WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying orthostatic intolerance

  1. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Technology Assessment Printer Friendly Version Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB 03-24- ... with important information about the hazards of orthostatic intolerance and suspension trauma when using fall arrest systems. ...

  2. Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luty, Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes investigations conducted on different orthostatic intolerance protection garments. This paper emphasizes on the engineering and operational aspects of the project. The current Shuttle pneumatic Anti-G Suit or AGS at 25 mmHg (0.5 psi) and customized medical mechanical compressive garments (20-30 mmHg) were tested on human subjects. The test process is presented. The preliminary results conclude that mechanical compressive garments can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in hypovolemic subjects. A mechanical compressive garment is light, small and works without external pressure gas source; however the current garment design does not provide an adjustment to compensate for the loss of mass and size in the lower torso during long term space missions. It is also difficult to don. Compression garments that do not include an abdominal component are less effective countermeasures than garments which do. An early investigation conducted by the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has shown there is no significant difference between the protection function of the AGS (at 77 mmHg or 1.5 psi) and the Russian anti-g suit, Kentavr (at 25 mmHg or 0.5 psi). Although both garments successfully countered hypovolemia-induced orthostatic intolerance, the Kentavr provided protection by using lower levels of compression pressure. This more recent study with a lower AGS pressure shows that pressures at 20-30 mmHg is acceptable but protection function is not as effective as higher pressure. In addition, a questionnaire survey with flight crewmembers who used both AGS and Kentavr during different missions was also performed.

  3. Orthostatic hypertension: An underestimated cause of orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung; Kim, Hyun-Ah

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the frequency and mechanism of orthostatic hypertension (OHT) in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We retrospectively reviewed 1033 consecutive case series of orthostatic intolerance that underwent autonomic function tests including a head-up tilt test. OHT was defined as a paradoxical orthostatic increase in systolic blood pressure (BP) of at least 20 mmHg during the tilt. We collected autonomic parameters during the standardized autonomic function tests, which included the beat-to-beat derived hemodynamic parameters during the tilt table test and compared them with age and sex-matched normal controls and the orthostatic hypotension (OH) group with orthostatic symptoms. We identified 38 (3.7%) patients who showed OHT during the tilt. The increase in mean systolic BP during the tilt was 26.5 mmHg. Approximately 87% (33/38) of the OHT patients showed an increase in total peripheral resistance during the tilt. The mean increase in total peripheral resistance from a supine baseline was significantly higher in OHT patients compared to normal controls, but the OH group showed a decrease in mean total peripheral resistance during the tilt. A select few patients with orthostatic dizziness can show OHT during the tilt and they have signs of increased peripheral resistance. OHT may be considered in the differential diagnosis of orthostatic intolerance. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Y. S.; Daamen, N.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients.

  5. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (Pfailed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (Pindices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by linear regressions, and the slope was not different between control subjects and patients with OI. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  6. Orthostatic intolerance and the cardiovascular response to early postoperative mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Jørgensen, T B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key element in enhanced postoperative recovery is early mobilization which, however, may be hindered by orthostatic intolerance, that is, an inability to sit or stand because of symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion as intolerable dizziness, nausea and vomiting, feeling of heat...... of orthostatic intolerance. In contrast, 8 (50%) and 2 (12%) patients were orthostatic intolerant at 6 and approximately 22 h after surgery, respectively. Before surgery, SAP, DAP, and TPR increased (P0.05) and Scv(O2) decreased (P... the preoperative evaluation (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The early postoperative postural cardiovascular response is impaired after radical prostatectomy with a risk of orthostatic intolerance, limiting early postoperative mobilization. The pathogenic mechanisms include both impaired TPR and CO responses....

  7. Orthostatic intolerance without postural tachycardia: how much dysautonomia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Singer, Wolfgang; Allison, Thomas G; Sletten, David M; Joyner, Michael J; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Low, Phillip A; Sandroni, Paola

    2013-08-01

    Chronic symptoms of orthostatic intolerance occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI) without tachycardia. We recently reported that deconditioning is almost universal in both patient groups. In this study, we focussed on the question of how much dysautonomia, besides orthostatic tachycardia, is there in POTS vs. OI, and how the two groups compare in regards to clinical, autonomic, laboratory, and exercise variables. We retrospectively studied all patients referred for orthostatic intolerance at Mayo Clinic between January 2006 and June 2011, who underwent standardized autonomic and exercise testing. Eighty-four POTS and 100 OI fulfilled inclusion criteria, 89 % were females. The mean age was 25 and 32 years, respectively. Clinical presentation, autonomic parameters, laboratory findings, and degree of deconditioning were overall similar between the two groups, except for the excessive orthostatic heart rate (HR) rise and mild vasomotor findings observed in POTS but not in OI (slightly larger Valsalva ratio and incomplete blood pressure recovery during Valsalva). Both groups responded poorly to various medications. Severely deconditioned patients were similar to non-deconditioned patients, except for 24 h urine volume (1,555 vs. 2,417 ml), sweat loss on thermoregulatory sweat test (1.5 vs. 0.5 %), and few respiratory parameters during exercise, which are likely clinically insignificant. Though similar in clinical presentation, POTS and OI are different entities with greater, albeit still mild, dysautonomia in POTS. The clinical and pathophysiological relevance of minimal dysautonomia in the absence of orthostatic tachycardia as seen in OI remain uncertain.

  8. Risk of Orthostatic Intolerance During Re-Exposure to Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Westby, Christian M.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Johnston, Smith; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance remains a significant concern to NASA. In Space Shuttle missions, astronauts wore anti-gravity suits and liquid cooling garments to protect against orthostatic intolerance during re-entry and landing, but in-flight exercise and the end-of-mission fluid loading failed to protect approximately 30% of Shuttle astronauts when these garments were not worn. The severity of the problem appears to be increased after long-duration space flight. Five of six US astronauts could not complete a 10-minutes upright-posture tilt testing on landing day following 4-5 month stays aboard the Mir space station. The majority of these astronauts had experienced no problems of orthostatic intolerance following their shorter Shuttle flights. More recently, four of six US astronauts could not complete a tilt test on landing day following approximately 6 month stays on the International Space Station. Similar observations were made in the Soviet and Russian space programs, such that some cosmonauts wear the Russian compression garments (Kentavr) up to 4 days after landing. Future exploration missions, such as those to Mars or Near Earth Objects, will be long duration, and astronauts will be landing on planetary bodies with no ground-support teams. The occurrence of severe orthostatic hypotension could threaten the astronauts' health and safety and success of the mission.

  9. Does Goal-directed Fluid Therapy Affect Postoperative Orthostatic Intolerance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Jans, Oivind; Müller, Rasmus Gamborg

    2013-01-01

    Early mobilization is important for postoperative recovery but is limited by orthostatic intolerance (OI) with a prevalence of 50% 6 h after major surgery. The pathophysiology of postoperative OI is assumed to include hypovolemia besides dysregulation of vasomotor tone. Stroke volume-guided fluid...... therapy, so-called goal-directed therapy (GDT), corrects functional hypovolemia, and the authors hypothesized that GDT reduces the prevalence of OI after major surgery and assessed this in a prospective, double-blinded trial....

  10. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Sundby, G. H.; Rostoft, S.; Sheynberg, N.; Aljuri, N.; Maa, M.; Mukkamala, R.; Sherman, D.; Toska, K.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight.

  11. Clinical significance of orthostatic dizziness in the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun-Ju; Park, Yong-Soo; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Nam, In-Chul; Chang, Ki-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic dizziness (OD) and positional dizziness (PD) are considerably common conditions in dizziness clinic, whereas those two conditions are not clearly separated. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of simple OD and OD combined with PD for the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and orthostatic intolerance (OI). Patients presenting with OD (n=102) were divided into two groups according to their symptoms: group PO, presenting with PD as well as OD; group O, presenting with OD. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and vestibular function tests were performed to identify the etiology of the dizziness. Orthostatic vital sign measurement (OVSM) was used to diagnose OI. The majority of patients were in group PO (87.3%). BPPV was the most common cause of OD for entire patients (36.3%) and group PO (37.1%), while OI was most common etiology for group O (38.5%). Total of 17 (16.7%) OI patients were identified by OVSM test. Orthostatic hypotension (n=10) was most frequently found, followed by orthostatic hypertension (n=5), and orthostatic tachycardia (n=2). Group O showed significantly higher percentage (38.5%) of OI than group PO (13.5%) (P=0.039). It is suggested that orthostatic testing such as OVSM or head-up tilt table test should be performed as an initial work up for the patients with simple OD. Positional tests for BPPV should be considered as an essential diagnostic test for patients with OD, even though their dizziness is not associated with PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Jacob, G.; Pohar, B.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (IOI) have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are not understood. If genetic predisposition were important in the pathogenesis of IOI, monozygotic twins of patients with IOI should have similar hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities. METHODS: We studied two patients with IOI and their identical twins. Both siblings in the first twin pair had orthostatic symptoms, significant orthostatic tachycardia, increased plasma norepinephrine levels with standing, and a greater than normal decrease in systolic blood pressure with trimethaphan infusion. RESULTS: Both siblings had a normal response of plasma renin activity to upright posture. In the second twin pair, only one sibling had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, an orthostatic tachycardia, and raised plasma catecholamines with standing. The affected sibling had inappropriately low plasma renin activity with standing and was 8-fold more sensitive to the pressor effect of phenylephrine than the unaffected sibling. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in some patients, IOI seems to be strongly influenced by genetic factors. In others, however, IOI may be mainly caused by nongenetic factors. These findings suggest that IOI is heterogenous, and that both genetic and environmental factors contribute individually or collectively to create the IOI phenotype.

  13. Orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndrome as suspected adverse effects of vaccination against human papilloma virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise S; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    intolerance, headache, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and neuropathic pain starting in close relation to HPV vaccination. METHODS: Patients were referred for orthostatic intolerance following HPV vaccination. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction were quantified by standardised questionnaire. The diagnosis...... intolerance, 94% nausea, 82% chronic headache, 82% fatigue, 77% cognitive dysfunction, 72% segmental dystonia, 68% neuropathic pain. CONCLUSIONS: In a population referred for symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and other symptoms consistent with autonomic dysfunction that began in close temporal association...

  14. Fludrocortisone improves nausea in children with orthostatic intolerance (OI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, John E; Shaltout, Hossam A; Larkin, Megan M; Rowe, Peter C; Diz, Debra I; Koch, Kenneth L

    2011-12-01

    INTRODUCTION/RESULTS: In 17 patients, chronic idiopathic nausea was associated with orthostatic intolerance (OI) by abnormal tilt table tests (88%) or gastric dysrhythmias (71%). After fludrocortisone treatment, there was >26% nausea improvement in 71%, 1-25% in 6%, and no improvement in 24%. In six subjects, EGGs repeated after >50% nausea improvement all remained to be abnormal, suggesting nausea is independent of gastric dysrhythmias. Association of EGG abnormalities and OI in this subset of nausea patients suggests a generalized disturbance of autonomic regulation.

  15. Slower lower limb blood pooling in young women with orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Marcus; Länne, Toste

    2015-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Orthostatic stress is mostly caused by venous blood pooling in the lower limbs. Venous distension elicits sympathetic responses, and increased distension speed enhances the cardiovascular response. We examine whether lower limb blood pooling rate during lower body negative pressure is linked to orthostatic intolerance. What is the main finding and its importance? A similar amount of blood was pooled in the lower limb, but at a slower rate in women who developed signs of orthostatic intolerance. The difference in blood pooling rate increased with orthostatic stress and was most prominent at a presyncope-inducing level of lower body negative pressure. The findings have implications for the pathophysiology as well as treatment of orthostatic intolerance. Vasovagal syncope is common in young women, but its aetiology remains elusive. Orthostatic stress-induced lower limb blood pooling is linked with central hypovolaemia and baroreceptor unloading. Venous distension in the arm elicits a sympathetic response, which is enhanced with more rapid distension. Our aim was to study both the amount and the speed of lower limb pooling during orthostatic stress and its effects on compensatory mechanisms to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis in women with orthostatic intolerance. Twenty-seven healthy women, aged 20-27 years, were subjected to a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of 11-44 mmHg. Five women developed symptoms of vasovagal syncope (orthostatic intolerant) and were compared with the remaining women, who tolerated LBNP well (orthostatic tolerant). Lower limb blood pooling, blood flow and compensatory mobilization of venous capacitance blood were measured. Lower body negative pressure induced equal lower limb blood pooling in both groups, but at a slower rate in orthostatic intolerant women (e.g. time to 50% of total blood pooling, orthostatic intolerant 44 ± 7 s and orthostatic tolerant 26 ± 2 s; P intolerant women (P = 0

  16. Orthostatic intolerance in 6 degrees head-down tilt and lower body negative pressure loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Akira; Ito, Masao; Mano, Takaichi; Nakayama, Kiyoshi

    6 degrees head-down tilt bed rest experiment for 6 days was conducted at Nihon University Itabashi Hospital for 10 male athletes. In order to observe the orthostatic intolerance due to six days head-down tilt bed rest, 70 degrees head up tilt tests were performed before and after the head-down tilt. Two types of orthostatic intolerance were distinguished by the time course of their cardiovascular responses. One was vagotonia type and the other was brain anemia type. The latter type was commonly seen among astronauts after space flight due to the lack of plasma volume. As this volume change is considered to be initiated by some fluid loss from the lower extremities, analysis was made to clarify the relation between the leg volume change and the types of orthostatic intolerance. Nakayama proposed a Heart Rate Controllability Index, which is calculated from the initiate leg volume change and heart rate increase in head up tilt, for an indicator of the orthostatic intolerability. The index was applied to the subjects of six days head-down tilt above mentioned. For the subjects who showed a sign of presyncopy, the index values were higher or lower than that of the rest subjects who showed no sign of presyncopy. In order to evaluate the validity of the index, another experiment was conducted to induce an orthostatic intolerance by a different way of loading. The same types of orthostatic intolerance were observed and the index value hit high in the brain anemia type of orthostatic intolerance, while the vagotonia type showed relatively lower values than the normal group.

  17. Orthostatic intolerance during early mobilization after fast-track hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, O; Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Solgaard, S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st>Early postoperative mobilization is a cornerstone in fast-track total hip arthroplasty (THA), but postoperative orthostatic intolerance (OI) may delay early recovery or lead to fainting, falls, and prosthesis dislocation or fracture. However, the prevalence and pathophysiology of OI...

  18. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  19. Hypovolemia in syncope and orthostatic intolerance role of the renin-angiotensin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Ertl, A. C.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Orthostatic intolerance is the cause of significant disability in otherwise normal patients. Orthostatic tachycardia is usually the dominant hemodynamic abnormality, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety and, in some cases, syncope. It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension. There is a predilection for younger rather than older adults and for women more than men. Its cause is unknown; partial sympathetic denervation or hypovolemia has been proposed. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma renin activity, perhaps from defects in sympathetic innervation of the kidney, could underlie a hypovolemia, giving rise to these clinical symptoms. Sixteen patients (14 female, 2 male) ranging in age from 16 to 44 years were studied. Patients were enrolled in the study if they had orthostatic intolerance, together with a raised upright plasma norepinephrine (> or = 600 pg/mL). Patients underwent a battery of autonomic tests and biochemical determinations. RESULTS: There was a strong positive correlation between the blood volume and plasma renin activity (r = 0.84, P = 0.001). The tachycardic response to upright posture correlated with the severity of the hypovolemia. There was also a correlation between the plasma renin activity measured in these patients and their concomitant plasma aldosterone level. CONCLUSIONS: Hypovolemia occurs commonly in orthostatic intolerance. It is accompanied by an inappropriately low level of plasma renin activity. The degree of abnormality of blood volume correlates closely with the degree of abnormality in plasma renin activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that reduced plasma renin activity may be an important pathophysiologic component of the syndrome of orthostatic intolerance.

  20. Abnormal norepinephrine clearance and adrenergic receptor sensitivity in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Shannon, J. R.; Costa, F.; Furlan, R.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic orthostatic intolerance (OI) is characterized by symptoms of inadequate cerebral perfusion with standing, in the absence of significant orthostatic hypotension. A heart rate increase of >/=30 bpm is typical. Possible underlying pathophysiologies include hypovolemia, partial dysautonomia, or a primary hyperadrenergic state. We tested the hypothesis that patients with OI have functional abnormalities in autonomic neurons regulating cardiovascular responses. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirteen patients with chronic OI and 10 control subjects underwent a battery of autonomic tests. Systemic norepinephrine (NE) kinetics were determined with the patients supine and standing before and after tyramine administration. In addition, baroreflex sensitivity, hemodynamic responses to bolus injections of adrenergic agonists, and intrinsic heart rate were determined. Resting supine NE spillover and clearance were similar in both groups. With standing, patients had a greater decrease in NE clearance than control subjects (55+/-5% versus 30+/-7%, P<0.02). After tyramine, NE spillover did not change significantly in patients but increased 50+/-10% in control subjects (P<0.001). The dose of isoproterenol required to increase heart rate 25 bpm was lower in patients than in control subjects (0.5+/-0.05 versus 1.0+/-0.1 microg, P<0.005), and the dose of phenylephrine required to increase systolic blood pressure 25 mm Hg was lower in patients than control subjects (105+/-11 versus 210+/-12 microg, P<0.001). Baroreflex sensitivity was lower in patients (12+/-1 versus 18+/-2 ms/mm Hg, P<0.02), but the intrinsic heart rate was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The decreased NE clearance with standing, resistance to the NE-releasing effect of tyramine, and increased sensitivity to adrenergic agonists demonstrate dramatically disordered sympathetic cardiovascular regulation in patients with chronic OI.

  1. Orthostatic intolerance and autonomic dysfunction following bariatric surgery: A retrospective study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Vanessa; Owens, Andrew P; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Iodice, Valeria; Mathias, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence and costs of the obesity epidemic and obesity-related conditions, including diabetes mellitus, is consistently increasing worldwide. Bariatric medicine is attempting to address this with weight loss and exercise programmes, and with increasing frequency, various forms of bariatric surgery. There has been considerable success reported after bariatric surgery but not without. We describe 14 patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI) post bariatric surgery. We report on OI (postural dizziness, palpitations and fainting), the results of cardiovascular autonomic testing and the associated and/or causative findings as well as reviewing the literature to consider the possible mechanisms. Comprehensive autonomic testing revealed that 35.7% (Buchwald et al., 2004) of these patients fulfilled the criteria for the Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (PoTS), 57.1% (Cremieux et al., 2008) had low levels of basal BP and 42.9% (Cammisotto & Bendayan, 2007) patients were presyncopal and 14.3% (Billakanty et al., 2008) experienced syncope. We propose that the incidence of OI post-bariatric surgery is higher than considered, that certain cohorts may be more susceptible to complications, and that further research is needed to identify the prevalence and, ideally anticipate occurrence. With the increasing prevalence of obesity and required clinical interventions, further understanding of the pathophysiological processes causing autonomic dysfunction after bariatric interventions will aid management, which may differ in those with an underlying disposition to autonomic involvement, such as diabetics, in whom such procedures are increasingly used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance: possible relationship to microgravity-induced plasticity in the vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, B. J.; Kerman, I. A.

    1998-01-01

    Even after short spaceflights, most astronauts experience at least some postflight reduction of orthostatic tolerance; this problem is severe in some subjects. The mechanisms leading to postflight orthostatic intolerance are not well-established, but have traditionally been thought to include the following: changes in leg hemodynamics, alterations in baroreceptor reflex gain, decreases in exercise tolerance and aerobic fitness, hypovolemia, and altered sensitivity of beta-adrenergic receptors in the periphery. Recent studies have demonstrated that signals from vestibular otolith organs play an important role in regulating blood pressure during changes in posture in a 1-g environment. Because spaceflight results in plastic changes in the vestibular otolith organs and in the processing of inputs from otolith receptors, it is possible that another contributing factor to postflight orthostatic hypotension is alterations in the gain of vestibular influences on cardiovascular control. Preliminary data support this hypothesis, although controlled studies will be required to determine the relationship between changes in the vestibular system and orthostatic hypotension following exposure to microgravity. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Simulated stand tests and centrifuge training to prevent orthostatic intolerance on Earth, moon, and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Brandon W; Sharp, M Keith

    2010-03-01

    One proposed method to overcome postflight orthostatic intolerance is for astronauts to undergo inflight centrifugation. Cardiovascular responses were compared between centrifuge and gravitational conditions using a seven-compartment cardiovascular model. Vascular resistance, heart rate, and stroke volume values were adopted from literature, while compartmental volumes and compliances were derived from impedance plethysmography of subjects (n=8) riding on a centrifuge. Three different models were developed to represent the typical male subject who completed a 10-min postflight stand test ("male finisher"), "non-finishing male" and "female" (all non-finishers). A sensitivity analysis found that both cardiac output and arterial pressure were most sensitive to total blood volume. Simulated stand tests showed that female astronauts were more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance due to lower initial blood pressure and higher pressure threshold for presyncope. Rates of blood volume loss by capillary filtration were found to be equivalent in female and male non-finishers, but four times smaller in male finishers. For equivalent times to presyncope during centrifugation as those during constant gravity, lower G forces at the level of the heart were required. Centrifuge G levels to match other cardiovascular parameters varied depending on the parameter, centrifuge arm length, and the gravity level being matched.

  4. Baroreflex dysfunction induced by microgravity: potential relevance to postflight orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, A. C.; Diedrich, A.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity imposes adaptive changes in the human body. This review focuses on the changes in baroreflex function produced by actual spaceflight, or by experimental models that simulate microgravity, e.g., bed rest. We will analyze separately studies involving baroreflexes arising from carotid sinus and aortic arch afferents ("high-pressure baroreceptors"), and cardiopulmonary afferents ("low-pressure receptors"). Studies from unrelated laboratories using different techniques have concluded that actual or simulated exposure to microgravity reduces baroreflex function arising from carotid sinus afferents ("carotic-cardiac baroreflex"). The techniques used to study the carotid-cardiac baroreflex, using neck suction and compression to simulate changes in blood pressure, have been extensively validated. In contrast, it is more difficult to selectively study aortic arch or cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. Nonetheless, studies that have examined these baroreceptors suggest that microgravity produces the opposite effect, ie, an increase in the gain of aortic arch and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. Furthermore, most studies have focus on instantaneous changes in heart rate, which almost exclusively examines the vagal limb of the baroreflex. In comparison, there is limited information about the effect of microgravity on sympathetic function. A substantial proportion of subjects exposed to microgravity develop transient orthostatic intolerance. It has been proposed that alterations in baroreflex function play a role in the orthostatic intolerance induced by microgravity. The evidence in favor and against this hypothesis is reviewed.

  5. Splanchnic Compression Improves the Efficacy of Compression Stockings to Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Brown, A. K.; Lee, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance (OI) is observed in 20-30% of astronauts. Previous data from our laboratory suggests that this is largely a result of decreased venous return. Currently, NASA astronauts wear an anti-gravity suit (AGS) which consists of inflatable air bladders over the calves, thighs and abdomen, typically pressurized from 26 to 78 mmHg. We recently determined that, thigh-high graded compression stockings (JOBST , 55 mmHg at ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh) were effective, though to a lesser degree than the AGS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of splanchnic compression to prevent orthostatic intolerance. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (6M, 4F) participated in three 80 head-up tilts on separate days while (1) normovolemic (2) hypovolemic w/ breast-high compression stockings (BS)(JOBST(R), 55 mmHg at the ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh, 12 mmHg over abdomen) (3) hypovolemic w/o stockings. Hypovolemia was induced by IV infusion of furosemide (0.5 mg/kg) and 48 hrs of a low salt diet to simulate plasma volume loss following space flight. Hypovolemic testing occurred 24 and 48 hrs after furosemide. One-way repeated measures ANOVA, with Bonferroni corrections, was used to test for differences in blood pressure and heart rate responses to head-up tilt, stand times were compared using a Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis. Results: BS were effective in preventing OI and presyncope in hypovolemic test subjects ( p = 0.015). BS prevented the decrease in systolic blood pressure seen during tilt in normovolemia (p high garments. These stockings are readily available, inexpensive, and can be worn for days following landing as astronauts re-adapt to Earth gravity.

  6. High Intensity Resistive and Rowing Exercise Countermeasures Do Not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following 70 Days of Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Laurie, Steven S.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Platts, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    More than 60% of US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions (greater than 5 months) were unable to complete a 10-min 80 deg head-up tilt test on landing day. This high incidence of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance may be related to limitations of the inflight exercise hardware that prevented high intensity training. PURPOSE: This study sought to determine if a countermeasure program that included intense lower-body resistive and rowing exercises designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 days of 6 deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, also would protect against post- BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: Sixteen males participated in this study and performed no exercise (Control, n=10) or performed an intense supine exercise protocol with resistive and aerobic components (Exercise, n=6). On 3 days/week, exercise subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and a 30-min continuous bout of rowing (greater than or equal to 75% max heart rate). On 3 other days/week, subjects performed only high-intensity, interval-style rowing. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80 deg head-up tilt test performed 2 days (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using a carbon monoxide rebreathing technique on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). RESULTS: Following 70 days of BR, tilt tolerance time decreased significantly in both the Control (BR-2: 15.0 +/- 0.0, BR70: 9.9 +/- 4.6 min, mean +/- SD) and Exercise (BR-2: 12.2 +/- 4.7, BR70: 4.9 +/- 1.9 min) subjects, but the decreased tilt tolerance time was not different between groups (Control: -34 +/- 31, Exercise: -56 +/- 16%). Plasma volume also decreased (Control: -0.56 +/- 0.40, Exercise: -0.48 +/- 0.33 L) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups (Control: -18 +/- 11%, Exerciser: -15 +/-1 0%). CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm previous reports

  7. Splanchnic Compression Improves the Efficacy of Compression Stockings to Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Brown, A. K.; Lee, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance (OI) is observed in 20-30% of astronauts. Previous data from our laboratory suggests that this is largely a result of decreased venous return. Currently, NASA astronauts wear an anti-gravity suit (AGS) which consists of inflatable air bladders over the calves, thighs and abdomen, typically pressurized from 26 to 78 mmHg. We recently determined that, thigh-high graded compression stockings (JOBST , 55 mmHg at ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh) were effective, though to a lesser degree than the AGS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of splanchnic compression to prevent orthostatic intolerance. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (6M, 4F) participated in three 80 head-up tilts on separate days while (1) normovolemic (2) hypovolemic w/ breast-high compression stockings (BS)(JOBST(R), 55 mmHg at the ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh, 12 mmHg over abdomen) (3) hypovolemic w/o stockings. Hypovolemia was induced by IV infusion of furosemide (0.5 mg/kg) and 48 hrs of a low salt diet to simulate plasma volume loss following space flight. Hypovolemic testing occurred 24 and 48 hrs after furosemide. One-way repeated measures ANOVA, with Bonferroni corrections, was used to test for differences in blood pressure and heart rate responses to head-up tilt, stand times were compared using a Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis. Results: BS were effective in preventing OI and presyncope in hypovolemic test subjects ( p = 0.015). BS prevented the decrease in systolic blood pressure seen during tilt in normovolemia (p < 0.001) and hypovolemia w/o countermeasure (p = 0.005). BS also prevented the decrease in diastolic blood pressure seen during tilt in normovolemia (p = 0.006) and hypovolemia w/o countermeasure (p = 0.041). Hypovolemia w/o countermeasure showed a higher tilt-induced heart rate increase (p = 0.022) than seen in normovolemia; heart rate while wearing BS was not different than normovolemia (p = 0.353). Conclusion: BS may

  8. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT, is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods. The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results. Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  9. Determination of Hemodynamic Changes on Heart Rate for Assessment of Orthostatic Intolerance in Older People

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hortelano Rubio, M.; Reilly, R.B.; Cervigón Abad, R.

    2016-07-01

    Introduction.- The aim of our study was to assess the hemodynamic changes that occur in symptomatic Orthostatic Intolerance (OI) patients, at the starting of exercise and recovery stages during six minutes walking distance test. Materials.- We analysed 65 older subjects, of whom 42 were women. The participants were carried out the Active Stand Protocol. The records were divided into: Phase 1 (pre-exercise), Phase 2 (starting of exercise), Phase 3 (active), Phase 4 (recovery) and Phase 5 (prost-exercise). Methods.- The averages and differences of heart rate (HR) between Phase 1, Phase 3 and Phase 5 were calculated. In the same way, duration before stabilization from passive to active stages (Phase 2) and from active to passive stages (Phase 4) were calculated. The máximum and mínimum values achieved in these time series and the difference between these values were also calculated. Results.- Results showed that the symptomatic OI patients employed more time to reach the active phase tan the asymptomatic OI participants. Moreover, the symptomatic OI participants showed higher mínimum heart rate values at the starting of exercise and recovery stages. However, the asymptomatic OI group illustrated a higher difference between the máximum and mínimum heart rate values in these stages with a significance p=0.003 and p=0.007, respectivecly. Conclusion.- This study provides important information on hemodynamic parameters and can be helpful for description of the hemodynamic changes that occur during OI. (Author)

  10. Development of Gradient Compression Garments for Protection Against Post Flight Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Westby, C. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance after space flight is still an issue for astronaut health. No in-flight countermeasure has been 100% effective to date. NASA currently uses an inflatable anti-gravity suit (AGS) during reentry, but this device is uncomfortable and loses effectiveness upon egress from the Shuttle. The Russian Space Agency currently uses a mechanical counter-pressure garment (Kentavr) that is difficult to adjust alone, and prolonged use may result in painful swelling at points where the garment is not continuous (feet, knees, and groin). To improve comfort, reduce upmass and stowage requirements, and control fabrication and maintenance costs, we have been evaluating a variety of gradient compression, mechanical counter-pressure garments, constructed from spandex and nylon, as a possible replacement for the current AGS. We have examined comfort and cardiovascular responses to knee-high garments in normovolemic subjects; thigh-high garments in hypovolemic subjects and in astronauts after space flight; and 1-piece, breast-high garments in hypovolemic subjects. These gradient compression garments provide 55 mmHg of compression over the ankle, decreasing linearly to 35 mmHg at the knee. In thigh-high versions the compression continues to decrease to 20 mmHg at the top of the leg, and for breast-high versions, to 15 mmHg over the abdomen. Measures of efficacy include increased tilt survival time, elevated blood pressure and stroke volume, and lower heart-rate response to orthostatic stress. Results from these studies indicate that the greater the magnitude of compression and the greater the area of coverage, the more effective the compression garment becomes. Therefore, we are currently testing a 3-piece breast-high compression garment on astronauts after short-duration flight. We chose a 3-piece garment consisting of thigh-high stockings and shorts, because it is easy to don and comfortable to wear, and should provide the same level of protection as the 1-piece

  11. Orthostatic intolerance and fatigue in the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wandele, Inge; Rombaut, Lies; De Backer, Tine; Peersman, Wim; Da Silva, Hellen; De Mits, Sophie; De Paepe, Anne; Calders, Patrick; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-08-01

    To investigate whether orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a significant predictor for fatigue in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Eighty patients with EDS-HT and 52 controls participated in the first part of the study, which consisted of questionnaires. Fatigue was evaluated using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS). As possible fatigue determinants OI [Autonomic Symptom Profile (ASP)], habitual physical activity (Baecke), affective distress [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)], pain (SF36), medication use and generalized hypermobility (5-point score of Grahame and Hakim regarding generalized joint hypermobility) were studied. Next, a 20 min head-up tilt (70°) was performed in a subsample of 39 patients and 35 controls, while beat-to-beat heart rate and blood pressure were monitored (Holter, Finometer Pro). Before and after tilt, fatigue severity was assessed using a numeric rating scale. Patients scored significantly higher on the CIS [total score: EDS: 98.2 (18.63) vs controls: 45.8 (16.62), P < 0.001] and on the OI domain of the ASP [EDS: 22.78 (7.16) vs controls: 6.5 (7.78)]. OI was prevalent in EDS-HT (EDS: 74.4%, controls: 34.3%, P = 0.001), and frequently expressed as postural orthostatic tachycardia (41.0% of the EDS group). Patients responded to tilt with a higher heart rate and lower total peripheral resistance (p < 0.001; p = 0.032). This altered response correlated with fatigue in daily life (CIS). In the EDS-HT group, tilt provoked significantly more fatigue [numeric rating scale increase: EDS: +3.1 (1.90), controls: +0.5 (1.24), P < 0.001]. Furthermore, the factors OI, pain, affective distress, decreased physical activity and sedative use explained 47.7% of the variance in fatigue severity. OI is an important determinant of fatigue in EDS-HT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  13. In-flight Assessment of Lower Body Negative Pressure as a Countermeasure for Post-flight Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J. B.; Stenger, M. B.; Phillips, T. R.; Arzeno, N. M.; Lee, S. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated the efficacy of combining fluid loading with sustained lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to reverse orthostatic intolerance associated with weightlessness during and immediately after Space Shuttle missions. Methods. Shuttle astronauts (n=13) underwent 4 hours of LBNP at -30 mm(Hg) and ingested water and salt ( soak treatment) during flight in two complementary studies. In the first study (n=8), pre-flight heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to an LBNP ramp (5-min stages of -10 mm(Hg) steps to -50 mm(Hg) were compared to responses in-flight one and two days after LBNP soak treatment. In the second study (n=5), the soak was performed 24 hr before landing, and post-flight stand test results of soak subjects were compared with those of an untreated cohort (n=7). In both studies, the soak was scheduled late in the mission and was preceded by LBNP ramp tests at approximately 3-day intervals to document the in-flight loss of orthostatic tolerance. Results. Increased HR and decreased BP responses to LBNP were evident early in-flight. In-flight, one day after LBNP soak, HR and BP responses to LBNP were not different from pre-flight, but the effect was absent the second day after treatment. Post-flight there were no between-group differences in HR and BP responses to standing, but all 5 treatment subjects completed the 5-minute stand test whereas 2 of 7 untreated cohort subjects did not. Discussion. Exaggerated HR and BP responses to LBNP were evident within the first few days of space flight, extending results from Skylab. The combined LBNP and fluid ingestion countermeasure restored in-flight LBNP HR and BP responses to pre-flight levels and provided protection of post-landing orthostatic function. Unfortunately, any benefits of the combined countermeasure were offset by the complexity of its implementation, making it inappropriate for routine application during Shuttle flights.

  14. Orthostatic Intolerance Is Independent of the Degree of Autonomic Cardiovascular Adaptation after 60 Days of Head-Down Bed Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaceflight and head-down bed rest (HDBR can induce the orthostatic intolerance (OI; the mechanisms remain to be clarified. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not OI after HDBR relates to the degree of autonomic cardiovascular adaptation. Fourteen volunteers were enrolled for 60 days of HDBR. A head-up tilt test (HUTT was performed before and after HDBR. Our data revealed that, in all nonfainters, there was a progressive increase in heart rate over the course of HDBR, which remained higher until 12 days of recovery. The mean arterial pressure gradually increased until day 56 of HDBR and returned to baseline after 12 days of recovery. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during HDBR and remained suppressed until 12 days of recovery. Low-frequency power of systolic arterial pressure increased during HDBR and remained elevated during recovery. Three subjects fainted during the HUTT after HDBR, in which systemic vascular resistance did not increase and remained lower until syncope. None of the circulatory patterns significantly differed between the fainters and the nonfainters at any time point. In conclusion, our data indicate that the impaired orthostatic tolerance after HDBR could not be distinguished by estimation of normal hemodynamic and/or neurocardiac data.

  15. Cardiovascular and Cutaneous Responses to the Combination of Alcohol and Soft Drinks: The Way to Orthostatic Intolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Maufrais

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Acute ingestion of alcohol is often accompanied by cardiovascular dysregulation, malaise and even syncope. The full hemodynamic and cutaneous responses to the combination of alcohol and sugar (i.e., alcopops, a common combination in young people, and the mechanisms for the propensity to orthostatic intolerance are not well established. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiovascular and cutaneous responses to alcopops in young subjects.Methods: Cardiovascular and cutaneous responses were assessed in 24 healthy young subjects (12 men, 12 women sitting comfortably and during prolonged active standing with a 30-min baseline and 130 min following ingestion of 400 mL of either: water, water + 48 g sugar, water + vodka (1.28 mL.kg−1 of body weight, providing 0.4 g alcohol.kg−1, water + sugar + vodka, according to a randomized cross-over design.Results: Compared to alcohol alone, vodka + sugar induced a lower breath alcohol concentration (BrAC, blood pressure and total peripheral resistance (p < 0.05, a higher cardiac output and heart rate (p < 0.05 both in sitting position and during active standing. In sitting position vodka + sugar consumption also led to a greater increase in skin blood flow and hand temperature (p < 0.05 and a decrease in baroreflex sensitivity (p < 0.05. We observed similar results between men and women both in sitting position and during active standing.Conclusion: Despite lower BrAC, ingestion of alcopops induced acute vasodilation and hypotension in sitting position and an encroach of the hemodynamic reserve during active standing. Even if subjects did not feel any signs of syncope these results could be of clinical importance with higher doses of alcohol or if combined to other hypotensive challenges.

