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Sample records for underlying renal disease

  1. Independent Role of Underlying Kidney Disease on Renal Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease under Nephrology Care.

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    Luca De Nicola

    Full Text Available Primary kidney disease is suggested to affect renal prognosis of CKD patients; however, whether nephrology care modifies this association is unknown. We studied patients with CKD stage I-IV treated in a renal clinic and with established diagnosis of CKD cause to evaluate whether the risk of renal event (composite of end-stage renal disease and eGFR decline ≥ 40% linked to the specific diagnosis is modified by the achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of therapeutic goals for hypertension (BP ≤ 130/80 mmHg in patients with proteinuria ≥ 1 50 mg/24h and/or diabetes and ≤ 140/90 in those with proteinuria <150 mg/24h and without diabetes anemia (hemoglobin, Hb ≥ 11 g/dL, and proteinuria (≤ 0.5 g/24h. Survival analysis started after first year of nephrology care. We studied 729 patients (age 64 ± 15 y; males 59.1%; diabetes 34.7%; cardiovascular disease (CVD 44.9%; hypertensive nephropathy, HTN 53.8%; glomerulonephritis, GN 17.3%; diabetic nephropathy, DN 15.9%; tubule-interstitial nephropathy, TIN 9.5%; polycystic kidney disease, PKD 3.6%. During first year of Nephrology care, therapy was overall intensified in most patients and prevalence of main therapeutic goals generally improved. During subsequent follow up (median 3.3 years, IQR 1.9-5.1, 163 renal events occurred. Cox analysis disclosed a higher risk for PKD (Hazard Ratio 5.46, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.28-10.6 and DN (1.28,2.99-3.05, versus HTN (reference, independently of age, gender, CVD, BMI, eGFR or CKD stage, use of RAS inhibitors and achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of each of the three main therapeutic goals. No interaction was found on the risk of CKD progression between diagnostic categories and month-12 eGFR (P=0.737, as with control of BP (P=0.374, Hb (P=0.248 or proteinuria (P=0.590. Therefore, in CKD patients under nephrology care, diagnosis of kidney disease should be considered in conjunction with the main

  2. Independent Role of Underlying Kidney Disease on Renal Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease under Nephrology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Garofalo, Carlo; Pacilio, Mario; Liberti, Maria Elena; Sagliocca, Adelia; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Primary kidney disease is suggested to affect renal prognosis of CKD patients; however, whether nephrology care modifies this association is unknown. We studied patients with CKD stage I-IV treated in a renal clinic and with established diagnosis of CKD cause to evaluate whether the risk of renal event (composite of end-stage renal disease and eGFR decline ≥ 40%) linked to the specific diagnosis is modified by the achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of therapeutic goals for hypertension (BP ≤ 130/80 mmHg in patients with proteinuria ≥ 1 50 mg/24h and/or diabetes and ≤ 140/90 in those with proteinuria nephrology care. We studied 729 patients (age 64 ± 15 y; males 59.1%; diabetes 34.7%; cardiovascular disease (CVD) 44.9%; hypertensive nephropathy, HTN 53.8%; glomerulonephritis, GN 17.3%; diabetic nephropathy, DN 15.9%; tubule-interstitial nephropathy, TIN 9.5%; polycystic kidney disease, PKD 3.6%). During first year of Nephrology care, therapy was overall intensified in most patients and prevalence of main therapeutic goals generally improved. During subsequent follow up (median 3.3 years, IQR 1.9-5.1), 163 renal events occurred. Cox analysis disclosed a higher risk for PKD (Hazard Ratio 5.46, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.28-10.6) and DN (1.28,2.99-3.05), versus HTN (reference), independently of age, gender, CVD, BMI, eGFR or CKD stage, use of RAS inhibitors and achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of each of the three main therapeutic goals. No interaction was found on the risk of CKD progression between diagnostic categories and month-12 eGFR (P=0.737), as with control of BP (P=0.374), Hb (P=0.248) or proteinuria (P=0.590). Therefore, in CKD patients under nephrology care, diagnosis of kidney disease should be considered in conjunction with the main risk factors to refine renal risk stratification.

  3. Effect of Underlying Renal Disease on Nutritional and Metabolic Profile of Older Adults with Reduced Renal Function.

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    Lai, Silvia; Amabile, Maria Ida; Altieri, Silvia; Mastroluca, Daniela; Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Crudo, Massimiliano; D'Angelo, Anna Rita; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Molfino, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common condition in the general population, particularly among older adults. Renal impairment is in turn associated with metabolic and nutritional derangements and with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To compare the metabolic, nutritional, and cardiovascular impact of reduced kidney function between patients with and without known renal disease. We enrolled consecutive outpatients (age ≥65 years) with reduced renal function who were divided into two groups: Group A with history of renal disease and Group B with unknown renal disease. Metabolic and nutritional parameters, including involuntary body weight loss (BWL) in the previous 6 months, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), were evaluated. A total of 76 patients were enrolled. Group A ( n  = 39, M: 24, F: 15) showed greater BWL with a significant reduction of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, transferrin, cholinesterase, albumin, and LVMI with respect to Group B ( p  < 0.01). Conversely, Group B ( n  = 37, M: 23, F: 14) showed significantly increased intact parathyroid hormone, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein when compared to Group A ( p  < 0.05). The positive history of renal disease may negatively impact on several metabolic and nutritional parameters related to increased cardiovascular risk among older adults.

  4. [Hypertension and renal disease

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    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  5. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive......Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  6. Underlying renal insufficiency: the pivotal risk factor for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients with non-transplant glomerular disease.

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    Ye, Wen-Ling; Tang, Nan; Wen, Yu-Bing; Li, Hang; Li, Min-Xi; Du, Bin; Li, Xue-Mei

    2016-11-01

    Data on PCP in patients with glomerular disease are rare. The aim of this study was to assess the predictors of PCP development, the risk factors for mortality and the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) when high-dose trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was used in patients with non-transplant glomerular disease. Forty-seven patients with PCP, as confirmed by positive results for Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA or Pneumocystis jirovecii cysts tested by a methenamine silver stain between January 1, 2003, and December 30, 2012, were retrospectively investigated. The baseline characteristics of glomerular disease, clinical findings of PCP and renal parameters after treatment were collected. Predictors for PCP development and risk factors for mortality were determined using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. All PCP patients exclusively received immunosuppressants. Baseline renal insufficiency [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) renal function to baseline values. PCP is a fatal complication in patients with glomerular disease, and the use of immunosuppressants may be a basic risk factor for this infection. Underlying renal insufficiency and high renal pathology chronicity are the key risk factors for PCP in IgA nephropathy. TMP-SMX therapy remains an ideal choice because of high treatment response and frequently reversible kidney injury.

  7. Epidemiologic study of end stage renal disease and related risk factors in patients under hemodialysis in Lorestan province

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    babak Hadian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD is increasing in the world. Because of clinical importance of ESRD and absence of significant data, we studied the epidemiology of end stage renal failure in patients under hemodialysis in Lorestan province. Material and methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out between January 2012 and January 2013 in dialysis centers of Lorestan university of medical sciences .Subject were selected by census method and data galhered using a questionnaire. At the end, collected data were analyzed by SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Chi-square test. Results: All the patients under hemodialysis were 318 cases, 182 out of them (57.2% and 136(42.8% were male and female respectively. The mean age of the subjects was 53.2± 16.4 years. The cause of renal failure in 38.1% of the patients were hypertension, diabetes (19.2% and unknown factors (27.4%. As well as 5.97% of the patients infected by HCV, HBV or HIV . A significant statistical difference was observed between causes of chronic renal failure and different ages of the subjects (p=0.002. Conclusion: Augmentation of screening programs and especially, early referral of high risk subjects to nephrologists is recommended for prevention of end stage renal disease.

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Two Omani Children with Underlying Renal Diseases

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    Mohamed A. El-Naggari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a neurological condition with a combination of clinical and radiological features. Clinical symptoms include headaches, confusion, seizures, disturbed vision or an altered level of consciousness. Classic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings indicate subcortical and cortical oedema, affecting mainly the posterior cerebral region. We report two paediatric cases of PRES with underlying renal diseases presenting at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in April 2010 and August 2011. The first case was an 11-year-old girl diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and the second was a six-and-a-half-year-old boy on peritoneal dialysis due to multi-drug-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Both patients were hypertensive and treated with blood pressure control medications. No residual neurological dysfunction was noted in the patients at a one-year follow-up and at discharge, respectively. The role of hypertension in paediatric PRES cases, among other important risk factors, is emphasised. Additionally, MRI is an important diagnostic and prognostic tool. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive management is fundamental to preventing permanent neurological damage.

  9. Acquired cystic kidney disease: an under-recognized condition in children with end-stage renal disease.

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    Chan, Eugene Y H; Warady, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is a condition that occurs predominantly in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In contrast to hereditary cystic kidney disease, ACKD is characterized by the presence of multiple small cysts in bilaterally small kidneys. Limited pediatric data suggest a high incidence (21.6-45.8%) of ACKD in children on dialysis, comparable to that in adults, with an increased frequency associated with a longer duration of dialysis. Recent research has shed light on the pathogenesis of ACKD, such as activation of proto-oncogenes. Although most patients with ACKD are asymptomatic, the condition can be complicated by renal cell carcinoma. Routine surveillance should therefore be considered in at-risk populations.

  10. Nox and renal disease.

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    Holterman, Chet E; Read, Naomi C; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2015-04-01

    Since the first demonstration of Nox enzyme expression in the kidney in the early 1990s and the subsequent identification of Nox4, or RENOX, a decade later, it has become apparent that the Nox family of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating enzymes plays an integral role in the normal physiological function of the kidney. As our knowledge of Nox expression patterns and functions in various structures and specialized cell types within the kidney grows, so does the realization that Nox-derived oxidative stress contributes significantly to a wide variety of renal pathologies through their ability to modify lipids and proteins, damage DNA and activate transcriptional programmes. Diverse studies demonstrate key roles for Nox-derived ROS in kidney fibrosis, particularly in settings of chronic renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy. As the most abundant Nox family member in the kidney, much emphasis has been placed on the role of Nox4 in this setting. However, an ever growing body of work continues to uncover key roles for other Nox family members, not only in diabetic kidney disease, but in a diverse array of renal pathological conditions. The objective of the present review is to highlight the latest novel developments in renal Nox biology with an emphasis not only on diabetic nephropathy but many of the other renal disease contexts where oxidative stress is implicated.

  11. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease

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    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter

    2017-01-01

    , progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from –72 to –3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid......A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority......, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk...

  12. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease.

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    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease.

  13. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus under Renal Replacement Therapy in Lleida, Spain

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    Montserrat Dòria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the prevalence of diabetic foot and other associated conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus under renal replacement in the region of Lleida, Spain. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 92 dialysis-treated diabetic patients. Besides a podiatric examination, we explored the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, late diabetes complications, including peripheral neuropathy, atherosclerotic disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation by logistic regression. Results. Prevalent diabetic foot was found in 17.4% of patients, foot deformities were found in 54.3%, previous ulcer was found in 19.6%, and amputations were found in 16.3%; and 87% of them had some risk of suffering diabetic foot in the future. We observed a high prevalence of patients with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease (89.1% and 64.2%, resp.. Multivariable analysis identified diabetic retinopathy and advanced atherosclerotic disease (stenosing carotid plaques as independent risk factors for foot ulceration (p=0.004 and p=0.023, resp. and diabetic retinopathy also as an independent risk factor for lower-limb amputations (p=0.013. Moreover, there was a temporal association between the initiation of dialysis and the incidence of amputations. Conclusion. Diabetic patients receiving dialysis therapy are at high risk of foot complications and should receive appropriate and intensive foot care.

  14. Advanced renal disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

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    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    followed from baseline (first eGFR after 1/1/2004) until last eGFR, ARD/ESRD/renal death; whichever occurred first. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors. 8817 persons were included, the majority were white (87.3%), males (73.9%) infected though homosexual contact (41.5%) and with a median age......Many studies have focused on chronic kidney disease in HIV-positive individuals, but few have studied the less frequent events, advanced renal disease (ARD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to investigate incidence, predictors and outcomes for ARD/ESRD and renal death...... in EuroSIDA. ARD was defined as confirmed eGFR 3 months apart) using Cockcroft-Gault. ESRD was defined as hemo- or peritoneal dialysis>1 month/renal transplant. Renal deaths were defined as renal failure as the underlying cause of death, using CoDe methodology. Patients were...

  15. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

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    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  16. sup(99m)Tc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in renal failure due to various renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Shin-ichi; Daijo, Kazuyuki; Okabe, Tatsushiro; Kawamura, Juichi; Hara, Akira

    1979-01-01

    Renal contours in renal failure were studied by means of sup(99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renoscintigraphy. Renal cortical images were obtained even in renal failure cases. Causes of renal failure were chronic glomerulonephritis in 7, bilateral renal tuberculosis in 2, chronic pyelonephritis in 3, bilateral renal calculi in 3, diabetic nephropathy in 2, polycystic kidney disease in 2 and stomach cancer in 1. (author)

  17. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Ultrasound Guidance in Patients with Renal Calculi and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report of 11 Cases

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    Xiao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis accelerates the renal failure in the patients with ADPKD. In order to evaluate the role of percutaneous nephrolithotomy in management of calculus in these patients, 11 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and renal stones were included in the study. Two patients had bilateral renal stones. All patients were treated by percutaneous nephrolithotomy under ultrasound guidance. 13 percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures were performed in 1 stage by the urology team under ultrasound guidance. 5 people received second operation with flexible nephroscopy in lateral position. The success rate and morbidity and mortality of the technique and hospital stay were recorded. Results. The puncture procedure was fully successful in all cases. The renal function improved in these patients. 5 patients had moderate fever after the surgery. 5 patients received flexible nephroscopy to take out the residual calculi. 2 persons had ESWL therapy after the surgery. Conclusion. PCNL is an ideal, safe, and effective method to remove the stones from those patients with no definite increase in the risk of complication. The outcome and stone-free rate are satisfactory comparable to the PCNL in the patients without ADPKD.

  18. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

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    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  19. RENAL INVOLVEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Trifonova; N. V. Rusakova

    2012-01-01

    The literature review deals with renal involvement in children with celiac disease. The article contains common conceptions on possible variants of renal disorders and mechanisms of development of dysmetabolic and IgA-nephropathy in children with celiac disease.

  20. Renal cystic disease: A practical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Renal cystic disease includes a group of lesions with extremely diverse clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings. The recent development of multiple imaging systems to study renal cystic disease has resulted in considerable interest in correlating the images obtained by different modalities with each other and with the underlying gross pathology. A thorough knowledge of the disturbed morphology and natural history of these diseases will lead to a better understanding of their appearance on radiologic imaging. This refresher course correlates disturbed morphology with appearances on diagnostic imaging, urography, US, angiography, CT, and MR imaging. The advantages and limitations of each imaging method are detailed. A practical classification emphasizing differential features is presented. The presentation is divided into two parts. In the first part typical and atypical cystic masses, including acquired cystic disease (from dialysis), Von Hippel-Lindau disease, and the cystic disease of tuberous sclerosis are discussed. In the second part, polycystic kidney disease (dominant and recessive), medullary cystic disease, medullary sponge kidney, multicycle-dysplastic kidney, renal sinus cysts (peripelvic), and pluricystic kidney disease are discussed

  1. Renal disease and mitochondrial genetics.

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    Rötig, Agnès

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies have long been regarded as neuromuscular diseases mainly originating from mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. Oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis-coupled electron transfer from substrate to oxygen through the RC, does not occur only in the neuromuscular system. Therefore, a RC deficiency can theoretically give rise to any symptom, in any organ or tissue, at any age and with any mode of inheritance, owing to the dual genetic origin of RC enzymes (nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA). Mitochondrial diseases can give rise to various syndromes or association, namely, neurologic and neuromuscular diseases, cardiac, renal, hepatic, hematological and endocrin or dermatological presentations. The most frequent renal symptom is proximal tubular dysfunction with a more or less complete de Toni-Debre-Fanconi Syndrome. A few patients have been reported with tubular acidosis, Bartter Syndrome, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis or nephrotic syndrome. The diagnosis of a RC deficiency is difficult when only renal symptoms are present, but should be easier when another, seemingly unrelated symptom is observed. Metabolic screening for abnormal oxidoreduction status in plasma, including lactate/pyruvate and ketone body molar ratios, can help to identify patients for further investigations. These include the measurement of oxygen consumption by mitochondria and the assessment of mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activities by spectrophotometric studies. Any mode of inheritance can be observed: sporadic, autosomal dominant or recessive, or maternal inheritance.

  2. [Renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders].

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    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in MYH9 gene encoding the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) are related to a number of rare autosomal-dominant disorders which has been known as May-Hegglin disease, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome and Epstein syndrome. Their common clinical features are congenital macrothrombocytopaenia and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies, in addition to a variable risk of developing proteinuria, chronic kidney disease progressing toward end stage, sensorineural deafness and presenile cataracts. The term MYH9 related disease (MYH9-RD) describes the variable expression of a single illness encompassing all previously mentioned hereditary disorders. Renal involvement in MYH9- RD has been observed in 30% of patients. Mutant MYH9 protein, expressed in podocytes, mesangial and tubular cells, plays a main role in foot process effacement and in development of nephropathy. Interestingly, the MYH9 gene is currently under investigation also for his possible contribution to many other non-hereditary glomerulopathies such as focal global glomerulosclerosis (hypertensive nephrosclerosis), idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, C1q nephropathy and HIV-associated nephropathy. In this review we are aimed to describe renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders, from the hereditary disease to the acquired disorders, in which MYH9-gene acts as a "renal failure susceptibility gene". Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  3. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

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    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  4. Several issues regarding evaluation of renal injury and renal insufficiency in patients with liver disease

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    HAO Kunyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In patients with liver disease such as viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, renal injury and renal insufficiency can be generally classified as acute kidney injury (AKI, chronic kidney disease, and acute-on-chronic nephropathy. AKI can be classified as stage 1 (risk stage, stage 2 (injury stage, and stage 3 (failure stage. Traditionally hepatorenal syndrome is classified as types Ⅰ and Ⅱ, and in recent years, type Ⅲ hepatorenal syndrome with organic renal injury has been proposed. Hepatorenal disorder(HRD is used to describe any renal disease which occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis. At present, sensitive and accurate biochemical parameters used to evaluate renal function in patients with liver disease in clinical practice include estimated glomerular filtration rate, increase in serum creatinine within unit time, and serum cystatin C level, and urinary microalbumin level also plays an important role in the early diagnosis of nephropathy. Causes of liver disease, severity, complications including infection, nutritional status, therapeutic drugs, and underlying nephropathy may be associated with renal injury and renal insufficiency in patients with liver disease and should be differentiated.

  5. RENAL INVOLVEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Trifonova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review deals with renal involvement in children with celiac disease. The article contains common conceptions on possible variants of renal disorders and mechanisms of development of dysmetabolic and IgA-nephropathy in children with celiac disease.

  6. Relationship between low blood pressure and renal/cardiovascular outcomes in Japanese patients with chronic kidney disease under nephrologist care: the Gonryo study.

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    Yamamoto, Tae; Nakayama, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Mariko; Matsushima, Masato; Sato, Toshinobu; Taguma, Yoshio; Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies established a J-shaped association between blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the different clinical profiles of CVD by ethnicity. However, the adequately lower BP target remains unclear in Asian patients with CKD. This prospective observational study included 2,655 Japanese outpatients with CKD under nephrologist care who met the inclusion criteria, namely estimated glomerular filtration rate kidney disease (ESKD) that requires renal replacement therapy. During a 3.02-year median follow-up, 64 patients died, 120 developed CVEs, and 225 progressed to ESKD. In the adjusted Cox models, the risks of CVEs and all-cause mortality were higher in the patients with systolic BPs (SBPs) < 110 mmHg than in those with SBPs of 130-139 mmHg. Moreover, the risk was higher in those with diastolic BPs (DBPs) < 70 mmHg than in those with DBPs of 80-89 mmHg. Although SBPs ≥ 140 mmHg were associated with higher incidence rates of ESKD, no significant increased risk was associated with BPs < 130/80 mmHg. SBPs < 110 mmHg and DBPs < 70 mmHg were independent risk factors of CVEs and all-cause mortality. No lower BPs were observed as significant risk factors of progression to ESKD. This study suggests that the lower BP target in Asian patients with CKD should be ≥110/70 mmHg.

  7. Prenatal ultrasonographic findings of renal cystic diseases of the fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Hong, Sung Ran

    2002-01-01

    The renal cystic diseases of the fetus consist of variable types of multicystic dysplastic kidney, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney, obstructive cystic renal dysplasia, simple renal cyst, medullary cystic disease, and various syndromes with associated cystic renal diseases. Prenatal US findings of renal cystic diseases were compared and analyzed with the pathologic and postnatal US findings to establish the differential points of renal cystic diseases.

  8. Renal cystic diseases in children: new concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avni, Fred E.; Hall, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights the changes that have occurred in the general approach to cystic renal diseases in children. For instance, genetic mutations at the level of the primary cilia are considered as the origin of many renal cystic diseases. Furthermore, these diseases are now included in the spectrum of the hepato-renal fibrocystic diseases. Imaging plays an important role as it helps to detect and characterize many of the cystic diseases based on a detailed sonographic analysis. The diagnosis can be achieved during fetal life or after birth. Hyperechoic kidneys and/or renal cysts are the main sonographic signs leading to such diagnosis. US is able to differentiate between recessive and dominant polycystic kidney diseases, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 Beta mutation, glomerulocystic kidneys and nephronophtisis. MR imaging can, in selected cases, provide additional information including the progressive associated hepatic changes. (orig.)

  9. Role of regional anesthesia for placement of peritoneal dialysis catheter under ultrasound guidance: Our experience with 52 end-stage renal disease patients

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    Smaranjit Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The number of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD has shown a consistent rise in India in recent years. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD remains one of the safe and effective forms of treatment. In this study, we have tried to assess the effectiveness of field block technique for analgesia during catheter placement surgery until 24 h postoperatively, also, if it can obviate the need for general anesthesia in these high-risk patients. Materials and Methods: We studied 52 ESRD patients from 2010 to 2012 who were posted for CAPD catheterization in the Department of Urology, Care Hospital, Hyderabad, India. Under ultrasound guidance, "unilateral posterior" and "unilateral subcostal" transversus abdominis plane block anesthesia were given for the placement of CAPD catheter. Patient′s intra-operative pain and post-operative pain were recorded with visual analog scores (VAS and analyzed. Results: All patients in our study belonged to American Society of Anesthesiologists category 2 or 3 with multiple co-morbidities. 41 out of 52 patients required no supplemental analgesia during the procedure; 8 patients needed additional infiltration of local anesthetic during skin incisions. Three patients required supplemental analgesia and were considered as failure. A VAS of two was noted in 30 patients and 1 in 19 Patients. No Patient had significant pain 24 h post operatively. No local complication was noted in any patient. Conclusion: CAPD Catheterization under regional field block remains safe and effective options for ESRD patients.

  10. Features of chronic renal disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Olga N; Savvina, Natalia A; Egorova, Victoria E

    chronic renal disease (CKD) is the inevitable outcome of many chronic diseases of the kidneys, which not all survive. The number of patients with chronic renal diseases is constantly growing. Aim to study the level osteocalcin and calcitonin and parathyroid hormone and immunological features in patients with chronic renal diseases. Materials and method The study involved 10 children with chronic renal failure at the age from 7 to 14 years in the initial stage - GFR 60-40 ml/min, creatinine blood increased to 180 μmol/l, and 20 healthy patients as a control group. in the studies there was significant increase in the level of calcitonin , osteocalcin, parathyroid hormone in patients with chronic renal failure. In patients with chronic renal disease decreased indices of cellular and humoral immunity. In children with chronic renal disease significantly increased CIK and decreased the content of IFN-γ, FNO-α in comparison with the group of healthy children. revealed that at all stages of CKD patients there is a change of level calcitonin, osteocalcin and parathyroid hormone. All patients with CKD, there was a reduction of humoral and cellular immunity.

  11. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilflingseder, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  12. Advanced renal disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    in EuroSIDA. ARD was defined as confirmed eGFR 3 months apart) using Cockcroft-Gault. ESRD was defined as hemo- or peritoneal dialysis>1 month/renal transplant. Renal deaths were defined as renal failure as the underlying cause of death, using CoDe methodology. Patients were...

  13. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical...

  14. Prevalence of genetic renal disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jeffery; McDonald, Stephen; Alexander, Stephen I

    2013-02-01

    Genetic etiology comprises a significant proportion of renal disease in childhood. Completion of the Human Genome Project and increased genetic testing has assisted with the increased recognition of a genetic basis to many renal disorders. Australia and New Zealand have a relatively stable but diverse population, with eight major pediatric nephrology referral centers, which allow ascertainment of disease frequency. To determine prevalence, pediatric nephrologists at the eight centers in Australia and New Zealand were surveyed on their estimated number of patients with renal disease of genetic etiology over a 10-year period. Disease prevalence was calculated using combined national population data. The overall prevalence of genetic kidney disease in children in Australia and New Zealand is 70.6 children per million age-representative population. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) are the most frequent, with a prevalence of 16.3 and 10.7, respectively, per million children. We find a similar prevalence of genetic renal disorders in Australia and New Zealand to those reported in other countries. This is likely to be due to inclusion of children with all forms of renal disease rather than being limited to those with renal impairment.

  15. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  16. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  17. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2012-03-01

    Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height) is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH) therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  18. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  19. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

  20. Dysfunction of the Lower Urinary Tract in Renal Transplant Children with Nephrological Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, M.J.A. van der; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Smits, J.P.J.M.; Feitz, W.F.J.

    2006-01-01

    - OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between dysfunction of the lower urinary tract after renal transplantation and renal transplant function in children with an underlying nephrologic disease. - METHODS: The research group consisted of 21 renal transplant children (12 girls and 9 boys,

  1. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric renal inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Schroeder, B.A.; Starshak, R.J.

    1986-08-15

    Some form of imaging procedure should be used to document the presence of infection of the upper urinary tract in troublesome cases in children. During the past several years, sonography, nuclear radiology, and computed tomography (CT) have had a significant influence on renal imaging. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate the noninvasive imaging procedures that can be used to diagnose pediatric renal inflammatory disease and to assess the relative value of each modality in the various types of renal infection. The authors will not discuss the radiologic evaluation of the child who has had a previous renal infection, in whom cortical scarring or reflux nephropathy is a possibility; these are different clinical problems and require different diagnostic evaluation.

  2. [Acute renal insufficiency in Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, C; Heidet, L; Gagnadoux, M F; Chéron, G; Niaudet, P

    1993-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute inflammatory condition characterized by various combinations of features but renal involvement is rare. This report is of a case of Kawasaki disease complicated by acute kidney failure. A 10 year-old girl was admitted because of acute renal failure with fever. She developed a high fever, and her general condition was poor; she had developed a macular erythematous rash 10 days earlier for which she was given cefadroxil. At admission, she remained febrile and had strawberry tongue, pharyngitis, dry erythematous lips, bilateral conjunctivitis, cervical lymphadenopathy and desquamation of the skin on her hands. She was anemic (hemoglobin = 9.6 g%), leukocytotic (33,100/mm3), but with no burr, fragmented red blood cells or thrombocytopenia. Her plasma C-reactive protein level was 236 mg/l; her blood urea was 9.5 mmol/l, her creatininemia 288 mumol/l and proteinuria was 0.5 g/l without hematuria. Urine cultures did not grow. Her blood transaminase and gammaglutamyltransferase activities were elevated. Ultrasonography of kidneys and coronary arteries was normal. Kidney biopsy performed one day after admission showed no vascular or glomerular changes, but renal tubular necrosis, indicating urinary excretion of pigments. Tests for myoglobinemia, myoglobinuria and blood muscle enzyme activities were all positive. The renal failure disappeared within 10 days but the fever and inflammatory manifestations persisted for 1 1/2-2 months despite two treatments of intravenous gammaglobulins and continuous salicylate administration. The patient developed arthralgias at the end of the first month of disease, but recovered without renal or vascular complications. Several cases of renal involvement have been reported during the course of Kawasaki disease. They have been rarely documented by histological examination so that the vascular origin of changes has not been demonstrated. Myoglobinuria, as seen in muscular crush injury, and in our case possibly due

  3. Dilemma of Renal Disease in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Essawy Abdel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process results in profound anatomic and functional changes in a number of human body systems. Changes in kidney function with normal aging are the most dramatic of any human organ or organ system. These include anatomical, physiological, hemodynamic and immunological changes. Increased propensities of systemic diseases and exposure to poly-pharmacy of the aged group have an additive deleterious effect. The aforementioned changes have its implications on clinical presentations, management and prognosis of all renal diseases in elderly. Atypical presentation, more frequent and longer course are the characteristics of acute renal failure in this age group. Also, presentation of glomerular diseases, clinical course, prognosis, decision of performing a renal biopsy and use of immunosuppressive drugs in elderly specially those subgroup above 80 years of age are still a big challenges that needs a consensus and standardization.

  4. HIV related renal disease in Africans | Elangovan | IMTU Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal disease is becoming an increasingly prevalent entity in human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV)–infected patients, first diagnosed in AIDS patients in 1984. The HIV-related renal disease represents a spectrum of clinical and histological conditions presenting as acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, glomerulopathies, ...

  5. Defining Kidney Biology to Understand Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Melissa H.; Brown, Dennis; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Sands, Jeff M.; Weisz, Ora A.; Mullins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Research National Dialogue represents a novel effort by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to solicit and prioritize research objectives from the renal research and clinical communities. The present commentary highlights selected scientific opportunities specific to the study of renal development, physiology, and cell biology. Describing such fundamental kidney biology serves as a necessary foundation for translational and clinical studies that will advance disease care and prevention. It is intended that these objectives foster and focus scientific efforts in these areas in the coming decade and beyond. PMID:24370769

  6. Advanced chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jd

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Knowledge about advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in HIV-positive persons is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate incidence, predictors and outcomes for advanced CKD/ESRD and renal death. METHODS: Advanced CKD was defined as confirmed...... (two consecutive measurements ≥ 3 months apart) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using Cockcroft-Gault, and ESRD as haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for ≥ 1 month or renal transplant. Renal death was death with renal disease as the underlying cause, using Coding...... Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. Follow-up was from 1 January 2004 until last eGFR measurement, advanced CKD, ESRD or renal death, whichever occurred first. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors. RESULTS: Of 9044 individuals included in the study, 58 (0.64%) experienced advanced...

  7. [Prognosis and therapy of inflammatory rheumatic diseases : Impact of renal manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zänker, M; Cohen, C D; Rupprecht, H D

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases and their treatment cause various renal manifestations requiring modification of treatment. Discussion of renal manifestations in selected rheumatic diseases, including their impact on general prognosis and therapy. Basic literature and expert opinions are analyzed and discussed. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases and their treatment cause various renal manifestations, including glomerular, tubular, interstitial, and vascular damage. The type of damage determines both, associated clinical symptoms (i.e. hematuria, proteinuria, loss of kidney function) and the renal and overall survival as will be discussed here for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, Sjögrens syndrome, cryoglobulinemia and ANCA-associated vasculitis. Renal manifestations are generally indicators of high disease activity and usually require more intensive treatment of the underlying rheumatic disease. Early and rigorous treatment, which has to be adapted to renal function, is capable of improving renal and overall survival in many of the affected patients.

  8. Arterial spin labelling in imaging of renal diseases and renal allograft pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labelling (ASL) is a technique for non-invasive and contrast-free assessment of perfusion with MRI. Renal ASL allows examination of renal pathophysiology, evaluation of the course of renal disease and therapy effects by longitudinal measurements as well as characterization of renal tumors. In this article, techniques of ASL will be explained and challenges of renal ASL will be emphasized. In addition, examples for clinical application of ASL for diagnosis of renal disease and renal allograft pathology will be given.

  9. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b) A...

  10. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Imberti

    Full Text Available New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  11. Kidney injury molecule-1 in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, Femke; van Timmeren, Mirjan M.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Goor, Harry

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a marker for renal proximal tubular damage, the hallmark of virtually all proteinuric, toxic and ischaemic kidney diseases. KIM-1 has gained increasing interest because of its possible pathophysiological role in modulating tubular damage and repair. In this

  12. Unilateral renal cell carcinoma with coexistent renal disease: a rare cause of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Alvarez-Navascués, R

    2001-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disorder encompassing a wide spectrum of pathological renal lesions. Coexistence of unilateral RCC and associated pathology in the contralateral kidney is an unusual and challenging therapeutic dilemma that can result in renal failure. So far, data on unilateral RCC with chronic renal failure necessitating renal replacement therapy have not been published. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from unilateral RCC, and to assess the associated pathology and possible pathogenic factors. In 1999, a survey of the 350 patients treated by chronic dialysis in Asturias, Spain, was carried out to identify and collect clinical information on patients with primary unilateral RCC whilst on their renal replacement programme. Seven patients were identified as having ESRD and unilateral RCC, giving an incidence of 2% of patients treated by dialysis. There was a wide spectrum of associated disease and clinical presentation. All patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy and were free of recurrence 6--64 months after surgery. Six patients were alive and free of malignancy recurrence for 6--30 months after the onset of haemodialysis. ESRD is rare in association with unilateral RCC, but does contribute to significant morbidity. However, the data presented here are encouraging and suggest that cancer-free survival with renal replacement therapy can be achieved in such patients.

  13. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  14. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Vaccinations in children on immunosuppressive medications for renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sushmita; Dissanayake, Pathum Vindana; Abeyagunawardena, Asiri Samantha

    2016-09-01

    Renal diseases are often treated with immunosuppressive medications, placing patients at risk of infections, some of which are vaccine-preventable. However, in such patients vaccinations may be delayed or disregarded due to complications of the underlying disease process and challenges in its management. The decision to administer vaccines to immunosuppressed children is a risk-benefit balance as such children may have a qualitatively diminished immunological response or develop diseases caused by the vaccine pathogen. Vaccination may cause a flare-up of disease activity or provocation of graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. Moreover, it cannot be assumed that a given antibody level provides the same protection in immunosupressed children as in healthy ones. We have evaluated the safety and efficacy of licensed vaccines in children on immunosuppressive therapy and in renal transplant recipients. The limited evidence available suggests that vaccines are most effective if given early, ideally before the requirement for immunosuppressive therapy, which may require administration of accelerated vaccine courses. Once treatment with immunosuppressive drugs is started, inactivated vaccines are usually considered to be safe when the disease is quiescent, but supplemental doses may be required. In the majority of cases, live vaccines are to be avoided. All vaccines are generally contraindicated within 3-6 months of a renal transplant.

  16. Imaging chronic renal disease and renal transplant in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Jim; Easty, Marina [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    At Great Ormond Street Hospital we have the highest number of paediatric renal transplant patients in Europe, taking cases from across the United Kingdom and abroad. Our caseload includes many children with rare complicating medical problems and chronic renal failure related morbidity. This review aims to provide an overview of our experience of imaging children with chronic renal failure and transplants. (orig.)

  17. Imaging chronic renal disease and renal transplant in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, Jim; Easty, Marina

    2010-01-01

    At Great Ormond Street Hospital we have the highest number of paediatric renal transplant patients in Europe, taking cases from across the United Kingdom and abroad. Our caseload includes many children with rare complicating medical problems and chronic renal failure related morbidity. This review aims to provide an overview of our experience of imaging children with chronic renal failure and transplants. (orig.)

  18. Protein intake in renal and hepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambühl, Patrice M

    2011-03-01

    The kidney and the liver play a central role in protein metabolism. Synthesis of albumin and other proteins occurs mainly in the liver, whereas protein breakdown and excretion are handled through an intricate interaction between these two organ systems. Thus, disease states of either the liver and/or the kidney invariably result in clinically relevant disturbances of protein metabolism. Conversely, metabolic processes regulated by these two organs are directly affected by dietary protein intake. Of particular importance in this respect is the maintenance of acid/base homeostasis. Finally, both the amount and composition of ingested proteins have a direct impact on renal function, especially in a state of diseased kidneys. Consequently, dietary protein intake is of paramount importance in patients with chronic nephropathy and renal insufficiency. Limitation of ingested protein, particularly from animal sources, is crucial in order to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease and impaired renal function. In contrast, patients with chronic renal failure undergoing renal replacement therapy by hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, have an increased protein demand. The syndrome of "protein-energy malnutrition" is a relevant factor for morbidity and mortality in this population and requires early detection and vigorous treatment. Protein intake in patients with cirrhosis of the liver should not be diminished as has been earlier suggested but rather increased to 1.0 - 1.2 g/kg body weight/day, in order to prevent protein malnutrition. Moderate restriction depending on protein tolerance (0.5 - 1.2 g/kg body weight/day), with the possible addition of branched chain amino acids (BCAA), has been recommended only in patients with advanced hepatic encephalopathy. Proteins of plant origin are theoretically superior to animal proteins.

  19. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal measurement parameters between ADPKD patients and normal controls were obtained by MT, DWI, BOLD, and MRE indicating the potential for detecting and following renal disease at an earlier stage than the conventional qualitative imaging techniques.

  20. Renal disease in HIV infected patients at University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV related renal disease is a common occurrence in patients with HIV infection. It is the third leading cause of end stage renal disease among African-American males between the ages of 20 and 64 years in USA. Renal function impairment has been reported at all stages of HIV infection. The aim of this study ...

  1. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  2. Chronic renal disease: the mother's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, H

    1995-01-01

    In a qualitative study, mothers (N = 4) of children with chronic renal disease were asked to share the meaning they assigned to their child's illness. The central theme of "uncertainty" emerged from the data and was described in three phases: (a) finding out, (b) learning to live with chronic illness, and (c) worries and dreams about the future. In this article phase three, labeled "learning to live with chronic illness," is presented.

  3. Serum Lipoprotein Changes in Dogs with Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Behling?Kelly, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background People with renal disease develop a dyslipidemia that contributes to progression of renal injury and development of cardiovascular disease. Lipoproteins in dogs with renal disease have not been investigated. Hypothesis Dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have dyslipidemia characterized by increased lower density lipoproteins and decreased high?density lipoproteins (HDLs). The degree of dyslipidemia is positively correlated with severity of disease, as reflected by serum creatini...

  4. Global variation in renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caskey, Fergus J.; Kramer, Anneke; Elliott, Robert F.; Stel, Vianda S.; Covic, Adrian; Cusumano, Ana; Geue, Claudia; Macleod, Alison M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Stengel, Benedicte; Jager, Kitty J.

    2011-01-01

    Incidence rates of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease vary considerably worldwide. This study examines the independent association between the general population, health care system and renal service characteristics and RRT incidence rates. RRT incidence data (2003-2005)

  5. Prevalence and Pattern of Renal Bone Disease in End Stage Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Information on renal bone disease (RBD) is sparse in Nigeria. The prevalence of RBD in a dialysis population worldwide ranges between 33% and 67% and it increases with progression of renal insufficiency. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and magnitude of. RBD in patients with end stage renal ...

  6. Biomarker for early renal microvascular and diabetic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrakul, Narisa; Futrakul, Prasit

    2017-11-01

    Recognition of early stage of diabetic kidney disease, under common practice using biomarkers, namely microalbuminuria, serum creatinine level above 1 mg/dL and accepted definition of diabetic kidney disease associated with creatinine clearance value below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , is unlikely. This would lead to delay treatment associated with therapeutic resistance to vasodilator due to a defective vascular homoeostasis. Other alternative biomarkers related to the state of microalbuminuria is not sensitive to screen for early diabetic kidney disease (stages I, II). In this regard, a better diagnostic markers to serve for this purpose are creatinine clearance, fractional excretion of magnesium (FE Mg), cystatin C. Recently, renal microvascular disease and renal ischemia have been demonstrated to correlate indirectly with the development of diabetic kidney disease and its function. Among these are angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, namely VEGF, VEGF receptors, angiopoietins and endostatin. With respect to therapeutic prevention, implementation of treatment at early stage of diabetic and nondiabetic kidney disease is able to restore renal perfusion and function.

  7. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    cells from a single donor, a critical point since many ESRD patients never get renal transplants due to shortage of organs for donation (13). The... Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jesus H. Dominguez CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : Indiana University School of...sections were examined under the fluorescent microscope to identify the location and number of transplanted cells in all the organs harvested. One half

  8. [Acute renal failure in paediatric oncological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Joanna; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Rückemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Drozyńska-Duklas, Magdalena; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Balcerska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in children with malignancies is a rare clinical situation, but nonetheless it is a serious life threatening condition. It may arise from different clinical situations and may be caused by various factors. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency, aetiology and the course of ARF in children treated for malignancies in the Department of Pediatrics, Hematology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Gdansk. A group of 586 pediatric oncology patients treated between 1992 and 2004 were enrolled in a retrospective study. ARF was diagnosed in 29 cases including: 12 patients with prerenal course of ARF (11 due to septic shock and 1 due to dehydration), 16 patients with intrinsic renal aetiology of ARF (as a complication after cisplatinum and carboplatinum therapy in 2 children, in 2 cases after methotrexate, as a consequence of bilateral nephrectomy due to nephroblastoma in 1 patient and in 11 children with tumour lysis syndrome, including 5 patients with neoplasmatic infiltration of kidneys) and postrenal ARF in 1 patient as a first symptom of a tumour located in the small pelvis (Rhabdomyosarcoma). Renal replacement therapy (dialysis) was necessary in 11 children. Among 29 analysed children, in 20 cases renal failure was reversible. Due to appropriate treatment, ARF in course of tumour lysis syndrome is nowadays reversible. ARF due to septic shock or cytostatics nephrotoxicity is a significant therapeutic problem. In most of the cases it is irreversible. 1. ARF in these studies occurred in 29 out of 586 children with malignancies (4.9%). 2. Prerenal and renal ARF were the most frequent forms. 3. Implementation of tumour lysis prophylaxis in the treatment of children with blood system proliferative diseases reduces the incidence of ARF. 4. In cases of ARF in children's malignancies close cooperation between paediatric oncologist and nephrologist is necessary.

  9. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pistello

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy.

  10. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy.

  11. Determinants of renal shape in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Takashi; Ikehira, Hiroo; Imasawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The determinants of renal shape are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the renal shape, as measured by ultrasound, and the clinical characteristics in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The study included 121 CKD patients who had undergone kidney biopsy. The renal shape was defined by: (1) the renal shape index: renal length/(renal width + renal thickness) and (2) the renal width/length. IgA nephritis patients (excluding patients with diabetes), comprised the largest subgroup (n = 49) and were analyzed separately. The correlation analyses and two-sample Student's t test results showed that age, eGFR, BMI, cortex volume fraction measured by MRI (cortex volume/renal volume), percentage of global sclerosis, weight, sex, hypertension and diabetes were significantly correlated with the renal shape in both kidneys. In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, old age and high BMI were independently associated with plump kidney. As for the left renal shape index, low cortex volume fraction was also independently associated with plump kidney. In the IgA nephritis patient subgroup, the cortex volume fraction was the most significant factor contributing to the left renal shape index (r = 0.50, p renal shape than renal function in CKD patients. The left renal cortex volume fraction was also an independent determinant and a more important factor in IgA nephritis patients.

  12. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available M Ounissi¹, T Gargueh², M Mahfoudhi¹, K Boubaker¹, H Hedri¹, R Goucha¹, E Abderrahim¹, F Ben Hamida¹, T Ben Abdallah¹, F El Younsi¹, H Ben Maiz³, A Kheder¹1Internal Medicine Department, 2Pediatric Department, 3Laboratory of Kidney Diseases, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, TunisiaIntroduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD.Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied.Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI, medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate.Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of

  13. Congenital and inherited renal disease of small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, D S

    2001-03-01

    Congenital renal diseases are present at birth and may be determined genetically; familial renal disorders occur in related animals with a higher frequency than would be expected by chance, and frequently are inherited. The most common familial disorders in cats and dogs include renal amyloidosis, renal dysplasia, polycystic kidneys, basement membrane disorders, and tubular dysfunction (Fanconi's syndrome). This article alerts the veterinarian to commonly observed congenital and hereditary conditions of the kidneys in small animals.

  14. Several issues regarding evaluation of renal injury and renal insufficiency in patients with liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    HAO Kunyan; YU Yuecheng

    2016-01-01

    In patients with liver disease such as viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, renal injury and renal insufficiency can be generally classified as acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease, and acute-on-chronic nephropathy. AKI can be classified as stage 1 (risk stage), stage 2 (injury stage), and stage 3 (failure stage). Traditionally hepatorenal syndrome is classified as types Ⅰ and Ⅱ, and in recent years, type Ⅲ hepatorenal syndrome with organic renal injury has been proposed. Hepator...

  15. Recurrence of light-chain deposition disease after renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas; Hammer, Anne; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker

    2008-01-01

    A 51-year-old male with a history of chronic renal disease received a renal allograft, in which disease recurred. Light-chain deposition disease was confirmed through biopsies of the native kidney and graft, and detection of free kappa light chains in serum. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep-6...

  16. Renal microvascular disease in an aging population: a reversible process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrakul, Narisa; Futrakul, Prasit

    2008-01-01

    Renal microvascular disease and tubulointerstitial fibrosis are usually demonstrated in aging in humans and animals. It has recently been proposed that renal microvascular disease is the crucial determinant of tubulointerstitial disease or fibrosis. Enhanced circulating endothelial cell loss is a biomarker that reflects glomerular endothelial injury or renal microvascular disease, and fractional excretion of magnesium (FE Mg) is a sensitive biomarker that reflects an early stage of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In aging in humans, both of these biomarkers are abnormally elevated. In addition, a glomerular endothelial dysfunction determined by altered hemodynamics associated with peritubular capillary flow reduction is substantiated. A correction of such hemodynamic alteration with vasodilators can effectively improve renal perfusion and restore renal function. Thus, anti-aging therapy can reverse the renal microvascular disease and dysfunction associated with the aging process.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaia D. Raikou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS on kidneys is related to many complications. We aimed to assess the association between MetS and chronic renal disease defined by a poor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and/or the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. Methods: 149 patients (77 males/72 females were enrolled in the study. Chronic renal disease was defined according to KDIGO 2012 criteria based on eGFR category and classified albuminuria. MetS was studied as a dichotomous variable (0 to 5 components including hypertension, waist circumference, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Results: The association between clustering MetS and both classified eGFR and classified albuminuria (x2 = 50.3, p = 0.001 and x2 = 26.9, p = 0.003 respectively was found to be significant. The MetS presence showed an odds 5.3-fold (1.6–17.8 higher for low eGFR and 3.2-fold (1.2–8.8 higher for albuminuria in combination with the presence of diabetes mellitus, which also increased the risk for albuminuria by 3.5-fold (1.1–11.3. Albuminuria was significantly associated with high triglycerides, hypertension, high glucose (x2 = 11.8, p = 0.003, x2 = 11.4, p = 0.003 and x2 = 9.1, p = 0.01 respectively, and it was mildly associated with a low HDL-C (x2 = 5.7, p = 0.06. A significant association between classified eGFR and both high triglycerides and hypertension (x2 = 9.7, p = 0.04 and x2 = 16.1, p = 0.003 respectively was found. Conclusion: The clustering of MetS was significantly associated with chronic renal disease defined by both classified eGFR and albuminuria. The definition of impaired renal function by classified albuminuria was associated with more MetS components rather than the evaluation of eGFR category. MetS may contribute to the manifestation of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  18. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  19. Renal disease, epidermal necrosis, and epithelial cell antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Deal, J E; Groves, R W; Harmer, A W; Welsh, K I; MacDonald, D M; Rigden, S P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe the association between epithelial cell IgM, which has previously been associated with an increased incidence of loss of renal graft in children, with a novel cutaneous eruption and unexplained native renal disease. DESIGN--Observational study on children with epithelial cell antibody presenting with unexplained renal or skin disease. SETTING--General paediatric department and regional paediatric nephrology unit. PATIENTS--Six children (five girls, one boy), who present...

  20. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation (r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease (r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients

  1. Assessment of dyslipidemia in renal disease patients | Digban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dyslipidemia is elevation of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), or both, or a low high density lipoprotein level that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Lipid pattern of renal disease patients were determined. One hundred volunteers were recruited for this study which comprised of sixty renal disease ...

  2. Causes and consequences of increased sympathetic activity in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Koomans, HA

    Much evidence indicates increased sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) in renal disease. Renal ischemia is probably a primary event leading to increased SNA. Increased SNA often occurs in association with hypertension. However, the deleterious effect of increased SNA on the diseased kidney is not only

  3. Income Gradient in Renal Disease Mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases and associated mortality follow a social gradient and chronic kidney disease is not an exception to this rule. Intermediate behavioral and medical factors that may explain such social gradients are, however, still unknown. Using nationally representative data in the United States, this study was conducted to investigate the mediating effect of medical and behavioral risk factors on the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and renal disease mortality. Americans' Changing Lives Study (ACL), 1986-2011, is a 25-year nationally representative prospective cohort study. ACL followed 3,361 adults for up to 25 years. Income, education, and unemployment were the main predictors of interest. Death due to renal disease was the main outcome. Health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) and medical risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, and obesity) were the mediators. Cox proportional hazards models were used for data analysis. Higher income (HR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62-0.89) was associated with lower risk of death due to renal disease over the 25-year follow-up period. Although health behaviors and medical risk factors at baseline were also predictors of the outcome, they failed to explain the effect of income on death due to renal disease. That is, income was associated with death due to renal disease above and beyond all potential mediators including behavioral and medical risk factors. Socioeconomic inequalities in the United States cause disparities in renal disease mortality; however, such differences are not due to health behaviors (smoking and drinking) and medical risk factors (hypertension and diabetes). To reduce disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States, policies should go beyond health behaviors and medical risk factors. While programs should help low-income individuals maintain exercise and avoid smoking, reduction of income disparities should be regarded as a strategy for reduction of disparities

  4. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI ( r 2 0.86; P chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its associated risk factors. PD is still an underutilized strategy for RRT in the region. Even though renal Tx is feasible, its growth rate is still not as fast as it should be in order to compensate for the increased prevalence of patients on waiting lists. Diagnostic and prevention programs for hypertension and diabetes, appropriate policies promoting the expansion of PD and organ procurement as well as transplantation as cost-effective forms of RRT are needed in the region. Regional cooperation among Latin American countries, allowing the more developed to

  5. Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donita L.

