation at Avery Island, Louisiana, and the quartz monzonite from the Climax Stock, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The testing temperature and pressures are meant to bracket conditions expected in the repository. In both rock types, the thermal properties show a strong dependence upon temperature and a weak or non-dependence upon confining pressure. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity both decrease with increasing temperature in approximately linear fashion for samples which have not been previously heated. At 50 MPa in both rocks this decrease closely matches the measured or expected intrinsic (crack-free) behavior of the material. Preliminary indications from the quartz monzonite suggest that conductivity and diffusivity at low pressure and temperature may decrease as a result of heat treatment above 400 0 K

  8. Simulation of Patterned Glass Film Formation in the Evaporating Colloidal Liquid under IR Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolegov, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    The paper theoretically studies the method of evaporative lithography in combination with external infrared heating. This method makes it possible to form solid microstructures of the required relief shape as a result of evaporation of the liquid film of the colloidal solution under the mask. The heated particles are sintered easier, so there are no cracks in the obtained structure, unlike the structure obtained employing the standard method of evaporative lithography. The paper puts forward a modification of the mathematical model which allows to describe not only heat and mass transfer at the initial stage of the process, but also the phase transition of colloidal solution into glass. Aqueous latex is taken as an example. The resulting final form of solid film is in good agreement with the experimental data of other authors.

  9. On the number of neurons and time scale of integration underlying the formation of percepts in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrer, Adrien; Machens, Christian K

    2015-03-01

    All of our perceptual experiences arise from the activity of neural populations. Here we study the formation of such percepts under the assumption that they emerge from a linear readout, i.e., a weighted sum of the neurons' firing rates. We show that this assumption constrains the trial-to-trial covariance structure of neural activities and animal behavior. The predicted covariance structure depends on the readout parameters, and in particular on the temporal integration window w and typical number of neurons K used in the formation of the percept. Using these predictions, we show how to infer the readout parameters from joint measurements of a subject's behavior and neural activities. We consider three such scenarios: (1) recordings from the complete neural population, (2) recordings of neuronal sub-ensembles whose size exceeds K, and (3) recordings of neuronal sub-ensembles that are smaller than K. Using theoretical arguments and artificially generated data, we show that the first two scenarios allow us to recover the typical spatial and temporal scales of the readout. In the third scenario, we show that the readout parameters can only be recovered by making additional assumptions about the structure of the full population activity. Our work provides the first thorough interpretation of (feed-forward) percept formation from a population of sensory neurons. We discuss applications to experimental recordings in classic sensory decision-making tasks, which will hopefully provide new insights into the nature of perceptual integration.

  10. Formation of Frenkel pairs and diffusion of self-interstitial in Si under normal and hydrostatic pressure: Quantumchemical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusakov, Vasilii; Belko, Victor; Dorozhkin, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical modeling of the formation of Frenkel pairs and the diffusion of a self-interstitial atom in silicon crystals at normal and high (hydrostatic) pressures has been performed using quantum-chemical (NDDO-PM5), methods. It is shown that, in a silicon crystal, the most stable configuration of a self-interstitial atom in the neutral charge state (I 0 ) is the split configuration . The tetrahedral configuration is not stable, an interstitial atom being shifted from T position in a new position T 1 on a distance Δd=0.2 A. The hexagonal configuration is not stable in NDDO approximation. The split interstitial configuration remains the more stable configuration under hydrostatic pressure (P a ( →T 1 )=0.59 eV, E a (T 1 →neighboring T 1 )=0.1 eV and E a (T 1 → )=0.23 eV. The hydrostatic pressure (P<80 kbar) increases the activation barrier for diffusion of self-interstitial atoms in silicon crystals. The energies of the formation of a separate Frenkel pair, a self-interstitial atom, and a vacancy are determined. It is demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure decreases the energy of the formation of Frenkel pairs.

  11. Experimental Behavior of Sulfur Under Primitive Planetary Differentiation Processes, the Sulfide Formations in Enstatite Meteorites and Implications for Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavergne, V.; Brunet, F.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Avril, C.; Borensztajn, S.; Berthet, S.