  16. 2014 Cardiovascular Risks SRP Evidence Review Final Report. [Evidence Review For: The Risk of Orthostatic Intolerance During Re-Exposure to Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan; Ziegler, Michael; Carter, Jason; Claydon, Victoria; Krummen, David; Thomas, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Cardiovascular Risks Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on December 17-18, 2014. The SRP reviewed the updated evidence report for The Risk of Orthostatic Intolerance During re-Exposure to Gravity (OI Risk). The SRP found the 2014 OI Evidence Report to be a well written, comprehensive overview of the OI risk; that clearly documents the key scientific evidence relevant for both mechanistic understanding and countermeasure development. The 2014 OI Evidence Report could be further strengthened by addressing the points discussed below.

  17. Orthostatic intolerance predicts mild cognitive impairment: incidence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia from the Swedish general population cohort Good Aging in Skåne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmståhl S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sölve Elmståhl, Elisabet Widerström Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Introduction: Contradictory results have been reported on the relationship between orthostatic hypotension (OH and mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Objective: To study the incidence of MCI and dementia and their relationship to OH and subclinical OH with orthostatic symptoms (orthostatic intolerance.Study design and setting: This study used a prospective general population cohort design and was based on data from the Swedish Good Aging in Skåne study (GÅS-SNAC, they were studied 6 years after baseline of the present study, with the same study protocol at baseline and at follow-up. The study sample comprised 1,480 randomly invited subjects aged 60 to 93 years, and had a participation rate of 82% at follow-up. OH test included assessment of blood pressure and symptoms of OH. Results: The 6-year incidence of MCI was 8%, increasing from 12.1 to 40.5 per 1,000 person-years for men and 6.9 to 16.9 per 1,000 person-years for women aged 60 to >80 years. The corresponding 6-year incidence of dementia was 8%. Orthostatic intolerance during uprising was related to risk for MCI at follow-up (odds ratio [OR] =1.84 [1.20–2.80][95% CI], adjusted for age and education independently of blood pressure during testing. After stratification for hypertension (HT, the corresponding age-adjusted OR for MCI in the non-HT group was 1.71 (1.10–2.31 and 1.76 (1.11–2.13 in the HT group. Among controls, the proportion of those with OH was 16%; those with MCI 24%; and those with dementia 31% (age-adjusted OR 1.93 [1.19–3.14]. Conclusion: Not only OH, but also symptoms of OH, seem to be a risk factor for cognitive decline and should be considered in the management of blood pressure among the elderly population. Keywords: orthostatic blood pressure, epidemiology, elderly

  18. Lactose intolerance : analysis of underlying factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Priebe, MG; Koetse, HA; Stellaard, F; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, [No Value; Antoine, JM; Zhong, Y; Huang, CY

    Background We studied the degree of lactose digestion and orocecal transit time (OCTT) as possible causes for the variability of symptoms of lactose intolerance (LI) in a sample of a population with genetically determined low lactase activity. Methods Lactose digestion index (LDI) was measured by

  19. Intravenous saline administration in patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance for tilt-table mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian; Olesen, Niels; Hovind, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Primary objective: This study aimed to investigate the effect of intravenous saline administration on orthostatic hypotension (OH) during head up tilt (HUT) and the change in the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system before and after HUT in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI). Research...... artery blood flow velocity. Blood samples were collected before and after two HUT sessions separated by 1 hour and saline was administered in between. Main outcomes and results: Patients’ ability to stand upright did not change after saline administration due to OH. The patients showed signs of reduced...... fluid administration. Research focusing on the ability to retain fluid after bed rest is warranted....

  20. Orthostatic symptoms does not always manifest during tilt-table test in pediatric postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Eon Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available &lt;b&gt;Purpose:&lt;/b&gt; Chronic day-to-day symptoms of orthostatic intolerance are the most notable features of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS. However, we have encountered patients with such symptoms and excessive tachycardia but with no symptoms during the tilt-table test (TTT. We aimed to investigate whether POTS patients with chronic orthostatic intolerance always present orthostatic symptoms during the TTT and analyze the factors underlying symptom manifestation during this test. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; We retrospectively examined patients who presented with POTS at the Gyeongsang Na tional University Hospital between 2008 and 2011. Diagnosis of POTS was based on chronic day-to-day orthostatic intolerance symptoms as well as excessive tachycardia during the TTT. The patients were divided two groups depending on the presentation of orthostatic symptoms during the TTT. Clinical data and the results of the TTT were compared between these groups. &lt;b&gt;Results:&lt;/b&gt; In 22 patients, 7 patients (31.8% did not present orthostatic symptoms during the test. Diastolic blood pressure (BP was significantly lower in the symptom-positive group. The head-up tilt resulted in a significant increase in diastolic BP in the symptom-negative group (&lt;i&gt;P&lt;/i&gt; =0.04, while systolic BP had a tendency to decrease in the symptom-positive group (&lt;i&gt;P&lt;/i&gt; =0.06. &lt;b&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/b&gt; Significant patients with POTS did not present orthostatic symptoms during the TTT despite having chronic daily symptoms. This finding may be important for establishing definitive diagnostic criteria for pediatric POTS. Development of symptoms during TTT might be related to low diastolic BP and abnormal compensatory responses to orthostasis.

  1. Preliminary application of a novel algorithm to monitor changes in pre-flight total peripheral resistance for prediction of post-flight orthostatic intolerance in astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tatsuya; Lee, Kichang; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Meck, Janice V.; Cohen, Richard J.

    2011-04-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a significant challenge for astronauts after long-duration spaceflight. Depending on flight duration, 20-80% of astronauts suffer from post-flight OI, which is associated with reduced vascular resistance. This paper introduces a novel algorithm for continuously monitoring changes in total peripheral resistance (TPR) by processing the peripheral arterial blood pressure (ABP). To validate, we applied our novel mathematical algorithm to the pre-flight ABP data previously recorded from twelve astronauts ten days before launch. The TPR changes were calculated by our algorithm and compared with the TPR value estimated using cardiac output/heart rate before and after phenylephrine administration. The astronauts in the post-flight presyncopal group had lower pre-flight TPR changes (1.66 times) than those in the non-presyncopal group (2.15 times). The trend in TPR changes calculated with our algorithm agreed with the TPR trend calculated using measured cardiac output in the previous study. Further data collection and algorithm refinement are needed for pre-flight detection of OI and monitoring of continuous TPR by analysis of peripheral arterial blood pressure.

  2. Orthostatic function and the cardiovascular response to early mobilization after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg Müller, Rasmus; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    procedures, because of an attenuated cardiovascular response, but the cardiovascular response and the incidence of orthostatic intolerance after minor procedures have not been clarified. We investigated the cardiovascular response and the incidence of orthostatic intolerance during early mobilization after...

  3. Authoritarianism and Intolerance Under Autocratic and Democratic Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Dunn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on findings indicating that authoritarians express greater intolerance in situations where diversity is more apparent, Stenner (2005 proposes that democracies may sabotage their stability by allowing the unbridled expression of societal pluralism. She therefore suggests that pluralism in democracies be suppressed in order to pacify authoritarians and the threat their unbridled intolerance may pose to the stability of these countries. Based on data from the World and European Values Surveys, I examined 75,478 individuals across 75 countries to determine if authoritarians are indeed more intolerant in more democratic societies; a key assumption upon which Stenner’s suggestion rests. While authoritarianism was more strongly and negatively related to tolerance in more democratic countries, authoritarians in more democratic countries were more tolerant than were authoritarians in more autocratic countries. I argue that Stenner’s concern may be valid if we strictly consider rapid pluralization within a single generation within consolidating democracies, but for established democracies, her concern appears unwarranted.

  4. Orthostatic Hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases can be treated with drugs, such as midodrine, to raise blood pressure. × Treatment When orthostatic hypotension ... cases can be treated with drugs, such as midodrine, to raise blood pressure. View Full Treatment Information ...

  5. Resolution of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome After CT-Guided, Percutaneous T2 Ethanol Ablation for Hyperhidrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Malcolm, E-mail: mabrock@jhmni.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Center for Sweat Disorders (United States); Chung, Tae Hwan, E-mail: Tchang7@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (United States); Gaddam, Sathvika Reddy, E-mail: drsathvikareddy@yahoo.com; Kathait, Anjaneya Singh, E-mail: askathait@gmail.com [Johns Hopkins University, Vascular & Interventional Radiology (United States); Ober, Cecily, E-mail: ceober21@gmail.com [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Thoracic Surgery (United States); Georgiades, Christos, E-mail: cgeorgi@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Vascular & Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is characterized by orthostatic intolerance. Orthostasis (or other mild physical stress) triggers a cascade of inappropriate tachycardia, lightheadedness, palpitations, and often fainting. The underlying defect is sympathetic dysregulation of the heart, which receives its sympathetic tone from the cervical and upper thoracic sympathetic ganglia. Primary hyperhidrosis is also thought to be the result of sympathetic dysregulation. We present the case of a patient treated with CT-guided, percutaneous T2 EtOH sympatholysis for craniofacial hyperhidrosis. The patient also suffered from postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome for many years and was unresponsive to treatment. Immediately after sympatholysis, the patient experienced resolution of both craniofacial hyperhidrosis and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

  6. Resolution of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome After CT-Guided, Percutaneous T2 Ethanol Ablation for Hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Malcolm; Chung, Tae Hwan; Gaddam, Sathvika Reddy; Kathait, Anjaneya Singh; Ober, Cecily; Georgiades, Christos

    2016-12-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is characterized by orthostatic intolerance. Orthostasis (or other mild physical stress) triggers a cascade of inappropriate tachycardia, lightheadedness, palpitations, and often fainting. The underlying defect is sympathetic dysregulation of the heart, which receives its sympathetic tone from the cervical and upper thoracic sympathetic ganglia. Primary hyperhidrosis is also thought to be the result of sympathetic dysregulation. We present the case of a patient treated with CT-guided, percutaneous T2 EtOH sympatholysis for craniofacial hyperhidrosis. The patient also suffered from postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome for many years and was unresponsive to treatment. Immediately after sympatholysis, the patient experienced resolution of both craniofacial hyperhidrosis and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

  7. Water drinking as a treatment for orthostatic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Tank, Jens; Robertson, Rose Marie; Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Water drinking increases blood pressure in a substantial proportion of patients who have severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure. We tested the hypothesis that water drinking can be used as a practical treatment for patients with orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, as well as those with orthostatic tachycardia. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied the effect of drinking water on seated and standing blood pressure and heart rate in 11 patients who had severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure and in 9 patients who had orthostatic tachycardia due to idiopathic orthostatic intolerance. We also tested the effect of water drinking on postprandial hypotension in 7 patients who had autonomic failure. Patients drank 480 mL of tap water at room temperature in less than 5 minutes. RESULTS: In patients with autonomic failure, mean (+/- SD) blood pressure after 1 minute of standing was 83 +/- 6/53 +/- 3.4 mm Hg at baseline, which increased to 114 +/- 30/66 +/- 18 mm Hg (P water drinking, compared with 22 +/- 10/12 +/- 5 mm Hg with drinking (P water drinking attenuated orthostatic tachycardia (123 +/- 23 beats per minute) at baseline to 108 +/- 21 beats per minute after water drinking ( P Water drinking elicits a rapid pressor response in patients with autonomic failure and can be used to treat orthostatic and postprandial hypotension. Water drinking moderately reduces orthostatic tachycardia in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance. Thus, water drinking may serve as an adjunctive treatment in patients with impaired orthostatic tolerance.

  8. Cardiovascular profile in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jem L; Au, Jason S; Guzman, Juan C; Morillo, Carlos A; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2017-04-01

    The cardiovascular profile of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome + Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (POTS + EDSIII) has not been described, despite suggestions that it plays a role in orthostatic intolerance. We studied nine individuals diagnosed with POTS + EDSIII and found that the arterial stiffness and cardiac profiles of patients with POTS + EDSIII were comparable to those of age- and sex-matched controls, suggesting an alternate explanation for orthostatic intolerance.

  9. Benign joint hypermobility syndrome with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and acrocyanosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjyot Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS are two common conditions which are frequently overlooked. While patients with BJHS are known to attend rheumatology, orthopedic, and medical outpatient departments for years with polyarthralgia; POTS is commonly misdiagnosed as anxiety neurosis or panic attack. Described first in 1940, POTS is one of the common causes of orthostatic symptoms in females. POTS is defined as orthostatic intolerance associated with tachycardia exceeding 120 beats/min (bpm or an increase in the heart rate (HR of 30 bpm from baseline within 10 min of changing the posture from a lying to standing position, in the absence of long-term chronic diseases and medications that affect the autonomic or vascular tone. Classified as primary and secondary, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is assumed to be a failure of peripheral vascular resistance to increase sufficiently in response to orthostatic stress, and consequently, venous pooling occurs in the legs resulting in decreased venous return to the heart. This is compensated by an increase in HR and inotropy. We present a case of BJHS, who reported to us with recurrent episodes of syncope and presyncope and was diagnosed to have POTS secondary to his hypermobility syndrome. Although the tilt-table test is the gold standard for diagnosis of POTS, this case highlights the importance of bedside tests in evaluation of orthostatic symptoms and in diagnosis of relatively common but frequently overlooked syndrome.

  10. Computational modeling of cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Thomas; Shim, Eun B.; Kamm, Roger D.; Mark, Roger G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a model of the cardiovascular system capable of simulating the short-term (responses to head-up tilt and lower body negative pressure. The model consists of a closed-loop lumped-parameter representation of the circulation connected to set-point models of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. Model parameters are largely based on literature values. Model verification was performed by comparing the simulation output under baseline conditions and at different levels of orthostatic stress to sets of population-averaged hemodynamic data reported in the literature. On the basis of experimental evidence, we adjusted some model parameters to simulate experimental data. Orthostatic stress simulations are not statistically different from experimental data (two-sided test of significance with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Transient response characteristics of heart rate to tilt also compare well with reported data. A case study is presented on how the model is intended to be used in the future to investigate the effects of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance.

  11. Water drinking as a treatment for orthostatic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Tank, Jens; Robertson, Rose Marie; Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Water drinking increases blood pressure in a substantial proportion of patients who have severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure. We tested the hypothesis that water drinking can be used as a practical treatment for patients with orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, as well as those with orthostatic tachycardia. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied the effect of drinking water on seated and standing blood pressure and heart rate in 11 patients who had severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure and in 9 patients who had orthostatic tachycardia due to idiopathic orthostatic intolerance. We also tested the effect of water drinking on postprandial hypotension in 7 patients who had autonomic failure. Patients drank 480 mL of tap water at room temperature in less than 5 minutes. RESULTS: In patients with autonomic failure, mean (+/- SD) blood pressure after 1 minute of standing was 83 +/- 6/53 +/- 3.4 mm Hg at baseline, which increased to 114 +/- 30/66 +/- 18 mm Hg (P drinking. After a meal, blood pressure decreased by 43 +/- 36/20 +/- 13 mm Hg without water drinking, compared with 22 +/- 10/12 +/- 5 mm Hg with drinking (P water drinking attenuated orthostatic tachycardia (123 +/- 23 beats per minute) at baseline to 108 +/- 21 beats per minute after water drinking ( P Water drinking elicits a rapid pressor response in patients with autonomic failure and can be used to treat orthostatic and postprandial hypotension. Water drinking moderately reduces orthostatic tachycardia in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance. Thus, water drinking may serve as an adjunctive treatment in patients with impaired orthostatic tolerance.

  12. A Case Report and Review of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Lide, Brianna; Haeri, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of orthostatic intolerance characterized by an increased heart rate upon transition from supine to standing, and head-up tilt without orthostatic hypotension. Its etiology is multifactorial, and no clear cause has been identified. Common symptoms include light-headedness, blurred vision, weakness, cognitive difficulties, and fatigue and are often accompanied by palpitations, shortness of breath, syncope, or gastrointestinal ...

  13. Spreading of intolerance under economic stress: Results from a reputation-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Vaquero, Luis A.; Cuesta, José A.

    2014-08-01

    When a population is engaged in successive prisoner's dilemmas, indirect reciprocity through reputation fosters cooperation through the emergence of moral and action rules. A simplified model has recently been proposed where individuals choose between helping others or not and are judged good or bad for it by the rest of the population. The reputation so acquired will condition future actions. In this model, eight strategies (referred to as "leading eight") enforce a high level of cooperation, generate high payoffs, and are therefore resistant to invasions by other strategies. Here we show that, by assigning each individual one of two labels that peers can distinguish (e.g., political ideas, religion, and skin color) and allowing moral and action rules to depend on the label, intolerant behaviors can emerge within minorities under sufficient economic stress. We analyze the sets of conditions where this can happen and also discuss the circumstances under which tolerance can be restored. Our results agree with empirical observations that correlate intolerance and economic stress and predict a correlation between the degree of tolerance of a population and its composition and ethical stance.

  14. Midodrine for severe orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Midodrine (Bramox-Brancaster Pharma Limited) was authorised in the UK by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in March 2015 for "the treatment of severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic dysfunction in adults when corrective factors have been ruled out and other forms of treatment are inadequate".(1) Previously, midodrine had only been available in the UK as an unlicensed product used on a named-patient basis. It is the first drug to be licensed in the UK for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension. Here we consider the evidence for midodrine in the treatment of severe orthostatic hypotension and how it fits with current management strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Heart rate variability analysis in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Calabrò

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of 36 year old male patient with idiopathic postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS diagnosed during head-up tilt testing. Power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV during the tilt test revealed that the ratio of low and high frequency powers (LF/HF increased with the onset of orthostatic intolerance. This analysis confirmed in our patient a strong activation in sympathetic tone.

  16. [Food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana

    2009-05-01

    Adverse food reactions are common in the general population. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the structure of food allergens and of the mechanisms involved is poor. In 1995 the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology suggested a classification based on the causative pathogenic mechanism. According to this classification, non-toxic reactions can be divided into food allergies when they recognize immunological mechanisms and food intolerance when there are no immunological implications. The treatment of food intolerance is avoidance of the particular food. There are specific treatments for some food intolerance (beta-galactosidases for the management of lactose intolerance).

  17. The impact of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on cardiac fibroblasts grown under altered gravity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Leder, Annekatrin; Pietsch, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Myocardium is very sensitive to gravitational changes. During a spaceflight cardiovascular atrophy paired with rhythm problems and orthostatic intolerance can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor...... (VEGF) on cardiac fibroblasts (CF) grown under altered gravity conditions....

  18. Orthostatic hypertension: Recognizing an underappreciated clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovely Chhabra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orthostatic hypertension refers to an increase in the blood pressure upon assuming an upright posture. This clinical condition has been understudied and is often underappreciated in clinical practice probably because of its unfamiliarity to many clinicians including subspecialists. We report a case of severely symptomatic orthostatic hypertension in a Caucasian female, which was likely secondary to an autonomic dysfunction caused by an underlying vascular adrenergic hypersensitivity and possibly also due to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus (causing baroreflex dysfunction associated with excessive sympathetic stimulation. The case work-up also illustrates a schematic diagnostic and management approach to this rarely encountered clinical entity.

  19. Lactose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abdominal pain Lactose intolerance Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  20. Lactose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactose intolerance means that you cannot digest foods with lactose in them. Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. After eating foods with lactose in them, you may feel sick to your ...

  1. Cold intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon ... of being cold? Medical history: What is your diet like? How is your general health? What are ...

  2. [Lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The most common problem limiting milk consumption worldwide is lactose intolerance (LI), which is defined as the experience of gastrointestinal symptoms due to the intake of lactose-containing food. When symptoms ensue the intake of milk, the condition is referred as milk intolerance, and it may or may not be due to LI. The most common cause of LI is primary lactase deficiency which occurs in 30% of Mexican adults when one glass of milk is consumed (12-18 g of lactose). LI occurs in less than 15% of adults after the intake of this dose of lactose. Another cause of lactose intolerance is due to secondary lactase deficiency, which occurs because lactase is reduced due to diseases that affect the intestinal mucosa. Lactose intolerance can be eliminated or significantly reduced by elimination or reduction of the intake of milk and milk containing products. Recent studies demonstrate that when β-casein-A1 contained in milk is hydrolyzed it produces β-casomorphine-7 which is an opioid associated with milk intolerance.

  3. Lactose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A health care provider will tell the patient what foods or medications to avoid before the test. • Stool ... and www.nccam.nih.gov. 7  Lactose Intolerance What products contain lactose? Lactose is present in many food products and in some medications. Food Products Lactose ...

  4. A Simulation Study of Mechanism of Postflight Orthostatic Intolerance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hao, W

    2001-01-01

    ...) with modification by incorporating into the model, some more detailed sub-models to describe blood redistribution, cardiac contractility, local vascular tone changes, and baroreflex control mechanism...

  5. Disaccharide intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaccharide intolerance presents a pathogenic heterogeneous and most complex clinical entity. It usually occurs due to primary or secondary deficit of disaccharide activity, and rarely because of disorders of absorption or monomer metabolism. Symptomatology of disaccharide maldigestion and/or malabsorption depends on the severity of the basic disorder, the level of its overload and the patient’s age. In the youngest children, due to a rapid gastrointestinal transit and a low compensatory capacity of the colon, osmotic-fermentative diarrhoea forms the basis of clinical features. Diarrhoeal disorder can be occasionally so intensive that it disturbs not only water and electrolytic balance, but also the nutritive status of the child. In older children and adults, as well as in milder forms of the disorder, the symptomatology, most often without diarrhoea, is dominated by abdominal colic, loud peristaltic sounds, meteorism and increased flatulence. Metabolic disorders followed by conversion disorders of galactose and fructose into glucose are characterized by a hypoglycaemic crisis, as well as by various multisystemic damages due to the deposit of toxic metabolic products. The diagnosis of gastrointestinal forms of disaccharide intolerance is based on the pathologic clinical and laboratory response during the overload test, while that of the metabolic form is based on the confirmed presence of specific enzyme and/or genetic defect. Treatment of disaccharide intolerance is based on the elimination diet. Besides, in the secondary forms of the disorder, it is also necessary to apply the treatment of the basic disease.

  6. Intolerant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  7. Effect of fluid countermeasures of varying osmolarity on cardiovascular responses to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Current operational procedures for shuttle crewmembers include the ingestion of a fluid countermeasure approximately 2 hours before reentry into the earth's gravitational field. The ingestion of the fluid countermeasure is thought to restore plasma volume and improve orthostatic responses upon reentry. The present countermeasure consists of ingesting salt tablets and water to achieve an isotonic solution. It has yet to be determined whether this is the optimal drink to restore orthostatic tolerance. It is also not known whether the drink solution is effective in increasing plasma volume. The purpose here is to evaluate the effectiveness of drink solutions of different osmolarity on restoring plasma volume and orthostatic responses. A hypertonic drink solution was more effective in restoring plasma volume after dehydration than an isotonic solution. However, there were no differences in their effects on an orthostatic challenge. These data suggest that the plasma volume differences produced in this study were not sufficient to produce differences in the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic challenge, or there are other changes that occur during space flight that are more important in determining orthostatic intolerance.

  8. Chemical intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Chemical intolerance (CI) is a term used to describe a condition in which the sufferer experiences a complex array of recurrent unspecific symptoms attributed to low-level chemical exposure that most people regard as unproblematic. Severe CI constitutes the distinguishing feature of multiple...... chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI...

  9. Familial orthostatic tachycardia due to norepinephrine transporter deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.; Flattem, N.; Tellioglu, T.; Carson, R.; Garland, E.; Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Blakely, R. D.; Biaggioni, I.

    2001-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) or postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome primarily affecting young females, and is characterized by lightheadedness, palpitations, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope primarily occurring with upright posture and being relieved by lying down. There is typically tachycardia and raised plasma norepinephrine levels on upright posture, but little or no orthostatic hypotension. The pathophysiology of OI is believed to be very heterogeneous. Most studies of the syndrome have focused on abnormalities in norepinephrine release. Here the hypothesis that abnormal norepinephrine transporter (NET) function might contribute to the pathophysiology in some patients with OI was tested. In a proband with significant orthostatic symptoms and tachycardia, disproportionately elevated plasma norepinephrine with standing, impaired systemic, and local clearance of infused tritiated norepinephrine, impaired tyramine responsiveness, and a dissociation between stimulated plasma norepinephrine and DHPG elevation were found. Studies of NET gene structure in the proband revealed a coding mutation that converts a highly conserved transmembrane domain Ala residue to Pro. Analysis of the protein produced by the mutant cDNA in transfected cells demonstrated greater than 98% reduction in activity relative to normal. NE, DHPG/NE, and heart rate correlated with the mutant allele in this family. CONCLUSION: These results represent the first identification of a specific genetic defect in OI and the first disease linked to a coding alteration in a Na+/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter. Identification of this mechanism may facilitate our understanding of genetic causes of OI and lead to the development of more effective therapeutic modalities.

  10. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  11. The changing face of orthostatic and neurocardiogenic syncope with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, J; Carew, S; Costelloe, A; Sheehy, T; Quinn, C; Lyons, D

    2011-08-01

    Reports of the outcomes of syncope assessment across a broad spectrum of ages in a single population are scarce. It is our objective to chart the varying prevalence of orthostatic and neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) as a patient ages. This was a retrospective study. All consecutive patients referred to a tertiary referral syncope unit over a decade were included. Patients were referred with recurrent falls or orthostatic intolerance. Tilt tests and carotid sinus massage (CSM) were performed in accordance with best practice guidelines. A total of 3002 patients were included (1451 short tilt, 127 active stand, 1042 CSM and 382 prolonged tilt). Ages ranged from 11 to 91 years with a median (IQR) of 75 (62-81) years. There were 1914 females; 1088 males. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) was the most commonly observed abnormality (test positivity of 60.3%). Those with OH had a median (IQR) age of 78 (71-83) years. Symptomatic patients were significantly younger than asymptomatic (P = 0.03). NCS demonstrated a bimodal age distribution. Of 194 patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity, the median age (IQR) was 77 (68-82) years. Those with vasovagal syncope (n = 80) had a median (IQR) age of 30 (19-44) years. There were 57 patients with isolated postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Of the total patients, 75% were female. They had a median (IQR) age of 23 (17-29) years. We have confirmed, in a single population, a changing pattern in the aetiology of syncope as a person ages. The burden of disease is greatest in the elderly.

  12. The changing face of orthostatic and neurocardiogenic syncope with age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    AIM: Reports of the outcomes of syncope assessment across a broad spectrum of ages in a single population are scarce. It is our objective to chart the varying prevalence of orthostatic and neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) as a patient ages. METHODS: This was a retrospective study. All consecutive patients referred to a tertiary referral syncope unit over a decade were included. Patients were referred with recurrent falls or orthostatic intolerance. Tilt tests and carotid sinus massage (CSM) were performed in accordance with best practice guidelines. RESULTS: A total of 3002 patients were included (1451 short tilt, 127 active stand, 1042 CSM and 382 prolonged tilt). Ages ranged from 11 to 91 years with a median (IQR) of 75 (62-81) years. There were 1914 females; 1088 males. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) was the most commonly observed abnormality (test positivity of 60.3%). Those with OH had a median (IQR) age of 78 (71-83) years. Symptomatic patients were significantly younger than asymptomatic (P = 0.03). NCS demonstrated a bimodal age distribution. Of 194 patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity, the median age (IQR) was 77 (68-82) years. Those with vasovagal syncope (n = 80) had a median (IQR) age of 30 (19-44) years. There were 57 patients with isolated postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Of the total patients, 75% were female. They had a median (IQR) age of 23 (17-29) years. CONCLUSION: We have confirmed, in a single population, a changing pattern in the aetiology of syncope as a person ages. The burden of disease is greatest in the elderly.

  13. Dystonia Associated with Idiopathic Slow Orthostatic Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kobylecki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to characterize the clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with slow orthostatic tremor.Case Report: The clinical and neurophysiological data of patients referred for lower limb tremor on standing were reviewed. Patients with symptomatic or primary orthostatic tremor were excluded. Eight patients were identified with idiopathic slow 4–8 Hz orthostatic tremor, which was associated with tremor and dystonia in cervical and upper limb musculature. Coherence analysis in two patients showed findings different to those seen in primary orthostatic tremor.Discussion: Slow orthostatic tremor may be associated with dystonia and dystonic tremor.

  14. Orthostatic hypotension in elderly patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is defined as a decrease in blood pressure (BP) after changing from supine to standing position and is frequently diagnosed in the elderly population. Information is limited with regard to differences between the various methods to determine OH, and about the

  15. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  16. Lactose Intolerance (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lactose Intolerance KidsHealth / For Parents / Lactose Intolerance What's in ... Print en español Intolerancia a la lactosa About Lactose Intolerance For many kids, an ice cream sundae ...

  17. Are compression stockings an effective treatment for orthostatic presyncope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Louise Protheroe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Syncope, or fainting, affects approximately 6.2% of the population, and is associated with significant comorbidity. Many syncopal events occur secondary to excessive venous pooling and capillary filtration in the lower limbs when upright. As such, a common approach to the management of syncope is the use of compression stockings. However, research confirming their efficacy is lacking. We aimed to investigate the effect of graded calf compression stockings on orthostatic tolerance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated orthostatic tolerance (OT and haemodynamic control in 15 healthy volunteers wearing graded calf compression stockings compared to two placebo stockings in a randomized, cross-over, double-blind fashion. OT (time to presyncope, min was determined using combined head-upright tilting and lower body negative pressure applied until presyncope. Throughout testing we continuously monitored beat-to-beat blood pressures, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output (finger plethysmography, cerebral and forearm blood flow velocities (Doppler ultrasound and breath-by-breath end tidal gases. There were no significant differences in OT between compression stocking (26.0±2.3 min and calf (29.3±2.4 min or ankle (27.6±3.1 min placebo conditions. Cardiovascular, cerebral and respiratory responses were similar in all conditions. The efficacy of compression stockings was related to anthropometric parameters, and could be predicted by a model based on the subject's calf circumference and shoe size (r = 0.780, p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data question the use of calf compression stockings for orthostatic intolerance and highlight the need for individualised therapy accounting for anthropometric variables when considering treatment with compression stockings.

  18. Alcohol Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an alcoholic beverage — such as chemicals, grains or preservatives. Combining alcohol with certain medications also can cause reactions. In rare instances, an unpleasant reaction to alcohol can be a sign of a serious underlying health problem that requires diagnosis and treatment. Symptoms Signs ...

  19. Using Concurrent Cardiovascular Information to Augment Survival Time Data for Evaluating Orthostatic Tilt Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Fiedler, James; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Koslovsky, Matthew D.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2018-01-01

    Head-up tilt (HUT) tests often are used in research to measure orthostatic intolerance (OI) (inability to appropriately control blood pressure while upright) in clinical populations and otherwise healthy individuals after interventions. Post-space flight orthostatic intolerance is a well-known phenomenon, and countermeasures to its development has been an active area of research at NASA. In the NASA HUT protocol, subjects lie horizontally on an automatic tilt table for baseline measurements before being raised to 80deg head-up tilt for a defined period of time or until signs or symptoms of presyncope ensues (light-headedness, nausea, dizziness, sweating, weakness or fainting). Multiple measures are collected to evaluate the cardiovascular system's ability to respond appropriately to the orthostatic challenge. However if the intended duration of the HUT is short, the ability to detect changes in OI due to an intervention or its prevention by a countermeasure may be limited by a small number of failures to permit comparisons based on survival time alone. Thus, the time-trajectory of the cardiovascular data becomes an important additional source of information. In particular, we will show how various measures of trajectory variability can effectively augment survival analysis for the assessment of OI in a joint model when high censoring rates are present.

  20. Gender-Specific Mechanisms Underlying the Amelioration of High-Fat Diet-Induced Glucose Intolerance in B-Cell-Activating Factor Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobae Kim

    Full Text Available It has recently been found that B cell activating factor (BAFF plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. We also have previously reported that BAFF deficiency reverses high-fat (HF diet-induced glucose intolerance by potentiating adipose tissue function. In the present study, we found that BAFF deficient (BAFF-/- mice exhibit gender-specific differences in protection against diet-induced glucose intolerance, and aimed to characterize the gender-dependent molecular alterations in energy metabolism. Under HF feeding conditions, serum BAFF level of female wild-type (WT mice was considerably higher than that of male mice. Despite increased body weight gain, both male and female BAFF-/- mice showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to their WT counterparts. Expressions of genes involved in glucose transport, thermogenesis and lipid oxidation were up-regulated in brown adipose tissues of both male and female BAFF-/- mice. Interestingly, the expression of thermogenic genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly enhanced in female BAFF-/- compared to WT mice, but the difference was not observed between male BAFF-/- and WT mice. The enhanced thermogenic program was confirmed by higher protein levels of UCP1 and irisin in female BAFF-/- than in WT mice. Additionally, adiponectin production in white adipose tissues and AMPK phosphorylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue were also significantly elevated in female BAFF-/- compared to WT mice, but not in male BAFF-/- mice. Our findings define a comprehensive scenario for the enhancing effect of BAFF depletion on glucose tolerance wherein the underlying mechanism is, at least in part, gender-specific, and suggest that gender difference should be considered as an important factor in the use of BAFF blockade as a therapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Orthostatic hypotension: definition, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjwal, Khalil; George, Anil; Figueredo, Vincent M; Grubb, Blair P

    2015-02-01

    Orthostatic hypotension commonly affects elderly patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus and Parkinson's disease. It is a cause of significant morbidity in the affected patients. The goal of this review is to outline the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of the patients suffering from orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Paradoxical presentation of orthostatic headache associated with increased intracranial pressure in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung B Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is the most common symptom of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT; however, the detailed underlying mechanisms and characteristics of headache in CVT have not been well described. Here, we report two cases of CVT whose primary and lasting presentation was orthostatic headache, suggestive of decreased intracranial pressure. Contrary to our expectations, the headaches were associated with elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography showed characteristic voiding defects consistent with CVT. We suggest that orthostatic headache can be developed in a condition of decreased intracranial CSF volume in both intracranial hypotensive and intracranial hypertensive states. In these cases, orthostatic headache in CVT might be caused by decreased intracranial CSF volume that leads to the inferior displacement of the brain and traction on pain-sensitive intracranial vessels, despite increased CSF pressure on measurement. CVT should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a patient complains of orthostatic headache.

  3. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions. PMID:24357350

  4. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S C

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain, or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating some patients with irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: lactose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lactose intolerance Lactose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, ...

  6. Orthostatic convulsive syncope in a burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primrose, Matthew; McDermid, Robert C; Tredget, Edward E; Khadaroo, Rachel G

    2012-01-01

    Orthostatic convulsive syncope is defined as a decrease in cerebral blood supply resulting in convulsive, seizure-like symptoms. The authors present the first case report of orthostatic convulsive syncope in a burn patient. There are many causes of transient loss of consciousness in patients. An algorithm is presented to aid in the workup and management strategies for this diagnosis. This approach in conjunction with a neurology consult should add in the assessment and treatment of transient loss of consciousness and orthostatic convulsive syncope in a burn patient.

  7. Ateistiske begravelsespladser og intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2011-01-01

    Kronikken diskuterer Charlotte Dyremoses kritik af planerne om begravelsespladser fri for religiøse symboler for at være udtryk for intolerance.......Kronikken diskuterer Charlotte Dyremoses kritik af planerne om begravelsespladser fri for religiøse symboler for at være udtryk for intolerance....

  8. Religious intolerance and Euroscepticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobolt, S.B.; van der Brug, W.; de Vreese, C.H.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Hinrichsen, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Research on Euroscepticism focuses increasingly on the role of group identities: national identities and attitudes towards multiculturalism. Yet hardly any attention has been paid to the way in which religious intolerance shapes Euroscepticism. We argue that religious intolerance influences not only

  9. Orthostatic stability with intravenous levodopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan H. Siddiqi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous levodopa has been used in a multitude of research studies due to its more predictable pharmacokinetics compared to the oral form, which is used frequently as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD. Levodopa is the precursor for dopamine, and intravenous dopamine would strongly affect vascular tone, but peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors are intended to block such effects. Pulse and blood pressure, with orthostatic changes, were recorded before and after intravenous levodopa or placebo—after oral carbidopa—in 13 adults with a chronic tic disorder and 16 tic-free adult control subjects. Levodopa caused no statistically or clinically significant changes in blood pressure or pulse. These data add to previous data that support the safety of i.v. levodopa when given with adequate peripheral inhibition of DOPA decarboxylase.