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin and to define the mechanisms which predispose to nephrotoxicity in subclinical renal disease. Subtotally nephrectomized beagle dogs were used as a model for human beings with compromised renal function secondary to a reduced number of functional nephrons. Using ultrastructural morphometry, light microscopy and clinical chemistry data, the model was defined and the nephrotoxic responses of intact dogs administered recommended doses of drug were compared to the response of subtotally nephrectomized dogs administered reduced doses based on each animal's clearance of drug. Lysosomal and mitochondrial morphometric changes suggested mechanisms for increased sensitivity. To determine if increased sensitivity in this model was dependent on altered serum concentrations, variable rate infusions based on individual pharmacokinetic disposition of drug were administered using computer-driven infusion pumps. Identical serum concentration-time profiles were achieved in normal dogs and subtotally nephrectomized dogs, however, toxicity was significantly greater in nephrectomized dogs. The difference in the nephrotoxic response was characterized by administering supratherapeutic doses of drug to dogs. Nephrectomized dogs given a recommended dose of gentamicin became oliguric during the second week of treatment and increasingly uremic after withdrawal of drug. In contrast, intact dogs administered 2 times the recommended dose of gentamicin become only slightly polyuric during week 4 of treatment. The need to individualize dosage regimens based on drug clearance and not serum creatinine nor creatinine clearance alone was substantiated by describing the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin in spontaneously occurring disease states. Four individualized dosage regimens with differing predicted efficacy were then administered to nephrectomized dogs to determine their relative nephrotoxic

  6. PATTERN AND OUTCOME OF RENAL DISEASES IN HOSPITALIZED CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Kebede; Shimelis, Damte

    2016-07-01

    Renal diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality in pediatric practice. Pediatric patients with renal disease, especially younger ones may present with nonspecific signs and symptoms unrelated to the urinary tract. Unexplained fever or failure to thrive may be the only manifestation. Most children with renal diseases in our hospital arrive very late either because of inadequate health awareness among the parents or failure of recognizing the symptoms of renal diseases at a lower health care level. This review will highlight the symptoms of renal diseases at presentation and outcomes of treatment in children in a major referral hospital. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was done over a period of 3 years (June, 2012 to May, 2015) in 381 admitted children (Birth-17 years) at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Out of 14521 pediatric ward admissions in the study period, kidney diseases accounted for 473 admissions in 381 children, accounting for 3.3% of all admissions. The three most common renal diseases observed were congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) seen in 127 children (26.8%), followed by nephrotic syndrome in 80 children 16.9% and acute glomerulonephritis in 58 children (12.2%). Other renal diseases observed were urinary tract infection 8.0%, urolithiasis 6.7%, Wilm’s tumor 6.3%, acute kidney injury 4.2% and chronic kidney disease 4.0%. Other less frequently detected diseases were bladder exstrophy, lupus nephritis, Henock shonlein Purpura nephritis and prune-belly syndrome. Out of 381 children 207 (54.3%) recovered normal renal function, 20(5.2%) remained with proteinuria, 13(3.4%) progressed to chronic kidney disease and 11(2.9%) died. Sixty one nephrotic children (76.3%) achieved remission but 17 children (21.3%) remained with proteinuria; one steroid resistant child died of end stage renal disease. Ten children (2.6%) with different renal diseases were lost to follow-up and 5

  7. Management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and anatomy of renal innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, Matthew W; Bahler, Clinton D; Shumate, Ashley M; Bacallao, Robert L; Sundaram, Chandru P

    2015-05-01

    Chronic pain is a prominent feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease that is difficult to treat and manage, often resulting in a decrease in quality of life. Understanding the underlying anatomy of renal innervation and the various etiologies of pain that occur in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can help guide proper treatments to manage pain. Reviewing previously studied treatments for pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can help characterize treatment in a stepwise fashion. We performed a literature search of the etiology and management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and the anatomy of renal innervation using PubMed® and Embase® from January 1985 to April 2014 with limitations to human studies and English language. Pain occurs in the majority of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease due to renal, hepatic and mechanical origins. Patients may experience different types of pain which can make it difficult to clinically confirm its etiology. An anatomical and histological evaluation of the complex renal innervation helps in understanding the mechanisms that can lead to renal pain. Understanding the complex nature of renal innervation is essential for surgeons to perform renal denervation. The management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease should be approached in a stepwise fashion. Acute causes of renal pain must first be ruled out due to the high incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. For chronic pain, nonopioid analgesics and conservative interventions can be used first, before opioid analgesics are considered. If pain continues there are surgical interventions such as renal cyst decortication, renal denervation and nephrectomy that can target pain produced by renal or hepatic cysts. Chronic pain in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is often refractory to conservative, medical and other noninvasive treatments

  8. The Genetics of Ultra-Rare Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff-Luett, Melissa; Nester, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    The complement-mediated renal diseases are a group of ultra-rare renal diseases that disproportionately affect children and young adults and frequently lead to irreversible renal failure. Genetic mutations in alternate pathway of complement genes are pathomechanistically involved in a significant number of these unique diseases. Here, we review our current understanding of the role of genetics in the primary complement-mediated renal diseases affecting children, with a focus on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy. Also, included is a brief discussion of the related diseases whose relationship to complement abnormality has been suspected but not yet confirmed. Advances in genetics have transformed both treatment and outcomes in these historically difficult to treat, highly morbid diseases. PMID:27617140

  9. Role of serum creatinine for screening renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younas, M.; Khan, F.A.; Sattar, A.; Kazmi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public Heath problem with increasing prevalence in Pakistan. Early identification of mild renal disease can delay its progression. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the best overall index of renal function, but it is difficult to measure, so mostly clinicians rely on. serum creatinine (SCr) concentration which its own limitations. On the other hand 24 hours (h) urinary creatinine clearance (CICl) is a more sensitive marker of renal dysfunction. Presently SCr is being used in our clinical practice to screen the renal diseases which can miss mild renal dysfunctions, so this study was designed to calculate frequency of individuals having reduced GFR as determined by CrCI having normal SCr levels. (author)

  10. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical ...

  11. Role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, P; Tervaert, JWC

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is often observed in patients with chronic renal failure. In the present review we summarize and discuss the recent literature on the pathogenic role of low-density lipoproteins modified by oxidative processes in atherosclerosis and the possible role in renal diseases.

  12. The role of complement in autoimmune renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seelen, M. A.; Daha, M. R.

    The predominance of renal involvement in autoimmune diseases can most likely be assigned to the specialised function of the kidneys filtrating over 120 ml plasma per minute. Complement activation by autoantibodies directed against planted antigens or antigens already present in renal tissue in the

  13. Effect of Aging in the Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients under Online-Hemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Alexandra; Madureira, José; Alija, Pablo; Fernandes, João Carlos; Oliveira, José Gerardo; Lopez, Martin; Filgueiras, Madalena; Amado, Leonilde; Sameiro-Faria, Maria; Miranda, Vasco; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2015-02-01

    This work aimed to evaluate how aging could influence patients' perception of health quality of life (HRQOL), as well as, the effect of aging on dialysis adequacy and in hematological, iron status, inflammatory and nutritional markers. In this transversal study were enrolled 305 ESRD patients under online-hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) (59.67% males; 64.9 ± 14.3 years old). Data about comorbidities, hematological data, iron status, dialysis adequacy, nutritional and inflammatory markers were collected from patient's records. Moreover, HRQOL score, by using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQOL-SF), was assessed. Analyzing the results according to quartiles of age, significant differences were found for some parameters evaluated by the KDQOL-SF instrument, namely for work status, physical functioning and role-physical, which decreased with increasing age. We also found a higher proportion of diabetic patients, a decrease in creatinine, iron, albumin serum levels, transferrin saturation and nPCR, with increasing age. Moreover, significant negative correlations were found between age and mean cell hemoglobin concentration, iron, transferrin saturation, albumin, nPCR, work status, physical functioning and role-physical. In conclusion, our results showed that aging is associated with a decreased work status, physical functioning and role-physical, with a decreased dialysis adequacy, iron availability and nutritional status, and with an increased proportion of diabetic patients and of patients using central venous catheter, as the vascular access. The knowledge of these changes associated with aging, which have impact in the quality of life of the patients, could be useful in their management.

  14. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wühl, Elke; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    -stage renal disease (ESRD) population is limited. The aims of this study were (i) to identify those rare diseases within the ERA-EDTA Registry for which renal replacement therapy (RRT) is being provided and (ii) to determine the prevalence and incidence of RRT for ESRD due to rare diseases, both overall...... and separately for children and adults. METHODS: The Orphanet classification of rare disease was searched for rare diseases potentially causing ESRD, and these diagnosis codes were mapped to the corresponding ERA-EDTA primary renal disease codes. Thirty-one diagnoses were defined as rare diseases causing ESRD...... disease affected young patients in up to 46%. On 31 December 2011, 20 595 patients (12.4% of the total RRT population) were on RRT for ESRD caused by a rare disease. The point prevalence was 32.5 per million age-related population in children and 152.0 in adults. Only 5.8% of these patients were younger...

  15. End-stage renal disease in Nigeria: An overview of the epidemiology and the pathogenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Odubanjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is paucity of information on the magnitude of the burden of renal disease in our environment. Obtaining accurate data is hampered by the poor socioeconomic status of most patients with lack of access to specialized care in tertiary institutions, where most of the data is generated. The incidence of chronic renal failure (CRF and end-stage renal disease (ESRD in any specified area is known to be influenced by the prevalence of specific disease entities resulting in CRF. Hypertension, glomerulonephritis (GN, sickle cell disease, quartan malaria nephropathy, urinary tract schistosomiasis and other parasite-related forms of chronic GN are known to contribute significantly to the incidence of CRF in Nigeria. As is the situation in other parts of the world, diabetic nephropathy appears to be of increasing importance in the causation of ESRD in Nigeria. Even though the underlying cause of renal disease can often not be treated, extensive studies in experimental animals and preliminary studies in humans suggest that progression in chronic renal disease may largely be due to secondary factors, attention to which may be important in the prevention and/or control of renal disease.

  16. Imaging findings in renal hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Serrano, B.; Ferreiro-Argueelles, C.; Rodriguez-Romero, R.; Marcos del Rio, N.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the image findings of renal hydatid disease, especially on MR. Four cases of echinococcal involvement of the kidney were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had intravenous urography (IVU) and US performed. Computed tomography examination was available in three patients and MR in two cases. Intravenous urography demonstrated communication of the cyst to the collecting system in one case. Ultrasound revealed multicystic appearance in three cases and unilocular in one case. Computed tomography demonstrated unilocular thick-walled or multilocular cysts with well-defined walls, calcified in one case. In multilocular cysts the CT densities of the fluid of daughter cysts was significantly lower than the fluid of mother cysts. This typical appearance was present in three of our cases. The presence of a hypointense rim and a multicystic appearance were distinctive in MR imaging. The combined findings of these different imaging modalities aid greatly in establishing the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is of value in determining the presence of a characteristic rim and enables the evaluation of anatomical relationships. (orig.)

  17. End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative promotes ongoing CMS strategies to improve the quality of care provided to ESRD patients. This initiative...

  18. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......, determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...... was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-hour fractional escape rate was taken as index of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport tended to be lower in patients with chronic renal disease than in healthy control patients [3.3 (95% CI 2.4-4.2) vs. 4.2 (3.7-4.2)%/hour; NS]. However...

  19. CT evaluation of severe renal inflammatory disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, P.; Kuhn, J.P.; Afshani, E.

    1987-01-01

    We have performed CT scans on 15 children and 2 young adults with severe renal inflammatory disease. Most children with urinary tract infections do not require such evaluation. We have, however, found CT helpful in defining the nature of renal abnormality and in defining the extent of disease in selected patients who either presented as diagnostic dilemmas or who did not respond initially to proper medical treatment. We therefore use CT scanning as our initial examination in such problem patients. (orig.)

  20. Dosing of radioactive iodine in end-stage renal disease patient with thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Bhat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe detailed administration of thyroidal and extrathyroidal doses of radioiodine to a patient with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. A thorough description of area under curve measurements in a patient with compromised renal function has rarely been described in the literature. Few publications have described thyroid cancer management of patients on hemodialysis, and we believe our management will aid in patient treatment in the future.

  1. Invasive assessment of renal artery atherosclerotic disease and resistant hypertension before renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribichini, Flavio; Pighi, Michele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Gambaro, Alessia; Valvo, Enrico; Lupo, Antonio; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is emerging as a new therapeutic option for patients with severe hypertension refractory to medical therapy. The presence of a renal artery stenosis may be both a cause of secondary hypertension and a contraindication to RSD if a renal artery stent is implanted; therefore, the definition of the functional importance of a renal artery stenosis in a patient with refractory hypertension is crucial. We describe the imaging and functional intravascular assessment of an angiographically severe stenosis of the renal artery in a patient with severe refractory hypertension, by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and measurement of the translesional pressure gradient with a pressure wire. Pressure wire examination excluded any severity of the stenosis, and IVUS showed the presence of a dissected plaque that resolved spontaneously after 3 months of intensive medical therapy and high-dose statin. Subsequently the patient was treated with RSD, achieving a significant effect on blood pressure control. Intravascular imaging and functional assessment of renal artery anatomy in patients with atherosclerotic disease may prove particularly suited to patients with refractory hypertension and multilevel vascular disease who are considered for endovascular therapies, either renal artery stenting or RSD.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  3. Sono-Guided Percutaneous Automated Gun Biopsy in Pediatric Renal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To evaluate whether sono-guided percutaneous automated gun biopsy is also useful in pediatricpatients with renal diseases. In the prone position of twenty pediatric patients with renal parenchymal diseases, percutaneous biopsy was done through lateral aspect of the lower pole of left kidney with automated biopsy gun under the guidance of ultrasonography. The biopsy needle was either of 18 or 20 gauge. The obtained core of renal tissue was examined with light, immunofluorescent or electron microscope by the renal pathologist. In 18 among 20 patients, adequate renal tissue core sufficient to be pathologically diagnosed was obtained. The histologic findings were as follows : IG A nephropathy (n = 2), lupus nephritis (n =2), minimal change glomerulonephritis (n = 5), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 3), mesangialproliferative glomeru-lonephritis (n = 1), diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 3), focalglomerulo-sclerosis (n = 1), membranous glomerulopathy (n = 1). No significant complications occurred during or after the biopsy. Sono-guided percutaneous renal biopsy using automated biopsy gun is also useful todiagnose renal parenchymal diseases without significant complications in pediatric patients

  4. The glycocalyx-linking albuminuria with renal and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabelink, Ton J.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Albuminuria is commonly used as a marker of kidney disease progression, but some evidence suggests that albuminuria also contributes to disease progression by inducing renal injury in specific disease conditions. Studies have confirmed that in patients with cardiovascular risk factors, such as

  5. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation on Lipid Profile, Anemia, and Quality of Life in Chronic Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Emami Naini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients on maintenance hemodialysis several factors reduce the body stored carnitine which could lead to dyslipidemia, anemia, and general health in these patients. We evaluated the effect of oral L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profiles, anemia, and quality of life (QOL in hemodialysis patients. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients on hemodialysis received either L-carnitine 1 g/d (n=24 or placebo (27 patients for 16 weeks. At the end of the study, there was a significant decrease in triglyceride (-31.1±38.7 mg/dL, P=0.001 and a significant increase in HDL (3.7±2.8 mg/dL, P0.05. Erythropoietin dose was significantly decreased in both the carnitine (-4750±5772 mg, P=0.001 and the placebo group (-2000±4296 mg, P<0.05. No improvement was observed in QOL scores of two groups. In ESRD patients under maintenance hemodialysis, oral L-carnitine supplementation may reduce triglyceride and cholesterol and increase HDL and hemoglobin and subsequently reduce needed erythropoietin dose without effect on QOL.

  6. Association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with renal stone disease detected on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, In Chul

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with renal stone disease detected on computed tomography (CT). A total 1812 patients who underwent abdomen-pelvis CT in July 2015 were included in this study. The inclusion criteria for NAFLD were as follows: (i) lower average Hounsfield unit (HU) of hepatic right lobe, left medial and lateral segment when compared with that of spleen, (ii) patients who having urolithiasis in kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder, and (iii) patients underwent abdomen-pelvis CT including noncontrast image. The statistical significance of the association between NAFLD and renal stone disease was assessed using Chi Square Test. The Odds ratios and 95% CI were calculated to assess the propensity of renal stones disease for NAFLD by using Logistic Regression analysis. The frequency of renal stone disease in patients with NAFLD was higher approximately 19% than those who having renal stone disease without NAFLD. In addition, the presence of NAFLD was linked with renal stone disease showing that detection rate of renal stone disease in patients with NAFLD was markedly high (odds ratio: 5, 95% CI, 3–8.2) (p < 0.05) in multivariate analysis. The presence of significant association between NAFLD with renal stone disease and NAFLD may be considered to be an independent variable as a risk factor for renal stone disease

  7. Nitric oxide levels in patients with chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, S R; Agarwal, Rajni

    2013-07-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO), the L-arginine derivative, is tonically synthesised by the endothelium within the kidney and it plays a crucial role in the regulation of the blood pressure and the renal blood flow. NO regulates the renal function through the modulation of the vascular tone and sodium handling. With the progressive development of the renal insufficiency, it remains unclear whether the endogenous NO production is increased or decreased in the kidney. This study was carried out to determine whether there were any changes in the levels of NO and teir correlation with the routine parameters of the renal dysfunction in the patients of Chronic Renal Failure (CRF), as the disease progresses in conjunction with poor renal functions. Thirty patients with chronic renal disease which was caused by chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertension, who were on Maintenance Haemodialysis (MHD) with serum creatinine levels of > 2.5 mg/dl, were included in this study. Thirty healthy voluntary blood donors were taken as the controls. NO was estimated by a spectrophotometric method by using cadmium reduction. The routine renal function tests, BUN and Creatinine were performed by the standard clinical chemistry procedures. The serum NO levels were found to be significantly increased (p insufficient blood purification, due to the common effect on their elimination pathways via the renal tract. Therefore, the alterations of the renal function, that are reflected in the changes of the creatinine concentration, will be accompanied by the changes in the serum NO. Thus, the determination of the NO levels in the peripheral blood may be useful in the assessment of the dialysis and they can also be used as markers in the follow up and the prognosis in these type of patients.

  8. [Decline in renal function in old age : Part of physiological aging versus age-related disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, F; Brinkkötter, P T

    2016-08-01

    The incidence and prevalence of chronic renal disease (CKD) in elderly patients are continuously increasing worldwide. Loss of renal function is not only considered to be part of the aging process itself but also reflects the multimorbidity of many geriatric patients. Calculating the glomerular filtration rate using specific algorithms validated for the elderly population and measuring the amount of proteinuria allow an estimation of renal function in elderly patients with high accuracy. Chronic renal failure has many clinical consequences and not only results in a delayed excretion of toxins cleared by the kidneys but also affects hematogenesis, water and electrolyte balance as well as mineral bone metabolism. Furthermore, CKD directly leads to and aggravates geriatric syndromes and in particular the onset of frailty. Therapeutic strategies to halt progression of CKD not only comprise treatment of the underlying disease but also efficient blood pressure and diabetic control and the avoidance of nephrotoxic medications.

  9. Organising care for people with diabetes and renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two of the commonest long-term conditions. One-fifth of patients with diabetes will have CKD, and diabetes is the commonest cause of advanced kidney disease. For most patients these comorbidities will be managed in primary care with the focus on cardiovascular prevention. Many patients with more advanced disease and complications require joint care from multidisciplinary specialist teams in diabetes and renal disease to ensure that care is consistent and coordinated. Models of joint speciality care, include joint registry management, parallel clinics, shared consulting and case discussion, but require more evaluation than has currently been performed. These underpin more informal interactions between the specialist teams. A local model of care for diabetes and renal disease that incorporates the roles of primary care, members of multidisciplinary teams and speciality care should be agreed, resourced appropriately and its effectiveness monitored. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  10. Renal involvement of mantle cell lymphona leading to end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Seo, Jong Woo; Cho, Hyun Seop; Kang, Yeojin; Bae, Eun Jin; Lee, Dong Won; Jeon, Dae-Hong; Lee, Jong Sil; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), owing to its insensitivity to chemotherapy, has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of 3 years to 4 years. MCL frequently infiltrates other organs. However, reports involving kidney in living patients are rare. Here, we report a case of MCL with renal involvement leading to end stage renal disease that required renal replacement therapy. A 69-year-old man diagnosed with MCL 3 years earlier was admitted to our emergency room due to uremic symptoms. After eight cycles of chemotherapy, he had displayed complete remission, but experienced a recurrence 1.5 years later; after refusing chemotherapy, the patient was lost on follow-up in the final 10 months. On presentation at the emergency room, the patient's serum blood urea nitrogen was 109.5 mg/dL, and creatinine was 11.1 mg/dL. All serological markers for secondary glomerulonephritis were negative. Renal biopsy revealed 50% sclerosis of the glomerulus and small dense lymphocyte infiltration of the tubulo-interstitium. Similar cells were found on the gastric mucosa. Despite our recommendation for chemotherapy, he refused all treatments except for hemodialysis, which was maintained for 12 months until his death. This patient represents the first case report of the renal involvement of MCL leading to end stage renal disease.

  11. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  12. Malignant hypertension in a patient with end of stage renal disease (esrd) treated by renal transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondal, M.; Farook, K.; Moin, S.; Bano, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Control of hypertension is often a problem in the management of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Multiple modalities of treatment are required to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality and morbidity. These include fluid and salt restriction, multidrug regimes and dialysis. We report a case of young 25 years old patient, admitted with chronic renal failure, complicated by malignant and refractory hypertension, not responding to hemodialysis and antihypertensive agent. During stay in hospital, patient also had intracerebral hemorrhage, fits due to uncontrolled hypertension requiring ventilatory support followed. Renal transplant was considered to be the final therapeutic modality. After gradual recovery, a successful live-related renal transplant was performed. As soon as good graft was established, the blood pressure settled and 4 of the 5 antihypertensives were withdrawn. After 2 weeks, patient was discharged in a stable condition with a total stay of about 2 months. (author)

  13. Income Gradient in Renal Disease Mortality in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNon-communicable diseases and associated mortality follow a social gradient and chronic kidney disease is not an exception to this rule. Intermediate behavioral and medical factors that may explain such social gradients are, however, still unknown.ObjectivesUsing nationally representative data in the United States, this study was conducted to investigate the mediating effect of medical and behavioral risk factors on the association between socioeconomic status (SES and renal disease mortality.Patients and methodsAmericans’ Changing Lives Study (ACL, 1986–2011, is a 25-year nationally representative prospective cohort study. ACL followed 3,361 adults for up to 25 years. Income, education, and unemployment were the main predictors of interest. Death due to renal disease was the main outcome. Health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise and medical risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, and obesity were the mediators. Cox proportional hazards models were used for data analysis.ResultsHigher income (HR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62–0.89 was associated with lower risk of death due to renal disease over the 25-year follow-up period. Although health behaviors and medical risk factors at baseline were also predictors of the outcome, they failed to explain the effect of income on death due to renal disease. That is, income was associated with death due to renal disease above and beyond all potential mediators including behavioral and medical risk factors.ConclusionSocioeconomic inequalities in the United States cause disparities in renal disease mortality; however, such differences are not due to health behaviors (smoking and drinking and medical risk factors (hypertension and diabetes. To reduce disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States, policies should go beyond health behaviors and medical risk factors. While programs should help low-income individuals maintain exercise and avoid smoking, reduction of income

  14. Renal biopsy-driven molecular target identification in glomerular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Kretzler, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease has severe impacts on the patient and represents a major burden to the health care systems worldwide. Despite an increased knowledge of pathophysiological processes involved in kidney diseases, the progress in defining novel treatment strategies has been limited. One reason is the descriptive disease categorization used in nephrology based on clinical findings or histopathological categories irrespective of potential different molecular disease mechanisms. To accelerate progress toward a targeted treatment, a definition of human disease extending from phenotypic disease classification to mechanism-based disease definitions is needed. In recent years, we have witnessed a major transition in biomedical research from a single gene research to an information rich and collaborative science. Tissue-based analysis in renal disease allows to link structure to molecular function. In our review, we introduce the concept of precision medicine in nephrology, describe several large cohort studies established for molecular analysis of kidney diseases, and highlight examples of renal biopsy-driven target identification by integrative systems biology approaches. Furthermore, we give an outlook on how the new disease definitions can be used for patient stratification in clinical trial design. Finally, we introduce the concept of an informational commons of renal precision medicine for joint analyses of large-scale data sets in renal failure.

  15. Localized renal cystic disease: Report of a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Shilpi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 32-year-old female who presented with right flank pain. Ultrasonography done for hematuria 10 years ago indicated the presence of renal cysts in the right kidney, but she had been asymptomatic since then. This history attracted our attention to the possibility of "localized renal cystic disease" (LRCD. Diagnosis was confirmed by computerized tomogram, negative renal ultrasound of one of the parents and absence of family history of renal disease. She is still being followed up for the last 3 years and is doing well. LRCD has been given various names since it was first recognized as a distinct clinical entity but the term LRCD appears to be the most accurate. Here, we present a brief discussion of clinical significance, diagnosis and differentials of this rare condition.

  16. Estatinas na doença renal crônica Statins in chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia R. C. Ferreira

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Hipertrigliceridemia e o HDL baixo são aspectos comuns em pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica. A mortalidade cardiovascular está substancialmente aumentada na presença de doença renal crônica (10-20 vezes maior. Existem evidências de estudos clínicos com estatinas sugerindo uma ação protetora dessas drogas na progressão da doença renal. Além disso, pacientes pós-transplante renal recebendo fluvastatina, experimentaram redução na incidência de infartos não fatais e de mortalidade cardíaca. Entretanto, um estudo recente com atorvastatina não demonstrou reduções na morbi-mortalidade cardiovascular entre pacientes diabéticos em hemodiálise. Estudos em andamento definirão o preciso papel das estatinas neste grupo especial de pacientes.Hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-c are common features in patients with chronic renal failure. Cardiovascular mortality is substantially increased in the presence of chronic renal disease (10-20 times higher. There is evidence from clinical trials with statins suggesting their protective role in the progression of renal disease. In addition, reduced rates of non-fatal myocardial infarction and cardiac mortality were seen after renal transplant in patients receiving fluvastatin. However, a recent study with atorvastatin failed to demonstrate reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients on hemodyalisis therapy. Ongoing trials will define the precise role of statins in this subset of patients.

  17. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious

  18. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.P. (New York Medical Coll., Valhalla); McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  19. Reducing VEGF-B Signaling Ameliorates Renal Lipotoxicity and Protects against Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkevall, Annelie; Mehlem, Annika; Palombo, Isolde; Heller Sahlgren, Benjamin; Ebarasi, Lwaki; He, Liqun; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Olauson, Hannes; Axelsson, Jonas; Sundelin, Birgitta; Patrakka, Jaakko; Scotney, Pierre; Nash, Andrew; Eriksson, Ulf

    2017-03-07

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of severe renal disease, and few treatment options are available today that prevent the progressive loss of renal function. DKD is characterized by altered glomerular filtration and proteinuria. A common observation in DKD is the presence of renal steatosis, but the mechanism(s) underlying this observation and to what extent they contribute to disease progression are unknown. Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) controls muscle lipid accumulation through regulation of endothelial fatty acid transport. Here, we demonstrate in experimental mouse models of DKD that renal VEGF-B expression correlates with the severity of disease. Inhibiting VEGF-B signaling in DKD mouse models reduces renal lipotoxicity, re-sensitizes podocytes to insulin signaling, inhibits the development of DKD-associated pathologies, and prevents renal dysfunction. Further, we show that elevated VEGF-B levels are found in patients with DKD, suggesting that VEGF-B antagonism represents a novel approach to treat DKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    OpenAIRE

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and ...

  1. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease:Associations with Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eRusso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephro pathological changes are commonly observed in the non tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy. In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with radical nephrectomy. Despite emerging evidence that partial nephrectomy provides equivalent local tumor control to radical nephrectomy while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  2. Characteristics and survival of patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in the United States renal data system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lijing; Bolen, Julie; Valdez, Rodolfo; Joseph, David; Baum, Michelle A; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-02-01

    We describe the characteristics, treatments and survival of patients with spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed from 2004 through 2008 in the United States Renal Data System. We used ICD-9-CM code 741.* to identify individuals with spina bifida using hospital inpatient data from 1977 to 2010, and physician and facility claims from 2004 to 2008. We constructed a 5:1 comparison group of patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida matched by age at first end stage renal disease service, gender and race/ethnicity. We assessed the risk of mortality and of renal transplantation while on dialysis using multivariate cause specific proportional hazards survival analysis. We also compared survival after the first renal transplant from the first end stage renal disease service to August 2011. We identified 439 patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed at an average younger age than in patients without spina bifida (41 vs 62 years, p spina bifida those who had spina bifida showed a similar mortality hazard on dialysis and after transplantation. However, patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida were more likely to undergo renal transplantation than patients with spina bifida (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03). Hospitalizations related to urinary tract infections were positively associated with the risk of death on dialysis in patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida (HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.33-1.53). Spina bifida was not associated with increased mortality in patients with end stage renal disease on dialysis or after renal transplantation. Proper urological and bladder management is imperative in patients with spina bifida, particularly in adults. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r2 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r2 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r2 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  4. Fetal polycystic renal disease: prenatal sonographic findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Soon Ae; Park, Yong Hyun; Cha, Sun Hee; Kay, Jung Woong; Cho, Joo Yeon; Cha, Kwang Yul; Cha, Kyung Sub; Chi, Je G.

    1990-01-01

    Polycystic renal disease are congenital disorders, most of which are fatal in the postnatal period. A series of ten cases of polycystic renal disease diagnosed prenatally by ultrasonography is presented. Diagnostic criteria of ultrasonography for cystic renal disease are; 1. enlarge kidney (4 cases) 2. echogenic density of kidney (3 cases) 3. 0.4 - 0.9cm sized multiple cysts within the renal cortex (3 cases) 4. decreased amount of amniotic fluid (4 cases) 5. hydronephrosis (4 cases) 6. distended bladder (2 cases) 7. absence of bladder (2 cases) Eight of ten cases were confirmed by autopsy. Seven cases had other associated congenital anomalies, i.e. pulmonary hypoplasia (5), hepatic fibrosis (3), congenital heart disease (3), tracheoesophageal fistula with imperforate anus (1), caudal regression syndrome (1), Meckel-Gruber syndrome (1) and ambiguous genitalia (2). Additional cytogenetic study of the fetus and the careful family history taking followed by prenatal diagnosis of cystic renal disease. Precise prenatal diagnosis may allow patients the option of elective abortion or may prevent unnecessary obstetric intervention

  5. Developing a provisional and national renal disease registry for Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ajami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease registry is a database that includes information about people suffering a special kind of disease. The aim of this study was to first identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR characteristics in some countries with Iran; and second, develop a provisional and NRDR for Iran. Materials and Methods: Retrieval of data of the NRDR was performed by scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, Malaysia, and Iran. This research was applied, and the study was descriptive-comparative. The study population consisted of the NRDR in selected countries in which data were collected by forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, related documents, and people who are active in this regard, and related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and patient support charity. The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as a single center experiences. America and Britain have a preeminent national registry of renal disease compared to other countries. Conclusion: Given that control, prevention, and treatment of chronic renal diseases incur high expenses and the disease is one of leading mortality factors in Iran and across the world and since national registry system for chronic renal diseases can provide better tools and strategies to manage and evaluate patients′ characteristics as well as risk factors which eventually leads to making better decisions.

  6. Diet-sensitive prognostic markers for cardiovascular and renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen, Ineke Jowanna

    2016-01-01

    Diet plays a relevant role in the development and progression of lifestyle-related diseases like hypertension and type 2 diabetes and the subsequent risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Riphagen used several diet-sensitive biomarkers to further explore the effects of diet on cardiovascular and

  7. Nanomedicines for renal disease: current status and future applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamaly, Nazila; He, John C.; Ausiello, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment and management of kidney disease currently presents an enormous global burden, and the application of nanotechnology principles to renal disease therapy, although still at an early stage, has profound transformative potential. The increasing translation of nanomedicines to the clinic, a...

  8. The spectrum of renal diseases in HIV infected adults presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The natural history of the renal diseases associated with HIV infection has been radically changed by antiretroviral therapy. There are other diseases, ... Patients had advanced HIV infection with mean CD4 count of197 cells/mm3. Majority of patients ( 64.5%) were not yet been initiated cART. 16% of the study patients were ...

  9. Growth retardation in children with chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the management of children with chronic renal disease (CRD, growth retardation remains its most visible comorbid condition. Growth retardation has adverse impact on morbidity and mortality rates, quality of life and education, and in adult patients on job family life, and independent leaving accomodation. Pathophysiology of impaired growth in CRD is complex and still not fully understood. The following complications are: anorexia, malnutrition, inflammation, decreased residual renal function, dialysis frequency and adequacy, renal anemia, metabolic acidosis, fluid/electrolyte imbalance, renal osteodistrophy, growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor -1 (IGF-1 resistance. Malnutrition is most frequent and most important factor contributing to the degree of growth retardation in infancy. The degree of renal dysfunction is the major determinant of variability in growth from third year of age until puberty onset, while in puberty hypergonadotropic hypogonadism has negative effect. The main factors that influence growth after renal transplantation are the age of the recipient and glucocorticoid drugs dosage with negative effect and allograft function with positive effect. In order to improve growth in children with CRD it is necessary to include: diet with optimal caloric intake, correction of fluid/ electrolyte imbalance, correction of acidosis, renal osteodistrophy and anemia. If growth velocity is insufficient to normalize growth, it is necessary to start recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy at 0.05 mg/kg per day (0.35 mg/kg per week or 28 IU/m2 per week administered by subcutaneous injection.

  10. [Growth retardation in children with chronic renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the management of children with chronic renal disease (CRD), growth retardation remains its most visible comorbid condition. Growth retardation has adverse impact on morbidity and mortality rates, quality of life and education, and in adult patients on job family life, and independent leaving accomodation. Pathophysiology of impaired growth in CRD is complex and still not fully understood. The following complications are: anorexia, malnutrition, inflammation, decreased residual renal function, dialysis frequency and adequacy, renal anemia, metabolic acidosis, fluid/electrolyte imbalance, renal osteodistrophy, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) resistance. Malnutrition is most frequent and most important factor contributing to the degree of growth retardation in infancy. The degree of renal dysfunction is the major determinant of variability in growth from third year of age until puberty onset, while in puberty hypergonadotropic hypogonadism has negative effect. The main factors that influence growth after renal transplantation are the age of the recipient and glucocorticoid drugs dosage with negative effect and allograft function with positive effect. In order to improve growth in children with CRD it is necessary to include: diet with optimal caloric intake, correction of fluid/ electrolyte imbalance, correction of acidosis, renal osteodistrophy and anemia. If growth velocity is insufficient to normalize growth, it is necessary to start recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy at 0.05 mg/kg per day (0.35 mg/kg per week or 28 IU/m2 per week) administered by subcutaneous injection.

  11. Value of renal cortical thickness as a predictor of renal function impairment in chronic renal disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Rafael Yamashita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the presence of linear relationship between renal cortical thickness, bipolar length, and parenchymal thickness in chronic kidney disease patients presenting with different estimated glomerular filtration rates (GFRs and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements using ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography was performed in 54 chronic renal failure patients. The scans were performed by two independent and blinded radiologists. The estimated GFR was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Interobserver agreement was calculated and a linear correlation coefficient (r was determined in order to establish the relationship between the different renal measurements and estimated GFR. Results: The correlation between GFR and measurements of renal cortical thickness, bipolar length, and parenchymal thickness was, respectively, moderate (r = 0.478; p < 0.001, poor (r = 0.380; p = 0.004, and poor (r = 0.277; p = 0.116. The interobserver agreement was considered excellent (0.754 for measurements of cortical thickness and bipolar length (0.833, and satisfactory for parenchymal thickness (0.523. Conclusion: The interobserver reproducibility for renal measurements obtained was good. A moderate correlation was observed between estimated GFR and cortical thickness, but bipolar length and parenchymal thickness were poorly correlated.

  12. Reduced impact of renal failure on the outcome of patients with alcoholic liver disease undergoing liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jaeyoun; Galanko, Joseph A; Arora, Sumant; Cabezas, Joaquin; Ndugga, Nambi J; Lucey, Michael R; Hayashi, Paul H; Barritt, Alfred Sidney; Bataller, Ramon

    2017-02-01

    Pretransplant renal failure is commonly reported to be a poor prognostic indicator affecting survival after liver transplantation (LT). However, whether the impact of renal failure on patient outcome varies according to the aetiology of the underlying liver disease is largely unknown. We investigated the association between renal failure at the time of LT and patient outcome in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 6920), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (n = 2956) and hepatitis C (HCV) (n = 14 922) using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database between February 2002 and December 2013. A total of 24 798 transplant recipients were included. The presence of renal failure was more frequently seen in patients with ALD (23.95%) and NASH (23.27%) compared to patients with HCV (19.38%) (P renal failure was an independent predictor of poor survival. Renal failure showed detrimental effect on patient survival in the overall series (HR = 1.466, P renal failure was less marked in patients with ALD (HR = 1.31, P renal failure had better long-term prognosis than non-ALD patients. Renal failure at the time of LT conferred a lower patient and graft survival post-LT. However, renal failure has less impact on the outcome of patients with ALD than that of patients with non-alcoholic liver disease after LT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prasad Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9% of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58% were male and (42% female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN was the most common disorder (37.7% followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%, urinary tract infection (21.3%, acute kidney injury (AKI (17.9%, obstructive uropathy (1.9%, chronic kidney disease (CKD (1.2%, and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN (32.9% followed by lupus nephritis (4% and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%. Urine culture was positive in (9.22% and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%. The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9% each, followed by dehydration (13.5%. Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%, PIGN (18.1%, and CKD (9%. Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management.

  14. Renal perfusion in chronic liver diseases: Evaluation by radiotechnetium renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanfani, G.; Fratello, A.; Mele, M.; Conte, E.; D'Addabbo, A.; Greco, L.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with chronic liver diseases and seven normal controls were studied using renal and hepatic radiotechnetium angiography. The time-activity histograms generated were employed to calculate both the renal perfusion index (RPI) and the hepatic perfusion index (HPI). Renal perfusion proved to be reduced not only in cirrhotic patients but also in patients with aggressive chronic hepatitis, as well as in those with persistent chronic hepatitis. The HPI, which is to be considered as being strictly dependent on portal flow, only fell significantly in the group of cirrhotic patients. In all patient groups, the correlation coefficient between the HPI and RPI (mean of the two kidneys) was low (r=0.275) and not significant (P>0.05). After Warren's splenorenal derivation, renal perfusion did not improve but worsened, particularly in the left kidney where derivation anastomosis probably caused a venous overload. (orig.)

  15. Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. V. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD in Brazil. Their mean age was 47 ± 39 years. The main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were arterial hypertension (89.4%, dyslipidemia (78.3%, low high-density lipoprotein levels (84.2% and low physical activity (64.1%. Family history of coronary insufficiency and high low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.005 and P = 0.029, respectively. Sedentary life style, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperglycemia also showed a significant association with the underlying vascular disease (P = 0.017, P = 0.039, P = 0.037 and P = 0.030, respectively. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and black race were factors significantly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P = 0.01, P = 0.0013 and P = 0.024, respectively. Our study shows that the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in patients with ESRD were left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic disease, valvular disease and coronary artery disease. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were the common risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on HD in a single center in Brazil.

  16. [Chronic renal disease--a global problem in the XXI century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutov, A M

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, it was proposed to consider functional renal disorders 3 and more months in duration under the general name chronic renal disease (CRD) bearing in mind the common mechanism behind progressive nephropathy and high cardiovascular mortality of such patients. The prevalence of CRD in Russia is unknown; it is supposed that every tenth adult in the world has CRD. Diagnostics of CRD requires at least measurement of serum creatinine, calculation of the glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI formula, and determination of albuminuria. A main cause of CRD is cardiovascular disorders. Complicated relationships between cardiac insufficiency and CRD account for 5 types of cardiorenal syndrome. CRD patients are at risk of terminal renal insufficiency requiring replacement therapy; moreover, CRD enhances cardiovascular morbidity and predisposes to acute renal lesion that in turn accelerates progress of CRD. Taken together these events account for the global character of the CRD problem.

  17. Late de novo minimal change disease in a renal allograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhan, Krishan K.; Camp, Cynric R. E. Temple

    2009-01-01

    Among the causes of the nephrotic syndrome in renal allografts, minimal change disease is a rarity with only few cases described in the medical literature. Most cases described have occurred early in the post-transplant course. There is no established treatment for the condition but prognosis is favorable. We describe a case of minimal change disease that developed 8 years after a successful transplantation of a renal allograft in a middle-aged woman. The nephrotic syndrome was accompanied by deterioration of allograft function. Treatment with mycophenolate mofetil was successful in inducing remission and stabilizing allograft function. (author)

  18. Tumour Calcification and Calciphylaxis in End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although soft tissue and vascular calcifications are common in CKD and progress as an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality, tumour calcification and calciphylaxis are uncommon in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Here, we discuss a rare case of a patient with tumour calcification complicated with calciphylaxis developed septic shock from infection. Our patient is a 57-year-old man in his late stage of renal disease who presented with a huge mass at the right hip and necrotic cutaneous ulcers on the lower legs followed by local and systemic infection and death due to septic shock.

  19. Hypertensive disease and renal hypertensions: renal structural and functional studies by using dynamic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabidze, G.G.; Pogrebnaya, G.N.; Todua, F.I.; Sokolova, R.I.; Kozdoba, O.A.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was conducted by the original methods; the findings were analyzed by taking into account time-density curves which made it possible to gain an insight into the status of blood flow and filtration in each individual kidney. Computed tomography and dynamic computed tomography revealed that hypertensive disease was characterized by normal volume and thickness of the renal cortical layer and symmetric time-density curves, whereas a hypertensive type of chronic glomerulonephritis featured lower renal cartical layer thickness, reduced renal volume, symmetrically decrease amplitudes of the first and second peaks of the time-density curve, chronic pyelonephritis showed asymmetric time-density diagrams due to the lower density areas in the afflicted kidney

  20. [Renal involvement in glycogen storage disease type 1: Practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Chehida, Amel; Bensmaïl, Takoua; Ben Rehouma, Faten; Ben Abdelaziz, Rim; Azzouz, Hatem; Boudabbous, Hela; Slim Abdelmoula, Mohamed; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kaabachi, Naziha; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Tebib, Néji

    2015-07-01

    To investigate risk factors of renal complications in glycogen storage disease type I, in order to identify practical implications for renal preservation. A retrospective study of 38 patients with glycogen storage disease type I. The patients studied were 8.6 years old in average (1.5 to 22 years) and were followed during 7.4 ± 4.5 years. Hypercalciuria was detected in 23 patients and was related to acidosis (P=0.028), higher lactate levels (5.9 ± 3.5 versus 3.7 ± 1.7 mmol/L; P=0.013) and smaller height (-2.1 ± 1.5 SD versus -0.8 ± 1.5 SD; P=0.026). Urolithiasis was diagnosed in 7 cases. Glomerular disease (19/38) was more frequent in cases with severe hypertriglyceridemia (P=0.042) and occurred at an older age (P=0.007). Microalbuminuria occurred in 15/31 cases; ACE inhibitors were prescribed in only 8 cases. The frequency of renal complications did not differ according to the diet group (continuous enteral feeding or uncooked starch). Logistic regression concluded as risk factors: lactic acidosis for tubular disease and age>10 years for glomerular disease. Renal involvement is common in glycogen storage disease type I patients. Tubular abnormalities are precocious, related to lactic acidosis and may be detected by monitoring of urinary calcium. Glomerular hyperfiltration is the first stage of a progressive glomerular disease and is related to age. Practical implications for renal preservation are discussed based on our results and literature. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasonography assessment of renal size and its correlation with body mass index in adults without known renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, M.; Hameed, A.; Khan, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Many conditions affect renal size. To evaluate abnormalities in renal size, knowledge of standardised values for normal renal dimensions is essential as it shows variability in the values of normal renal size depending on body size, age and ethnicity. Ultrasound, being an easily available, non-invasive, safe and less expensive modality, is widely used for evaluation of renal dimensions and repeated follow-ups. The objectives of this study were to determine renal size by ultrasound in adults without any known renal disease, and to determine the relationship of renal size with body mass index. Methods: Study was conducted in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Shifa International Hospital and PIMS Islamabad. Renal size was assessed by ultrasound in 4,035 adult subjects with normal serum creatinine and without any known renal disease, between November 2002 and December 2010. Renal length, width, thickness and volume were obtained and mean renal length and volume were correlated with body mass index and other factors like age, side, gender, weight and height of the subjects. Results: Mean renal length on right side was 101.6+-8.9 mm, renal width 42.7+-7.1 mm, and parenchymal thickness 14.4+-2.9 mm. On left side, mean renal length was 102.7+-9.2 mm, width 47.6+-7.0 mm, and parenchymal thickness 15.1+-3.1 mm. Mean renal volume on right was 99.8+-37.2 cm/sup 3/ and on left was 124.4+-41.3 cm/sup 3/. Left renal size was significantly larger than right in both genders. Relationship of mean renal length was significant when correlated with age, side, gender, height and weight, and body mass index. Renal volumes also showed a similar relationship with side, gender, height and weight, and body mass index; but with age such a relationship was seen only for left kidney. Conclusion: Pakistani population has mean renal size smaller than reference values available in international literature. Renal length and volume have a direct relationship with body mass index. Mean renal

  2. MicroRNA biomarkers in clinical renal disease: from diabetic nephropathy renal transplantation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Raj, Dominic; Townsend, Raymond; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a common health problem affecting 1 in 12 Americans. It is associated with elevated risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and high costs for the treatment of renal failure with dialysis or transplantation. Advances in CKD care are impeded by the lack of biomarkers for early diagnosis, assessment of the extent of tissue injury, estimation of disease progression, and evaluation of response to therapy. Such biomarkers should improve the performance of existing measures of renal functional impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) or kidney damage (proteinuria). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional repressors are gaining momentum as biomarkers in a number of disease areas. In this review, we examine the potential utility of miRNAs as promising biomarkers for renal disease. We explore the performance of miRNAs as biomarkers in two clinically important forms of CKD, diabetes and the nephropathy developing in kidney transplant recipients. Finally, we highlight the pitfalls and opportunities of miRNAs and provide a broad perspective for the future clinical development of miRNAs as biomarkers in CKD beyond the current gold standards of eGFR and albuminuria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; Pchronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. End Stage Renal Disease: Racial Differences | Chijioke | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The prevalence and aetiological of end stage renal disease (ESRD) differ from race to race and from location to location even among people of the same race. There is paucity of data on the comparison of ESDR in whites and blacks living in their native environment. The study was undertaken to retrospectively ...

  5. Microalbuminuria Represents a Feature of Advanced Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... beta thalassemia J Nephrol 1997; 10(3):163-167. 3. Abbott,KC, Hypolite, IO and Agodoa, LY. Sickle cell nephropathy at end-stage renal disease in the United States: patient characteristics and sur- vival Clin Nephrol 2002; 58(1): 9-15. 4. Polkinghome ,KR Detection and measure- ment of urinary protein ...

  6. The dyslipidemia of chronic renal disease: effects of statin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozsoy, Riza C.; van Leuven, Sander I.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Arisz, Lambertus; Koopman, Marion G.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Dyslipidemia is a prevalent condition in patients with chronic renal disease, but is often left untreated. Statin treatment constitutes an effective way to improve lipid abnormalities. This review summarizes present studies on dyslipidemia and its treatment in patients with

  7. Aging-associated renal disease in mice is fructokinase dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Milagres, Tamara; Hernando, Ana Andres; Jensen, Thomas; Miyazaki, Makoto; Doke, Tomohito; Hayasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Marumaya, Shoichi; Long, David A; Garcia, Gabriela E; Kuwabara, Masanari; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Kang, Duk-Hee; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-10-01

    Aging-associated kidney disease is usually considered a degenerative process associated with aging. Recently, it has been shown that animals can produce fructose endogenously, and that this can be a mechanism for causing kidney damage in diabetic nephropathy and in association with recurrent dehydration. We therefore hypothesized that low-level metabolism of endogenous fructose might play a role in aging-associated kidney disease. Wild-type and fructokinase knockout mice were fed a normal diet for 2 yr that had minimal (renal injury was amplified by provision of high-salt diet for 3 wk, as noted by the presence of glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial matrix expansion, and alpha smooth muscle actin expression, and with segmental thrombi. Fructokinase knockout mice were protected from renal injury both at baseline and after high salt intake (3 wk) compared with wild-type mice. This was associated with higher levels of active (phosphorylated serine 1177) endothelial nitric oxide synthase in their kidneys. These studies suggest that aging-associated renal disease might be due to activation of specific metabolic pathways that could theoretically be targeted therapeutically, and raise the hypothesis that aging-associated renal injury may represent a disease process as opposed to normal age-related degeneration.

  8. Cost Evaluation of Haemodialysis for End Stage Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maintenance haemodialysis is a life sustaining mode of treatment of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients. However, the widespread and sustained application of this mode of treatment has been largely unsuccessful because of costs. Objectives: To assess the costs and use of haemodialysis in a ...

  9. Childhood renal diseases in Benin-City: assessment of knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Researcher- administered questionnaire was used in extracting relevant information bothering on biodata, perception, attitude and practice concerning common renal diseases in children. The 110 respondents comprised 79 (71.8%) males and 31 (28.2%) females. Their mean age was 32.4 + 5.8 years (range 24 – 50 ...

  10. Estimating glomerular filtration rate: Cockcroft-Gault and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulas compared to renal inulin clearance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botev, R.; Mallie, J.P.; Couchoud, C.; Schuck, O.; Fauvel, J.P.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Lee, N.; Santo, N.G. De; Cirillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of renal function by estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is very important for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulas are the

  11. Chronic kidney disease in children with unilateral renal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Denis A; Ceccanti, Silvia; Frediani, Simone; Schiavetti, Amalia; Cozzi, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    In patients who have undergone nephrectomy lower stage chronic kidney disease may develop, which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. We investigated whether the prevalence of lower stage chronic kidney disease is related to the amount of renal parenchyma excised in children with unilateral renal tumor. A total of 15 patients treated with nephrectomy and 10 treated with nephron sparing surgery were enrolled at a single academic center. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines were used to classify patients by chronic kidney disease stage based on estimated glomerular filtration rate values. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation and Schwartz equation were used in patients older and younger than 17 years, respectively. At a mean followup of more than 12 years 8 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and 1 treated with bilateral nephron sparing surgery presented with stage II chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate 60 to 89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Sequential measurements from diagnosis to 12 to 17 years postoperatively showed that stage II chronic kidney disease in patients who had undergone nephrectomy manifested as a negligible postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (75.7 ± 25.5 vs 79.4 ± 3.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.6). Five of the 8 patients presented with stage II chronic kidney disease even before nephrectomy. The other 7 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and those treated with nephron sparing surgery presented with a significant postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (81.1 ± 24 vs 102.3 ± 3 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.02, and 88.7 ± 2 vs 107.4 ± 14 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.005, respectively). A subset of children with unilateral renal tumor presents before and/or after nephrectomy, and not after nephron sparing surgery, with stage II chronic kidney disease, probably due to a reduced renal

  12. Vasopressin, Copeptin, and Renal Concentrating Capacity in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease without Renal Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zittema, Debbie; Boertien, Wendy E.; van Beek, Andre P.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Franssen, Casper F. M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Meijer, Esther; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Background and objectives Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent hereditary renal disease, characterized by cyst formation in the kidneys leading to end stage kidney failure. It is clinically acknowledged that ADPKD patients have impaired urine concentrating

  13. Anthropometry and renal size of children suffering under sustained conflict in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehall, John

    2008-11-01

    To measure anthropometry, blood pressure and renal lengths of children in a war torn region of Sri Lanka and compare results with local and international standards. Measurements of 147 Tamil children in Kilinochchi, north-east Sri Lanka, were compared with the World Health Organization standards using Anthro 2005 software in a period of relative peace in December 2005. Renal lengths were measured by ultrasound and compared with Australian and Indian data. 1 2-5 years of age. The weight-to-height ratio for combined sexes revealed 13.9% were children was children was children are stunted and wasted in this older group. Girls are more affected than boys. 3 Renal lengths fell progressively below -2 SD for both age and height when compared with Australian and Indian children. Tamil children in Kilinochchi are more stunted and wasted than others in Sri Lanka, except those in the tea estates. Progressive renal stunting because of under-nutrition may be a mechanism for later disease. The loss of potential for human development can only be addressed by long-term improvement in access to nutrition.