    2012-01-01

    Enstatite meteorites are the most reduced naturally-occuring materials of the solar system. The cubic monosulfide series with the general formula (Mg,Mn,Ca,Fe)S are common phases in these meteorite groups. The importance of such minerals, their formation, composition and textural relationships for understanding the genesis of enstatite chondrites (EC) and aubrites, has long been recognized (e.g. [1]). However, the mechanisms of formation of these sulfides is still not well constrained certainly because of possible multiple ways to produce them. We propose to simulate different models of formation in order to check their mineralogical, chemical and textural relevancies. The solubility of sulfur in silicate melts is of primary interest for planetary mantles, particularly for the Earth and Mercury. Indeed, these two planets could have formed, at least partly, from EC materials (e.g. [2, 3, 4]). The sulfur content in silicate melts depends on the melt composition but also on pressure (P), temperature (T) and oxygen fugacity fO2. Unfortunately, there is no model of general validity in a wide range of P-T-fO2-composition which describes precisely the evolution of sulfur content in silicate melts, even if the main trends are now known. The second goal of this study is to constrain the sulfur content in silicate melts under reducing conditions and different temperatures.

  12. Mechanisms for the Formations of the Thymine Under Astrophysical Conditions and Implications for the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleobases are the carriers of the genetic information in ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for all life on Earth. Their presence in meteorites clearly indicates that compounds of biological importance can form via non-biological processes in extraterrestrial environments. Recent experimental studies have shown that the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil and cytosine can be easily formed from the ultraviolet irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ice mixtures that simulate astrophysical processes. In contrast, thymine, which is found only in DNA, is more difficult to form under the same experimental conditions, as its formation usually requires a higher photon dose. Earlier quantum chemical studies confirmed that the reaction pathways were favorable provided that several H2O molecules surrounded the reactants. However, the present quantum chemical study shows that the formation of thymine is limited because of the inefficiency of the methylation of pyrimidine and its oxidized derivatives in an H2O ice, as supported by the laboratory studies. Our results constrain the formation of thymine in astrophysical environments and thus the inventory of organic molecules delivered to the early Earth and have implications for the role of thymine and DNA in the origin of life.

  13. Induced leaf intercellular CO₂, photosynthesis, potassium and nitrate retention and strawberry early fruit formation under macronutrient limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Li, Tingxian; Fu, Gang; Katulanda, Panchali

    2013-07-01

    Relationships between induced high leaf intercellular CO₂ concentrations, leaf K⁺ and NO₃⁻ ion movement and early fruit formation under macronutrient limitation are not well understood. We examined the effects and interactions of reduced K/N input treatments on leaf intercellular CO₂, photosynthesis rate, carboxylation and water use efficiency, berry formation as well as leaf/fruit K⁺, NO₃⁻ and photosynthate retention of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) to enhance low-input agriculture. The field study was conducted in Nova Scotia, eastern Canada during 2009-2010. The experimental treatments consisted of five K₂O rates (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 kg ha(-1)) and five N rates (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kg ha(-1)), representing respectively, 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of regular macronutrient recommendations based on the soil testing. The treatments were arranged in a split-plot design with three blocks in the field. The cultivar was 'Mira', a June-bearing crop. The results showed that strawberry plants treated with 25 %-reduced inputs could induce significantly higher leaf intercellular CO₂ concentrations to improve plant photosynthesis, carboxylation and water use efficiency and translocation of leaf/fruit K⁺ and dissolved solids, which could advance berry formation by 6 days and produce significantly higher marketable yields (P < 0.05). Higher leaf intercellular CO₂ inhibited leaf/fruit NO₃⁻ ion retention, but this inhibition did not occur in leaf/fruit K⁺ retention. Linear interactions of the K/N treatments were significant on fruit marketable yields, intercellular CO₂, net photosynthesis, leaf transpiration rates, and leaf temperatures (P < 0.05). It was concluded that higher leaf CO₂ could enhance plant photosynthesis, promote plant carboxylation and water use efficiency, and advance berry formation, but it could inhibit leaf NO₃⁻ retention. This inhibition did not find in leaf K⁺ ion and dissolved solid retention. Overlay co