  10. Interaction of mental and orthostatic stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Lackner, Helmut K.; Papousek, Ilona; Jezova, Daniela; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut G.

    2011-05-01

    We assessed hemodynamic responses induced by orthostatic and mental stressors, using passive head up tilt (HUT) and mental arithmetic (MA), respectively. The 15 healthy males underwent three protocols: (1) HUT alone, (2) MA in supine position and (3) MA+HUT, with sessions randomized and ≥2 weeks apart. In relation to baseline, HUT increased heart rate (HR) (+20.4±7.1 bpm; pMental challenge during orthostatic challenge elicited greater increases in heart rate, despite similar reductions in stroke volume such as those during orthostatic stress alone. Overall, cardiac output decreases were less with combinations of mental and orthostatic challenges in comparison to orthostasis alone. This would suggest that carefully chosen mental stressors might affect orthostatic responses of people on standing up. Therefore, additional mental loading could be a useful countermeasure to alleviate the orthostatic responses of persons, particularly in those with histories of dizziness on standing up or on return to earth from the spaceflight environment of microgravity.

  11. Common schizophrenia alleles are enriched in mutation-intolerant genes and in regions under strong background selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Holmans, Peter; Pocklington, Andrew J

    2018-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric condition often associated with poor quality of life and decreased life expectancy. Lack of progress in improving treatment outcomes has been attributed to limited knowledge of the underlying biology, although large-scale genomic studies have begun to p...

  12. Lactose Intolerance (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groups of people — about 90% or more of Asian Americans and Native Americans are lactose intolerant, and ... aged cheeses, including cheddar. Yogurt that contains live cultures is more easily digested because it contains healthy ...

  13. Lactose Intolerance (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intolerant for different reasons: Ethnic background. People of Asian, African, Native American, and Hispanic backgrounds are more ... are lower in lactose. Yogurts that contain active cultures are easier to digest and much less likely ...

  14. A Case Report and Review of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Lide

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS is a form of orthostatic intolerance characterized by an increased heart rate upon transition from supine to standing, and head-up tilt without orthostatic hypotension. Its etiology is multifactorial, and no clear cause has been identified. Common symptoms include light-headedness, blurred vision, weakness, cognitive difficulties, and fatigue and are often accompanied by palpitations, shortness of breath, syncope, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Management includes volume expansion, physical counter maneuvers, and pharmacological agents such as fludrocortisone, midodrine, propranolol, and pyridostigmine. The course of POTS in pregnancy is variable and POTS has not been directly implicated in any adverse outcomes for the mother or fetus. Methods - Two cases of POTS in pregnancy are presented, along with a review of the literature for reports of POTS in pregnancy. Results - Along with our 2 cases, 10 other case reports were identified and included. Conclusion - The course of POTS in pregnancy is variable, and not directly linked to increase perinatal morbidity or mortality. Women can safely undergo regional anesthesia, and vaginal delivery with close monitoring of hemodynamic changes.

  15. A Case Report and Review of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lide, Brianna; Haeri, Sina

    2015-04-01

    Purpose Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of orthostatic intolerance characterized by an increased heart rate upon transition from supine to standing, and head-up tilt without orthostatic hypotension. Its etiology is multifactorial, and no clear cause has been identified. Common symptoms include light-headedness, blurred vision, weakness, cognitive difficulties, and fatigue and are often accompanied by palpitations, shortness of breath, syncope, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Management includes volume expansion, physical counter maneuvers, and pharmacological agents such as fludrocortisone, midodrine, propranolol, and pyridostigmine. The course of POTS in pregnancy is variable and POTS has not been directly implicated in any adverse outcomes for the mother or fetus. Methods Two cases of POTS in pregnancy are presented, along with a review of the literature for reports of POTS in pregnancy. Results Along with our 2 cases, 10 other case reports were identified and included. Conclusion The course of POTS in pregnancy is variable, and not directly linked to increase perinatal morbidity or mortality. Women can safely undergo regional anesthesia, and vaginal delivery with close monitoring of hemodynamic changes.

  16. Influence of Regular Exercise Training on Post-exercise Hemodynamic Regulation to Orthostatic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eSugawara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To prevent orthostatic hypotension, arterial blood pressure (BP is neurally and hormonally regulated via increases in heart rate (HR and peripheral vascular tone. After dynamic exercise, however, the latter arm is blunted because of the increased vasodilators in exercised muscles. Orthostatic tachycardia is likely a more important compensatory mechanism for post-exercise orthostatic intolerance in individuals who have higher leg vasodilator capacity, such as endurance-trained athletes. To test the hypothesis that regular endurance training was associated with the greater augmentation of tachycardia response to post-exercise orthostasis, we compared hemodynamic responses to 5-min 60-degree head-up tilt (HUT before and after 60 min of cycling at 70% of HR reserve in the endurance-trained (n=8 and sedentary men (n=9. Calf peak vascular conductance was 62% greater in the endurance-trained than the sedentary (P<0.001. After the exercise, the HUT-induced reduction of SV was significantly augmented in the endurance-trained (from -27.7±6.9 to -33.7±7.7 ml, P=0.03 but not in their sedentary peers. Nevertheless, MAP was well maintained during post-exercise HUT even in the endurance-trained (from 81±10 to 80±8 mmHg. Tachycardia responses during sustained orthostasis were significantly increased in the sedentary (1.3-fold vs. pre-exercise and more in the endurance-trained (2.0-fold. The augmented response of HUT-induced tachycardia was greater in the endurance-trained than the sedentary (P=0.04. Additionally, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, evaluated by the HR response to the hypotensive perturbation, was improved after the exercise in the endurance-trained (from -0.56±0.32 to -1.03±0.26 bpm/mmHg, P=0.007 but not in the sedentary. These results suggest that in the endurance-trained men the increased orthostatic tachycardia and augmented cardiovagal BRS may favorably mitigate accumulated risks for orthostatic intolerance in the early phase of

  17. Initial and delayed circulatory responses to orthostatic stress in normal humans and in subjects with orthostatic intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, W.; Shepherd, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational stresses, which are common daily event for humans, result in a diminution in central blood volume, due to displacement of blood to the lower parts of the body. They demand complex adjustments in the cardiovascular system to offset the decrease in cardiac filling pressure. Such changes

  18. Delaying Orthostatic Syncope With Mental Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Roessler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Steptoe, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    At orthostatic vasovagal syncope there appears to be a sudden withdrawl of sympathetic activity. As mental challenge activates the sympathetic system, we hypothesized that doing mental arithmetic in volunteers driven to the end point of their cardiovascular stability may delay the onset of orthostatic syncope. We investigated this in healthy male subjects. Each subject underwent a head up tilt (HUT) + graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) up to presyncope session (control) to determine the orthostatic tolerance time, OTT (Time from HUT commencement to development of presyncopal symptoms/signs). Once the tolerance time was known, a randomized crossover protocol was used: either 1) Repeat HUT + LBNP to ensure reproducibility of repeated run or 2) HUT + LBNP run but with added mental challenge (two min before the expected presyncope time). Test protocols were separated by two weeks. Our studies on five male test subjects indicate that mental challenge improves orthostatic tolerance significantly. Additional mental loading could be a useful countermeasure to alleviate the orthostatic responses of persons, particularly in those with histories of dizziness on standing up, or to alleviate hypotension that frequently occurs during hemodialysis or on return to earth from the spaceflight environment of microgravity.

  19. [Fructose and fructose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2016-10-01

    Although fructose was discovered in 1794, it was realised in recent decades only that its malabsorption can lead to intestinal symptoms while its excessive consumption induces metabolic disturbances. Fructose is a monosaccharide found naturally in most fruits and vegetables. Dietary intake of fructose has gradually increased in the past decades, especially because of the consumption of high fructose corn syrup. With its 16.4 kg/year consumption, Hungary ranks secondly after the United States. Fructose is absorbed in the small intestine by facilitated transport mediated by glucose transporter proteins-2 and -5, and arrives in the liver cells. Here it is transformed enzymatically into fructose-1-phosphate and then, fructose-1,5-diphosphate, which splits further into glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone-phosphate, entering the process of glycolysis, triglyceride and uric acid production. The prevalence of fructose intolerance varies strongly, depending on the method used. The leading symptoms of fructose intolerance are similar, but less severe than those of lactose intolerance. Multiple secondary symptoms can also occur. A symptom-based diagnosis of fructose intolerance is possible, but the gold standard is the H 2 breath test, though this is less accurate than in lactose testing. Measuring fructosaemia is costly, cumbersome and not widely used. Fructose intolerance increases intestinal motility and sensitivity, promotes biofilm formation and contributes to the development of gastrooesophageal reflux. Long-term use of fructose fosters the development of dental caries and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Its role in carcinogenesis is presently investigated. The cornerstone of dietary management for fructose intolerance is the individual reduction of fructose intake and the FODMAP diet, led by a trained dietetician. The newly introduced xylose-isomerase is efficient in reducing the symptoms of fructose intolerance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(43), 1708-1716.

  20. Caloric restriction decreases orthostatic tolerance independently from 6° head-down bedrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Florian

    Full Text Available Astronauts consume fewer calories during spaceflight and return to earth with an increased risk of orthostatic intolerance. Whether a caloric deficiency modifies orthostatic responses is not understood. Thus, we determined the effects of a hypocaloric diet (25% caloric restriction during 6° head down bedrest (an analog of spaceflight on autonomic neural control during lower body negative pressure (LBNP. Nine healthy young men completed a randomized crossover bedrest study, consisting of four (2 weeks each interventions (normocaloric bedrest, normocaloric ambulatory, hypocaloric bedrest, hypocaloric ambulatory, each separated by 5 months. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA was recorded at baseline following normocaloric and hypocaloric interventions. Heart rate (HR and arterial pressure were recorded before, during, and after 3 consecutive stages (7 min each of LBNP (-15, -30, -45 mmHg. Caloric and posture effects during LBNP were compared using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. There was a strong trend toward reduced basal MSNA following caloric restriction alone (normcaloric vs. hypocaloric: 22±3 vs. 14±4 burst/min, p = 0.06. Compared to the normocaloric ambulatory, both bedrest and caloric restriction were associated with lower systolic blood pressure during LBNP (p<0.01; however, HR responses were directionally opposite (i.e., increase with bedrest, decrease with caloric restriction. Survival analysis revealed a significant reduction in orthostatic tolerance following caloric restriction (normocaloric finishers: 12/16; hypocaloric finishers: 6/16; χ2, p = 0.03. Caloric restriction modifies autonomic responses to LBNP, which may decrease orthostatic tolerance after spaceflight.

  1. Slow breathing as a means to improve orthostatic tolerance: a randomized sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Lewis, Nia C S; Sikken, Elisabeth L G; Thomas, Kate N; Ainslie, Philip N

    2013-07-15

    Endogenous oscillations in blood pressure (BP) and cerebral blood flow have been associated with improved orthostatic tolerance. Although slow breathing induces such responses, it has not been tested as a therapeutic strategy to improve orthostatic tolerance. With the use of a randomized, crossover sham-controlled design, we tested the hypothesis that breathing at six breaths/min (vs. spontaneous breathing) would improve orthostatic tolerance via inducing oscillations in mean arterial BP (MAP) and cerebral blood flow. Sixteen healthy participants (aged 25 ± 4 yr; mean ± SD) had continuous beat-to-beat measurements of middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv), BP (finometer), heart rate (ECG), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure during an incremental orthostatic stress test to presyncope by combining head-up tilt with incremental lower-body negative pressure. Tolerance time to presyncope was improved (+15%) with slow breathing compared with spontaneous breathing (29.2 ± 5.4 vs. 33.7 ± 6.0 min; P breathing) across time from baseline to presyncope. Our findings show that orthostatic tolerance can be improved within healthy individuals with a simple, nonpharmacological breathing strategy. The mechanisms underlying this improvement are likely mediated via the generation of negative intrathoracic pressure during slow and deep breathing and the related beneficial impact on cerebrovascular and autonomic function.

  2. [The role of cellular mediators in the development of the phenomenon of inhibition induced by barium sulfate luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of blood under the influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with intolerance to these drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausova, S V; Gurevich, K G; Bondareva, G P; Filatov, O Ju; Malyshev, I Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated contribution mediator mechanism in the development of the phenomenon of inhibition induced by barium sulfate luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (SLCHL) of blood under the influence of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with intolerance to these drugs. It was found that the phenomenon of suppression SLCHL blood under the influence of NSAIDs in patients with intolerance is mediated by the participation of mediators, and the contribution of H1--and H2--histamine receptors, 5-HT2 serotonin receptors and Cys-leukotriene receptors in the development of that phenomenon depends on the chemical nature of NSAIDs and the clinical manifestations of intolerance.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of metformin in patients with gastrointestinal intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mccreight, Laura J.; Stage, Tore B.; Connelly, Paul

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Metformin intolerance symptoms are gastrointestinal in nature, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess potential causes of metformin intolerance including: altered metformin uptake from the intestine; increased anaerobic glucose utilisation...... and subsequent lactate production; altered serotonin uptake; and altered bile acid pool. METHODS: This pharmacokinetic study recruited ten severely intolerant and ten tolerant individuals matched for age, sex and BMI. A single 500mg dose of metformin was administered, with blood sampling at eleven time points...... over 24 hours. Blood samples were analysed for metformin, lactate, serotonin, and bile acid concentrations and compared across the phenotypes. RESULTS: The intolerant individuals were severely intolerant to 500mg metformin. No significant difference was identified between tolerant and intolerant...

  4. Oral Midodrine Hydrochloride for Prevention of Orthostatic Hypotension during Early Mobilization after Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Øivind; Mehlsen, Jesper; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Husted, Henrik; Solgaard, Søren; Josiassen, Jakob; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Early postoperative mobilization is essential for rapid recovery but may be impaired by orthostatic intolerance (OI) and orthostatic hypotension (OH), which are highly prevalent after major surgery. Pathogenic mechanisms include an insufficient postoperative vasopressor response. The oral α-1 agonist midodrine hydrochloride increases vascular resistance, and the authors hypothesized that midodrine would reduce the prevalence of OH during mobilization 6 h after total hip arthroplasty relative to placebo. This double-blind, randomized trial allocated 120 patients 18 yr or older and scheduled for total hip arthroplasty under spinal anesthesia to either 5 mg midodrine hydrochloride or placebo orally 1 h before mobilization at 6 and 24 h postoperatively. The primary outcome was the prevalence of OH (decrease in systolic or diastolic arterial pressures of > 20 or 10 mmHg, respectively) during mobilization 6 h after surgery. Secondary outcomes were OI and hemodynamic responses to mobilization at 6 and 24 h. At 6 h, 14 (25%; 95% CI, 14 to 38%) versus 23 (39.7%; 95% CI, 27 to 53%) patients had OH in the midodrine and placebo group, respectively, relative risk 0.63 (0.36 to 1.10; P = 0.095), whereas OI was present in 15 (25.0%; 15 to 38%) versus 22 (37.3%; 25 to 51%) patients, relative risk 0.68 (0.39 to 1.18; P = 0.165). At 24 h, OI and OH prevalence did not differ between groups. Preemptive use of oral 5 mg midodrine did not significantly reduce the prevalence of OH during early postoperative mobilization compared with placebo. However, further studies on dose and timing are warranted since midodrine is effective in chronic OH conditions.

  5. Wheat and gluten intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busink-van den Broeck, Hetty; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Brouns, F.

    2016-01-01

    With this White Paper, the current state of scientific knowledge on human disorders related to gluten and wheat is presented, with reference to other grains such as spelt, barley, rye, and oats. Backgrounds are described of coeliac disease (gluten intolerance), wheat allergies and any kind of wheat

  6. Management of statin intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma B Raju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are the revolutionary drugs in the cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. But they also possess several adverse effects like myopathy with elevation of hepatic transaminases (>3 times the upper limit of normal or creatine kinase (>10 times the upper limit of normal and some rare side-effects, including peripheral neuropathy, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and erectile dysfunction. Due to these adverse effects, patients abruptly withdrew statins without consulting physicians. This abrupt discontinuation of statins is termed as statin intolerance. Statin-induced myopathy constitutes two third of all side-effects from statins and is the primary reason for statin intolerance. Though statin intolerance has considerably impacted cardiovascular outcomes in the high-risk patients, it has been well effectively managed by prescribing statins either as alternate-day or once weekly dosage regimen, as combination therapy with a non-statin therapy or and by dietary intervention. The present article reviews the causes, clinical implications of statin withdrawal and management of statin intolerance.

  7. Evolution and Collective Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoite, Fred H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Examines behavioral and intellectual conformity as major attitudes in shaping political behavior. Manifestations of coercion within human and animal social units are presented, including religious intolerance, prohibition of artistic activity and literary expression, and rejection of outsiders. Available from: Managing Editor, Department of…

  8. Orthostatic hypertension: profile of a Nigerian population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, age, sex distribution and blood pressure (BP) pattern of patients with orthostatic hypertension in a cohort of hypertensives. Method: A total of 179 patients on follow-up treatment in a hypertension clinic were assessed for age, sex and BP in the seated ...

  9. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Venema, K.; Priebe, M. G.; Welling, G. W.; Brummer, R. -J. M.; Vonk, R. J.

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the

  10. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Venema, K.; Priebe, M.G.; Welling, G.W.; Brummer, R.J.M.; Vonk, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the

  11. [Breath tests in children with suspected lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, P Ángela; Furió, C Simone; Arancibia, A Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Up to 70% of the world population is lactose intolerance. However, there are no epidemiological studies among Chilean pediatric population affected by this condition. Clinical characterization of a series of children who underwent the lactose intolerance breath test for lactose intolerance study, establishing intolerance and malabsorption frequencies, the most frequent symptoms, and test performance depending on the origin. Patients under 18 years old who took the lactose intolerance breath test in the Gastroenterology Laboratory of the Catholic University of Chile, and who were admitted due to clinically suspected lactose intolerance. Malabsorption was considered when there was as an increase of ≥20ppm above the baseline (H2) or ≥34ppm of H2 and methane (CH4) combined. Intolerance was considered when the above was associated with a symptom intensity score ≥7 during registration. The analysis included194 patients aged 1 to17 years of age. Of these, 102 (53%) presented with malabsorption, and 53 (27%) were intolerant. The frequency of lactose intolerance varied from 7.1 to 45.4%, and it occurred more frequently at older ages. The most common reported symptoms were abdominal pain, bloating and rumbling. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance can be investigated from the first years of life using the lactose breath test plus a symptom questionnaire. An increase in the frequency of intolerance with age, and a greater number of positive tests, if they were requested by a gastroenterologist, were observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Orthostatic changes in blood pressure and mortality in a nursing home population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Laura C.; Hendriks, Steven H.; Cimzar-Sweelssen, Mateja; Knipscheer, Astrid; Groenier, Klaas H.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Bilo, Henk J. G.; van Hateren, Kornelis J. J.

    Objective: Hypertension, orthostatic hypotension and orthostatic hypertension (OHT) are highly prevalent in old age. The associations in the very elderly and frail patients between blood pressure, and especially orthostatic changes in blood pressure, and mortality are unclear. We aimed to

  13. Characterizing Orthostatic Tremor Using a Smartphone Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Balachandar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthostatic tremor is one of the few tremor conditions requiring an electromyogram for definitive diagnosis since leg tremor might not be visible to the naked eye.Phenomenology Shown: An iOS application (iSeismometer, ObjectGraph LLC, New York using an Apple iPhone 5 (Cupertino, CA, USA inserted into the patient’s sock detected a tremor with a frequency of 16.4 Hz on both legs.Educational Value: The rapid and straightforward accelerometer-based recordings accomplished in this patient demonstrate the ease with which quantitative analysis of orthostatic tremor can be conducted and, importantly, demonstrates the potential application of this approach in the assessment of any lower limb tremor. 

  14. Interaction of mental and orthostatic stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Nandu; Lackner, Helmut K.; Papousek, Ilona; Jezova, Daniela; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut G.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed hemodynamic responses induced by orthostatic and mental stressors, using passive head up tilt (HUT) and mental arithmetic (MA), respectively. The 15 healthy males underwent three protocols: (1) HUT alone, (2) MA in supine position and (3) MA+HUT, with sessions randomized and ≥2 weeks apart. In relation to baseline, HUT increased heart rate (HR) (+20.4±7.1 bpm; p

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  16. Midodrine as a Countermeasure to Orthostatic Hypotension Immediately After Space Shuttle Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Ribeiro, L. Christine; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Midodrine prevents post-space flight orthostatic intolerance when testing is conducted in a controlled laboratory setting within 2-4 hours after Space Shuttle landing. It is unknown if midodrine is as effective during re-entry and immediately following landing. METHODS: Cardiovascular responses to 10 minutes of 80 head-up tilt in five male astronauts were compared before and immediately after Space Shuttle missions. Preflight tests were conducted in the Johnson Space Center Cardiovascular Laboratory without midodrine. Post-flight testing was performed in the Crew Transport Vehicle on the Space Shuttle runway within 60 minutes of landing; midodrine was self-administered before re-entry. Survival analysis was performed (Gehan-Breslow test) to compare presyncope rates pre- to post-flight. Cardiovascular responses (last minute standing minus supine) to tilt before and after space flight were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: Midodrine did not prevent post-flight orthostatic hypotension in two of the five astronauts, but the rate of presyncope across the group did not increase (p=0.17) from pre- to post-flight. Also, although the change in heart rate from supine to the last minute of standing was not affected by space flight, systolic blood pressure decreased more (p=0.05) and diastolic blood pressure tended to decrease (p=0.08) after space flight. CONCLUSIONS: Accurate interpretation of the current results requires that similar data be collected in control subjects (without midodrine) on the CTV. However, drug interaction concerns with commonly used anti-emetics and potentiation of prolonged QTc intervals observed in long duration astronauts make the routine use of midodrine for immediate post-flight orthostatic hypotension unlikely. 2

  17. Four faces of baroreflex failure: hypertensive crisis, volatile hypertension, orthostatic tachycardia, and malignant vagotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketch, Terry; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, RoseMarie; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The baroreflex normally serves to buffer blood pressure against excessive rise or fall. Baroreflex failure occurs when afferent baroreceptive nerves or their central connections become impaired. In baroreflex failure, there is loss of buffering ability, and wide excursions of pressure and heart rate occur. Such excursions may derive from endogenous factors such as stress or drowsiness, which result in quite high and quite low pressures, respectively. They may also derive from exogenous factors such as drugs or environmental influences. METHODS AND RESULTS: Impairment of the baroreflex may produce an unusually broad spectrum of clinical presentations; with acute baroreflex failure, a hypertensive crisis is the most common presentation. Over succeeding days to weeks, or in the absence of an acute event, volatile hypertension with periods of hypotension occurs and may continue for many years, usually with some attenuation of pressor surges and greater prominence of depressor valleys during long-term follow-up. With incomplete loss of baroreflex afferents, a mild syndrome of orthostatic tachycardia or orthostatic intolerance may appear. Finally, if the baroreflex failure occurs without concomitant destruction of the parasympathetic efferent vagal fibers, a resting state may lead to malignant vagotonia with severe bradycardia and hypotension and episodes of sinus arrest. CONCLUSIONS: Although baroreflex failure is not the most common cause of the above conditions, correct differentiation from other cardiovascular disorders is important, because therapy of baroreflex failure requires specific strategies, which may lead to successful control.

  18. Intolerance toward immigrants in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2013-01-01

    Intolerance toward immigrants has recently reached noticeable highs in Switzerland. Referring to the conflict theory, the perception of a specific group as a threat tends to lead to intolerance toward that group. The expectation of a negative relationship between threat and tolerance is neverthel......Intolerance toward immigrants has recently reached noticeable highs in Switzerland. Referring to the conflict theory, the perception of a specific group as a threat tends to lead to intolerance toward that group. The expectation of a negative relationship between threat and tolerance...

  19. Efficacy of Servo-Controlled Splanchnic Venous Compression in the Treatment of Orthostatic Hypotension: A Randomized Comparison With Midodrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Luis E; Diedrich, André; Baudenbacher, Franz J; Harder, René; Whitfield, Jonathan S; Iqbal, Fahad; Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya A; Black, Bonnie K; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2016-08-01

    Splanchnic venous pooling is a major hemodynamic determinant of orthostatic hypotension, but is not specifically targeted by pressor agents, the mainstay of treatment. We developed an automated inflatable abdominal binder that provides sustained servo-controlled venous compression (40 mm Hg) and can be activated only on standing. We tested the efficacy of this device against placebo and compared it to midodrine in 19 autonomic failure patients randomized to receive either placebo, midodrine (2.5-10 mg), or placebo combined with binder on separate days in a single-blind, crossover study. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured seated and standing before and 1-hour post medication; the binder was inflated immediately before standing. Only midodrine increased seated SBP (31±5 versus 9±4 placebo and 7±5 binder, P=0.003), whereas orthostatic tolerance (defined as area under the curve of upright SBP [AUCSBP]) improved similarly with binder and midodrine (AUCSBP, 195±35 and 197±41 versus 19±38 mm Hg×minute for placebo; P=0.003). Orthostatic symptom burden decreased with the binder (from 21.9±3.6 to 16.3±3.1, P=0.032) and midodrine (from 25.6±3.4 to 14.2±3.3, Pmidodrine and binder with midodrine alone. The combination produced a greater increase in orthostatic tolerance (AUCSBP, 326±65 versus 140±53 mm Hg×minute for midodrine alone; P=0.028, n=21) and decreased orthostatic symptoms (from 21.8±3.2 to 12.9±2.9, Pmidodrine, the standard of care, in the management of orthostatic hypotension. Combining both therapies produces greater improvement in orthostatic tolerance. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00223691. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Advantages and disadvantages of fludrocortisone or saline load in preventing post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, Joan; Convertino, Victor A.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of saline load to fludrocortisone (florinef) as countermeasures for reduced plasma volume and orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight. Eleven males (ages 30-50 yr) underwent a 3-day ambulatory baseline period followed by 7 days of 6° head-down bedrest, during which cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex sensitivity and plasma volume (PV) were determined. During pre-bedrest and 2.5 h after treatment on day 8, PV was also measured and subjects underwent a 15-min unsupported stand test. Treatments consisted of 8 salt tablets (1 g NaCl per tablet) and 960 ml of water in 5 subjects and 0.6 mg (0.2 mg × 3) over 24 h in the other 6 subjects. PV decreased by 12% on day 7 of bedrest. This was restored on day 8 by florinef but not by saline load. The effect of florinef on PV was paralleled by decreases in urine volume and the urinary sodium/potassium ratio. Reduced PV was associated with greater vascular resistance for the same drop in central venous pressure, suggesting less vasoconstriction reserve after bedrest. Carotid baroreflex control of heart rate was attenuated after 7 days of bedrest. Both baroreflex functions were restored by florinef but not saline load. Only 1 of 6 subjects showed syncopal symptoms in the florinef-treated group, whereas 4 of 5 subjects did so in the saline-load group. Acute florinef treatment appears to have distinct advantages as a protective measure for post-bedrest orthostatic intolerance, not only through its salt retaining, volume-expanding mineralcorticoid effect, but possibly through its actions on baroreflex and sympathetic functions.

  1. Medicines, excipients and dietary intolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Medicinal products contain not only active drugs but also other ingredients included for a variety of purposes and collectively known as excipients.(1) People who wish to avoid a specific substance because of an allergy or intolerance may ask a healthcare professional about the constituents of a medicine and whether an alternative is available. In a previous article we discussed the issues facing people who wish to avoid certain substances for religious or cultural reasons.(2) Here, we provide an overview of several dietary conditions and the pharmaceutical issues that need to be considered by healthcare professionals advising on the suitability of a medicine. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Genetics Home Reference: lysinuric protein intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Lysinuric protein intolerance Lysinuric protein intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lysinuric protein intolerance is a disorder caused by the body's inability ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  4. Evaluation of Baroreflex Effectiveness Index during Real and Simulated Microgravity: Relation to Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rachel; Stenger, Michael; Platts, Steven; Lee, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Bed Rest and Space Flight cause a significant decrease in BEI. BR causes similar changes to BEI as SF. BEI may not correlate with subjects experiencing presyncope, but error is high and n is low. Compression Garments have the potential to restore BEI after short duration BR, but do not prevent recovery.

  5. The Prevalence of Orthostatic Hypotension in Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic Hypotension is a serious and common complication of diabetes mellitus. AIMS: To determine the prevalence and risk factors of Orthostatic Hypotension in type 2 diabetic patients in a diabetes mellitus clinic in Enugu South-East Nigeria. METHOD AND MATERIALS: A structured questionnaire ...

  6. Gender-Related Differences in Cardiovascular Responses to Orthostatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; DAunno, Dominick S.; Waters, Wendy W.; Freeman-Perez, Sondra

    1999-01-01

    There is evidence that men and women have different cardiovascular responses to standing, and that women are more susceptible to orthostatic hypotension than men. The present study seeks to determine if decreased orthostatic tolerance in women is caused by diminished vasoconstrictive responses.

  7. The clinical relevance of orthostatic hypotension in elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Laura; Kleefstra, Nanne; Luigies, Rene; de Rooij, Sophia; Bilo, Henk; van Hateren, Kornelis

    2017-01-01

    AimOrthostatic hypotension (OH) is highly prevalent in old age. The impact of OH on orthostatic complaints and falling is questionable. We wondered if the consensus definition of OH plays an essential role in the accuracy and direction of the prediction of these endpoints. We aimed to explore the

  8. Normal Reactions to Orthostatic Stress in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Gunilla; Julu, Peter O. O.; Engerstrom, Ingegerd Witt; Sandlund, Marlene; Lindstrom, Britta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate orthostatic reactions in females with Rett syndrome (RTT), and also whether the severity of the syndrome had an impact on autonomic reactions. Based on signs of impaired function of the central autonomic system found in RTT, it could be suspected that orthostatic reactions were affected. The orthostatic…

  9. The clinical relevance of orthostatic hypotension in elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Laura; Kleefstra, Nanne; Luigies, Rene; de Rooij, Sophia; Bilo, Henk; van Hateren, Kornelis

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is highly prevalent in old age. The impact of OH on orthostatic complaints and falling is questionable. We wondered if the consensus definition of OH plays an essential role in the accuracy and direction of the prediction of these endpoints. We aimed to explore the

  10. Neural Correlates of Intolerance of Uncertainty in Clinical Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Mirjam; Smeets, Paul; Sternheim, Lot

    2015-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty is a key contributor to anxiety-related disorders. Recent studies highlight its importance in other clinical disorders. The link between its clinical presentation and the underlying neural correlates remains unclear. This review summarizes the emerging literature on the neural correlates of intolerance of uncertainty. In conclusion, studies focusing on the neural correlates of this construct are sparse, and findings are inconsistent across disorders. Future research should identify neural correlates of intolerance of uncertainty in more detail. This may unravel the neurobiology of a wide variety of clinical disorders and pave the way for novel therapeutic targets.

  11. Evaluating the efficacy of an active compression brace on orthostatic cardiovascular responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Moein

    Full Text Available Orthostatic intolerance, one of the principle causes of syncope, can occur secondary to concomitant venous pooling and enhanced capillary filtration. We aimed to evaluate a prototype portable calf active compression brace (ACB designed to improve orthostatic haemodynamic control. Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, cross-over, double-blind study. Testing consisted of head-upright tilting and walking on a treadmill conducted on two consecutive days with a pair of ACBs wrapped around both calves. The ACB was actuated on one test day, but not on the other (placebo. Wearability, comfort, and ambulatory use of the ACB were assessed using questionnaires. The average calf pressure exerted by the ACB was 46.3±2.2 mmHg and the actuation pressure was 20.7±1.7 mmHg. When considering the differences between ACB actuation and placebo during tilt after supine rest there were trends for a larger stroke volume (+5.20±2.34%, p = 0.05 and lower heart rate (-5.12±2.41%, p = 0.06 with ACB actuation, with no effect on systolic arterial pressure (+4.86±3.41%, p = 0.18. The decrease in stroke volume after ten minutes of tilting was positively correlated with the height:calf circumference (r = 0.464; p = 0.029; n = 22; both conditions combined. The increase in heart rate after ten minutes of tilting was negatively correlated with the height:calf circumference (r = -0.485; p = 0.022; n = 22; both conditions combined and was positively correlated with the average calf circumference (r = 0.539; p = 0.009; n = 22; both conditions combined. Participants reported good ACB wearability and comfort during ambulatory use. These data verify that the ACB increased stroke volume during tilting in healthy controls. Active calf compression garments may be a viable option for the management of orthostatic intolerance.

  12. Systemic exertion intolerance disease/chronic fatigue syndrome is common in sleep centre patients with hypersomnolence: A retrospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, Caroline; Saini, Prabhjyot; Bliwise, Donald L; Olvera, Victoria; Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn M

    2018-04-06

    Symptoms of the central disorders of hypersomnolence extend beyond excessive daytime sleepiness to include non-restorative sleep, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. They share much in common with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, recently renamed systemic exertion intolerance disease, whose additional features include post-exertional malaise and orthostatic intolerance. We sought to determine the frequency and correlates of systemic exertion intolerance disease in a hypersomnolent population. One-hundred and eighty-seven hypersomnolent patients completed questionnaires regarding sleepiness and fatigue; questionnaires and clinical records were used to assess for systemic exertion intolerance disease. Sleep studies, hypocretin and cataplexy were additionally used to assign diagnoses of hypersomnolence disorders or sleep apnea. Included diagnoses were idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 63), narcolepsy type 2 (n = 25), persistent sleepiness after obstructive sleep apnea treatment (n = 25), short habitual sleep duration (n = 41), and sleepiness with normal sleep study (n = 33). Twenty-one percent met systemic exertion intolerance disease criteria, and the frequency of systemic exertion intolerance disease was not different across sleep diagnoses (p = .37). Patients with systemic exertion intolerance disease were no different from those without this diagnosis by gender, age, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, depressive symptoms, or sleep study parameters. The whole cohort reported substantial fatigue on questionnaires, but the systemic exertion intolerance disease group exhibited more profound fatigue and was less likely to respond to traditional wake-promoting agents (88.6% versus 67.7%, p = .01). Systemic exertion intolerance disease appears to be a common co-morbidity in patients with hypersomnolence, which is not specific to hypersomnolence subtype but may portend a poorer prognosis for treatment response. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T; Venema, K; Priebe, M G; Welling, G W; Brummer, R-J M; Vonk, R J

    2008-08-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the fermentation metabolites and how these processes would play a role in the pathophysiology of lactose intolerance. We suggest that the balance between the removal and production rate of osmotic-active components (lactose, and intermediate metabolites, e.g. lactate, succinate, etc.) in the colon is a key factor in the development of symptoms. The involvement of the colon may provide the basis for designing new targeted strategies for dietary and clinical management of lactose intolerance.

  14. Heat intolerance: predisposing factor or residual injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Y

    1990-02-01

    Great individual variability exists in the ability to sustain heat stress. Some individuals are more susceptible to heat than others. Those individuals, among the young active population (athletes, military recruits, laborers), are at risk to contract exertional heat stroke. Low tolerance to heat results from either functional factors, or from congenital or acquired disturbances. In most cases heat intolerance can be foreseen. Cases of dehydration, overweight, low physical fitness, lack of acclimatization, febrile or infectious diseases, and skin disorders should be regarded a priori as predisposing factors for heat intolerance. Special attention should be paid to subjects with previous heat stroke episodes since it might reflect an underlying cause for heat susceptibility. The heat tolerance of these subjects should be tested 8-12 wk postepisode to detect a possible residual injury in the ability to thermoregulate adequately in the heat.