  14. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements section...

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in children with renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotsky, V; Mughal, M Z; Berry, J L; Webb, N J A

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the vitamin D status of children with renal disease attending the outpatient clinics of our tertiary nephrology centre, allowing us to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and study its relationship with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration. 90 boys and 53 girls (99 white Caucasians, 38 of South Asian origin and six from other ethnic groups) were enrolled into the study. 18 were on dialysis (15 peritoneal dialysis and three haemodialysis), 61 had a functioning renal transplant (19 with reduced GFR), 18 had chronic renal failure and 46 had a variety of renal disorders with normal renal function. Serum/plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, PTH, creatinine, calcium, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase were measured. Patients with serum 25(OH)D concentrations of less than 25 nmol/l were considered to be deficient and those with levels of 25-50 nmol/l considered insufficient. 26% of all patients were 25(OH)D deficient and a further 32% were insufficient. The prevalence in South Asians was higher (87% deficient/insufficient) than in white Caucasians (46% deficient/insufficient, prenal patients were vitamin D deficient/insufficient, particularly children of South Asian origin. High PTH values in the setting of reduced GFR might be due to vitamin D deficiency and should lead to estimation of serum 25(OH)D concentration.

  16. Renal Scintiscanning with Hg209-Neohydrin in Urologic Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollini, V.; Tori, G.

    1964-01-01

    Renal scintiscanning has been carried out using Hg 203 - labelled Neohydrin. The equipment used is the Nuclear Chicago Isotope Scanner Type 1700 with 2 x 2 - i n crystal and a 7 - cm focal-length honeycomb collimator. Usually the scintigrams are registered both on paper and on photographic film. Hg 203 - labelled Neohydrin is usually employed in doses of 120 - 160 μc (about 2 μc/kg). The scanning examination starts about 2 h after the injection and lasts about 40-50 min. The selective storage of labelled Neohydrin at the level of the renal cortex makes it possible to obtain a graphic representation of the two kidneys and to identify their position, orientation and shape, and the homogeneity of the actively functioning parenchyma. In some cases, autoradiographic investigations have been carried out on diseased kidneys after surgical removal. By this method anomalies in position and orientation, both congenital and acquired, can be ascertained. As regards shape, the limits of the renal patterns are the mote clearly defined as the renal function is better. Technical aspects such as the width of the crystal, type of collimator (whose focal plane should pass through the transverse medial plane of the kidneys), and dose - which should be not too high not too low - are essential conditions for a correct graphic reproduction of the renal patterns. Failure in tabular activity in the parenchyma is shown by a lack in the uptake of radioactivity. The position, extent and shape of such defects in uptake vary according to the entity of the renal structures and their derangement due to various pathological processes: tumours, cysts, hydronephrosis, tuberculosis etc. In normal subjects a homogeneous scintigram is usual, although a clearer hilar region is not a rare occurrence. Any circumscribed decrease of scintigraphic density outside the hilum is the expression of a less actively functioning zone. Among kidney patterns larger than normal, the homogeneous ones which point to a

  17. [The peritoneal ultrafiltration in patients with cardio-renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corciulo, Roberto; Corciulo, Simone

    2017-03-01

    In Italy, the congestive heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization and despite advances in therapy, the long-term prognosis is poor. Congestive heart failure is associated with advanced varying degrees of chronic renal disease that identify the cardio-renal syndrome type 2. High-dose diuretic therapy often fail to solve the water overload that is frequently the cause of death. The resistance to diuretics aggravates the state of the patient's edema and consequently morbidity and mortality. In the acute stage, the extracorporeal ultrafiltration unable to repair over hydration but needs frequent access weekly or midweek at the dialysis center. In addition, the significant changes of the fluid overload induce the risk of intradialytic hypotension and consequent renal hypoperfusion can cause a gradual loss of kidney function. The ultrafiltration can also be obtained using a method similar to the peritoneal dialysis (peritoneal ultrafiltration -PUF) but with a limited daily commitment both manual and automated modalities because the indication is not the correction of end stage renal disease. PUF is a home treatment and is indicated for chronic congestive heart failure with refractory hypervolemia despite optimal sequential diuretic therapy. PUF clinical results for the treatment of chronic congestive heart failure have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the clinical condition with reduction of NYHA class and improvement of FE%, the reduction of days of hospitalization, in reducing mortality, improving quality patient's life. In addition, PUF ensures a constant and continuous ultrafiltration, similar to renal function and thus allows a constant hemodynamic stability and ensures the maintenance of diuresis and the residual renal function. Therefore PUF in patients with refractory heart failure seems to be a viable integration of cardiological therapy and the encouraging results lead to the search of a multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologist

  18. Nondiabetic renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikram Mami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the major complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The diagnosis of DN is mostly clinical. Kidney biopsy is indicated only if nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD is suspected. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of NDRD and to determine predictor and prognostic factors of DN, NDRD. It was a retrospective analytic study including T2DM patients in whom renal biopsies were performed at our department from 1988 to 2014. Seventy-five patients were included. Mean age was 52.7 years with sex ratio at 1.56. Renal biopsy findings were isolated NDRD in 33 cases, NDRD superimposed on DN in 24 cases, and isolated DN in 18 cases. Most common NDRD found were focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (21% and membranous nephropathy (19%. Multivariate analysis showed that the absence of ischemic heart disease [odds ratio (OR = 0.178, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.041–0.762], absence of peripheral vascular disease (OR = 0.173, 95% CI = 0.045–0.669, and presence of hematuria (OR = 7.200, 95%CI = 0.886–58.531 were independent predictors of NDRD. 24 patients reached end-stage renal disease 55% in DN group, 16% in DN associated to NDRD group, and 30% in NDRD group. The prevalence of NDRD found in our study confirmed usefulness of renal biopsy in patients with T2DM, especially in those without degenerative complications, hypertension, and insulin therapy.

  19. Cystic fibrosis and renal disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shawwa Baha A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disease that is predominantly seen in the Caucasian population and involves multiple organs. Traditionally it has been thought that the kidney is the only organ which does not seem to be generally affected by the disease although the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene is expressed in the kidney. Case presentation We report the case of an 11 year old boy with cystic fibrosis and nephrotic syndrome and review the literature that describes nephrotic syndrome and renal involvement in cystic fibrosis. Conclusion With continued advances in the management of cystic fibrosis and improvement in life expectancy, several unrecognized co-morbidities are expected to emerge. It is important to screen patients for possible co-morbidities. Urine analysis may be helpful in this group of patients and any proteinuria should raise the suspicion of cystic fibrosis-related renal disease.

  20. Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perretta, Fernando; Antongiovanni, Norberto; Jaurretche, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis). This would explain why women (heterozygotes) present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported.

  1. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Ossoli

    Full Text Available Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT deficiency (FLD is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  2. Renal disease in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, K J; Levy, J K; Edinboro, C H; Vaden, S L; Tompkins, M B

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cause similar clinical syndromes of immune dysregulation, opportunistic infections, inflammatory diseases, and neoplasia. Renal disease is the 4th most common cause of death associated with HIV infection. To investigate the association between FIV infection and renal disease in cats. Client-owned cats (153 FIV-infected, 306 FIV-noninfected) and specific-pathogen-free (SPF) research colony cats (95 FIV-infected, 98 FIV-noninfected). A mixed retrospective/prospective cross-sectional study. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, urine specific gravity (USG), and urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC) data were compared between FIV-infected and FIV-noninfected cats. In FIV-infected cats, total CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were measured using flow cytometry, and CD4+:CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio was calculated. Renal azotemia was defined as a serum creatinine ≥ 1.9 mg/dL with USG ≤ 1.035. Proteinuria was defined as a UPC > 0.4 with an inactive urine sediment. Among the client-owned cats, no association was detected between FIV infection and renal azotemia (P = .24); however, a greater proportion of FIV-infected cats were proteinuric (25.0%, 16 of 64 cats) compared to FIV-noninfected cats (10.3%, 20 of 195 cats) (P FIV-infected cats, but UPC was positively correlated with the CD4+:CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio (Spearman's rho = 0.37, P = .01). Among the SPF research colony cats, no association was detected between FIV infection and renal azotemia (P = .21) or proteinuria (P = .25). Proteinuria but not azotemia was associated with natural FIV infection. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Assessment of Renal Pathology and Dysfunction in Pediatric Patients with Fabry Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswami, Uma; Najafian, Behzad; Schieppati, Arrigo; Mauer, Michael; Bichet, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Overt renal disease often first presents in males with Fabry disease in early-to-mid adulthood, but proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate may occur in adolescents and in young children. More recently, kidney biopsy data have shown early renal histological changes in pediatric patients. Renal investigations and their timing in children remain poorly defined. A consensus on renal investigations is necessary to understand the natural progression of the disease and to evaluate the ef...

  4. Renal outcome and risk factors for end-stage renal disease in pediatric rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyaphanee, Nuntawan; Ananboontarick, Chompoonut; Supavekin, Suroj; Sumboonnanonda, Achra

    2017-03-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), defined as acute nephritic syndrome with dramatic loss of renal function within a few months, is associated with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CresGN), which requires ≥50% crescents on pathology. The disease characteristics and renal outcome in children with RPGN, however, will differ according to the percentage of crescents. To evaluate the renal outcomes and factors associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), this retrospective cohort study assessed children aged ≤15 years with RPGN at a tertiary medical center. Of 67 patients with RPGN, 32 (47.8%) were male; mean age was 10.6 ± 3.0 years; median follow up was 1.1 years (range, 0.02-9.17 years) and 24 (35.8%) progressed to ESRD. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis was the most frequent cause of RPGN (50.7%). The incidence of ESRD was significantly higher in patients with ≥50% than disease etiology, serum creatinine >3 mg/dL, need for acute dialysis, ≥80% crescents and ≥20% tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis (TA/IF) were associated with ESRD. On multivariate analysis, need for acute dialysis (HR, 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1-7.3, P = 0.041) and ≥20% TA/IF (HR, 4.8; 95% CI: 1.4-16.1, P = 0.011) were independent risk factors for the development of ESRD. Approximately one-third of children with RPGN developed ESRD; and need for acute dialysis and TA/IF ≥20% were independent risk factors for ESRD. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Diagnosis of renal diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringerts, G.

    1995-01-01

    Description of methods for kidney investigation in pediatric patients and picture of normal kidneys in child's age is presented. Radional approach to application of kidney visualization methods (USI, urography, scintigraphy, computer tomography) is proposed. Various kidney diseases in child's age are described. 6 refs

  6. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  7. Cochlear sensitivity in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Rahime; Renda, Levent; Selçuk, Ömer Tarık; Eyigör, Hülya; Yılmaz, Mustafa Deniz; Osma, Üstün

    2015-12-01

    Auditory system abnormalities commonly occur in patients with chronic renal disease and end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between cochlear sensitivity and hemodialysis in dialytic and non-dialytic chronic kidney disease patients. The study included children aged 6-18 years that were divided into 3 groups: 36 non-dialytic patients with chronic kidney disease, 16 end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis, and 30 healthy controls. Blood urea nitrogen, serum cystatin C levels, duration of chronic kidney disease, and the duration of hemodialysis were compared between the chronic kidney disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis. Hearing health was measured via tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry and distortion product otoacoustic emissions testing. Distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios were significantly lower at all frequencies tested in the non-dialytic and dialytic groups than in the control group (pchronic renal disease-both dialytic and non-dialytic-should be monitored to prevent any further deterioration by avoiding potential ototoxic agents, even if their hearing thresholds are within normal limits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. IgG4 related renal disease: A wolf in sheep′s clothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rohan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4 related disease is a fibro-inflammatory condition with involvement of renal and extra renal organs, characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with organ dysfunction. We describe three cases of IgG4 related renal disease from a tertiary care hospital in south India.

  9. Graves′ disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C G Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves′ disease (GD are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis.

  10. Tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Myung Jin; Moon, Min Hoan; Koh, Young Hwan; Im, Jung Gi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease. The medical records, chest radiographs, and CT scans of 42 patients with tuberculosis among 871 consecutive patients with end-stage renal disease were reviewed. Patterns of initial chest radiographs were categorized as primary, postprimary, miliary, or atypical, according to the predominant radiologic findings. Chest radiographs and CT scans revealed pulmonary tuberculosis in 28 patients and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 15. The pattern of chest radiographs indicative of pulmonary tuberculosis was primary in 12 cases, postprimary in 11, miliary in one, demonstrated atypical infiltrates in three, and was normal in one. Tuberculosis involved the extrathoracic lymph nodes in six cases, the peritoneum in four, the spine in three, and the bone marrow in two. The primary pattern, seen in 12 patients, manifested as pleural effusion or segmental consolidation, and in ten of the twelve the former was dominant. The radiological pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis in end-stage renal disease is often primary, and extrapulmonary involvement is frequent

  11. [Obesity and kidney disease - renal consequences of an "epidemic"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffl, Helmut; Lang, Susanne Maria

    2017-09-01

    Overweight and obesity are widespread in the German population, affecting not only adults but also a significant number of children and adolescents. The risk to develop chronic kidney disease is markedly increased in overweight or adipose children, adolescents and adults.Overweight and obesity induced risk factors have a direct impact on the development of chronic renal disease (obesity-associated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). They accelerate the progression of coexistent nephropathies (diabetic or hypertensive nephropathy, primary glomerulonephritides) and are independent risk factors for the development of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients.Obesity induced nephropathies are basically preventible. Marked weight reduction, normoglycemia and control of hypertension may contribute to an improved glomerular filtration rate and/or reduced proteinuria in early stages of renal damage.The prevalence of kidney diseases in Germany is 13 % and estimated 80 000 patients need renal replacement therapy. In order to avoid a further rapid increase in numbers, preventive measures should be enforced more rigorously.It is necessary to raise the awareness of the negative consequences of obesity in the general public, to motivate the public to adopt a healthier lifestyle and to install nephrological surveillance to contain the obesity "epidemic". © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Clinical predictors of non-diabetic renal disease and role of renal biopsy in diabetic patients with renal involvement: a single centre review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yip-Boon; Keng, Tee-Chau; Tan, Li-Ping; Ng, Kok-Peng; Kong, Wai-Yew; Wong, Chew-Ming; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Looi, Lai-Meng; Tan, Si-Yen

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is reportedly the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. However, non-diabetic renal diseases (NDRD) are not uncommon among T2DM patients with renal involvement. Our study aimed to examine the prevalence of NDRD in T2DM and clinical markers for diabetic nephropathy (DN) and NDRD and to determine the role of renal biopsy in T2DM patients and its impact on clinical practice. We conducted a retrospective analysis of T2DM patients in whom renal biopsies were performed from January 2004 to March 2008 (n = 110). Biopsy results were divided into three groups: group I/pure DN (62.7%), group II/isolated NDRD (18.2%), and group III/mixed lesions (19.1%). The causes of NDRD in decreasing order of frequency were acute interstitial nephritis, glomerulonephritides, hypertensive renal disease, and acute tubular necrosis. Significant clinical markers for DN are presence of diabetic retinopathy and longer duration of diabetes. For NDRD, useful clinical markers include the presence of acute renal failure and microscopic hematuria. In the DN subgroup, Indians had significantly shorter duration of diabetes on biopsy compared with Malays and Chinese. NDRD is prevalent in T2DM patients, and given its potentially treatable nature, renal biopsy should be considered in T2DM patients with nephropathy, especially in those with atypical features.

  13. Dialysis for end stage renal disease financed through the Brazilian National Health System, 2000 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease has become a public health problem worldwide. Its terminal stage requires renal replacement therapy – dialysis or transplantation – for the maintenance of life, resulting in high economic and social costs. Though the number of patients with end-stage renal disease treated by dialysis in Brazil is among the highest in the world, current estimates of incidence and prevalence are imprecise. Our aim is to describe incidence and prevalence trends and the epidemiologic profile of end-stage renal disease patients receiving publically-financed dialysis in Brazil between 2000 and 2012. Methods We internally linked records of the High Complexity Procedure Authorization/Renal Replacement Therapy (APAC/TRS) system so as to permit analyses of incidence and prevalence of dialysis over the period 2000-2012. We characterized temporal variations in the incidence and prevalence using Joinpoint regression. Results Over the period, 280,667 patients received publically-financed dialysis, 57.2% of these being male. The underlying disease causes listed were hypertension (20.8%), diabetes (12.0%) and glomerulonephritis (7.7%); for 42.3%, no specific cause was recorded. Hemodialysis was the therapeutic modality in 90.1%. Over this period, prevalence increased 47%, rising 3.6% (95% CI 3.2% - 4.0%)/year. Incidence increased 20%, or 1.8% (1.1% – 2.5%)/year. Incidence increased in both sexes, in all regions of the country and particularly in older age groups. Conclusions Incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease receiving publically-financed dialysis treatment has increased notably. The linkage approach developed will permit continuous future monitoring of these indicators. PMID:25008169

  14. Arterial spin labelling in imaging of renal diseases and renal allograft pathology; MRT-Perfusionsmessung mit Arterial Spin Labelling. Anwendung fuer die Niere und Transplantatniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kuehn, Bernd [Siemens AG/Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Arterial Spin Labelling (ASL) is a technique for non-invasive and contrast-free assessment of perfusion with MRI. Renal ASL allows examination of renal pathophysiology, evaluation of the course of renal disease and therapy effects by longitudinal measurements as well as characterization of renal tumors. In this article, techniques of ASL will be explained and challenges of renal ASL will be emphasized. In addition, examples for clinical application of ASL for diagnosis of renal disease and renal allograft pathology will be given.

  15. Periodontal disease characterization in dogs with normal renal function or chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbudo-Selmi Glenda Ramalho

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal disease (PD in dogs with chronic renal failure (CRF and to compare it to PD in dogs with normal renal function (NRF. Twelve dogs with CRF and 24 dogs with NRF, all presenting dental pocket formation, were compared. In all dogs, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine specific gravity and total red and white blood cells were determined. A complete oral examination was also performed including evaluation of bacterial plaque, gingivitis, gingival recession, pocket, calculus, dental mobility, dental loss, and ulcers. These data were used to calculate plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI and periodontal destruction index (PDI. PD was graded as mild, moderate or severe based on the results. Mild, moderate or severe PD was observed in dogs with NRF, whereas dogs with CRF presented either mild or severe PD. Dogs with NRF showed higher involvement of the maxillary teeth, whereas dogs with CRF showed a higher involvement of the mandibular teeth. Plaque index was significantly higher in dogs with NRF. It was concluded that lesion distribution and periodontal disease progression may be altered in dogs with CRF, and gingival inflammatory response differs in dogs with NRF and CRF regarding to the stage of periodontal disease.

  16. Renal Impairment and Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Positive Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Lundgren, Jens D; Ross, Mike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While the association between renal impairment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established in the general population, the association remains poorly understood in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. METHODS: Individuals with ≥2 estimated glomerular...... relation between confirmed impaired eGFR and CVD was observed. This finding highlights the need for renal preventive measures and intensified monitoring for emerging CVD, particularly in older individuals with continuously low eGFRs....... filtration rate (eGFR) measurements after 1 February 2004 were followed until CVD, death, last visit plus 6 months, or 1 February 2015. CVD was defined as the occurrence of centrally validated myocardial infarction, stroke, invasive cardiovascular procedures, or sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: During a median...

  17. Mechanisms of renal NaCl retention in proteinuric disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Versland, Jostein B

    2013-01-01

    In diseases with proteinuria, for example nephrotic syndrome and pre-eclampsia, there often are suppression of plasma renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system components, expansion of extracellular volume and avid renal sodium retention. Mechanisms of sodium retention in proteinuria are reviewed....... In animal models of nephrotic syndrome, the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel ENaC is activated while more proximal renal Na(+) transporters are down-regulated. With suppressed plasma aldosterone concentration and little change in ENaC abundance in nephrotic syndrome, the alternative modality...... of proteolytic activation of ENaC has been explored. Proteolysis leads to putative release of an inhibitory peptide from the extracellular domain of the gamma ENaC subunit. This leads to full activation of the channel. Plasminogen has been demonstrated in urine from patients with nephrotic syndrome and pre...

  18. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  19. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  20. Renal cell carcinoma co-existent with other renal disease: clinico-pathological features in pre-dialysis patients and those receiving dialysis or renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Miguel, José Luis; Arrieta, Javier; Costero, Olga; Górriz, José Luis; Picazo, Mari-Luz; Fresno, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Patients on chronic dialysis are prone to developing acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may lead to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The risk factors for the development of RCC so far have not been determined in pre-dialysis patients with co-existent renal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinico-pathological features of RCC in pre-dialysis patients with associated renal diseases or in those undergoing chronic dialysis and renal transplantation. We studied 32 kidneys from 31 patients with RCC and associated renal diseases. Of those, 18 kidneys were from 17 patients not on renal replacement therapy (RRT) when diagnosed with RCC; 14 patients received dialysis or dialysis followed by renal transplantation. Several clinico-pathological features were analysed and compared between the two groups. Overall, there was a preponderance of males (75%); nephrosclerosis was the predominant co-existent disease (31%). The median intervals from renal disease to RCC in the dialysis and transplanted groups were significantly longer than in the pre-dialysis group (15.8+/-1.1 vs 2.4+/-0.7 years, P<0.0001). In contrast to pre-dialysis RCC, the dialysis and transplant RCC groups had greater frequency of ACKD (100 vs 28%, P<0.0001), papillary type RCC (43 vs 11%, P<0.05) and multifocal tumours (43 vs 5%, P<0.05). At the end of the study, 71% of dialysis and transplanted patients and 72% of pre-dialysis patients were alive. ACKD develops in dialysis patients, as it does in those with renal disease prior to RRT. The duration of renal disease, rather than the dialysis procedure itself, appears to be the main determinant of ACKD and RCC. The RCC occurring in patients with ACKD and prolonged RRT is more frequently of the papillary type and multifocal than the RCC occurring in patients with no or few acquired cysts and a short history of renal disease. Long-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups.

  1. Kidney trauma with underlying renal pathology: Is conservative management sufficient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabii El-Atat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pre-existing renal lesions (PERL found incidentally during evaluation for blunt renal trauma, determine their importance, and suggest guidelines for effective management, including conservative treatment, we reviewed 180 patients who were hospitalized with blunt renal trauma between 1992 and 2008. Thirty of the 180 (16.6% patients had PERL, which had been undiagnosed. The mean follow-up was 5 years (range 1-9 years. There were 24 men and 6 women with a mean age of 30 years (range 14-80 years. The most common cause of blunt renal injuries was falls and sports. Renal stones were present in 14 patients, pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction in 12, ectopic kidney in two, and megaureter and renal cyst in one case each. Ureteral stenting was used in four cases, and early nephrectomy was required in the other four. Fourteen patients underwent surgery for the PERL and not trauma, with a pyeloplasty in eight cases, partial nephrectomy in three cases, percutaneous nephrololithotomy in two cases, and ureteroneocystostomy in one case. In our study, the conservative treatment was possible in 73% of cases. We believe the published data support increasing conservative attempts in the hemodynamically stable patient.

  2. Association of RAC1 Gene Polymorphisms with Primary End-Stage Renal Disease in Chinese Renal Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Liu

    Full Text Available RAC1 gene could influence susceptibility to renal failure by altering the activity and expression of Rac1, which is a member of the Rho family of small GTP-binding proteins. In clinical practice, renal transplantation provides the optimal treatment for people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The objective of this present study was to determine whether the RAC1 gene polymorphisms were associated with primary ESRD susceptibility in Chinese renal recipients.Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of RAC1 gene, including rs836488 T>C, rs702482 A>T, rs10951982 G>A, rs702483 A>G, rs6954996 G>A, and rs9374 G>A, were genotyped in 300 renal transplant recipients (cases and 998 healthy Chinese subjects (controls by using TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Allele, genotype, and haplotype frequencies of the six SNPs were compared between cases and controls. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated in logistic regression models to evaluate the associations of the six SNPs with ESRD risk.The genotype distributions for the six SNPs in controls were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05. Association analysis revealed that three SNPs were significantly associated with ESRD risk. Positive associations with ESRD risk were found for the rs836488, rs702482, and rs702483 in the co-dominant model (minor allele homozygotes versus major allele homozygotes; specifically, the frequencies of the minor allele homozygotes and the minor allele for the three SNPs were higher in the cases than in the controls. In addition, these three SNPs also had associations with increased ESRD risk under the additive model (P 0.05. In haplotype analysis, carriers with "C-T-G-G-G-G" haplotype had a significantly higher risk of ESRD compared with the most common haplotype "T-A-G-A-G-G" (P = 0.011, OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.09-1.94.This study suggested that polymorphisms of RAC1 gene might influence the susceptibility to ESRD in Chinese Han population. Further

  3. Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Jiro; Ikari, Yuji

    2017-12-25

    Cardiovascular disease is a major concern for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), especially those on hemodialysis. ESRD patients with coronary artery disease often do not have symptoms or present with atypical symptoms. Coronary lesions in ESRD patients are characterized by increased media thickness, infiltration and activation of macrophages, and marked calcification. Several studies showed worsened clinical outcomes after coronary revascularization, which were dependent on the severity of renal dysfunction. ESRD patients on hemodialysis have the most severe renal dysfunction; thus, the clinical outcomes are worse in these patients than in those with other types of renal dysfunction. Medications for primary or secondary cardiovascular prevention are also insufficient in ESRD patients. Efficacy of drug-eluting stents is inferior in ESRD patients, compared to the excellent outcomes observed in patients with normal renal function. Unsatisfactory outcomes with trials targeting cardiovascular disease in patients with ESRD emphasize a large potential to improve outcomes. Thus, optimal strategies for diagnosis, prevention, and management of cardiovascular disease should be modified in ESRD patients.

  4. Wilson′s disease - A rare cause of renal tubular acidosis with metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. S. Subrahmanyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with weakness of lower limbs. He was diagnosed to have Wilson′s disease, renal tubular acidosis and osteoporosis. Screening of siblings showed that his younger sister was also affected by the disease.

  5. Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Jaap W.; Lilien, Marc R.; van de Kar, Nicole C. A. J.; Wolff, Eric D.; Davin, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    As in older adults, cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in adolescents and young adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) since childhood. This concerns patients on dialysis as well as transplant patients, despite the fact that a long duration of dialysis during

  6. Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, J.W.; Lilien, M.R.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Wolff, E.D.; Davin, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    As in older adults, cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in adolescents and young adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) since childhood. This concerns patients on dialysis as well as transplant patients, despite the fact that a long duration of dialysis during

  7. Adenosine contribution to normal renal physiology and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Carlos; Garrido, Wallys; Alarcón, Sebastián; Yáñez, Alejandro; Sobrevia, Luis; Quezada, Claudia; San Martín, Rody

    2017-06-01

    Adenosine is a nucleoside that is particularly interesting to many scientific and clinical communities as it has important physiological and pathophysiological roles in the kidney. The distribution of adenosine receptors has only recently been elucidated; therefore it is likely that more biological roles of this nucleoside will be unveiled in the near future. Since the discovery of the involvement of adenosine in renal vasoconstriction and regulation of local renin production, further evidence has shown that adenosine signaling is also involved in the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism, sodium reabsorption and the adaptive response to acute insults, such as ischemia. However, the most interesting finding was the increased adenosine levels in chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy and also in non-diabetic animal models of renal fibrosis. When adenosine is chronically increased its signaling via the adenosine receptors may change, switching to a state that induces renal damage and produces phenotypic changes in resident cells. This review discusses the physiological and pathophysiological roles of adenosine and pays special attention to the mechanisms associated with switching homeostatic nucleoside levels to increased adenosine production in kidneys affected by CKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Renal and extrarenal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Romão

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of the most common clinical features in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a sample of the Brazilian population. The medical records of 92 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease attended during the period from 1985 to 2003 were reviewed. The following data were recorded: age at diagnosis, gender, associated clinical manifestations, occurrence of stroke, age at loss of renal function (beginning of dialysis, and presence of a family history. The involvement of abdominal viscera was investigated by ultrasonography. Intracranial alterations were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography in 42 asymptomatic patients, and complemented with digital subtraction arteriography when indicated. Mean age at diagnosis was 35.1 ± 14.9 years, and mean serum creatinine at referral was 2.4 ± 2.8 mg/dL. The most frequent clinical manifestations during the disease were arterial hypertension (63.3%, lumbar pain (55.4%, an abdominal mass (47.8%, and urinary infection (35.8%. Loss of renal function occurred in 27 patients (mean age: 45.4 ± 9.5 years. The liver was the second organ most frequently affected (39.1%. Stroke occurred in 7.6% of the patients. Asymptomatic intracranial aneurysm was detected in 3 patients and arachnoid cysts in 3 other patients. In conclusion, the most common clinical features were lumbar pain, arterial hypertension, abdominal mass, and urinary infection, and the most serious complications were chronic renal failure and stroke. Both intracranial aneurysms and arachnoid cysts occurred in asymptomatic patients at a frequency of 7.14%.

  9. Nutritional management of chronic renal disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Denise A

    2006-11-01

    Chronic renal disease is a leading cause of death in dogs and cats. Recent clinical studies show that nutrition plays a key role in improving quality of life and life expectancy of these patients. Typical nutritional interventions include modifying the protein, phosphorus, and lipid concentrations. Nutritional therapy, however, does not simply mean changing the diet; consideration must also be given to ensuring adequate caloric intake and to the method of feeding. Monitoring the effects of the dietary therapy is also crucial to ensure that the patients are responding appropriately to the selected nutritional modifications. Nutritional management must be coordinated with medical management for long term successful treatment.

  10. Edema in renal diseases – current view on pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Bobkova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Edema is a common complication of numerous renal disease. In the recent past several aspects of the pathophysiology of this condition have been elucidated. We herein present a case of nephrotic syndrome in a 30 year-old men. The discussion revolves around the following key questions on fluid accumulation in renal disease: 1. What is edema? What diseases can cause edema? 2. What are the mechanisms of edema in nephrotic syndrome?   2a. The “underfill” theory   2b. The “overfill” theory   2c. Tubulointerstitial inflammation   2d. Vascular permeability 3. What are the mechanisms of edema in nephritic syndrome? 4. How can the volume status be assessed in patients with nephrotic syndrome? 5. What are therapeutic strategies for edema management? 6. What are the factors affecting response to diuretics? 7. How can we overcome the diuretics resistance?   7a. Effective doses of loop diuretics   7b. Combined diuretic therapy   7c. Intravenous administration of diuretics   7d. Albumin infusions   7e. Alternative methods of edema management 8. Conclusion.

  11. Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Perretta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis. This would explain why women (heterozygotes present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported.

  12. Bariatric Surgery as a Bridge to Renal Transplantation in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahri, Shadi; Fakhry, Tannous K; Gonzalvo, John Paul; Murr, Michel M

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is a relative contraindication to organ transplantation. Preliminary reports suggest that bariatric surgery may be used as a bridge to transplantation in patients who are not eligible for transplantation because of morbid obesity. The Bariatric Center at Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. We reviewed the outcomes of 16 consecutive patients on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent bariatric surgery from 1998 to 2016. Demographics, comorbidities, weight loss, as well as transplant status were reported. Data is mean ± SD. Six men and ten women aged 43-66 years (median = 54 years) underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n = 12), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 3), or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n = 1). Preoperative BMI was 48 ± 8 kg/m 2 . Follow-up to date was 1-10 years (median = 2.8 years); postoperative BMI was 31 ± 7 kg/m 2 ; %EBWL was 62 ± 24. Four patients underwent renal transplantation (25%) between 2.5-5 years after bariatric surgery. Five patients are currently listed for transplantation. Five patients were not listed for transplantation due to persistent comorbidities; two of these patients died as a consequence of their comorbidities (12.5%) more than 1 year after bariatric surgery. Two patients were lost to follow-up (12.5%). Bariatric surgery is effective in patients with ESRD and improves access to renal transplantation. Bariatric surgery offers a safe approach to weight loss and improvement in comorbidities in the majority of patients. Referrals of transplant candidates with obesity for bariatric surgery should be considered early in the course of ESRD.

  13. Successful aging theory and the patient with chronic renal disease: application in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Candy; Toutman, Meredith Flood

    2011-01-01

    As life expectancies increase, nurses will care for more individuals with chronic conditions, one of which is chronic renal disease. Increasing diversity and complexity of older adult healthcare needs signals a need to reconceptualize perceptions of successful aging. By emphasizing health promotion and adaptation, successful aging is possible for those with chronic renal disease. This article provides an overview of theory-based strategies for fostering successful aging in the patient with chronic renal disease.

  14. Beware erysipelas: renal disease is just around the corner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Lagi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of erysipelas caused by Streptococcus Group G to draw attention to organ and systemic complications that may be associated with this disease. Group G streptococcal infection affected a 70-year old woman following a small skin wound at the base of her second left toe. On admittance to the emergency department, the patient’s urine was dark from macrohematuria. She later developed septic shock. Cutaneous and renal symptoms were kept in check with antibiotic therapy, and she fully recovered from the septic shock after receiving specific therapies. This case shows that erysipelas is not just a disease of the skin and soft tissues, but one that may be associated with organ diseases and systemic complications. The patient completely recovered from both the cutaneous and kidney pathologies after antibiotic therapy.

  15. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  16. Long-term outcomes of children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term survival of children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has increased in the last 20 years, but the mortality rate remains high. Cardiovascular disease accounts for 40 to 50% of all deaths, infectious disease for about 20%. A prolonged period of dialysis versus having a renal graft and

  17. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  18. A review of renal disease in children with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Ankur Kumar; Tiewsoh, Karalanglin; Pilania, Rakesh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. HIV-infected individuals are now surviving for a relatively longer period and this is because of easy accessibility to antiretroviral therapy these days. As a result, chronic disease-related complications are now being recognized more often. Kidney disease in HIV-infected children can vary from glomerular to tubular-interstitial involvement. We searched the database to identify various kidney diseases seen in HIV-infected children. We describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, management and outcome of commonly seen kidney disease in HIV-infected children. We also provide a brief overview of toxicity of antiretroviral drugs seen in HIV-infected children. Kidney involvement in HIV-infected children may arise because of HIV infection per se, opportunistic infections, immune mediated injury and drug toxicity. HIV-associated nephropathy is perhaps the most common and most severe form of kidney disease. Proteinuria may be a cost-effective screening test in the long-term management of HIV-infected children, however, there are no definite recommendations for the same. Other important renal diseases are HIV immune complex kidney disease, thrombotic microangiopathy, interstitial nephritis and vasculitis.

  19. Biomarkers of Renal Disease and Progression in Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Hojs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes prevalence is increasing worldwide, mainly due to the increase in type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to 40% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is important to identify patients at risk of diabetic nephropathy and those who will progress to end stage renal disease. In clinical practice, most commonly used markers of renal disease and progression are serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria or albuminuria. Unfortunately, they are all insensitive. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the prognostic value and benefits of targeting some novel risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy and its progression. It is focused mainly on tubular biomarkers (neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule 1, liver-fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, markers of inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines and markers of oxidative stress. Despite the promise of some of these new biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed before they can be used in everyday clinical practice.

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. History of Childhood Kidney Disease and Risk of Adult End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Margalit, Ronit; Golan, Eliezer; Twig, Gilad; Leiba, Adi; Tzur, Dorit; Afek, Arnon; Skorecki, Karl; Vivante, Asaf

    2018-02-01

    The long-term risk associated with childhood kidney disease that had not progressed to chronic kidney disease in childhood is unclear. We aimed to estimate the risk of future end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among adolescents who had normal renal function and a history of childhood kidney disease. We conducted a nationwide, population-based, historical cohort study of 1,521,501 Israeli adolescents who were examined before compulsory military service in 1967 through 1997; data were linked to the Israeli ESRD registry. Kidney diseases in childhood included congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pyelonephritis, and glomerular disease; all participants included in the primary analysis had normal renal function and no hypertension in adolescence. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio for ESRD associated with a history of childhood kidney disease. During 30 years of follow-up, ESRD developed in 2490 persons. A history of any childhood kidney disease was associated with a hazard ratio for ESRD of 4.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.52 to 4.99). The associations between each diagnosis of kidney disease in childhood (congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pyelonephritis, and glomerular disease) and the risk of ESRD in adulthood were similar in magnitude (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of 5.19 [95% CI, 3.41 to 7.90], 4.03 [95% CI, 3.16 to 5.14], and 3.85 [95% CI, 2.77 to 5.36], respectively). A history of kidney disease in childhood was associated with younger age at the onset of ESRD (hazard ratio for ESRD among adults kidney disease in childhood, even if renal function was apparently normal in adolescence, was associated with a significantly increased risk of ESRD, which suggests that kidney injury or structural abnormality in childhood has long-term consequences.

  2. Observations on some renal function indices in dogs under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to evaluate the effect of an increased dose of ketamine on some renal function indices of Ketamine−Xylazine anaesthetised dogs. Five adult female mongrel dogs assigned to two different treatment groups in a randomized cross over design were used for this study. Each of the dogs received either ...

  3. The Feasibility of Percutaneous Renal Cryoablation Under Local Anaesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerviler, Eric de, E-mail: eric.de-kerviler@sls.aphp.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service de Radiologie, INSERM UMR-S1165, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Margerie-Mellon, Constance de, E-mail: constancedemm@gmail.com; Coffin, Alexandre, E-mail: alex-surikat@yahoo.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service de Radiologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Legrand, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.legrand@sls.aphp.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service d’Urologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Resche-Rigon, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.resche-rigon@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service de Biostatistique et d’Information Médicale (SBIM), Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Ploussard, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.ploussard@sls.aphp.fr; Meria, Paul, E-mail: paul.meria@sls.aphp.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service d’Urologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); and others

    2015-06-15

    ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cryoablation of renal tumours without sedation.Materials and methodsWe prospectively evaluated 149 computed tomography-guided renal cryoablation procedures that were performed at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The patients received only 1 g of IV paracetamol prior to the procedure; intraprocedural, local anaesthesia was administered. We recorded the date and duration of the procedure, size and location of the tumour, number of cryoneedles used, need for dissection with saline or carbon dioxide and intraprocedural degree of pain, which was scored using an established visual analogue pain score (VAS) (0–10). Multivariate analysis was used to identify the associations between the recorded parameters and VAS.ResultsAn interventional radiologist and a technician could perform all procedures without the help of anaesthesiologists and with adequate analgesia. The pain level ranged from 0 to 8 (mean, 2.0). It did not correlate with the tumour size or with the number of cryoneedles. It was significantly greater when the ice ball involved renal cavities (p = .0033) and when carbon dioxide was used for dissection (p < .0001). Conversely, the team experience was positively correlated with lower pain levels (p = .0381).ConclusionThis study demonstrates that the cryoablation of renal tumours is feasible by interventional radiologists alone using a combination of IV paracetamol and local anaesthesia.

  4. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9% were more than females 178 (42.1%. Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2% was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3% and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%. Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1% followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN in 27 (6.4% and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%. Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3% cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8% and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%. Lupus nephritis (LN was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent.

  5. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padullés A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ariadna Padullés,1 Inés Rama,2 Inés Llaudó,2 Núria Lloberas2 1Pharmacy Department, 2Nephrology Department, IDIBELL-Hospital Universitari Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms. Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme, diabetes, hypertension, renal treatment, gene polymorphisms, biomarkers

  6. Postprandial responses of incretin and pancreatic hormones in non-diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Jørgensen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have glucometabolic disturbances resulting in a high prevalence of prediabetes. The underlying pathophysiology remains unclear, but may prove important for the strategies employed to prevent progression to overt diabetes. Meal-induced relea...

  7. Renal calculus at presentation in a child with Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, H.M.; Fairhurst, J.J.; Beattie, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Genitourinary complications are relatively common in inflammatory bowel disease, with a reported incidence of 4-23%, although they more frequently occur in established disease. We present the case of a 12-year-old, already under investigation for short stature, who only developed florid symptoms of colitis after removal of a large staghorn calculus. In all cases of childhood nephrolithiasis, the possibility of underlying inflammatory bowel disease needs to be considered. (orig.)

  8. A CASE OF RENAL DISEASE IN HIV INFECTED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Vina Septiani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Kidney diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients has been been fourth leading cause of death after sepsis, pneumonia, and liver disease. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN is the most common. We report a case, a male patient, 48 years, who experienced shortness of breath, cough and intermittent fever and has been reported as HIV positive, without previous antiretroviral treatment and last CD4+ count is 89 cells/mm3. There are elevated BUN and SC from day to day during treatment and proteinuria +2 as a sign of kidney disease with normal blood pressure and there was no edema. Patients given an antibiotic and ACE inhibitors as antiproteinuria. Patients with suspicion of HIVAN in this case can progress very rapidly and causes progressive decline in renal function. Prognosis of patients with HIVAN if not handled properly will develop end stage renal disease (ESRD in 1-4 months and had a mortality rate 4.7 times higher than HIV patients without renal impairment. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  9. Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Jaap; Gruppen, Mariken; de Groot, Eric; Offringa, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the late cardiovascular outcome of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. Design: A nation-wide Long-term follow-up study. Determinants of outcomes and causes of death were retrospectively assessed. Patients underwent assessment of overall health state, B- and M-mode

  10. Mizoribine: A New Approach in the Treatment of Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiko Kawasaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mizoribine (MZB is an imidazole nucleoside and an immunosuppressive agent. The immunosuppressive effect of MZB has been reported to be due to the inhibition of DNA synthesis in the S phase of the cell cycle. Because of its relative lack of toxicity, during the past decade MZB has been frequently used instead of azathioprine as a component of immunosuppressive drug regimens. MZB is being used to treat renal transplantation patients, IgA nephropathy, lupus erythematosus, and childhood nephrotic syndrome (NS, and some recent studies have assessed the efficacy of oral MZB pulse therapy for severe lupus nephritis, steroid-resistant NS, and frequently relapsing-steroid-dependent NS. This review summarizes the published findings on the efficacy of MZB for renal disease including IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and NS, as well as of oral MZB pulse therapy for severe lupus nephritis and NS, and also the mechanism of the effect of oral MZB pulse therapy on the lymphocyte cell cycle.

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism and renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navis, G; van der Kleij, FGH; de Zeeuw, D; de Jong, PE

    1999-01-01

    In recent years a vast amount of data has been published on the association between the insertion/deletion (VD) polymorphism of the gene coding for angiotensin-converting enzyme and renal disease. It has be come clear that the polymorphism does not affect the prevalence of renal disease. However,

  12. Proteinuria as a modifiable risk factor for the progression of non-diabetic renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafar, TH; Stark, PC; Schmid, CH; Landa, M; Maschio, G; Marcantoni, C; de Jong, PE; de Zeeuw, D; Shahinfar, S; Ruggenenti, P; Remuzzi, G; Levey, AS

    Background. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce urine protein excretion and slow the progression of renal disease. The beneficial effect in slowing the progression of renal disease is greater in patients with higher urine protein excretion at the onset of treatment. We hypothesized

  13. Care of the Patient with Renal Disease: Peritoneal Dialysis and Transplants, Nursing 321A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulburd, Kimberly

    A description is provided of a course, "Care of the Patient with Renal Disease," offered at the community college level to prepare licensed registered nurses to care for patients with renal disease, including instruction in performing the treatments of peritoneal dialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The first…

  14. Challenges in the management of a child with end stage renal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) is on the rise among children in Nigeria. The cost of its management with renal replacement therapy is quite enormous for the average Nigerian family. There is no support yet from the Nigerian government or the National Health Insurance Scheme to cushion the burden of this disease.

  15. Effec Of Low Protein Diet On Chronic Renal Failure Due To Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terukuni Ideura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports about therapeutic effects of low protein diet on the progression of chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, although the disease is common.The annual incidence rate for end-stage renal disease caused by ADPKD is around 6 per million.In this retrospective study in one center, ten chronic renal failure patients due to ADPKD with creatinine clearnce of 17.0±3.3 mL/min /1.73 m2 and serum creatinine (Cr level of 4.4±0.7 mg/dL were studied for 40 months after the introduction of severe low protein diet (SLPD (0.48±0.03 g/kgBW/day without supplementation of essential amino acids or keto-analogues. Dietary protein intake was estimated by urea appearance rate from 24hr urine sample according to Mitch-Maroni's formula. The results clearly showed that ▵1/Cr/month(×10−3 was significantly suppressed from 5.8±0.9 to 2.0±0.6 following the introduction of SLPD (p<0.02. Furthermore, BUN/Cr ratio decreased from 10.4±0.02 to 7.3±0.02 (p<0.01. Mean blood pressure (mmHg remained unchanged; 92±3 vs 89±3 (ns, and urinary protein excretion (g/day did not change; 0.6±0.2 vs 0.6±0.1 (ns. There were no significant differences between body mass index, serum albumin, transferrin and hemoglobin levels as the indices of nutritional state before and after the introduction of SLPD.In conclusion, SLPD was effective in suppressing the progression of further decline in renal function due to ADPKD under nutritionally safety condition in this cohort.

  16. Renal expression of FGF23 in progressive renal disease of diabetes and the effect of ACE inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Zanchi

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 is a phosphaturic hormone mainly produced by bone that acts in the kidney through FGF receptors and Klotho. Here we investigated whether the kidney was an additional source of FGF23 during renal disease using a model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of FGF23 and Klotho was assessed in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and control lean rats at 2, 4, 6, 8 months of age. To evaluate whether the renoprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor in this model was associated with changes in FGF23 and Klotho, ZDF rats received ramipril from 4, when proteinuric, to 8 months of age. FGF23 mRNA was not detectable in the kidney of lean rats, nor of ZDF rats at 2 months of age. FGF23 became measurable in the kidney of diabetic rats at 4 months and significantly increased thereafter. FGF23 protein localized in proximal and distal tubules. Renal Klotho mRNA and protein decreased during time in ZDF rats. As renal disease progressed, serum phosphate levels increased in parallel with decline of fractional phosphorus excretion. Ramipril limited proteinuria and renal injury, attenuated renal FGF23 upregulation and ameliorated Klotho expression. Ramipril normalized serum phosphate levels and tended to increase fractional phosphorus excretion. These data indicate that during progressive renal disease the kidney is a site of FGF23 production which is limited by ACE inhibition. Interfering pharmacologically with the delicate balance of FGF23 and phosphorus in diabetes may have implications in clinics.

  17. Childhood Albuminuria and Chronic Kidney Disease is Associated with Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Yuang Lin; Shiuh-Ming Huang

    2016-01-01

    We do not yet fully grasp the significance of childhood albuminuria. Based on mass urinary screening (MUS) using albumin-specific dipsticks in school children, we studied the independent association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: A prospective cohort of 5351 children with albuminuria detected by school MSU during the period 1992–1996, followed up to 2009...

  18. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 increases renal fibrosis by accelerating transforming growth factor-β signaling in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Jun; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Endo, Motoyoshi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Tian, Zhe; Sugizaki, Taichi; Tanigawa, Hiroki; Zhao, Jiabin; Zhu, Shunshun; Sato, Michio; Araki, Kimi; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Mukoyama, Masashi; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common pathological consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with tissue fibrosis closely associated with chronic inflammation in numerous pathologies. However, molecular mechanisms underlying that association, particularly in the kidney, remain unclear. Here, we determine whether there is a molecular link between chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis in CKD progression. Histological analysis of human kidneys indicated abundant expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) in renal tubule epithelial cells during progression of renal fibrosis. Numerous ANGPTL2-positive renal tubule epithelial cells colocalized with cells positive for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a critical mediator of tissue fibrosis. Analysis of M1 collecting duct cells in culture showed that TGF-β1 increases ANGPTL2 expression by attenuating its repression through microRNA-221. Conversely, ANGPTL2 increased TGF-β1 expression through α5β1 integrin-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, ANGPTL2 deficiency in a mouse unilateral ureteral obstruction model significantly reduced renal fibrosis by decreasing TGF-β1 signal amplification in kidney. Thus, ANGPTL2 and TGF-β1 positively regulate each other as renal fibrosis progresses. Our study provides insight into molecular mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis and identifies potential therapeutic targets for CKD treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prognostic clinical and molecular biomarkers of renal disease in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease occurs in ∼ 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification. In thi...... but also our understanding of the mechanisms of actions of existing and novel drugs and may yield biomarkers that can be used to monitor drug response. We conclude that this will be an area to focus research on in the future.......Diabetic kidney disease occurs in ∼ 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification....... In this review, we first focus on the classical panel of albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate as the primary clinical predictors of renal disease and then move our attention to novel biomarkers, primarily concentrating on assay-based multiple/panel biomarkers, proteomics biomarkers...

  20. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A Study of Clinical Presentation and Correlative Histopathological Patterns in Renal Parenchymal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K; Nair, R R; Seethalekshmy, N V; Kurian, G; Mathew, A; Sreedharan, S; Paul, Z

    2018-01-01

    Suspicion and subsequent detection of renal disease is by an assessment of the urinalysis and renal function in the clinical context. Our attempt in this study is to correlate initial presenting features of urinalysis and renal function to the final histopathological diagnosis. A retrospective analysis of 1059 native kidney biopsies performed from January 2002 to June 2015 at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences was conducted. Correlative patterns between urinalysis, renal function, and final histopathological diagnosis were studied. Five hundred and eleven (48%) patients had nephrotic syndrome. Out of these, 193 (38%) had pure: nephrotic syndrome, 181 (35.8%) had associated microhematuria, 110 (21.7%) had microhematuria and renal failure, and 27 (5.3%) had only associated renal failure. Minimal change disease (MCD) (30%), membranous nephropathy (30%), and IgA nephropathy (29%) were the major diseases in the respective groups. Five hundred and five (47.6%) patients had subnephrotic proteinuria. Out of these, 29 (5.6%) had only subnephrotic proteinuria, 134 (27%) had additional microhematuria, 300 (59%) had subnephrotic proteinuria, microhematuria, and renal failure, and 42 (8%) had subnephrotic proteinuria with renal failure. Lupus Nephritis (45% and 40%) and IgA Nephropathy (32% and 21%) were the major disorders in the subgroups respectively. Forty-two patients (3.7%) were biopsied for isolated renal failure with bland urinary sediment. Cast nephropathy and acute interstitial nephritis were the major diseases. Out of 89 patients with diabetes who were biopsied, 15 (16.8%) had diabetic nephropathy, 45 (50.5%) had no diabetic nephropathy, and 29 (32.5%) had diabetic nephropathy along with a non-diabetic renal disease. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis was the major glomerular disease. IgA nephropathy (22.2%) and membranous nephropathy (15.5%) were the major diseases in patients with diabetes with no diabetic nephropathy. In our population, MCD and membranous

  2. Senescence rates in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, J J E; Rozing, M P; Kramer, Ada

    2011-01-01

    The most frequently used model to describe the exponential increase in mortality rate over age is the Gompertz equation. Logarithmically transformed, the equation conforms to a straight line, of which the slope has been interpreted as the rate of senescence. Earlier, we proposed the derivative...... function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional...... kidney transplant have mortality rates comparable to the general population. Therefore, we calculated the age-specific mortality rates for European patients on dialysis (n=274 221; follow-up=594 767 person-years), for European patients with a functioning kidney transplant (n=61 286; follow-up=345 024...