  14. Influence of Implant Neck Design on Bone Formation Under Mechanical Repetitive Loading: Histomorphometric and Microcomputed Tomographic Studies in Rabbit Tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Munenori; Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Ishimoto, Takuya; Nakano, Takayoshi; Sawase, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of implant neck design on the original concept of osseointegration and bone formation when applying mechanical repetitive loading by bone-integrated implants. Twenty-eight anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with +60° or -60° grooves in the implant neck were placed in the proximal tibial metaphysis of 14 rabbits. Fourteen implants received mechanical repetitive loading along the long axis of the implant for 8 weeks at 12 weeks after implant placement. The remaining 14 implants received no loading. Histomorphometric and microcomputed tomographic analyses were then performed. No effect of neck design was observed without mechanical loading, whereas osseointegration around the +60° grooves was upregulated with mechanical loading. Calculated load effects on bone structure around the implant neck with +60° grooves were larger when compared with the -60° grooves under mechanical loading. These findings indicate that the establishment of osseointegration and bone formation around the implant neck with +60° grooves is superior to those with -60° grooves under loaded conditions.

  15. Helium accumulation and bubble formation in FeCoNiCr alloy under high fluence He+ implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Tong, Y.; Li, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Y. L.; Hu, Alice; Kai, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Face-centered cubic (FCC) high-entropy alloys (HEA), as emerging alloys with equal-molar or near equal-molar constituents, show a promising radiation damage resistance under heavy ion bombardment, making them potential for structural material application in next-generation nuclear reactors, but the accumulation of light helium ions, a product of nuclear fission reaction, has not been studied. The present work experimentally studied the helium accumulation and bubble formation at implantation temperatures of 523 K, 573 K and 673 K in a homogenized FCC FeCoNiCr HEA, a HEA showing excellent radiation damage resistance under heavy ion irradiation. The size and population density of helium bubbles in FeCoNiCr samples were quantitatively analyzed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the helium content existing in bubbles were estimated from a high-pressure Equation of State (EOS). We found that the helium diffusion in such condition was dominated by the self-interstitial/He replacement mechanism, and the corresponding activation energy in FeCoNiCr is comparable with the vacancy migration energy in Ni and austenitic stainless steel but only 14.3%, 31.4% and 51.4% of the accumulated helium precipitated into helium bubbles at 523 K, 573 K and 673 K, respectively, smaller than the pure Ni case. Importantly, the small bubble size suggested that FeCoNiCr HEA has a high resistance of helium bubble formation compared with Ni and steels.

  16. Lipid peroxidation is another potential mechanism besides pore-formation underlying hemolysis of tentacle extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Mei, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Qian-Qian; He, Qian; Zheng, Jie-Min; Zhao, Jie; Xiao, Liang; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2013-01-09

    This study was performed to explore other potential mechanisms underlying hemolysis in addition to pore-formation of tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. A dose-dependent increase of hemolysis was observed in rat erythrocyte suspensions and the hemolytic activity of TE was enhanced in the presence of Ca2+, which was attenuated by Ca2+ channel blockers (Diltiazem, Verapamil and Nifedipine). Direct intracellular Ca2+ increase was observed after TE treatment by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the Ca2+ increase could be depressed by Diltiazem. The osmotic protectant polyethylenglycol (PEG) significantly blocked hemolysis with a molecular mass exceeding 4000 Da. These results support a pore-forming mechanism of TE in the erythrocyte membrane, which is consistent with previous studies by us and other groups. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), an important marker of lipid peroxidation, increased dose-dependently in rat erythrocytes after TE treatment, while in vitro hemolysis of TE was inhibited by the antioxidants ascorbic acid-Vitamin C (Vc)-and reduced glutathione (GSH). Furthermore, in vivo hemolysis and electrolyte change after TE administration could be partly recovered by Vc. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation is another potential mechanism besides pore-formation underlying the hemolysis of TE, and both Ca2+ channel blockers and antioxidants could be useful candidates against the hemolytic activity of jellyfish venoms.