  15. EFFICACY OF SERVO-CONTROLLED SPLANCHNIC VENOUS COMPRESSION IN THE TREATMENT OF ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION. A RANDOMIZED COMPARISON WITH MIDODRINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Luis E.; Diedrich, André; Baudenbacher, Franz J.; Harder, René; Whitfield, Jonathan S.; Iqbal, Fahad; Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya A.; Black, Bonnie K.; Raj, Satish R.; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2016-01-01

    Splanchnic venous pooling is a major hemodynamic determinant of orthostatic hypotension (OH), but is not specifically targeted by pressor agents, the mainstay of treatment. We developed an automated inflatable abdominal binder that provides sustained servo-controlled venous compression (40 mmHg) and can be activated only on standing. We tested the efficacy of this device against placebo and compared it to midodrine in nineteen autonomic failure patients randomized to receive either placebo, midodrine (2.5–10 mg) or placebo combined with binder on separate days in a single-blind, crossover study. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured seated and standing before and 1-hour post-medication; the binder was inflated immediately before standing. Only midodrine increased seated SBP (31±5 vs. 9±4 placebo and 7±5 binder, P=0.003); whereas orthostatic tolerance (defined as area under the curve of upright SBP [AUCSBP]) improved similarly with binder and midodrine (AUCSBP, 195±35 and 197±41 vs. 19±38 mmHg*min for placebo, P=0.003). Orthostatic symptom burden decreased with the binder (from 21.9±3.6 to 16.3±3.1, P=0.032) and midodrine (from 25.6±3.4 to 14.2±3.3, Pmidodrine and binder, with midodrine alone. The combination produced a greater increase in orthostatic tolerance (AUCSBP, 326±65 vs. 140±53 mmHg*min for midodrine alone, P=0.028, n=21), and decreased orthostatic symptoms (from 21.8±3.2 to 12.9±2.9, Pmidodrine, the standard of care, in the management of OH. Combining both therapies produces greater improvement in orthostatic tolerance. PMID:27271310

  16. Prevalence of Food Additive Intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1994-01-01

    1 The existing prevalence estimates of food additive intolerance(1-4) are being reviewed. 2 In the EEC report the estimated frequency of food additive intolerance is 0.03% to 0.15% based on data from patient groups. 3 The British population study results in a prevalence estimate of 0...... The prevalence estimates vary with a factor 100. As the results vary so do the study populations. 6 If the different study populations are accounted for, a common conclusion can be drawn: Food additive intolerance is found in adults with atopic symptoms from the respiratory tract and skin. The prevalence...... estimates are questionable but may be less than 0.15%. In adults and children with reproducible, and with more subjective symptoms, such as headache and behavioural/mood change the prevalence is even lower (0.026%). Food additive intolerance is primarily found in atopic children with cutaneous symptoms...

  17. A review of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carew, Sheila

    2012-01-31

    A 21-year-old female reports an 18-month history of light-headedness on standing. This is often associated with palpitations and a feeling of intense anxiety. She has had two black-outs in the past 12 months. She is not taking any regular medications. Her supine blood pressure was 126\\/84 mmHg with a heart rate of 76 bpm, and her upright blood pressure was 122\\/80 mmHg with a heart rate of 114 bpm. A full system examination was otherwise normal. She had a 12-lead electrocardiogram performed which was unremarkable. She was referred for head-up tilt testing. She was symptomatic during the test and lost consciousness at 16 min. Figure 1 summarizes her blood pressure and heart rate response to tilting. A diagnosis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with overlapping vasovagal syncope was made.

  18. Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension (Shy-Drager Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or other vision disturbances, difficulty breathing and swallowing, sleep disturbances, and decreased sweating. Because the disease resembles others, a correct diagnosis may take years. × Definition Multiple system atrophy with orthostatic hypotension is the ...

  19. [131I] Hippuran renography in the detection of orthostatic hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clorius, J.H.; Kjelle-Schweigler, M.; Ostertag, H.; Moehring, K.

    1978-01-01

    Scintigrams in prone and standing positions were done in 11 hypertensive women. All had nephroptosis with ventral rotation. On the basis of the renograms, seven patients were identified as suffering from orthostatic hypertension. Nephropexy resulted in normalization of blood pressure in six of the seven patients and normalization of the renograms of all seven. We believe that sequence scintigrams in prone and standing positions offer a simple method of identifying patients with orthostatic hypertension

  20. Midodrine as a Countermeasure for Post-Spaceflight Orthostatic Hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Stein, Sydney P.; Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    One possible mechanism for post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension, which affects approximately 30% of astronauts after short duration shuttle missions, is inadequate norepinephrine release during upright posture. We performed a two phased study to determine the effectiveness of an alpha1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine, as a countermeasure to post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension. The first phase of the study examined the landing day orthostatic responses of six veteran astronauts after oral midodrine (10 mg) administered on the ground within approximately two hours of wheel stop. One female crewmember exhibited orthostatic hypotension in a previous flight but not after midodrine. Five male crewmembers, who did not exhibit orthostatic hypotension during previous flights, also did not show signs of orthostatic hypotension after midodrine. Additionally, phase one showed that midodrine did not cause hypertension in these crewmembers. In the second phase of this study, midodrine is ingested inflight (near time of ignition, TIG) and orthostatic responses are determined immediately upon landing via an 80 degree head-up tilt test performed on the crew transport vehicle (CTV). Four of ten crewmembers have completed phase two of this study. Two crewmembers completed the landing day tilt tests, while two tests were ended early due to presyncopal symptoms. All subjects had decreased landing day stroke volumes and increased heart rates compared to preflight. Midodrine appears to have increased total peripheral resistance in one crewmember who was able to complete the landing day tilt test. The effectiveness of midodrine as a countermeasure to immediate post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension has yet to be determined; interpretation is made more difficult due to low subject number and the lack of control subjects on the CTV.

  1. Locoregional Anesthesia for Carotid Endarterectomy: Identification of Patients with Intolerance to Cross-Clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaretti, Marcos; de Vasconcelos, Laura T; Dourado, Jules; de Souza, Renata F; Fontoura, Renato R; de Sousa, Atos A

    2016-03-01

    During carotid endarterectomy (CEA), carotid cross-clamping is performed to allow for artery incision and plaque removal. A small subgroup of patients can tolerate carotid occlusion for only a few seconds, if at all, without presenting neurologic deficit. These patients are described as having ''cross-clamp intolerance.'' The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the safety of locoregional anesthesia in identifying patients with cross-clamp intolerance and factors associated with this condition. From August 2008 to May 2010, 115 consecutive patients were submitted to CEA under locoregional anesthesia at the Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte; the procedure was performed by the main author. Patients who showed intolerance to internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion for intolerance. Among the 115 participating patients, 9.6% (11 patients) showed intolerance to ICA occlusion and developed deficits in intolerance). The factor that was associated with cross-clamp intolerance was the mean degree of contralateral carotid stenosis, which was 57.5% for those who presented intolerance and 27.8% for those who tolerated ICA occlusion. Locoregional anesthesia is a safe method for identifying patients with cross-clamp intolerance. Patients with cross-clamp intolerance present contralateral stenosis that is greater on average than patients who readily tolerate carotid artery occlusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Venlafaxine-Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in a Geriatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyashree Chikkaramanjegowda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Venlafaxine is not usually associated with risk of orthostatic hypotension. A 65-year-old US Caucasian female taking 225 mg/day of venlafaxine extended-release developed symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure dropped by 25 and 18 mm Hg, respectively, from supine position to standing position within 3 minutes. The patient was otherwise healthy and the orthostatic hypotension resolved with venlafaxine discontinuation. This was a probable venlafaxine adverse drug reaction according to the Naranjo scale. This case contributes to the scarce literature that indicates that clinicians need to be aware that occasionally venlafaxine can induce clinically significant orthostatic hypotension, particularly in geriatric patients. Our patient did not have orthostatic hypotension when she was taking venlafaxine at 60 years of age in higher venlafaxine doses (300 mg/day but developed this adverse drug reaction when venlafaxine was restarted at the geriatric age. This case indicates that a history of prior tolerance to venlafaxine does not guarantee tolerance after 65 years of age. If a clinician decides to use venlafaxine in geriatric patients, the clinician should warn the patient about the risk of orthostatic hypotension and consider very slow titration and low doses.

  3. Prevalence of Food Additive Intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1994-01-01

    estimates are questionable but may be less than 0.15%. In adults and children with reproducible, and with more subjective symptoms, such as headache and behavioural/mood change the prevalence is even lower (0.026%). Food additive intolerance is primarily found in atopic children with cutaneous symptoms......1 The existing prevalence estimates of food additive intolerance(1-4) are being reviewed. 2 In the EEC report the estimated frequency of food additive intolerance is 0.03% to 0.15% based on data from patient groups. 3 The British population study results in a prevalence estimate of 0.......026%. The challenged population is 81 children and adults with a history of reproducible clinical symptoms after ingestion of food additives. 4 In the Danish population study a prevalence of 1-2% is found in children age 5-16. In this study a total of 606 children mainly with atopic disease have been challenged. 5...

  4. Individual Differences in the Temporal Profile of Cardiovascular Responses to Head Down Tilt and Orthostatic Stress with and Without Fluid Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Kanis, Dionisios; Gebreyesus, Fiyore

    2013-01-01

    Susceptibility of healthy astronauts to orthostatic hypotension and presyncope is exacerbated upon return from spaceflight. Hypo-volemia is suspected to play an important role in cardiovascular deconditioning following exposure to spaceflight, which may lead to increased peripheral resistance, attenuated arterial baroreflex, and changes in cardiac function. The effect of altered gravity during space flight and planetary transition on human cardiovascular function is of critical importance to maintenance of astronaut health and safety. A promising countermeasure for post-flight orthostatic intolerance is fluid loading used to restore loss fluid volume by giving crew salt tablets and water prior to re-entry. Eight men and eight women will be tested during two, 6-hour exposures to 6o HDT: 1) fluid loading, 2) no fluid loading. Before and immediately after each HDT, subjects will perform a stand test to assess their orthostatic tolerance. Physiological measures (e.g., ECG, blood pressure, peripheral blood volume) will be continuously monitored while echocardiography measures are recorded at 30-minute intervals during HDT and stand tests. Preliminary results (N=4) clearly show individual differences in responses to this countermeasure and the time course of physiological changes induced by HDT.

  5. [Abdominal spasms, meteorism, diarrhea: fructose intolerance, lactose intolerance or IBS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, Margaritha; El-Sayad, Sabine; Wantke, Felix; Fellinger, Christina; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2012-12-01

    Meteorism, abdominal spasms, diarrhea, casually obstipation, flatulence and nausea are symptoms of fructose malabsorption (FIT) and/or lactose intolerance (LIT), but are also symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore these diseases should be considered primarily in patients with digestive complaints. For diagnosis an H(2)-breath test is used.In 1,935 patients (526 m, 1,409 f) a fructose intolerance test and in 1,739 patients (518 m,1,221 f) a lactose intolerance test was done.FIT is found more frequently than LIT (57 versus 52 % in adults (p intolerance (HIT). Headache (ca. 10 %), fatigue (ca. 5 %) and dizziness (ca. 3 %) may occur after the test, irrespective whether the test was positive or negative.In more than 2/3 of patients a diet reduced in fructose or lactose may lead to improvement or remission of these metabolic disorders. IBS, which is often correlated with FIT (183/221 patients = 83 %), can be improved by relevant but also not relevant diets indicating that irritable bowel disease seems to be caused primarily by psychological disorders.

  6. Orthostatic hypotension in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension after even short space flights has affected a significant number of astronauts. Given the need for astronauts to function at a high level of efficiency during and after their return from space, the application of pharmacologic and other treatments is strongly indicated. This report addresses the clinical problem of orthostatic hypotension and its treatments to ascertain whether pharmacologic or physiologic treatment may be useful in the prevention of orthostatic hypotension associated with space flight. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension in patients now includes increasing intravascular volume with high sodium intake and mineralocorticoids, or increasing vascular resistance through the use of drugs to stimulate alpha or block beta vascular receptors. Earlier treatment used oral sympathomimetic ephedrine hydrochloride alone or with "head-up" bed rest. Then long-acting adrenocortical steroid desoxycorticosterone preparations with high-salt diets were used to expand volume. Fludrocortisone was shown to prevent the orthostatic drop in blood pressure. The combination of the sympathomimetic amine hydroxyamphetamine and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine has been used, as has indomethacin alone. Davies et al. used mineralocorticoids at low doses concomitantly with alpha-agonists to increase vasoconstrictor action. Schirger et al used tranylcypromine and methylphenidate with or without a Jobst elastic leotard garment or the alpha-adrenergic agonist midodrine (which stimulates both arterial and venous systems without direct central nervous system or cardiac effects). Vernikos et al established that the combination of fludrocortisone, dextroamphetamine, and atropine exhibited a beneficial effect on orthostatic hypotension induced by 7-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest (a model used to simulate the weightlessness of space flight). Thus, there are numerous drugs that, in combination with mechanical techniques, including lower body negative

  7. Cerebral autoregulation and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente Mora, Cristina; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy

    2017-07-01

    Familial dysautonomia is an inherited autonomic disorder with afferent baroreflex failure. We questioned why despite low blood pressure standing, surprisingly few familial dysautonomia patients complain of symptomatic hypotension or have syncope. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography of the middle cerebral artery, we measured flow velocity (mean, peak systolic, and diastolic), area under the curve, pulsatility index, and height of the dictrotic notch in 25 patients with familial dysautonomia and 15 controls. In patients, changing from sitting to a standing position, decreased BP from 124 ± 4/64 ± 3 to 82 ± 3/37 ± 2 mmHg (p < 0.0001, for both). Despite low BP, all patients denied orthostatic symptoms. Middle cerebral artery velocity fell minimally, and the magnitude of the reductions were similar to those observed in healthy controls, in whom BP upright did not fall. While standing, patients had a greater fall in cerebrovascular resistance (p < 0.0001), an increase in pulsatility (p < 0.0001), and a deepening of the dicrotic notch (p = 0.0010), findings all consistent with low cerebrovascular resistance. No significant changes occurred in controls. Patients born with baroreflex deafferentation retain the ability to buffer wide fluctuations in BP and auto-regulate cerebral blood flow. This explains how they can tolerate extremely low BPs standing that would otherwise induce syncope.

  8. Genetic determinants of statin intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollex Rebecca L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statin-related skeletal muscle disorders range from benign myalgias – such as non-specific muscle aches or joint pains without elevated serum creatinine kinase (CK concentration – to true myositis with >10-fold elevation of serum CK, to rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The genetic basis of statin-related muscle disorders is largely unknown. Because mutations in the COQ2 gene are associated with severe inherited myopathy, we hypothesized that common, mild genetic variation in COQ2 would be associated with inter-individual variation in statin intolerance. We studied 133 subjects who developed myopathy on statin monotherapy and 158 matched controls who tolerated statins without incident or complaint. Results COQ2 genotypes, based on two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP1 and SNP2 and a 2-SNP haplotype, all showed significant associations with statin intolerance. Specifically, the odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals for increased risk of statin intolerance among homozygotes for the rare alleles were 2.42 (0.99 to 5.89, 2.33 (1.13 to 4.81 and 2.58 (1.26 to 5.28 for SNP1 and SNP2 genotypes, and the 2-SNP haplotype, respectively. Conclusion These preliminary pharmacogenetic results, if confirmed, are consistent with the idea that statin intolerance which is manifested primarily through muscle symptoms is associated with genomic variation in COQ2 and thus perhaps with the CoQ10 pathway.

  9. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  10. Is it just lactose intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Celso Eduardo; Lorena, Sônia Letícia Silva; Pavan, Célia Regina; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves; dos Santos Lima, Regiane Patussi; Pinto, Daiana Guedes; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Lima Zollner, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Acquired delayed-onset hypolactasia is a common autosomal recessive condition. Cow's milk allergies, conversely, are less common conditions that may manifest with equivalent symptoms and are able to simulate and/or aggravate lactose intolerance. This study was designed to evaluate the contribution of IgE-mediated cow's milk sensitization to the symptomatology of adult patients with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance. Forty-six adult patients with lactose intolerance and persistent symptoms despite a lactose-free diet underwent skin-prick test to investigate cow's milk, goat's milk, and soy protein-specific-IgE. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting was used to investigate the presence of cow's milk protein-specific IgE. The percentage of patients who had skin reactions to whole cow's milk, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins, goat's milk, and soy was 69.5, 36.9, 56.5, 56.5%, 54.3, and 50%, respectively. The percentage of patients with immunoblot-detected IgE specific for alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins, and bovine serum albumin was 21.7, 63, 67.3, and 2.1%, respectively. IgE-mediated sensitization to cow's milk is a frequent comorbidity in subjects with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance and is worth consideration in patients with this condition.

  11. Insights into the clinical management of the syndrome of supine hypertension--orthostatic hypotension (SH-OH): the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman; O'Connell, Matthew D L; Finucane, Ciaran; Soraghan, Christopher; Fan, Chie Wei; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-07-15

    Our previously proposed morphological classification of orthostatic hypotension (MOH) is an approach to the definition of three typical orthostatic hemodynamic patterns using non-invasive beat-to-beat monitoring. In particular, the MOH pattern of large drop/non-recovery (MOH-3) resembles the syndrome of supine hypertension-orthostatic hypotension (SH-OH), which is a treatment challenge for clinicians. The aim of this study was to characterise MOH-3 in the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA), with particular attention to concurrent symptoms of orthostatic intolerance (OI), prescribed medications and association with history of faints and blackouts. The study included all TILDA wave 1 participants who had a Finometer® active stand. Automatic data signal checks were carried out to ensure that active stand data were of sufficient quality. Characterisation variables included demographics, cardiovascular and neurological medications (WHO-ATC), and self-reported information on comorbidities and disability. Multivariable statistics consisted of logistic regression models. Of the 4,467 cases, 1,456 (33%) were assigned to MOH-1 (small drop, overshoot), 2,230 (50%) to MOH-2 (medium drop, slower but full recovery), and 781 (18%) to MOH-3 (large drop, non-recovery). In the logistic regression model to predict MOH-3, statistically significant factors included being on antidepressants (OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.50 - 2.64, P hypertensive patients with cardiovascular medications that were not associated with adverse outcomes in our study. Therefore, the evidence of benefit does not necessarily have to conflict with the evidence of potential harm.

  12. Lactose intolerance in systemic nickel allergy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, I A; Vadrucci, E; Cammarota, G; Minelli, M; Gasbarrini, A

    2011-01-01

    Some patients affected by nickel-contact allergy present digestive symptoms in addition to systemic cutaneous manifestations, falling under the condition known as systemic nickel allergy syndrome (SNAS). A nickel-related pro-inflammatory status has been documented at intestinal mucosal level. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients affected by SNAS compared to a healthy population. Consecutive patients affected by SNAS referring to our departments were enrolled. The control population consisted of healthy subjects without gastrointestinal symptoms. All subjects enrolled underwent lactose breath test under standard conditions. One hundred and seventy-eight SNAS patients and 60 healthy controls were enrolled. Positivity of lactose breath test occurred in 74.7% of the SNAS group compared to 6.6% of the control group. Lactose intolerance is highly prevalent in our series of patients affected by SNAS. Based on our preliminary results, we can hypothesize that in SNAS patients, the nickel-induced pro-inflammatory status could temporarily impair the brush border enzymatic functions, resulting in hypolactasia. Further trials evaluating the effect of a nickel-low diet regimen on lactase activity, histological features and immunological pattern are needed.

  13. Alterations in autonomic function and cerebral hemodynamics to orthostatic challenge following a mountain marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Carissa; Wilson, Luke; Cotter, James D; Lucas, Samuel; Ogoh, Shigehiko; George, Keith; Ainslie, Philip N

    2007-07-01

    We examined potential mechanisms (autonomic function, hypotension, and cerebral hypoperfusion) responsible for orthostatic intolerance following prolonged exercise. Autonomic function and cerebral hemodynamics were monitored in seven athletes pre-, post- (marathon [42.2 km; cumulative gain approximately 1,000 m; approximately 15 degrees C; completion time, 261 +/- 27 (SD) min]. In each condition, middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and cardiac output (Modelflow) were measured continuously before and during a 6-min stand. Measurements of HR and BP variability and time-domain analysis were used as an index of sympathovagal balance and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Cerebral autoregulation was assessed using transfer-function gain and phase shift in BP and MCAv. Hypotension was evident following the marathon during supine rest and on standing despite increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic control, and elevations in HR and cardiac output. On standing, following the marathon, there was less elevation in normalized low-frequency HR variability (P marathon. These findings indicate that following prolonged exercise, hypotension and postural reductions in autonomic function or baroreflex control, or both, rather than a compromise in cerebral autoregulation, may place the brain at risk of hypoperfusion. Such changes may be critical factors in collapse following prolonged exercise.

  14. Delayed Orthostatic Hypotension: A Pilot Study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arun Grace; Gopinath, Siby; Kumar, Suresh; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Kumar, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is defined as a sustained decrease in systolic blood pressure of 20 mm Hg or a decrease in diastolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg within three minutes of standing compared with blood pressure from the sitting or supine position or by head-up tilt-table testing (1). When sustained blood pressure (BP) drop is after three minutes of upright posture it is called delayed orthostatic hypotension (delayed OH) (2). To detect the incidence of delayed orthostatic hypotension in patients referred to our autonomic lab. BP was measured noninvasively at 1-minute intervals with an automated cuff sphygmomanometer over the right brachial artery for 45 minutes. The onset and duration of falls in blood pressure either systolic or diastolic or both were documented, and any associated symptoms were recorded. Only patients with sustained falls in BP were included. Drugs causing OH was stopped 48 hours before testing as per protocol followed in lab. We also looked into other autonomic function test abnormalities in patients with delayed OH. Patients above age of 18 years referred for evaluation of autonomic function tests. Patients with severe cardiac failure and cardiac arrhythmias were excluded and patients with rapid fall in BP and bradycardia (Neurally mediated syncope) were excluded. Total 170 patients underwent tilt table testing. Orthostatic hypotension was seen within 3 minutes in seventy patients, fifty patients had delayed OH (BP fall after 3 minutes). There were twenty seven males and twenty three females in this group. Twenty nine of the 50 patients with delayed orthostatic hypotension, had symptoms during the tilt table procedure. Asymptomatic OH was more common in patients who developed OH after 10 minutes. This is a pilot study, first in India where we looked into the incidence of delayed orthostatic hypotension in patients undergoing tilt table testing in our autonomic lab. We found that fifty patients had delayed orthostatic hypotension which could

  15. Perioperative care of an adolescent with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kernan Scott

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS is a disorder characterized by postural tachycardia in combination with orthostatic symptoms without associated hypotension. Symptoms include light-headedness, palpitations, fatigue, confusion, and anxiety, which are brought on by assuming the upright position and usually relieved by sitting or lying down. Given the associated autonomic dysfunction that occurs with POTS, various perioperative concerns must be considered when providing anesthetic care for such patients. We present an adolescent with POTS who required anesthetic care during posterior spinal fusion for the treatment of scoliosis. The potential perioperative implications of this syndrome are discussed.

  16. Recent advances in the treatment of orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.; Davis, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a fall in blood pressure on standing that causes symptoms of dizziness, visual changes, and discomfort in the head and neck. The goal of treatment is the improvement of the patient's functional capacity, rather than a target blood pressure. For treatment to be successful, it must be individualized. Non-pharmalogic interventions include carefully managed exercise, scheduled activities, and monitoring of the environmental temperature. Agents such as fludrocortisone, midodrine, and epoetin alfa offer successful pharmacologic interventions. Although these measures ease the symptoms of orthostatic hypotension, current approaches neither reverse nor stabilize the disease process in autonomic disorders.

  17. Neural Correlates of Intolerance of Uncertainty in Clinical Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, M.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Sternheim, L.

    2015-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty is a key contributor to anxiety-related disorders. Recent studies highlight its importance in other clinical disorders. The link between its clinical presentation and the underlying neural correlates remains unclear. This review summarizes the emerging literature on the

  18. Food intolerance and mucosal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Most infants are immunologically active and are able to develop a tolerance to oligoclonal antigens by producing IgA, along with activation of regulatory T cells, in early infancy. Cytokines and their signaling molecules are important mediators in the intestine, regulating both oral tolerance and mucosal inflammation. This system works efficiently in most individuals, but for an as yet undefined reason, some people react to food and other proteins as though they were pathogens, with induction of chronic inflammation in the mucosa. The adverse reaction caused by ingested foods is defined as food intolerance. The clinical features of food intolerance include vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, eczema, failure to thrive, and a protean range of other symptoms. Intolerance can be divided into two categories depending on whether or not they are immunologically mediated. Food intolerance and mucosal inflammation are deeply related because tolerance cannot be established when there is an inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Mast cells, eosinophils, mucosal lymphocytes, and epithelial cells are deeply involved and related to each other in the development of mucosal inflammation. Meanwhile, rectal bleeding in infancy is related to lymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophil infiltration into the colonic mucosa facilitated by C-C motif ligand 11 (CCL11, known as eotaxin-1) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 13 (CXCL13). Rectal bleeding in infancy may not be simply caused by allergic reactions against specific antigens, but may be due to migrated lymphocytes developing immunological tolerance; including IgA synthesizing, in the intestinal mucosa. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Treating statin-intolerant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigna G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcello Arca, Giovanni PignaAtherosclerosis Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Allied Medical Specialities, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular events and are safe for almost all patients. Nevertheless, intolerance to statins is frequently faced in clinical practice. This is mostly due to muscular symptoms (myalgia with or without increase of plasma creatinine kinase and/or elevation of hepatic aminotransferases, which overall constitutes approximately two-thirds of reported adverse events during statin therapy. These side effects raise concerns in patients as well as in doctors and are likely to reduce patients' adherence and, as a consequence, the cardiovascular benefit. Therefore, it is mandatory that clinicians improve their knowledge on the clinical aspects of muscular and hepatic side effects of statin therapy as well as their ability to manage patients with statin intolerance. Besides briefly examining the clinical aspects and the mechanisms that are proposed to be responsible for the most common statin-associated side effects, the main purpose of this article is to review the available approaches to manage statin-intolerant patients. The first step is to determine whether the adverse events are indeed related to statin therapy. If so, lowering the dosage or changing statin, alternate dosing options, or the use of nonstatin compounds may be practical strategies. The cholesterol-lowering potency as well as the usefulness of these different approaches in treating statin-intolerant patients will be examined based on currently available data. However, the cardiovascular benefit of these strategies has not been well established, so their use has to be guided by a careful clinical assessment of each patient.Keywords: statin therapy, atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, aminotransferase levels, myopathy

  20. Orthostatic hypotension caused by sympathectomies performed for hyperhidrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, J. J.; Wieling, W.; Wesseling, K. H.; Endert, E.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied sympathetic cardiovascular control in a patient after sympathectomies and found severe hypoadrenergic orthostatic hypotension before and after, but not during upright exercise. This report is the first to correlate in man anatomical sympathetic lesions with autonomic function test results

  1. Effects of promethazine and midodrine on orthostatic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shang-Jin; Platts, Steven H; Ziegler, Michael G; Meck, Janice V

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience both orthostatic hypotension and space motion sickness during re-entry. Midodrine, an alpha1-adrenergic agonist, is used to treat orthostatic hypotension. Promethazine, a histamine H1-receptor antagonist, is prescribed for space motion sickness. Many astronauts need both midodrine and promethazine. This study evaluated the interactive effects of midodrine and promethazine on hemodynamic responses to upright tilt. Subjects (5 men; 3 women) were studied four times: control (no drug); midodrine only; promethazine only; or midodrine plus promethazine. Hemodynamic parameters, plasma norepinephrine, renin activity, and aldosterone were measured supine and upright. Rates of presyncope were 38% with no drug; 0% with midodrine alone; 100% with promethazine alone; and 63% with both drugs. Supine to upright decreases in systolic pressure were greater with promethazine alone than control (P midodrine (P midodrine alone (P midodrine plus promethazine (P midodrine. Inhibition of sympathetic responses, likely via enhancement of the inhibitive effects of GABA, by promethazine may underlie the increased orthostatic hypotension. Promethazine also appears to inhibit responses of the renin angiotensisn system during orthostatic challenge.

  2. Effects of volume loading and pressor agents in idiopathic orthostatic tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Shannon, J. R.; Black, B.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic orthostatic tachycardia (IOT) is characterized by an increase in heart rate (HR) with standing of > or = 30 bpm that is associated with elevated catecholamine levels and orthostatic symptoms. A dynamic orthostatic hypovolemia and alpha1-adrenoreceptor hypersensitivity have been demonstrated in IOT patients. There is evidence of an autonomic neuropathy affecting the lower-extremity blood vessels. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied the effects of placebo, the alpha1-adrenoreceptor agonist midodrine (5 to 10 mg), the alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine (0.1 mg), and I.V. saline (1 L) in 13 patients with IOT. Supine and upright blood pressure (BP) and HR were measured before and at 1 and 2 hours after intervention. Midodrine decreased both supine and upright HR (all HR values are given as bpm) at 2 hours (from 78+/-2 supine to 108+/-5 upright before treatment and from 69+/-2 supine to 95+/-5 upright after treatment, Pmidodrine decreased supine systolic BP mildly. CONCLUSIONS: IOT responds best acutely to saline infusion to correct the underlying hypovolemia. Chronically, this can be accomplished with increased salt and water intake in conjunction with fludrocortisone. The response of patients to the alpha1-agonist midodrine supports the hypothesis of partial dysautonomia and indicates that the use of alpha1-agonists to pharmacologically replace lower-extremity postganglionic sympathetics is an appropriate overall goal of therapy. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that the tachycardia and elevated catecholamine levels associated with IOT are principally due to hypovolemia and loss of adequate lower-extremity vascular tone.

  3. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  4. Liberal intolerance in European education debates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2017-01-01

    by subdividing it into four categories of liberal intolerance and demonstrates this by analysing six national debates on the accommodation of cultural and religious diversity in education. The analysis indicates that the nature of liberal intolerance understood as the combination of the four categories...... of liberal intolerance varies with the state tradition regarding religious neutrality of public institutions and the type of welfare state, but also that many liberal arguments for and against accommodation repeat themselves across national contexts....

  5. Statin intolerance: more questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, John R; Campbell, Kristen B; Lakey, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effectiveness of statins in improving the course of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease tends to overshadow questions of statin intolerance. Thus after more than 25 years of clinical statin use, intolerance remains a poorly understood, frustrating issue for patients and providers. It has been extraordinarily difficult to define statin intolerance and its implications for clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge and raise questions that need to be addressed.

  6. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Correia

    2014-01-01

    When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, ...

  7. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  8. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  9. Decreased baroreflex sensitivity in Parkinson's disease is associated with orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaho, Andrej; Šutovský, Stanislav; Valkovič, Peter; Šiarnik, Pavel; Sýkora, Marek; Turčáni, Peter

    2017-06-15

    Autonomic dysfunction is a substantial part of extrapyramidal diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Baroreflex is an important determinant of short-term blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular variability. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in PD has been a subject of investigation in several studies, however the relationship between BRS and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is still poorly understood. To compare the BRS of Parkinson's disease patients with those of an age-matched control population, and to determine BRS association with blood pressure, orthostatic hypotension and antiparkinson treatment. The study included 52 patients with Parkinson's disease and 52 controls. We assessed autonomic dysfunction with a Finometer device using the method of spontaneous fluctuations of blood pressure (BP) and the R-R interval in time domain, expressed as baroreflex sensitivity. Supine and standing blood pressure were measured under standard conditions. BRS values were significantly lower in the PD group as compared to the control group: 4.0±2.0 vs. 6.4±3.8ms/mmHg (p=0.001). We determined a significant correlation between decreased BRS values and increased systolic BP (p=0.003) as well as between decreased BRS values and orthostatic hypotension (OH), in the PD group (p=0.048). Moreover, patients with PD and OH had significantly lower BRS as compared with patients with PD without OH (3.2±2 versus 4.5±2, p=0.045). We also determined that BRS values were significantly lower in the PD population treated with LDOPA+COMTI as compared to the LDOPA+COMTI untreated patients (3.0±1.5 vs. 4.8±2.0, pbaroreflex sensitivity in PD patients. Moreover, orthostatic hypotension was associated with low BRS not only qualitatively but also quantitatively. We also revealed a strong association between LDOPA+COMTI therapy and decreased BRS in the literature for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intolerance and Violence Against Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meharban

    2017-10-01

    Intolerance and grouse against doctors is a global phenomenon but India seems to lead the world in violence against doctors. According to World Health Organization, about 8-38% healthcare workers suffer physical violence at some point in their careers. Many more are verbally abused or threatened. Public is almost behaving like health sector terrorists. The spate of increasing attacks on doctors by damaging their property and causing physical injury is not acceptable by any civilized society. The public is becoming increasingly intolerant to a large number of social issues because of poor governance and vote bank politics. There is a need to arrest the development of further distrust between doctors and their patients/relatives, otherwise it will compromise all achievements of medical science and adversely affect healing capabilities of doctors. Rude and aggressive behavior of the patients or their family members, and arrogant and lackadaisical approach of the doctor, adversely affects the doctor-patient relationship and the outcome of the patient. The doctors, hospital administration and government must exercise "zero tolerance" with respect to acts of violence against healthcare professionals. It is possible to reduce the incidence of intolerance against doctors but difficult to eliminate it completely. The healthcare providers should demonstrate greater compassion and empathy with improved communication skills. The hospitals must have adequate infrastructure, facilities and staff to handle emergencies without delay and with due confidence and skills. The security of healthcare providers, especially in sensitive areas, should be improved by having adequate number of security guards, frisking facilities, extensive CCTV network and availability of "Quick response team" to handle unruly mob. In case of any grievances for alleged mismanagement, the public should handle the situation in a civilized manner and seek redressal through Medical Protection Act and legal

  11. Continued glucose output after re-feeding contributes to glucose intolerance in hyperthyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Holness, M J; Sugden, M C

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism to elicit glucose intolerance after glucose administration were decreased under conditions where hepatic glucose output was suppressed. It is concluded that continued hepatic glucose output contributes to abnormal glucose tolerance in hyperthyroidism.

  12. [Food allergy or food intolerance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, S; Maniu, C-M; Buss, G; Maillard, M H; Spertini, F; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    Adverse food reactions can be classified into two main categories depending on wether an immune mechanism is involved or not. The first category includes immune mediated reactions like IgE mediated food allergy, eosinophilic oesophagitis, food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and celiac disease. The second category implies non-immune mediated adverse food reactions, also called food intolerances. Intoxications, pharmacologic reactions, metabolic reactions, physiologic, psychologic or reactions with an unknown mechanism belong to this category. We present a classification of adverse food reactions based on the pathophysiologic mechanism that can be useful for both diagnostic approach and management.

  13. estigma tolerable al estigma intolerable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Arteaga Botello

    2006-01-01

    cristalización pasa por dos referentes de interacción y relación social al interior del espacio escolar. El primero está constituido por parámetros de normalidad y anormalidad a partir de la localización de estigmas. El segundo se encuentra, a contrapelo de la tendencia anterior, tratando de diluir los efectos de los estigmas al señalarlos como una práctica de tipificación social intolerable o inaceptable.

  14. Orthostatic Tremor and Orthostatic Myoclonus: Weight-bearing Hyperkinetic Disorders: A Systematic Review, New Insights, and Unresolved Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anhar Hassan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthostatic tremor (OT and orthostatic myoclonus (OM are weight-bearing hyperkinetic movement disorders most commonly affecting older people that induce “shaky legs” upon standing. OT is divided into “classical” and “slow” forms based on tremor frequency. In this paper, the first joint review of OT and OM, we review the literature and compare and contrast their demographic, clinical, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, pathophysiological, and treatment characteristics. Methods: A PubMed search up to July 2016 using the phrases “orthostatic tremor,” “orthostatic myoclonus,” “shaky legs,” and “shaky legs syndrome” was performed. Results: OT and OM should be suspected in older patients reporting unsteadiness with prolonged standing and/or who exhibit cautious, wide-based gaits. Surface electromyography (SEMG is necessary to verify the diagnoses. Functional neuroimaging and electrophysiology suggest the generator of classical OT lies within the cerebellothalamocortical network. For OM, and possibly slow OT, the frontal, subcortical cerebrum is the most likely origin. Clonazepam is the most useful medication for classical OT, and levetiracetam for OM, although results are often disappointing. Deep brain stimulation appears promising for classical OT. Rolling walkers reliably improve gait affected by these disorders, as both OT and OM attenuate when weight is transferred from the legs to the arms. Discussion: Orthostatic hyperkinesias are likely underdiagnosed, as SEMG is often unavailable in clinical practice, and thus may be more frequent than currently recognized. The shared weight-bearing induction of OT and OM may indicate a common pathophysiology. Further research, including use of animal models, is necessary to better define the prevalence and pathophysiology of OT and OM, in order to improve their treatment, and provide additional insights into basic balance and gait mechanisms.

  15. Hypothesis: Human papillomavirus vaccination syndrome--small fiber neuropathy and dysautonomia could be its underlying pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lavín, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most effective public health measures in the history of medicine. However, seemingly inexplicit adverse reactions have been described after the injection of the newer vaccines vs. human papillomavirus (HPV). The symptoms more often reported are chronic pain with paresthesias, headaches, fatigue, and orthostatic intolerance. Adverse reactions appear to be more frequent after HPV vaccination when compared to other type of immunizations. Different isolated cases and small series have described the development of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and fibromyalgia after HPV vaccination. These are illnesses often difficult to diagnose that have overlapping clinical features. Sympathetic nervous system dysfunction seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of these syndromes. Also, small fiber neuropathy has been recently recognized in CRPS, POTS, and fibromyalgia. This article forwards the hypothesis that small fiber neuropathy and dysautonomia could be the common underlying pathogenesis to the group of rare, but severe reactions that follow HPV vaccination. Clinicians should be aware of the possible association between HPV vaccination and the development of these difficult to diagnose painful dysautonomic syndromes.