  3. Developmental Abnormalities, Blood Pressure Variability and Renal Disease In Riley Day Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    Riley Day syndrome, commonly referred to as familial dysautonomia (FD), is a genetic disease with extremely labile blood pressure due to baroreflex deafferenation. Chronic renal disease is very frequent in these patients and was attributed to recurrent arterial hypotension and renal hypoperfusion. Aggressive treatment of hypotension, however, has not reduced its prevalence. We evaluated the frequency of kidney malformations as well as the impact of hypertension, hypotension and blood pressure variability on the severity of renal impairment. We also investigated the effect of fludrocortisone treatment on the progression of renal disease. Patients with FD appeared to have an increased incidence of hydronephrosis/reflux and patterning defects. Patients younger than 4 years old had hypertension and normal eGFR. Patients with more severe hypertension and greater variability in their blood pressure had worse renal function (both, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no relationship between eGFR and the lowest blood pressure recorded during upright tilt. The progression of renal disease was faster in patients receiving fludrocortisone (p<0.02). Hypertension precedes kidney disease in these patients. Moreover, increased blood pressure variability as well as mineralocorticoid treatment accelerate the progression of renal disease. No association was found between hypotension and renal disease in patients with FD. PMID:22129610

  4. Polycystic kidney disease and cancer after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, James B; Calvet, James P; Yu, Alan S L; Lynch, Charles F; Wang, Connie J; Kasiske, Bertram L; Engels, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common form of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), is a disorder with characteristics of neoplasia. However, it is not known whether renal transplant recipients with PKD have an increased risk of cancer. Data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, which contains information on all solid organ transplant recipients in the United States, were linked to 15 population-based cancer registries in the United States. For PKD recipients, we compared overall cancer risk with that in the general population. We also compared cancer incidence in PKD versus non-PKD renal transplant recipients using Poisson regression, and we determined incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, dialysis duration, and time since transplantation. The study included 10,166 kidney recipients with PKD and 107,339 without PKD. Cancer incidence in PKD recipients was 1233.6 per 100,000 person-years, 48% higher than expected in the general population (standardized incidence ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 1.60), whereas cancer incidence in non-PKD recipients was 1119.1 per 100,000 person-years. The unadjusted incidence was higher in PKD than in non-PKD recipients (IRR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20). However, PKD recipients were older (median age at transplantation, 51 years versus 45 years for non-PKD recipients), and after multivariable adjustment, cancer incidence was lower in PKD recipients than in others (IRR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91). The reason for the lower cancer risk in PKD recipients is not known but may relate to biologic characteristics of ADPKD or to cancer risk behaviors associated with ADPKD. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Renal infarct: a rare disease due to a rare etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshintala, Divya; Bansal, Saurabh K.; Emani, Vamsi Krishna; Yadav, Manajyoti

    2015-01-01

    Renal infarction is caused by profound hypoperfusion secondary to embolic/thrombotic occlusion of the renal artery or vasospasm of the renal artery. We present a case of a 54-year-old patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, and vague abdominal pain. He had frequent episodes of migraine headaches and he treated himself with as needed rizatriptan. CT scan of the abdomen showed renal cortical infarction. After extensive investigations, etiology of his renal infarct was deemed to be due to rizatriptan. PMID:26091657

  6. Saving the sweetness: renal glucose handling in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Blythe D; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2017-07-01

    Glucose homeostasis is highly controlled, and the function of the kidney plays an integral role in this process. The exquisite control of blood glucose relies, in part, on renal glucose filtration, renal glucose reabsorption, and renal gluconeogenesis. Particularly critical to maintaining glucose homeostasis is the renal reabsorption of glucose; with ~162 g of glucose filtered by the kidney per day, it is imperative that the kidney have the ability to efficiently reabsorb nearly 100% of this glucose back in the bloodstream. In this review, we focus on this central process, highlighting the renal transporters and regulators involved in both the physiology and pathophysiology of glucose reabsorption. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Features of Mineral Metabolism and Parathyroid Glands Functioning in Chronic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Martynyuk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The calcium phosphoric metabolism was analyzed depending on the severity of renal functioning disorders. Chronic renal disease is known to be associated with impaired mineral metabolism in terms of hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia and enhanced level of Ca × P product that aggravates in chronic renal failure progression. The majority of patients with nephropathy have parathyroid hormone concentration to be different from target one recommended by NKF-K/DOQI (2003, at that secondary hyperparathyroidism prevails on pre-dialysis stage of chronic renal disease, the relative hypoparathyroidism is common among the patients received dialysis.

  8. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  9. The role of dietary phosphorus restriction in the conservative management of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2005-01-01

    Evidence exists that phosphate retention plays a major role in causing secondary hyperparathyroidism, cardiovascular morbidity, and loss of residual renal function in chronic renal disease patients, and that a subtle elevation in serum phosphate occurs at early stages in the course of renal insufficiency. The implementation of a low-phosphorus, low-protein dietary regimen plays a special role in the conservative management of chronic renal disease patients, for the prevention and correction of secondary hyperparathyroidism and for the renal and cardiovascular protection. However, the success and safety of dietary phosphate restriction largely depends on good compliance with dietary recommendations, which must represent a major goal to be regularly pursued in the clinical practice. To this aim, it is crucial that dietitians expert in renal nutrition give education and personalized dietary advice, with the aim of enhancing the patient's adherence to nutritional prescriptions.

  10. The clinical evaluation of CT and radionuclide examination in renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Wataru; Ishida, Hirofumi; Shirakawa, Shigetoshi; Shintaku, Takao; Funaki, Ryo

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twelve cases of renal diseases were studied by computed tomography (CT) using EMI 5005/12. Of them, 60 were examined by both CT and renal scintigraphy, and comparatively evaluated. The CT units were checked before and after the contrast enhancement. Renal scintigrams were obtained by gamma cameras (PHO/GAMMA HP 6406, PHO/GAMMA LFOV) using 99 M Tc-DMSA. CT was especially useful in diagnosing the renal cysts and the hydronephrosis. Cysts in other organs (liver, spleen and pancreas) were simultaneously ascertained in polycystic diseases. CT was not helpful in diagnosing nephritis and diabetic nephropathy. Floating kidney and horse-shoe kidney were difficult to diagnose with CT. The renal scintigram was the reflection of the renal function, and was relatively more useful than CT in diagnosing horse-shoe kidney, floating kidney and nephritis, while it was not useful for non-functioning kidneys. (author)

  11. Frequency and risk factors of renal insufficiency in inflammatory bowel disease inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian; Mukewar, Saurabh; Lopez, Rocio; Brzezinski, Aaron; Hall, Philip; Shen, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Renal involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been well documented. However, there was a paucity of data on the frequency of renal insufficiency and its risk factors in this patient population. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with renal insufficiency within IBD inpatients. This case-control study was conducted on both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis inpatients in our tertiary care center from 2009 to 2010. Patients were identified as having renal insufficiency by the criterion of glomerular filtration rate renal insufficiency were evaluated by univariable and multivariable analyses. A total of 251 eligible patients were included. The frequency of renal insufficiency was 15.9% (95% confidence interval: 11.4-20.5), with 40 patients having a glomerular filtration rate renal insufficiency increased by 30%. Acute or chronic renal sufficiency in IBD inpatients was common, especially in elderly. Acute renal insufficiency can be medically reversed if properly treated. We recommend that renal function be closely monitored in IBD inpatients.

  12. Preoperative Renal Volume: A Surrogate Measure for Radical Nephrectomy-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fiona Mei Wen; Tay, Melissa Hui Wen; Tai, Bee Choo; Chen, Zhaojin; Tan, Lincoln; Goh, Benjamin Yen Seow; Raman, Lata; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-12-01

    Surgically induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been found to have less impact on survival as well as function when compared to medical causes for CKD. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether preoperative remaining kidney volume correlates with renal function after nephrectomy, which represents an individual's renal reserve before surgically induced CKD. A retrospective review of 75 consecutive patients (29.3% females) who underwent radical nephrectomy (RN) (2000-2010) was performed. Normal side kidney parenchyma, excluding renal vessels and central sinus fat, was manually outlined in each transverse slice of CT image and multiplied by slice thickness to calculate volume. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. CKD is defined as eGFR kidney parenchymal volume (mean age 55 [SD 13] years) is 150.7 (SD 36.4) mL. Over median follow-up of 36 months postsurgery, progression to CKD occurred in 42.6% (n = 32) of patients. On multivariable analysis, preoperative eGFR and preoperative renal volume renal volume renal volume is >144 mL. Normal kidney parenchymal volume and preoperative eGFR are independent predictive factors for postoperative CKD after RN and may represent renal reserve for both surgically and medically induced CKD, respectively. Preoperative remaining kidney volume may be an adjunct representation of renal reserve postsurgery and predict later renal function decline due to perioperative loss of nephrons.

  13. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  14. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α activation improves renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function in early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joanna L; Pham, Hai; Li, Ying; Hall, Elanore; Perkins, Guy A; Ali, Sameh S; Patel, Hemal H; Singh, Prabhleen

    2017-08-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is driven by alterations in surviving nephrons to sustain renal function with ongoing nephron loss. Oxygen supply-demand mismatch, due to hemodynamic adaptations, with resultant hypoxia, plays an important role in the pathophysiology in early CKD. We sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this mismatch. We utilized the subtotal nephrectomy (STN) model of CKD to investigate the alterations in renal oxygenation linked to sodium (Na) transport and mitochondrial function in the surviving nephrons. Oxygen delivery was significantly reduced in STN kidneys because of lower renal blood flow. Fractional oxygen extraction was significantly higher in STN. Tubular Na reabsorption was significantly lower per mole of oxygen consumed in STN. We hypothesized that decreased mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity may account for this and uncovered significant mitochondrial dysfunction in the early STN kidney: higher oxidative metabolism without an attendant increase in ATP levels, elevated superoxide levels, and alterations in mitochondrial morphology. We further investigated the effect of activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of cellular hypoxia response. We observed significant improvement in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and tubular Na reabsorption per mole of oxygen consumed with HIF-1α activation. Importantly, HIF-1α activation significantly lowered mitochondrial oxygen consumption and superoxide production and increased mitochondrial volume density. In conclusion, we report significant impairment of renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function at the early stages of CKD and demonstrate the beneficial role of HIF-1α activation on renal function and metabolism.

  15. [Retrospective analysis of influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wendi; Yin, Daoxin; Cui, Wenying; Liu, Wenhu

    2014-01-28

    To explore retrospectively the influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 159 chronic kidney disease patients at stages 2, 3 and 4 were enrolled and a questionnaire survey was conducted from January 2009 to July 2012. They were followed monthly and their clinical data collected, including primary disease, blood pressure, body mass index and adverse events. Laboratory tests were performed every 3 months, including biochemical parameters, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), diet reviews and daily protein intake (DPI). A simplified MDRD formula was employed to evaluate the level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). According to the level of DPI, they were divided into 3 groups of very low protein diet (VLPD): DPI ≤ 0.6 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), low-protein diet (LPD): DPI >0.6-protein diet (NPD): DPI ≥ 0.8 · g · kg(-1) · d(-1). Among them, 4 cases (2.50%) progressed to uremia stage and received renal replacement therapy, 2(1.25%) experienced rapid decline in renal function, 9(5.66%) were hospitalized from cardio-cerebral diseases and the 2-year kidney survival rate was 97.5%. At the end of study, among 9 patients of PEM, 2 subjects had a serum level of albumin under 32 g/L and another 7 with a BMI 0.05). Within a certain range, differential protein intake may not significantly affect the prognosis of kidney for progressive CKD patients.

  16. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Emerging Burden in Cardiometabolic and Renal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Han

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As the number of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has increased, the influence of NAFLD on other metabolic diseases has been highlighted. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence indicates that NAFLD not only affects the liver but also increases the risk of extra-hepatic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, an advanced type of NAFLD, can aggravate these inter-organ relationships and lead to poorer outcomes. NAFLD induces insulin resistance and exacerbates systemic chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which leads to organ dysfunction in extra-hepatic tissues. Although more research is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms and causal relationship between NAFLD and cardiometabolic and renal diseases, screening for heart, brain, and kidney diseases, risk assessment for diabetes, and a multidisciplinary approach for managing these patients should be highly encouraged.

  17. Renal insufficiency and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Terpos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Renal impairment is a common complication of multiple myeloma. Chronic renal failure is classified according to glomerular filtration rate as estimated by the MDRD (modification of diet in renal disease) formula, while RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss and end-stage renal disease) and AKIN (acute renal injury network) criteria may be used for the definition of the severity of acute renal injury. Novel criteria based on estimated glomerular filtration rate measurements are proposed for the definition of the reversibility of renal impairment. Renal complete response (CRrenal) is defined as sustained (i.e., lasting at least 2 months) improvement of creatinine clearance (CRCL) from under 50 mL/min at baseline to 60 mL/min or above. Renal partial response (PRrenal) is defined as sustained improvement of CRCL from under 15 mL/min at baseline to 30 to 59 mL/min. Renal minor response (MRrenal) is defined as sustained improvement of the baseline CRCL of under 15 mL/min to 15 to 29 mL/min or, if baseline CRCL was 15 to 29 mL/min, improvement to 30 to 59 mL/min. Bortezomib with high-dose dexamethasone is considered the treatment of choice for myeloma patients with renal impairment and improves renal function in most patients. Although there is limited experience with thalidomide, this agent can be administered at the standard dosage to patients with renal failure. Lenalidomide, when administered at reduced doses according to renal function, is effective and can reverse renal impairment in a subset of myeloma patients.

  18. Paraprotein–Related Kidney Disease: Diagnosing and Treating Monoclonal Gammopathy of Renal Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mitchell H.; Edeani, Amaka; Yanagita, Motoko; Glezerman, Ilya G.

    2016-01-01

    Paraprotein–related kidney disease represents a complex group of diseases caused by an abnormal paraprotein secreted by a clone of B cells. The disease manifestations range from tubulopathies, such as the Fanconi syndrome, to a spectrum of glomerular diseases that can present with varying degrees of proteinuria and renal dysfunction. Diagnosis of these diseases can be challenging because of the wide range of manifestations as well as the relatively common finding of a serum paraprotein, especially in elderly patients. Thus, renal biopsy along with detailed hematologic workup is essential to link the presence of the paraprotein to the associated renal disease. Recent advances in treatment with more effective and targeted chemotherapies, as well as stem cell transplantation, have improved the renal and overall prognosis for many of these disorders. PMID:27526705

  19. Paraprotein-Related Kidney Disease: Diagnosing and Treating Monoclonal Gammopathy of Renal Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Edeani, Amaka; Yanagita, Motoko; Glezerman, Ilya G; Leung, Nelson

    2016-12-07

    Paraprotein-related kidney disease represents a complex group of diseases caused by an abnormal paraprotein secreted by a clone of B cells. The disease manifestations range from tubulopathies, such as the Fanconi syndrome, to a spectrum of glomerular diseases that can present with varying degrees of proteinuria and renal dysfunction. Diagnosis of these diseases can be challenging because of the wide range of manifestations as well as the relatively common finding of a serum paraprotein, especially in elderly patients. Thus, renal biopsy along with detailed hematologic workup is essential to link the presence of the paraprotein to the associated renal disease. Recent advances in treatment with more effective and targeted chemotherapies, as well as stem cell transplantation, have improved the renal and overall prognosis for many of these disorders. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. 99mTc-DMSA renal uptake in urological diseases measured from renal tomographic images using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Kishimoto, Koichi; Wada, Tetsuro; Torii, Shinichiro; Yoshigoe, Fukuo; Machida, Toyohei; Yamada, Hideo; Toyama, Hinako.

    1987-01-01

    To determine renal function, 99m Tc-DMSA renal uptake was measured from renal tomographic images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A total of 77 tests was conducted on 73 patients with various diseases in the kidneys and urinary tract to determine renal uptake. The correlation coefficient(r) between total renal volume and total renal uptake was 0.3509 and that between renal volume and uptake of 143 kidneys was 0.5433. In 62 patients whose creatinine clearance could be measured, the correlation coefficient between creatinine clearance and total renal volume was 0.2352, and that between creatinine clearance and total renal uptake was 0.8854, that is, creatinine clearance correlated well with renal uptake. Renal volume and uptake determined in 10 normal male and 10 normal female adults were 220 ml and 26.8 % for the right kidney and 239 ml and 27.6 % for the left kidney for the males and 206 ml and 26.4 % (right) and 237 ml and 27.9 % (left) for the females. This method, which requires no blood or urine collection, is very useful as an individual kidney function test to evaluate individual kidney function and to understand kidney function before and after operation in patients with renal and urinary diseases. (author)

  1. Celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients undergoing renal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Rakel; Metso, Martti; Pörsti, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäkelä, Satu

    2018-01-01

    An association between celiac disease and renal diseases has been suggested, but the results are controversial. To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity among individuals undergoing renal biopsies and to evaluate whether co-existent celiac autoimmunity influences the clinical outcome of the renal disease. The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity (previous diagnosis of celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies) was determined in 827 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsies due to clinical indications. Up to 15 years' follow-up data on kidney function and co-morbidities were obtained. Celiac autoimmunity was found in 45 (5.4%) patients. Among the IgA nephropathy patients, 8.2% of had celiac autoimmunity. At the time of kidney biopsy and after a median follow-up of 5 to 6 years, renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was inferior in IgA nephropathy patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to those without it (P=0.048 and P=0.022, respectively). The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity seems to be high in patients undergoing renal biopsies, especially in patients with IgA nephropathy. Such autoimmunity may be associated with worse renal function in IgA nephropathy. Hence the co-existence of celiac disease should be taken into consideration when treating patients with renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Renal denervation attenuates hypertension and renal dysfunction in a model of cardiovascular and renal disease, which is associated with reduced NADPH and xanthine oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleli, Maria; Flacker, Peter; Zhuge, Zhengbing; Gomez, Cristina; Wheelock, Craig E; Persson, A Erik G; Carlstrom, Mattias

    2017-10-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a central pathophysiological event in cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. Early age reduction in renal mass is associated with hypertension and oxidative stress in later life, which is aggravated by increased salt intake. The aim of the present study was to examine if renal sympathetic denervation can exert blood pressure lowering effects in uninephrectomized (UNX) rats (3-week old) fed with high salt (HS, 4%; w/w) diet for 4 weeks. Moreover, we investigated if renal denervation is associated with changes in NADPH and xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species. Rats with UNX + HS had reduced renal function, elevated systolic and diastolic arterial pressures, which was accompanied by increased heart weight, and cardiac superoxide production compared to sham operated Controls. UNX + HS was also associated with higher expression and activity of NADPH and xanthine oxidase in the kidney. Renal denervation in rats with UNX + HS attenuated the development of hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but also improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced proteinuria. Mechanistically, renal denervation was associated with lower expression and activity of both NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase in the kidney, but also reduced superoxide production in the heart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time that renal denervation has anti-hypertensive, cardio- and reno-protective effects in the UNX + HS model, which can be associated with decreased NADPH oxidase- and xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (i.e., superoxide and hydrogen peroxide) in the kidney. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical course of dengue fever and its impact on renal function in renal transplant recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun Thomas, E T; George, Jacob; Sruthi, Devi; Vineetha, N S; Gracious, Noble

    2018-04-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease endemic in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. There is only limited data in the literature about dengue fever in renal transplant recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease. This study compares the clinical course of dengue fever and its impact on renal function in renal transplant recipients, patients with chronic kidney disease and patients with normal base line renal function. An observational study was conducted from 1 st May to 31 st July 2017, at a tertiary care centre of South India. A major epidemic of dengue had occurred during the study period. Twelve renal transplant recipients, 22 patients with CKD and 58 patients with normal baseline renal function (control group) admitted with dengue fever were prospectively studied. Nadir WBC count was lowest in renal transplant recipients (2575 + 1187/mm 3 ), [Pdengue fever were different in renal transplant recipients and patients with CKD. Severe worsening of renal function was common in CKD patients. Worsening of renal function in renal transplant recipients was less severe and transient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunoglobulin G4-related Kidney Disease as a Cause of Acute Renal Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Du, Xiao-Gang

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related kidney disease is a systemic autoimmune disease which characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and dense infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells into tubular interstitium. It can be a mimicker of acute renal insufficiency. We herein report a rare case of IgG4-related kidney disease as a cause of acute renal insufficiency.

  5. A chronic renal rejection model with a fully MHC-mismatched rat strain combination under immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Kaori; Kawato, Yuka; Kubo, Kaori; Nakanishi, Tomonori; Maeda, Masashi; Nakamura, Koji; Hirose, Jun; Noto, Takahisa; Fukahori, Hidehiko; Fujikawa, Akihiko; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Takakura, Shoji; Morokata, Tatsuaki; Higashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-09-01

    The Fischer-to-Lewis (LEW) rat model of kidney transplantation is a widely accepted and well-characterized model of chronic rejection. In contrast to transplantation in a clinical setting, however, the absence of treatment with immunosuppressants and only minor mismatch of major histocompatibility complexes (MHCs) are critical discrepancies. Here, we established a rat model of chronic rejection using fully MHC-mismatched strains in which kidney disease progresses even under immunosuppressive therapy. LEW (RT1(l)) rats were used as donors and Brown Norway (BN, RT1(n)) rats as recipients. Intramuscular administration of 0.1mg/kg of tacrolimus was initiated on the day of transplantation. Post-transplantation, this dose was maintained until Day 9, suspended until Day 28 and then resumed from Day 29. Renal function, histopathology, and levels of donor-specific antibody (DSA) and several biomarkers of renal injury were assessed. On Day 91 post-transplantation, recipients received tacrolimus treatment with short-term suspension exhibited reduced renal function and changes in histology. Those were characteristics of chronic rejection including glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy in human transplantation recipients. Urinary protein excretion increased in a linear fashion, and elevated levels of several biomarkers of renal injury and DSA were observed even under administration of an immunosuppressant. We established an allograft rejection model with impaired renal function and typical histopathological changes of chronic rejection in fully MHC-mismatched rats by controlling administration of an immunosuppressant. These findings suggest that this model more accurately reflects transplantation in a clinical setting than existing models and enables the evaluation of therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The clinical and pathological characteristics of nephropathies in connective tissue diseases in the Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Konta, Tsuneo; Sato, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    In connective tissue diseases, a wide variety of glomerular, tubulointerstitial, and vascular lesions of the kidney are observed. Nonetheless, recent information is limited regarding renal lesions in connective tissue diseases, except in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we used a nationwide database of biopsy-confirmed renal diseases in Japan (J-RBR) (UMIN000000618). In total, 20,523 registered patients underwent biopsy between 2007 and 2013; from 110 patients with connective tissue diseases except SLE, we extracted data regarding the clinico-pathological characteristics of the renal biopsy. Our analysis included patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 52), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) (n = 35), scleroderma (n = 10), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD; n = 5), anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS; n = 3), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; n = 1), Behçet's disease (n = 1) and others (n = 3). The clinico-pathological features differed greatly depending on the underlying disease. The major clinical diagnosis was nephrotic syndrome in RA; chronic nephritic syndrome with mild proteinuria and reduced renal function in SjS; rapidly progressive nephritic syndrome in scleroderma. The major pathological diagnosis was membranous nephropathy (MN) and amyloidosis in RA; tubulointerstitial nephritis in SjS; proliferative obliterative vasculopathy in scleroderma; MN in MCTD. In RA, most patients with nephrosis were treated using bucillamine, and showed membranous nephropathy. Using the J-RBR database, our study revealed that biopsy-confirmed cases of connective tissue diseases such as RA, SjS, scleroderma, and MCTD show various clinical and pathological characteristics, depending on the underlying diseases and the medication used.

  7. Recovery of renal function after glucocorticoid therapy for IgG4-related kidney disease with renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Takako; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Mizushima, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Wada, Yoko; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Ito, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Hajime; Narita, Ichiei; Saito, Takao

    2016-02-01

    Although renal dysfunction in IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) shows rapid resolution with glucocorticoid therapy, little is known about the appropriate initial glucocorticoid dose for induction therapy or long-term renal outcome. We retrospectively examined the differences in recovery of renal function according to the dose of glucocorticoid used for induction therapy and the long-term renal outcome in 43 patients with definite IgG4-RKD (mostly IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis), in whom the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) before glucocorticoid therapy was 0.6 mg/kg/day (mean 0.81) in 16 patients (group H). In both groups, the pretreatment eGFR was significantly improved at 1 month after the start of glucocorticoid therapy and the degree of improvement showed no significant inter-group difference. Relapse of IgG4-RKD occurred in 16.7% of the group L patients and 13.3% of the group H patients (p = 0.78). Among 29 patients who were followed up for over 36 months (mean 74 months) and had been maintained on glucocorticoid, none showed progression to end-stage renal disease and there was no significant difference between eGFR at 1 month after treatment and eGFR at the last review. In glucocorticoid monotherapy for IgG4-RKD, a moderate dose is sufficient for induction, and recovery of renal function can be maintained for a long period on low-dose maintenance, although relapse can occur even in patients receiving maintenance therapy.

  8. Corynebacterium renale as a cause of reactions to the complement fixation test for Johne's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilmour, N.J.L.; Goudswaard, J.

    Complement fixation (C.F.) tests and fluorescent antibody (F.A.) tests were carried out on sera from rabbits inoculated with Corynebacterium renale and Mycobacterium johnei, and on sera from cattle with C. renale pyelonephritis and with Johne's disease. Cross-reactions were a feature of the C.F.

  9. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries

  10. Etiology and epidemiology of end-stage renal disease in Dutch children 1987-2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miklovicova, Daniela; Cornelissen, Marlies; Cransberg, Karlien; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Dedik, Ladislav; Schroder, Cornelis H.

    2005-01-01

    In this retrospective study 351 children ( <16.0 years) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) accepted for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the four Dutch pediatric centers were analyzed for the period 1987-2001. The data were compared with a previous study performed in 1979-1986. Eighty patients

  11. Nutrition and growth in European children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonthuis, M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focused on nutrition and growth in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Europe. ESRD in childhood is a rare condition, with a total number of children of 4.4 per million age related population who started renal replacement therapy in 2011. Therefore, in order to conduct

  12. Renal Function in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I, Natural Course, and Renopreservative Effects of ACE Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Navis, Gerjan; Fidler, Vaclav; van Dael, Catharina M. L.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Renal failure is a major complication in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). We studied the natural course of renal function in GSD I patients. We studied differences between patients in optimal and nonoptimal metabolic control and possible renoprotective effects of

  13. Multiple adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma in a renal transplant patient with glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossmann, J; Scheuermann, E H; Frilling, A; Geiger, H; Dietrich, C F

    2001-07-27

    We report on a 42-year-old female patient with glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease, GSD 1a) who developed hepatic adenomas and finally a hepatocellular carcinoma 10 years after renal transplantation. The tumor was resected; however, the patient died 6 months later as a result of fulminant carcinoma recurrence. In patients who have GSD 1a with terminal renal failure, combined liver and kidney transplantation may be considered at an early stage of the disease.

  14. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors.

  15. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  16. Effect of radiocontrast media on kidneys of patients with renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, A.; Edmondson, R.P.S.; Jones, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective study was undertaken of 15 patients with impaired renal function undergoing x-ray procedures entailing the use of contrast material to see whether any deterioration in renal function resulted. Patients with diabetes or myelomatosis were excluded. Detailed observations were made during three days before and after the x-ray procedure to detect any change in factors such as fluid state, drug treatment, infection, or diet which might have affected renal function. No significant changes occurred in endogenous creatinine and 51 Cr-EDTA clearances, or in plasma creatinine and urea concentrations after the x-ray procedures. Furthermore, there was no change in urinary activity of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase, which is a highly sensitive indicator of renal parenchymal damage. Provided that fluid depletion and multiple x-ray procedures with radiocontrast material in rapid sequence are avoided, these procedures do not appear to affect renal function adversely, even when renal disease is advanced. (author)

  17. Restless legs syndrome in end stage renal disease patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, Y.; Siddiqui, U.A.

    2014-01-01

    To study the frequency of restless legs syndrome in patients of end stage renal disease undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of medicine, CMH Multan from Nov 2010 to April 2011. Patients and Methods: One hundred and ninety four (n=194) patients of End stage renal disease who had been on maintenance hemodialysis for at least 3 months, were included in the study after full informed consent and using consecutive sampling. Patients having dementia, psychiatric illness, pregnancy, hypothyroidism, Parkinson's disease and alcoholics were excluded from the study. Patients who fulfilled all four diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome as proposed by International restless legs syndrome study group (IRLSSG), by direct questioning were diagnosed as having restless legs syndrome. Results: The frequency of restless legs syndrome was found to be 12.4% in patients undergoing hemodialysis (10.5% in males versus 16% in females). The mean duration of hemodialysis was higher among RLS positive patients (12.88 +- 5.543 months) as compared to RLS negative patients (6.94 +- 4.610 months). Conclusion: RLS is a frequent, under-diagnosed co-morbidity in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. (author)

  18. CT of acquired cystic kidney disease and renal tumors in long-term dialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.; Slusher, S.L.; Greathouse, J.L.; Krohn, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kidneys of long term dialysis patients frequently demonstrate multiple small acquired cysts and renal cell tumors on pathologic examination. The original kidneys of 30 long-term dialysis patients and six renal transplant patients were evaluated by computed tomography to determine the incidence of these abnormalities. Among dialysis patients, 43.3% had diffuse bilateral cysts, while 16.7% had occasional cysts (fewer than five per kidney), and 40% showed no renal cysts. Seven solid renal tumors were detected in four dialysis patients with renal cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease tends to result in renal enlargement, is more common in patients who have been maintained on dialysis for prolonged periods, and may lead to spontaneous renal hemorrhage. The six transplant patients showed no evidence of renal cysts, and all had markedly shrunken kidneys. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell tumors in the original kidneys of dialysis patients may be due to biologically active substances that are not cleared effectively by dialysis but that are removed by normally functioning transplant kidneys

  19. Renal sonographic findings of type I glycogen storage disease in infancy and early childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Lee, Hung-Chang [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Taipei Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-08-01

    Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD-I) is an inherited disorder affecting glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The characteristic manifestations are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Renal disease is regarded as a long-term complication and is reported mainly in older patients. We report the renal manifestations and renal ultrasonographic findings of GSD-I in infancy and early childhood in order to assess the role of renal sonography in the diagnosis of GSD-I. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital's database for patients with GSD-I from January 1993 to September 2004. The records of five patients were reviewed for this study. These five patients were diagnosed when they were younger than 3 years old. Data extracted from the charts included the initial extrarenal and renal manifestations, laboratory data, and imaging studies. We analyzed the indications for, and results of, renal sonography. In addition to the clinical presentations and laboratory abnormalities, all five children had nephromegaly and increased echogenicity on ultrasonography on their first visit, although only a minor degree of tubular dysfunction was noted clinically. Three of these five patients had nephrocalcinosis or renal stones or both. Hyperechoic large kidneys, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stones are common in GSD-I. They can be present in early infancy. Abnormalities on renal sonography might suggest GSD-I in a patient with suspected inborn errors of metabolism. (orig.)

  20. Renal sonographic findings of type I glycogen storage disease in infancy and early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD-I) is an inherited disorder affecting glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The characteristic manifestations are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Renal disease is regarded as a long-term complication and is reported mainly in older patients. We report the renal manifestations and renal ultrasonographic findings of GSD-I in infancy and early childhood in order to assess the role of renal sonography in the diagnosis of GSD-I. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital's database for patients with GSD-I from January 1993 to September 2004. The records of five patients were reviewed for this study. These five patients were diagnosed when they were younger than 3 years old. Data extracted from the charts included the initial extrarenal and renal manifestations, laboratory data, and imaging studies. We analyzed the indications for, and results of, renal sonography. In addition to the clinical presentations and laboratory abnormalities, all five children had nephromegaly and increased echogenicity on ultrasonography on their first visit, although only a minor degree of tubular dysfunction was noted clinically. Three of these five patients had nephrocalcinosis or renal stones or both. Hyperechoic large kidneys, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stones are common in GSD-I. They can be present in early infancy. Abnormalities on renal sonography might suggest GSD-I in a patient with suspected inborn errors of metabolism. (orig.)

  1. The antiproteinuric effect of ace inhibition in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1985 some studies were published showing that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition not only reduced the elevated blood pressure in animals with chronic renal failure (experimentally induced by renal ablation or by induced diabetic nephropathy), but also prevented the development of

  2. Isolated localization of Rosai Dorfman disease as renal mass: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This unusual benign entity is uncommon in the kidney, but in medical imaging, it may simulate an infiltrative renal neoplasm, especially a lymphoma or leukemia or even renal cell carcinoma. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to summarize the clinical and pathologic features of this disorder. Pan African ...

  3. Renal ultrasonography in the management of calculus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neisius, D; Moll, V

    1989-11-01

    Our experience with piezoelectric ultrasound-guided lithotripsy began in December 1985, and in the three years to February 1989, we have treated stones in more than 2200 kidneys in 2000 patients. Stones of any size or composition were treated. All stones apart from those situated in the area hidden by the pelvic bones could be localized by ultrasound. Focusing of the shock waves on stones located inside the kidney is as easy, fast, and safe as using an x-ray location system. Ureteral stones treated in situ accounted for 10 per cent of all treatments. The disadvantage of needing more time and experience to identify ureteral stones with ultrasound-guided localization is minor compared to the advantage of no x-ray exposure and the possibility of a continuous visual control of lithotripsy. At our hospital, the "old" x-ray-guided lithotripsy system (Dornier HM3) is used only in the rare cases of ureteral stones located in "no man's land" that cannot be pushed back or moved a little more toward the urinary bladder. In addition to the benefits of stone location by ultrasound, it is possible to detect urinary obstruction and dilatation of the collecting system more easily and effectively than by the use of radiographic contrast material. Renal ultrasonography must be considered an optimal technique in the management of calculus disease by lithotripsy.

  4. Frequency and predictors of renal artery stenosis in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.S.; Hafeezullah, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a common finding in patients undergoing coronary angiography. We designed this study to look for the frequency and any predictors of renal artery stenosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: A total of 201 consecutive patients with CAD confirmed by coronary angiography underwent an abdominal aortogram in the same sitting to screen for RAS. Patient demographics and co-morbidities were analysed for any association with RAS. Results: Forty-one of the patients were female (20.4%); ninety patients were hypertensive (44.8%); 49 patients (24.4%) were smokers; 19 patients (9.5%) had renal insufficiency; 88 patients (43.8%) had high cholesterol levels; 44 patients (21.9%) were diabetic. Thirty-two patients (15.9%) had single coronary artery disease, 59 patients (29.4%) had two vessel disease, and 110 patients (54.7%) had three vessel disease. Significant renal artery stenosis (less or equal to 50% stenosis) was present in 26 patients (12.9%). Among the variables studied, only female gender was found to be associated with a higher frequency of renal artery stenosis (24.39% vs 10.0%, p=0.01). Conclusions: The frequency of renal artery stenosis in patients with coronary artery disease is 12.9%. Female gender is associated with a higher frequency of renal artery stenosis in patients with CAD. (author)

  5. Glomerular diseases and cancer: evaluation of underlying malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Antonello; Porta, Camillo; Cosmai, Laura; Melis, Patrizia; Floris, Matteo; Piras, Doloretta; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rosner, Mitchell; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Onconephrology is an emerging medical subspecialty focused on the numerous interconnections between cancer and kidney diseases. Patient with malignancies commonly experience kidney problems including acute kidney injury, tumor lysis syndrome, fluid and electrolyte disorders and chronic kidney disease, often as a consequence of the anti-cancer treatment. Conversely, a number of glomerulopathies, tubulopathies and vascular renal diseases can early signal the presence of an underlying cancer. Furthermore, the administration of immunosuppressive drugs, especially cytotoxic drugs and calcineurin inhibitors, may strongly impair the immune response increasing the risk of cancer. The objective of this review article is to: (i) discuss paraneoplastic glomerular disease, (ii) review cancer as an adverse effect of immunosuppressive agents used to treat glomerulopathies, and (iii) in the absence of international approved guidelines, propose a screening program based on expert opinion aimed at guiding nephrologists to early detect malignancies during their clinical practice.

  6. Diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and long-term risk of renal disease mortality: Racial and socioeconomic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Assari, Shervin

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes, hypertension, and obesity increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and associated mortality. Race and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in the effects of these risk factors are, however, still unknown. The current study aimed to investigate whether or not race and SES alter the effects of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity on mortality due to renal disease. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives Study, 1986-2011, a nationally representative prospective cohort of adults with 25 years of follow up. The study included 3,361 adults aged 25 years and older who were followed for up to 25 years. The outcome was death from renal disease. Diabetes, hypertension, and obesity were the main predictors. Race and SES (education, income, and employment) were moderators. Health behaviors and health status at baseline were covariates. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. In separate models, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity at baseline were associated with a higher risk of death from renal disease. From our SES indicators, education and income interacted with diabetes, hypertension, and obesity on death from renal disease. In a consistent pattern, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity showed stronger effects on the risk of death from renal disease among high-SES groups compared with low-SES individuals. Race and employment did not alter the effects of diabetes, hypertension and obesity on the risk of death from renal disease. Social groups differ in how diabetes, hypertension, and obesity influence health outcomes over long-term periods. Elimination of disparities in renal disease mortality in the USA requires understanding of the complex and non-linear effects of socioeconomic and medical risk factors on health outcomes. Multidisciplinary programs and policies are required to reduce social inequality in renal disease burden caused by diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published

  7. Social consequences in adult life of end-stage renal disease in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Jaap W.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Offringa, Martin; Stronks, Karin; Hutten, Gerard J.; Heymans, Hugo S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To describe employment achievement and social independence of adults with childhood end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to explore determining factors. Study design Employment, occupational level, living arrangements, social engagements, and subjective health perception were

  8. Hypokalemic Rhabdomyolysis Induced Acute Renal Failure As a Presentation of Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sarı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult coeliac disease commonly presents without classical symptoms as chronic diarrhea and weight loss. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman with persistent life-threatening hypokalemia, acute renal failure, and acute quadriplegia due to diarrhea that had continued for one month. Although there are cases of coeliac disease diagnosed with hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis in the literature, none of the cases developed acute renal failure. This is the first case in the literature diagnosed with acute renal failure due to hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis as a presentation of coeliac disease. In acute renal failure cases that present with hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis due to severe diarrhea, coeliac disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis despite the negative antigliadin IgA antibody.

  9. Improving Outcomes in Patients with Lupus and End Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Inda-Filho, Antonio; Neugarten, Joel; Putterman, Chaim; Broder, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The development of lupus-related end stage renal disease (ESRD) confers the highest mortality rates among individuals with lupus. Lupus-related ESRD is also associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with non-lupus ESRD.

  10. PO-60 - Renal tumors with extensive vascular disease: management challenges in a pediatric series from the Hospital for Sick Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamperlini-Netto, G; Zanette, A; Wehbi, E; Williams, S; Grant, R M; Brandao, L R

    2016-04-01

    Venous thrombotic events (VTE) are becoming more and more common in children, particularly in the hospital setting. To date, 1 in 200 children admitted to tertiary pediatric hospitals are now being recognized to develop VTE. Amongst those patients with an identified thrombotic occlusion, pediatric patients diagnosed with renal tumors have long been recognized, but their ideal management in the instances of vascular invasion remains controversial. We describe the clinical behavior of patients diagnosed with renal tumors and extra renal vascular involvement at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. A retrospective analysis was conducted in patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2012. Data collected included: age, gender, symptoms at presentation, staging, pathology report, radiological evidence of intravascular thrombus [i.e. renal veins (RV), inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA)], intraoperative findings, therapeutic protocol implemented and anticoagulation; for outcomes, tumor and/or thrombus recurrence, thromboembolic phenomena [i.e. pulmonary embolism (PE)] and survival. Of 299 patients with renal tumors identified, 292 were included: Wilms (219), Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC, 29), Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney (CCSK, 12), others (32). The median age of the group was 4.53years (4days - 18 years). Extra renal vascular disease was identified in 29 patients, with a median age 7.05years (0.6-16 years; p=0.03), including Wilms tumors (22/219, 10%), RCC (2/29, 7%), CCSK (1/12, 8.3%) and others (4/32, 12.5%; p=0.01). Vascular involvement comprised exclusive evidence of RV disease (7), IVC disease (19; 15 infra-hepatic), RA disease (3) and PE (5).Treatment escalation because of vascular disease included neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (12; Wilms [11], RCC [1]), intraoperative cavectomy/ thrombectomy (1; Wilms), and cavotomies (11 Wilms [7], RCC [1], CCSK [1], PNET [1], sarcoma [1]). Four patients were placed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Anticoagulation was

  11. Childhood Albuminuria and Chronic Kidney Disease is Associated with Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yuang; Huang, Shiuh-Ming

    2016-08-01

    We do not yet fully grasp the significance of childhood albuminuria. Based on mass urinary screening (MUS) using albumin-specific dipsticks in school children, we studied the independent association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A prospective cohort of 5351 children with albuminuria detected by school MSU during the period 1992-1996, followed up to 2009. Cumulative mortality rate, prevalence of CKD, and ESRD were higher in children with albuminuria than those without. Albuminuria category was associated with the risk of mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 3.4] and ESRD (HR 3.24). Lower eGFR and albuminuria predicted mortality and ESRD among children with albuminuria and CKD. We found that being below a threshold of 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was significantly associated with ESRD. The highest renal function decline, along with the steepest slope of cumulative ESRD number, occurred in Stage 3, the critical point in renal progression. Risk factors for renal progression among different age groups with albuminuria were hypercholesterolemia and low serum albumin at 7-17 years of age. Beyond 18 years of age, besides the risk factor, a higher fasting blood sugar (BS) was also noted. Childhood albuminuria is a risk factor for CKD in later life, albuminuria provides additional prognostic information, and complications of CKD should be defined in each case. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Well Preserved Renal Function in Children With Untreated Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ulla B; Németh, Antal

    2018-04-01

    On the basis of studies with hepatorenal syndrome, it is widely regarded that renal function is impacted in chronic liver disease (CLD). Therefore, we investigated renal function in children with CLD. In a retrospective study of 277 children with CLD, renal function was investigated as glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), measured as clearance of inulin and para-amino hippuric acid or clearance of iohexol. The data were analyzed with regard to different subgroups of liver disease and to the grade of damage. Hyperfiltration (>+2 SD of controls) was found in the subgroups of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (44%), glycogenosis (75%), and acute fulminant liver failure (60%). Patients with biliary atresia, most other patients with metabolic disease and intrahepatic cholestasis, and those with vascular anomalies and cryptogenic cirrhosis had normal renal function. Decreased renal function was found in patients with Alagille's syndrome (64% < -2 SD). Increased GFR and ERPF was found in patients with elevated transaminases, low prothrombin level, high bile acid concentration, and high aspartate-aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio. Most children with CLD had surprisingly well preserved renal function and certain groups had even hyperfiltration. The finding that children with decompensated liver disease and ongoing liver failure had stable kidney function suggests that no prognostic markers of threatening hepatorenal syndrome were at hand. Moreover, estimation of GFR based on serum creatinine fails to reveal hyperfiltration.

  13. Long term end-stage renal disease and death following acute renal replacement therapy in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, R.; Damholt, M. B.; Wiis, J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In ICU the need for acute renal replacement therapy (RRT) associates with high mortality and risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but there are limited long-term data. We investigated these outcomes and their risk factors. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of all adult patients...... with markedly increased long term risk of death and ESRD; in contrast its use was not associated with 30-day mortality. In addition to acute RRT, decreased kidney function and peripheral vascular disease before ICU admission were risk factors for ESRD. It seems warranted offering medical follow-up to patients...... admitted to a general, university hospital ICU 2005-2012, excluding chronic dialysis patients. ESRD was defined as need of RRT > 90 days or kidney transplant. RESULTS: Of 5766 patients included, 1004 (16%) received acute RRT; their 30-day mortality was 42% vs. 16% for those not requiring acute RRT...

  14. Incidence and predictors of end-stage renal disease in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle; Gislason, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Background- Renal dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF), but whether this dysfunction progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Therefore, we examined incidence and predictors of ESRD in outpatients with HF. Methods and Results- Patients with systolic HF...... were identified in The Danish Heart Failure database and new-onset ESRD from the Danish Registry on Dialysis. Renal function was estimated by The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation and patients grouped by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-group I: ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m...

  15. Octreotide reduces hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) received octreotide for 12 months, and this was associated with a 6.3% reduction in liver volume, an 8% reduction in total kidney volume and stabilization of renal function. There was also a reduction of cyst size in fibrocystic disease of breast. These data suggest that the cyst fluid accumulation in different organs from patients with ADPKD is a dynamic process which can be reversed by octreotide. This is the first report of a case of simultaneous reduction in hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume with preservation of renal function in a patient with ADPKD receiving octreotide.

  16. Interankle systolic blood pressure difference and renal outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Lee, Su-Chu; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Interankle blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with peripheral artery disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the relationship between interankle BP difference and renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether interankle BP difference is associated with the rate of renal function decline and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD. We enrolled 144 patients with CKD from one regional hospital. The BP in four limbs was simultaneously measured using an ABI-form device. The decline in renal function was evaluated using an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Rapid renal progression was defined as an eGFR slope < -3 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. The renal end points were defined as ≥ 25% decline in eGFR or commencement of dialysis during the follow-up period. During a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years, 90 patients (62.5%) reached renal end points. Multivariate analysis showed that an increased interankle systolic BP difference (per 5 mmHg) was associated with a worse eGFR slope (regression β, -0.292; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.482 to -0.102; P = 0.003), rapid renal progression (odds ratio, 1.189; 95% CI, 1.015-1.394; P = 0.032), and an increased risk of progression to renal end points (hazard ratio, 1.126; 95% CI, 1.052-1.204, P = 0.001). Interankle systolic BP difference was associated with rapid renal progression and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD in our study. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  17. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Michele

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238 or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224, and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS, were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA and/or Selective Angiography (SA. An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA. Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis.

  18. Endothelin-A receptor blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental renovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Silvia; Hall, John E; Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-07-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent renal vasoconstrictor with mitogenic properties, is upregulated by ischemia and has been shown to induce renal injury via the ET-A receptor. The potential role of ET-A blockade in chronic renovascular disease (RVD) has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. We hypothesized that chronic ET-A receptor blockade would preserve renal hemodynamics and slow the progression of injury of the stenotic kidney in experimental RVD. Renal artery stenosis, a major cause of chronic RVD, was induced in 14 pigs and observed for 6 wk. In half of the pigs, chronic ET-A blockade was initiated (RVD+ET-A, 0.75 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) at the onset of RVD. Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and perfusion were quantified in vivo after 6 wk using multidetector computer tomography. Renal microvascular density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional microcomputer tomography, and growth factors, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis were determined in renal tissue. The degree of stenosis and increase in blood pressure were similar in RVD and RVD+ET-A pigs. Renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density were decreased in the stenotic kidney but preserved by ET-A blockade, accompanied by increased renal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and downstream mediators such as phosphorilated-Akt, angiopoietins, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ET-A blockade also reduced renal apoptosis, inflammation, and glomerulosclerosis. This study shows that ET-A blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental RVD and preserves renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density in the stenotic kidney. These results support a role for ET-1/ET-A as a potential therapeutic target in chronic RVD.

  19. CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE AS A CAUSE OF CARDIOVASCULAR PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. E. Kulik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The issues of etiology of development of cardiac changes in renal dysfunction, diagnostics and establishment of clinical diagnosis are reviewed as illustrated by a clinical case. Recommendations on lifestyle modification and medicament treatment tactics are described.

  20. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E; Leventhal, P S; Brejda, J; Ahle, N W; Schiefelbein, H M; Forrester, S D

    2015-01-01

    Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD.

  1. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. Material and Methods In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. Results All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Conclusions Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD. PMID:26587240

  2. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  3. White/black racial differences in risk of end-stage renal disease and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Andy I; Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Bacchetti, Peter; Bertenthal, Daniel; Hernandez, German T; O'Hare, Ann M

    2009-07-01

    End-stage renal disease disproportionately affects black persons, but it is unknown when in the course of chronic kidney disease racial differences arise. Understanding the natural history of racial differences in kidney disease may help guide efforts to reduce disparities. We compared white/black differences in the risk of end-stage renal disease and death by level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline in a national sample of 2,015,891 veterans between 2001 and 2005. Rates of end-stage renal disease among black patients exceeded those among white patients at all levels of baseline eGFR. The adjusted hazard ratios for end-stage renal disease associated with black versus white race for patients with an eGFR > or = 90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and death among black persons at all levels of eGFR. The highest risk of mortality associated with black race also was observed among those with an eGFR 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m2 (hazard ratio 1.32, 95% CI, 1.27-1.36). Racial differences in the risk of end-stage renal disease appear early in the course of kidney disease and are not explained by a survival advantage among blacks. Efforts to identify and slow progression of chronic kidney disease at earlier stages may be needed to reduce racial disparities.

  4. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for pediatric renal calculus disease: 5 years of local experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowsky, Igor; Lismer, Leonard; Asali, Murad; Rosenberg, Eran; Kaneti, Jackob

    2008-06-01

    Pediatric renal calculus disease has been considered a management dilemma. The various treatment modalities have different effects on the growing kidney, with concern to the significant recurrence rate, and the long-term outcome. We report our experience with performing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) monotherapy in staghorn or complex pediatric renal calculi. We retrospectively analyzed the results of PCNL in 9 children treated at our institute between 2001 and 2006. A total of 9 children (10 renal units) with a mean age of 10.1 years underwent 10 percutaneous nephrolithotomies (PCNLs). One patient underwent bilateral percutaneous nephrolithotomy at the initial presentation. The average calculus size was 45.9 mm (range 15-65 mm). Of the patients, 7 had complete or partial staghorn, 1 was a shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) failure, and 1 had a stone located in a lower calyx with a narrowed infundibulum; 7 from the 9 patients turned out to have some kind of a metabolic disorder--cystinuria in 6 patients and hyperoxaluria in one patient. The operations were performed under the guidance of monoplane fluoroscopy--standard PCNL in 3 cases and percutaneous nephrolithotomy with minimal access (mini-perc) in 7 cases. A rigid nephroscope was used in all of the cases. The stones were fragmented with pneumatic or ultrasonic devices and extracted with forceps. Stone-free status was achieved in 8 renal units (80%) after a single stage PCNL. With subsequent shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), the clearance rate had increased to 100%. The mean operating time was 88 minutes (range, 35 to 180 minutes) and no intraoperative or postoperative major complications were observed and no blood transfusions were required. One patient had suffered from intraoperative hypothermia, which had responded to conservative treatment. PCNL is an effective and safe form of therapy in pediatric stone disease. Since two-thirds of pediatric stone patients have an underlying metabolic disorder, a close

  5. Embolization of renal arteries before transplantation in patients with polycystic kidney disease: a single institution long-term experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitpierre, F.; Cornelis, F.; Lasserre, A.S.; Tricaud, E.; Le Bras, Y.; Grenier, N.; Couzi, L.; Merville, P.; Combe, C.; Ferriere, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to retrospectively assess the long-term safety and efficacy of embolization of renal arteries (ERA) in patients with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) before renal transplantation. Between January 2008 and November 2013, 82 ERA procedures were performed on 76 kidneys in 73 patients (mean age 53 years, range: 34-72). All patients had terminal-stage PKD and were under dialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list with a temporary contraindication due to excessive renal volume. ERA was considered successful in 89.5 % (68/76) of embolized kidneys, meaning that the temporary contraindication for transplantation could be withdrawn for 65 patients (on average 5.6 months, range: 2.8-24.3, after ERA). Mean volume reduction was 40 (range: 2-69) at 3 months and 59 % (35-86) thereafter (both p < 0.001). Post-embolization syndrome occurred after 15 of 82 procedures (18.3 %). The severe complication rate was 4.9 %. Forty-three (67.7 %) transplantations were successfully conducted after ERA, with a mean follow-up of 26.2 months (range: 1.8-59.5), and the estimated 5-year graft survival rate was 95.3 % [95 % CI: 82.7-98.8]. ERA is a safe and effective alternative to nephrectomy before renal transplantation in patients with PKD. (orig.)