  17. Lipid Peroxidation Is another Potential Mechanism besides Pore-Formation Underlying Hemolysis of Tentacle Extract from the Jellyfish Cyanea capillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to explore other potential mechanisms underlying hemolysis in addition to pore-formation of tentacle extract (TE from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. A dose-dependent increase of hemolysis was observed in rat erythrocyte suspensions and the hemolytic activity of TE was enhanced in the presence of Ca2+, which was attenuated by Ca2+ channel blockers (Diltiazem, Verapamil and Nifedipine. Direct intracellular Ca2+ increase was observed after TE treatment by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the Ca2+ increase could be depressed by Diltiazem. The osmotic protectant polyethylenglycol (PEG significantly blocked hemolysis with a molecular mass exceeding 4000 Da. These results support a pore-forming mechanism of TE in the erythrocyte membrane, which is consistent with previous studies by us and other groups. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA, an important marker of lipid peroxidation, increased dose-dependently in rat erythrocytes after TE treatment, while in vitro hemolysis of TE was inhibited by the antioxidants ascorbic acid—Vitamin C (Vc—and reduced glutathione (GSH. Furthermore, in vivo hemolysis and electrolyte change after TE administration could be partly recovered by Vc. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation is another potential mechanism besides pore-formation underlying the hemolysis of TE, and both Ca2+ channel blockers and antioxidants could be useful candidates against the hemolytic activity of jellyfish venoms.

  18. Cellular inhibitory behavior underlying the formation of retinal direction selectivity in the starburst network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, R R

    2010-09-01

    Optical imaging of dendritic calcium signals provided evidence of starburst amacrine cells exhibiting calcium bias to somatofugal motion. In contrast, it has been impractical to use a dual-patch clamp technique to record membrane potentials from both proximal dendrites and distal varicosities of starburst amacrine cells in order to unequivocally prove that they are directionally sensitive to voltage, as was first suggested almost two decades ago. This paper aims to extend the passive cable model to an active cable model of a starburst amacrine cell that is intrinsically dependent on the electrical properties of starburst amacrine cells, whose various macroscopic currents are described quantitatively. The coupling between voltage and calcium just below the membrane results in a voltage-calcium system of coupled nonlinear Volterra integral equations whose solutions must be integrated into a prescribed model for example, for a synaptic couplet of starburst amacrine cells. Networks of starburst amacrine cells play a fundamental role in the retinal circuitry underlying directional selectivity. It is suggested that the dendritic plexus of starburst amacrine cells provides the substrate for the property of directional selectivity, while directional selectivity is a property of the exclusive layerings and confinement of their interconnections within the sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer involving cone bipolar cells and directionally selective ganglion cells.

  19. Mechanisms underlying reductant-induced reactive oxygen species formation by anticancer copper(II) compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowol, Christian R; Heffeter, Petra; Miklos, Walter; Gille, Lars; Trondl, Robert; Cappellacci, Loredana; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2012-03-01

    Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via thiol-mediated reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) has been assumed as the major mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer potential of copper(II) complexes of Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone; currently in phase II clinical trials) and its terminally dimethylated derivative with that of 2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone and that of 2,2'-bipyridyl-6-carbothioamide. Experiments on generation of oxidative stress and the influence of biologically relevant reductants (glutathione, ascorbic acid) on the anticancer activity of the copper complexes revealed that reductant-dependent redox cycling occurred mainly outside the cells, leading to generation and dismutation of superoxide radicals resulting in cytotoxic amounts of H(2)O(2). However, without extracellular reductants only weak intracellular ROS generation was observed at IC(50) levels, suggesting that cellular thiols are not involved in copper-complex-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, thiol-induced intracellular ROS generation might contribute to the anticancer activity of copper thiosemicarbazone complexes but is not the determining factor.

  20. NdFeO3 nanocrystals under glycine nitrate combustion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugova, Ekaterina; Yastrebov, Sergey; Karpov, Oleg; Smith, Roger

    2017-06-01

    Nanocrystalline perovskite NdFeO3 with the orthorhombic structure was prepared by a glycine nitrate combustion method under different technological conditions. The starting materials Fe(NO3)3 · 9H2O,Nd(NO3)3 · 6H2O in stoichiometric amounts and H2NCH2COOH were used. These quantities were varied by changing the ratio of glycine moles to metal nitrate moles (G/N) in the range between 0.25 and 0.75. The prepared NdFeO3 nanocrystals were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microscopy. Decomposition of the XRD diffraction profile using Voigt contours was exploited for analysis of the pattern in the area where the most prominent diffraction peak was situated. We demonstrate that Voigt functions reduce to Lorentzians for G / N = 0.75 and 0.55 . A volume-weighted diameter distribution function was derived using the width of the Lorentzians. The log-normal shape of the distribution is discussed in terms of the model, assuming exponential growth of cluster size in the time available for the NdFeO3 nanograin to grow.