  16. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  17. Pathogenesis of glucose intolerance in uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFronzo, R A

    1978-12-01

    The pathogenesis of glucose intolerance in uremia was examined with the glucose clamp technique. Hyperglycemic clamp (n = 8): The plasma glucose concentration is acutely raised and maintained at 125 mg/dl above basal levels. Under these steady state conditions the glucose infusion rate, M, equals the amount of glucose metabolized: Predialysis M averaged 4.23 +/- 0.36 mg/kg/min and increased to 7.71 +/- 0.43 postdialysis (p less than 0.001). The plasma insulin response predialysis was 90 +/- 20 microU/ml and decreased to 80 +/- 23 microU/ml following dialysis. Consequently the M/l ratio, a measure of tissue sensitivity to insulin, increased by 80% +/- 25% (p less than 0.001) but still remained less than controls (p less than 0.01). Euglycemic insulin clamp (n = 10): The plasma insulin concentration is acutely raised by 100 microU/ml and the plasma glucose concentration is held constant at the basal level. Predialysis both M (3.37 +/- 0.36 mg/kg/min) and M/l (3.56 +/- 0.33 mg/kg/min per microU/ml X 100) were significantly less than controls (p less than 0.01). Postdialysis both M and M/l increased significantly (p less than 0.01) to a mean that was not significantly different from controls. Basal hepatic glucose production (n = 6), 2.15 +/- 0.09 mg/kg/min, was similar to controls and fell (87% +/- 4%) normally during the insulin clamp. In five uremic subjects in wom insulin binding to monocytes was measured, there was no correlation with tissue sensitivity to insulin (M/l). Significant abnormalities in both growth hormone and glucagon physiology were present in uremic individuals, but no correlation with either the presence or degree of glucose intolerance was demonstrable. In conclusion, glucose intolerance is universally present in uremic subjects and results primarily from peripheral tissue insensitivity to insulin. Insulin secretion is usually enhanced in an attempt to compensate for this insulin resistance but in occasional subjects uremia also inhibits beta

  18. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  19. Food Intolerance vs. Food Allergy: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the difference? What's the difference between a food intolerance and a food allergy? Answers from James T C Li, ... common, but most are caused by a food intolerance rather than a food allergy. A food intolerance ...

  20. What People with Lactose Intolerance Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People With Lactose Intolerance Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Lactose Intolerance? Lactose intolerance is a ... Health Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become ...

  1. Recurrent syncope, orthostatic hypotension and volatile hypertension: think outside the box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thein Aung

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The baroreceptors in the neck and aortic arch are important regulators of sudden blood pressure changes. They are innervated by CN IX and X and synapse in the brainstem. Baroreceptor failure is an under-recognized cause of recurrent syncope, orthostatic hypotension, and volatile hypertension, which is refractory to and may in fact worsen with conventional treatments. Baroreflex failure can be the result of neck and chest radiation, head and neck surgery, and cerebrovascular accidents involving the brainstem nuclei. The management of baroreflex failure is a challenge since patient education, lifestyle changes, and family support are extremely important in managing blood pressure. Leg exercises and Thrombo-Embolic Deterrent Stockings (TED stockings are important in treating orthostatic hypotension. Clonidine is the antihypertensive of choice for supine hypertension. Low-dose benzodiazepines are helpful in suppressing sympathetic surges. We have encountered two patients with baroreflex failure after chemotherapy and radiation to the neck or upper chest. Temporal relationship between symptoms onset and the history of head, neck, and upper chest radiation or trauma is important in reaching a diagnosis.

  2. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  3. The differential diagnosis of food intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Yurdagül; Baenkler, Hanns-Wolf; Silbermann, Andrea; Hahn, Eckhart G; Raithel, Martin

    2009-05-01

    More than 20% of the population in industrialized countries suffer from food intolerance or food allergy. Selective literature search for relevant publications in PubMed and the Cochrane Library combined with further data from the interdisciplinary database on chronic inflammatory and allergic diseases of the Erlangen University Hospital. The majority of cases of food intolerance (15% to 20%) are due to non-immunological causes. These causes range from pseudoallergic reactions to enzymopathies, chronic infections, and psychosomatic reactions that are associated with food intolerance. The prevalence of true food allergy, i.e., immunologically mediated intolerance reactions, is only 2% to 5%. The differential diagnosis of food intolerance is broad. Therefore, a structured diagnostic algorithm with input from multiple clinical disciplines should be applied. The treatment consists of eliminating the offending substance from the diet as well as medications and psychosomatic support, when indicated.

  4. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: a systematic review on the diagnostic value of gastrointestinal symptoms and self-reported milk intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, P.; Schellevis, F. G.; van der Windt, D. A. W. M.; Kneepkens, C. M. F.; van der Horst, H. E.

    2010-01-01

    When lactose malabsorption gives rise to symptoms, the result is called 'lactose intolerance'. Although lactose intolerance is often bothersome for patients, once recognized it may be managed by simple dietary adjustments. However, diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward, especially in

  5. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatović, Maja; Heijstek, Marloes W; Verkaaik, Marleen; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Kuis, Wietse; Egberts, Toine C G; Sinnema, Gerben; Rademaker, Carin M A; Wulffraat, Nico M

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  6. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatovic, M.; Heijstek, M.W.; Verkaaik, M.; Dijkhuizen, E.H. van; Armbrust, W.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Kamphuis, S.; Kuis, W.; Egberts, T.C.; Sinnema, G.; Rademaker, C.M.A.; Wulffraat, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  7. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: a systematic review on the diagnostic value of gastrointestinal symptoms and self-reported milk intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, A.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; van der Horst, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: When lactose malabsorption gives rise to symptoms, the result is called 'lactose intolerance'. Although lactose intolerance is often bothersome for patients, once recognized it may be managed by simple dietary adjustments. However, diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward,

  8. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: a systematic review on the diagnostic value of gastrointestinal symptoms and self-reported milk intolerance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; Horst, H.E. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: When lactose malabsorption gives rise to symptoms, the result is called 'lactose intolerance'. Although lactose intolerance is often bothersome for patients, once recognized it may be managed by simple dietary adjustments. However, diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward,

  9. Aging augments renal vasoconstrictor response to orthostatic stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine M; Monahan, Kevin D; Drew, Rachel C

    2015-12-15

    The ability of the human body to maintain arterial blood pressure (BP) during orthostatic stress is determined by several reflex neural mechanisms. Renal vasoconstriction progressively increases during graded elevations in lower body negative pressure (LBNP). This sympathetically mediated response redistributes blood flow to the systemic circulation to maintain BP. However, how healthy aging affects the renal vasoconstrictor response to LBNP is unknown. Therefore, 10 young (25 ± 1 yr; means ± SE) and 10 older (66 ± 2 yr) subjects underwent graded LBNP (-15 and -30 mmHg) while beat-to-beat renal blood flow velocity (RBFV; Doppler ultrasound), arterial BP (Finometer), and heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram) were recorded. Renal vascular resistance (RVR), an index of renal vasoconstriction, was calculated as mean BP/RBFV. All baseline cardiovascular variables were similar between groups, except diastolic BP was higher in older subjects (P aging augments the renal vasoconstrictor response to orthostatic stress in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Noninvasive Ventilation Intolerance: Characteristics, Predictors, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinhua; Duan, Jun; Bai, Linfu; Zhou, Lintong

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) intolerance is one reason for NIV failure. However, the characteristics, predictors, and outcomes of NIV intolerance are unclear. A prospective observational study was performed in the respiratory intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Subjects with acute respiratory failure who used NIV were enrolled. Initially, continuous use of NIV was encouraged. However, if the subject could not tolerate NIV, it was used intermittently. NIV intolerance was defined as termination of NIV due to subject refusal to receive it because of discomfort, even after intermittent use was attempted. A total of 961 subjects were enrolled in the study. Of these, 50 subjects (5.2%) experienced NIV intolerance after a median 2.4 h of NIV support. Age (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.963-0.996) and heart rate (OR = 1.02, 95% CI 1.006-1.030) measured before NIV were 2 independent risk factors of NIV intolerance. After 1-2 h of NIV, independent risk factors of NIV intolerance were heart rate (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.016-1.044) and breathing frequency (OR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.027-1.099). Intolerant subjects had no improvement in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or breathing frequency after the NIV intervention. Moreover, intolerant subjects had a higher intubation rate (44.0% vs 25.8%, P = .008) and higher mortality (34.0% vs 22.4%, P = .08). The three most common complaints were that NIV worsened subjects' distress (46%), that NIV resulted in dyspnea (26%), and that the flow or pressure of NIV was too strong to bear (16%). NIV intolerance worsened subjects' outcomes. Younger subjects with a high heart rate and breathing frequency may be more likely to experience NIV intolerance. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Efficacy of Jobst Compression Garments to Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance for up to Three Days following 14 Days of Bed Rest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project was completed with a total of 16 volunteers, 8 control subjects (Group 1), and 8 treatment subjects (Group 2). Data analysis was completed, and a...

  12. Evaluation of Commercial Compression Garments as a Countermeasure to Post-Spaceflight Orthostatic Intolerance (OIG DSO641)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Results from this study indicate that the gradient compression garments prevented the tachycardia and stroke volume reduction normally associated with a 3.5 min...

  13. Theoretical analysis of the mechanisms of a gender differentiation in the propensity for orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Jerry G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A tendency to develop reentry orthostasis after a prolonged exposure to microgravity is a common problem among astronauts. The problem is 5 times more prevalent in female astronauts as compared to their male counterparts. The mechanisms responsible for this gender differentiation are poorly understood despite many detailed and complex investigations directed toward an analysis of the physiologic control systems involved. Methods In this study, a series of computer simulation studies using a mathematical model of cardiovascular functioning were performed to examine the proposed hypothesis that this phenomenon could be explained by basic physical forces acting through the simple common anatomic differences between men and women. In the computer simulations, the circulatory components and hydrostatic gradients of the model were allowed to adapt to the physical constraints of microgravity. After a simulated period of one month, the model was returned to the conditions of earth's gravity and the standard postflight tilt test protocol was performed while the model output depicting the typical vital signs was monitored. Conclusions The analysis demonstrated that a 15% lowering of the longitudinal center of gravity in the anatomic structure of the model was all that was necessary to prevent the physiologic compensatory mechanisms from overcoming the propensity for reentry orthostasis leading to syncope.

  14. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse

  15. Statin intolerance - a question of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algharably, Engi Abdel-Hady; Filler, Iris; Rosenfeld, Stephanie; Grabowski, Katja; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Statin therapy is the backbone of pharmacologic therapy for low-density lipoproteins cholesterol lowering and plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease prevention. Statin intolerance is understood as the inability to continue using a statin to reduce individual cardiovascular risk sufficiently, due to the development of symptoms or laboratory abnormalities attributable to the initiation or dose escalation of a statin. Muscle symptoms are the most common side effects observed. Areas covered: The main aim of this article is to present a review on published definitions of statin intolerance. In addition, a brief review on clinical aspects and risk factors of statin intolerance is provided and features for a common definition for statin intolerance are suggested. Expert opinion: A definition of statin intolerance by major drug regulatory agencies is not available. In clinical studies, different definitions are chosen and results are not comparable; different medical associations do not agree on one common definition. There is an unmet need to establish a common definition of statin intolerance to ensure an appropriate clinical use of this important drug class. Further work is required to develop a consensus definition on statin intolerance that could have significant positive impact on both research and clinical management.

  16. [Progress on the research of lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Sai, X Y

    2016-02-01

    Our group generalized the research development of lactose intolerance, both internationally and nationally. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis, genetic polymorphisms of lactase deficiency, relevant progress of diagnostic methods and treatment. Through this systematic review, we undedrstood that there were insufficient research efforts made on understanding the epidemiological feature of lactose intolerance in this country. Relevant genetic mutations of people were also not clear, neither the development of simple and effective diagnosis method made. We should continue to extensively and deeply carry out the study regarding methods for early prevention and intervention on lactose intolerance.

  17. Fructose and/or Sorbitol Intolerance in a Subgroup of Lactose Intolerant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Mishkin

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of lactose intolerance often does not resolve all the symptoms of postcibal bloating and flatulence. Included in this study were 104 lactose intolerant patients (71 female, 33 male who complained of residual postcibal discomfort in spite of adherence to and benefit from appropriate measures for their documented lactose intolerance (at least 20 ppm H2 after 25 g lactose as well as appropriate symptomatic discomfort. Clinical characteristics common to this group included: symptomatic diarrhea (12.5%, history of foreign travel (5.8%, endoscopic and pathological evidence of gastritis and helicobacter infection (19.2 and 8.7%, respectively, nonspecific abnormalities of small bowel follow-through (15.4%, Crohn’s disease (8.7% and colonic cliverticulosis (14.4%. Intolerance co fructose (at least 10 ppm H2 after 25 g fructose plus appropriate symptoms or sorbitol (at least 10 ppm H2 after 5 g sorbitol plus appropriate symptoms was documented in 17.3 and 18.3%, respectively. Intolerance to both fructose and sorbicol (administered as separate challenges, more than twice as common as intolerance to either one alone, occurred in 41.4% and was independent of sex. In conclusion, additional carbohydrate intolerances contribute to postcibal discomfort in more than 75% of lactose intolerant patients who remain symptomatic in spite of adherence to appropriate measures for this condition. While 62% of all patients had benefited significantly (greater than 50% from appropriate dietary measures and enzyme replacement for lactose intolerance, only 40% of those who were also fructose intolerant and 47% who were sorbitol intolerant benefited (greater than 50% from appropriate dietary measures (no enzyme replacement yet available for intolerance to these sugars.

  18. The nocebo effect in the context of statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B

    2016-01-01

    The nocebo effect, the inverse of the placebo effect, is a well-established phenomenon that is under-appreciated in cardiovascular medicine. It refers to adverse events, usually purely subjective, that result from expectations of harm from a drug, placebo, other therapeutic intervention or a nonmedical situation. These expectations can be driven by many factors including the informed consent form in a clinical trial, warnings about adverse effects communicated by clinicians when prescribing a drug, and information in the media about the dangers of certain treatments. The nocebo effect is the best explanation for the high rate of muscle and other symptoms attributed to statins in observational studies and clinical practice, but not in randomized controlled trials, where muscle symptoms, and rates of discontinuation due to any adverse event, are generally similar in the statin and placebo groups. Statin-intolerant patients usually tolerate statins under double-blind conditions, indicating that the intolerance has little if any pharmacological basis. Known techniques for minimizing the nocebo effect can be applied to the prevention and management of statin intolerance. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arrhythmia and exercise intolerance in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, L; Juul, K; Jensen, A S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival after the Fontan procedure shows excellent results but is associated with a persistent risk of arrhythmias and exercise intolerance. We aimed to analyze the current burden of clinically relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance in Danish Fontan patients...... and estimated to 99.1% per year. Prevalence of clinically relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance increased significantly with age and was found in 32% and 85% of patients ≥20years, respectively. Thus, from survival data and logistic regression models the future prevalence of patients, clinically...... relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance were estimated, revealing a considerable augmentation. Furthermore, resting and maximum cardiac index, resting stroke volume index and pulmonary diffusing capacity decreased significantly with age while diastolic and systolic ventricular function...

  20. Lactose intolerance: from diagnosis to correct management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, T; D'Angelo, G; D'Aversa, F; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Montalto, M; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses one of the most relevant problems in gastrointestinal clinical practice: lactose intolerance. The role of lactase-persistence alleles the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption the development of lactose intolerance symptoms and its management. Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately, 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and diarrhea with a considerable intraindividual and interindividual variability in the severity. Diagnosis is most commonly performed by the non invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Management of lactose intolerance consists of two possible clinical choice not mutually exclusive: alimentary restriction and drug therapy.

  1. Prevalence of orthostatic hypotension among diabetic patients in a community hospital of Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.U.; Ahmad, R.; Aamir, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    background: The postural drop in blood pressure caused by autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of orthostatic hypotension and its relation with hypertension in patients with diabetes mellitus admitted in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: Two hundred indoor diabetic patients were assessed. Lying and standing blood pressure of each patient was determined using standard procedure for determination of orthostatic hypotension. Patients having orthostatic hypotension were compared with those having no orthostatic hypotension for different clinical and biochemical parameters using statistical program for social sciences. Results: Twenty-six percent of the patients were found to have orthostatic hypotension. Fifty two percent of the total patients showed hypertension. Proportion of hypertension in the patients having orthostatic hypotension was more than those without orthostatic hypotension while other parameters showed no difference. Conclusion: Orthostatic hypotension is a common phenomenon in our diabetic patients admitted to tertiary care facilities. Diabetic hypertensive patients are more likely to have postural drop in blood pressure as compared to diabetic normotensive patients. (author)

  2. Laktosemalabsorption og intolerance - Hvem, hvad og hvorfor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mikkel Malham; Olin, Anne Bille; Pærregaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    During the last decade, lactose-free diets have become increasingly popular in the general population, either isolated or as a part of a cow's milk-free diet. However, health-related benefits from a lactose-free diet are only documented for individuals with clinical lactose intolerance due...... to decreased intestinal lactase activity and subsequent lactose malabsorption. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge of lactose intolerance regarding diagnostic procedures and treatment....

  3. Galactose intolerance and the risk of cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Winder, A. F.; Fells, P.; Jones, R. B.; Kissun, R. D.; Menzies, I. S.; Mount, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    Cataracts may arise in association with various major and minor disorders restricting galactose metabolism, and the risk is broadly associated with the degree of galactose intolerance. A family is described in which a girl presented at the age of 7 3/4 years with cataracts, galactosuria, and partial deficiencies of the enzymes galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase. Galactose intolerance as determined by an oral test was impaired and fluctuated with variation in activity o...

  4. MODERN METHODS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE TESTING

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yu. Rosensteyn; A. Z. Rosensteyn; S. E. Kondakov; N. A. Cherevko

    2016-01-01

    Аn analytical review of modern methods of food intolerance diagnostics based on interpretation of markers used in the various tests is рresented. It is shown that tests based on observation of the reaction of specific antibodies of the immune system to food antigens tested, are the most accurate, reliable and representative for the diagnosis of food intolerance.

  5. Pharmacological options in the management of orthostatic hypotension in older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, Fiona

    2009-11-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common disorder in older adults with potentially serious clinical consequences. Understanding the key underlying pathophysiological processes that predispose individuals to OH is essential when making treatment decisions for this group of patients. In this article, we discuss the key antihypotensive agents used in the management of OH in older adults. Commonly, midodrine is used as a first-line agent, given its supportive data in randomized, controlled trials. Fludrocortisone has been evaluated in open-label trials and has long-established usage in clinical practice. Other agents are available and in clinical use, either alone or in combination, but larger randomized trial evaluations are yet to be published. It is important to bear in mind that a patient may be taking medications that predispose to or exacerbate the symptoms of OH. Withdrawal of such medications, where possible, should be considered before commencing other pharmacological agents that attenuate the symptoms of OH.

  6. Does Googling lead to statin intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sarah; Holbrook, Anne; Shah, Baiju R

    2018-07-01

    The nocebo effect, where patients with expectations of adverse effects are more likely to experience them, may contribute to the high rate of statin intolerance found in observational studies. Information that patients read on the internet may be a precipitant of this effect. The objective of the study was to establish whether the number of websites about statin side effects found using Google is associated with the prevalence of statin intolerance. The prevalence of statin intolerance in 13 countries across 5 continents was established in a recent study via a web-based survey of primary care physicians and specialists. Using the Google search engine for each country, the number of websites about statin side effects was determined, and standardized to the number of websites about statins overall. Searches were restricted to pages in the native language, and were conducted after connecting to each country using a virtual private network (VPN). English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, UK, USA) had the highest prevalence of statin intolerance and also had the largest standardized number of websites about statin side effects. The sample Pearson correlation coefficient between these two variables was 0.868. Countries where patients using Google are more likely to find websites about statin side effects have greater levels of statin intolerance. The nocebo effect driven by online information may be contributing to statin intolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency of methotrexate intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis patients using methotrexate intolerance severity score (MISS questionnaire).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Nibah; Salim, Babur; Nasim, Amjad; Hussain, Kamran; Gul, Harris; Niazi, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of methotrexate intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by applying the methotrexate intolerance severity score (MISS) questionnaire and to see the effect of dose and concomitant use of other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS) on methotrexate (MTX) intolerance. For the descriptive study, non-probability sampling was carried out in the Female Rheumatology Department of Fauji Foundation Hospital (FFH), Rawalpindi, Pakistan. One hundred and fifty diagnosed cases of RA using oral MTX were selected. The MISS questionnaire embodies five elements: abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and behavioural symptoms. The amplitude of each element was ranked from 0 to 3 being no complaint (0 points), mild (1 point), moderate (2 points) and severe (3 points). A cut-off score of 6 and above ascertained intolerance by the physicians. A total of 33.3 % of the subjects exhibited MTX intolerance according to the MISS questionnaire. Out of which, the most recurring symptom of all was behavioural with a value of 44 % whereas vomiting was least noticeable with a figure of 11 %. About 6.6 % of the women with intolerance were consuming DMARDs in conjunction with MTX. Those using the highest weekly dose of MTX (20 mg) had supreme intolerance with prevalence in 46.2 % of the patients. The frequency of intolerance decreased with a decrease in weekly dose to a minimum of 20 % with 7.5 mg of MTX. MTX intolerance has moderate prevalence in RA patients and if left undetected, the compliance to use of MTX as a first-line therapy will decrease. Methotrexate intolerance is directly proportional to the dose of MTX taken. Also, there is no upstroke seen in intolerance with the use of other disease-modifying agents.

  8. Short-term exercise training improves the cardiovascular response to exercise in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shigeki; Fu, Qi; Bivens, Tiffany B; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Wang, Wade; Levine, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the presence of cardiac atrophy as a key component of the pathogenesis of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), similar to physical deconditioning. It has also been shown that exercise intolerance is associated with a reduced stroke volume (SV) in POTS, and that the high heart rate (HR) observed at rest and during exercise in these patients is due to this low SV. We tested the hypotheses that (a) circulatory control during exercise is normal in POTS; and (b) that physical ‘reconditioning’ with exercise training improves exercise performance in patients with POTS. Nineteen (18 women) POTS patients completed a 3 month training programme. Cardiovascular responses during maximal exercise testing were assessed in the upright position before and after training. Resting left ventricular diastolic function was evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with those of 10 well-matched healthy sedentary controls. A lower SV resulted in a higher HR in POTS at any given oxygen uptake () during exercise while the cardiac output ()– relationship was normal. was lower in POTS than controls (26.1 ± 1.0 (SEM) vs. 36.3 ± 0.9 ml kg−1 min−1; P physical fitness and cardiovascular responses during exercise in patients with POTS. PMID:22641777

  9. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours.

  10. Orthostatic heart rate changes in patients with autonomic failure caused by neurodegenerative synucleinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Shibao, Cyndya A; Biaggioni, Italo; Peltier, Amanda C; Singer, Wolfgang; Low, Phillip A; Goldstein, David S; Gibbons, Christopher H; Freeman, Roy; Robertson, David

    2018-03-01

    Blunted tachycardia during hypotension is a characteristic feature of patients with autonomic failure, but the range has not been defined. This study reports the range of orthostatic heart rate (HR) changes in patients with autonomic failure caused by neurodegenerative synucleinopathies. Patients evaluated at sites of the U.S. Autonomic Consortium (NCT01799915) underwent standardized autonomic function tests and full neurological evaluation. We identified 402 patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH) who had normal sinus rhythm. Of these, 378 had impaired sympathetic activation (ie, neurogenic OH) and based on their neurological examination were diagnosed with Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, pure autonomic failure, or multiple system atrophy. The remaining 24 patients had preserved sympathetic activation and their OH was classified as nonneurogenic, due to volume depletion, anemia, or polypharmacy. Patients with neurogenic OH had twice the fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP; -44 ± 25 vs -21 ± 14 mmHg [mean ± standard deviation], p < 0.0001) but only one-third of the increase in HR of those with nonneurogenic OH (8 ± 8 vs 25 ± 11 beats per minute [bpm], p < 0.0001). A ΔHR/ΔSBP ratio of 0.492 bpm/mmHg had excellent sensitivity (91.3%) and specificity (88.4%) to distinguish between patients with neurogenic from nonneurogenic OH (area under the curve = 0.96, p < 0.0001). Within patients with neurogenic OH, HR increased more in those with multiple system atrophy (p = 0.0003), but there was considerable overlap with patients with Lewy body disorders. A blunted HR increase during hypotension suggests a neurogenic cause. A ΔHR/ΔSBP ratio < 0.5 bpm/mmHg is diagnostic of neurogenic OH. Ann Neurol 2018;83:522-531. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  11. The effect of orthostatic stress on multiscale entropy of heart rate and blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turianikova, Zuzana; Javorka, Kamil; Calkovska, Andrea; Javorka, Michal; Baumert, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular control acts over multiple time scales, which introduces a significant amount of complexity to heart rate and blood pressure time series. Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis has been developed to quantify the complexity of a time series over multiple time scales. In previous studies, MSE analyses identified impaired cardiovascular control and increased cardiovascular risk in various pathological conditions. Despite the increasing acceptance of the MSE technique in clinical research, information underpinning the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the MSE of heart rate and blood pressure is lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of orthostatic challenge on the MSE of heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV) and the correlation between MSE (complexity measures) and traditional linear (time and frequency domain) measures. MSE analysis of HRV and BPV was performed in 28 healthy young subjects on 1000 consecutive heart beats in the supine and standing positions. Sample entropy values were assessed on scales of 1–10. We found that MSE of heart rate and blood pressure signals is sensitive to changes in autonomic balance caused by postural change from the supine to the standing position. The effect of orthostatic challenge on heart rate and blood pressure complexity depended on the time scale under investigation. Entropy values did not correlate with the mean values of heart rate and blood pressure and showed only weak correlations with linear HRV and BPV measures. In conclusion, the MSE analysis of heart rate and blood pressure provides a sensitive tool to detect changes in autonomic balance as induced by postural change

  12. Cardiovascular dysautonomia in de novo Parkinson's disease without orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, H; Toyoda, C; Yogo, M; Mochio, S

    2011-02-01

    Clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) include not only motor distress, but also autonomic dysfunction. To study the characteristics of subclinical autonomic nervous dysfunction in de novo PD without orthostatic hypotension (OH). Autonomic nervous function including cardiac sympathetic gain was evaluated on the basis of cardiac radioiodinated metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake, the response to the Valsalva maneuver, and spectral analyses of the RR interval and blood pressure in 20 patients with de novo PD without OH. Decreased cardiac MIBG uptake was found even in patients with PD without OH. Hemodynamic studies using the Valsalva maneuver revealed that patients with PD without OH had preserved baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in phase II and phase IV. Blood pressures normally responded in early and late phase II, but not in phase IV. Blood pressure recovery time was slightly reduced in patients with PD without OH when compared with the value in controls. The low frequency component of the RR interval and systolic blood pressure and the ratio of RR-LF to RR-HF in de novo PD without OH were significantly reduced when compared with the control values, whereas the high frequency component of the RR interval did not differ significantly. These results show that latent cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic dysfunction but not parasympathetic dysfunction is already present in early stage de novo PD, even without orthostatic hypotension. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.

  13. Aerobic fitness and orthostatic tolerance: Evidence against an association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation will focus on only one side of the debate as to whether high levels of aerobic fitness have a deleterious effect on tolerance to gravitational stress. This issue was raised in the early 1970's as a result of two research publications. The first work investigated the carotid sinus baroreflex of humans with an airtight chamber that surrounded the head and neck. The steady-state reflex changes in blood pressure that were recorded 3 minutes after application of the head and neck stimuli, were attenuated in an athletic group compared to a sedentary group of volunteers. A second report in the NASA literature indicated that five endurance-trained runners were less tolerant to LBNP than five nonrunners. These early research findings have stimulated a considerable amount of interest that has lead to a growing number of research efforts seeking an association between aerobic fitness and orthostatic tolerance in humans. I will briefly review some of the more pertinent published research information which suggests that there is no relationship between aerobic fitness and orthostatic tolerance in humans.

  14. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension – management update and role of droxidopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Joy Vijayan,1 Vijay K Sharma1,21Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, National University Health System, 2Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Orthostatic hypotension (OH is defined as a significant decrease in blood pressure (BP during the first 3 minutes of standing or a head up on a tilt table. Symptoms of OH are highly variable, ranging from mild light-headedness to recurrent syncope. OH occurs due to dysfunction of one or more components of various complex mechanisms that interplay closely to maintain BP in a normal range during various physiological and associated disease states. Various biochemical and electrophysiological studies are often undertaken to assess the severity and etiology of OH. In addition to the lifestyle modifications, various medications that stimulate the adrenergic receptors or increase central blood volume are used in patients with OH. Droxidopa is a newer agent that increases the levels of norepinephrine in postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Management strategies for OH are presented, including the mechanism of action of droxidopa and various studies performed to assess its efficacy.Keywords: orthostatic hypotension, systemic blood pressure, midodrine, fludrocortisone, droxidopa

  15. Clinical benefit of midodrine hydrochloride in symptomatic orthostatic hypotension: a phase 4, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, tilt-table study

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, William; Wan, Hong; Much, David; Robinson, Antoine G.; Martin, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objective Midodrine hydrochloride is a short-acting pressor agent that raises blood pressure in the upright position in patients with orthostatic hypotension. The US Food and Drug Administration?s Subpart H approval, under which midodrine was initially approved, requires post-marketing studies to confirm midodrine?s clinical benefit in this indication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefit of midodrine with regard to symptom response. Methods This was a double-blind, ...

  16. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy.

  17. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2009-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  18. Cognitive and neuropsychiatric features of orthostatic tremor: A case-control comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Puertas-Martín, Verónica; Romero, Juan Pablo; Matarazzo, Michele; Molina-Arjona, José Antonio; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro

    2016-02-15

    Evidence suggests that the cerebellum could play a role in the pathophysiology of orthostatic tremor. The link between orthostatic tremor and the cerebellum is of interest, especially in light of the role the cerebellum plays in cognition, and it raises the possibility that orthostatic tremor patients could have cognitive deficits consistent with cerebellar dysfunction. Our aim was to examine whether orthostatic tremor patients had cognitive deficits and distinct personality profiles when compared with matched controls. Sixteen consecutive orthostatic tremor patients (65.7 ± 13.3 years) and 32 healthy matched controls underwent a neuropsychological battery and the Personality Assessment Inventory. In linear regression models, the dependent variable was each one of the neuropsychological test scores or the Personality Assessment Inventory subscales and the independent variable was orthostatic tremor vs. Adjusted for age in years, sex, years of education, comorbidity index, current smoker, and depressive symptoms, diagnosis (orthostatic tremor vs. healthy control) was associated with poor performance on tests of executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language tests, and on a number of the Personality Assessment Inventory subscales (somatic concerns, anxiety related disorders, depression, and antisocial features). Older-onset OT (>60 years) patients had poorer scores on cognitive and personality testing compared with their younger-onset OT counterparts. Orthostatic tremor patients have deficits in specific aspects of neuropsychological functioning, particularly those thought to rely on the integrity of the prefrontal cortex, which suggests involvement of frontocerebellar circuits. Cognitive impairment and personality disturbances could be disease-associated nonmotor manifestations of orthostatic tremor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors of response to a low-FODMAP diet in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and lactose or fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, C H; Olesen, S S; Materna, A; Drewes, A M

    2017-04-01

    Diets low in fermentable sugars (low-FODMAP diets) are increasingly adopted by patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID), but outcome predictors are unclear. To identify factors predictive of an efficacious response to a low-FODMAP diet in FGID patients with fructose or lactose intolerance thereby gaining insights into underlying mechanisms. Fructose and lactose breath tests were performed in FGID patients to determine intolerance (positive symptom score) and malabsorption (increased hydrogen or methane concentrations). Patients with fructose or lactose intolerance consumed a low-FODMAP diet and global adequate symptom relief was assessed after 6-8 weeks and correlated with pre-diet clinical symptoms and breath test results. A total of 81% of 584 patients completing the low-FODMAP diet achieved adequate relief, without significant differences between FGID subgroups or types of intolerance. Univariate analysis yielded predictive factors in fructose intolerance (chronic diarrhoea and pruritus, peak methane concentrations and fullness during breath tests) and lactose intolerance (peak hydrogen and methane concentrations and flatulence during breath tests). Using multivariate analysis, symptom relief was independently and positively predicted in fructose intolerance by chronic diarrhoea [odds ratio (95% confidence intervals): 2.62 (1.31-5.27), P = 0.007] and peak breath methane concentrations [1.53 (1.02-2.29), P = 0.042], and negatively predicted by chronic nausea [0.33 (0.16-0.67), P = 0.002]. No independent predictive factors emerged for lactose intolerance. Adequate global symptom relief was achieved with a low-FODMAP diet in a large majority of functional gastrointestinal disorders patients with fructose or lactose intolerance. Independent predictors of a satisfactory dietary outcome were only seen in fructose intolerant patients, and were indicative of changes in intestinal host or microbiome metabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A. R. R.; Ryman, Brenda E.

    1971-01-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance. PMID:5289293

  1. Exenatide improves glucocorticoid-induced glucose intolerance in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiying Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruiying Zhao1,2*, Enrique Fuentes-Mattei1,2*, Guermarie Velazquez-Torres1,3, Chun-Hui Su1,2, Jian Chen1, Mong-Hong Lee1,2, Sai-Ching Jim Yeung4,51Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 2Program in Genes and Development, 3Program in Cancer Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA *Both authors contributed equally.Abstract: Exenatide is an incretin mimetic that is recently available in the US for the treatment of diabetes. There is a paucity of information on the effects of exenatide in glucocorticoid (GC-induced diabetes. Although the effect of continuous intravenous infusion of exenatide on GC-induced glucose intolerance has been investigated before in healthy human males receiving oral prednisolone, we investigated the efficacy of a single subcutaneous dose of exenatide (3 µg/kg in lowering blood glucose in GC-induced glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice. In a longitudinal experiment, the area under the curve (AUC of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT significantly increased after dexamethasone (P = 0.004, which was subsequently decreased by exenatide (P < 0.001. A cross-sectional experiment showed that exenatide improved glucose tolerance compared with placebo in a mouse model of dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance. AUC of OGTT in the exenatide group were significantly (P < 0.001 lower than in the placebo group. Insulin tolerance tests (ITT demonstrated that exenatide decreased the ability of the mice to tolerate insulin compared with placebo. The AUC of ITT in the exenatide group were also significantly (P = 0.006 lower than in the placebo group. In conclusion, a single dose of exenatide was able to decrease glucose intolerance and

  2. Thalamic Ventral Intermediate Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Orthostatic Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C. Lehn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthostatic tremor (OT was first described in 1977. It is characterized by rapid tremor of 13–18 Hz and can be recorded in the lower limbs and trunk muscles. OT remains difficult to treat, although some success has been reported with deep brain stimulation (DBS.Case Report: We report a 68-year-old male with OT who did not improve significantly after bilateral thalamic stimulation.Discussion: Although some patients were described who improved after DBS surgery, more information is needed about the effect of these treatment modalities on OT, ideally in the form of randomized trial data. 

  3. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    During orthostatic stress, arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes play a key role in maintaining arterial pressure by regulating heart rate. This study, presents a mathematical model that can predict the dynamics of heart rate regulation in response to postural change from sitting to standing....... The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...... least squares problem for parameter estimation and successfully demonstrate that our mathematical model can accurately predict heart rate dynamics observed in data obtained from healthy young, healthy elderly, and hypertensive elderly subjects. One of our key findings indicates that to successfully...