  6. Embolization of renal arteries before transplantation in patients with polycystic kidney disease: a single institution long-term experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitpierre, F.; Cornelis, F.; Lasserre, A.S.; Tricaud, E.; Le Bras, Y.; Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Couzi, L.; Merville, P. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Bordeaux (France); Combe, C.; Ferriere, J.M. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Urology, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-11-15

    We aimed to retrospectively assess the long-term safety and efficacy of embolization of renal arteries (ERA) in patients with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) before renal transplantation. Between January 2008 and November 2013, 82 ERA procedures were performed on 76 kidneys in 73 patients (mean age 53 years, range: 34-72). All patients had terminal-stage PKD and were under dialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list with a temporary contraindication due to excessive renal volume. ERA was considered successful in 89.5 % (68/76) of embolized kidneys, meaning that the temporary contraindication for transplantation could be withdrawn for 65 patients (on average 5.6 months, range: 2.8-24.3, after ERA). Mean volume reduction was 40 (range: 2-69) at 3 months and 59 % (35-86) thereafter (both p < 0.001). Post-embolization syndrome occurred after 15 of 82 procedures (18.3 %). The severe complication rate was 4.9 %. Forty-three (67.7 %) transplantations were successfully conducted after ERA, with a mean follow-up of 26.2 months (range: 1.8-59.5), and the estimated 5-year graft survival rate was 95.3 % [95 % CI: 82.7-98.8]. ERA is a safe and effective alternative to nephrectomy before renal transplantation in patients with PKD. (orig.)

  7. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  8. Ultrasonographic evaluation of renal parenchymal diseases in dogs: 32 cases (1981-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, P.A.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; O'Leary, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    The medical records of 32 dogs with microscopically proven renal parenchymal disease were evaluated to characterize the associated ultrasonographic patterns and to assess the contribution of ultrasonography to the diagnosis and management in each case. Ultrasonography provided additional information on internal renal architecture in 18 dogs with radiographic evidence of structural abnormality. Ultrasonography determined the renal origin of 2 abdominal masses, defined the extent and distribution of neoplastic disease in 6 dogs, and identified kidneys not seen on survey radiographs or excretory urograms in 5 dogs because of decreased abdominal contrast or poor function. The ultrasonographic patterns were most specific for focal and multifocal or diffuse neoplasia. Ultrasonographic findings were least specific for diffuse parenchymal disease without architectural disruption such as glomerulo/interstitial nephritis, renal tubular necrosis, and nephrocalcinosis. In these cases, biopsy was recommended. Six interpretive errors were made. Four of these errors were related to the overestimation of renal pelvic and diverticular size because of confusion with medullary papilla. Two errors occurred in the diagnosis of renal lymphosarcoma, one of which was interpreted to be pyelonephritis. The other was an interpretive dilemma because of absence of hypoechoic multifocal nodules. Renal tubular necrosis was confirmed in this case

  9. The application of computerized tomography in the diagnosis of renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzymski, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the report is presentation of the experiences collected in the diagnosis of renal changes obtained by means of computerized tomography after application of this method in 800 examinations of the abdominal cavity. In 88 cases the examination was performed because of diagnosed or supposed renal disease. The examination was done using an EMI Medical CT 5005/2 whole-body scanner. In the group of 88 cases in 22 unilateral or bilateral hydronephros was diagnosed, in 16 cases single cysts were demonstrated in the kidneys, in 5 polycystic renal disease, in 9 malignant neoplasms and in 11 nephrosclerosis were found. Besides that, atrophic kidneys were recognized and patients were examined after nepherctomy carried out for neoplasm. The final diagnosis was based on surgical, autopsy, angiographic and clinical findings. Computerized tomography of the kidneys is important mainly as a method supplementing traditional methods of examination of the kidneys. The main indication to the use of this method as the first radiological examination of the kidneys is in search for the cause of morphological renal failure, so called ''dumb kidney'' in urography, and in search for retroperitoneal metastases and recurrences after operations of renal neoplasms. In all other circumstances it should be accepted as a rule to begin renal examination with plain-film taking and intravenous urography, which methods together with other classic radiological methods make possible recognition of the causes of renal diseases in most cases. (author)

  10. Progressive development of renal cysts in glycogen storage disease type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgjieva, Monika; Raffin, Margaux; Duchampt, Adeline; Perry, Ariane; Stefanutti, Anne; Brevet, Marie; Tortereau, Antonin; Dubourg, Laurence; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Mabille, Mylène; Pelissou, Coralie; Lassalle, Louis; Labrune, Philippe; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajas, Fabienne

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is a rare metabolic disease due to glucose-6 phosphatase deficiency, characterized by fasting hypoglycemia. Patients also develop chronic kidney disease whose mechanisms are poorly understood. To decipher the process, we generated mice with a kidney-specific knockout of glucose-6 phosphatase (K.G6pc -/- mice) that exhibited the first signs of GSDI nephropathy after 6 months of G6pc deletion. We studied the natural course of renal deterioration in K.G6pc -/- mice for 18 months and observed the progressive deterioration of renal functions characterized by early tubular dysfunction and a later destruction of the glomerular filtration barrier. After 15 months, K.G6pc -/- mice developed tubular-glomerular fibrosis and podocyte injury, leading to the development of cysts and renal failure. On the basis of these findings, we were able to detect the development of cysts in 7 out of 32 GSDI patients, who developed advanced renal impairment. Of these 7 patients, 3 developed renal failure. In addition, no renal cysts were detected in six patients who showed early renal impairment. In conclusion, renal pathology in GSDI is characterized by progressive tubular dysfunction and the development of polycystic kidneys that probably leads to the development of irreversible renal failure in the late stages. Systematic observations of cyst development by kidney imaging should improve the evaluation of the disease's progression, independently of biochemical markers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities.

  12. A case of Noonan's syndrome with terminal renal failure and neoplasmic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzbowska-Lange, B.; Sieniawska, M.; Polanski, J.; Kisiel, M.

    1993-01-01

    A 16 year old boy with Noonan syndrome diagnosed in the 3rd month of life was treated for renal insufficiency and hepatic tumor. Hemodialisis was started in preparation for surgery. Exacerbation of renal insufficiency occurred after surgical removal of the hepatic tumor together with the right hepatic lobe. Histopathologic examination showed adenoma hepatocellulare. Cysts in the extraperitoneal space appeared in the following months and were identified as cystes dysontogenetici benigni ''hamartia''. Renal function deteriorated during this time to end stage renal disease. The authors emphasize the possibility of good mental development in a patients with Noonan syndrome as well as the presence of urinary tract abnormalities and renal insufficiency of unknown origin - a phenomenon that has not yet been reported in other cases of Noonan syndrome. (author)

  13. Histopathological pattern of pediatric renal diseases: A study from a university hospital in western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Saleh Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the clinical indications and histopathological pattern of renal biopsies and renal resection specimens in the pediatric age group (birth to 17 years in a large academic center in western Saudi Arabia. A retrospective review of the computerized database of the Pathology Department at King Abdul Aziz University Hospital (KAUH was carried out on the final patho-logy reports of all children of the age of 17 years and below who either had ultrasound-guided renal biopsies or partial or total renal resections during the period between January 1995 and December 2008. All the specimens were reported by our pathology department. The most common clinical indication in the study group (242 is nephrotic syndrome (117, 48.3%, fol-lowed by systemic lupus erythromatosis for staging (30, 12.4%, nephritic syndrome (27, 11.1% and renal mass for histological diagnosis (17, 7.0%. The most frequently reported pathological diagnosis was renal glomerulopathies, constituting 183 cases (n = 183, 75.6% of the total number of pathology reports reviewed. Primary glomerulopathies were more common (n = 155, 88.4% than the secondary ones (n = 28, 11.6%. The second most common pediatric renal pathology in this study was renal neoplasms (14, 5.7%. Vascular renal diseases and renal glomerulosclerosis ranked as the third pathological diagnosis in order of frequency in this study, with ten cases (10, 4.1%. The most common clinical indication for renal tissue sampling in this study is nephrotic syndrome and the most frequently detected pathology is glomerulonephritis. Larger multicentre studies are needed to further study pediatric nephropathies.

  14. End-stage renal disease in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Alkhunaizi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell nephropathy is a severe complication of sickle cell disease (SCD that has a wide range of manifestations, from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The data on patients with SCD who develop ESRD are scarce. The aim of this study was to explore the course of patients with SCD who developed ESRD and received renal replacement therapy (RRT. The course of patients with SCD who developed ESRD and started dialysis at two centers in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia was retrospectively analyzed. Parameters included age at initiation of dialysis, survival until death or kidney transplantation, hospitalization due to pain crisis, disease-related parameters, and requirement for blood transfusion. Sixteen patients with SCD developed ESRD and started RRT with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The mean age at initiation of dialysis was 46.6 years. The majority of patients (10 out of 16 were resistant to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA and required blood transfusion repeatedly. Pain crises were infrequently encountered. Median survival was 54 months. Four patients received kidney transplantation with good outcome. In conclusion, most patients with SCD who developed ESRD were resistant to ESA and required repeated blood transfusion. The rate of hospitalization due to pain crisis was relatively low. Survival on dialysis was comparable to that of patients with no SCD, and the post-transplant course was relatively benign.

  15. [The role of renal anemia and cardiovascular disease in the progression of chronic glomerulonephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkamilov, I T; Gordeev, I G; Kaliev, R R

    To study the rate of chronic glomerulonephritis progression when added by anemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD). 231 patients (133 men and 98 women) with predialysis chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) were examined. The patients' mean age of was 35.8±11.8 years; the disease duration was 1 to 17 years. The disease onset was the date when urinalysis showed evidence of persistent proteinuria and (or) hematuria. Besides, the time when anemia developed and the clinical and instrumental signs of CVD appeared was taken as the initial reference point; the time when end-stage renal failure was diagnosed was taken to be the endpoint. Red blood cell counts with the inclusion of its indices, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit values, daily proteinuria values, and glomerular filtration rate were analyzed. The biochemical parameters included the concentrations of electrolytes, creatinine, fibrinogen, iron, cholesterol, total protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). Electrocardiography and echocardiography, bicycle ergometry and 24-hour ECG monitoring were used to detect CVD. The presence of anemia and CVD in patients with predialysis CGN versus those without anemia and CVD was associated with an increase in the concentrations of CRP [36.2 and 12.6%; respectively; (p<0.05)], creatinine [123.0 (83.2-217.0) and 86.5 (72.0-128.5) µmol/L; (p<0.05)] and a decrease in GFR [65.4 (30.8-95.5) and 92.7 (64.5-122.3) ml/min; (p<0.05)]. The 8-year survival of patients with CGN concurrent with CVD was noted to be 58% whereas the renal survival in patients with CGN + CVD + anemia was shorter and the 6-year survival in this case was as high as 52%. Anemia and CVD in patients with CGN serve as additional independent factors for the progression of the underlying disease. The concurrence of CGN, anemia, and CVD substantially reduces the predialysis period.

  16. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  17. Radionuclide assessment of renal function in patients with oncogynecological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Penkova, D.; Kovachev, A.

    1989-01-01

    Results of 131 I-hippuran (0.74 MBq) nephrography and 99m Tc DMCA (55.6 MBq) scintigraphy of the kidneys in 204 women from 21 to 75 years of age are analyzed. All patients were examined before and after treatment (surgical, radiation, hormonal). It was found that combined radiotherapy of patients with cervix uteri cancer and surgical treatment of patients with corpus uteri cancer resulted in aggravation of the secretory and excretory renal disorders, as compared to the pre-treatment state. It was not until after the second year of treatment that normal renal function was reestablished. Radionuclide methods furnish the opportunity both for early detection of renal function disorders and for their dynamic control and treatment. 1 tab., 4 refs

  18. Renal depletion of myo-inositol is associated with its increased degradation in animal models of metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H-H; Chao, H-N; Walker, C S; Choong, S-Y; Phillips, A; Loomes, K M

    2015-11-01

    Renal depletion of myo-inositol (MI) is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms involved are unclear. We hypothesized that MI depletion was due to changes in inositol metabolism and therefore examined the expression of genes regulating de novo biosynthesis, reabsorption, and catabolism of MI. We also extended the analyses from diabetes mellitus to animal models of dietary-induced obesity and hypertension. We found that renal MI depletion was pervasive across these three distinct disease states in the relative order: hypertension (-51%)>diabetes mellitus (-35%)>dietary-induced obesity (-19%). In 4-wk diabetic kidneys and in kidneys derived from insulin-resistant and hypertensive rats, MI depletion was correlated with activity of the MI-degrading enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX). By contrast, there was decreased MIOX expression in 8-wk diabetic kidneys. Immunohistochemistry localized the MI-degrading pathway comprising MIOX and the glucuronate-xylulose (GX) pathway to the proximal tubules within the renal cortex. These findings indicate that MI depletion could reflect increased catabolism through MIOX and the GX pathway and implicate a common pathological mechanism contributing to renal oxidative stress in metabolic disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia in the development of calcific aortic valve disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Kris; Roosens, Bram; Bala, Gezim; Remory, Isabel; Hernot, Sophie; Delvenne, Philippe; Mestrez, Fabienne; Droogmans, Steven; Cosyns, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is currently the most common heart valve disease worldwide and is known to be an active process. Both renal failure and dyslipidaemia are considered to be promoting factors for the development of valvular calcifications. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate the respective contribution and interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia on CAVD in a rat model, using echocardiography and compared with histology. Sixty-eight male Wistar rats were prospectively divided in eight groups, each fed a different diet to induce renal failure alone and combined with hyperlipidaemia or hypercholesterolemia. CAVD was detected and quantified by calibrated integrated backscatter of ultrasound (cIB) and compared with the histological calcium score. The study follow-up was 20 weeks. At the end of the study, the cIB value and the calcium score of the aortic valve were significantly increased in the group with isolated renal failure but not with dyslipidaemia. The combination of renal failure with high cholesterol or high-fat diet did not significantly increase calcifications further. Renal failure alone does induce aortic valve calcifications in a rat model of CAVD, whereas dyslipidaemia alone does not. The combination of renal failure with dyslipidaemia does not increase calcification further. These findings suggest that a combination of atherosclerotic and calcifying factors is not required to induce aortic valve calcifications in this model.

  20. Hypertensive Cardiovascular and Renal Disease and Target Organ Damage: Lessons from Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, Dinko; Frohlich, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review discusses some aspects of hypertensive damage to the kidneys and cardiovascular system. A comparison of renal and cardiac manifestations of hypertensive disease between results of clinical and experimental studies was made, with a major focus on the possible role of salt and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in inducing target organ damage. Thus, some degree of renal impairment is often present in patients with essential hypertension, varying from microalbuminuria to end-stage renal disease, whereas in rats with spontaneous hypertension only slight renal damage is seen in old rats with little evidence of renal failure. Since renal damage in hypertensive rats is induced when they are exposed to increased salt intake, we suggested that salt may also account for kidney injury in hypertensive patients. Similarly, cardiac damage is aggravated in hypertensive human beings and rats when given salt excess. We further presented evidence that the RAS may mediate adverse cardiac and renal effects of excessive salt intake. Finally, we also discussed some aspects of the cardiovascular physiology in the giraffe, the only mammal that in comparison with the human being has extremely high pressure at the level of the heart and kidneys but no target organ damage. PMID:22258536

  1. The application of knemometry in renal disease: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, C; Schaefer, F; Walther, U; Schärer, K

    1991-07-01

    Short-term lower leg length was measured longitudinally using a high-precision device called a knemometer in 11 children with chronic renal failure and 12 normal children. The method has a high accuracy (mean standard error 0.13 mm) and may prove useful for prediction of long-term total body growth. Its application in renal patients undergoing corticosteroid, growth hormone (GH) and erythropoietin (EPO) therapy is documented. GH was shown to improve lower leg growth in an adolescent who already had passed the maximum of his pubertal spurt. EPO treatment produced no consistent increase of short-term growth.

  2. RON kinase inhibition reduces renal endothelial injury in sickle cell disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaibullina, Alfia; Adjei, Elena A; Afangbedji, Nowah; Ivanov, Andrey; Kumari, Namita; Almeida, Luis E F; Quezado, Zenaide M N; Nekhai, Sergei; Jerebtsova, Marina

    2018-03-08

    Sickle cell disease patients are at increased risk of developing a chronic kidney disease. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation associated with hemolysis lead to vasculopathy and contribute to the development of renal disease. Here we used a Townes sickle cell disease mouse model to examine renal endothelial injury. Renal disease in Townes mice was associated with glomerular hypertrophy, capillary dilation and congestion, and significant endothelial injury. We also detected substantial renal macrophage infiltration, and accumulation of macrophage stimulating protein 1 in glomerular capillary. Treatment of human cultured macrophages with hemin or red blood cell lysates significantly increased expression of macrophage membrane-associated protease that might cleave and activate circulating macrophage stimulating protein 1 precursor. Macrophage stimulating protein 1 binds to and activates RON kinase, a cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase. In cultured human renal glomerular endothelial cells, macrophage stimulating protein 1 induced RON downstream signaling, resulting in increased phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases, expression Von Willebrand factor, increased cell motility, and re-organization of F-actin. Specificity of macrophage stimulating protein 1 function was confirmed by treatment with RON kinase inhibitor BMS-777607 that significantly reduced downstream signaling. Moreover, treatment of sickle cell mice with BMS-777607 significantly reduced glomerular hypertrophy, capillary dilation and congestion, and endothelial injury. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that RON kinase is involved in the induction of renal endothelial injury in sickle cell mice. Inhibition of RON kinase activation may provide a novel approach for prevention of renal disease development in sickle cell disease. Copyright © 2018, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Dupplex doppler sonography in patients with medical renal diseases: correlation with clinical and histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Soon Young; Koh, Byung Hee; Lee, Seung Chul; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Cho, On Koo; Park, Chan Hyun; Park, Moon Hyang

    1997-01-01

    To compare the RI (resistive index) of renal artery with serum creatinine level and histological change in 50 patients with renal parenchymal disease. To measure RI in each patient, Doppler studies were performed three times in each kidney at the level of the interlobar arteries, and the average value of RI was taken. The study was performed 1 -3 days after renal biopsy and the time interval between blood sampling for serum creatinine and duplex study was also 1 - 3 days. The RI of patients with renal disease was also correlated with patient's age, sex and serum creatinine level, and RI was also correlated with the degree of severity of glomerular, interstitial, and vascular change in the kidneys. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t test and Pearson's correlation method. The RI of the normal control and renal disease group was 0.566±0.037 and 0.584±0.038, respectively with no statistical significance(p=0.444). In the group with renal disease, there was no significant correlation between RI and a patient's age, sex, and serum creatinine level(p>0.05). RI was not significantly different between predominantly glomerular disease (n=45) and nonglomerular or mixed disease(n=5)(p=0.558), and did not correlate with the severity of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, or atherosclerosis(p>0.05). The authors conclude that RI is not helpful for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of renal parenchymal diseases and does not correlate with serum creatinine levels. In order to define the role of the RI, further clinical experience with more cases is required

  4. Burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, María; Ferreiro, Alejandro; García-García, Guillermo; Fernandez-Cean, Juan; Douthat, Walter

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a major challenge for Latin America (LA). Epidemiological information needed to assist in the development of ESRD care in the region. The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR), has published several reports and its continuity has implied a sustained effort of the entire LA Nephrology community. This paper summarizes the results corresponding to year 2012. Our methods have been reported previously. Participant countries complete an annual survey collecting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities. 20 countries participated in the surveys, more than 90% of the Latin America. The prevalence of ESRD under RRT in LA increased from 119 patients Per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 661 pmp in 2012. HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (82%). A wide rate variation in incidence is observed: from 472.7 in Jalisco (Mexico) to 14 pmp in Guatemala. Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent cause of death was cardiovascular. There is a wide rate variation of nephrologist by country, from 1.8 pmp in Honduras to 45.2 pmp in Cuba. The heterogeneity or even absence of registries in some LA countries is congruent with the inequities in access to RRT in such countries, as well as the availability of qualified personnel. The SLANH is currently running training programs as well as cooperation programs between LA countries to help the least developed start ESRD programs. In this spirit, RLADTR is training personnel to carry out dialysis and transplant registries in LA.

  5. An aid to the diagnosis of genetic disorders underlying adult-onset renal failure : a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.; Strunk, A. L. M.; Meijer, S.; Boers, J. E.; Aries, M.J.H.; Abbes, A. P.; Engel, H.; Beukhof, J. R.

    Several genetic disorders can present in adult patients with renal insufficiency. Genetic renal disease other than ADPKD accounts for ESRD in 3% of the adult Dutch population. Because of this low prevalence and their clinical heterogeneity most adult nephrologists are less familiar with these

  6. End-Stage Renal Disease From Cast Nephropathy in a Teenager With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Ducore, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Cast nephropathy is the most common manifestation of renal injury in patients with multiple myeloma but is rarely reported in other conditions. We are reporting our experience in caring for a teenager with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma who developed rapidly progressive kidney injury that advanced to end-stage renal disease. On renal biopsy extensive tubular necrosis and intratubular eosinophilic casts were noted. This previously unreported finding should prompt oncologists to closely monitor for such a complication in patients with secretory tumors. Whether early plasmapheresis could be of benefit, as has been tried in multiple myeloma, remains to be determined.

  7. Incidence and prognostic importance of glomerular crescents in renal diseases of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M N; Baumal, R; Poucell, S; Steele, B T

    1984-01-01

    The renal biopsies of 372 children with various glomerular disorders were reviewed and crescent formation was seen in 56 cases (15%). Four disorders, i.e. systemic lupus erythematosus, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) types I and II and Henoch-Schönlein disease accounted for 74% of 10 diagnostic categories. Idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) was seen in only 2 cases. Crescents associated with MPGN types I or II or idiopathic RPGN had a bad renal prognosis, whereas the presence of crescents in other disorders did not necessarily affect the renal outcome. Immunofluorescent and electron microscopic findings are essential to distinguish many conditions which may be associated with crescent formation in childhood renal disease.

  8. Intradialytic Muscle Cramp and its Association with Peripheral Arterial Disease in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, M; Sharma, S K; Chimoriya, R; Das, G C

    2014-01-01

     Muscle cramp is a common intradialytic complication observed in hemodialysis patients. Similarly Peripheral arterial disease is a common condition in the hemodialysis population.  Fifty patients with a diagnosis of End Stage Renal Disease who were on hemodialysis were studied over a period of one year. Muscle cramp was defined clinically as contractions of a large muscle group and Peripheral arterial disease was diagnosed on the basis of the ankle -brachial index (ABI).  A total of 50 End Stage Renal Disease patients were analyzed. The major causes of End Stage Renal Disease in the study population was Chronic Glomerulonephritis 40 % (n=20). Muscle cramps were present in 26% (n=13) cases. Peripheral arterial disease was present in 30% (n=15) of patients. However there was no statistically significant association between the presence of Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease (p value =0.18) CONCLUSIONS: Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease were common occurrence in end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis patients, however there was no association between the presence of intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease.

  9. The end-stage renal disease industry and exit strategies for nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, John D

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to identify exit strategies for nephrologists under changing conditions in the dialysis market. The end-stage renal disease service provider market continues to be highly receptive to consolidation. Taking advantage of large economies of scale, large for-profit dialysis chains have surpassed independent operators in both number of clinics and total patients. With relatively low barriers to entry, new smaller clinics continue to open, serving a niche outside the larger chains. Additional competition comes in the form of medium players funded by venture capitalists with the added pressure of rapid growth and financial return. To ensure market power in both dialysis products and managed care negotiation leverage, medium and large service providers will continue to seek out attractive acquisition targets. For nephrologists to capitalize on investment, clinic and business preparation will continue to be the driving force for these divestitures.

  10. Penile necrosis due to calciphylaxis in a patient of end stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, T.; Al-Nakshabandi, Nizar A.

    2009-01-01

    A case of a 72-year-old diabetic, hypertensive male with end stage renal disease as a result of the underlying condition of calciphylaxis, presenting with gangrene of the glans penis is reported. In calciphylaxis, calcification of small and medium-sized arteries occurs, which may result in ischemia and gangrene. A computed tomography scan of the lower abdomen, pelvis and the upper thigh was performed, which showed diffuse and extensive calcification of the walls of the small and medium-sized arteries, with almost complete obliteration of the lumen of the small arteries. A 3-dimensional reconstruction of the penis using volume rendering technique, demonstrated the ulceration of the glans penis in an exquisite manner. The appearance is so peculiar that no histological confirmation is needed. A review of relevant literature related to the etiopathogenesis, radiological findings, treatment and prognosis is also discussed. (author)

  11. Renal disease in HIV infected patients at University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those with RFI detected by glomerular filtration rate < 60ml/min/1.73m² or urine protein creatinine ratio ³ 200 were stratified into mild, moderate and severe RFI. Forty patients from each stratum and forty HIV infected patients with normal renal functions were recruited as subjects and control respectively. Their clinical and ...

  12. Influence of disease remission on renal dimensions in childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... at determining the dimensions of the kidneys of children with nephrotic syndrome and to com- ... Keywords: Nephrotic syndrome, renal dimensions, ultrasonography, nephromegaly, paediatric. ... Patients with nephrotic syndrome were initially man- aged with per oral (p.o) prednisolone 60mg/m2daily for.

  13. Renal hypertension and cardiovascular disorder in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peco-Antić, Amira; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Renal hypertension is one of the earliest and the most prevalent complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Among renal patients, hypertension is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. For casual blood pressure measurement, the best method is auscultatory, while for ambulatory blood pressure measurement, oscillometric method is the most commonly used. Both casual and ambulatory blood pressure measurement provide more powerful means of diagnosing hypertension. Masked hypertension is a condition in which casual blood pressure is normal but ambulatory blood pressure is elevated. The risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is higher with masked hypertension as compared to the controls. Children and adolescents with CKD are at high risk of cardiovascular disease that has been established as the leading cause of death in patients with end stage renal disease. Left ventricular hypertrophy remains the most thoroughly documented form of end-organ damage caused by hypertension in children and adolescents with CKD. Based on clear evidence on the correlation between blood pressure and cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and renal function, renal hypertension must be aggressively treated. Target blood pressure for patients with renal hypertension should be at low normal values: < 75 percentile for patients without proteinuria and <50 percentile for patients with proteinuria. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists are considered the first choice pharmacological option in hypertensive CKD 2-4 patients while the management of volume overload is the most important in dialysis patients. Successful transplantation can eliminate or significantly improve uremia-related cardiovascular risk factors and increase predicted life expectancy.

  14. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles. Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile. Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk than healthy controls. An htTKV above 468 mL/m is associated

  15. Determinants and prevalence of depression in patients with chronic renal disease, and their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawamdeh S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sana Hawamdeh, Aljawharah Mohammed Almari, Asrar Salem Almutairi, Wireen Leila T Dator College of Nursing, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: This study explored the prevalence of depression among the patients with chronic kidney disease and their caregivers and its association to their demographic profile.Methods: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study that used the Hamilton rating scale tool to assess the prevalence of depression among 226 patients undergoing hemodialysis and 105 of their caregivers in a hospital in Saudi Arabia.Results: Patients with chronic renal disease and their caregivers experience depression at varying levels. Depression was positively associated with the socioeconomic and marital status of the patients. Socioeconomic status of the caregivers was seen to be associated with their depression.Conclusion: Depression is highly prevalent among patients with chronic renal disease and their caregivers. Keywords: caregivers, chronic renal disease, depression

  16. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  17. Cell therapy in renal and cardiovascular disease Terapia celular en enfermedades renales y cardiovasculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Senior Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been important advances in the field of molecular biology, the mechanisms responsible for nephrogenesis and the factors that modulate the process of development, proliferation, growth, and maturation during fetal and adult life have not been thoroughly explained. Animals, including mammals, share the intrinsic ability to regenerate tissues and organs as an important biological defense mechanism. In the case of the kidney, after tissue damage secondary to injury, anatomical and functional recovery of integrity is achieved, accompanied by the activation of a complex, poorly understood process, leading to the replacement of damaged tubular cells by functional ones that reorganize tubular architecture. This regeneration and repair process is produced by somatic, exogenous, adult stem cells, and probably by intrinsic renal stem cells, that are responsible for maintaining renal homeostasis Aunque se han logrado grandes avances en el campo de la biología molecular, todavía no se han esclarecido completamente los mecanismos responsables de la organogénesis y los factores que modulan el proceso de desarrollo, proliferación, crecimiento y maduración celulares durante la vida fetal y adulta. Los animales comparten la capacidad de regenerar tejidos y órganos, como un mecanismo biológico importante de defensa. En el caso del riñón, luego del daño tisular secundario a una noxa, se produce recuperación anatómica y funcional de la integridad, acompañada por la activación de un proceso sofisticado, mal comprendido, que lleva al reemplazo de las células tubulares dañadas por otras funcionalmente normales que reorganizan la arquitectura tubular. Este fenómeno de recambio se produce gracias a la presencia de células madre adultas somáticas exógenas, responsables del proceso de mantenimiento de la homeostasis renal, y posiblemente por células renales intrínsecas.

  18. Hyperdiagnostic of renal tumor by intravenous urography in patient with adult polycystic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djerassi, R.; Lubomirova, M.; Mutafova, I.; Bogov, B.; Gavrikova, V.; Garvanska, G.

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the often seen (from 1:400 to 1:1000) inherited renal diseases with serious prognosis. The exact diagnosis, earlier treatment of the urinary tract infections and hypertension were the steps for prevention of the renal disease progression. The abdominal ultrasound is method used for screening. The frequency of the renal tumors in general population was not higher compared to those in patients with ADPKD. We described and discussed the results obtained by different imaging techniques in 23 years old female with family history for ADPKD. She was admitted to the 'Alexandrovska' University Hospital Nephrology Clinic because of the recurrence of the urinary tract infection. The diagnosis of renal tumor was suspected by renal intravenous pyelography (IVP). All the others imaging techniques - Triplex sonography-B-mode, Color, Pulse, Power Doppler, Tissue Doppler as well as contrast computer tomography showed the polycystic kidney disease, without focal changes, with several small cysts based in the medulla near distal calyces. This was probably the reason for the false-positive image made by IVP. The diagnostic values of the different imaging techniques in making the exact diagnosis in patients with polycystic kidney disease were comment, as well as a peculiar ultrasound image of the polycystic kidney in young patients, aged less then 30 years. To make the correct diagnosis of ADPKD the combination of all known imaging techniques was needed. The small kidney tumors were better visualized by tissue-harmonic ultrasound

  19. Mechanisms of metabolic memory and renal hypoxia as a therapeutic target in diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a worldwide public health problem. The definition of DKD is under discussion. Although the term DKD was originally defined as 'kidney disease specific to diabetes,' DKD frequently means chronic kidney disease with diabetes mellitus and includes not only classical diabetic nephropathy, but also kidney dysfunction as a result of nephrosclerosis and other causes. Metabolic memory plays a crucial role in the progression of various complications of diabetes, including DKD. The mechanisms of metabolic memory in DKD are supposed to include advanced glycation end-products, deoxyribonucleic acid methylation, histone modifications and non-coding ribonucleic acid including micro ribonucleic acid. Regardless of the presence of diabetes mellitus, the final common pathway in chronic kidney disease is chronic kidney hypoxia, which influences epigenetic processes, including deoxyribonucleic acid methylation, histone modification, and conformational changes in micro ribonucleic acid and chromatin. Therefore, hypoxia and oxidative stress are appropriate targets of therapies against DKD. Prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibitor enhances the defensive mechanisms against hypoxia. Bardoxolone methyl protects against oxidative stress, and can even reverse impaired renal function; a phase 2 trial with considerable attention to heart complications is currently ongoing in Japan. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Incidence and causes of end-stage renal disease among Aboriginal children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Susan M; Foster, Bethany J; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Crowshoe, Lynden; Alexander, R Todd; Soo, Andrea; Tonelli, Marcello A

    2012-10-02

    Although Aboriginal adults have a higher risk of end-stage renal disease than non-Aboriginal adults, the incidence and causes of end-stage renal disease among Aboriginal children and young adults are not well described. We calculated age- and sex-specific incidences of end-stage renal disease among Aboriginal people less than 22 years of age using data from a national organ failure registry. Incidence rate ratios were used to compare rates between Aboriginal and white Canadians. To contrast causes of end-stage renal disease by ethnicity and age, we calculated the odds of congenital diseases, glomerulonephritis and diabetes for Aboriginal people and compared them with those for white people in the following age strata: 0 to less than 22 years, 22 to less than 40 years, 40 to less than 60 years and older than 60 years. Incidence rate ratios of end-stage renal disease for Aboriginal children and young adults (age diseases were less common among Aboriginal people aged less than 22 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, 95% CI 0.36-0.86), and glomerulonephritis was more common (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.55-3.07). An excess of glomerulonephritis, but not diabetes, was seen among Aboriginal people aged 22 to less than 40 years. The converse was true (higher risk of diabetes, lower risk of glomerulonephritis) among Aboriginal people aged 40 years and older. The incidence of end-stage renal disease is higher among Aboriginal children and young adults than among white children and young adults. This higher incidence may be driven by an increased risk of glomerulonephritis in this population.

  1. Renal transplantation in systemic lupus erythematosus: Comparison of graft survival with other causes of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Camargo-Coronel, Adolfo; Miranda-Hernández, Dafhne Guadalupe; Gónzalez-Parra, Leslie Gabriela; Romero-Figueroa, María Del Socorro; Pérez-Cristóbal, Mario

    2017-08-14

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to lupus nephritis (LN) occurs in 10%-30% of patients. Initially systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was a contraindication for kidney transplantation (KT). Today, long-term graft survival remains controversial. Our objective was to compare the survival after KT in patients with SLE or other causes of ESRD. All SLE patients who had undergone KT in a retrospective cohort were included. Renal graft survival was compared with that of 50 controls, matched for age, sex, and year of transplantation. Survival was evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier test and the Cox proportional hazards model. Twenty-five subjects with SLE were included. The estimated 1-year, 2- and 5-year survival rates for patients with SLE were 92%, 66% and 66%. Renal graft survival did not differ between patients with SLE and other causes of ESRD (P=.39). The multivariate analysis showed no significant difference in graft survival between the two groups (hazard ratio, HR=1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-6.61, P=.28). The recurrence rate of LN was 8% and was not associated with graft loss. Acute rejection was the only variable associated with graft loss in patients with SLE (HR=16.5, 95% CI 1.94-140.1, P=.01). Renal graft survival in SLE patients did not differ from that reported for other causes of ESRD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytomegalovirus Disease Amongst Renal Transplant Recipients in Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Seale

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a significant pathogen causing disease in renal transplant patients. The highest incidence of CMV disease occurs during the first 3 months post-transplant and is most problematic in CMV-naïve transplant recipients. In this study, we conducted a retrospective review of two databases, the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA and the National Hospital Morbidity Database, from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW, to examine CMV in renal transplant recipients. The first source looked at CMV serostatus at the time of transplantation and the second recorded hospital admissions for recipients with invasive CMV disease. From the ANZDATA registry, we obtained information from 13,530 renal transplants recipients from 1980 to 2004. Of these recipients, 7808 had a known CMV serostatus, of which 65.7% (5134/7808 had a positive sero antibody status and 34.2% (2674/7808 had a negative sero antibody status. In univariate analysis, factors significantly associated with renal rejection were being male, recipient age <50 years, being diabetic, being diagnosed with cancer at some point and having a positive EBV status. Positive CMV serostatus was not a contributing factor. Between 1993 and 2001 there were 1445 renal transplant recipients hospitalized in Australia with a diagnosis of CMV disease, of which 38% (554/1445 had CMV disease as a principal diagnoses. The average annual rate of admissions with any diagnosis was 3871 episodes per 100,000 people living with a functioning graft. Preventative strategies for CMV in renal transplant recipients should be a priority. New vaccines for CMV may soon be available and renal transplant recipients would be a suitable target group for vaccination.

  3. Osteomesopyknosis associated to renal lithiasis. Case report. Differential diagnosis of the axial osteoesclerosant diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, Gerardo; Fernandez, Andres; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rojas, Adriana; Calvo, Enrique; Rondon, Federico; Sanchez, Alvaro; Forero, Elias; Iglesias, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    In this article we present a brief description of the bone diseases characterized by osteosclerosis. We present our experience with their morpho-radiological changes, we describe a case of osteomesopyknosis associated to renal lithiasis and we propose a classification for osteosclerosant diseases of the axial skeleton with practical differential diagnosis of these conditions

  4. Circadian sleep-wake rhythm disturbances in end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, B.C.P.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Kerkhof, G.A.; ter Wee, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an increasing health problem worldwide. Given the increasing prevalence of this disease, the high cost of hemodialysis treatment and the burden of hemodialysis on a patient's life, more research on improving the clinical outcomes and the quality of life of

  5. Ten-years trends in renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease in mainland France: Lessons from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneau, Cécile; Kolko, Anne; Stengel, Bénédicte; Jacquelinet, Christian; Landais, Paul; Rieu, Philippe; Bayat, Sahar; Couchoud, Cécile

    2017-06-01

    The incidence rate of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing in several countries, but not in France. We studied the RRT trends in mainland France from 2005 to 2014 to understand the reasons for this discrepancy and determine the effects of ESRD management changes. Data were extracted from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network registry. Time trends of RRT incidence and prevalence rates, patients' clinical and treatment characteristics were analysed using the Joinpoint regression program and annual percentage changes. Survival within the first year of RRT was analysed using Kaplan-Meier estimates for 4 periods of time. The overall age- and gender-adjusted RRT incidence rate increased from 144 to 159 individuals per million inhabitants (pmi) (+0.8% per year; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2) and the prevalence from 903 to 1141 pmi (+2.4% per year; 95% CI: 2.2-2.7). This increase concerned exclusively ESRD associated with type 2 diabetes (+4.0%; 3.4-4.6) and mostly elderly men. Despite patient aging and increasing comorbidity burden and a persistent 30% rate of emergency dialysis start, the one-year survival rate slightly improved from 82.1% (81.4-82.8) to 83.8% (83.3-84.4). Pre-emptive wait listing for renal transplantation and the percentage of wait-listed patients within one year after dialysis start strongly increased (from 5.6% to 15.5% and from 29% to 39%, respectively). Kidney transplantation and survival significantly improved despite the heavier patient burden. However, the rise in type 2 diabetes-related ESRD and the stable high rate of emergency dialysis start remain major issues. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Plasma elimination of cardiac troponin I in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, K; Dreisbach, A W; Lertora, J L

    2001-10-01

    We retrospectively compared the decline of cardiac troponin I after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with normal renal function and those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were receiving hemodialysis. We reviewed 257 cases with a discharge diagnosis of AMI or AMI plus ESRD; 222 were excluded due to inadequate data or evidence of ongoing myocardial necrosis. Decline of cardiac troponin I values was followed over a mean (+/- SD) of 2.75 +/- 1.2 days in patients with normal renal function and 2.7 +/- 2.0 days in ESRD patients. Average apparent half-life and apparent elimination rate constant of troponin I were compared between groups. Of 35 patients with AMI, 16 had ESRD and were receiving hemodialysis, and 19 had normal renal function. Mean (+/- SD) apparent half-lives of troponin I in the ESRD group and the group with normal renal function were 1.48 +/- 0.77 days and 1.08 +/- 0.63 days, respectively. The mean apparent elimination rate constants of cardiac troponin I were 0.64 +/- 0.33 days(-1) in the ESRD group and 0.91 +/- 0.55 days(-1) in the group with normal renal function. The difference in apparent half-life and apparent elimination rate constant of cardiac troponin I between patients with normal renal function and those with ESRD is not statistically significant.

  7. Prognostic indicators of renal disease progression in adults with Fabry disease: natural history data from the Fabry Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanner, Christoph; Oliveira, João P.; Ortiz, Alberto; Mauer, Michael; Germain, Dominique P.; Linthorst, Gabor E.; Serra, Andreas L.; Maródi, László; Mignani, Renzo; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Vujkovac, Bojan; Lemay, Roberta; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Waldek, Stephen; Warnock, David G.

    2010-01-01

    These analyses were designed to characterize renal disease progression in untreated adults with Fabry disease. Data from the Fabry Registry for 462 untreated adults (121 men and 341 women) who had at least two estimated GFR (eGFR) values over a span of ≥12 months before starting enzyme replacement

  8. Acute renal infarction Secondary to Atrial Fibrillation Mimicking Renal Stone Picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Salih Bin; Al-Durihim, H.; Al-Jizeeri, A.; Al-Maziad, G.

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal infarction presents in a similar clinical picture to that of a renal stone. We report a 55-year-old Saudi female, known to have atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral stenosis due to rheumatic heart disease. She presented with a two day history of right flank pain that was treated initially as renal stone. Further investigations confirmed her as a case of renal infarction. Renal infarction is under-diagnosed because the similarity of its presentation to renal stone. Renal infarction should be considered in the differential diagnosis of loin pain, particularly in a patient with atrial fibrillation. (author)

  9. Risk Factors for Severe Renal Disease in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sparks, Kathryn; Best, Sunayna; Borrows, Sarah; Hoskins, Bethan; Sabir, Ataf; Barrett, Timothy; Williams, Denise; Mohammed, Shehla; Goldsmith, David; Milford, David V; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Beales, Philip L

    2017-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive, multisystem disease characterized by retinal dystrophy, renal malformation, obesity, intellectual disability, polydactyly, and hypogonadism. Nineteen disease-causing genes ( BBS1-19 ) have been identified, of which mutations in BBS1 are most common in North America and Europe. A hallmark of the disease, renal malformation is heterogeneous and is a cause of morbidity and mortality through the development of CKD. We studied the prevalence and severity of CKD in 350 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-related renal disease attending the United Kingdom national Bardet-Biedl syndrome clinics to further elucidate the phenotype and identify risk indicators of CKD. Overall, 31% of children and 42% of adults had CKD; 6% of children and 8% of adults had stage 4-5 CKD. In children, renal disease was often detected within the first year of life. Analysis of the most commonly mutated disease-associated genes revealed that, compared with two truncating mutations, two missense mutations associated with less severe CKD in adults. Moreover, compared with mutations in BBS10 , mutations in BBS1 associated with less severe CKD or lack of CKD in adults. Finally, 51% of patients with available ultrasounds had structural renal abnormalities, and 35% of adults were hypertensive. The presence of structural abnormalities or antihypertensive medication also correlated statistically with stage 3b-5 CKD. This study describes the largest reported cohort of patients with renal disease in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and identifies risk factors to be considered in genetic counseling. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Periostin promotes renal cyst growth and interstitial fibrosis in polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Darren P.; White, Corey; Savinkova, Lyudmyla; Nivens, Emily; Reif, Gail A.; Pinto, Cibele S.; Raman, Archana; Parnell, Stephen C.; Conway, Simon J.; Fields, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    In renal cystic diseases, sustained enlargement of fluid-filled cysts is associated with severe interstitial fibrosis and progressive loss of functioning nephrons. Periostin, a matricellular protein, is highly overexpressed in cyst-lining epithelial cells of autosomal dominant polycystic disease kidneys (ADPKD) compared to normal tubule cells. Periostin accumulates in situ within the matrix subjacent to ADPKD cysts, binds to αVβ3- and αVβ5-integrins and stimulates the integrin-linked kinase to promote cell proliferation. We knocked out periostin (Postn) in pcy/pcy mice, an orthologous model of nephronophthisis type 3, to determine whether periostin loss reduces PKD progression in a slowly progressive model of renal cystic disease. At 20 weeks of age, pcy/pcy: Postn−/− mice had a 34% reduction in kidney weight/body weight, a reduction in cyst number and total cystic area, a 69% reduction in phosphorylated S6, a downstream component of the mTOR pathway, and fewer proliferating cells in the kidneys compared to pcy/pcy: Postn+/+ mice. The pcy/pcy Postn knockout mice also had less interstitial fibrosis with improved renal function at 20 weeks and significantly longer survival (51.4 compared to 38.0 weeks). Thus, periostin adversely modifies the progression of renal cystic disease by promoting cyst epithelial cell proliferation, cyst enlargement and interstitial fibrosis, all contributing to the decline in renal function and premature death. PMID:24284511

  11. Improved survival rate in patients with diabetes and end-stage renal disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Heaf, J

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We investigated the survival rate of Danish diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between 1990 and 2005 and evaluated possible predictors of survival rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were obtained from the Danish National Register on Dialysis and Transplantation...... and from the Scandiatransplant database. Survival rates in different patient groups and association with age, sex, calendar time, waiting-list status and renal transplantation were evaluated using a multivariate Cox regression model. RESULTS: During the study period 8,421 patients (13% type 1 diabetic, 9......% type 2 diabetic and 78% non-diabetic) started renal replacement therapy. The overall survival rate improved by 15% per five calendar years (hazard ratio [HR]=0.85, 95% CI: 0.81-0.88). The percentage of patients within each group who received renal transplantation was: type 1 diabetic: 26%, type 2...

  12. Osteonecroses in children with chronical renal diseases before and after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppermann, H.C.; Mehls, O.; Willich, E.; Twittenhof, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    From 1969 to 1980 202 children suffering from chronic renal insufficiency underwent treatment in the Children's Hospital of Heidelberg University. In 36 patients kidney transplantations were performed. Two children developed femoral head necroses before transplantation without corticosteroid therapy. Three patients developed femoral head necroses in one or both sides within one to 24 months after kidney transplantation. All children with femoral head necrosis were suffering from congenital renal disease and had a history of servere renal osteodystrophy which was followed by severe coxa vara. Coxa vara and the resulting faulty loading seem to be essential factors for the development of femoral head necrosis in patients with renal insufficiency before and after kidney transplantation. (orig.) [de

  13. Challenges and barriers to managing quality in an end-stage renal disease facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanValkenburgh, D; Snyder, S

    1994-08-01

    The End-Stage Renal Disease Program is underfunded and overregulated. Objective parameters of end points of care do not correlate to specific clinical practice patterns. We do not have consensus between payers, providers, and patients as to what the objectives of the End-Stage Renal Disease Program are or should be. This report will address the need for an integrated health care delivery system that would benefit the end-stage renal disease patient and the barriers to designing such a system. The quality improvement program of a five-unit dialysis system will be described. The deficiencies of the quality improvement program and the limitation of the facilities to improve outcome will be discussed, and constructive alternatives to achieve an integrated health care delivery system that promotes improvement in patient outcomes will be suggested.

  14. Renal Response in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Predicts Outcome Following Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Gaurav; Upadhyay, Gaurav A; Borgquist, Rasmus; Friedman, Daniel J; Chatterjee, Neal A; Kandala, Jagdesh; Park, Mi Young; Orencole, Mary; Dec, George W; Picard, Michael H; Singh, Jagmeet P; Mela, Theofanie

    2015-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) severity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in congestive heart failure. There is a paucity of data regarding renal improvement after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and its potential impact on clinical outcomes, especially in patients with severe CKD. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected cohort of 260 patients with CKD undergoing CRT at a single center. Renal function was compared before and after CRT. The primary end point was a composite of death, heart transplant, and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), assessed at 5 years. Patients with more severe CKD demonstrated increased risk of death, transplant, or LVAD following CRT (P = 0.015). Renal response (estimated glomerular filtration rate improvement ≥10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ) was observed in 14% of all patients and 28% of patients with stage IV CKD. Independent predictors of renal response included left ventricular ejection fraction improvement (odds ratio [OR] 1.06, confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.10), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker use (OR 4.31, CI 1.08-17.23), and advanced CKD stage (OR 2.19, CI 1.14-4.23). Renal response independently decreased hazard of the primary outcome (HR 0.24, CI 0.08-0.73, P = 0.01). Renal responders with stage IV CKD had 80% 5-year event-free survival, compared to 0% for nonrenal responders in stage IV (P = 0.03). Although severity of CKD is associated with poorer outcome after CRT, improvement in renal function can occur in patients across all CKD stages. Renal responders, including those with stage IV CKD, demonstrate favorable 5-year outcomes. Assessment of renal response may help better prognostic outcomes following CRT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genetic variation underlying renal uric acid excretion in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoor, Geetha; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Laston, Sandra; Cole, Shelley A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Butte, Nancy F; Voruganti, V Saroja

    2017-01-17

    Reduced renal excretion of uric acid plays a significant role in the development of hyperuricemia and gout in adults. Hyperuricemia has been associated with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in children and adults. There are limited genome-wide association studies associating genetic polymorphisms with renal urate excretion measures. Therefore, we investigated the genetic factors that influence the excretion of uric acid and related indices in 768 Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study. We performed a genome-wide association analysis for 24-h urinary excretion measures such as urinary uric acid/urinary creatinine ratio, uric acid clearance, fractional excretion of uric acid, and glomerular load of uric acid in SOLAR, while accounting for non-independence among family members. All renal urate excretion measures were significantly heritable (p uric acid clearance with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in zinc finger protein 446 (ZNF446) (rs2033711 (A/G), MAF: 0.30). The minor allele (G) was associated with increased uric acid clearance. Also, we found suggestive associations of uric acid clearance with SNPs in ZNF324, ZNF584, and ZNF132 (in a 72 kb region of 19q13; p <1 × 10 -6 , MAFs: 0.28-0.31). For the first time, we showed the importance of 19q13 region in the regulation of renal urate excretion in Hispanic children. Our findings indicate differences in inherent genetic architecture and shared environmental risk factors between our cohort and other pediatric and adult populations.

  16. [Feasibility of SLEDAI-2000 and BILAG-2004 scoring systems for assessing renal disease activity in children with lupus nephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie-Qing; Jiang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    To study feasibility of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2000) and British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 (BILAG-2004) scoring systems for assessing renal disease activity in children with lupus nephritis (LN). The clinical data of 159 children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and LN were collected, and disease activity was assessed by SLEDAI-2000 and BILAG-2004 scoring systems. The correlations between SLEDAI-2000 and BILAG-2004 scores and 24-hour urinary protein excretion and renal pathology index were analyzed. The SLEDAI-2000 and BILAG-2004 scoring systems were evaluated using ROC curve. Approximately one third (31.5%) of the 159 children had a moderate level of 24-hour urinary protein excretion. Among the 37 patients undergoing renal biopsy, 46.0% had diffuse LN (type Ⅳ). 24-hour urinary protein excretion was positively correlated with both SLEDAI-2000 (r=0.36, P2000 scores (r=0.86, 0.88, 0.84, 0.77 respectively; P2000 score showed the best correlation with AI in patients with type Ⅱ LN, followed by those with type Ⅰ LN. BIILAG-2004 score showed the best correlation with AI in patients with type Ⅱ LN, followed by those with type Ⅳ LN. The BILAG-2004 scoring system had an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.93, and the SLEDAI-2000 scoring system had an AUC of 0.88. BILAG-2004 and SLEDAI-2000 scoring systems can be used to assess renal disease activity of patients with LN. The BILAG-2004 scoring system can provide more reliable and comprehensive assessment.