  4. [An epidemiological study of food intolerance in 2434 children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Juan; Zhu, Ting-Ting; Zeng, Rong; Chang, Li; Li, Feng-Yi; Li, Wen-Sheng; Jiang, Yong-Mei

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of intolerance to 14 foods in children and the relationship between food intolerance and disease of various systems. Serum samples of 2434 children with diseases were collected for food intolerance testing between January 2009 and October 2012. Allergen-specific IgG antibodies to 14 foods were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The children's intolerance to different foods and its relationship with age, sex and disease of various systems were analyzed. Among these children, positive rates of intolerance to milk and eggs were as high as 74.16% and 66.47% respectively, while positive rates of intolerance to chicken and pork were relatively low (0.29% and 0.21% respectively). The overall positive rates of food intolerance were 12.579% and 12.470% in males and females respectively. For infants, the highest intolerance rate was to milk; for preschool and school-age children, the highest intolerance rates were to milk and eggs respectively; for children in adolescence, the highest intolerance rate was to eggs. Among children with food intolerance involving single system, those with developmental abnormality or immune system disease had the highest overall positive rate of food intolerance. Children with double-system diseases had an overall positive rate of food intolerance as high as 13.393%. Among the children involving various systems, the positive rate of intolerance to milk and eggs were higher than other food. Factors influencing food intolerance in children include food categories and age. There may be a relationship between food intolerance and disease of various systems, and this is significant to the growth and development of children.

  5. Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does not exist

    OpenAIRE

    Dreborg, Sten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The term "intolerance" is not mentioned in the World Allergy Organization (WAO) document on allergy nomenclature. "Intolerance" has been used to describe some non-immunological diseases. However, pediatric gastroenterologists mix allergy and intolerance, e.g. by using the term "cow's milk protein allergy/intolerance (CMPA/I)", lumping together all types of mechanisms for not tolerating cow's milk. The basis for this mix is the fact that double-blind oral food challenges are time-c...

  6. Orthostatic hypoxaemia in dialysed adult polycystic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzets, Z; Golan, E; Ben-Chitrit, S; Smorjik, Y; Os, P; Bernheim, J

    1997-04-01

    Recently we observed a unique clinical phenomenon, namely, orthostatic or postural hypoxaemia in a 72-year-old female adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) patient, maintained on CAPD. Extensive investigations failed to yield a satisfactory explanation for her ambulatory hypoxaemia. To validate our observation, 15 dialysed patients underwent blood gases analyses in both the supine and ambulatory positions (SpO2 and ApO2 respectively). Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n-7) whose end-stage renal failure (ESRF) was due to APKD and group 2 (n-8) in whom ESRF was due to other causes. Both haemodialysed (HD) and CAPD patients were included. ApO2 was determined as the pO2 immediately upon standing up. Readings in HD patients were taken at the end of the dialysis session, that is, at the patients' dry weight. Respective SpO2 and ApO2 of the two groups were 85 +/- 17.1 and 78 +/- 20.5 vs 85.8 +/- 19 and 91 +/- 21 mmHg. Delta change in pO2 defined as the mean decrease (negative value) or mean increase (positive value) of ApO2 in relation to SpO2 was -7.85 (group 1) vs + 5.2 mmHg (group 2), P delta. In group 2, four of eight showed a positive delta whilst the remaining four had no change in the delta value. Orthostatic hypoxaemia may occur in dialysed patients whose ESRF is due to APKD.

  7. [A cross sectional survey on the prevalence of food intolerance and its determinants in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Xiao-yong; Zheng, Yan-song; Zhao, Jing-mei; Hao, Wei

    2011-03-01

    To study the prevalence of food intolerance among attendants in a general hospital and to learn its related determinants in Beijing, China. An cross sectional survey, from August 1st, 2008 to June 30th, 2009, was carried out, including 12 766 adults from Health Sciences Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital. Data for epidemiological analysis were entered (double entry) into computer and organized by EpiData 3.0. Non-conditional logistic regression model was used for odd ratio (OR) and 95%CI calculation, with statistic analysis through SPSS 13.0. The three leading intolerance food items were egg, crab and milk, and the prevalence rates were 28.5%, 24.5% and 24.5% respectively. Prevalence of food intolerance increased along with aging. Levels and the kinds of food intolerance were associated with age, sex and appeared a linear correlation tendency (P food intolerance in females (67.3%) was higher than that in males (56.2%). Data from multiple regression analysis showed that, comparing with age group under 40 and 40 years, the OR (95%CI) of age group 41 - 50, 51 - 60, and above 60 were 1.125 (1.027 - 1.233), 1.307 (1.176 - 1.452) and 1.536 (1.275 - 1.849) respectively. Compared to males, the OR (95%CI) of females was 1.602 (1.475 - 1.741). When compared with normal weights, the OR (95%CI) of people with low weight was 1.772 (1.207 - 2.602). Food intolerance was associated with age, sex and body mass index. Health education should be carried out according to the related characteristics of age and sex. Suggesting that reducing the risk of food intolerance, keeping the suitable weight was necessary.

  8. An exploration of food intolerance in the primary care setting: the general practitioner's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mia; Ogden, Jane

    2008-09-01

    Food intolerance is one of medicine's modern enigmas. Its etiology and mechanism are unclear and the subject of constant debate, while estimates of its prevalence vary widely from 2% to over 20% of the population. Using interpretive phenomenonological analysis, this study explored the phenomenon of food intolerance in primary care from the general practitioner's (GP) perspective. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 17 GPs from around the UK. Food intolerance was primarily conceptualised as a spectrum of clinical importance with medical conditions arranged in three hierarchies; the certainty that the GP would have in making a diagnosis, the authenticity of the patients' experience, and the threat posed to physical health. Since some conditions within the spectrum had a medical name that was used in preference to the term 'food intolerance', food intolerance essentially became a 'dustbin diagnosis', focused at just one end of the spectrum and viewed with scepticism. The scepticism about food intolerance as a specific condition influenced the GPs' perceptions of patients and of the patients' underlying problems. This was, however, tempered by an element of awareness of the limitations of modern medicine. Rather than risk damaging the doctor-patient relationship, the GPs chose, despite their scepticism, to negotiate mutually acceptable ground with patients and with patients' beliefs. As a result, whether due to a placebo effect, secondary benefit, or as a biophysical result of excluding a food from the diet, the GPs acknowledged both personal and therapeutic benefit in working with the patients' belief in food intolerance and with behaviours associated with the beliefs.

  9. Orthostatic hypotension due to suppression of vasomotor outflow after amphetamine intoxication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A. A.; Wieling, W.; Voogel, A. J.; Koster, R. W.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Ten hours after ingestion of amphetamines, a previously healthy 17-year-old female adolescent experienced dizziness on standing. Examination revealed pronounced drowsiness and severe orthostatic hypotension. Assessment of arterial baroreflex function suggested that suppressed sympathetic vasomotor

  10. Effects of imipramine of the orthostatic changes in blood pressure, heart rate and plasma catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Johansen, Torben; Arentoft, A

    1983-01-01

    The effect of imipramine on the orthostatic changes in heart rate, blood pressure and plasma catecholamines were examined in six healthy male subjects on two occasions on high sodium balance (Na+ excretion greater than 120 mmol per day) and on low sodium balance (Na+ excretion less than 110 mmol...... per day), respectively. Orthostatic tests were carried out before and 2 h after ingestion of 150 mg imipramine hydrochloride. Imipramine caused a moderate increase in supine systolic blood pressure, and a pronounced increase in the rise in heart rate, when the subjects assumed erect position....... The orthostatic drop in systolic blood pressure was in most cases only moderately increased after ingestion of imipramine, but in three subjects pronounced orthostatic hypotension developed when the sodium balance was low, whereas no clinical symptoms were seen in the same subjects when tested after imipramine...

  11. Mathematical modeling of human cardiovascular system for simulation of orthostatic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, F. M.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the short-term response of the human cardiovascular system to orthostatic stresses in the context of developing a mathematical model of the overall system. It discusses the physiological issues involved and how these issues have been handled in published cardiovascular models for simulation of orthostatic response. Most of the models are stimulus specific with no demonstrated capability for simulating the responses to orthostatic stimuli of different types. A comprehensive model incorporating all known phenomena related to cardiovascular regulation would greatly help to interpret the various orthostatic responses of the system in a consistent manner and to understand the interactions among its elements. This paper provides a framework for future efforts in mathematical modeling of the entire cardiovascular system.

  12. Comparison of different definitions of feeding intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reintam Blaser, Annika; Starkopf, Liis; Deane, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: While feeding intolerance (FI) is clinically important in the critically ill it is inconsistently defined. By evaluating definitions of FI based on relationships between symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction and mortality the objective was to define FI using...

  13. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-08-31

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed.

  14. Chemical Intolerance among Hairdressers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Elberling, Jesper; Skovbjerg, Sine

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the severity of fragrance-related symptoms among hairdressers in Denmark compared with the Danish general population. Further, to characterize former hairdressers who are severely chemically intolerant to fragranced products in relation to sex, age and health...

  15. Intolerance of Uncertainty and Adult Separation Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Reijntjes, Albert; Carleton, R. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU)—the tendency to react negatively to situations that are uncertain—is involved in different anxiety disorders and depression. No studies have yet examined the association between IU and symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder. However, it is possible that greater

  16. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  17. [Food allergy, food intolerance or functional disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    2009-04-01

    The term "food allergy" is widely misused for all sorts of symptoms and diseases caused by food. Food allergy (FA) is an adverse reaction to food (food hypersensitivity) occurring in susceptible individuals, which is mediated by a classical immune mechanism specific for the food itself. The best established mechanism in FA is due to the presence of IgE antibodies against the offending food. Food intolerance (FI) are all non-immune-mediated adverse reactions to food. The subgroups of FI are enzymatic (e.g. lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency), pharmacological (reactions against biogenic amines, histamine intolerance), and undefined food intolerance (e.g. against some food additives). The diagnosis of an IgE-mediated FA is made by a carefully taken case history, supported by the demonstration of an IgE sensitization either by skin prick tests or by in vitro tests, and confirmed by positive oral provocation. For scientific purposes the only accepted test for the confirmation of FA/FI is a properly performed double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). A panel of recombinant allergens, produced as single allergenic molecules, may in future improve the diagnosis of IgE-mediated FA. Due to a lack of causal treatment possibilities, the elimination of the culprit "food allergen" from the diet is the only therapeutic option for patients with real food allergy.

  18. Lactose intolerance and cow's milk protein allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Henrique do Nascimento RANGEL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adverse reactions to food intake have very diverse etiology and symptomatology. Regarding milk, its food allergy is presented as lactose intolerance, the sugar in milk, or allergy to milk protein. Despite having different symptomatology, confusions among allergic conditions to dairy and its mediators are common. Milk protein allergy originates from protein components present in milk, causing reactions to either the protein fractions in emulsion (caseins or in whey (milk albumin. The allergic reaction is type IV mediated by T lymphocytes. The allergic reaction produces severe cellular damage and it triggers physical, mental and emotional symptomatology that may vary in time, intensity and severity. Lactose intolerance is originated by total or partial absence of the enzyme that digests this disaccharide. Lactose intolerance can be primary or congenital and secondary; the former being more rare and severe, the latter being more common. Lactase deficiency can be diagnosed by symptoms associated with cramping and diarrhea. Thus, the objective of this study was to conduct a review of available literature on cow’s milk protein allergy and lactose intolerance.

  19. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-10-25

    The author summarises the interrelations between lactose intolerance, calcium and vitamin D metabolism and osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance enhances the risk of forearm and hip fractures in some patients. Lactase gene genotype and fracture risk are related in some populations. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation increase bone mineral content and they are justified in children, during pregnancy and lactation, and in postmenopausal women. The intake of milk and milk products could increase the risk of ovarian carcinoma. CC genotype of the lactase gene increased the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Finns; no such effect was observed in British, Spanish and Italian patients. Even small quantities of lactose in drugs (10-750 mg) could elicit intolerance symptoms due to individual susceptibility. In spite of public knowledge and advertising, controlled studies did not prove the beneficial effect of either a lactose-free diet, enzyme supplementation or probiotics in an evidence-based manner. While accepted guidelines are lacking, a personalised therapy is mandatory. In spite of increasing public interest in lactose intolerance, many unknown factors must still be studied.

  20. Lactose intolerance : the role of colonic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Tao

    2006-01-01

    Dairy products provide us with calcium and other valuable nutrients. However, they also contain lactose which is maldigested by a large part of the world adult population. The mechanisms by which lactose maldigestion causes symptoms of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. Studies on the

  1. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  2. Fear of heights and visual height intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Huppert, Doreen

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review is, first, to cover the different aspects of visual height intolerance such as historical descriptions, definition of terms, phenomenology of the condition, neurophysiological control of gaze, stance and locomotion, and therapy, and, second, to identify warranted epidemiological and experimental studies. Vivid descriptions of fear of heights can be found in ancient texts from the Greek, Roman, and Chinese classics. The life-time prevalence of visual height intolerance is as high as 28% in the general population, and about 50% of those who are susceptible report an impact on quality of life. When exposed to heights, visual exploration by eye and head movements is restricted, and the velocity of locomotion is reduced. Therapy for fear of heights is dominated by the behavioral techniques applied during real or virtual reality exposure. Their efficacy might be facilitated by the administration of D-cycloserine or glucocorticoids. Visual height intolerance has a considerable impact on daily life and interpersonal interactions. It is much more frequent than fear of heights, which is defined as an environmental subtype of a specific phobia. There is certainly a continuum stretching from acrophobia to a less-pronounced visual height intolerance, to which the categorical distinction of a specific phobia does not apply.

  3. Severe lactose intolerance with lactosuria and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosková, A; Sabacký, J; Mrskos, A; Pospísil, R

    1980-01-01

    An infant with lactose intolerance is described. A breast-fed infant developed vomiting at 3 weeks, and became dehydrated. Lactosuria, aminoaciduria, and liver damage were preesent. A milk-free diet led to rapid recovery. At 6 months a normal diet was well tolerated. PMID:7416780

  4. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebely Pal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows’ milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows’ milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows’ milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed.

  5. Identifying Foods causing Allergies/ Intolerances among Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the foods that caused allergies / intolerances and symptoms of reaction experienced by diabetic patients attending State Specialist Hospital, Akure. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight diabetics aged 30-80 years (30 males and 68 females) were included in the study.

  6. Dermatitis herpetiformis intolerant to dapsone in Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man with AIDS and pulmonary tuberculosis presented with lesions suggestive of dermatitis herpetiformis and intolerance to dapsone. He was managed successfully with a combination of nicotinamide 200 mg/day and indomethacin 75 mg/day, topical steroids and gluten free diet.

  7. Factors predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus: decision-curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, M; Nagao, Y; Mahbub, M H; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Tanizawa, Y

    2018-04-29

    To identify factors predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus, using decision-curve analysis. A retrospective cohort study was performed. The participants were 123 Japanese women with gestational diabetes who underwent 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests at 8-12 weeks after delivery. They were divided into a glucose intolerance and a normal glucose tolerance group based on postpartum oral glucose tolerance test results. Analysis of the pregnancy oral glucose tolerance test results showed predictive factors for postpartum glucose intolerance. We also evaluated the clinical usefulness of the prediction model based on decision-curve analysis. Of 123 women, 78 (63.4%) had normoglycaemia and 45 (36.6%) had glucose intolerance. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin and summation of glucose levels, assessed during pregnancy oral glucose tolerance tests (total glucose), to be independent risk factors for postpartum glucose intolerance. Evaluating the regression models, the best discrimination (area under the curve 0.725) was obtained using the basic model (i.e. age, family history of diabetes, BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 and use of insulin during pregnancy) plus insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin intolerance. Insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin calculated using oral glucose tolerance test results during pregnancy is potentially useful for predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of single or combined midodrine and pyridostigmine in orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Moon, Jangsup; Kim, Do-Yong; Shin, Hyerim; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han Sang; Jun, Jin-Sun; Park, Kyung-Il; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2017-09-05

    To evaluate the long-term (for up to 3 months) efficacy and safety of single or combined therapy with midodrine and pyridostigmine for neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (OH). This was a randomized, open-label clinical trial. In total, 87 patients with symptomatic neurogenic OH were enrolled and randomized to receive 1 of 3 treatments: midodrine only, pyridostigmine only, or midodrine + pyridostigmine. The patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months after treatment. The primary outcome measures were improvement in orthostatic blood pressure (BP) drop at 3 months. Secondary endpoints were improvement of the orthostatic BP drop at 1 month and amelioration of the questionnaire score evaluating OH-associated symptoms. Orthostatic systolic and diastolic BP drops improved significantly at 3 months after treatment in all treatment groups. Orthostatic symptoms were significantly ameliorated during the 3-month treatment, and the symptom severity was as follows: midodrine only midodrine + pyridostigmine midodrine and pyridostigmine was effective and safe in patients with OH for up to 3 months. Midodrine was better than pyridostigmine at improving OH-related symptoms. NCT02308124. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with neurogenic OH, long-term treatment with midodrine alone, pyridostigmine alone, or both midodrine and pyridostigmine is safe and has similar effects in improving orthostatic BP drop up to 3 months. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Sleep deprivation increases blood pressure in healthy normotensive elderly and attenuates the blood pressure response to orthostatic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Rébecca; Lanfranchi, Paola A; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-03-01

    To determine how aging affects the impact of sleep deprivation on blood pressure at rest and under orthostatic challenge. Subjects underwent a night of sleep and 24.5 h of sleep deprivation in a crossover counterbalanced design. Sleep laboratory. Sixteen healthy normotensive men and women: 8 young adults (mean 24 years [SD 3.1], range 20-28 years) and 8 elderly adults (mean 64.1 years [SD 3.4], range 60-69 years). Sleep deprivation. Brachial cuff arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured in semi-recumbent and upright positions. These measurements were compared across homeostatic sleep pressure conditions and age groups. Sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in elderly but not young adults. Moreover, sleep deprivation attenuated the systolic blood pressure orthostatic response in both age groups. Our results suggest that sleep deprivation alters the regulatory mechanisms of blood pressure and might increase the risk of hypertension in healthy normotensive elderly.

  10. Orthostatic Dysregulation during Postural Change on the Dental Chair and Intraoperative Monitoring by Heart Rate Variability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Momota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first case report of orthostatic dysregulation (OD manifested during postural change on the dental chair and intraoperatively monitored by heart rate variability (HRV analysis. OD-associated autonomic dysfunction is induced by postural changes and easily leads to disturbance in circulatory dynamics; however, most dental practices have not yet realized the importance of managing OD. We measured autonomic activity in a patient with OD during dental therapy and assessed the clinical significance of HRV analysis for OD. The patient was a 17-year-old Japanese female. She was diagnosed with impacted wisdom teeth and had no previous history of a distinct systemic disease. A surgical procedure to extract the teeth was safely performed under both local anesthesia and sedation with nitrous oxide and midazolam. After the surgery, her postural change to sitting induced orthostatic hypotension. HRV variables showed parasympathetic dominance due to the upright position. Subsequently, her posture was returned to supine, and atropine sulfate administration for the immediate treatment of OD returned her blood pressure to normal levels. HRV variables showed relative sympathetic dominance due to an atropine-derived parasympathetic blockade. HRV analysis revealed OD-associated autonomic dysfunction and should become a standard tool for safe and secure dental management of OD.

  11. Orthostatic Dysregulation during Postural Change on the Dental Chair and Intraoperative Monitoring by Heart Rate Variability Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momota, Yukihiro; Tomioka, Shigemasa; Furukita, Mayuko; Fujisawa, Kenji; Takano, Hideyuki; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    This is the first case report of orthostatic dysregulation (OD) manifested during postural change on the dental chair and intraoperatively monitored by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. OD-associated autonomic dysfunction is induced by postural changes and easily leads to disturbance in circulatory dynamics; however, most dental practices have not yet realized the importance of managing OD. We measured autonomic activity in a patient with OD during dental therapy and assessed the clinical significance of HRV analysis for OD. The patient was a 17-year-old Japanese female. She was diagnosed with impacted wisdom teeth and had no previous history of a distinct systemic disease. A surgical procedure to extract the teeth was safely performed under both local anesthesia and sedation with nitrous oxide and midazolam. After the surgery, her postural change to sitting induced orthostatic hypotension. HRV variables showed parasympathetic dominance due to the upright position. Subsequently, her posture was returned to supine, and atropine sulfate administration for the immediate treatment of OD returned her blood pressure to normal levels. HRV variables showed relative sympathetic dominance due to an atropine-derived parasympathetic blockade. HRV analysis revealed OD-associated autonomic dysfunction and should become a standard tool for safe and secure dental management of OD.

  12. Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Y

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals and patients mix and mingle (hyper)sensitivity, allergy and intolerance. The consequences are discrepancies which result in confusion. The following is a very personal point of view, intended to start a debate to come to consensus. We aimed to clarify the proposed terminology for the primary health care professional from the point of view of the pediatric gastroenterologist. Many patients present with symptoms "related to food ingestion". We propose to use this wording if no underlying mechanism can be identified. Intolerance should be restricted to carbohydrate malabsorption causing symptoms. Allergy is restricted to IgE mediated allergy and non-IgE manifestations that can only be explained through an immune mediated mechanism, such as food induced atopic dermatitis and allergic colitis with blood in the stools. Unfortunately, primary heath care physicians have no diagnostic tools for non-IgE mediated allergy. A positive challenge test is a proof of a food-induced symptom, but does not proof that the immune system is involved. (Hyper)sensitivity suggests immune mediated mechanisms and should therefore not be used. The pathophysiologic mechanism of many food-related symptoms is unclear. The same symptom can be caused by allergy or be considered functional, such as infantile colic, gastro-esophageal reflux and constipation related to cow's milk ingestion in infants. In fact, "functional" is used if the pathophysiologic mechanism causing the symptom cannot be explained. Since the long term outcome of "allergy" differs substantially from "functional symptom", allergy should not be used inappropriate. "Food related symptom" should be used in each patient in which the pathophysiologic mechanism is not clear. Intolerance means a carbohydrate malabsorption that causes symptoms. Allergy should be used when the immune system is involved.

  13. Distress intolerance and clinical functioning in persons with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Katie L.; Chiappelli, Joshua; Rowland, Laura M.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Hong, L. Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Impaired tolerance to distress may help explain part of the cognitive and functional impairments in schizophrenia. This project investigated distress intolerance in schizophrenia patients (SZ) as compared to controls, and whether distress intolerance represented an independent domain in relationship to symptoms, cognition, and functional capacity. Healthy controls (n=43) and SZ (n=65) completed a psychological distress challenge experiment and their levels of intolerance to distress were estimated. SZ showed increased distress intolerance such that they were significantly more likely to terminate the distress challenge session early compared to controls. Greater distress intolerance was associated with reduced functional capacity and worse cognitive performance in SZ. Mediation analyses suggested that distress intolerance had an independent effect on functional capacity, while some of this effect was mediated by cognitive performance. Our results suggest that distress intolerance is a promising domain for treatment research, and functional capacity may be improved by targeting treatments towards SZ patient’s ability to tolerate distress. PMID:25107316

  14. The consequences of social intolerance on non-violent protest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Ackermann, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This paper scrutinizes the impact of intolerance toward diverse ethnic, religious, and cultural groups on an individual's willingness to actively engage in non-violent protest. Following new insights, we examine the individual as well as the ecological effect of social intolerance on protest...... behavior. Drawing from insights of social psychology and communication science, we expect that the prevalence of intolerance reinforces the positive effect of individual-level intolerance on protest participation. From a rational choice perspective, however, a negative moderating effect is expected......, as the expression of opinions becomes redundant for intolerant individuals in an intolerant society. We base our multilevel analyses on data from the World Values Surveys covering 32 established democracies. Our results reveal that intolerance leads to more non-violent protest participation. This relationship...

  15. Intolerance to food additives - does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul J; Kemp, Andrew S

    2012-02-01

    'Food intolerance' is often confused with a range of adverse symptoms which may be coincidental to ingestion of food. 'Food intolerance' is defined as a reaction in which symptoms must be objectively reproducible and not known to involve an immunological mechanism. A more precise term is non-allergic food hypersensitivity, which contrasts with food allergies which are due to an immunological mechanism. Some children will experience food reactions to food additives. Reported symptoms range from urticaria/angioedema to hyperactive behaviours. While parents/carers report that over one fifth of children experience of food reaction, only 1 in 20 of these are confirmed to have a non-allergic food hypersensitivity on testing. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  17. Does training-induced orthostatic hypotension result from reduced carotid baroreflex responsiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczyk, James A.; Raven, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    As manned space travel has steadily increased in duration and sophistication, the answer to a simple, relevant question remains elusive. Does endurance exercise training - high intensity rhythmic activity, performed regularly for extended periods of time - alter the disposition to, or severity of, postflight orthostatic hypotension? Research results continue to provide different views; however, data are difficult to compare because of the following factors that vary between investigations: the type of orthostatic stress imposed (+Gz, lower body negative pressure (LBNP), head-up tilt); pretest perturbations used (exercise, heat exposure, head-down tilting, bed rest, water immersion, hypohydration, pharmacologically-induced diuresis); the length of the training program used in longitudinal investigations (days versus weeks versus months); the criteria used to define fitness; and the criteria used to define orthostatic tolerance. Generally, research results indicate that individuals engaged in aerobic exercise activities for a period of years have been reported to have reduced orthostatic tolerance compared to untrained control subjects, while the results of shorter term longitudinal studies remain equivocal. Such conclusions suggest that chronic athletic training programs reduce orthostatic tolerance, whereas relatively brief (days to weeks) training programs do not affect orthostatic tolerance to any significant degree (increase or decrease). A primary objective was established to identify the alterations in blood pressure control that contribute to training-induced orthostatic hypotension (TIOH). Although any aspect of blood pressure regulation is suspect, current research has been focused on the baroreceptor system. Reductions in carotid baroreflex responsiveness have been documented in exercise-trained rabbits, reportedly due to an inhibitory influence from cardiac afferent, presumably vagal, nerve fibers that is abolished with intrapericardiac denervation. The

  18. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  19. Religious diversity, intolerance and civil conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Joseph Flavian

    2013-01-01

    We compute new measures of religious diversity and intolerance and study their effects on civil conflict. Using a religion tree that describes the relationship between different religions, we compute measures of religious diversity at three different levels of aggregation. We find that religious diversity is a significant and robust correlate of civil conflict. While religious fractionalization significantly reduces conflict, religious polarization increases it. This is most robust at the sec...

  20. Lactose Intolerance and Symptom Pattern of Lactose Intolerance among Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Madhusudan; Parveen, Irin; Shil, Bimal Chandra; Saha, Shasanka Kumar; Banik, Ranjit Kumar; Majumder, Monojit; Salam, Mahjuba Umme; Islam, Asm Nazmul

    2016-01-01

    To see the prevalence of lactose intolerance (LI) and related symptoms following oral lactose challenge in healthy volunteers. Symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, and diarrhea were noted for 24 hours and blood glucose was estimated at 0 hour and 30 minutes after 25 gm oral lactose load to healthy volunteers. Failure to rise blood glucose level ≥ 1.1 mmol/l at 30 minutes after lactose intake from fasting level was taken as lactose malabsorption (LM), i.e., LI. A total of 166 volunteers (123 males, 43 females) with a mean age 34.78 ± 11.45 years participated in this study. Lactose intolerance was found among 85.54% (n = 142, M = 104, F = 38). The main symptoms of LI were diarrhea (n = 83, 58.4.0%), borborygmi (n = 81, 57.04%), abdominal pain (n = 35, 24.65%), and flatulence (n = 27, 19.0%). Lactose intolerance among healthy adults may be common in Bangladesh. Diarrhea and borborygmi were mostly associated symptoms of LI. Saha M, Parveen I, Shil BC, Saha SK, Banik RK, Majumder M, Salam MU, Nazmul Islam ASM. Lactose Intolerance and Symptom Pattern of Lactose Intolerance among Healthy Volunteers. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2016;6(1):5-7.

  1. Seafood Allergy, Toxicity, and Intolerance: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prester, Ljerka

    2016-01-01

    Seafood allergies have been increasing their presence in the last 2 decades. Allergic reactions to seafood can range from mild urticarial and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Ingestion of seafood infested with Anisakis larvae can cause a disease known as anisakiasis with symptoms similar to true seafood allergy. Furthermore, some adverse reactions to seafood including histamine fish poisoning (HFP), and intolerance to histamine can trigger clinical symptoms, which, although nonallergic in origin, are similar to true immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Because seafood allergy usually remains a lifelong food allergy, this review focuses on the current knowledge on fish and shellfish allergens and emphasizes the importance of differentiating seafood allergy from other allergy-like reactions (anisakiasis, HFP, and intolerance to histamine). Key teaching points: • Fish and shellfish are potent allergens that can provoke serious IgE antibody-mediated adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. • Sensitization to seafood allergens can be achieved by ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. • Shellfish major allergen, tropomyosin, shares significant homology to arthropods (dust mites and cockroaches). • Accidental exposures to seafood products cross-contaminated with fish or shellfish allergens (hidden allergens) during processing may present a health risk for sensitive individuals. • Allergens of fish parasite A. simplex present common hidden allergens in seafood, particularly in raw and undercooked home-made fish dishes. • Symptoms caused by HFP, histamine intolerance, and anisakiasis are similar to true seafood allergy.

  2. Lactase Non-persistence and Lactose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, Theodore M; Brown, Elizabeth; Paige, David M

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical and nutritional significance of genetically determined lactase non-persistence and potential lactose and milk intolerance in 65-70% of the world's adult population. Milk consumption is decreasing in the USA and is the lowest in countries with a high prevalence of lactase non-persistence. The dairy industry and Minnesota investigators have made efforts to minimize the influence of lactose intolerance on milk consumption. Some lactose intolerant individuals, without co-existent irritable bowel syndrome, are able to consume a glass of milk with a meal with no or minor symptoms. The high frequency of lactase persistence in offspring of Northern European countries and in some nomadic African tribes is due to mutations in the promoter of the lactase gene in association with survival advantage of milk drinking. Educational and commercial efforts to improve calcium and Vitamin D intake have focused on urging consumption of tolerable amounts of milk with a meal, use of lowered lactose-content foods including hard cheeses, yogurt, and lactose-hydrolyzed milk products.

  3. Religious Intolerance in the Cortes of Cadiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Domínguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been no shortage of studies on religious intolerance in the Cadiz Cortes, but many of them are burdened by two critical errors. The first one is to focus the arguments on article 12 of the Constitution, without paying attention to other parliamentary debates in which the intolerant policy of the Cortes was more clearly expounded. The second common mistake is to ignore the circumstances which prevented some deputies from freely speaking their minds on religious matters. Through a detailed analysis of the proceedings of the Cortes, as well as other sources of the period, this article is intended to remedy both shortcomings, and thus to question certain common assumptions in current historiography. This approach leads to the conclusion that, while some deputies may had hidden his penchant for freedom of conscience, the decrees and speeches of the Cortes were more intolerant than many suppose. Not only they ordered to punish all dissenters from the Church's doctrines, but they decreed death penalty for anyone who dared to suggest the introduction of religious freedom in Spain.

  4. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians.

  5. Factor structure of the intolerance of uncertainty scale for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchio, Danielle; Sanchez, Amanda L; Coxe, Stefany; Roy, Amy; Pincus, Donna B; Read, Kendra L; Holaway, Robert M; Kendall, Philip C; Comer, Jonathan S

    2018-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU), a dispositional negative orientation toward uncertainty and its consequences, has been studied in adults, but research has only recently examined IU in youth. Despite some advances, little is known about the factor structure of measures of IU in youth. The present study used confirmatory factor analysis to examine the structure of IU as measured by the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children (IUSC; Comer et al., 2009) in a sample of youth (N=368) 9-18 years of age (M age =12.47) with and without anxiety disorders and their mothers. Findings demonstrated multiple acceptable factor structures: a correlated factors 2-factor structure and a bifactor model where a general factor underlies all items. While the bifactor model provides better fit and reliability to the data, multivariate analyses indicated that the 2-factor structure distinguishes apprehensive anxiety regarding future events (prospective IU) from present-focused inhibition of behavior due to uncertainty and negative reactions to the presence of uncertainty (inhibitory IU); a total IU score predicted all anxiety domains for self- and parent-reports except for parent-report harm avoidance. Findings are discussed in terms of consistency of IU across adult and youth samples, and how results can inform treatment efforts and etiologic models of IU and anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Disease: H01031 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01031 Orthostatic intolerance (OI); Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) Orthostatic intolerance...rdan J, Jacob G, Black BK, Biaggioni I, Blakely RD, Robertson D ... TITLE ... Orthostatic intolerance

  7. Public and patient research priorities for orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, James; Bashir, Ayat S; Elliott, Chris S; Newton, Julia L

    2014-11-01

    With a rapidly expanding older population and increased survival of older people with chronic disease, we can expect to see increasing numbers of people with orthostatic hypotension (OH). Unfortunately the evidence base for people with OH, with particular relevance to older people, has not kept up and has resulted in a real lack of progress and little good evidence. There are several areas of research that could potentially benefit patients but establishing which ones are priority areas requires public and patient involvement (PPI). This process includes people/patients in the research team to maximise the relevance, success and translation of the research. This brief report describes the early involvement of older people in prioritising the research question, methods to improve adherence during a trial and the preferred methods to disseminate research output. The individuals' priority was to research non-pharmacological treatment strategies and to improve the education of patients about their condition. Education was felt to be the best strategy to promote adherence during a trial, with change in symptoms and quality of life felt to be the most important outcome measures as opposed to blood pressure. This report offers guidance for academics that are undertaking OH-related research and how they can improve its relevance and increase its translation into clinical practice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Orthostatic Hypotension in Middle-Age and Risk of Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Daya, Natalie; Appel, Lawrence J.; Miller, Edgar R.; Windham, Beverly Gwen; Pompeii, Lisa; Griswold, Michael E.; Kucharska-Newton, Anna

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND One-third of older adults fall each year. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) has been hypothesized as an important risk factor for falls, but findings from prior studies have been inconsistent. METHODS We conducted a prospective study of the association between baseline OH (1987–1989) and risk of falls in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Falls were ascertained during follow-up via ICD-9 hospital discharge codes or Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services claims data. OH was defined as a drop in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥20mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥10mm Hg within 2 minutes of moving from the supine to standing position. Changes in SBP or DBP during OH assessments were also examined as continuous variables. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 23 years, there were 2,384 falls among 12,661 participants (mean age 54 years, 55% women, 26% black). OH was associated with risk of falls even after adjustment for demographic characteristics and other risk factors (hazard ratio (HR): 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.54; P = 0.002). Postural change in DBP was more significantly associated with risk of falls (HR 1.09 per −5mm Hg change in DBP; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13; P falls over 2 decades of follow-up. Future studies are needed to examine OH thresholds associated with increased risk of falls. PMID:27638848

  9. Orthostatic responses to nitric oxide synthase inhibition in persons with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecht, Jill M; Radulovic, Miroslav; Lafountaine, Michael F; Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Zhang, Run-Lin; Bauman, William A

    2009-08-01

    To determine the effects of 1.0 mg/kg nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on orthostatic mean arterial pressure (MAP), serum aldosterone, and plasma renin concentrations in persons with chronic tetraplegia compared with nonspinal cord-injured controls. Prospective placebo-controlled intervention study. James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Patients (n=5) with tetraplegia and controls (n=7) participated. The groups were matched for age, height, and weight; the average duration of injury in the tetraplegia group was 22+/-14 years. Subjects with tetraplegia visited the laboratory twice, receiving placebo on day 1 and L-NAME (1.0 mg/kg) on day 2. The agents were infused via an intravenous catheter over 60 minutes with the patient in the supine position. Data were collected during the infusion and then during head-up tilt to 45 degrees for 30 minutes. Control subjects visited the laboratory once for placebo infusion and the head-up tilt maneuver. Orthostatic MAP. Orthostatic MAP was reduced after placebo infusion in subjects with tetraplegia compared with controls (69+/-11 vs 89+/-9 mmHg, respectively; Ptetraplegia group with controls after L-NAME infusion. Orthostatic aldosterone levels were increased after placebo compared with L-NAME infusion in persons with tetraplegia; plasma renin levels did not differ among the groups. These data suggest that nitric oxide synthase inhibition may have clinical potential for treatment of orthostatic hypotension in persons with chronic tetraplegia.

  10. The role of distress intolerance in the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and problematic alcohol use among Latin American MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Katie; White Hughto, Jaclyn M; Biello, Katie B; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Novak, David S; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2017-06-01

    Despite the high prevalence of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) among men who have sex with men (MSM) and its well-documented association with substance use in adulthood, little research has examined the psychological mechanisms underlying this association. The current study utilized a large, multinational sample of MSM in Latin America to examine the role of distress intolerance (i.e., decreased capacity to withstand negative psychological states) in the relationship between childhood sexual abuse history and problematic alcohol use. As part of an online survey conducted among members of the largest social/sexual networking website for MSM in Latin America, participants (n=19,451) completed measures of childhood sexual abuse history, distress intolerance, and problematic alcohol use (CAGE score>=2). Participants who reported a history of childhood sexual abuse indicated higher levels of distress intolerance, which was in turn associated with greater odds of engaging in problematic alcohol use. A mediation analysis further showed that distress intolerance partially accounted for the significant association between childhood sexual abuse history and problematic alcohol use. These findings provide initial evidence for the role of distress intolerance as a process through which early trauma shapes MSM health later in life. These findings also underscore the potential utility of addressing distress intolerance in alcohol use prevention and intervention efforts that target MSM with a history of childhood sexual abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    on pollen and latex cross-reactivity, systemic reactions to contact allergens and coeliac disease point to a prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in the adult European population of approximately 5%. A mild itch in the mouth and lactose intolerance are not included in this estimate which is a qualified......Discussed in this paper is the prevalence of allergy and intolerance to foods in Europe. Prevalence of allergy to food additives is not included. A fully reliable estimate of the prevalence of food allergy/intolerance does not exist. Prevalence changes with age, as does the relative importance...... of the most common food allergens. The cumulative prevalence of allergy and intolerance to cow's milk during the first year of life is approximately 2%. The total prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in children is not as well documented. In 18-month-old infants the Danish estimate is 6.5%. The high...

  12. Prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    Discussed in this paper is the prevalence of allergy and intolerance to foods in Europe. Prevalence of allergy to food additives is not included. A fully reliable estimate of the prevalence of food allergy/intolerance does not exist. Prevalence changes with age, as does the relative importance...... of the most common food allergens. The cumulative prevalence of allergy and intolerance to cow's milk during the first year of life is approximately 2%. The total prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in children is not as well documented. In 18-month-old infants the Danish estimate is 6.5%. The high...... on pollen and latex cross-reactivity, systemic reactions to contact allergens and coeliac disease point to a prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in the adult European population of approximately 5%. A mild itch in the mouth and lactose intolerance are not included in this estimate which is a qualified...

  13. Idiopathic orthostatic hypotension: Recent data (eleven cases) and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninet, J.; Annat, G.; Boisson, D.; Holzhapfel, L.; Vincent, M.; Peyrin, L.; Michel, D.; Schott, B.; Devic, M.; Levrat, R.

    1981-01-01

    Eight cases of Shy-Drager syndrome and three of Bradbury-Eggleston idiopathic orthostatic hypotension were examined. In all cases, examination of circulatory reflexes showed major dysfunction of the sympathetic vasoconstrictor system. Anomalies in the vagal cardiomoderator system were less constant. Normal urinary elimination of catecholamines was recorded daily. Characteristically, no elevation of blood or urine norepinephrine levels were found in orthostatism. Insulin hypoglycemia normally raised urinary adrenalin elimination in three of ten patients. Plasma dopa-beta-hydroxylase activity was normal. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system showed variable activity at basal state but usually rose during orthostatism. On the average, very low homovanillic acid levels were found in cerebrospinal fluid before and after probenecid; hydroxyindolacetic acid was normal. Cerebral autoregulation had deteriorated in two of four cases. Physiopathologically the two clinical types are indistinguishable with or without central neurological signs.

  14. Cardiac responses to exercise distinguish postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianosi, Paolo T; Schroeder, Darrell R; Fischer, Philip R

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that one-third of adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have hyperkinetic circulation. In a subsequent cohort, we compare participants with POTS grouped according to cardiac output (Q˙) versus oxygen uptake (V˙O2) function, whose circulatory response to exercise lay at the lower end of this distribution. We hypothesized that such grouping determines the circulatory response to incremental-protocol, upright, cycle ergometry by whatever blend of flow and resistance adjustments best maintains normal blood pressure. We reviewed data on 209 POTS participants aged 10-19 years (73% female) grouped as follows: Q˙-V˙O2 8 L·min -1 per L·min -1 (N = 32). Heart rate response to exercise was virtually identical in each group. Mean stroke volume (SV) rose normally in the hyperkinetic group (51 ± 38%); less in the normal Q˙ group (22 ± 27%); but was flat in the low Q˙ group (-7 ± 16%). Mean arterial pressure was similar at rest while systemic vascular conductance was flat from rest to exercise in the hypokinetic group, and by comparison rose more steeply in the normal Q˙ (P < 0.001) and in the hyperkinetic (P = 0.02) groups. In conclusion, we identified a variant of POTS with a hypokinetic circulation maintained by a vasoconstricted state. We speculate that they cannot muster preload to augment exercise SV due to profound thoracic hypovolemia, and must resort to vasoconstriction in order to maintain perfusion pressure within working muscle. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  15. Comprehensive, blinded assessment of balance in orthostatic tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Danish; Thompson, Rebecca; Xia, Yiwen; Hellman, Amy; Schmaderer, Lorene; Suing, Katie; McKune, Jennifer; Penke, Cynthia; Iske, Regan; Roeder, Bobbi Jo; Siu, Ka-Chun; Bertoni, John M; Torres-Russotto, Diego

    2018-02-01

    Orthostatic Tremor (OT) is a movement disorder characterized by a sensation of unsteadiness and tremors in the 13-18 Hz range present upon standing. The pathophysiology of OT is not well understood but there is a relationship between the sensation of instability and leg tremors. Despite the sensation of unsteadiness, OT patients do not fall often and balance in OT has not been formally assessed. We present a prospective blinded study comparing balance assessment in patients with OT versus healthy controls. We prospectively enrolled 34 surface Electromyography (EMG)-confirmed primary OT subjects and 21 healthy controls. Participants underwent evaluations of balance by blinded physical therapists (PT) with standardized, validated, commonly used balance scales and tasks. OT subjects were mostly female (30/34, 88%) and controls were majority males (13/20, 65%). The average age of OT subjects was 68.5 years (range 54-87) and for controls was 69.4 (range 32-86). The average duration of OT symptoms was 18 years. OT subjects did significantly worse on all the balance scales and on most balance tasks including Berg Balance Scale, Functional Gait Assessment, Dynamic Gait Index, Unipedal Stance Test, Functional Reach Test and pull test. Gait speed and five times sit to stand were normal in OT. Common validated balance scales are significantly abnormal in primary OT. Despite the objective finding of impaired balance, OT patients do not commonly have falls. The reported sensation of unsteadiness in this patient population seems to be out of proportion to the number of actual falls. Further studies are needed to determine which components of commonly used balance scales are affected by a sensation of unsteadiness and fear of falling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Early Discontinuation of Treatment in Patients with Orthostatic Hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibao, C.; Grijalva, C.G.; Lipsitz, L.A.; Biaggioni, I.; Griffin, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Midodrine and fludrocortisone are considered the first-line pharmacologic treatments for orthostatic hypotension (OH). Although OH is thought to require long-term therapy, it is unknown how long patients remain on treatment (“persistence”). Methods We assembled a retrospective cohort of patients with OH aged ≥50 years enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid (1996–2008), and identified new episodes of midodrine and fludrocortisone use. Follow-up continued from first medication fill through treatment discontinuation (90 days without medication), change in treatment, death, hospitalization, loss of enrollment or study end. We compared persistence on treatment using Cox regression models and fludrocortisone as reference. Covariates included demographics, healthcare utilization measurements and co-morbidities. Results We identified 1,704 OH patients, who initiated 1,767 episodes of fludrocortisone (1103) or midodrine (664) use. The median age was 69 years, 53% were female and 80% were white. During 738 person years of follow-up, episodes of use ended because of treatment discontinuation in 467 (27% fludrocortisone, 25% midodrine); treatment change in 72 (3% fludrocortisone, 6% midodrine) and death in 53 (3% fludrocortisone, 2% midodrine). Overall median persistence on fludrocortisone and midodrine was 254 (IQR: 119–783) and 259 (IQR: 119–807) days, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for overall non-persistence on midodrine compared to fludrocortisone was 1.07 (95% CI: 0.90–1.28). Conclusions Overall duration of OH treatment with first-line medications was short, and similar for fludrocortisone and midodrine. Further research is warranted to determine the causes of this low persistence. PMID:24008021

  17. Orthostatic blood pressure test for risk stratification in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Münch

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD in young adults, mainly ascribed to ventricular tachycardia (VT. Assuming that VT is the major cause of (pre- syncope in HCM patients, its occurrence is essential for SCD risk stratification and primarily preventive ICD-implantation. However, evidence of VT during syncope is often missing. As the differentiation of potential lethal causes for syncope such as VT from more harmless reasons is crucial, HCM patients were screened for orthostatic dysregulation by using a simple orthostatic blood pressure test.Over 15 months (IQR [9;20] 100 HCM patients (55.8±16.2 yrs, 61% male were evaluated for (pre-syncope and VT (24h-ECGs, device-memories within the last five years. Eighty patients underwent an orthostatic blood pressure test. Logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis.In older patients (>40 yrs a positive orthostatic test result increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 63 (95%-CI [8.8; 447.9], p<0.001; 93% sensitivity, 95%-CI [76; 99]; 74% specificity, 95%-CI [58; 86]. No correlation with VT was shown. A prolonged QTc interval also increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 6.6 (95%-CI [2.0; 21.7]; p=0.002.The orthostatic blood pressure test is highly valuable for evaluation of syncope and presyncope especially in older HCM patients, suggesting that orthostatic syncope might be more relevant than previously assumed. Considering the high complication rates due to ICD therapies, this test may provide useful information for the evaluation of syncope in individual risk stratification and may help to prevent unnecessary device implantations, especially in older HCM patients.

  18. Abuse, exclusion and intolerance to being female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bertha Velázquez Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of abuse, exclusion and intolerance to women is a consequence of practices of domination pervasive in contemporary societies. This problem is manifested in the systematic harassment to women's bodies, to her thoughts and personal lifestyles, which constrains her personal dignity and violates her basic human rights. The approach to this analysis is based on the documentary method and is part of an investigation of health and gender issues in the collegiate body Gender and Sustainable Development in the Autonomous University of Mexico State.

  19. A man with small vessel vasculitis presenting with brachial diplegia, multiple cranial mononeuropathies and severe orthostatic hypotension in diabetes mellitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Goodman, Jerry Clay; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2013-10-01

    We report a rare case of fulminant vasculitic mononeuropathy resulting in brachial diplegia, with suspected brainstem and autonomic nervous system involvement in a patient with diabetes mellitus. A 58-year-old Hispanic Caucasian man with diabetes mellitus presented with a 1-year history of progressive bilateral upper extremity weakness, orthostatic intolerance and progressive memory decline. Diagnostic evaluation including laboratory tests for progressive encephalopathies, systemic inflammatory and non-inflammatory neuropathies, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, electrodiagnostic studies, and nerve biopsy were performed. Clinical examination revealed moderate cognitive deficits on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale, bilateral facial weakness and weakness of bilateral shoulder girdle and intrinsic hand muscles. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses revealed elevated protein and an elevated immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, suggesting an immune-mediated process. Further laboratory work up was non-diagnostic. Electrodiagnostic studies demonstrated chronic asymmetric axonal mononeuropathies with ongoing denervation. A superficial radial nerve biopsy showed a chronic vasculitic neuropathy. Glucocorticosteroid treatment, symptomatic pharmacologic and supportive non-pharmacologic therapies resulted in improved clinical outcomes despite challenges with glycemic control. This case report emphasizes the importance of a thorough evaluation of atypical or uncommon neuromuscular presentations in diabetic patients without etiological presumptions. This is necessary in order to promptly establish a diagnosis, initiate appropriate therapies and prevent irreversible nerve injury.

  20. Effects of imipramine of the orthostatic changes in blood pressure, heart rate and plasma catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Johansen, Torben; Arentoft, A

    1983-01-01

    The effect of imipramine on the orthostatic changes in heart rate, blood pressure and plasma catecholamines were examined in six healthy male subjects on two occasions on high sodium balance (Na+ excretion greater than 120 mmol per day) and on low sodium balance (Na+ excretion less than 110 mmol...... per day), respectively. Orthostatic tests were carried out before and 2 h after ingestion of 150 mg imipramine hydrochloride. Imipramine caused a moderate increase in supine systolic blood pressure, and a pronounced increase in the rise in heart rate, when the subjects assumed erect position...

  1. Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does not exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreborg, Sten

    2015-01-01

    The term "intolerance" is not mentioned in the World Allergy Organization (WAO) document on allergy nomenclature. "Intolerance" has been used to describe some non-immunological diseases. However, pediatric gastroenterologists mix allergy and intolerance, e.g. by using the term "cow's milk protein allergy/intolerance (CMPA/I)", lumping together all types of mechanisms for not tolerating cow's milk. The basis for this mix is the fact that double-blind oral food challenges are time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, cow's milk exclusion and reintroduction is proposed to be used in primary care for the diagnosis of CMPA in children with common gastrointestinal (GI) problems such as colic and constipation. This may lead to a widespread use of hypoallergenic formulas in children without proven CMPA. In lay language, intolerance describes "not tolerating". To discuss the reasons why the term "intolerance" should not be used in the area of allergy. Presently, intolerance is not part of the allergy nomenclature. It is used by lay persons to describe "not tolerating". Pediatricians use intolerance to describe non-immunological hypersensitivity such as lactose intolerance which is acceptable. However, using the mixed term CMPA/I describing a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms in children, should be avoided. The WAO Nomenclature does not clearly distinguish between non-IgE-mediated allergy and non-allergic hypersensitivity. The term "intolerance" should not be used within the area of allergy. Intolerance should be better defined and the term restricted to some non-immunological/non-allergic diseases and not mixed with allergy, e.g. by using the term CMPA/I. A revision of the WAO nomenclature is proposed.

  2. Chemical Intolerance in Primary Care Settings: Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David A.; Bell, Iris R.; Palmer, Raymond F.; Miller, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study extends previous community-based studies on the prevalence and clinical characteristics of chemical intolerance in a sample of primary care clinic patients. We evaluated comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders, functional status, and rates of health care use. METHODS A total of 400 patients were recruited from 2 family medicine clinic waiting rooms in San Antonio, Texas. Patients completed the validated Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory (QEESI) to assess chemical intolerance; the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) screen for possible psychiatric disorders; the Dartmouth–Northern New England Primary Care Cooperative Information Project (Dartmouth COOP) charts for functional status; and the Healthcare Utilization Questionnaire. RESULTS Overall, 20.3% of the sample met criteria for chemical intolerance. The chemically intolerant group reported significantly higher rates of comorbid allergies and more often met screening criteria for possible major depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse disorder, as well as somatization disorder. The total number of possible mental disorders was correlated with chemical intolerance scores (P intolerance were significantly more likely to have poorer functional status, with trends toward increased medical service use when compared with non–chemically intolerant patients. After controlling for comorbid psychiatric conditions, the groups differed significantly only regarding limitations of social activities. CONCLUSIONS Chemical intolerance occurs in 1 of 5 primary care patients yet is rarely diagnosed by busy practitioners. Psychiatric comorbidities contribute to functional limitations and increased health care use. Chemical intolerance offers an etiologic explanation. Symptoms may resolve or improve with the avoidance of salient chemical, dietary (including caffeine and alcohol), and drug triggers. Given greater medication

  3. [Intolerance to food additives: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, F; Mangini, F; Berardi, M; Sterpeta Loffredo, M; Chinellato, I; Dellino, A; Cristofori, F; Di Domenico, F; Mastrototaro, M F; Cappiello, A; Centoducati, T; Carella, F; Armenio, L

    2008-12-01

    Contrary to common believing, the prevalence of the intolerance to food additives in the general population is rather low. Nowadays many doubts persist with regard both to the pathogenetic mechanisms and to the clinical and diagnostic aspects in this field. Symptoms due to, or exacerbated from, food additives usually involve non-IgE-mediate mechanisms (pseudo-allergic reactions, PAR) and are usually less severe of those induced by food allergy. The most frequent clinical feature of the intolerance to food additives still remains the urticaria-angioedema syndrome, although these substances are really involved only in a minority of patients. Other possible clinical features include anaphylaxis, atopic eczema, behaviour disturbances, asthma and non-allergic rhinitis. The diagnostic approach consists in diary cards, reporting symptoms and food habits, elimination diet and double blinded placebo-controlled oral challenge with suspected additives. However, such procedure still remains poorly standardized and numerous uncertainties persist with regard to optimal conditions for performing and interpret the challenge results. The therapeutic approach consists in the exclusion of foods and products containing the additive involved, and, in patients not compliant to the diet, in treatment with symptomatic drugs.

  4. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  5. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  6. Glucose intolerance among apparently healthy Hausa-Fulani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glucose intolerance has been recently reclassified by the World Health Organization (WHO) incorporating a new class known as impaired fasting glycaemia. Previous studies in this environment looked as diabetes mellitus only but not the other forms of glucose intolerance. Objectives: To study the prevalence ...

  7. 5-Aminosalicylate intolerance causing exacerbation in pediatric ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka; Arai, Katsuhiro; Tang, Julian; Hosoi, Kenji; Funayama, Rie

    2017-05-01

    5-Aminosalicylate (5-ASA) is widely used as the first-line drug for ulcerative colitis (UC). 5-ASA is mostly a safe and effective drug, but it can bring about exacerbation due to 5-ASA intolerance. 5-ASA intolerance can be confusing and it can mislead physicians into considering unnecessary treatment escalation, including corticosteroid (CS), biologics, or even surgery. In spite of the clinical importance of 5-ASA intolerance, there have been few studies on its incidence, clinical features, and diagnosis. In order to evaluate the incidence, characteristic symptoms, disease course, and laboratory data of children with 5-ASA intolerance, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 80 children with UC. Eleven of 80 children (13.8%) with UC were diagnosed with 5-ASA intolerance. The median time between the initiation of 5-ASA and the onset of 5-ASA intolerance was 10 days (range, 4-20 days) in patients not receiving CS. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) was performed in 10 patients, and was positive in eight. C-reactive protein (CRP) increased significantly when exacerbation of colitis symptoms occurred. The incidence of 5-ASA intolerance was relatively high. Besides the challenge test, elevation of CRP and positive DLST appeared to support the diagnosis of 5-ASA intolerance. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Reduced muscle strength, exercise intolerance and disabling symptoms in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcellis, R.G.; Lenssen, A.F.; de Vries, J.; Drent, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This review focuses on innovations in the field of assessment and treatment of muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in sarcoidosis and the association between these and fatigue, dyspnea and quality of life (QoL). Recent findings: Muscle strength and exercise intolerance are

  9. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children: A Psychometric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Roy, Amy K.; Furr, Jami M.; Gotimer, Kristin; Beidas, Rinad S.; Dugas, Michel J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has contributed to our understanding of excessive worry and adult anxiety disorders, but there is a paucity of research on IU in child samples. This gap is due to the absence of a psychometrically sound measure of IU in youth. The present study adapted parallel child- and parent-report forms of the Intolerance of…

  10. Systematic review: effective management strategies for lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Aasma; Levitt, Michael D; Taylor, Brent C; MacDonald, Roderick; Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Wilt, Timothy J

    2010-06-15

    Lactose intolerance resulting in gastrointestinal symptoms is a common health concern. Diagnosis and management of this condition remain unclear. To assess the maximum tolerable dose of lactose and interventions for reducing symptoms of lactose intolerance among persons with lactose intolerance and malabsorption. Multiple electronic databases, including MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library, for trials published in English from 1967 through November 2009. Randomized, controlled trials of individuals with lactose intolerance or malabsorption. Three investigators independently reviewed articles, extracted data, and assessed study quality. 36 unique randomized studies (26 on lactase- or lactose-hydrolyzed milk supplements, lactose-reduced milk, or tolerable doses of lactose; 7 on probiotics; 2 on incremental lactose administration for colonic adaptation; and 1 on another agent) met inclusion criteria. Moderate-quality evidence indicated that 12 to 15 g of lactose (approximately 1 cup of milk) is well tolerated by most adults. Evidence was insufficient that lactose-reduced solution or milk with a lactose content of 0 to 2 g, compared with greater than 12 g, is effective in reducing symptoms of lactose intolerance. Evidence for probiotics, colonic adaptation, and other agents was also insufficient. Most studies evaluated persons with lactose malabsorption rather than lactose intolerance. Variation in enrollment criteria, outcome reporting, and the composition and dosing of studied agents precluded pooling of results and limited interpretation. Most individuals with presumed lactose intolerance or malabsorption can tolerate 12 to 15 g of lactose. Additional studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of lactose intolerance treatment.

  11. Prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    Discussed in this paper is the prevalence of allergy and intolerance to foods in Europe. Prevalence of allergy to food additives is not included. A fully reliable estimate of the prevalence of food allergy/intolerance does not exist. Prevalence changes with age, as does the relative importance...... of the most common food allergens. The cumulative prevalence of allergy and intolerance to cow's milk during the first year of life is approximately 2%. The total prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in children is not as well documented. In 18-month-old infants the Danish estimate is 6.5%. The high...... prevalence of peanut allergy (0.5%) in British children is not reflected in the results from other European countries. Milk, egg, fish and oranges seem to be the most common causes of allergy and intolerance in European infants and children. Results from epidemiological studies combined with the knowledge...

  12. [Calcium supplementation uncovering lactose intolerance - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifina, Eva; Geissler, Dietmar; Zwettler, Elisabeth; Klaushofer, Klaus; Mikosch, Peter

    2012-03-01

    A 44 yr-old female with osteoporosis had no relevant gastrointestinal symptoms and did not avoid any specific food. However, after prescription of a lactose-rich calcium supplementation, clinical symptoms suspicious for lactose intolerance occurred, which were thereafter confirmed by a lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance may present with only slight or subtle symptoms. Drugs containing lactose may induce or increase gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with lactose intolerance. In case of gastrointestinal symptoms occurring after the initiation of drugs containing lactose, the possibility of lactose intolerance should be considered and tested by lactose tolerance test or genetic testing for the LCT (-13910) polymorphism. Due to the prevalence of about 15-25% lactose intolerance in the Austrian population, lactose free drugs should be prescribed as widely as possible.

  13. Competing Claims: Religious Affiliation and African Americans' Intolerance of Homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledet, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Literature on religion and political intolerance indicates competing expectations about how Black Protestant church affiliation affects African Americans' attitudes about civil liberties. On the one hand, Black Protestant theology emphasizes personal freedom and social justice, factors generally linked to more tolerant attitudes. On the other hand, Black Protestants tend to be conservative on family and social issues, factors often linked to intolerance of gays and lesbians. Data from the General Social Survey are used to examine the influence of religious group identification, as well as other relevant aspects of religiosity, on political intolerance among African Americans. Results indicate that although other aspects of religion (beliefs and behaviors) help explain variation in political intolerance, Black Protestant church affiliation has no relationship with attitudes about the civil liberties of homosexuals. However, additional tests show that Black Protestant church affiliation significantly predicts intolerance of other target groups (atheists and racists).

  14. Use of lower abdominal compression to combat orthostatic hypotension in patients with autonomic dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Adrianus A. J.; Wieling, Wouter; Fujimura, Jiro; Denq, Jong C.; Opfer-Gehrking, Tonette L.; Akarriou, Mohammed; Karemaker, John M.; Low, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension the mechanism and usefulness of abdominal compression to increase standing blood pressure. in three protocols, 23 patients underwent abdominal compression. Protocol 1 evaluated in a 40-60degrees head-up-tilt

  15. Orthostatic hypotension and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly people: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); J. Heeringa (Jan); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the prognostic role of orthostatic hypotension for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in elderly people. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Community based. PARTICIPANTS: Five thousand sixty-four subjects from the Rotterdam study aged 55 and

  16. A definition of normovolaemia and consequences for cardiovascular control during orthostatic and environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, Jasper; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2010-01-01

    not increase further indicating that in the supine resting position the heart operates on the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve which, therefore, may be taken as a functional definition of normovolaemia. Since the capacity of the vascular system surpasses the blood volume, orthostatic and environmental...

  17. Prevalence and Prescribed Treatments of Orthostatic Hypotension in Institutionalized Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommel, A.; Faber, M.J.; Weerkamp, N.J.; Dijk, J.G. van; Bloem, B.R.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common non-motor sign that can be hard to recognize and treat. OH prevalence and treatment in institutionalized PD-patients remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and prescribed

  18. Effect of discontinuation of antihypertensive medication on orthostatic hypotension in older persons with mild cognitive impairment: the DANTE Study Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, Justine E F; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Grond, Jeroen; de Craen, Anton J M; van der Mast, Roos C

    2016-03-01

    the relationship between antihypertensive medication and orthostatic hypotension in older persons remains ambiguous, due to conflicting observational evidence and lack of data of clinical trials. to assess the effect of discontinuation of antihypertensive medication on orthostatic hypotension in older persons with mild cognitive impairment. a total of 162 participants with orthostatic hypotension were selected from the Discontinuation of Antihypertensive Treatment in Elderly people (DANTE) Study. This randomised clinical trial included community-dwelling participants aged ≥75 years, with mild cognitive impairment, using antihypertensive medication and without serious cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomised to discontinuation or continuation of antihypertensive treatment (ratio 1:1). Orthostatic hypotension was defined as a drop of at least 20 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and/or 10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure on standing from a seated position. Outcome was the absence of orthostatic hypotension at 4-month follow-up. Relative risks (RR) were calculated by intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses. at follow-up, according to intention-to-treat analyses, of the 86 persons assigned to discontinuation of antihypertensive medication, 43 (50%) were free from orthostatic hypotension, compared with 29 (38%) of the 76 persons assigned to continuation of medication [RR 1.31 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.87); P = 0.13]. Per-protocol analysis showed that recovery from orthostatic hypotension was significantly higher in persons who completely discontinued all antihypertensive medication (61%) compared with the continuation group (38%) [RR 1.60 (95% CI 1.10-2.31); P = 0.01]. in older persons with mild cognitive impairment and orthostatic hypotension receiving antihypertensive medication, discontinuation of antihypertensive medication may increase the probability of recovery from orthostatic hypotension. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  19. Clinical benefit of midodrine hydrochloride in symptomatic orthostatic hypotension: a phase 4, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, tilt-table study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William; Wan, Hong; Much, David; Robinson, Antoine G; Martin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Midodrine hydrochloride is a short-acting pressor agent that raises blood pressure in the upright position in patients with orthostatic hypotension. The US Food and Drug Administration's Subpart H approval, under which midodrine was initially approved, requires post-marketing studies to confirm midodrine's clinical benefit in this indication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefit of midodrine with regard to symptom response. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover, multicenter study (NCT01518946). Following screening, patients aged ≥18 years with severe symptomatic orthostatic hypotension and on a stable dose of midodrine for at least 3 months were randomized to treatment with either their previous midodrine dose or placebo on day 1 and the respective alternate treatment on day 2. The primary endpoint measured time to syncopal symptoms or near-syncope using a 45-min tilt-table test at 1 h post-dose. Thirty-three patients were screened for inclusion: 19 received at least one dose of midodrine and had at least one post-dose measurement of the primary endpoint. The least-squares mean time to syncopal symptoms or near-syncope after tilt-table initiation (mean ± standard error) was 1626.6 ± 186.8 s for midodrine and 1105.6 ± 186.8 s for placebo (difference, 521.0 s; 95 % confidence interval 124.2-971.7 s; p = 0.0131). There were 15 adverse events in 10 patients; all of these were mild or moderate in severity, with none considered by the investigators to be related to midodrine. Midodrine is a well-tolerated and clinically effective treatment for symptomatic orthostatic hypotension.

  20. Sitting and standing blood pressure measurements are not accurate for the diagnosis of orthostatic hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is associated with troublesome symptoms and increased mortality. It is treatable and deserving of accurate diagnosis. This can be time consuming. The current reference standard for its diagnosis is head-up tilt (HUT) testing with continuous beat-to-beat plethysmography. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of sit-stand testing with semi-automatic sphygmomanometry for the diagnosis of OH. DESIGN: Retrospective test of diagnostic accuracy. METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed using a database maintained by a busy syncope unit. HUT testing was performed using an automated tilt table with Finometer monitoring. A 3 min 70 degrees HUT was performed following 5 min supine. Sitting blood pressure (BP) was measured following 3 min rest. Standing BP was measured within 30 s of assuming the upright posture. The results of sit-stand testing were compared with HUT testing as a reference standard. Both tests happened within 5 min of each other and patients underwent no intervention between tests. RESULTS: From a total of 1452 consecutive HUTs, we identified 730 with pre-test measures of sitting and standing BP. The mean age of this group was 70.57 years (SD = 15.1), 62% were female. The sensitivity of sit-stand testing was calculated as 15.5%, specificity as 89.9%, positive predictive value as 61.7%, negative predictive value as 50.2% and the likelihood ratio as 1.6. The area under the Receiver Operator Curve was 0.564. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that sit-stand testing for OH has very low diagnostic accuracy. We recommend that the more time-consuming reference standard method of diagnosis be used if the condition is suspected.

  1. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattar R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rejane Mattar, Daniel Ferraz de Campos Mazo, Flair José CarrilhoDepartment of Gastroenterology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management.Keywords: hypolactasia, lactase persistence, lactase non-persistence, lactose, LCT gene, MCM6 gene

  2. Towards understanding (religious (intolerance in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand J. Potgieter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, schools and education authorities world wide have been paying increasing attention to issues surrounding diversity and religious (intolerance. The term ‘tolerance’ is, however, clouded by considerable confusion and vagueness. This article seeks to contribute to recent scholarly attempts at understanding (religious tolerance and the term that denotes it. After a brief semantic analysis of the term ‘tolerance’, arguments concerning the onticity of tolerance as phenomenon or entity are discussed. By examining its onticity we explore and explain some of the essential features of tolerance. The article ends with a brief discussion of some of the implications of our examination that we foresee for (religion education.

  3. Blood pressure and heart rate during orthostatic stress and walking with continuous postoperative thoracic epidural bupivacaine/morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Hjortsø, N C; Blemmer, T

    1993-01-01

    lower heart rate (approximately 10 bpm) 48 h after surgery at rest and during orthostatic stress in the epidural group. There was no significant difference between groups in number of patients with a reduction > 20 mmHg (2.7 kPa) in systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress (two in each group...... and during mobilisation was superior compared to systemic morphine and NSAID. There were no significant differences between groups in haemodynamic responses (BP and heart rate) during rest, orthostatic stress and after walking assessed before, 24 and 48 h after operation except for a clinically unimportant...

  4. Preliminary experience with midodrine in kidney/pancreas transplant patients with orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, G C; Somerville, K T; Alloway, R R; Gaber, A O; Stratta, R J

    2000-02-01

    In an effort to ameliorate the problem of orthostatic hypotension in pancreas transplant patients, current medical management consists of maximizing the patient's hydration, altering antihypertensives, increasing sodium intake, initiation of fludrocortisone, compression stockings, and behavioral modifications. Despite these medical interventions, a subset of patients remains symptomatic. Midodrine (ProAmatine), an alpha-adrenergic agonist, was approved for the treatment of symptomatic orthostatic hypotension in the US. This preliminary report attempts to assess the safety and efficacy of midodrine use in kidney/pancreas (KP) or pancreas alone (PA) transplant recipients. A retrospective review was performed of 7 KP and 1 PA recipient experiencing symptomatic postural hypotension after maximizing other medical treatments. Blood pressure, serum creatinine (SrCr), and objective responses to postural hypotension were assessed at routine intervals. Pre-midodrine monitoring revealed a mean orthostatic change in systolic blood pressure from sitting to standing of 43 mmHg (range 20-100 mmHg). Patients received a mean starting midodrine dose of 18 mg/d, which was titrated to a maximum dose of 30 mg/d. Systolic blood pressure monitoring revealed a mean orthostatic change of 27 mmHg (range 0-81 mmHg) after initiation of treatment with midodrine and a mean follow-up of 3.2 months. All study patients reported improvement in symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. SrCr was not affected based upon comparison of pre-treatment and current SrCr values of 1.4 and 1.3 mg/dL, respectively. The most common side effect experienced was supine hypertension. These preliminary results suggest that midodrine is safe and effective in transplant recipients; however, the dosage should be titrated to symptomatic relief or a maximum dose of 30 mg. Careful monitoring for supine hypertension is necessary.

  5. Orthostatic hypotension and cognitive function: cross-sectional results from the ELSA-Brasil study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemoto, Claudia K; Baena, Cristina P; Mill, Jose G; Santos, Itamar S; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela

    2018-03-20

    The association between orthostatic hypotension (OH) and cognitive impairment is controversial, and most studies have investigated older white adults from Western Europe and the United States. Therefore, we investigated the association between OH and cognitive performance in a large and racially diverse sample of adults using cross-sectional data from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). OH was defined when systolic blood pressures (SBP) decreased 20 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased 10 mmHg from supine to standing position. We investigated the association between OH and composite global cognition, memory, verbal fluency (VF), and Trail Making test z-scores, using multiple linear regression models. We also investigated the association of orthostatic hypertension and SBP/DBP changes with cognitive performance, as well as the interaction between OH and compensatory heart rate (HR) after postural change on cognitive performance. We evaluated 12,826 participants (mean age=51.5±9.0 years, 46% male, 53% white). Participants with OH (4% of the sample) had poorer z-scores for VF (β=-0.108, 95% CI=-0.189; -0.025, p=0.01) than participants without OH. Orthostatic hypertension was also associated with worse performance on the VF test (β=-0.080, 95% CI=-0.157; -0.003, p=0.04). SBP orthostatic change had a non-linear association with VF. The interaction terms between OH and compensatory increase in HR for the Trail Making Test z-score (p=0.09) was borderline significant, suggesting that participants who lack compensatory HR after postural change might have poorer performance. OH and orthostatic hypertension were associated with poorer performance on the VF test in participants from Brazil.

  6. Efficacy of atomoxetine versus midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Claudia E; Okamoto, Luis E; Arnold, Amy C; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-12-01

    The clinical presentation of autonomic failure is orthostatic hypotension. Severely affected patients require pharmacological treatment to prevent presyncopal symptoms or frank syncope. We previously reported in a proof of concept study that pediatric doses of the norepinephrine transporter blockade, atomoxetine, increases blood pressure in autonomic failure patients with residual sympathetic activity compared with placebo. Given that the sympathetic nervous system is maximally activated in the upright position, we hypothesized that atomoxetine would be superior to midodrine, a direct vasoconstrictor, in improving upright blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of acute atomoxetine versus midodrine on upright systolic blood pressure and orthostatic symptom scores in 65 patients with severe autonomic failure. There were no differences in seated systolic blood pressure (means difference=0.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence [CI], -7.3 to 7.9; P=0.94). In contrast, atomoxetine produced a greater pressor response in upright systolic blood pressure (means difference=7.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, 0.6 to 15; P=0.03) compared with midodrine. Furthermore, atomoxetine (means difference=0.4; 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.8; P=0.02), but not midodrine (means difference=0.5; 95% CI, -0.1 to 1.0; P=0.08), improved orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms as compared with placebo. The results of our study suggest that atomoxetine could be a superior therapeutic option than midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. High incidence of intolerance to tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    The outlook of inflammatory joint diseases has changed significantly with the advent of TNF blockers. However, these advances come with a trade off-risk of infections, especially tuberculosis. The Irish society of rheumatology has proposed guidelines to investigate and treat latent TB infection (LTBI), which is in accordance with majority of international recommendations. This protocol requires that every patient with LTBI should have chemoprophylaxis. INH and different anti-rheumatic drugs are known to cause hepatic and gastrointestinal complications. We sought to investigate the toxicity of adding prophylactic anti-TB medications to different DMARDs and anti-TNF agents. We prospectively documented the course of all patients who were prescribed chemoprophylaxis for LTBI, from August 2007 to August 2008. Arrangements were made for central re-issuing of prescription of INH or rifampicin, after reviewing monthly liver function tests and following telephone interview seeking presence of adverse events. Out of 132 patients who were commenced on different TNF blockers, only 23 patients (17%) were diagnosed with LTBI and were given prophylaxis as per recommended guidelines. Thirty-nine percent (9 out of 23) of patients discontinued INH because of adverse events. Primary reason for discontinuation in these 9 patients was as follows: 3 patients got marked transaminitis (transaminases >5 times the normal limit), 5 patients had non-resolving gastrointestinal intolerance (mainly nausea), and one patient developed non-resolving rash. We have found a significant number of our patients (39%) who could not continue anti-TB prophylaxis due to either gastrointestinal intolerance or hypertransaminesemia.

  8. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests.

  9. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time.