  17. Assessment of renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease using diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, Z.J.; Liu, M.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, T.; Li, S.; Li, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD), with histopathology as a reference standard. Materials and methods: Forty patients with CKD and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. All participants underwent diffusion-weighted MRI. Renal biopsy was performed in 25 patients with CKD. Mean renal medullary and cortical apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared between CKD patients and the healthy volunteers. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to investigate the relationship between ADC values, serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 24 h urinary protein (24h-UPRO), and renal histopathological scores. Results: Cortical and medullary ADC values in the CKD group were significantly lower compared to those in the healthy controls. In the CKD group, a significant negative correlation was found between cortical ADC values and SCr/24h-UPRO, and significant positive correlation was found between cortical ADC and eGFR. There was also a significant negative correlation between medullary ADC values and SCr. Both cortical and medullary ADC values were significantly correlated with histopathological fibrosis score. Conclusion: Renal ADC values strongly correlate with histological measures of fibrosis, and have the potential to enhance the non-invasive monitoring of chronic kidney disease. - Highlights: • Renal ADC values in the CKD patients were lower than those in controls. • Renal ADC values were strongly correlated with histological fibrosis score. • Renal ADC values have the potential to enhance the noninvasive monitoring of CKD

  18. Retrospective review of bone mineral metabolism management in end-stage renal disease patients wait-listed for renal transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavlovski A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Chavlovski,1 Greg A Knoll,1–3 Timothy Ramsay,4 Swapnil Hiremath,1–3 Deborah L Zimmerman1–31University of Ottawa, 2Ottawa Hospital, 3Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 4Ottawa Methods Centre, Ottawa, ON, CanadaBackground: In patients with end-stage renal disease, use of vitamin D and calcium-based phosphate binders have been associated with progression of vascular calcification that might have an impact on renal transplant candidacy. Our objective was to examine management of mineral metabolism in patients wait-listed for renal transplant and to determine the impact on cardiac perfusion imaging.Methods: Data was collected retrospectively on patients wait-listed for a renal transplant (n = 105, being either active (n = 73 and on hold (n = 32. Demographic data, medications, serum concentrations of calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and cardiac perfusion imaging studies were collected from the electronic health record. Chi-square and Student’s t-tests were used to compare active and on-hold patients as appropriate. Logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with worsening cardiac imaging studies.Results: The wait-listed patients were of mean age 56 ± 14 years and had been on dialysis for 1329 ± 867 days. On-hold patients had received a significantly greater total dose of calcium (2.35 ± .94 kg versus 1.49 ± 1.52 kg; P = 0.02 and were more likely to have developed worsening cardiovascular imaging studies (P = 0.03. Total doses of calcium and calcitriol were associated with worsening cardiovascular imaging studies (P = 0.05.Conclusion: Patients on hold on the renal transplant waiting list received higher total doses of calcium. A higher total dose of calcium and calcitriol was also associated with worsening cardiovascular imaging. Time on dialysis before transplant has been associated with worse post-transplant outcomes, and it is possible that the total calcium and calcitriol dose

  19. Treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia for the prevention of gouty arthritis, renal disease, and cardiovascular events: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Ophir; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Falzon, Louise; Buchbinder, Rachelle; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Bombardier, Claire

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review available literature on treatment of hyperuricemia (HU) as a measure of preventing gouty arthritis, renal disease, or cardiovascular events in asymptomatic patients. A systematic literature search was conducted in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, clinical trials registries of the World Health Organization and the US National Institutes of Health, and abstracts from American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism meetings, for interventional studies involving adults with no history of gouty arthritis, who were treated for HU. Outcomes of interest included gouty arthritis, renal disease (i.e., renal insufficiency, urate nephropathy, nephrolithiasis), and cardiovascular events (i.e., myocardial infarction, heart failure, ischemic stroke). A total of 3 studies met the inclusion criteria, 2 studies assessing the prevention of renal disease and 1 study evaluating the potential for delaying progression of preexisting renal disease. In hyperuricemic patients without renal disease, treatment resulted in increased estimated glomerular filtration rate. In hyperuricemic patients with preexisting renal disease, treatment resulted in no significant elevation of serum creatinine over a 1-year followup. However, differences in renal function between the treatment and no-treatment groups were not statistically significant in any of the identified studies. Very limited data are available on the treatment of HU in asymptomatic patients. There is currently insufficient empiric evidence to suggest that lowering serum uric acid level in asymptomatic patients with HU can prevent gouty arthritis, renal disease, or cardiovascular events.

  20. Comparison of survival in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Hayati, Fatemeh; Valavi, Ehsan; Rekabi, Fazlollah; Mousavi, Marzieh Beladi

    2015-03-01

    Although the life expectancy of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has improved in recent years, it is still far below that of the general population. In this retrospective study, we compared the survival of patients with ESRD receiving hemodialysis (HD) versus those on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study was conducted on patients referred to the HD and PD centers of the Emam Khomini Hospital and the Aboozar Children's Hospital from January 2007 to May 2012 in Ahvaz, Iran. All ESRD patients on maintenance HD or PD for more than two months were included in the study. The survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the differences between HD and PD patients were tested by the log-rank test. Overall, 239 patients, 148 patients on HD (61.92%) and 91 patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) (38.55%) with mean age of 54.1 ± 17 years were enrolled in the study. Regardless of the causes of ESRD and type of renal replacement therapy (RRT), one-, two- and three-year survival of patients was 65%, 51% and 35%, respectively. There was no significant difference between type of RRT in one- (P-value = 0.737), two- (P-value = 0.534) and three- (P-value = 0.867) year survival. There was also no significant difference between diabetic and non-diabetic patients under HD and CAPD in the one-, two- and three-year survival. Although the three-year survival of diabetic patients under CAPD was lower than that of non-diabetic patients (13% vs. 34%), it was not statistically significant (P-value = 0.50). According to the results of the current study, there is no survival advantage of PD during the first years of initiation of dialysis, and the one-, two- and three-year survival of HD and PD patients is also similar.

  1. Renal replacement therapy for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Still, there are few epidemiological data on the prevalence of, and survival on RRT for ADPKD. METHODS: This study used data from the ERA-EDTA Registry...... on RRT prevalence and survival on RRT in 12 European countries with 208 million inhabitants. We studied four 5-year periods (1991-2010). Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: From the first to the last study period, the prevalence...

  2. (131)I treatment in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A J M; Vázquez, R G; Cuenca, J I C; Brocca, M A M; Castilla, J; Martínez, J M M; González, E N

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) is a cornerstone in the treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). In patients on haemodialysis due to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), it must be used cautiously, considering the renal clearance of this radionuclide. Also, the safety of the procedure and subsequent long-term outcome is still not well defined. In 2001, we described a dosimetric method and short-term results in three patients, with a good safety profile. We hypothesize that our method is safe in a long-term scenario without compromising the prognosis of both renal and thyroid disease. Descriptive-retrospective study. A systematic search was carried out using our clinical database from 2000 to 2014. DTC and radioiodine treatment while on haemodialysis. peritoneal dialysis. Final sample n=9 patients (n=5 males), age 48 years (median age 51 years males, 67 years female group); n=8 papillary thyroid cancer, n=1 follicular thyroid cancer; n=5 lymph node invasion; n=1 metastatic disease. Median RAI dose administered on haemodialysis 100mCi. 7.5 years after radioiodine treatment on haemodialysis, n=7 deemed free of thyroid disease, n=1 persistent non-localised disease. No complications related to the procedure or other target organs were registered. After 3.25 years, n=4 patients underwent successful renal transplantation; n=4 patients did not meet transplantation criteria due to other conditions unrelated to the thyroid disease or its treatment. One patient died due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (free of thyroid disease). Radioiodine treatment during haemodialysis is a long-term, safe procedure without worsening prognosis of either renal or thyroid disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Personalized Medicine: New Perspectives for the Diagnosis and the Treatment of Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Olszewski, Robert; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-06-10

    The prevalence of renal diseases is rising and reaching 5-15% of the adult population. Renal damage is associated with disturbances of body homeostasis and the loss of equilibrium between exogenous and endogenous elements including drugs and metabolites. Studies indicate that renal diseases are influenced not only by environmental but also by genetic factors. In some cases the disease is caused by mutation in a single gene and at that time severity depends on the presence of one or two mutated alleles. In other cases, renal disease is associated with the presence of alteration within a gene or genes, but environmental factors are also necessary for the development of disease. Therefore, it seems that the analysis of genetic aspects should be a natural component of clinical and experimental studies. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine the right drug, for the right patient, at the right time. Whole-genome examinations may help to change the approach to the disease and the patient resulting in the creation of "personalized medicine" with new diagnostic and treatment strategies designed on the basis of genetic background of each individual. The identification of high-risk patients in pharmacogenomics analyses will help to avoid many unwarranted side effects while optimizing treatment efficacy for individual patients. Personalized therapies for kidney diseases are still at the preliminary stage mainly due to high costs of such analyses and the complex nature of human genome. This review will focus on several areas of interest: renal disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rate of progression and the prediction of prognosis.

  4. A Case of Immunotactoid Glomerulopathy with Rapid Progression to End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotactoid glomerulopathy (IGN is a rare immunoglobulin deposition disease. It is often mistaken for cryoglobulinemia or amyloidosis due to the similarities on biopsy findings. The disease progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD within 7 months to 10 years. This is the first case reported of a patient with a diagnosis of IGN who developed acute kidney injury (AKI and ESRD within 1 week of initial presentation.

  5. Clinical approach to quality of life in children with end-stage renal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Min Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life in addition to various medical problems in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) should be objectively assessed to accomplish normal growth and development during childhood. However, unfortunately, studies of quality of life (QoL) in children with ESRD have been not popular yet and there are only fewer suitable assessment tools compared with adults. Recently, disease-specific modules to evaluate QoL in children with chronic disease such as ESRD have been developed. This...

  6. Progression of chronic kidney disease in children with vesicoureteral reflux: the North American Pediatric Renal Trials Collaborative Studies Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Thomas E; Mathews, Ranjiv; Martz, Karen; Neu, Alicia

    2009-10-01

    We describe a cohort of children with chronic kidney disease due to vesicoureteral reflux. We compared the rate of progression to end stage renal disease in those patients to the rate in children with another cause of chronic kidney disease and identified potential risk factors for progression. We performed a retrospective cohort study using data from the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies Registry. Patients with vesicoureteral reflux as a cause of chronic kidney disease were compared to 2 other diagnostic cohorts. The 3 groups were compared with respect to baseline characteristics and progression to end stage renal disease based on diagnostic category. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for progression to end stage renal disease using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Data on 6,981 patients were available for analysis. Patients with vesicoureteral reflux as a cause of chronic kidney disease had a significantly slower rate of progression to end stage renal disease than patients with renal aplasia, hypoplasia or dysplasia and all other causes (log rank p renal disease in patients with vesicoureteral reflux as the cause of chronic kidney disease we found that, in addition to older age and more advanced chronic kidney disease stage, a history of urinary tract infection at registration was significantly associated with an increased risk of progression. Children with vesicoureteral reflux had a slower rate of progression to end stage renal disease than children with another cause of chronic kidney disease even after controlling for multiple possible confounders. In children with vesicoureteral reflux as the cause of chronic kidney disease older age, higher chronic kidney disease stage and history of urinary tract infection are significantly associated with the risk of progression to end stage renal disease.

  7. Long term end-stage renal disease and death following acute renal replacement therapy in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, R; Damholt, M B; Wiis, J; Perner, A; Lange, T; Ibsen, M

    2016-09-01

    In ICU the need for acute renal replacement therapy (RRT) associates with high mortality and risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but there are limited long-term data. We investigated these outcomes and their risk factors. Retrospective analysis of all adult patients admitted to a general, university hospital ICU 2005-2012, excluding chronic dialysis patients. ESRD was defined as need of RRT > 90 days or kidney transplant. Of 5766 patients included, 1004 (16%) received acute RRT; their 30-day mortality was 42% vs. 16% for those not requiring acute RRT (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.13 (0.96-1.32)). The 90-day mortality was 55% for patients receiving acute RRT vs. 22% for those who did not (adjusted HR 1.32 (1.15-1.51)) and 1-year mortality was 63% vs. 30%, respectively, (adjusted HR 1.31 (1.16-1.48)). The 7-year risk of ESRD for ICU patients surviving 90 days was 10% for patients who received acute RRT vs. 0.5% among those who did not (adjusted HR 5.9 (2.9-12.4)). Independent risk factors for ESRD included pre-existing kidney disease, pre-existing peripheral vascular disease and use of acute RRT in ICU. The need of acute RRT was associated with markedly increased long term risk of death and ESRD; in contrast its use was not associated with 30-day mortality. In addition to acute RRT, decreased kidney function and peripheral vascular disease before ICU admission were risk factors for ESRD. It seems warranted offering medical follow-up to patients after acute RRT in ICU. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Early renal abnormalities in children with postnatally diagnosed autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selistre, Luciano; de Souza, Vandréa; Ranchin, Bruno; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Cochat, Pierre; Dubourg, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children is often regarded as a benign condition. However, previous studies pointed out renal-related anomalies which may benefit from early appropriate treatments. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and severity of early renal dysfunction in ADPKD children. An extensive renal evaluation was performed in 52 consecutive ADPKD patients diagnosed either from prenatal screening or post-natal ultrasound (US) examination (54 % males, mean age 10 ± 4 years [1-17]). Three patients had both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure above the 95th percentile, one patient had a "high normal" DBP, and one child was treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI). The mean ± SD glomerular filtration rate (GFR ml/min per 1.73 m(2), inulin clearance) was 115 ± 26 [47-168] but six children (12 %) had a GFR 135). Microalbuminuria (2 20 mg/mmol). Early renal manifestations are frequent in ADPKD children, including hypertension in 6 %, albuminuria in 58 %, and decreased GFR in 12 %. In conclusion, renal function in children with ADPKD should be regularly assessed in order to manage early renal dysfunction and even consider further therapeutic intervention.

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of left atrial size in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçinaj, Dardan; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Merita; Koçinaj, Allma; Ramadani, Naser; Korça, Hajrije

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. It is assumed that the high rate of cardiovascular mortality is related to accelerated atherosclerosis. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency have an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease, silent myocardial ischaemia, complex ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, left ventricular hypertrophy, annular mitral and aortic valve calcification, and enlargement of the left atrium, than patients with normal renal function. It is also well known that haemodialysis is associated with cardiovascular structural changes and rapid fluctuations in electrolyte levels. In this study, we sought to estimate left atrial size by means of echocardiography and to determine any correlations between different echocardiographic measurements in patients with end-stage renal disease. We analysed data from 123 patients who were on regular haemodialysis, by means of traditional transthoracic echocardiographic examination. The usual statistical parameters, correlations and the Student's t-test were performed, with levels of significance of p < 0.01 and p < 0.05. The most presented age group was 60 to 69 years old, with a predomination of females (56.1%). We found dilated left atrium in 26.02% of the study patients and a high statistical correlation between different methods of measurement and calculated volumes of the left atrium. Evaluation of left atrial size should be determined by several different measurements, and left atrial enlargement should be seen as a risk factor for advancing disease.

  10. Association of renal function, estimated by four equations, with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganer, Yusuf C; Rohrer, James E; Aydogan, Umit; Barcin, Cem; Cayci, Tuncer; Saglam, Kenan

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with impaired renal function are at increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is also associated with an increased likelihood of having chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we sought to determine the association between impaired renal function with CAD presence and CAD severity based on four different estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equations. We estimated GFR values using four equations: modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD), Cockcroft-Gault (C-G), chronic kidney disease epidemiology (CKD-Epi), and Mayo Quadratic. Three hundred and fifty-six CAD patients were classified by the number of stenotic coronary arteries occluded >50%, while the CAD severity was categorized based on the number of involved coronary arteries determined to be healthy, single- and multi-vessel disease. The mean values of eGFR calculated by CKD-Epi, MDRD, Mayo, and C-G equations were 77.44, 71.34, 96.33, and 89.49 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively. Based on these equations, the prevalence of eGFR equations were independently related to significant CAD: CKD-Epi (p = 0.004, β = 0.969), MDRD (p = 0.003, β = 0.965), and C-G (p = 0.021, β = 0.978). The present study established that accurate eGFR equations commonly used still accurate to determine the association of the impaired renal function with CAD presence and extent.

  11. Biopsy-proven kidney diseases in the elderly: clinical characteristics, renal histopathological spectrum and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Li, Ping; Cui, Chunli; Yuan, Aihong; Zhang, Kun; Yu, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics, renal histopathological spectrum and prognostic factors of biopsy-proven kidney diseases in the elderly. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted in elderly patients who had received renal biopsies. Demographic, clinical and pathological data at the time of the biopsy were collected from the medical records. Follow-up records and prognostic factors were studied. Results The elderly (≥60 years) accounted for 74 of 434 (17.1%) native renal biopsies that were performed in a 9-year period. In the cohort of included elderly patients ( n = 72), the prevalence of nephrotic syndrome and acute kidney injury was 62.5% (45 of 72) and 40.3% (29 of 72), respectively. For elderly patients with primary glomerular diseases ( n = 44), membranous nephropathy was the most frequent pathological type (24 of 44; 54.5%). For elderly patients with secondary glomerular diseases ( n = 25), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis was the most frequent aetiology (nine of 25; 36.0%). Requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT) was an independent risk factor for poor prognosis. Conclusions Kidney diseases in the elderly have distinctive characteristics. Requirement for RRT was associated with poor prognosis in the elderly with biopsy-proven kidney diseases.

  12. Early Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease with Renal Injury Caused by Hypertension in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yabuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old spayed female Papillon weighing 4.0 kg presented with a history of persistent hematuria and pollakiuria. Concurrent bladder calculi, a mammary gland tumor, and nonazotemic early stage of chronic kidney disease with contracted kidneys were noted in this dog. The dog underwent cystectomy, unilateral mastectomy, and intraoperative renal biopsy. On the basis of histopathological analysis of renal biopsy results, it was suspected that renal injury of the dog was caused by persistent hypertension, and a follow-up examination revealed severe hypertension. The dog was treated with a combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and calcium channel blocker. The treatment produced a good outcome in the dog, and there has been no progression of the chronic kidney disease for over 2 years.

  13. Scleroderma renal crisis in a case of mixed connective tissue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Vij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD is an overlap syndrome first defined in 1972 by Sharp et al. In this original study, the portrait emerged of a connective tissue disorder sharing features of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma and polymyositis. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC is an extremely infrequent but serious complication that can occur in MCTD. The histologic picture of SRC is that of a thrombotic micro-angiopathic process. Renal biopsy plays an important role in confirming the clinical diagnosis, excluding overlapping/superimposed diseases that might lead to acute renal failure in MCTD patients, helping to predict the clinical outcome and optimizing patient management. We herewith report a rare case of SRC in a patient with MCTD and review the relevant literature.

  14. Renal outcomes of agalsidase beta treatment for Fabry disease: role of proteinuria and timing of treatment initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnock, David G.; Ortiz, Alberto; Mauer, Michael; Linthorst, Gabor E.; Oliveira, João P.; Serra, Andreas L.; Maródi, László; Mignani, Renzo; Vujkovac, Bojan; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Lemay, Roberta; Cole, J. Alexander; Svarstad, Einar; Waldek, Stephen; Germain, Dominique P.; Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of renal disease progression in adults with Fabry disease during treatment with agalsidase beta. Methods. Renal function was evaluated in 151 men and 62 women from the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase beta at an average dose of

  15. Monitoring renal function in children with Fabry disease: comparisons of measured and creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tøndel, Camilla; Ramaswami, Uma; Aakre, Kristin Moberg; Wijburg, Frits; Bouwman, Machtelt; Svarstad, Einar

    2010-01-01

    Studies on renal function in children with Fabry disease have mainly been done using estimated creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The aim of this study was to compare estimated creatinine-based GFR (eGFR) with measured GFR (mGFR) in children with Fabry disease and normal renal

  16. Diabetic retinopathy in predicting diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, F; Xia, X; Wu, X F; Yu, X Q; Huang, F X

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis is to determine the predictive value of diabetic retinopathy in differentiating diabetic nephropathy from non-diabetic renal diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal disease. Medline and Embase databases were searched from inception to February 2012. Renal biopsy studies of participants with type 2 diabetes were included if they contained data with measurements of diabetic retinopathy. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and other diagnostic indices were evaluated using a random-effects model. The meta-analysis investigated 26 papers with 2012 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of diabetic retinopathy to predict diabetic nephropathy were 0.65 (95% CI 0.62, 0.68) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.73, 0.78), respectively. The pooled positive and negative predictive value of diabetic retinopathy to predict diabetic nephropathy were 0.72 (95% CI 0.68, 0.75) and 0.69 (95% CI 0.67, 0.72), respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75, and the diagnostic odds ratio was 5.67 (95% CI 3.45, 9.34). For proliferative diabetic retinopathy, the pooled sensitivity was 0.25 (95% CI 0.16, 0.35), while the specificity was 0.98 (95% CI 0.92, 1.00). There was heterogeneity among studies (p Diabetic retinopathy is useful in diagnosing or screening for diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal disease. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy may be a highly specific indicator for diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Renal C3 complement component: feed forward to diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Katherine J; Liu, Yunlong; Zhang, Jizhong; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the main cause of end-stage renal disease and has reached epidemic proportions. Comprehensive genomic profiling (RNAseq) was employed in the ZS (F1 hybrids of Zucker and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure) model of diabetic nephropathy. Controls were lean littermates. Diabetic nephropathy in obese, diabetic ZS was accelerated by a single episode of renal ischemia (DI). This rapid renal decline was accompanied by the activation of the renal complement system in DI, and to a lesser extent in sham-operated diabetic rats (DS). In DI there were significant increases in renal mRNA encoding C3, C4, C5, C6, C8, and C9 over sham-operated lean normal controls (LS). Moreover, mRNAs encoding the receptors for the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a were also significantly increased in DI compared to LS. The classic complement pathway was activated in diabetic kidneys with significant increases of C1qa, C1qb, and C1qc mRNAs in DI over LS. In addition, critical regulators of complement activation were significantly attenuated in DI and DS. These included mRNAs encoding CD55, decay accelerating factor, and CD59, which inhibit the membrane attack complex. C3, C4, and C9 proteins were demonstrated in renal tubules and glomeruli. The complement RNAseq data were incorporated into a gene network showing interactions among C3-generating renal tubular cells and other immune competent migratory cells. We conclude that local activation of the complement system mediates renal injury in diabetic nephropathy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [THE RISK OF ACUTE RENAL LESIONS AND ITS PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE UNDERGOING CARDIAC SURGICAL INTERVENTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskenderov, B G; Sisina, O N; Budagovskaia, Z M

    2015-01-01

    to determine the frequency and risk factors of acute renal lesions (ARL) and their prognostic significance in patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) undergoing surgical intervention. The study included 1122 patients (586 men and 536 women) aged 32-68 (mean 62.3 ± 5.2) years who underwent correction of valvular defects, aortocoronary bypass surgery or their combination). Initial glomerular filtration rate was higher than 90 ml/min/l.73 m2 in 656 patients (group 1) and 89-60 ml/min/l/73 m2 in 470 ones (group 2). ARL were diagnosed based on the serum creatinine level using RIFLE criteria. In the early postoperative period, ARL were diagnosed in 23.9% of the patients in group I and 38.7% of those in group 2 (p < 0.001). Intra-hospital lethality in group 1 was 4.9% (14.1% in patients with ARL) and 12.1% in group 2 (18.1% iin patients with ARL). In group 2, 47.9% of the patients with ARL experienced regress of renal dysfunction during 12 months compared with 56.9% ones without ARL. The progress of CRD was documented in 11% of group 2 patients with ARL and in (4.5% without AR (p = 0.013). 5.7% of the patients in group 1 developed CRD after ARL. 4.9% of the patients in group 2 needed programmed hemodialysis. The development of ARL in patients with CRD is associated with unfvouravle cardiovascular prognosis following cardiosurgery.

  19. Human CD36 overexpression in renal tubules accelerates the progression of renal diseases in a mouse model of folic acid-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong Hwan; Choi, Jee Eun; Song, Ju Hung; Ahn, Seon-Ho

    2018-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a risk factor for progression to chronic kidney disease, with even subclinical AKI episodes progressing to chronic kidney disease. Several risk factors such as preexisting kidney disease, hyperglycemia, and hypertension may aggravate renal disease after AKI. However, mechanisms underlying the progression of AKI are still unclear. This study identified the effect of human cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) overexpression on the progression of folic acid-induced AKI. Pax8-rtTA/tetracycline response element-human CD36 transgenic mice were used to elucidate the effect of human CD36 overexpression in the proximal tubules on folic acid-induced AKI. Results of histological analysis showed severely dilated tubules with casts and albuminuria in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD36 compared with folic acid-treated wild-type mice. In addition, analysis of mRNA expression showed a significant increase in the collagen 3a1 gene in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD 36 compared with folic acid-treated wild type mice. Human CD36-overexpressing transgenic mice showed severe pathological changes and albuminuria compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, mRNA expression of the collagen 3a1 gene increased in folic acid-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that human CD36 overexpression is a risk factor of AKI and its progression to chronic kidney disease.

  20. Human CD36 overexpression in renal tubules accelerates the progression of renal diseases in a mouse model of folic acid-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwan Jung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute kidney injury (AKI is a risk factor for progression to chronic kidney disease, with even subclinical AKI episodes progressing to chronic kidney disease. Several risk factors such as preexisting kidney disease, hyperglycemia, and hypertension may aggravate renal disease after AKI. However, mechanisms underlying the progression of AKI are still unclear. This study identified the effect of human cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36 overexpression on the progression of folic acid-induced AKI. Methods : Pax8-rtTA/tetracycline response element-human CD36 transgenic mice were used to elucidate the effect of human CD36 overexpression in the proximal tubules on folic acid-induced AKI. Results : Results of histological analysis showed severely dilated tubules with casts and albuminuria in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD36 compared with folic acid-treated wild-type mice. In addition, analysis of mRNA expression showed a significant increase in the collagen 3a1 gene in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD 36 compared with folic acid-treated wild type mice. Conclusion : Human CD36-overexpressing transgenic mice showed severe pathological changes and albuminuria compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, mRNA expression of the collagen 3a1 gene increased in folic acid-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that human CD36 overexpression is a risk factor of AKI and its progression to chronic kidney disease.

  1. The efficacy of hemodialysis in interventional therapy in coronary artery disease patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hongxia; Li, Liang; Yin, Yaxin; Zhang, Jinjin; Chen, Haiwei; Liu, Runmei; Xia, Yun-feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy and safety of hemodialysis in interventional therapy for patients with coronary artery disease combined with chronic renal insufficiency. With the aging and social development, the number of coronary artery disease patients with chronic renal insufficiency gradually increased. Total 58 coronary heart disease patients with chronic renal dysfunction were selected. These patients were characterized with typical angina symptoms and typical electrocardiogram (ECG) changes of onset angina. Continuous oral administration of sodium bicarbonate tablets 1 g 3/day × 3 days and slow intravenous input sodium chloride 1000 ∼1500 mL 3-12 h before operation were given. By this way, all patients were treated by hydration and alkalization. After percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment, patients were immediately transferred to undergo 4 h of dialysis treatment without removing indwelling of femoral artery puncture sheath tube to protect renal function. Changes in renal function including serum creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, and urine were observed and recorded. All patients were successfully underwent PCI treatment. Within one month after PCI, there were no obvious complication and no stent thrombosis occurred. Among of 58 patients, 56 cases showed no significant increase in serum creatinine levels compared with those before operation. However, serum creatinine level of one patient increased to 251 umol/L and one patient still required permanent dialysis. Using hemodialysis in interventional therapy in coronary artery disease patients with chronic renal insufficiency could significantly improve the prognosis of the patients.

  2. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome with Unilateral Hemivaginal Obstruction, Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis, and Contralateral Renal Thin GBM Disease: A Case Report with Radiological Follow Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Hee Jin; Park, Chan Sup; Park, Sung Il

    2010-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome is a rare Mullerian ductal anomaly that is characterized by the presence of a hemivaginal septum, a didelphic uterus and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It is generally difficult to diagnose the uterine malformation before menarche owing to its small size. Therefore, a follow-up study is very important for confirming the uterine malformation in girls with renal agenesis. We report a patient with renal agenesis and microscopic hematuria, who showed symptoms before menarche. A follow-up study eventually revealed uterine didelphys with a hemivaginal obstruction. A biopsy proved that the microscopic hematuria was caused by thin glomerular basement membrane disease of the contralateral kidney

  3. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome with Unilateral Hemivaginal Obstruction, Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis, and Contralateral Renal Thin GBM Disease: A Case Report with Radiological Follow Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Hee Jin; Park, Chan Sup [Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Il [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome is a rare Mullerian ductal anomaly that is characterized by the presence of a hemivaginal septum, a didelphic uterus and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It is generally difficult to diagnose the uterine malformation before menarche owing to its small size. Therefore, a follow-up study is very important for confirming the uterine malformation in girls with renal agenesis. We report a patient with renal agenesis and microscopic hematuria, who showed symptoms before menarche. A follow-up study eventually revealed uterine didelphys with a hemivaginal obstruction. A biopsy proved that the microscopic hematuria was caused by thin glomerular basement membrane disease of the contralateral kidney

  4. Glomerular hyperfiltration and renal progression in children with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Imed; Reed, Berenice; McFann, Kim; Yan, Xiang-Dong; Fick-Brosnahan, Godela M; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa; Schrier, Robert W

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether glomerular hyperfiltration (GH) occurring early in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is indicative of more rapid disease progression in children. One hundred eighty children with ADPKD (ages 4 to 18 years) with normal renal function were examined by renal ultrasound. Renal volume was calculated using a standard formula for a modified ellipsoid. Creatinine clearance was calculated from serum creatinine and 24-hour urine creatinine. GH was defined as creatinine clearance ≥140 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Thirty-two children had GH (mean age 11.4 ± 3.6 years) and 148 had normal renal function (mean age 10.8 ± 3.9 years). Patients with GH at baseline demonstrated an increased rate of total renal volume growth (β: rate of change = +19.3 ± 10.8 cm(3)/year) over 5 years compared with those without GH at baseline (β = -4.3 ± 7.7 cm(3)/year), P = 0.008. Those with GH at baseline experienced a faster decline in creatinine clearance in subsequent years (β = -5.0 ± 0.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year) compared with those without GH at baseline (β = +1.0 ± 0.4 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year), P children is associated with a significantly faster decline in renal function and higher rate of kidney enlargement over time. GH combined with the increased renal volume may therefore be used as an early marker for a more severe progression of ADPKD in children.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic ischemic renal disease in a dog model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Dong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this feasibility study was to prospectively explore in a dog model of chronic ischemic renal disease (CIRD the hypothesis that real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS can quantitatively evaluate the early perfusion changes of renal cortex. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this animal care and use committee-approved study, the model of CIRD was carried out in healthy dogs (10.0~12.0 kg, n=5, by placing the Ameroid ring constrictors on the distal portion of right renal artery through operation. CEUS monitoring of right kidney perfusion was performed by intravenous bolus injection of 0.6 ml Sulfur hexafluoride filled microbubbles (SonoVue; Bracco S.P.A., Milan, Italy every week after operation. The slope rate of ascending curve (A and descending curve (α, area under curve (AUC, derived peak intensity (DPI, and time to peak (TTP were measured in renal cortex using commercial quantification software (Q-LAB version 6; Philips Medical Systems, Bothell,WA,USA. The sensitivity of CEUS was compared with blood serum urea nitrogen (BUN and serum creatinine (SCr level. RESULTS: With the progression of CIRD, dogs showed delayed enhancement and perfusion in renal CEUS curve. Earliest significant changes happened 4 weeks after operation on DPI and TTP which changed from 13.04 ± 2.71 to 15.58 ± 4.75 dB and 9.03 ± 2.01 to 10.62 ± 6.04 sec, respectively (P<.05. CONCLUSIONS: CEUS can display the perfusion changes of CIRD in the early period.

  6. Risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among individuals with and without end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Have; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    transplant recipients (8.9 per 1,000 person-years). In persons with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, ninety-day case fatality was 18.2% (95% CI, 16.2%-20.3%) for end-stage renal disease patients and 33.7% (95% CI, 30.3-37.3) for population controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with end-stage renal disease......BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections among hemodialysis patients and of exit-site infections among peritoneal dialysis patients. However, the risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among end-stage renal disease patients have not been...... delineated. METHODS: In this Danish nationwide, population-based cohort study patients with end-stage renal disease and matched population controls were observed from end-stage renal disease diagnosis/sampling until first episode of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, death, or end of study period...

  7. Multiparametric Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Validation, Interventions, and Alterations in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Eleanor F.; Buchanan, Charlotte E.; Bradley, Christopher R.; Prestwich, Benjamin; Mahmoud, Huda; Taal, Maarten; Selby, Nicholas M.; Francis, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This paper outlines a multiparametric renal MRI acquisition and analysis protocol to allow non-invasive assessment of hemodynamics (renal artery blood flow and perfusion), oxygenation (BOLD T2*), and microstructure (diffusion, T1 mapping). Methods: We use our multiparametric renal MRI protocol to provide (1) a comprehensive set of MRI parameters [renal artery and vein blood flow, perfusion, T1, T2*, diffusion (ADC, D, D*, fp), and total kidney volume] in a large cohort of healthy participants (127 participants with mean age of 41 ± 19 years) and show the MR field strength (1.5 T vs. 3 T) dependence of T1 and T2* relaxation times; (2) the repeatability of multiparametric MRI measures in 11 healthy participants; (3) changes in MRI measures in response to hypercapnic and hyperoxic modulations in six healthy participants; and (4) pilot data showing the application of the multiparametric protocol in 11 patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Results: Baseline measures were in-line with literature values, and as expected, T1-values were longer at 3 T compared with 1.5 T, with increased T1 corticomedullary differentiation at 3 T. Conversely, T2* was longer at 1.5 T. Inter-scan coefficients of variation (CoVs) of T1 mapping and ADC were very good at renal artery flow (0.844). In response to hypercapnia, a decrease in cortex T2* was observed, whilst no significant effect of hyperoxia on T2* was found. In CKD patients, renal artery and vein blood flow, and renal perfusion was lower than for healthy participants. Renal cortex and medulla T1 was significantly higher in CKD patients compared to healthy participants, with corticomedullary T1 differentiation reduced in CKD patients compared to healthy participants. No significant difference was found in renal T2*. Conclusions: Multiparametric MRI is a powerful technique for the assessment of changes in structure, hemodynamics, and oxygenation in a single scan session. This protocol provides the potential to

  8. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended.

  9. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Mbarki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual′s health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years. All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF, active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended.

  10. A report on a randomly sampled questionnaire survey about renal stone disease in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S Wh; Ng, C F; Man, C W; Chung, R; Li, S K

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of patients with renal stone in Hong Kong, and awareness of corresponding prevention strategies. Telephone public survey. Hong Kong community. PARTICIPANTS. A public telephone survey concerning the occurrence of renal stone disease and the public awareness of the condition was performed. Respondents whose telephone numbers were randomly selected by computer and the family member of the household who had the closest birthday to that date was chosen for interview. Data collected were further adjusted for the gender and age distribution of the Hong Kong population in mid-2007. A total of 1010 Hong Kong citizens aged 18 years or above were successfully interviewed in November 2007. Among them, 25 respondents themselves had a history of renal stones, yielding a point prevalence of 2.5%. In addition, 70 respondents had family members with a history of renal stones, yielding an estimated household point prevalence of 6.9%. Stone patients were mainly older, male, and imbibed less fluids than the average for all respondents. The public's concepts with regard to the diet necessary and the importance of taking more fluid to prevent stone formation was poor. Hong Kong has a relatively low prevalence of renal stone disease, compared to neighbouring areas. However, the local public and affected patients had little knowledge and awareness about this important health problem.

  11. [Early identification of impaired renal function in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hu; Fu, Junfen; Chen, Xuefeng; Huang, Ke; Wu, Wei; Liang, Li

    2013-07-01

    To early assess the impaired renal function in the obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to identify the relationship between NAFLD and impairment of renal function. Three hundred and eighty-six obese children were enrolled and divided into NAFLD group and simple obesity group (control) according to the diagnostic criteria. Clinical biochemical parameters and early impaired renal functions were evaluated and compared. Among all patients 234 obese children aged over 10 y were subdivided into 3 groups: NAFLD combined with metabolic syndrome (NAFLD+MS) group, NAFLD group and simple obesity group (control), and the above indexes were compared among 3 groups. The urinary microalbumin levels in NAFLD, NAFLD+MS (>10y) and NAFLD groups (>10y) were significantly higher than those in controls. Additionally, the positive correlations of urinary microalbumin with systolic pressure, triglyceride and 2h-postprandial blood glucose were found. There is early renal dysfunction in children with NAFLD and those accompanied with MS, which may be associated with hypertension and glucose-lipid metabolic disorder. The results indicate that NAFLD is not only an early sign of early impaired renal function but also an early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in obese children.

  12. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Analysis of the New Zealand Black contribution to lupus-like renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, C.G.; Rozzo, S.J.; Hirschfeld, H.F.; Smarnworawong, N.P. [National Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO (United States); Palmer, E. [Basel Institute of Immunology, Basel (Switzerland); Kotzin, B.L. [National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    F{sub 1} progeny of New Zealand Black (NZB) and New Zealand White (NZW) mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune process remarkably similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have implicated major genetic contributions from the NZW MHC and from a dominant NZB gene on chromosome 4. To identify additional NZB contributions to lupus-like disease, (NZB x SM/J)F{sub 1} x NZW backcross mice were followed for the development of severe renal disease and were comprehensively genotyped. Despite a 50% incidence of disease significant associations between the presence of the NZB genotype and disease were noted on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, and 19. The data indicated that multiple NZB genes, in different combinations, contribute to severe renal disease, and that no single gene is required. To further investigate this NZB contribution, NZB x SM/J (NXSM) recombinant inbred (RI) strains were crossed with NZW mice, and F{sub 1} progeny were analyzed for the presence of lupus-like renal disease. Interestingly, nearly all of the (RI x NZW)F{sub 1} cohorts studies expressed some level of disease. Five RI strains generated a high incidence of disease, similar to (NZB x NZW)F{sub 1} mice, and nearly one-half of the cohorts developed disease at intermediate levels. Only two cohorts demonstrated very little disease, supporting the conclusion that multiple genes are capable of disease induction. Experiments correlating the genotypes of these RI strains with their ability to generate disease revealed that none of the disease-associated loci defined by the backcross analysis were present in all five RI strains that generated disease at high levels. Overall, both the backcross data and RI analysis provide additional support for the genetic complexity of lupus nephritis and uphold the conclusion that heterogeneous combinations of contributing NZB genes seem to operate in a threshold manner to generate the disease phenotype. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Subjective global assessment of nutritional status of patients with chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiawala, Shruti; Vora, H; Patel, Zamrud; Badve, S; Shah, B

    2006-12-01

    (1)To assess the nutritional status of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) and dialysis patients using the subjective global assessment (SGA) method. (2) To validate SGA in assessing the nutritional status of this group of patients. The nutritional status of 81 patients was evaluated using dietary recall, anthropometry, biochemical parameters and SGA. There were 51 males and 30 females. Their mean +/- SD age was 53.8 +/- 14.3 years. There were 27 patients with (CRI) on conservative management, 38 patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and 16 patients with ESRD on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). SGA was done using seven variables derived from medical history and physical examination. Each variable was scored from 1-7 depending on the severity. The SGA scores were correlated with the standard methods. Thirteen (48%) patients with CRI, 22 (58%) patients on HD and 8 (50%) patients on CAPD were malnourished. It was seen that the dietary protein & calorie intake and serum albumin level did not correlate well with the SGA scores. The anthropometric measures correlated with the SGA scores (Skinfolds and SGA r = 0.2, MAC and SGA r = 0.5 and MAMC and SGA r = 0.5). Malnutrition is an important complication in CRI patients and ESRD patients on dialysis. SGA is a reliable method of assessing nutritional status. Most important is the fact that it can detect the changing trend of nutritional status, which may be missed by one-time anthropometry and biochemical methods.

  15. Prevalence and patterns of renal involvement in imaging of malignant lymphoproliferative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey; Holzhausen, Hans Jurgen; Katzer, Michaela; Arnold, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Background: Renal involvement in patients with lymphoproliferative disease is an uncommon radiological finding. Purpose: To determine its prevalence and radiological appearances in a patient population. Material and Methods: All forms of lymphoproliferative disease (ICD: C81-C96) were considered. From January 2005 to January 2010, 668 consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disease were identified with the help of the radiological database and patient records. Inclusion criteria were complete staging including appropriate CT scan and/or MRI. All stored images (initial staging and follow-up examinations) were reviewed. Results: Review of all stored images revealed renal infiltration in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (11 of 364 = 3.0%; median age = 65 years, m:f = 6:5) but also multiple myeloma (2 of 162 = 1.2%; median age = 72 years; m:f = 1:1) and leukemia (5 of 101 4.9%; median age = 12 years; m:f = 2:3). There were no cases of renal infiltration in 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease. In total there were six patients with solitary lesions, five patients with diffuse renal enlargement, four patients with perirenal lesions, and two patients with direct invasion of the kidney. Conclusion: In leukemia the most common imaging pattern is diffuse enlargement. In the other subtypes of lymphoproliferative disease no specific correlation between typical CT patterns and subtype of lymphoproliferative disease can be found. The prevalence of renal involvement is in line with earlier studies. Contrary to earlier reports, multiple lesions were not found to be a common pattern

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase as a biomarker for early renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S Alzahri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among many complications of sickle cell disease, renal failure is the main contributor to early mortality. It is present in up to 21% of patients with sickle cell disease. Although screening for microalbuminuria and proteinuria is the current acceptable practice to detect and follow renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease, there is a crucial need for other, more sensitive biomarkers. This becomes especially true knowing that those biomarkers start to appear only after more than 60% of the kidney function is lost. The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether lactate dehydrogenase (LDH correlates with other, direct and indirect bio-markers of renal insufficiency in patients with sickle cell disease and, therefore, could be used as a biomarker for early renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease. Fifty-five patients with an established diagnosis of sickle cell disease were recruited to in the study. Blood samples were taken and 24-h urine collection samples were collected. Using Statcrunch, a data analysis tool available on the web, we studied the correlation between LDH and other biomarkers of kidney function as well as the distribution and relationship between the variables. Regression analysis showed a significant negative correlation between serum LDH and creatinine clearance, R (correlation coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.0008. This correlation was more significant at younger age. This study shows that in sickle cell patients LDH correlates with creatinine clearance and, therefore, LDH could serve as a biomarker to predict renal insufficiency in those patients.

  17. Clinical value of renal injury biomarkers in diagnosis of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-lu ZHANG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the levels of renal injury biomarkers in patients with chronic kidney disease(CKD and evaluate their clinical significances in diagnosis of CKD.Methods A total of 66 subjects(37 patients with CKD and 29 healthy individuals were involved in this study.Serum blood urea nitrogen(SBUN was determined by Glutamate dehydrogenase method;serum creatinine(SCr and urinary creatinine(UCr were detected by sarcosine oxidase method;serum uric acid(SUA was measured by uricase colorimetry;serum cystatin C(Cys C and urinary microalbumin(UmAlbwere analyzed by immunological transmission turbidimetry;urinary protein(U-PROwas measured by Coomassies Brilliant Blue(CBB assay.The UmAlb and U-PRO levels were expressed in units of mg/mmolUCr.Results The results of independent samples t test indicated that significant differences were found in SBUN,SCr,SUA,Cys C,UmAlb and U-PRO(P < 0.05 between patient group and healthy control group.The evaluation of diagnostic effects showed that the areas under the curve at ROC plot for SBUN,SCr,SUA,Cys C,UmAlb and U-PRO were 0.907,0.912,0.742,0.982,0.984 and 0.991,respectively.Conclusions U-PRO,UmAlb and Cys C are ideal biomarkers,SCr and SBUN come next,SUA is the weakest when the above biomarkers are applied to evaluate the renal injury and its severity of the patients with CKD.

  18. Assessment of Respiratory Complications Associated with End Stage Renal Disease in Northern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alosayfir Mohammed Abdulrahman S.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD is increasing in different parts of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, particularly Hail Region. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the respiratory complications that associated with ESRD.

  19. Hypertension, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Renal Pathology in a Child with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gordillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a child with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS and chronic kidney disease (stage II with histological diagnosis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. A 15-year-old male of Puerto Rico ancestry with history of HPS, hypertension (HTN, asthma, obesity, and chronic kidney disease (CKD stage II presented with new-onset proteinuria without edema. His blood pressure had been controlled, serum creatinine had been 0.9–1.4 mg/dL, and first morning urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPC ranged from 0.2 to 0.38. Due to persistent nonorthostatic proteinuria with CKD, renal biopsy was performed and FSGS (not otherwise specified with chronic diffuse tubulopathy (tubular cytoplasmic droplets and acute tubular injury was reported. Ceroid-like material is known to infiltrate tissues (i.e., lungs, colon, and kidney in HPS, but the reason for the renal insufficiency is unknown. Nonspecific kidney disease and in one adult case IgA nephropathy with ANCA-positive glomerulonephritis have previously been reported in patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. To our knowledge, we report the first pediatric renal pathology case of HPS associated with CKD. This paper discusses presentation and management of renal disease in HPS.

  20. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Repeated puncture PD although inferior to HD biochemically, is easily and freely available across Rajasthan, India, and is simple to perform, and does not require sophisticated machines, thus making it an attractive option for dialysis ...

  1. Hyaluronan Biology and Regulation in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells and its Role in Kidney Stone Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asselman (Marino)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractRenal stone disease is a widespread problem afflicting more and more people throughout the world. Epidemiological studies show an increase in incidence and prevalence rates. In North America and Europe the yearly incidence is estimated to be about 0.5% 1, 2. The prevalence of kidney

  2. Effect of Sex Hormones on Progression of Diabetic Renal Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Sex Hormones on Progression of Diabetic Renal Disease in Experimental Model of Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats. ... into five groups 8 rats each, normal control, diabetic, gonadectomized diabetic, 17 beta estradiol is given to female and testosterone propionate to male diabetic and gonadectomized diabetic.

  3. hiv-related renal disease - a clinical and practical approach in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peritoneal dialysis fluid may worsen the patient's systemic viral load. CONClUSION. As therapy for HIV becomes more readily available in South. Africa it is to be hoped that the prevalence of HIVAN and renal disease related to this epidemic will decrease. Currently available therapy is far from adequate, and without HAART ...

  4. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Steffen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on occurrence and risk factors for pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are sparse. Methods: This was a nationwide population-based study assessing occurrence and risk factors for PCP among patients with ESRD and population controls over a 21...

  5. Low agreement between cardiologists diagnosing left ventricular hypertrophy in children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmaker, Nikki J.; van der Lee, Johanna H.; Groothoff, Jaap W.; van Iperen, Gabrielle G.; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M. E.; Tanke, Ronald B.; Ottenkamp, Jaap; Kuipers, Irene M.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of the appearance of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by echocardiography is currently recommended for in the management of children with End-stage renal disease (ESRD). In order to investigate the validity of this method in ESRD children, we assessed the intra- and inter-observer

  6. End-stage renal disease in Slovak children : epidemiology from a European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolvek, G.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Podracka, L.; Rosenberger, J.; Nagyova, I.; Stewart, R.E.; van Dijk, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Slovak children, to compare it with earlier Slovak data and with data from other European countries, and to explore etiology. Over the years 2003-2009, data on the incidence and prevalence of all cases of ESRD

  7. Smoking and hyperparathyroidism in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. Tripepi (Giovanni); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); P. Pizzini (Patrizia); S. Cutrupi (Sebastiano); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zoccali (Carmine); F. Mallamaci (Francesca)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground and methods: Smoking is associated with hyperparathyroidism in the elderly general population and nicotine, the main component of tobacco smoke, stimulates PTH release in experimental models. Although smoking is a persisting problem in patients with endstage renal disease

  8. Biopsy-proven renal disease in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A histopathologic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I M Onwubuya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various patterns of renal diseases have been reported from different renal biopsy registries worldwide, data from Nigeria remain scanty. A 10-year retrospective review of renal biopsies was conducted in our tertiary health care facility. All cases were reclassified based on their light microscopic features after the application of standard histochemical stains. A total of 165 cases were reviewed with a male:female ratio of 1.8:1 and a mean age of 15.4 ± 12.0 years. About 69.7% of the cases were below the age of 16 years, while only 2.4% were older than 50 years. The most common indications for biopsy were nephrotic syndrome (72.1% and acute renal failure of unknown etiology (11.5%. Overall, glomerulonephritis (80% was the most common histologic category and occurred only in individuals younger than 50 years old. Minimal change disease (22.9% and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (21.9% were the most common varieties in children, while membranous glomerulonephritis (30.6% and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (27.8% were the commonest among the adult population. The initial histologic diagnosis was revised in 18 cases while a diagnosis was arrived at in seven cases initially adjudged as inadequate for assessment. This study showed that renal biopsy was predominantly performed in children and adolescents. Although glomerulonephritis was the predominant disease, the predominant histologic patterns varied with the patient age. Despite the scarcity of advanced diagnostic tools in resource-poor environments, routine use of histochemical stains is helpful in the evaluation of renal biopsies.

  9. Plasma S100A12 Levels and Peripheral Arterial Disease in End-Stage Renal Disease

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    Yayoi Shiotsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: S100A12 is an endogenous ligand of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE. Plasma S100A12 levels are high in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is common in HD patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates in this population. To date, however, no study has specifically assessed the relationship between plasma S100A12 and PAD in HD patients. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 152 HD patients in our affiliated hospital. We investigated PAD history and patient characteristics and quantified plasma S100A12 levels in all participants. Results: HD patients with PAD (n = 26; 21.9 [13.6–33.4] ng/ml showed significantly higher plasma S100A12 levels than HD patients without PAD (n = 126; 11.8 [7.5–17.6]ng/ml; p Conclusion: These results suggest that plasma S100A12 levels are strongly associated with PAD prevalence in ESRD patients undergoing HD.

  10. Radionuclide and differential radiodiagnosis of renal parenchymal tumors versus nontumorous renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khripta, F.P.

    1981-01-01

    Modern radiation semiotics of kidney parenchyma cancer and nontumoural diseases of kidney parenchyma is described. Their new indices are shown, the place and significance of radionuclide and roentgenologic methods for the differential diagnosis of kidney parenchyma cancer and nontumoural kidney parenchyma diseases are shown. The plan described is nowadays one of the most rational diagrams. The diagnostic value of roen-- tgenologic and radionuclide investigations of kidney parenchyma cancer is not equivalent. Radio-indication methods state changes which are not characteristic of a particular disease. Therefore, they are used as tests for the further purpose ful special roentgenologic investigation with the minimum traumaticity which improves the diagnosis of kidney parenchyma cancer and permits to reduce investigation periods and material expenditure [ru

  11. Renal excretion of water in men under hypokinesia and physical exercise with fluid and salt supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Federenko, Youri F.; Togawa, Mitsui N.

    It has been suggested that under hypokinesia (reduced number of steps/day) and intensive physical exercise, the intensification of fluid excretion in men is apparently caused as a result of the inability of the body to retain optimum amounts of water. Thus, to evaluate this hypothesis, studies were performed with the use of fluid and sodium chloride (NaCl) supplements on 12 highly trained physically healthy male volunteers aged 19-24 years under 364 days of hypokinesis (HK) and a set of intensive physical exercises (PE). They were divided into two groups with 6 volunteers per group. The first group of subjects were submitted to HK and took daily fluid and salt supplements in very small doses and the second group of volunteers were subjected to intensive PE and fluid-salt supplements. For the simulation of the hypokinetic effect, both groups of subjects were kept under an average of 4000 steps/day. During the prehypokinetic period of 60 days and under the hypokinetic period of 364 days water consumed and eliminated in urine by the men, water content in blood, plasma volume, rate of glomerular filtration, renal blood flow, osmotic concentration of urine and blood were measured. Under HK, the rate of renal excretion of water increased considerably in both groups. The additional fluid and salt intake failed to normalize water balance adequately under HK and PE. It was concluded that negative water balance evidently resulted not from shortage of water in the diet but from the inability of the body to retain optimum amounts of fluid under HK and a set of intensive PEs.

  12. The organization and financing of end-stage renal disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luño, José

    2007-12-01

    While the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Spain is high, the incidence in comparison to the United States and Japan is low. Spain's rate of deceased organ donation is the highest in the world, and its renal transplant incidence rate is also relatively high. In addition, ESRD care represents a large portion of the overall health care budget. Quality of care in the National Health Service is not determined by competition or performance rewards; instead, several health agencies and scientific societies monitor it. Nevertheless, nephrologists with low salaries have relatively few professional and economic incentives to improve quality.

  13. Polycystic Kidney Disease with Renal Failure Presenting as Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia in the ED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silman, Eric F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may present to the emergency department (ED with vomiting, abdominal pain or hernias, renal insufficiency or failure, or bleeding from cerebral aneurysms. A 37-year-old man presented to the ED with signs and symptoms of incarcerated inguinal hernia. Laboratory studies showed renal failure with anion gap acidosis, and bedside ultrasound showed multicystic kidneys. Computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. Emergency physicians should be aware of this common connective tissue defect and its serious associated conditions. [WestJEM. 2009;10:55-57

  14. Renal papillary necrosis in patients with sickle cell disease: How to recognize this 'forgotten' diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderickx, Michaël M E L; Brits, Tim; De Baets, Karen; Seghers, Mattias; Maes, Philip; Trouet, Dominique; De Wachter, Stefan; De Win, Gunter

    2017-06-01

    Renal papillary necrosis is not commonly seen in daily practice, but can have severe consequences when it is not diagnosed in time. It is known to be associated with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies; however a wide range of etiologies are possible, and it is therefore not the first diagnosis clinicians consider in patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. A literature search was performed to summarize the current knowledge about renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease. These findings are illustrated with a case of a 9-year old girl with sickle cell disease who was referred with painless gross hematuria. Typical radiologic signs for renal papillary necrosis are necrotic cavities that fill with contrast, small collections of contrast peripheral to the calyces in the papillary region (ball-on-tee sign), calcification of the papillary defect, filling defects, hydronephrosis, blunted papillary tip, clefts in the renal medulla filled with contrast, hyperattenuated medullary calcifications, non-enhanced lesions surrounded by rings of excreted contrast, and clubbed calyces. This study focuses on the pathophysiology of renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease, the possible symptoms, as well as the diagnostic steps, with a special interest in particular presentation on old (retrograde pyelography) and new (computed tomography) gold standard in radiologic imaging, and the management for this pathology. This study aims to remind clinicians of this "forgotten" diagnosis and what signs to look for in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. In pediatric cases radiation protection is important, therefore knowing what radiologic signs can be found on retrograde pyelography can lead to early identification of this pathology without having to proceed to computed tomography. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide in renal physiology, disease and transplantation - The smell of renal protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Anne M.; Frenay, Anne-Roos S.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Goor, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, is a key mediator in physiology and disease. It is involved in homeostatic functions, such as blood pressure control, electrolyte balance and apoptosis, and regulates pathological mechanisms, including

  16. Down-regulation of integrin β1 and focal adhesion kinase in renal glomeruli under various hemodynamic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Yuan

    Full Text Available Given that integrin β1 is an important component of the connection to maintain glomerular structural integrity, by binding with multiple extracellular matrix proteins and mediating intracellular signaling. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is the most essential intracellular integrator in the integrin β1-FAK signalling pathway. Here, we investigated the changes of the two molecules and visualized the possible interaction between them under various hemodynamic conditions in podocytes. Mice kidney tissues were prepared using in vivo cryotechnique (IVCT and then were stained and observed using light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. The expression of these molecules were examined by western blot. Under the normal condition, integrin β1 stained continually and evenly at the membrane, and FAK was located in the cytoplasm and nuclei of the podocytes. There were significant colocalized plaques of two molecules. But under acute hypertensive and cardiac arrest conditions, integrin β1 decreased and stained intermittently. Similarly, FAK decreased and appeared uneven. Additionally, FAK translocated to the nuclei of the podocytes. As a result, the colocalization of integrin β1 and FAK reduced obviously under these conditions. Western blot assay showed a consistent result with the immunostaining. Collectively, the abnormal redistribution and decreased expressions of integrin β1 and FAK are important molecular events in regulating the functions of podocytes under abnormal hemodynamic conditions. IVCT could offer considerable advantages for morphological analysis when researching renal diseases.

  17. Renal Abnormalities Among Egyptian Children With Hemophilia A Using Renal Scintigraphy: Relation to Risk Factors and Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ahmed Alsaeed; Shalaby, Mennatallah Hatem; El-Kinawy, Nihal Saad; Elamawy, Alaa Adel; Abd El-Ghany, Shereen Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Many risk factors may contribute to renal disease in patients with hemophilia A. We aimed to evaluate functional and structural renal abnormalities among a group of Egyptian children with severe and moderate hemophilia A using technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and technetium-99 m dimercaptusuccinic acid ( 99m Tc-DMSA) scan. We also aimed to determine the relation between these abnormalities and different risk factors and disease severity. Forty male patients, 16 with severe and 24 with moderate hemophilia A, were enrolled in this study. Their mean age was 10.2 ± 4.3 years (range, 5-17 years). Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory, and radionuclide investigations including serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urine analysis, creatinine clearance, 24-hour urinary protein, 99m Tc-DTPA scan, and 99m Tc-DMSA scan were performed to all enrolled patients. Serum creatinine and BUN were normal in all patients, and corrected creatinine clearance was diminished in 2 patients. However, 99m Tc-DTPA results yielded 19 (47.5%) patients with diminished glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Moreover, it showed that 14 (35%) had obstructive uropathy, 15 (37.5%) had obstructive nephropathy, while 11 (27.5%) patients showed normal scan. One patient had atrophy of 1 kidney on 99m Tc-DMSA scan. Among our cohort, 5 (12.5%) patients were hypertensive. Microscopic hematuria was detected in 14 (35%) patients while 72.5% had proteinuria. We found an association between hematuria and hypertension with diminished GFR. Despite normal kidney functions (serum creatinine and BUN), we found a high rate of diminished GFR and obstructive uropathy and nephropathy as detected by 99m Tc-DTPA scan among children with hemophilia A.

  18. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Zhigang; Ma, Xiaofen; Tian, Junzhang; Dong, Jianwei; He, Jinlong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Yikai; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18?61 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22?58 years). A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain i...

  19. Does significant renal ablation truly and invariably lead to hyperfiltration and progressive chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Sam, Ramin

    2017-06-01

    It is generally believed that significant renal ablation leads to hyperfiltration and eventually progressively worsening chronic kidney disease. The data behind this belief have not been scrutinized intensively. More importantly, the above belief leads many physicians to manage patients differently than they otherwise would manage. Here, we examine the data behind whether hyperfiltration occurs when patients lose kidney mass (by excision or by disease) and whether the hyperfiltration is uniformly injurious.

  20. Experience of percutaneous access under ultrasound guidance in renal transplant patients with allograft lithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvano Palazzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urolithiasis of the transplanted kidney has an incidence of 0.2 to 1.7%, it increases the risk of infection in immunosuppressed patients and it can lead to ureteral obstruction that is often associated with deterioration of renal function. Urolithiasis of the transplanted kidney has different characteristics compared to the native kidney, due to the absence of innervation, which does not lead to colic pain. Percutaneous approach is an optimal choice in transplant patients. Material and methods: Here we report our experience in two cadaveric transplant patients with urolithiasis. The first case was a patient of 68 years with a 20 mm stone located in the transplanted kidney pelvis and another smaller in a lower calyx. The second case was a patient of 65 years with a 15 mm stone in the distal part of the transplanted ureter. In both cases the patients were asymptomatic, but they had a reduction in urine output associated with worsening of the transplanted kidney function. The diagnosis was performed in both cases with ultrasound study, showing a severe hydronephrosis and it was confirmed by computed tomography scan. In both cases, we performed a Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL. Access was made after targeting the stone, through a lower pole puncture under ultrasound guidance. The first case was treated with pneumatic and laser energy, breaking stones through a nephroscope. In the second case we performed a laser lithotripsy of the ureteral stone, using a flexible videoureteroscope. At the end of both procedures a Double-J stent and a 14 Fr Malecot nephrostomy were positioned, that were removed at 6 weeks and 10 days, respectively. Results: Both patients achieved a resolution of the worsening of renal function, recovering the spontaneous diuresis. The surgical procedure using ultrasound guidance was safe and allowed quick access to the renal pelvis. Both patients experienced no bleeding or infection during hospitalization. Conclusions

  1. Experience of percutaneous access under ultrasound guidance in renal transplant patients with allograft lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Silvano; Colamonico, Ottavio; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele; Martino, Pasquale

    2016-12-30

    Urolithiasis of the transplanted kidney has an incidence of 0.2 to 1.7%, it increases the risk of infection in immunosuppressed patients and it can lead to ureteral obstruction that is often associated with deterioration of renal function. Urolithiasis of the transplanted kidney has different characteristics compared to the native kidney, due to the absence of innervation, which does not lead to colic pain. Percutaneous approach is an optimal choice in transplant patients. Here we report our experience in two cadaveric transplant patients with urolithiasis. The first case was a patient of 68 years with a 20 mm stone located in the transplanted kidney pelvis and another smaller in a lower calyx. The second case was a patient of 65 years with a 15 mm stone in the distal part of the transplanted ureter. In both cases the patients were asymptomatic, but they had a reduction in urine output associated with worsening of the transplanted kidney function. The diagnosis was performed in both cases with ultrasound study, showing a severe hydronephrosis and it was confirmed by computed tomography scan. In both cases, we performed a Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Access was made after targeting the stone, through a lower pole puncture under ultrasound guidance. The first case was treated with pneumatic and laser energy, breaking stones through a nephroscope. In the second case we performed a laser lithotripsy of the ureteral stone, using a flexible videoureteroscope. At the end of both procedures a Double-J stent and a 14 Fr Malecot nephrostomy were positioned, that were removed at 6 weeks and 10 days, respectively. Both patients achieved a resolution of the worsening of renal function, recovering the spontaneous diuresis. The surgical procedure using ultrasound guidance was safe and allowed quick access to the renal pelvis. Both patients experienced no bleeding or infection during hospitalization. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an established safe and effective

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming; Yan, Fuhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ 2 = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up

  3. Clinical significance of renal cortical thickness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet; Aras, Bekir; Güneyli, Serkan; Yılmaz, Mümtaz

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between laboratory findings and ultrasonographic measurements of renal length and cortical thickness in patients receiving follow-up for chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 41 CKD patients (18 males and 23 females; mean age, 65.2 years; range, 42 to 85 years) with a low glomerular filtration rate who did not require renal replacement therapy were included in this prospective study. Patients were followed up with laboratory assays at bimonthly intervals and with ultrasonography performed twice a year. Renal cortical thickness, renal length, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values were compared using the paired-samples t test. Additionally, Pearson correlation analysis was conducted between renal length and cortical thickness measurements and eGFR values to assess kidney function. At the beginning of the study and after 24 months, mean eGFR values of the 41 patients were 35.92 mL/min and 28.38 mL/min, respectively. The mean renal length was 91.29 mm at the beginning of the study and 90.24 mm at the end of the study. The mean cortical thickness was 5.76±2.05 mm at the beginning of the study and 5.28±1.99 mm at the end of the study. A statistically significant positive association was found between eGFR and mean renal length (r=0.66, P<0.01) and between eGFR and mean cortical thickness (r=0.85, P<0.01), with the latter being more prominent. Our study suggests that ultrasonographic cortical thickness measurements may be an important imaging technique in the follow-up care of patients with CKD.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Yan, Fuhua, E-mail: zemylife@163.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ{sup 2} = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up.

  5. Incidence and Spectrum of Renal Complications and Extrarenal Diseases and Syndromes in 380 Children and Young Adults With Horseshoe Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Bo-Kyung; Kim, Hee Kyung; Horn, Paul S

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of renal complications and of extrarenal diseases and syndromes in children with horseshoe kidney (HSK). The clinical data and imaging studies of 380 subjects (median age, 2.8 years) diagnosed with HSK over a 24-year period were reviewed: 366 children and young adults and 14 fetuses, one of whom died in utero. All renal complications and extrarenal diseases and syndromes were documented. Patient age, initial imaging modality, follow-up imaging modalities, and imaging modality at diagnosis were recorded. One hundred seventy-five patients (46.1%) had renal complications. Pelvocaliectasis without an identifiable cause was the most common complication (n = 83, 21.8%) followed by vesicoureteral reflux (n = 37, 9.7%). Less common renal complications included duplex kidney, multicystic dysplastic kidney, renal stones, asymmetric renal size, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, ureteral stones, acute pyelonephritis, trauma, and renal rhabdomyosarcoma. One hundred ninety patients (50%) had extrarenal diseases or syndromes. Gastrointestinal tract (n = 62) and vertebral (n = 54) anomalies were the most common. Forty-nine patients had syndromes. Turner syndrome was the most common (n = 16) followed by caudal regression syndrome (n = 9). HSK was missed on initial imaging in 42 of 364 postnatal renal examinations and was diagnosed later. The patient groups with renal complications and with extrarenal diseases or syndromes and a missed diagnosis of HSK were significantly younger than the groups without them (p children with HSK have renal complications or extrarenal diseases or syndromes. The incidence is higher in younger children, and the spectrum of complications, diseases, and syndromes differs from those reported in previous studies of adults with HSK. Children with HSK, especially young children, therefore require follow-up renal examinations and extensive extrarenal workup.

  6. Renal microvascular disease determines the responses to revascularization in experimental renovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R; Kelsen, Silvia

    2010-08-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) is the most frequent therapeutic approach to resolving renal artery stenosis (RAS). However, renal function recovers in only 30% of the cases. The causes of these poor outcomes are still unknown. We hypothesized that preserving the renal microcirculation distal to RAS will improve the responses to PTRA. RAS was induced in 28 pigs. In 14, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-165 0.05 microg/kg was infused intrarenally (RAS+VEGF). Single-kidney function was assessed in all pigs in vivo using ultrafast CT after 6 weeks. Observation of half of the RAS and RAS+VEGF pigs was completed. The other half underwent PTRA and repeated VEGF, and CT studies were repeated 4 weeks later. Pigs were then euthanized, the stenotic kidney removed, renal microvascular (MV) architecture reconstructed ex vivo using 3D micro-CT, and renal fibrosis quantified. The degree of RAS and hypertension were similar in RAS and RAS+VEGF. Renal function and MV density were decreased in RAS but improved in RAS+VEGF. PTRA largely resolved RAS, but the improvements of hypertension and renal function were greater in RAS+VEGF+PTRA than in RAS+PTRA, accompanied by a 34% increase in MV density and decreased fibrosis. Preservation of the MV architecture and function in the stenotic kidney improved the responses to PTRA, indicating that renal MV integrity plays a role in determining the responses to PTRA. This study indicates that damage and early loss of renal MV is an important determinant of the progression of renal injury in RAS and instigates often irreversible damage.

  7. Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase in setting of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Masood, Umair; Khan, Babar; Chawla, Kunal; Manocha, Divey

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level is a rare phenomenon. This is especially true in patient with end-stage renal disease as lipase and amylase are renally excreted. Literature review reveals previous case report of pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level, however, none of them occurred in the setting of end-stage renal disease. Our case is the first such reported case of pancreatitis in such setting. Here we report a 30year old male with past medical history of end-stage renal disease who presented in emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Laboratory work up revealed normal lipase and amylase level. However, radiological work up was consistent with pancreatitis. This case report highlight the importance of taking the overall clinical picture rather than laboratory work up to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Furthermore, this should also serve an important reminder for clinicians to further investigate where clinical suspicion for pancreatitis is high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase-Mimetic Drug, Ameliorates Progression of Renal Disease in CKD Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD and antioxidants may ameliorate disease progression. We investigate the beneficial effect of Tempol, a superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, on progression of disease in a mouse model of CKD. Methods: CKD was surgically induced in c57BL/6 mice by 5/6 nephrectomy. Mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham group, 5/6 nephrectomized group (Nx and Nx+Tempol (2 mmol/l in drinking water. Mice were sacrificed at the end of 12 weeks. Renal function, structure as well as expression of key molecules involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation, fibrosis and progression in mice were measured. Results: Reduced body weight and impaired renal function (elevation on serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine albumin, segmental sclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage was demonstrated in Nx mice but was significantly improved by Tempol administration. Nx animals exhibited significantly elevated proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, activation of NF-κB, increased expression of NADPH oxidase related subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox, and elevated activation of TGF-ß/Smad3, EGFR, MAPK signaling pathway. Tempol inhibited NF-κB mediated inflammation, TGF-ß/Smad3-induced renal fibrosis as well as EGFR and MAPK signaling pathway activation. Conclusions: Tempol administration attenuated renal injury in CKD mice through NF-κB, TGF-ß/Smad3, redox-senstive EGFR activation and c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways.

  9. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase-Mimetic Drug, Ameliorates Progression of Renal Disease in CKD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Minmin; Gu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and antioxidants may ameliorate disease progression. We investigate the beneficial effect of Tempol, a superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, on progression of disease in a mouse model of CKD. CKD was surgically induced in c57BL/6 mice by 5/6 nephrectomy. Mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham group, 5/6 nephrectomized group (Nx) and Nx+Tempol (2 mmol/l in drinking water). Mice were sacrificed at the end of 12 weeks. Renal function, structure as well as expression of key molecules involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation, fibrosis and progression in mice were measured. Reduced body weight and impaired renal function (elevation on serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine albumin, segmental sclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage) was demonstrated in Nx mice but was significantly improved by Tempol administration. Nx animals exhibited significantly elevated proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, activation of NF-κB, increased expression of NADPH oxidase related subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox), and elevated activation of TGF-β/Smad3, EGFR, MAPK signaling pathway. Tempol inhibited NF-κB mediated inflammation, TGF-β/Smad3-induced renal fibrosis as well as EGFR and MAPK signaling pathway activation. Tempol administration attenuated renal injury in CKD mice through NF-κB, TGF-β/Smad3, redox-senstive EGFR activation and c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Protocols for treating patients with end-stage renal disease: a survey of nephrology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Maureen Munnelly; Howell, Scott; Patel, Nipa

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 14% of Americans are living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the result of progressing CKD continues to rise by 21,000 per year. Currently, the only antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines for patients with ESRD undergoing dental treatment were published by the AHA in 2003. Presented in three parts, the first and second parts of this study found no consistent protocols amongst U.S. dental schools and U.S. GPRs and AEGDs, respectively. The goal of the third part of the project was to determine the current protocol being used to treat ESRD patients at U.S. nephrology fellowship programs. An 18 multiple-choice question survey was e-mailed to 130 directors of nephrology fellowships within the U.S. regarding renal treatment protocol details and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with renal disease. Note that, 34.6% of respondents reported having an established renal treatment protocol. For programs with a protocol, 69% of programs reported following AHA guidelines. There is a lack of consistent, established protocols amongst U.S. nephrology fellowships. It is suggested that updated and evidence based guidelines for the safe treatment of patients be developed. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. β2-microglobulin test in the diagnosis of chronic renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trusov, V.V.; Filimonov, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the content of low molecular protein B 2 -microglobulin in the blood and urine of 126 patients with chronic renal diseases and 95 healthy persons. As a result of the study it was shown that B 2 -microglobulin concentration in the blood grows with age. The maximum level of B 2 -microglobulin was marked in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis. A high level of the urinary eXcretion of B 2 -microglobUlin with a moderate rise of its concentration in the blood is typical of patients with chronic pyehlonephritis during exacerbation. Indices of the B 2 -microglobulin test are closely related to renal function. The B 2 -microglobulin test is of great diagnostic significance as it proVides an opportunity to establish the nature of protenuria, site and expression of renal pathologic processes

  12. Role of oxidants/inflammation in declining renal function in chronic kidney disease and normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassara, Helen; Torreggiani, Massimo; Post, James B; Zheng, Feng; Uribarri, Jaime; Striker, Gary E

    2009-12-01

    Oxidant stress (OS) and inflammation increase in normal aging and in chronic kidney disease (CKD), as observed in human and animal studies. In cross-sectional studies of the US population, these changes are associated with a decrease in renal function, which is exhibited by a significant proportion of the population. However, since many normal adults have intact renal function, and longitudinal studies show that some persons maintain normal renal function with age, the link between OS, inflammation, and renal decline is not clear. In aging mice, greater oxidant intake is associated with increased age-related CKD and mortality, which suggests that interventions that reduce OS and inflammation may be beneficial for older individuals. Both OS and inflammation can be readily lowered in normal subjects and patients with CKD stage 3-4 by a simple dietary modification that lowers intake and results in reduced serum and tissue levels of advanced glycation end products. Diabetic patients, including those with microalbuminuria, have a decreased ability to metabolize and excrete oxidants prior to observable changes in serum creatinine. Thus, OS and inflammation may occur in the diabetic kidney at an early time. We review the evidence that oxidants in the diet directly lead to increased serum levels of OS and inflammatory mediators in normal aging and in CKD. We also discuss a simple dietary intervention that helps reduce OS and inflammation, an important and achievable therapeutic goal for patients with CKD and aging individuals with reduced renal function.

  13. Bilateral multiple cystic kidney disease and renal cortical abscess in a Boerboel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Kitshoffa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cystic renal disease is rare in dogs and although infected renal cysts have been reported in humans, no report could be found in dogs. A 58 kg, 5-year-old, castrated, male Boerboel presented with weight loss, pyrexia, lethargy and vomiting, 20 months after an incident of haematuria was reported. The initial ultrasonographic diagnosis was bilateral multiple renal cysts of unknown aetiology. The cysts had significantly increased in size over the 20-month period and some contained echogenic specks which could be related to infection, normal cellular debris or haemorrhage. In both kidneys the renal contours were distorted (the left more than the right. The abnormal shape of the left kidney was largely due to multiple cysts and a large crescent-shaped septate mass on the cranial pole of the kidney. Aspirates of the septate mass were performed (left kidney and the cytology and culture were indicative of an abscess. It is suggested that the previous incident of haematuria provided a portal of entry for bacteria into the cysts resulting in renal cortical abscess formation.

  14. Paraffin-based immunohistochemistry in the evaluation of glomerular diseases in renal biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, M.U.; Khadim, M.T.; Atique, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine sensitivity and specificity of paraffin-based immunohistochemistry in the evaluation of glomerular diseases in renal biopsies using immunofluorescence as gold standard. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from August 2008 to August 2009. Methodology: Seventy renal biopsy specimens fulfilling the inclusion criteria for light microscopy and immuno-fluorescence during the study period were evaluated. Antibodies to immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and components of complement system (C3) were applied on 70 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded renal biopsy specimens previously classified by means of light microscopy and immunofluorescence (IF). Staining for these antibodies was recorded as positive and negative for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and IF in paired proportions presuming IF as gold standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of individual antibody were calculated. Results: Of 70 patients, mean age was 33 +- 18 years ranging from 2 to 80 years. Forty five (64%) were males and 25 (36%) were females. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of individual antibodies to IgG, IgA, IgM and C3 were very low and generally in the range of 40 - 60%. Conclusion: The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded renal biopsy specimens were very low and therefore, not suitable for evaluation of renal biopsies in current circumstances. (author)

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Active disease and latent infection in a renal transplant cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, Nastaran; Williams, Jackie; Mulley, William R; Trauer, James M; Jenkin, Grant A; Rogers, Benjamin A

    2018-04-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious opportunistic infection in renal transplant recipients associated with high mortality. Screening and treatment of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) offers an opportunity to prevent subsequent active disease. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all adult patients who underwent renal transplantation at our centre from 2005 to 2014 to assess current screening practices, the risks for and burden of active TB. A total of 660 individuals underwent renal transplantation during this period, totalling 3647 person years of follow up. Three patients were diagnosed with active TB after renal transplant, resulting in an incidence of 82 per 100,000 person-years. Of 656 transplant recipients, 102 (15.5%) were born in high TB incidence countries and 89 (13.5%) had an interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) at any point. Individuals born in high TB risk countries had a much higher incidence of active TB (530 per 100,000 person-years). Ten individuals had positive IGRA tests, of whom two were treated for active TB, two received chemoprophylaxis and six were not treated. In the absence of formal guidelines, IGRA-based screening for LTBI was infrequently performed. Our data suggests that screening and treatment of renal transplant recipients born in high incidence countries is an important preventive measure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Nintedanib, a triple tyrosine kinase inhibitor, attenuates renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Li; Qi, Hualin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Liuqing; Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-08-15

    Nintedanib (BIBF1120) is a triple kinase inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and Src family kinase, which has recently been approved by FDA to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Whether it affects renal fibrosis remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that administration of nintedanib immediately or 3 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) injury and with folic acid (FA) injection attenuated renal fibrosis and inhibited activation of renal interstitial fibroblasts. Delayed administration of nintedanib also partially reversed established renal fibrosis. Treatment with nintedanib blocked UUO-induced phosphorylation of PDGFRβ, FGFR1, FGFR2, VEGFR2, and several Src family kinases including Src, Lck, Lyn as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and Smad-3 in the kidney. Furthermore, nintedanib inhibited UUO-elicited renal proinflammatory cytokine expression and macrophage infiltration. These data indicate that nintedanib is a potent anti-fibrotic agent in the kidney and may hold therapeutic potential as a treatment of chronic fibrotic kidney disease. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Role of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase in renal physiology and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallows, Kenneth R.; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Power, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ultrasensitive energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) orchestrates the regulation of energy-generating and energy-consuming pathways. AMPK is highly expressed in the kidney where it is reported to be involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including ion transport, podocyte function, and diabetic renal hypertrophy. Sodium transport is the major energy-consuming process in the kidney, and AMPK has been proposed to contribute to the coupling of ion transport with cellular energy metabolism. Specifically, AMPK has been identified as a regulator of several ion transporters of significance in renal physiology, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC), and the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Identified regulators of AMPK in the kidney include dietary salt, diabetes, adiponectin, and ischemia. Activation of AMPK in response to adiponectin is described in podocytes, where it reduces albuminuria, and in tubular cells, where it reduces glycogen accumulation. Reduced AMPK activity in the diabetic kidney is associated with renal accumulation of triglyceride and glycogen and the pathogenesis of diabetic renal hypertrophy. Acute renal ischemia causes a rapid and powerful activation of AMPK, but the functional significance of this observation remains unclear. Despite the recent advances, there remain significant gaps in the present understanding of both the upstream regulating pathways and the downstream substrates for AMPK in the kidney. A more complete understanding of the AMPK pathway in the kidney offers potential for improved therapies for several renal diseases including diabetic nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:20181668

  18. End-stage renal disease in India and Pakistan: incidence, causes, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhuja, Vinay; Kohli, Harbir S

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a devastating medical, social, and economic problem for patients and their families in India and Pakistan. Reliable data on the true incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in India and Pakistan are lacking because no national registries exist. Among reported cases, chronic glomerulonephritis is the most common cause, accounting for more than one third of patients, while diabetic nephropathy accounts for approximately 20% of all patients in India. Delayed diagnosis and failure to institute measures to slow the progression of renal failure have resulted in a predominantly young ESRD population, with a median age of 44 years. Because of financial constraints, less than one third of all patients referred to a tertiary care center receive any kind of renal replacement therapy. Most hemodialysis patients who stop treatment and die do so because of cost constraints within the first three months, and approximately 5% of patients are started on ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Renal transplantation is the cheapest option, but < 10% of all patients with ESRD have a transplant. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone continue to be the backbone of post-transplant immunosuppression, but cyclosporine is stopped in a significant proportion of patients at one year post-transplant to cut down costs. Living related donor transplants constitute 70% of all transplants; two thirds of the donors are females, while more than three fourths of all recipients are males. Spouses account for 20% of donors from within families. Almost 30% of transplanted kidneys are donated by living unrelated donors, while cadaver donors account for only 2%. More resources must be mobilized to care for these patients; early detection of renal disease must be facilitated, and measures to delay ESRD must be implemented.

  19. Experience of World Kidney Day 2013 at the Central Military Hospital in Bogotá: Metabolic syndrome and renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Echeverri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last decade wills have joined in the fight against the progression of chronic kidney disease. Thus, in 2006 the International Kidney Day was established, being the second Thursday of March of each year the commemorative date. In the Central Military Hospital in Bogotá, under the International Kidney Day, an educational and screening journey of renal risk factors was performed. Attendees were users of the health system of the Armed Forces of Colombia. It was found in 4.5% of the population a decline in the glomerular filtration rate according to age, with 11% presence of microalbuminuria. The metabolic syndrome is frequent in our environment and in our study population about half (52% of the attendees met the diagnostic criteria. Association between increased BMI or elevated glycosylated hemoglobin and development of microalbuminuria was identified. Campaigns are needed to control the metabolic syndrome in order to control the underlying risk for chronic kidney disease.

  20. The Impact of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Renal Function in Children with Overweight/Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; Andreoli, Gian Marco; Di Martino, Michele; Gallozzi, Alessia; De Luca, Ester; Chiesa, Claudio

    2016-07-27

    The association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease has attracted interest and attention over recent years. However, no data are available in children. We determined whether children with NAFLD show signs of renal functional alterations, as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin excretion. We studied 596 children with overweight/obesity, 268 with NAFLD (hepatic fat fraction ≥5% on magnetic resonance imaging) and 328 without NAFLD, and 130 healthy normal-weight controls. Decreased GFR was defined as eGFR children with abnormal albuminuria was also higher in the NAFLD group compared to those without NAFLD, and controls (9.3% vs. 4.0% vs. 0; p Children with NAFLD are at risk for early renal dysfunction. Recognition of this abnormality in the young may help to prevent the ongoing development of the disease.

  1. Pattern of Childhood Renal Diseases in Jos, Nigeria: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %), urinary tract infection (11.6%), nephroblastoma (7.2%), hemolytic uremic syndrome (5.3%) and polycystic kidney disease (1.5%). The commonest complication of AGN was hypertensive encephalopathy. Chronic glomerulonephritis was the ...

  2. Microalbuminuria represents a feature of advanced renal disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The systematic screening for microalbuminuria represents the touchstone to prevent CRF in patients with diabetes mellitus. Microalbuminuria has also been demonstrated in patients with sickle cell disease. Whether this has the same ...

  3. Developmental Origins of Chronic Renal Disease: An Integrative Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Boubred

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality. Hypertension (HT is one of the principal risk factors associated with death. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, which is probably underestimated, increases the risk and the severity of adverse cardiovascular events. It is now recognized that low birth weight is a risk factor for these diseases, and this relationship is amplified by a rapid catch-up growth or overfeeding during infancy or childhood. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the “early programming” of CKD are multiple and partially understood. It has been proposed that the developmental programming of arterial hypertension and chronic kidney disease is related to a reduced nephron endowment. However, this mechanism is still discussed. This review discusses the complex relationship between birth weight and nephron endowment and how early growth and nutrition influence long term HT and CKD. We hypothesize that fetal environment reduces moderately the nephron number which appears insufficient by itself to induce long term diseases. Reduced nephron number constitutes a “factor of vulnerability” when additional factors, in particular a rapid postnatal growth or overfeeding, promote the early onset of diseases through a complex combination of various pathophysiological pathways.

  4. Fetal programming of CVD and renal disease: animal models and mechanistic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley-Evans, Simon C

    2013-08-01

    The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis postulates that exposure to a less than optimal maternal environment during fetal development programmes physiological function, and determines risk of disease in adult life. Much evidence of such programming comes from retrospective epidemiological cohorts, which demonstrate associations between birth anthropometry and non-communicable diseases of adulthood. The assertion that variation in maternal nutrition drives these associations is supported by studies using animal models, which demonstrate that maternal under- or over-nutrition during pregnancy can programme offspring development. Typically, the offspring of animals that are undernourished in pregnancy exhibit a relatively narrow range of physiological phenotypes that includes higher blood pressure, glucose intolerance, renal insufficiency and increased adiposity. The observation that common phenotypes arise from very diverse maternal nutritional insults has led to the proposal that programming is driven by a small number of mechanistic processes. The remodelling of tissues during development as a consequence of maternal nutritional status being signalled by endocrine imbalance or key nutrients limiting processes in the fetus may lead to organs having irreversibly altered structures that may limit their function with ageing. It has been proposed that the maternal diet may impact upon epigenetic marks that determine gene expression in fetal tissues, and this may be an important mechanism connecting maternal nutrient intakes to long-term programming of offspring phenotype. The objective for this review is to provide an overview of the mechanistic basis of fetal programming, demonstrating the critical role of animal models as tools for the investigation of programming phenomena.

  5. Comparative study: Oral mucosal lesions, signs and symptoms in diabetes mellitus patients with end stage renal disease with analogous findings in diabetes mellitus patients with non-end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramani Senthil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to compare oral signs, symptoms and oral lesions type and prevalence, in end stage renal disease (ESRD with non-end stage renal disease (NESRD in diabetes mellitus (DM patients. Methodology: Two groups of DM patients were studied, Group 1 includes 100 patients with ESRD, who were under hemodialysis therapy, and Group 2 includes100 patients with NESRD whose serum creatinine level is <2.0 mg/dl. The DM status and other laboratory investigations were recorded, with the patients consent and thorough oral examination was performed and the findings were recorded. All the data were entered into Microsoft Excel sheets. Statistical analysis including Pearson's correlation analysis, Chi-square test, and t-test were done using SPSS software SYSTAT version 7.0. Results: On thorough clinical examination, the prevalence of oral lesions was found to be higher in ESRD patients. The most common lesions such as saburral tongue (P ≤ 0.002, petechiae/ecchymoses (P ≤ 0.000, pale mucosa (P ≤ 0.000, stomatitis medicamentosa (P ≤ 0.043 fissured tongue, smooth tongue, candidiasis, dry and fissured lips, angular cheilitis, uremic stomatitis, signs such as uremic fetor (P ≤ 0.000, xerostomia and symptoms like burning tongue, unpleasant taste are noted. Conclusion: The high prevalence of uremic fetor, saburral tongue, pale mucosa, and petechiae/ecchymoses in ESRD patient group can be considered as a possible sign of undiagnosed advanced stage of renal disease in other diabetic patients.

  6. Trends in surgical revascularization for renal artery disease: ten years' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novick, A.C.; Ziegelbaum, M.; Vidt, D.G.; Gifford, R.W. Jr.; Pohl, M.A.; AGoormastic, M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with surgical revascularization (SR) for renal artery disease (RAD) in 361 patients from 1975 through 1984 to illustrate the evolving role of SR in the management of these patients. The time intervals selected for comparison were 1975 through 1980 and 1981 through 1984. Since 1981, in patients with atherosclerosis, SR has been done more often in elderly patients (30% vs 10.4%), in patients with generalized atherosclerosis (87% vs 73%), and for the sole purpose of preserving renal function (36% vs 14%). Since 1981, fewer patients with atherosclerosis have undergone SR solely to treat renovascular hypertension (26% vs 41%). Since 1981, in patients with fibrous dysplasia, SR has been done in more patients with branch renal artery disease (70% vs 28%). These trends in performance of SR have been due to the advent of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty as effective therapy for certain patients, improved results of SR in elderly patients with atherosclerosis, an enhanced appreciation of advanced atherosclerotic RAD as a correctable cause of renal failure, and the development of more effective techniques for SR in patients with severe aortic atherosclerosis and branch RAD. The overall clinical results of SR remain excellent in properly selected patients with RAD

  7. Role of Epigenetic Histone Modifications in Diabetic Kidney Disease Involving Renal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the commonest causes of end-stage renal disease is diabetic kidney disease (DKD. Renal fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in glomerular basement membranes and the tubulointerstitium, is the final manifestation of DKD. The TGF-β pathway triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, which plays a key role in the accumulation of ECM proteins in DKD. DCCT/EDIC studies have shown that DKD often persists and progresses despite glycemic control in diabetes once DKD sets in due to prior exposure to hyperglycemia called “metabolic memory.” These imply that epigenetic factors modulate kidney gene expression. There is evidence to suggest that in diabetes and hyperglycemia, epigenetic histone modifications have a significant effect in modulating renal fibrotic and ECM gene expression induced by TGF-β1, as well as its downstream profibrotic genes. Histone modifications are also implicated in renal fibrosis through its ability to regulate the EMT process triggered by TGF-β signaling. In view of this, efforts are being made to develop HAT, HDAC, and HMT inhibitors to delay, stop, or even reverse DKD. In this review, we outline the latest advances that are being made to regulate histone modifications involved in DKD.

  8. [Prevalence of kidney disease in asymptomatic children with family history of renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Mara; Andrade Veneros, Gioconda Daniela; Toussaint Martínez de Castro, Georgina; Ortiz Vásquez, Lourdes; Hernández Sánchez, Ana María; Olvera, Nadia; Obrador Vera, Gregorio Tomás; Velásquez Jones, Luis

    Having a first- or second-degree relative with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been reported as a risk factor for CKD development. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of CKD in children with a first- or second-degree relative undergoing renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis or renal transplant). A screening study was performed in asymptomatic children with a family history of CKD in a first- or second-degree relative undergoing renal replacement therapy. Informed consent was obtained in all cases. A clinical examination was performed. Blood and urine samples were obtained for serum creatinine, serum electrolytes, urinalysis, and microalbumin/creatinine ratio. There were 45 subjects included with a median age of 9.6 years; 24 (53%) were male. Urinary abnormality/CKD was observed in 11 subjects (24.4%). The most common urinary abnormalities were hematuria (6/11) and microalbuminuria (4/11). Stage 2 CKD was found in seven subjects and four subjects with stage 1 CKD. The study of families of patients undergoing renal replacement therapy is useful to identify children in early stages of kidney disease. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. The risk of developing end-stage renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy : The RENAAL Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keane, WF; Brenner, BM; de Zeeuw, D; Grunfeld, JP; McGill, J; Mitch, WE; Ribeiro, AB; Shahinfar, S; Simpson, RL; Snapinn, SM; Toto, R

    Background. Diabetic nephropathy has become the single most important cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Strategies to slow the rate of loss of renal function in these patients have been developed. We examined the risk factors that predict loss of kidney function (doubling of serum

  10. The Significance of Serum β2-Microglobulin Measurement in Various Renal Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koong, Sung Soo; Oh, Ha Yong; Han, Jin Suk; Lee, Jung Sang

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate change of serum β 2 -microglobulin concentration (sβ 2 -MG) and the usefulness of sβ 2 -MG and sβ 2 -MG/serum creatinine concentration (sCr) ratio in various renal diseases, sβ 2 -MG and sCr were measured in 25 normal controls and 90 patients of various renal diseases (16 cases of glomerulonephritis, 12 cases of acute renal failure, 8 cases of chronic renal failure, 24 cases of nephrotic syndrome, 15 cases of tubulointerstitial diseases and 15 cases of lupus nephritis) using Phadebas β 2 -Micro Test kits. The results were as follows; 1) In normal control, the mean value of sβ 2 -MG was 1.65±0.41 mg/l and the mean value of sβ 2 -MG/sCr ratio was 0.14±0.05. 2) In various renal diseases, the mean value of sβ 2 -MG was 6.74±5.47 mg/l. The mean value of sβ 2 -MG/sCr ratio was 0.24±0.11 and significantly elevated than that of normal contro1. (P 2 -MG=0.90 log sCr-0.48 and its correlation coefficient was 0.78 (P 2 -MG and sCr was log sβ 2 -MG=0.89 log sCr-0.46 (r-0.76) and in tubulointerstitial disease, it was log sβ 2 -MG=0.95 1og sCr-0.59 (r-0.87). There was no significant difference between the two groups (p 2 -MG. The mean values of sβ 2 -MG/sCr ratio in these patients was 0.30±0.14 and significantly elevated than that of normal control (p 2 -MG with normal sCr and 12 cases showed elevated sβ 2 -MG/sCr ratio. With above results, It was found that the sβ 2 -MG can be used as an index of glomerular filtration rate as in the case of sCr and thats sβ 2 -MG/sCr ratio can be used as a tool in early detection of slightly decreased glomerular filtration rate and in detection of the renal disease of increased β 2 -MG production.

  11. YKL-40 in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ture Lange; Plesner, Louis Lind; Warming, Peder Emil; Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Dalsgaard, Morten; Schou, Morten; Høst, Ulla; Rydahl, Casper; Brandi, Lisbet; Køber, Lars; Johansen, Julia Sidenius; Kastrup, Jens; Iversen, Kasper Karmark

    2018-03-08

    This study aimed to determine serum YKL-40 in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) and to evaluate the prognostic value of serum YKL-40. Patients >18 years on maintenance HD were included. Serum YKL-40 was measured using ELISA before and after a single HD treatment. A total of 306 patients were included. Median serum YKL-40 concentration was 238 µgL -1 (IQR: 193-291 µgL -1 ) before HD treatment and 198 µgL -1 (IQR: 147-258 µgL -1 ) after HD treatment, which corresponded to age-corrected 93th percentile in healthy subjects. All-cause mortality after 2.8 years was 35.9%. Patients with serum YKL-40 in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile had a univariate HR of 4.0 (95% CI: 2.2-7.3, p 40 after HD treatment had significant higher area under the curves from 90 d (p = 0.004) and throughout the rest of the follow-up period when compared to serum YKL-40 before HD treatment. YKL-40 was highly elevated in patients with ESRD on HD, and dialysis reduced serum YKL-40 concentrations approximately one-sixth. YKL-40 measured after dialysis was independently associated with mortality in HD patients.

  12. Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chronic renal disease (CRD is a predisposing factor for the occurrence of soft and hard tissue lesions in the oral cavity. The cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF is an uncommon benign fibroosseous lesion composed of fibrocellular component and calcified materials like cementum and woven bone. A 37-year-old female patient undergoing chronic haemodialysis reported to our institution with a complaint of slow growing, nontender swelling of mandible of 6-month duration. Computed tomography disclosed an ill-defined lesion showing thinning and expansion of buccal as well as lingual cortical plate with flecks of radiopacity in centre. Incision biopsy revealed histological characteristics consistent with cemento-ossifying fibroma. The lesion was excised under local anesthesia. The histopathological examination revealed irregularly shaped bone and cementum-like hard tissue calcifications contained within hypercellular fibrous tissue stroma, leading to a confirmation of the diagnosis of cemento-ossifying fibroma. This paper aims to provide light to the fact that the soft and hard tissues of the oral region may become susceptible to the development of pathological growths in case of some particular systemic conditions.

  13. Prevalence of Baseline Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients Presenting with Solid Renal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Daniel; Kutikov, Alexander; Sirohi, Mohit; Street, Ryan; Viterbo, Rosalia; Chen, David YT; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Serum creatinine (sCr) inadequately reflects renal function. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and CKD stage are more clinically relevant parameters to reflect the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients following nephron loss. Comparing sCr and eGFR, we evaluated the prevalence of baseline CKD in a large cohort of patients presenting with renal masses to a tertiary care center. Methods Using the prospectively maintained Fox Chase Kidney Cancer Database, we identified patients undergoing kidney surgery between 1/2000– 5/2010. eGFR was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and the CKDEpidemiology formulas. CKD stages I–V were defined using the National Kidney Foundation definitions. Results 1114 patients had adequate data available to calculate a preoperative eGFR (ml/min). Although 88% of all patients presenting for surgery at our institution had a “normal” baseline sCr (≤1.4 mg/dl), 22% of patients had CKD Stage III or greater. Moreover, of the 282 patients 70 years and older, 40% (113/282) had CKD stage III. 23% (51/220) of patients older than 70 years had a CKD stage III with a seemingly normal sCr. Conclusions Many patients with a normal sCr have CKD III or higher, particularly patients older 70 years old. Given the high prevalence of baseline CKD in patients with a solid renal tumor, a concerted effort must be made to preserve renal function when surgically treating solid renal masses. PMID:21316090

  14. RENAL COMPLICATIONS IN GLYCOGEN-STORAGE-DISEASE TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REITSMABIERENS, WCC

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase is the biochemical defect in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Normally this enzyme is present in the liver, intestine and kidneys. The lack of the enzyme in the kidney makes it obvious that glycogen storage will not be restricted to the liver

  15. Hypertension, end-stage renal disease and mesangiocapillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methamphetamine abuse has risen dramatically in South Africa. The chronic effects of abuse on the kidneys and blood pressure have not been documented. This study reviewed patients referred for evaluation of kidney disease and/or hypertension, who had been abusing methamphetamines. Methods: The ...

  16. Thyroid hormone levels in patients with chronic renal failure under haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Ahmed Shukralla M.

    1998-06-01

    This study was conducted with three main objectives, to study thyroid hormones (T 4 , T 3 ) and TSH levels in patients with CRF under haemodialysis and to compare them with normal subjects, to study best means of treatment and to compare these findings with results from other parts of the world. This study was done on 61 patients with renal failure in Khartoum dialysis and kidney transplant centre U of K, 45 males and 16 females with ages ranging from 17-75 years and 42 symptoms-free subjects 14 males and 23 females with age ranging from 16-60 years. The radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique was used for the determination of serum T 4 , T 3 and TSH. By using t-test found that the mean concentrations of T 4 , T 3 of normal subjects were much higher than those of the patients (p 0.05). These results also illustrated that 45.9% of patients with renal failure of low T 4 , and 91.8%, 90.26 of patients had T 3 and TSH hormone levels in the normal range, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the mean of thyroid hormones (T 4 , T 3 ) and thyroid-stimulating hormones between males and females (p>0.05). The T 3 and T '4 concentrations in patients at all age groups (year) was less than the age groups of the control group, and this decrease was statistically significant (p 0.05).(Author)

  17. Relative risk of renal disease among people living with HIV: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Fakhrul M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART has substantially decreased mortality and HIV-related morbidity. However, other morbidities appear to be more common among PLHIV than in the general population. This study aimed to estimate the relative risk of renal disease among people living with HIV (PLHIV compared to the HIV-uninfected population. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of relative risks of renal disease among populations of PLHIV reported in studies from the peer-reviewed literature. We searched Medline for relevant journal articles published before September 2010, yielding papers published during or after 2002. We also searched conference proceedings of the International AIDS Society (IAS and Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI prior to and including 2010. Eligible studies were observational studies reporting renal disease defined as acute or chronic reduced renal function with glomerular filtration rate less than or equal to 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 among HIV-positive adults. Pooled relative risks were calculated for various groupings, including class of ART drugs administered. Results The overall relative risk of renal disease was 3.87 (95% CI: 2.85-6.85 among HIV-infected people compared to HIV-uninfected people. The relative risk of renal disease among people with late-stage HIV infection (AIDS was 3.32 (1.86-5.93 compared to other PLHIV. The relative risk of renal disease among PLHIV who were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART was 0.54 (0.29-0.99 compared to treatment-naïve PLHIV; the relative risk of renal disease among PLHIV who were treated with tenofovir was 1.56 (0.83-2.93 compared to PLHIV who were treated with non-tenofovir therapy. The risk of renal disease was also found to significantly increase with age. Conclusion PLHIV are at increased risk of renal disease, with greater risk at later stages of infection and at older ages. ART prolongs survival and decreases the

  18. Relative risk of renal disease among people living with HIV: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Fakhrul M; Wu, Jianyun; Jansson, James; Wilson, David P

    2012-03-23

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has substantially decreased mortality and HIV-related morbidity. However, other morbidities appear to be more common among PLHIV than in the general population. This study aimed to estimate the relative risk of renal disease among people living with HIV (PLHIV) compared to the HIV-uninfected population. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of relative risks of renal disease among populations of PLHIV reported in studies from the peer-reviewed literature. We searched Medline for relevant journal articles published before September 2010, yielding papers published during or after 2002. We also searched conference proceedings of the International AIDS Society (IAS) and Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) prior to and including 2010. Eligible studies were observational studies reporting renal disease defined as acute or chronic reduced renal function with glomerular filtration rate less than or equal to 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 among HIV-positive adults. Pooled relative risks were calculated for various groupings, including class of ART drugs administered. The overall relative risk of renal disease was 3.87 (95% CI: 2.85-6.85) among HIV-infected people compared to HIV-uninfected people. The relative risk of renal disease among people with late-stage HIV infection (AIDS) was 3.32 (1.86-5.93) compared to other PLHIV. The relative risk of renal disease among PLHIV who were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) was 0.54 (0.29-0.99) compared to treatment-naïve PLHIV; the relative risk of renal disease among PLHIV who were treated with tenofovir was 1.56 (0.83-2.93) compared to PLHIV who were treated with non-tenofovir therapy. The risk of renal disease was also found to significantly increase with age. PLHIV are at increased risk of renal disease, with greater risk at later stages of infection and at older ages. ART prolongs survival and decreases the risk of renal disease. However, less reduction in renal

  19. Chronic renal disease is not chronic kidney disease: implications for use of the QRISK and Joint British Societies risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sarah L; Stevens, Richard J; Hobbs, F D Richard; Lasserson, Daniel S

    2016-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and European guidelines advocate assessment of CVD risk. QRISK and JBS3 risk calculators do not use the consensus definition of CKD stages 3-5 but instead use a definition referring to renal pathologies and CKD stages 4 and 5. Consequently, there is potential for doctors to misclassify their patients when using these risk calculators. To quantify the number of people who may be affected by such misclassifications. Database analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD).We identified 2512053 adults aged 25-84 without prior history of CVD on 1st January 2014. We identified those with 'chronic renal disease' and/or CKD by searching medical event history data. The study population was 48.7% male with mean age of 50.2 years. A total of 80718 had diagnostic READ codes for CKD stages 3, 4 or 5. Of these, 6585 individuals (8.2%) were classified as having 'chronic renal disease' according to the updated QRISK 2014, up from 3365 according to QRISK 2013. Whilst the updated QRISK definition of 'chronic renal disease' in total identified 62% more people than previously and had improved sensitivity for CKD stages 3 to 5, sensitivity remained poor (8.16%; 95% CI: 7.97-8.35%). Misuse of risk scores by general practitioners could result in clinically important differences in risk estimates. Users of risk scores should recognize the potential for error and developers should aim to label risk factors more clearly. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Clinical approach to quality of life in children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Hyun

    2013-08-01

    Quality of life in addition to various medical problems in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) should be objectively assessed to accomplish normal growth and development during childhood. However, unfortunately, studies of quality of life (QoL) in children with ESRD have been not popular yet and there are only fewer suitable assessment tools compared with adults. Recently, disease-specific modules to evaluate QoL in children with chronic disease such as ESRD have been developed. This review was made to introduce these QoL instruments for children and help the clinical application of them.

  1. Renal Failure: A Modern Semiology for an Old Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuto, Michelangelo; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Cotten, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex systemic disease that induces mineral metabolic dysfunction leading to bone fragility and tissue calcifications. Bone abnormalities in CKD can include increased bone turnover and resorption due to secondary hyperparathyroidism, decreased bone turnover and bone formation, defective bone mineralization, or a mixed pattern of these abnormalities. Other features of musculoskeletal involvement include synovial, tendon, and ligament thickening due to β2-microglobulin amyloidosis, soft tissue masses, or axial and peripheral arthropathies. The accurate assessment of bone involvement in early-stage CKD is crucial for the success of therapeutic interventions. We summarize the key semiologic features of bone abnormalities in CKD and review musculoskeletal complications as depicted by conventional radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound imaging. We also discuss different experimental diagnostic approaches developed for the purpose of identifying changes in bone quality and structure in early-stage CKD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Nocardia cyriacigeorgica bacteraemia presenting with cytomegalovirus disease and rapidly fatal pneumonia in a renal transplant patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddin Mashuk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nocardia cyriacigeorgica bacteraemia has been described in the setting of profound immunodeficiency in only two previous case reports. In both instances, diagnosis was rapidly facilitated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of blood culture isolates. To the best of our knowledge, we believe that our case is the first presentation of N. cyriacigeorgica bacteraemia associated with acute cytomegalovirus disease in a kidney transplant recipient, which was then followed by severe and fatal pneumonia only seven days later. Case presentation We present the case of a 73-year-old Caucasian woman, a renal transplant recipient, with peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, osteoporosis and vascular dementia who was diagnosed with septicemia and pneumonia. In spite of appropriate anti-microbial therapy for nocardial sepsis, she developed severe pneumonia and acute renal failure. Conclusion This case illustrates a potential for disseminated nocardial infection to produce clinical syndromes that may be indistinguishable from acute cytomegalovirus disease. An atypical presentation (pneumonia and renal failure of a rare disease (nocardial septicemia in the setting of renal transplantation is discussed. This case illustrates that the possibility of severe cytomegalovirus disease should be considered in renal transplanted patients diagnosed with nocardial septicemia who subsequently develop severe sepsis, pneumonia, and renal failure. Molecular diagnosis should readily be available to assist with the prompt diagnosis and treatment of these infections in renal transplant patients.

  3. Prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome in hemodialyzed patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkowiec, I; Klawe, J J; Tafil-Klawe, M; Jeske, K; Laudencka, A; Bielicka, B; Manitius, J; Zlomańczuk, P

    2006-09-01

    The majority of hemodialyzed patients suffer from sleep disturbances. In the present study the prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome in hemodialyzed patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD-patients) was investigated by the survey, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and polysomnography (PSG). Sixty-one patients: 24 women and 37 men were involved in the study. All subjects participated in the first part of the study consisting of the survey and ESS. The second and third parts consisted of nighttime PSG, performed the night after hemodialysis (17 patients) and between hemodialyses (11 patients). Eleven out of the 61 patients had the symptoms of sleep apnea and heavy daily sleepiness. Eleven subjects were involved in the double PSG study: after and between hemodialyses. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 7 of those patients during both nights analyzed. Our results confirm the occurrence of sleep disorders in ESRD-patients. Hemodialysis does not change the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in chronic renal disease.

  4. Cardiac surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäck, Caroline; Hornum, Mads; Møller, Christian Joost Holdflod

    2017-01-01

    were age (p = .001), diabetes (p = .017) and active endocarditis (p = .012). CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference in mortality was found between patients in hemo- or peritoneal dialysis. However, we observed that patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis have two times higher...... and 2015, 136 patients with end-stage renal disease initiating dialysis more than one month before surgery underwent cardiac surgery. Demographics, preoperative hemodynamic and biochemical data were collected from the patient records. Vital status and date of death was retrieved from a national register....... RESULTS: Hemodialysis was undertaken in 73% and peritoneal dialysis in 22% of patients aged 59.7 ± 12.9 years, mean EuroSCORE 8.6% ± 3.5. Isolated coronary artery bypass graft was performed in 46%, isolated valve procedure in 29% and combined procedures in 24% with no significant statistical difference...

  5. Renal oxygenation and hemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhleen; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Nordquist, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Acute kidney injury (AKI) puts a major burden on health systems that may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radio-contrast administration as well as sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). 2. Although the mechanisms for development of AKI and progression of CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance is likely to constitute a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that will in turn induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop-diuretics, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and atrial natriuretic peptide, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. PMID:23360244

  6. Renal status of children with sickle cell disease in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei-Yeboah, C T; Rodrigues, O

    2011-12-01

    In West Africa, the prevalence of sickle cell disease (SCD) is 2%. The disease adversely affects growth, development and organ function including the kidneys. There is however a dearth of information about the renal status of SCD children in Ghana. To assess the renal status of children with SCD in steady state. A cross-sectional case-control study. Paediatric Sickle Cell Clinic, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra. Cases-357 SCD cases and 70 of their HbAA siblings as controls. Documentation of their socio-demographic data, clinical data and dipstick urinalysis findings, and renal ultrasonography on selected participants. The mean [SD] age was 7.18 [3.15]yrs for cases and 5.16[3.28]yrs for controls. The genotypes were Hb SS (76.7%), Hb SC (21.8 %), and Hb Sβthal (1.4%). Urinalysis showed leucocyturia in 12.6% versus 5.7% (χ2=62.5 and the p=0.000)), isolated proteinuria in 2.8% versus 1.43% (χ2=10.01 and p=0.001) haematuria in 2.6% versus 0% (χ2=9.233, p=0.002) and nitrites in 2.2% versus 1.4% (χ2=16.3,p=0.02) of cases and controls respectively. The youngest SCD case with proteinuria was 2 yrs. old. Proteinuria prevalence increased with age, , occurring in 5.7% of cases aged 9-11yrs. and 20.6% of cases aged 12 yrs. Two-thirds of the proteinuria cases were aged 9-12 yrs., of whom 50% were aged 12 yrs. Renal ultrasound findings were normal in all those examined. Urinary abnormalities suggesting nephropathy occur early in SCD patients in Ghana. Routine dipstick screening at clinic visits countrywide would help early detection and prompt intervention to limit renal impairment.

  7. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney: an analysis of the ERA-EDTA Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wühl, Elke; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Wanner, Christoph; Ariceta, Gema; Heaf, James Goya; Bjerre, Anna K.; Palsson, Runolfur; Duneau, Gabrielle; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Ravani, Pietro; Schaefer, Franz; Jager, Kitty J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increased efforts have been undertaken to address the needs of patients with rare diseases by international initiatives and consortia devoted to rare disease research and management. However, information on the overall prevalence of rare diseases within the end-stage renal disease

  8. Restless Legs Syndrome in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Haemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Irfan; Anees, Muhammad; Shahid, Syed Adnan Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was cross sectional survey conducted to find the prevalence of Restless legs syndrome (RLS) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on haemodialysis (HD). Methods: Data were obtained from 250 patients on chronic maintenance HD. To assess the prevalence of RLS, Clinical diagnostic criteria for RLS was used which is established by the International RLS Study Group. Results: Total 250 patients were included in this study. 153 (61.2%) patients were male and 97 (38.8%) wer...

  9. Strategies for glucose control in a study population with diabetes, renal disease and anemia (Treat study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrauch, Larry A; D'Elia, John A; Finn, Peter; Lewis, Eldrin F; Desai, Akshay S; Claggett, Brian L; Cooper, Mark E; McGill, Janet B

    2016-03-01

    Glucose lowering medication use among patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced renal disease (eGFRrenal disease advances, most of the oral anti-diabetic agents requiring renal clearance must be reduced or discontinued. The potential for prolonged hypoglycemia, fluid/volume overload and congestive heart failure may complicate medication choices. In order to evaluate patterns of glycemia management we describe glucose lowering medication use among patients with advanced renal disease and type 2 diabetes in a large multinational outcome trial designed to focus on patients with eGFRrenal function when compared with standard populations with normal kidney function. The use of multiple oral agents, or oral agents plus insulin was quite common. While gender did not appear to play a role in medication choices, there were significant regional variations. For example, oral agents were used more in North America compared with other regions (Latin America, Australia/Western Europe, Russia/Eastern Europe). Patients enrolled at more advanced ages were less likely to be on a regimen of rapid-acting insulin alone consistent with recommendations that suggest a preference for longer-acting preparations in the geriatric population (1). Higher degrees of obesity were associated more complex treatment regimens. Despite this population being at high risk for cardiovascular events, the use of beta blockers (50%), statins (64%) and aspirin (48%) were relatively low, especially in the group that did not require medications to achieve adequate glycemic control. Current attempts to compare strategies for diabetes therapy must control for baseline demographic group differences influencing treatment choice. Future recommendations for glycemic control in patients with Grade 3 or higher chronic kidney disease require additional studies, with matched populations. We suggest that evaluation of studies similar to TREAT will assist in determining the optimal therapeutic regimens for populations

  10. Ischemic Stroke among the Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Who Were Undergoing Maintenance Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, San; Kwon, Seok-Beom; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Noh, Jung Woo; Lee, Young-Ki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In spite of higher incidence of stroke in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients compared to general population, the risk factor for stroke which is specific to ESRD is not fully understood. The ESRD patients who develop stroke may have certain additional risk factors compared to ESRD patients without stroke. We used registered data of Hallym Stroke Registry to elucidate the factors which affect development of ischemic stroke among the dialysis patients. Materials and Methods We recr...

  11. The kinetics of urinary shedding of BK virus in children with renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2015-01-01

    Children with renal diseases are typically treated with immunosuppressive drugs, which place them at high risk of reactivation of the BK virus (BKV). Currently, little is known about the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on the kinetics of urinary shedding of BKV and viral reactivation in pediatric patients with renal diseases. Urine samples were collected monthly for 1 year from 20 children (median age, 9 years; range, 4-15 years) with renal diseases and subjected to real-time PCR. Urinary shedding of BKV was detected in 35% (7/20) of the patients, three of these patients having persistent viral DNA excretion (two cases, twelve times; one case, four times) and four having intermittent viral DNA excretion. Thirty-four of the 240 urine samples contained BKV DNA (median copy numbers, 5.66 log copies/mL; range, 2.45-7.69 log copies/mL). In two of the cases with persistent viral shedding, high copy numbers (range, 4.57-7.69 log copies/mL) of BKV DNA were detected in all 12 urine samples collected. In the other case with persistent viral excretion, a range of 2.45-3.98 log copies/mL of BKV DNA was detected in the four urine samples collected between the 9th and 12th sampling time points. Additionally, high copy numbers (range, 3.12-4.36 log copies/mL) of BKV DNA were detected intermittently in the urine samples of the other four cases. No remarkable correlations were found between the kinetics of BKV DNA loads and urinary findings such as proteinuria and hematuria. The present data demonstrate the kinetics of urinary BKV shedding in pediatric patients with renal diseases. Additionally, no pathogenic role for BKV infection was identified. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. The Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunction among the Patients with End Stage Renal Disease in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, K K; Soyibo, A K; James, K; Barton, E N

    2013-12-01

    Sexual performance and gratification impact quality of life. Although recognized in the literature as a problem, sexual dysfunction among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) has never been studied in Jamaica. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was determined among 268 adult Jamaican patients (166 males, 102 females) with ESRD who had been on haemodialysis for at least three months. Erectile dysfunction (ED) was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) was determined using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 classifications of sexual disorders. Prevalence, severity of sexual dysfunctions and relationships with the primary aetiology of ESRD and anaemia were assessed. Erectile dysfunction, desire and orgasmic disorderS were found in 91.4%, 88.3%, and 81.6% of male subjects, respectively. The majority of male patients were dissatisfied with their performance at intercourse after progressing to ESRD. Hypoactive sexual disorder, sexual arousal and orgasmic disorders, and aversion sexual disorder were prevalent, found in 96%, 88.1% and 87.1% of female patients. All diabetic patients with ESRD reported hypoactive sexual disorder and orgasmic dysfunction; arousal disorder was found in 94.7%. Aversion sexual disorder was found more among patients with underlying chronic glomerulonephritis. All patients with severe anaemia were found to have hypoactive sexual disorder and among these, 87.5% and 97.8% had severe arousal and orgasmic disorders, respectively. Sexual dysfunction among patients with ESRD in Jamaica was prevalent in males and females. Associations exist between sexual dysfunction and diabetes mellitus, chronic glomerulonephritis and anaemia.

  13. KIR and Human Leukocyte Antigen Genotype Associated Risk of Cytomegalovirus Disease in Renal Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelo, Clive M; van der Meer, Arnold; Tijssen, Henk J; Zomer, Ramona; Stelma, Foekje; Hilbrands, Luuk B; Joosten, Irma

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus(CMV) infections have a significant effect on morbidity and mortality in kidney transplants. We conducted a study to ascertain the association of natural killer cell killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype with risk of CMV disease. The 90 CMV-negative patients receiving a first renal transplantation from a CMV-positive donor in this study received triple immunosuppressive therapy and prophylactic CMV treatment for up to 3 months after transplantation. We observed a 43.3% incidence rate of CMV disease within the first year after transplantation. Twenty-seven recipients experienced a rejection episode, 14 of which had CMV disease, mostly after rejection, suggesting that in this group, CMV disease is not a risk factor for rejection. KIR gene or genotype distribution were similar between the CMV diseased and CMV disease-free group. Twenty-seven recipients (30%) carried KIR-AA genotype, of which nine (33%) had CMV disease. Of the remaining 63 (70%) recipients with KIR-BX genotype, 30 (48%) had CMV disease. There was no significant difference between the two genotype groups with regard to occurrence of CMV disease, although there was a trend toward a lower incidence of CMV disease in recipients carrying the KIR-AA genotype. For CMV disease, we found no significant risk associated with the number of activating or inhibitory KIRs. Neither was missing KIR ligands for the inhibitory KIRs (HLA-C1/C2/Bw4) in recipients associated with lower rates of CMV disease. In CMV-negative recipients, genotypic analysis of KIR repertoire and HLA ligands does not provide risk factors for primary CMV disease after renal transplantation.

  14. Bidirectional relationship between renal function and periodontal disease in older Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Masanori; Miyazaki, Hideo; Nakamura, Kazutoshi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reciprocal effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and periodontal disease. A total of 332 postmenopausal never smoking women were enrolled, and their serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum osteocalcin and serum cystatin C levels were measured. Poor renal function was defined as serum cystatin C > 0.91 mg/l. Periodontal disease markers, including clinical attachment level and the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA), were also evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationships between renal function and periodontal disease markers, serum osteocalcin level and hsCRP level. The prevalence-rate ratios (PRRs) on multiple Poisson regression analyses were determined to evaluate the relationships between periodontal disease markers and serum osteocalcin, serum cystatin C and serum hsCRP levels. On logistic regression analysis, PISA was significantly associated with serum cystatin C level. The odds ratio for serum cystatin C level was 2.44 (p = 0.011). The PRR between serum cystatin C level and periodontal disease markers such as number of sites with clinical attachment level ≥6 mm was significantly positive (3.12, p periodontal disease can have reciprocal effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Inhibition of G0/G1 Switch 2 Ameliorates Renal Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Matsunaga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a global health problem, and novel therapies to treat CKD are urgently needed. Here, we show that inhibition of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0s2 ameliorates renal inflammation in a mouse model of CKD. Renal expression of chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (Ccl2 was increased in response to p65 activation in the kidneys of wild-type 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx mice. Moreover, 5/6Nx Clk/Clk mice, which carry homozygous mutations in the gene encoding circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK, did not exhibit aggravation of apoptosis or induction of F4/80-positive cells. The renal expression of G0s2 in wild-type 5/6Nx mice was important for the transactivation of Ccl2 by p65. These pathologies were ameliorated by G0s2 knockdown. Furthermore, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of G0s2 expression was identified by high-throughput chemical screening, and the inhibitor suppressed renal inflammation in 5/6Nx mice. These findings indicated that G0s2 inhibitors may have applications in the treatment of CKD.

  16. A Spanish version for the new ERA-EDTA coding system for primary renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurriaga, Óscar; López-Briones, Carmen; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; Saracho-Rotaeche, Ramón; Moina Eguren, Íñigo; Pallardó Mateu, Luis; Abad Díez, José María; Sánchez Miret, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The European Renal Association and the European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) have issued an English-language new coding system for primary kidney disease (PKD) aimed at solving the problems that were identified in the list of "Primary renal diagnoses" that has been in use for over 40 years. In the context of Registro Español de Enfermos Renales (Spanish Registry of Renal Patients, [REER]), the need for a translation and adaptation of terms, definitions and notes for the new ERA-EDTA codes was perceived in order to help those who have Spanish as their working language when using such codes. Bilingual nephrologists contributed a professional translation and were involved in a terminological adaptation process, which included a number of phases to contrast translation outputs. Codes, paragraphs, definitions and diagnostic criteria were reviewed and agreements and disagreements aroused for each term were labelled. Finally, the version that was accepted by a majority of reviewers was agreed. A wide agreement was reached in the first review phase, with only 5 points of discrepancy remaining, which were agreed on in the final phase. Translation and adaptation into Spanish represent an improvement that will help to introduce and use the new coding system for PKD, as it can help reducing the time devoted to coding and also the period of adaptation of health workers to the new codes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Renal Transplant Recipient Attending Duhok Kidney Disease Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, N R; Saleem, Z S M; Balatay, A A; Abd, K H; Daniel, S; Taha, A A; Ibrahim, N M R; Assafi, M S

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer in the general population. Although dyspeptic complaints are frequent in renal transplant subjects, the role of H pylori in such complaints is not clear. This study was conducted to examine the prevalence of H pylori infection in patients with renal transplant and its role in the development of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptoms. We compared the prevalence of H pylori in 109 renal transplant subjects with the prevalence of 161 healthy volunteers using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure anti-H pylori IgG. Then, within the transplant group, we stratified our data in accordance with different variables, including upper GIT symptoms, sex, education level, smoking, and dialysis history. The prevalence of H pylori in the control group was 111 of 161 (68.9%), which was significantly higher than that found in renal transplant subjects (48/109; 43.04%; P = .001). Within the transplant group, no association was found between immunoglobulin G positivity and different variables including upper GIT symptoms, sex, education level, smoking, and dialysis history. The prevalence of H pylori was lower in transplant subjects than that of general population. Upper GIT symptoms were equally found in both groups. Hence, the routine eradication of H pylori might not be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Total renal denervation reduces sympathoexcitation to different target organs in a model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Glaucia L; Nishi, Erika E; Estrela, Heder F; Lincevicius, Gisele S; Gomes, Guiomar N; Simões Sato, Alex Y; Campos, Ruy R; Bergamaschi, Cássia T

    2017-05-01

    It is known that increased sympathetic nerve activity in chronic kidney disease (CKD) progressively worsens kidney function and hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that total renal denervation contributes to reduce sympathetic activation to different beds and improves renal function in 5/6 nephrectomy model of CKD in male Wistar rats. After eight weeks of 5/6 nephrectomy surgery there was an increase in mean arterial pressure (CKD 179±22mmHg, n=6 vs. control animals 108±9; pkidney, splanchnic and lumbar beds compared to control (CTL) group (CKD rSNA: 150±50, n=9 vs. CTL 96±15, n=9; CKD sSNA: 129±51, n=5 vs. CTL 34±14, n=6; CKD lSNA: 203±35, n=8 vs. CTL 146±21, spikes/s, n=7, prenal denervation (DNX) MAP was normalized in the CKD rats (124±19mmHg, n=5, pRenal function, assessed by creatinine plasma levels was improved after renal denervation (CKD 1.50±0.64, n=8; vs. CKD+DNX 0.82±0.22mg/mL, n=8, prenal nerves contribute to the maintenance of hypertension in CKD by increasing sympathoexcitation to other beds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. BP and Renal Outcomes in Diabetic Kidney Disease: The Veterans Affairs Nephropathy in Diabetes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leehey, David J; Zhang, Jane H; Emanuele, Nicholas V; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Palevsky, Paul M; Reilly, Robert F; Guarino, Peter; Fried, Linda F

    2015-12-07

    Proteinuric diabetic kidney disease frequently progresses to ESRD. Control of BP delays progression, but the optimal BP to improve outcomes remains unclear. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the relationship between BP and renal outcomes in proteinuric diabetic kidney disease. BP data from all 1448 randomized participants in the Veterans Affairs Nephropathy in Diabetes Trial were included in a post hoc analysis. The associations of mean on-treatment BP with the primary end point (decline in eGFR, ESRD, or death), renal end point (decline in eGFR or ESRD), rate of eGFR decline, and mortality were measured. The median (25th, 75th percentile) follow-up time was 2.2 (1.2, 3.0) years. There were 284 primary end points. In univariate analyses, both mean systolic and mean diastolic BPs were strongly associated (Prenal end point and rate of eGFR decline were similar to those with the primary end point. No association of BP with mortality was observed, possibly because of the limited number of mortality events. In patients with proteinuric diabetic kidney disease, mean systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and mean diastolic BP ≥ 80 mmHg were associated with worse renal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. End-stage renal disease in Japanese children: a nationwide survey during 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Motoshi; Sako, Mayumi; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Ashida, Akira; Matsunaga, Akira; Igarashi, Tohru; Itami, Noritomo; Ohta, Toshiyuki; Gotoh, Yoshimitsu; Satomura, Kenichi; Honda, Masataka; Igarashi, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children is considered a rare, but serious condition. Epidemiological and demographic information on pediatric ESRD patients around the world is important to better understand this disease and to improve patient care. The Japanese Society for Pediatric Nephrology (JSPN) reported epidemiological and demographic data in 1998. Since then, however, there has been no nationwide survey on Japanese children with ESRD. The JSPN conducted a cross-sectional nationwide survey in 2012 to update information on the incidence, primary renal disease, initial treatment modalities, and survival in pediatric Japanese patients with ESRD aged less than 20 years during the period 2006-2011. The average incidence of ESRD was 4.0 per million age-related population. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract were the most common cause of ESRD, present in 39.8 % of these patients. In addition, 12.2 % had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and 5.9 % had glomerulonephritis. Initial treatment modalities in patients who commenced renal replacement therapy (RRT) consisted of peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, and pre-emptive transplantation (Tx) in 61.7, 16.0, and 22.3 %, respectively. The Japanese RRT mortality rate was 18.2 deaths per 1000 person-years of observation. The incidence of ESRD is lower in Japanese children than in children of other high-income countries. Since 1998, notably, there has been a marked increase in pre-emptive Tx as an initial treatment modality for Japanese children with ESRD.

  1. INfluence of Successful Periodontal Intervention in REnal Disease (INSPIRED): study protocol for a randomised controlled pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praveen; Cockwell, Paul; Dietrich, Thomas; Ferro, Charles; Ives, Natalie; Chapple, Iain L C

    2017-11-13

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit increased morbidity and mortality which is associated with an increased systemic inflammatory burden. Identifying and managing comorbid diseases that contribute to this load may inform novel care pathways that could have a beneficial impact on the morbidity/mortality associated with CKD. Periodontitis, a highly prevalent, chronic inflammatory disease affecting the supporting structures of teeth, is associated with an increased systemic inflammatory and oxidative stress burden and the successful treatment of periodontitis has been shown to reduce both. This pilot study aims to gather data to inform a definitive study into the impact of successful periodontal treatment on the cardio-renal health of patients with CKD. This pilot study will employ a randomised, controlled, parallel-group design. Sixty adult patients, with CKD with a high risk of progression and with periodontitis, from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, will be randomised to receive either immediate, intensive periodontal treatment (n = 30) or treatment at a delay of 12 months (n = 30). Patients will be excluded if they have reached end-stage renal disease or have received specialist periodontal treatment in the previous year. Periodontal treatment will be delivered under local anaesthetic, on an outpatient basis, over several visits by a qualified dental hygienist at the Birmingham Dental Hospital, UK. Patients in the delayed-treatment arm will continue to receive the standard community level of periodontal care for a period of 12 months followed by the intensive periodontal treatment. Randomization will occur using a centralised telephone randomisation service, following baseline assessments. The assessor of periodontal health will be blinded to the patients' treatment allocation. Patients in either arm will be followed up at 3-monthly intervals for 18 months. Aside from the pilot outcomes to inform the practicalities of a larger

  2. Small Renal Masses Progressing to Metastases under Active Surveillance: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Marc C.; Kutikov, Alexander; Egleston, Brian L.; Canter, Daniel J.; Viterbo, Rosalia; Chen, David Y.T.; Jewett, Michael A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a systematic review and pooled analysis of small renal masses under active surveillance to identify progression risk and characteristics associated with metastases. Materials and Methods A MEDLINE search was performed to identify all clinical series reporting surveillance of localized renal masses. For studies reporting individual level data, clinical and radiographic characteristics of tumors without progression were compared to those progressing to metastases. Results 18 series (880 patients, 936 masses) met screening criteria from which 18 patients progressing to metastasis were identified (mean 40.2 months). Six studies (259 patients, 284 masses) provided individual level data for pooled analysis. With a mean follow up of 33.5±22.6 months, mean initial tumor diameter was 2.3±1.3 cm and mean linear growth rate was 0.31±0.38 cm/year. 65 masses (23%) exhibited zero net growth under surveillance; of which none progressed to metastasis. Pooled analysis revealed increased age (75.1±9.1 vs. 66.6±12.3 years, p=0.03), initial tumor diameter (4.1±2.1 vs. 2.3±1.3 cm, p<0.0001), initial estimated tumor volume (66.3±100.0 vs. 15.1±60.3 cm3, p<0.0001), linear growth rate (0.8±0.65 vs. 0.3±0.4 cm/yr, p=0.0001), and volumetric growth rate (27.1±24.9 vs. 6.2±27.5 cm3/yr, p<0.0001) in the progression cohort. Conclusions A substantial proportion of small renal masses remain radiographically static following an initial period of active surveillance. Progression to metastases occurs in a small percentage of patients and is generally a late event. These results indicate that in patients with competing health risks, radiographic surveillance may be an acceptable initial approach with delayed intervention reserved for those exhibiting significant linear or volumetric growth. PMID:21766302

  3. Mortality risk in European children with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnaye, Nicholas C; Schaefer, Franz; Groothoff, Jaap W; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Reusz, György; Heaf, James G; Lewis, Malcolm; Maurer, Elisabeth; Paripović, Dušan; Zagozdzon, Ilona; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Jager, Kitty J

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to describe survival in European pediatric dialysis patients and compare the differential mortality risk between patients starting on hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Data for 6473 patients under 19 years of age or younger were extracted from the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology, the European Renal Association, and European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry for 36 countries for the years 2000 through 2013. Hazard ratios (HRs) were adjusted for age at start of dialysis, sex, primary renal disease, and country. A secondary analysis was performed on a propensity score-matched (PSM) cohort. The overall 5-year survival rate in European children starting on dialysis was 89.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 87.7%-91.0%). The mortality rate was 28.0 deaths per 1000 patient years overall. This was highest (36.0/1000) during the first year of dialysis and in the 0- to 5-year age group (49.4/1000). Cardiovascular events (18.3%) and infections (17.0%) were the main causes of death. Children selected to start on HD had an increased mortality risk compared with those on PD (adjusted HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.06-1.82, PSM HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.06-2.00), especially during the first year of dialysis (HD/PD adjusted HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.22-2.38, PSM HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.20-2.66), when starting at older than 5 years of age (HD/PD: adjusted HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.03-2.43, PSM HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.17-2.98) and when children have been seen by a nephrologist for only a short time before starting dialysis (HD/PD adjusted HR 6.55, 95% CI 2.35-18.28, PSM HR 2.93, 95% CI 1.04-8.23). Because unmeasured case-mix differences and selection bias may explain the higher mortality risk in the HD population, these results should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Renal Effects and Underlying Molecular Mechanisms of Long-Term Salt Content Diets in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Caldeira Machado Berger

    Full Text Available Several evidences have shown that salt excess is an important determinant of cardiovascular and renal derangement in hypertension. The present study aimed to investigate the renal effects of chronic high or low salt intake in the context of hypertension and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects. To this end, newly weaned male SHR were fed with diets only differing in NaCl content: normal salt (NS: 0.3%, low salt (LS: 0.03%, and high salt diet (HS: 3% until 7 months of age. Analysis of renal function, morphology, and evaluation of the expression of the main molecular components involved in the renal handling of albumin, including podocyte slit-diaphragm proteins and proximal tubule endocytic receptors were performed. The relationship between diets and the balance of the renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and ACE2 enzymes was also examined. HS produced glomerular hypertrophy and decreased ACE2 and nephrin expressions, loss of morphological integrity of the podocyte processes, and increased proteinuria, characterized by loss of albumin and high molecular weight proteins. Conversely, severe hypertension was attenuated and renal dysfunction was prevented by LS since proteinuria was much lower than in the NS SHRs. This was associated with a decrease in kidney ACE/ACE2 protein and activity ratio and increased cubilin renal expression. Taken together, these results suggest that LS attenuates hypertension progression in SHRs and preserves renal function. The mechanisms partially explaining these findings include modulation of the intrarenal ACE/ACE2 balance and the increased cubilin expression. Importantly, HS worsens hypertensive kidney injury and decreases the expression nephrin, a key component of the slit diaphragm.

  5. [Psychological experiences and coping strategies of children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease on renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markart, Astrid Johanna; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Mantovan, Franco

    2014-03-01

    Children, adolescents and young adults with end-stage renal disease need a renal replacement therapy (dialysis) or a renal transplant to survive. The dialysis is related to a very complex care, which includes invasive and painful procedures. Chronic diseases have a strong influence not only on the physical but also on the psychological development of children and adolescents. The most important psychological consequences include social isolation, differences in body image, limited lifestyle, as well as the changed personal relationships with family and friends. Therefore, caregivers should also have knowledge about the psychological consequences, being able to provide adequate help and support to children, adolescents and young adults.

  6. Development of a measure of caregiver burden in paediatric chronic kidney disease: The Paediatric Renal Caregiver Burden Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Rhian; Jacyna, Nicola; Hothi, Daljit; Marks, Stephen D; Holttum, Sue; Camic, Paul

    2016-02-01

    To inform the development of a measure of caregiver burden for carers of children with chronic kidney disease, interviews were conducted with 16 caregivers and 10 renal healthcare professionals. A pool of 97 items generated from interviews was reduced to 60 items following review. A piloting exercise provided evidence for the usability, readability and relevance of items and informed further adaptations resulting in the 51-item Paediatric Renal Caregiver Burden Scale. Further to assessment of its psychometric properties, it is hoped that that the Paediatric Renal Caregiver Burden Scale will serve as a useful measure of caregiver burden in paediatric chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Advances in Ethical, Social, and Economic Aspects of Chronic Renal Disease in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arze, S; Paz Zambrana, S

    2016-03-01

    Since 2005, great progress has been made in health care provision to patients with terminal renal failure in Bolivia. Access to dialysis and transplantation is regulated by the Ministry of Health, based on clinical criteria, applied equitably, without favoritism or discrimination based on race, sex, economic means, or political power. Until December 2013, there were no restrictions in dialysis and transplantation in Health Insurance institutions, but they covered only 30% of the population. Now the remaining 70% has access to free dialysis funded by the communities where patients live, with funds coming from the government and taxes on oil products. More than 2,231 people are getting dialysis, reaching a population growth of >60% annually. The number of hemodialysis units has increased by >200% (60 units), making access easier for end-stage renal failure patients. Treatment protocols have been drawn up to guarantee the best quality of life for the patients. The Law on Donation and Transplantation was enacted in 1996, and Supplementary Regulations were enacted in 1997 with various amendments over the past 5 years. A National Transplant Coordination Board, working under the National Renal Health Program, supervises and regulates transplants and promotes deceased-donor transplantation in an attempt to cover the demand for donors. Rules have been drawn up for accreditation of transplant centers and teams to guarantee the best possible conditions and maximum guaranties. Since January 2014, the National Renal Health Program has been providing free kidney transplants from living donors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetes, renal dysfunction, inflammation, and anemia: the deadly quartet in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mislav Vrsalović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the burden of peripheral artery disease (PAD and its association with diabetes, renal dysfunction, inflammation, and anemia. PAD is a marker of advanced atherosclerotic disease and is associated with a poor quality of life, ischemic events, and mortality. Polyvascular involvement is often observed in PAD patients (pts, and contributes to the greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Diabetes is a major risk factor for PAD, and the presence of PAD in diabetic pts is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes. In comparison to nondiabetic PAD pts, diabetic pts often have severe forms of PAD such as foot ulcers and gangrene, and more often have involvement of the distal extremities. Diabetes is often accompanied by anemia, particularly in the presence of impaired renal function. Chronic kidney disease and PAD share some common risk factors and frequently coexist. In PAD pts, renal dysfunction has been associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality. Anemia is quite prevalent in PAD pts, especially in those with critical limb ischemia. The severity of anemia has been identified as an independent predictor of limb loss and mortality. C-reactive protein (CRP is associated with the development of PAD and diabetes. Increased levels of CRP in diabetic pts intensify the risk for PAD development. Data regarding the prognostic role of CRP in PAD pts suggest that CRP is a better prognostic marker for short-term rather than long-term mortality. Considering the close relationship between diabetes, renal dysfunction, inflammation, and anemia in PAD pts, a multidisciplinary approach is needed in order to improve quality of life and prevent ischemic events and fatal outcomes.

  9. Persistent proteinuria as an indicator of renal disease in HIV-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Hisbiiyah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Persistent proteinuria (microalbuminuria has been reported to be a precursor of HIV-related renal disease. Screening allows for early management in order to prevent the progression of renal disease and decrease morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease in HIV. Several studies have been done on renal manifestation in HIV-infected children from American and African regions, but similar studies from Asia are lacking. Objective To determine the prevalence of persistent proteinuria in HIV-positive children on antiretroviral therapy (ARV in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya. Methods A cross-sectional study on children with HIV and treated with  highly active antiretroviral therapy (HARRT was done from August 2014 to February 2015. Microalbuminuria was measured by the ratio of urine albumin to creatinine (ACR, while proteinuria was measured by dipstick. Measurements were performed 3 times in 4-8 weeks. All subjects underwent complete evaluation of blood tests, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, CD4 counts, and urinalysis. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and logistic regression tests. Results Of 38 children on HARRT enrolled in this study, 2 subjects developed acute kidney injury (AKI, 4 subjects were suspected to have urinary tract infection (UTI, and 1 subject was suspected to have urinary tract stones. The prevalence of persistent microalbuminuria was 2.6%. There was no correlation between immunological status, WHO clinical stage, or duration of ARV and the incidence of persistent proteinuria (P>0.05. Conclusion The prevalence of persistent proteinuria is  lower in younger HIV-infected children at a non-advanced stage and HIV-infected children with normal immunological status who are on HAART. We provide baseline data on the renal conditions of HIV-infected children in the era of HAART, before tenovofir is  increasingly used as an antiretroviral therapy regimen in Indonesia.

  10. Renal Transplantation Dramatically Reduces IgA Anti-beta-2-glycoprotein I Antibodies in Patients with Endstage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Serrano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IgA anti-beta-2-glycoprotein I (aB2GPI antibodies have been related to vascular pathology in the general population and mainly in hemodialyzed patients (prevalence 33% in whom an elevated incidence of thrombosis and mortality is found. In this paper we have studied the presence of IgA aB2GPI antibodies at pretransplant and their evolution after transplantation with a cross-sectional-based follow-up study of a cohort of 288 endstage renal disease (ESRD patients treated with kidney transplantation. Pretransplant IgA aB2GPI levels were elevated 31.7±4.2 U/mL without differences in age or type of dialysis. Patients with different etiologies of ESRD showed higher levels of IgA aB2GPI than blood donors, except the groups of non-IgA glomerular disease and systemic erythematosus lupus, whose nonsignificant differences were observed. IgA aB2GPI antibodies dropped immediately after transplantation (10.7±1.0 U/mL, P<0.0001, coinciding with a high degree of immunosuppression, and remained significantly lower than that observed in pretransplant status. Prevalence of patients with elevated antibodies was also less in transplanted patients (8.9% versus 30.4%, P<0.0001. Among, positivity for IgA aB2GPI was higher than in patients who had received their first transplant that those were retransplanted. This finding could have important clinical implications and can suggest new therapeutic strategies in patients with IgA aB2GPI antibodies.

  11. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordmans, Gerda A.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this

  12. Trace minerals in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasama, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The kidneys are famously responsible for maintaining external balance of prevalent minerals, such as sodium, chloride, and potassium. The kidney's role in handling trace minerals is more obscure to most nephrologists. Similarly, the impact of kidney failure on trace mineral metabolism is difficult to anticipate. The associated dietary modifications and dialysis create the potential for trace mineral deficiencies and intoxications. Indeed, there are numerous reports of dialysis-associated mishaps causing mineral intoxication, notable for the challenge of assigning causation. Equally challenging has been the recognition of mineral deficiency syndromes, amid what is often a cacophony of multiple comorbidities that vie for the attention of clinicians who care for patients with chronic kidney disease. In this paper, I review a variety of minerals, some of which are required for maintenance of normal human physiology (the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's list of essential minerals), and some that have attracted attention in the care of dialysis patients. For each mineral, I will discuss its role in normal physiology and will review reported deficiency and toxicity states. I will point out the interesting inter-relationships between several of the elements. Finally, I will address the special concerns of aluminum and magnesium as they pertain to the dialysis population. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF HEART VALVE DISEASE WITH CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS IN PATIENTS AFTER RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belokurov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluation of the possibility heart valve replacement in renal transplant recipients from a position of safe- ty for graft function. Materials and methods. 5 patients, heart valve replacement was performed with a func- tioning kidney transplant at a satisfactory its function. The average age of patients at the time of cardiac surgery was 38,8 ± 12,6 years, among whom were two (40% men and 3 (60% women. The interval between renal transplantation and heart surgery was 40,3 ± 44,1 (2 to 120 months. Prior to kidney transplantation, all patients were on renal replacement therapy with hemodialysis program for 50,2 ± 48,6 months. In 4 of the 5 patients of heart disease was the cause of infective endocarditis. Results. Average time IR was 81,2 ± 21,7 minutes , the average time of aortic clamping 63,6 ± 20,9 minutes and hypothermia during CPB 29,2 ± 3,2 °C. All patients were implanted with double-leaf mechanical prostheses "MedEng-2" and "SarboMedics". All 5 patients in sa- tisfactory condition were discharged from the hospital. The average duration of the postoperative period was 14,2 ± 3,4 days. All patients had relatively smooth flow after surgery, no infectious complications, a satisfactory renal transplant function and prosthetic heart valves. In the late period in four patients and transplant graft func- tion is satisfactory in terms of the observation of 5 years, 3 years and 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Our experience shows the possibility of successful correction of heart defects in IR in renal transplant recipients. 

  14. Skin Examination: An Important Diagnostic Tool in Renal Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde-Kossmann, Karen M

    2018-01-26

    Renal failure is common in the United States with an estimated prevalence of 660,000 treated end-stage renal disease patients in 2015 [1]. Causes of renal failure are many, and complications from renal failure, underlying disease, and treatment are not infrequent. Examples of common skin manifestations include xerosis, pigmentary change, and nail dystrophies. Frequent disease-specific skin changes may be helpful in the diagnosis of primary disorders leading to renal disease or severity of disease including bullosis diabeticorum, sclerodactyly, or leukoctoclastic vasculitis. Some cutaneous changes, such as the multiple angiokeratomas of Fabry disease or the plexiform neurofibromas of neurofibromatosis, are pathognomonic of genetic disorders, which often lead to renal failure. Careful examination of the skin can provide crucial clues to diagnosis of renal failure causation and aid in monitoring complications. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Association between Low Serum Bicarbonate Concentrations and Cardiovascular Disease in Patients in the End-Stage of Renal Disease

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    Vaia D. Raikou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic acidosis, a common condition particularly in the end-stage of renal disease patients, results in malnutrition, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the association between low serum bicarbonate and cardiovascular disease in patients on intermittent dialysis. Methods: We studied 52 on-line-pre-dilution hemodiafiltration (on-l HDF patients, 32 males and 20 females, with a mean age of 58.01 ± 15.4 years old. Metabolic acidosis was determined by serum bicarbonate concentrations less than 22 mmol/L. Residual renal function (RRF was defined by interdialytic urine volume. Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox regression models were performed to predict coronary artery disease (CAD, defined by ejection fraction <50%, or diastolic dysfunction congestive heart failure (CHF and peripheral vascular disease (PVD. Results: Kaplan–Meier analyses showed that a lower or higher than 22 mmol/L serum bicarbonate metabolic acidosis status was significantly associated with both PVD and diastolic dysfunction (log-rank = 5.07, p = 0.02 and log-rank = 5.84, p = 0.01, respectively. A similar prevalence of serum bicarbonate on CAD or CHF by low ejection fraction was not shown. The RRF was associated with PVD event and serum bicarbonate less than 22 mmol/L (log-rank = 5.49, p = 0.01 and log-rank = 3.9, p = 0.04, respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that serum bicarbonate and RRF were significant risk factors for PVD after adjustment for confounders. Furthermore, RRF adjusted for covariates was shown to be a significant risk factor for diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: Low serum bicarbonate was associated with peripheral vascular disease and diastolic dysfunction in intermittent dialysis. The residual renal function may impact patients’ outcomes through its relationship with metabolic acidosis status, particularly for peripheral vascular disease manifestation.

  16. End-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Saraladevi

    2003-02-01

    The major health problems in Africa are AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, gastroenteritis and hypertension; hypertension affects about 20% of the adult population. Renal disease, especially glomerular disease, is more prevalent in Africa and seems to be of a more severe form than that found in Western countries. The most common mode of presentation is the nephrotic syndrome, with the age of onset at five to eight years. It is estimated that 2 to 3% of medical admissions in tropical countries are due to renal-related complaints, the majority being the glomerulonephritides. There are no reliable statistics for ESRD in all African countries. Statistics of the South African Dialysis and Transplant Registry (SADTR) reflect the patients selected for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and do not accurately reflect the etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF), where public sector state facilities will offer RRT only to patients who are eligible for a transplant. In 1994, glomerulonephritis was recorded as the cause of ESRD in 1771 (52.1%) and hypertension in 1549 (45.6%) of patients by the SADTR. In a six-year study of 3632 patients with ESRD, based on SADTR statistics, hypertension was reported to be the cause of ESRD in 4.3% of whites, 34.6% of blacks, 20.9% mixed race group and 13.8% of Indians. Malignant hypertension is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among urban black South Africans, with hypertension accounting for 16% of all hospital admissions. In a ten-year study of 368 patients with chronic renal failure in Nigeria, the etiology of renal failure was undetermined in 62%. Of the remaining patients whose etiology was ascertained, hypertension accounted for 61%, diabetes mellitus for 11% and chronic glomerulonephritis for 5.9%. Patients with CRF constituted 10% of all medical admissions in this center. Chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertension are principal causes of CRF in tropical Africa and East Africa, together with diabetes mellitus and obstructive

  17. Vascular toxicity of urea, a new "old player" in the pathogenesis of chronic renal failure induced cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Ida; D'Apolito, Maria; Brownlee, Michael; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Colia, Anna Laura; Sacco, Michele; Ferrara, Pietro; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease in children is an irreversible process that may lead to end-stage renal disease. The mortality rate in children with end-stage renal disease who receive dialysis increased dramatically in the last decade, and it is significantly higher compared with the general pediatric population. Furthermore, dialysis and transplant patients, who have developed end-stage renal disease during childhood, live respectively far less as compared with age/race-matched populations. Different reports show that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in children with end-stage renal disease and in adults with childhood-onset chronic kidney disease, and that children with chronic kidney disease are in the highest risk group for the development of cardiovascular disease. Urea, which is generated in the liver during catabolism of amino acids and other nitrogenous metabolites, is normally excreted into the urine by the kidneys as rapidly as it is produced. When renal function is impaired, increasing concentrations of blood urea will steadily accumulate. For a long time, urea has been considered to have negligible toxicity. However, the finding that plasma urea is the only significant predictor of aortic plaque area fraction in an animal model of chronic renal failure -accelerated atherosclerosis, suggests that the high levels of urea found in chronic dialysis patients might play an important role in accelerated atherosclerosis in this group of patients. The aim of this review was to provide novel insights into the role played by urea in the pathogenesis of accelerated cardiovascular disease in renal failure.

  18. Experimental and clinical substantiation of a choice of optimum methods of radiodiagnosis of renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telichko, F.F.; Yazykov, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Limits of potentialities of methods of radiodiagnosis of renal diseases were studied by way of experimental simulation of organs with various pathomorphological changes (urilithiasis, kidney tumors and tuberculosis). Special attention was paid to the detection of pathomorphological elements which were characteristics for the initial form of disease. Protofilm and thermoluminiscent dosimetry were used to study radiation-hygienic characteristics of radiation metods of kidney investigation. Recommendation for establishing diagnosis were worked out in suspected urolithiasis, kidney tumors and tuberculosis. An objective method of the control over the quality of roentgenocontrast images was proposed

  19. Renal failure: implications of chronic kidney disease in the management of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shari; Raj, Dominic; Guzman, Nicolas J

    2012-06-01

    Foot complications are common in patients with diabetes, however, chronic kidney disease has emerged as an independent risk factor for development of foot lesions in the diabetic population. Apart from peripheral arterial disease, infection, and neuropathy, which are classic factors contributing to development of foot lesions, skin disorders specific to renal failure, impaired wound healing from uremia, and psychosocial issues offer further compounded risk. Consequently, there are high ulceration and amputation rates that are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In recent studies, foot-care programs with a multidisciplinary approach within dialysis units have demonstrated improved outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in renal function after discontinuation of vitamin D analogues in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Francisco; Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Azevedo, Lilia; Luna, Enrique

    In routine clinical practice, the prescription of vitamin D analogues (VDA) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with a decline of the estimated renal function. The reason for this is not fully understood. To analyse the effects of VDA discontinuation in advanced CKD and to determine the factors associated with changes in renal function. Retrospective cohort study of adult patients with advanced CKD. The case subgroup was treated with VDA and this medication was discontinued at baseline (the first visit). The control subgroup was not treated with VDA and they were selected according to comparability principles for CKD progression by propensity score matching. The primary outcome measure was a change to both the estimated glomerular filtration rate (MDRD-GFR) and the measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR by combined creatinine and urea clearances). Baseline parameters related to mineral metabolism and creatinine generation were analysed as potential determinants of renal function changes. The study sample consisted of 67 cases and 67 controls. Renal function improved in 67% of cases and worsened in 72% of controls (p<0.0001). Changes in MDRD-GFR for the case subgroup and the control subgroup were +0.455±0.997 vs. -0.436±1.103ml/min/1.73 m 2 /month (p<0.0001), respectively. Total creatinine excretion was slightly higher in cases than in controls but the difference was not significant. According to multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses, baseline total serum calcium was one of the best determinants of both renal function recovery (Odds ratio=3.49; p=0.001), and of the extent of renal function recovery (beta=0.276; p=0.001). Discontinuation of VDA treatment in CKD patients is associated with significant recovery of estimated renal function. The extent of these changes is mainly associated with baseline total serum calcium. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All

  1. Ultrasonography in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka E-mail: jadranka.buturovic@mf.uni-lj.si; Visnar-Perovic, Alenka

    2003-05-01

    Many chronic renal diseases lead to the final common state of decrease in renal size, parenchymal atrophy, sclerosis and fibrosis. The ultrasound image show a smaller kidney, thinning of the parenchyma and its hyperechogenicity (reflecting sclerosis and fibrosis). The frequency of renal cysts increases with the progression of the disease. Ultrasound generally does not allow for the exact diagnosis of an underlying chronic disease (renal biopsy is usually required), but it can help to determine an irreversible disease, assess prognosis and avoid unnecessary diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. The main exception in which the ultrasound image does not show a smaller kidney with parenchymal atrophy is diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in developed countries in recent years. In this case, both renal size and parenchymal thickness are preserved until end-stage renal failure. Doppler study of intrarenal vessels can provide additional information about microvascular and parenchymal lesions, which is helpful in deciding for or against therapeutic intervention and timely planning for optimal renal replacement therapy option.

  2. Ultrasonography in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Visnar-Perovic, Alenka

    2003-01-01

    Many chronic renal diseases lead to the final common state of decrease in renal size, parenchymal atrophy, sclerosis and fibrosis. The ultrasound image show a smaller kidney, thinning of the parenchyma and its hyperechogenicity (reflecting sclerosis and fibrosis). The frequency of renal cysts increases with the progression of the disease. Ultrasound generally does not allow for the exact diagnosis of an underlying chronic disease (renal biopsy is usually required), but it can help to determine an irreversible disease, assess prognosis and avoid unnecessary diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. The main exception in which the ultrasound image does not show a smaller kidney with parenchymal atrophy is diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in developed countries in recent years. In this case, both renal size and parenchymal thickness are preserved until end-stage renal failure. Doppler study of intrarenal vessels can provide additional information about microvascular and parenchymal lesions, which is helpful in deciding for or against therapeutic intervention and timely planning for optimal renal replacement therapy option

  3. Late latent syphilis in a patient with end-stage renal disease and presumptive penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Karen T; Day, Sarah A

    2014-04-01

    Pharmacotherapy challenges in a case of late latent syphilis complicated by end-stage renal disease and presumptive penicillin allergy are described. A 58-year-old white woman was admitted to the hospital for symptoms including altered mental status, shortness of breath, and chest pain. The initial workup isolated syphilis immunoglobulin G antibody. A treponemal test was reactive, and a nontreponemal test was nonreactive; analysis of cerebrospinal fluid did not indicate neurosyphilis. The patient was diagnosed as having late latent syphilis of unknown duration, for which the standard treatment is intramuscular penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units once weekly for three weeks. Given the patient's advanced renal disease and other serious comorbidities, there were concerns about the potential need for renal dosage adjustment and repeated desensitization. However, given the slow absorption and long half-life of penicillin G and published data indicating its safe use in the context of hemodialysis, the treating clinicians decided to proceed with penicillin G therapy at the usual dose after an oral penicillin desensitization protocol; repeat desensitization before two subsequent injections was not performed. The patient completed the full course of penicillin G without incident. Notably, skin testing was not performed to definitively establish penicillin allergy. Microbiological testing to determine a cure of syphilis was not performed. After the completion of an oral desensitization protocol, the standard three-dose regimen of intramuscular penicillin G for late latent syphilis was safely administered to a hemodialysis patient without dosage adjustment or repeated desensitization.

  4. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  5. [Amyloidosis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a patient with a renal transplant and recurrent urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Ablanedo, P; Seco, M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a group of syndromes which share a defect in a component of the phagocyte NADPH-oxidase complex. Without this enzyme activity, phagocytic cells cannot produce superoxide, peroxide, and other potent microbicidal radicals, and are less able to kill ingested pathogens. The clinical picture is characterised by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and abnormal tissue granuloma formation. On the other hand, amyloidosis is a systemic disease with renal involvement occurring in the majority of cases. Recurrent amyloidosis is a rare but well documented event in renal transplant recipients. However, graft loss secondary to amyloidosis has been noted infrequently. In addition, de novo amyloidosis has not been previously associated with graft loss. We report here a renal transplant recipient with chronic granulomatous disease and history of recurrent urinary tract infections, who developed nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal insufficiency secondary to de novo AA amyloidosis leading to graft loss 66 months after transplantation.

  6. [Executive summary of the recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorriz, José L; Gutiérrez, Félix; Trullàs, Joan C; Arazo, Piedad; Arribas, Jose R; Barril, Guillermina; Cervero, Miguel; Cofán, Frederic; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Fulladosa, Xavier; Galindo, María J; Gràcia, Sílvia; Iribarren, José A; Knobel, Hernando; López-Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Martínez, Esteban; Mazuecos, Maria A; Miralles, Celia; Montañés, Rosario; Negredo, Eugenia; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez-Elías, María J; Portilla, Joaquín; Praga, Manuel; Quereda, Carlos; Rivero, Antonio; Santamaría, Juan M; Sanz, José; Sanz, Jesús; Miró, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to update the 2010 recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Renal function should be monitored in all HIV-infected patients. The basic renal work-up should include measurements of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and urinary sediment. Tubular function tests should include determination of serum phosphate levels and urine dipstick for glycosuria. In the absence of abnormal values, renal screening should be performed annually. In patients treated with tenofovir, or with risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), more frequent renal screening is recommended. In order to prevent disease progression, potentially nephrotoxic antiretroviral drugs are not recommended in patients with CKD or risk factors for CKD. The document provides indications for renal biopsy and advises on the optimal time for referral of a patient to the nephrologist. The indications for and evaluation and management of dialysis and renal transplantation are also addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U