  10. Food intolerance prevalence in active ulcerative colitis in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinling; Chen, Yuke; Huang, Fangyan; Luo, Qianying; Lv, Hui; Long, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Food intolerance is believed to be a source of frequent medical problems in ulcerative colitis (UC), which closely correlate with patients' dietary pattern. Living in an underdeveloped area of China, residents in southwestern region have diverse dietary habits. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of food intolerance in the UC patients in this area and to discuss some of the possible risk factors leading to the condition. Food antibodies in serum of 80 patients with active UC were determined by standard enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). This study examined the risk factors contributing to high titers of food antibodies and the dietary patterns correlating with food intolerance in these demographics. 83.8% of patients (67/80) were found to be seropositive for food intolerance. Patients of female, aged between 20 to 40 and the one who tended to have a high fat diet were tested to be highly seropositive (pintolerance (p>0.05). Active UC patients in southwestern region of China have showed to be high seropositive in food intolerance, particularly in female and young patients. Dietary patterns with high in fat intake seem to have caused high prevalence of seropositivity in food intolerance. Although rice has been taken as staple food and the spicy food has been popular among citizen in this region, these foods have indicated to no effect on food intolerance in this study.

  11. [The discussion on relationship between adenoids hypertrophy and food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Hua

    2013-06-01

    To explore the relationship between food intolerance and adenoidal hypertrophy and accordingly to provide evidence for intolerance and adenoidal hypertrophy. Adenoidal hypertrophy in patients with a total of 111 cases as the experiment group, 30 cases of children with no history of allergies and allergy-related diseases and adenoidal hypertrophy symptoms as the control group, and compared the result of food intolerance between two groups. 1) Food intolerance detected positive rate of adenoidal hypertrophy group was higher than the control group. 2) The distribution of the two groups of children in the extent of food intolerance is different. 3) Adenoid hypertrophy and how many types of the food, which is high, moderate intolerance, are unrelated. 4) The daily consumption of 14 kinds of food, the top three foods of adenoidal hypertrophy group and control group are eggs, milk, cod. Food intolerance is the possible cause of adenoidal hypertrophy. The detection of specific IgG antibodies of food have positive significance in the prevention of adenoidal hypertrophy.

  12. Effect of Social Intolerance on Psychological Distress in Cardiac Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonash, R.; Arouj, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The patients with diverse cardiac issues and physical illness experience different levels of social intolerance, depression, anxiety and stress. Objectives: To explore the relationship between social intolerance and psychological distress among cardiac patients and investigate the effect of different type of cardiac illness, its duration and physical symptoms on social intolerance and psychological distress. Study design, settings and duration: Cross-sectional study, conducted at Benazir Bhutto Hospital (BBH), Rawalpindi Institute of Cardiology (RIC), Hearts International Hospital (HIH) and Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS) from September-December, 2014. Patients and Methods: The sample size of 180 adult cardiac patients was collected. These patients were selected from the cardiac units of 4 hospitals of Rawalpindi using purposive sampling. Social intolerance was assessed using Frustration Discomfort Scale (FDS), distress was assessed using depression anxiety and stress scale (DASS) Results: Out of 180 patients, 53.3 percent were males and 46.7 percent females. Their ages ranged from 20 to 60 years. Results revealed significant discomfort intolerance, (p < 0.01) entitlement (p < 0.05) and emotional intolerance (p < 0.01) in these patients. There was 45 percent variance in depression, while discomfort intolerance (p < 0.01) and achievement frustration (p< 0.01) showed 35 percent variance in anxiety. Conclusion: Cardiac patients suffer from major emotional distress.(author)

  13. Emotional Intolerance and Core Features of Anorexia Nervosa: A Dynamic Interaction during Inpatient Treatment? Results from a Longitudinal Diary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe-Kunold, Esther; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Stadnitski, Tatjana; Wesche, Daniela; Herzog, Wolfgang; Schwab, Michael; Wild, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of emotion dysregulation with regard to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasingly discussed. It is both assumed that AN symptoms have an impact on difficulties in tolerating aversive emotions and that—conversely—emotion dysregulation influences AN. To date, such conclusions are drawn on the basis of cross-sectional data not allowing for inferences on the temporal dynamics. The current study investigates the longitudinal interaction between emotional intolerance and core AN symptoms over the course of inpatient treatment by comparing patients with high (BMIintolerance and their AN-specific cognitions and behaviours. The temporal dynamics between emotional intolerance and these variables were analysed using a multivariate time series approach. Results The time series of the processes under investigation adequately reflected the individual treatment courses. The majority of significant linear time trends was found for HSS patients. Most importantly, analysis revealed significant temporal interactions between emotional intolerance and AN symptoms in almost 70% of HSS patients. Thereby, up to 37% of variance in eating restraint and up to 23% in weight concern could be attributed to changes in emotional intolerance. Conclusions The findings support the notion that intolerable unpleasant emotions in severely affected AN patients influence their psychopathology. Additionally, time series analysis outlined the inter-individual heterogeneity of psychosomatic treatment courses of AN patients. PMID:27191959

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Barcellos Arruda

    Full Text Available Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs, and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001, while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009. Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies.

  15. Hypothyroidism as a risk factor for statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Craig D; Bair, Tami L; Horne, Benjamin D; McCubrey, Ray O; Lappe, Donald L; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Anderson, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Three-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of medications because of their proven cardiovascular benefits. However, statin intolerance occurs in 5% to 20% of patients. Understanding the basis for statin intolerance remains a key issue in preventive medicine. To evaluate the association of statin intolerance with hypothyroidism in a large integrated health care system, including its sex-specific relationship and subsequent statin rechallenge and prescription history. The Intermountain Healthcare electronic medical record database identified patients (n = 2686; males = 1276, females = 1410) with a documentation of intolerance ("allergy") to at least 1 statin. Age and sex similar controls (n = 8103; males = 3892, females = 4211) were identified among patients prescribed statins without documented intolerance. Patients were evaluated for a history of hypothyroidism, development of hypothyroidism, and statin prescription history up to 5 years of follow-up. A total of 30.2% patients (210 males, 16.5%; 602 females, 42.7%) with statin intolerance had a history of hypothyroidism compared with 21.5% of statin-tolerant patients (475 males, 12.2%; 1266 females, 30.1%), for an odds ratio (OR) in the total population of 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34-1.65; P intolerance and hypothyroidism were less likely to be on a statin than their statin-intolerant counterparts without hypothyroidism (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.75-0.94; P = .002). Hypothyroidism is more prevalent in those with statin intolerance, both in males and, especially, in females. People with hypothyroidism are less likely to have a prescription for a statin at follow-up than those without hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2014 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Errata Corrige. Orthostatic Reactivity in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period. http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.090.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Danche; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta

    2015-09-15

    This study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on orthostatic reactivity in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). An active orthostatic test is used for the evaluation of the orthostatic reactions. The arterial blood pressure and heart rate were defined in the 10 minutes of supine position, before and after 1, 5 and 10 minutes of active upright position. The orthostatic autoregulation is evaluated four times - at the beginning of the study, on the 10th day, on the 1st month and three months after the start of the KT. The classification by Thulesius was used to separate the patients into two groups depending on the type of their orthostatic reactivity. At the beginning of the study of infringements symptomatic type orthostatic reactivity (SOR) was observed in 24 patients and hypertensive type orthostatic reactivity (HOR) was observed in the remaining 32 patients. Once applied SKTM establish improvement of orthostatic autoregulation for the groups SOR and HOR at the 10th day and the 1st month with a level of significance p <0.05. The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as an adapted exercise program at home, has significantly improved the orthostatic reactivity in patients with orthostatic dysregulation due to the ISChP.

  17. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-03-10

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  18. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  19. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berni Canani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  20. Blaming for a better future: future orientation and associated intolerance of personal uncertainty lead to harsher reactions toward innocent victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Michèlle; van den Bos, Kees

    2012-07-01

    People are often encouraged to focus on the future and strive for long-term goals. This noted, the authors argue that this future orientation is associated with intolerance of personal uncertainty, as people usually cannot be certain that their efforts will pay off. To be able to tolerate personal uncertainty, people adhere strongly to the belief in a just world, paradoxically resulting in harsher reactions toward innocent victims. In three experiments, the authors show that a future orientation indeed leads to more negative evaluations of an innocent victim (Study 1), enhances intolerance of personal uncertainty (Study 2), and that experiencing personal uncertainty leads to more negative evaluations of a victim (Study 3). So, while a future orientation enables people to strive for long-term goals, it also leads them to be harsher toward innocent victims. One underlying mechanism causing these reactions is intolerance of personal uncertainty, associated with a future orientation.

  1. Hospital admissions for orthostatic hypotension and syncope in later life: insights from the Malmö Preventive Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Fabrizio; Manzoli, Lamberto; Sutton, Richard; Melander, Olle; Flacco, Maria E; Gallina, Sabina; De Caterina, Raffaele; Fedorowski, Artur

    2017-04-01

    We explored incidence, predictors, and long-term prognosis of hospital admissions attributed to reflex syncope and orthostatic hypotension. We analyzed a cohort of 32 628 individuals (68.2% men; age, 45.6 ± 7.4 years) without prevalent cardiovascular disease over a follow-up period of 26.6 ± 7.5 years. One thousand and fourteen persons (3.1%, 1.2 per 1000 person-years) had at least 1 hospitalization for orthostatic hypotension (n = 462, 1.42%) or syncope (n = 632, 1.94%). Orthostatic hypotension-related hospitalizations were predicted by age [per 1-year increase, hazard ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.16], smoking (hazard ratio 1.35, 95% CI: 1.12-1.64), diabetes (hazard ratio 1.50, 95% CI: 1.00-2.25), baseline orthostatic hypotension (hazard ratio 1.45, 95% CI: 1.05-1.98), in particular, by SBP fall at least 30 mmHg (hazard ratio 3.93, 95% CI: 2.14-7.23), whereas syncope hospitalizations by age (per 1-year increase, hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI: 1.07-1.11), smoking (hazard ratio 1.27, 95% CI: 1.08-1.49), and hypertension (hazard ratio 1.42, 95% CI: 1.20-1.69). Both syncope-hospitalized and orthostatic hypotension hospitalized patients had higher burden of hospital admissions for other reasons such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal disease, or diabetes. During the follow-up, 10 727 (32.9%) died, with 419 deaths preceded by syncope/orthostatic hypotension hospitalization. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, syncope-hospitalization predicted all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.16, 95% CI: 1.02-1.31), whereas orthostatic hypotension hospitalization predicted cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% CI: 1.07-1.19). Hospital admissions due to syncope and orthostatic hypotension occur in ≈3% of older individuals and increase with age and comorbidities. Admissions due to syncope are associated with prevalent hypertension, whereas those due to orthostatic hypotension overlap with diabetes and previously identified

  2. Intolerance of Uncertainty as a Framework for Understanding Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulter, Christina; Freeston, Mark; South, Mikle; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is a problem for many children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). There is a paucity of models of the cognitive processes underlying this. Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) has utility in explaining anxiety in neurotypical populations but has only recently received attention in ASD. We modelled the relationship between anxiety…

  3. The diagnosis and management of cow milk protein intolerance in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Whitney Merrill; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2005-01-01

    Cow milk protein intolerance (CMPI) affects 3% of infants under the age of 12 months and is often misdiagnosed as GERD or colic, risking dangerous exposure to antigens. Most infants out grow CMPI by 12 months; however, those with IgE-mediated reactions usually continue to be intolerant to cow's milk proteins and also develop other allergens including environmental allergens that cause asthmatic symptoms. Clinical manifestations of CMPI include diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting, feeding refusal, eczema, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, allergic rhinitis, coughing, wheezing, failure to thrive, and anaphylaxis. The research and literature showed that CMPI is easily missed in the primary care setting and needs to be considered as a cause of infant distress and clinical symptoms. This article focuses on correctly diagnosing CMPI and managing it in the primary care setting.

  4. Clinical symptoms of food allergy/intolerance in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S

    1997-01-01

    Food allergy is principally a problem in infancy and early childhood. Food allergy/intolerance may cause a broad spectrum of symptoms and signs in children, including generalized reactions, such as anaphylactic shock. Reactions are localized mainly in the gastrointestinal tract, but food allergy/intolerance...... may also cause local symptoms in other organs such as the skin and the respiratory tract. About 50-70% demonstrate cutaneous symptoms, 50-60% gastrointestinal symptoms, and 20-30% respiratory symptoms. Among young children with food allergy/intolerance the majority have two or more symptoms...... with symptoms occurring in two or more organ systems. The symptoms occur primarily within a few minutes after food exposure (immediate reactions), however delayed reactions in the skin, gastrointestinal tract and lungs may also occur. Among children with symptoms suggestive of food allergy/intolerance...

  5. [Food intolerance: reliability and characteristics of different diagnostic alternative tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, B; Esposito, A; Capone, S; Fistetto, G; Iannitti, T

    2011-03-01

    The expression "food intolerance" dates back to the ancient Greece and can be generally defined as a sum of unpleasant symptoms of varying etiology that can onset in some patients after the ingestion of various food products. Adverse reactions to food can be divided into toxic and non-toxic. The last ones are classified as immunologically mediated, called "allergies", and non-immunologically mediated, commonly defined as "intolerances". The gut wall is directly involved in these adverse reactions to some foods, since it plays a key role in food absorption and in the regulation of the immunitary system. In this paper we discuss food intolerances and allergies, evaluating the available diagnostic methods and their scientific reliability and focusing on IgG analysis based immunoenzymatic test which is the most relevant test for intolerance diagnosis.

  6. Predicting intolerance of uncertainty in individuals with eating disorder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sternheim, Lot C; Fisher, Martin; Harrison, Amy; Watling, Rosamond

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is recognized for its contribution to various psychopathologies, in particular anxiety and depression. Studies highlight the relevance of IU for Eating Disorders (EDs) however, potential factors contributing to IU in EDs remain unstudied. METHODS: Three

  7. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werlin Steven L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children.

  8. Renal Fanconi syndrome with ultrastructural defects in lysinuric protein intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, M. A.; Lilien, M.; de Koning, T. J.; Duran, M.; Versteegh, F. G. A.; Goldschmeding, R.; Poll-The, B. T.

    2007-01-01

    Renal Fanconi syndrome developed rapidly in a 3-year-old Moroccan girl with established lysinuric protein intolerance. She was hospitalized because of lowered consciousness, uncoordinated movements and hepatosplenomegaly after a febrile period. Laboratory investigations revealed plasma ammonia 270

  9. Reducing the incidence of allergy and intolerance to cereals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    During recent decades, allergies and certain food intolerances have shown a worldwide gradual increase in prevalence, concomitantly with economic growth, urbanization, and changes in lifestyle and dietary patterns. They are triggered in humans with an unbalanced immune system and intestinal

  10. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-02-23

    To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900-4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40-87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900-3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000-3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300-4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500-4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs intolerance. Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose intolerance, with polycythaemia as a sign of poor hypoxic adaptation, accelerated by lifestyle change and ageing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  11. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  12. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from.......05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease....

  13. Intolerance reaction after application of glucagon during double contrast studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Fruehwald, F.; Schwaighofer, B.; Lindemayr, H.

    1986-01-01

    Whereas intolerance reactions against contrast media are a well-known hazard during radiologic procedures, intolerance reactions to other preparations used in radiology are rare. Glucagon, frequently used to induce gastrointestinal hypotonia, is said to have almost no side-effects. A case of anaphylactic reaction during double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examination is reported. Pseudoallergic reaction to propylparaben, a preservative agent in glucagon, is suspected. IgE-antibodies to glucagon could not be detected by RAST. (orig.) [de

  14. Prevalence of intolerance to food additives among Danish school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G.; Madsen, C.; Saval, P.

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of intolerance to food additives was assessed in a group of unselected school children aged 5-16 years. A study group of 271 children was selected on the basis of the results of a questionnaire on atopic disease answered by 4,274 (86%) school children in the municipality of Viborg...... clinics, the prevalence of intolerance to food additives in school children is estimated to be 1-2%....

  15. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motilit...

  16. [Current prospects for diagnosis and treatment of food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynchuk, A A; Gubskaia, E Iu

    2014-11-01

    In the study we found most frequent symptoms and pathological conditions associated with food intolerance and their changes when using dietary recommendations established on the results of test-FED (FED). We were determined the frequency of responses by type of food intolerance for the most common foods. We have investigated the possibility of the normalization of body weight in patients with high body mass index.

  17. 'Food allergy / intolerance testing' in dermatology : science or hype?

    OpenAIRE

    Mercieca, Liam; Scerri, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are becoming an increasingly recognized clinical problem and patients frequently ask if their health complaints are related to their diet. There has been a recent phenomenon of food allergy or intolerance testing leading to dietary alterations and restrictions. This article gives a brief overview of the latest evidence and current guidelines for proper diagnosis and management. A distinction between food allergies and food intolerance or sensitivity should be made. It focuses o...

  18. Perceived lactose intolerance in adult Canadians: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan I

    2013-08-01

    Although double-blind studies show that lactose-intolerant individuals can consume moderate quantities of milk products without perceptible symptoms, many who perceive that they are lactose intolerant limit or avoid milk products, potentially compromising calcium and vitamin D intakes. Adult Canadians are at risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients, but no data exist on the prevalence, correlates, and potential impact of perceived lactose intolerance among Canadians. To address this, a Web-based survey of a population-representative sample of 2251 Canadians aged ≥19 years was conducted. Overall, 16% self-reported lactose intolerance. This was more common in women (odds ratio (OR), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46-2.33) and in nonwhites (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.24-2.58) and less common in those >50 years of age (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90) and in those completing the survey in French (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Those with self-reported lactose intolerance had lower covariate-adjusted milk product and alternative intakes (mean ± SE; 1.40 ± 0.08 servings·day(-1) vs. 2.33 ± 0.03 servings·day(-1), p lactose intolerance by sex, age, and language preference was unexpected and suggests that some groups may be more vulnerable to the perception that they are lactose intolerant. Regardless of whether lactose intolerance is physiologically based or perceptual, education is required to ensure that calcium intakes are not compromised.

  19. Lysinuric protein intolerance presenting with multiple fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Posey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in SLC7A7, which encodes a component of the dibasic amino acid transporter found in intestinal and renal tubular cells. Patients typically present with vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, failure to thrive, and symptomatic hyperammonemia after protein-rich meals. Long-term complications may include pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, renal disease, and osteoporosis. We present a 5-year-old male who was followed in our skeletal dysplasia clinic for 3 years for multiple fractures, idiopathic osteoporosis, and short stature in the absence of typical features of LPI. Whole exome sequencing performed to determine the etiology of the osteoporosis and speech delay identified a nonsense mutation in SLC7A7. Chromosome microarray analysis identified a deletion involving the second allele of the same gene, and biochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of LPI. Our patient's atypical presentation underscores the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for LPI in patients with unexplained fractures and idiopathic osteoporosis, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of hyperammonemia after protein rich meals or other systemic features of classical LPI. This case further demonstrates the utility of whole exome sequencing in diagnosis of unusual presentations of rare disorders for which early intervention may modify the clinical course.

  20. Milk consumption and lactose intolerance in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Rong; Huang, ChengYu; Du, HuiZhang; Zeng, Guo; Li, Ling; Ye, Sheng

    2011-10-01

    To investigate relations between milk consumption and lactose intolerance (LI) in adults and to explore the effect of milk consumption on lactase activity. Total of 182 subjects aged 20-70 years were recruited and interviewed by questionnaires, and their accumulative cow's milk intake (AMI) was calculated. LI was evaluated by hydrogen breath test (HBT). A negative correlation was found between AMI and severity of observed LI symptom (r=-0.2884; P<0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed a negative correlation between LI and duration and frequency of milk consumption (OR, 0.317 and 0.465, respectively; both P<0.05) and a positive correlation between LI and amount of milk consumed per sitting (OR, 6.337; P<0.05). LI is related to various milk consumption behaviors. Most Chinese adults with LI may tolerate moderate milk consumption <160 mL. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differentiating food allergies from food intolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guandalini, Stefano; Newland, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Adverse reactions to foods are extremely common, and generally they are attributed to allergy. However, clinical manifestations of various degrees of severity related to ingestion of foods can arise as a result of a number of disorders, only some of which can be defined as allergic, implying an immune mechanism. Recent epidemiological data in North America showed that the prevalence of food allergy in children has increased. The most common food allergens in the United States include egg, milk, peanut, tree nuts, wheat, crustacean shellfish, and soy. This review examines the various forms of food intolerances (immunoglobulin E [IgE] and non-IgE mediated), including celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Immune mediated reactions can be either IgE mediated or non-IgE mediated. Among the first group, Immediate GI hypersensitivity and oral allergy syndrome are the best described. Often, but not always, IgE-mediated food allergies are entities such as eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic gastroenteropathy. Non IgE-mediated immune mediated food reactions include celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, two increasingly recognized disorders. Finally, non-immune mediated reactions encompass different categories such as disorders of digestion and absorption, inborn errors of metabolism, as well as pharmacological and toxic reactions.

  2. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  3. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-09-18

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance.

  4. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyong Deng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs. This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance.

  5. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance.

  6. Mechanisms of Orthostatic Tolerance Improvement Following Artificial Gravity Exposure Differ Between Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Ferguson, C. R.; Ribiero, L. C.; Zhang, Q.; Moore, F. B.; Serrador, J.; Smith, J. D.; Knapp, C. F.

    2014-01-01

    We recently determined that a short exposure to artificial gravity (AG) improved the orthostatic tolerance limit (OTL) of cardiovascularly deconditioned subjects. We now seek to determine the mechanisms of that improvement in these hypovolemic men and women. Methods. We determined the orthostatic tolerance limit (OTL) of 9 men and 8 women following a 90 min exposure to AG compared to 90 min of head down bed rest (HDBR). In both cases (21 days apart), subjects were made hypovolemic (low salt diet plus 20 mg intravenous furosemide). Orthostatic tolerance was determined from a combination of head up tilt and increasing lower body negative pressure until presyncope. Mean values and correlations with OTL were determined for heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output and peripheral resistance (Finometer), cerebral artery blood velocity (DWL), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Novametrics) and body segmental impedance (UFI THRIM) were measured during supine baseline, during OTL to presyncope and during supine recovery Results. Orthostatic tolerance of these hypovolemic subjects was significantly greater on the day of AG exposure than on the HDBR day. Regression of OTL on these variables identified significant relationships on the HDBR day that were not evident on the AG day: resting TPR correlated positively while resting cerebral flow correlated negatively with OTL. On both days, women's resting stroke volume correlated positively with orthostatic tolerance. Higher group mean values of stroke volume and cerebral artery flow and lower values of blood pressure, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular resistance both at control and during OTL testing were observed on the AG day. Even though regression of OTL on resting stroke volume was significant only in women, presyncopal stroke volume reached the same level on each day of study for both men and women while the OTL test lasted 30% longer in men and 22% longer in women. Cerebral artery flow appeared to

  7. Some physiological aspects of artificial gravity. [gravitational effects on human orthostatic tolerance and physical fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, D. B.; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of increasing artificial gravity exposure on four aspects of physiological fitness are examined in four young men who, prior to exposure, were deconditioned with bed rest and water immersion. The four aspects of physiological fitness are orthostatic tolerance, exercise tolerance, forearm endurance, and maximum strength. Orthostatic tolerance was sharply reduced by deconditioning and was substantially improved by walking in simulated lunar gravity (1/6 g) for 2.5 hours daily for 7 days or by walking in 1/2 g and 1 g for 1 hour daily for 3 days. Exercise tolerance was also sharply reduced by deconditioning but did not significantly improve with increasing g-exposure. Walking in 1 g for 1 hour daily for 3 days raised exercise tolerance only a little above the low produced by deconditioning. Forearm endurance and maximum strength were relatively unaffected by deconditioning and subsequent g-exposure.

  8. Unexplored relationship of sleep disturbances linked to suicidal ideation and behavior in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat MN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Nabeel Shafqat,1 Muhammad Aadil,2 Maria Shoaib31Department of Medicine, University of Medical Sciences “Serafin Ruiz de Zarate” Villa Clara (UCMVC, Villa Clara, Cuba; 2Department of Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, PakistanWe read with great interest the currently published article written by Pederson and Brook1 entitled “Sleep disturbance linked to suicidal ideation in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome”. Awareness of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS has increased in recent years. However, sleep disturbance has not been thoroughly investigated as a cause of increased suicidal risk in patients with POTS. We would like to applaud the authors on conducting this novel cross-sectional study to understand and highlight the potential relationship between sleep disturbances and increased risk of suicide in patients suffering from POTS.1View the original paper by Pederson and Brook.

  9. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with midodrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, J.; Gilden, J. L.; Hiner, B. C.; Kaufmann, H.; Brown, D. C.; Coghlan, C. H.; Rubin, M.; Fouad-Tarazi, F. M.

    1993-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of midodrine for treatment of patients with orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure. PATIENTS: Ninety-seven patients with orthostatic hypotension were randomized in a 4-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with a 1-week placebo run-in period. Patients ranged in age from 22 to 86 years (mean: 61 years). METHODS: After a 1-week run-in phase, either placebo or midodrine at a dose of 2.5 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg was administered three times a day for 4 weeks. Both the placebo group and the 2.5-mg midodrine group received constant doses throughout the double-blind phase. The patients receiving 5 mg or 10 mg of midodrine were given doses that were increased at weekly intervals by 2.5-mg increments until the designated dose was reached. Efficacy evaluations were based on an improvement at 1-hour postdose in standing systolic blood pressure and in symptoms of orthostatic hypotension (syncope, dizziness/lightheadedness, weakness/fatigue, and low energy level). RESULTS: Midodrine (10 mg) increased standing systolic blood pressure by 22 mm Hg (28%, p hypotension compared to placebo: dizziness/lightheadedness, weakness/fatigue, syncope, low energy level, impaired ability to stand, and feelings of depression. The overall side effects were mainly mild to moderate. One or more side effects were reported by 22% of the placebo group compared with 27% of the midodrine-treated group. Scalp pruritus/tingling, which was reported by 10 of 74 (13.5%) of the midodrine-treated patients, was most frequent. Other reported side effects included supine hypertension (8%) and feelings of urinary urgency (4%). CONCLUSION: We conclude that midodrine is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for moderate-to-severe orthostatic hypotension associated with autonomic failure.

  10. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with midodrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, J.; Gilden, J. L.; Hiner, B. C.; Kaufmann, H.; Brown, D. C.; Coghlan, C. H.; Rubin, M.; Fouad-Tarazi, F. M.

    1993-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of midodrine for treatment of patients with orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure. PATIENTS: Ninety-seven patients with orthostatic hypotension were randomized in a 4-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with a 1-week placebo run-in period. Patients ranged in age from 22 to 86 years (mean: 61 years). METHODS: After a 1-week run-in phase, either placebo or midodrine at a dose of 2.5 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg was administered three times a day for 4 weeks. Both the placebo group and the 2.5-mg midodrine group received constant doses throughout the double-blind phase. The patients receiving 5 mg or 10 mg of midodrine were given doses that were increased at weekly intervals by 2.5-mg increments until the designated dose was reached. Efficacy evaluations were based on an improvement at 1-hour postdose in standing systolic blood pressure and in symptoms of orthostatic hypotension (syncope, dizziness/lightheadedness, weakness/fatigue, and low energy level). RESULTS: Midodrine (10 mg) increased standing systolic blood pressure by 22 mm Hg (28%, p Midodrine improved (p midodrine-treated group. Scalp pruritus/tingling, which was reported by 10 of 74 (13.5%) of the midodrine-treated patients, was most frequent. Other reported side effects included supine hypertension (8%) and feelings of urinary urgency (4%). CONCLUSION: We conclude that midodrine is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for moderate-to-severe orthostatic hypotension associated with autonomic failure.

  11. Decreases in left atrial compliance during early-stage exercise are related to exercise intolerance in asymptomatic significant mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hyang; Jung, Hae Ok; Lee, Jung-Won; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2017-11-01

    Doppler-driven net atrioventricular compliance (C n ), which represents left atrial (LA) compliance, is an important determinant of pulmonary hypertension in mitral stenosis (MS). We hypothesized that decreases in C n during early-stage exercise underlie exercise intolerance in patients with MS. Thirty-three asymptomatic patients with significant MS (valve area 1.24 ± 0.16 cm 2 ) underwent resting and bicycle exercise echocardiography. LA compliance and conventional parameters were assessed at each workload. The patients were classified into two groups based on whether they developed dyspnea during exercise: an exercise-intolerance group (n = 22) and an exercise-tolerance group (n = 11). Moreover, "50 W" was defined as an early exercise stage. Although the groups had similar resting characteristics, there were striking differences in their echocardiographic parameters from the early stages of exercise. The relative C n decrease at 50 W (expressed as a percentage of the resting C n ) was significantly greater in the exercise-intolerance group (70.3 ± 15.4% vs 49.7 ± 9.7%, P intolerance group (P = .0005). Furthermore, differences in the trends in this parameter were observed between the two groups (P intolerance (adjusted OR 1.105, 95% CI 1.030-1.184) after adjustment for other conventional parameters. Decreases in C n during early-stage exercise are an important mechanism underlying exercise intolerance in MS. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory: Validity and Comparison of Scoring Methods to Assess Individuals Screening Positive for Anxiety and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriola, Marco; Mosca, Oriana; Trentini, Cristina; Foschi, Renato; Tambelli, Renata; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty is a fundamental transdiagnostic personality construct hierarchically organized with a core general factor underlying diverse clinical manifestations. The current study evaluated the construct validity of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory, a two-part scale separately assessing a unitary Intolerance of Uncertainty disposition to consider uncertainties to be unacceptable and threatening (Part A) and the consequences of such disposition, regarding experiential avoidance, chronic doubt, overestimation of threat, worrying, control of uncertain situations, and seeking reassurance (Part B). Community members ( N = 1046; Mean age = 36.69 ± 12.31 years; 61% females) completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory with the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Part A demonstrated a robust unidimensional structure and an excellent convergent validity with Part B. A bifactor model was the best fitting model for Part B. Based on these results, we compared the hierarchical factor scores with summated ratings clinical proxy groups reporting anxiety and depression symptoms. Summated rating scores were associated with both depression and anxiety and proportionally increased with the co-occurrence of depressive and anxious symptoms. By contrast, hierarchical scores were useful to detect which facets mostly separated between for depression and anxiety groups. In sum, Part A was a reliable and valid transdiagnostic measure of Intolerance of Uncertainty. The Part B was arguably more useful for assessing clinical manifestations of Intolerance of Uncertainty for specific disorders, provided that hierarchical scores are used. Overall, our study suggest that clinical assessments might need to shift toward hierarchical factor scores.

  13. Emotional Intolerance and Core Features of Anorexia Nervosa: A Dynamic Interaction during Inpatient Treatment? Results from a Longitudinal Diary Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Stroe-Kunold

    Full Text Available The role of emotion dysregulation with regard to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa (AN is increasingly discussed. It is both assumed that AN symptoms have an impact on difficulties in tolerating aversive emotions and that-conversely-emotion dysregulation influences AN. To date, such conclusions are drawn on the basis of cross-sectional data not allowing for inferences on the temporal dynamics. The current study investigates the longitudinal interaction between emotional intolerance and core AN symptoms over the course of inpatient treatment by comparing patients with high (BMI<15 kg/m2 vs. low symptom severity (HSS vs. LSS.The study adopted a longitudinal, process-oriented design with N = 16 analysed electronic diaries. Throughout the course of their inpatient treatment, the patients answered questions daily about emotional intolerance and their AN-specific cognitions and behaviours. The temporal dynamics between emotional intolerance and these variables were analysed using a multivariate time series approach.The time series of the processes under investigation adequately reflected the individual treatment courses. The majority of significant linear time trends was found for HSS patients. Most importantly, analysis revealed significant temporal interactions between emotional intolerance and AN symptoms in almost 70% of HSS patients. Thereby, up to 37% of variance in eating restraint and up to 23% in weight concern could be attributed to changes in emotional intolerance.The findings support the notion that intolerable unpleasant emotions in severely affected AN patients influence their psychopathology. Additionally, time series analysis outlined the inter-individual heterogeneity of psychosomatic treatment courses of AN patients.

  14. High fat diet-induced glucose intolerance impairs myocardial function, but not myocardial perfusion during hyperaemia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Brom Charissa E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose intolerance is a major health problem and is associated with increased risk of progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. However, whether glucose intolerance is related to impaired myocardial perfusion is not known. The purpose of the present study was to study the effect of diet-induced glucose intolerance on myocardial function and perfusion during baseline and pharmacological induced hyperaemia. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly exposed to a high fat diet (HFD or control diet (CD (n = 8 per group. After 4 weeks, rats underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Subsequently, rats underwent (contrast echocardiography to determine myocardial function and perfusion during baseline and dipyridamole-induced hyperaemia (20 mg/kg for 10 min. Results Four weeks of HFD feeding resulted in glucose intolerance compared to CD-feeding. Contractile function as represented by fractional shortening was not altered in HFD-fed rats compared to CD-fed rats under baseline conditions. However, dipyridamole increased fractional shortening in CD-fed rats, but not in HFD-fed rats. Basal myocardial perfusion, as measured by estimate of perfusion, was similar in CD- and HFD-fed rats, whereas dipyridamole increased estimate of perfusion in CD-fed rats, but not in HFD-fed rats. However, flow reserve was not different between CD- and HFD-fed rats. Conclusions Diet-induced glucose intolerance is associated with impaired myocardial function during conditions of hyperaemia, but myocardial perfusion is maintained. These findings may result in new insights into the effect of glucose intolerance on myocardial function and perfusion during hyperaemia.

  15. Tolerance of food intolerance: a socio-cultural study of parents who have investigated food intolerance with their families

    OpenAIRE

    Golemac, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on parent perceptions about food, behaviour and the learning of their young children in a sociocultural context. It aims to provide further information to educators, parents, teachers and care providers of children, particularly in the pre-school years, about families who have investigated food intolerance and its possible role in early childhood learning. The four participants of this study are members of the Food Intolerance Network (FIN), an online discussion forum f...

  16. Do subjects with vasovagal syncope have subtle haemodynamic alterations during orthostatic stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucà, Giuseppe; Dinelli, Maurizio; Gianfranchi, Lorella; Bressan, Sabrina; Lamborghini, Catia; Alboni, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    There are conflicting reports on the presence of subtle haemodynamic alterations during orthostatic stress in subjects with vasovagal syncope (VVS). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether young/middle-aged subjects with VVS show abnormal responses to orthostatic stress. Four groups of subjects underwent tilt testing (TT) during the passive phase and, if negative, after nitroglycerin administration: Group I, 20 subjects with a history of syncope and positive passive TT; Group II, 23 subjects with a history of syncope and TT positive after nitroglycerin; Group III, 23 subjects with a history of syncope and negative TT; and Group IV, 20 normal control subjects. Heart rate, systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were computed from pressure pulsations (Modelflow). The demographic data and the values of the haemodynamic variables in the supine position did not differ significantly among the four groups. The per cent changes in these variables did not differ significantly among the four groups after 2 and 5 min of TT and among Groups II, III, and IV, 2 min after nitroglycerin administration. Young/middle-aged subjects with VVS have a normal measured haemodynamic response to orthostatic stress; therefore, the vasovagal reflex is not secondary to an impairment of the primary vasoconstrictive mechanism.

  17. Effects of Body Mass Index on Parasympathetic Nervous System Reactivity and Recovery Following Orthostatic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D P; Joseph, N; Sones, E; Chetluru, S; Hillecke, T K; Thayer, J F; Koenig, J

    2017-01-01

    Vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV), defined as the beat-to-beat fluctuations in a heart series mediated by the vagus nerve, serves as a non-invasive index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity. Lower resting state vmHRV is associated with greater body mass index (BMI), providing a psychophysiological pathway linking obesity with health and disease. However little research has been conducted to examine how BMI may influence PNS reactivity to orthostatic stress. The present study sought to explore this in a sample of 59 individuals (44 females, mean age = 24.37 years, age range 19-65 years). VmHRV was measured throughout the 5-minute baseline (sitting), orthostatic (standing), and recovery (sitting) conditions. Individuals were stratified into low (BMI 25) BMI groups. Results indicate that the high BMI group had a greater decrease in vmHRV from baseline to standing in comparison to the moderate BMI group. Furthermore, the low BMI group showed lower vmHRV during recovery compared to baseline, suggesting that these individuals did not fully recover from the standing position. Taken together, these results extend previous literature showing that those with low and high BMI can show different yet maladaptive patterns of vmHRV in response to orthostatic stress.

  18. Effects of volume loading and pressor agents in idiopathic orthostatic tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Shannon, J. R.; Black, B.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic orthostatic tachycardia (IOT) is characterized by an increase in heart rate (HR) with standing of > or = 30 bpm that is associated with elevated catecholamine levels and orthostatic symptoms. A dynamic orthostatic hypovolemia and alpha1-adrenoreceptor hypersensitivity have been demonstrated in IOT patients. There is evidence of an autonomic neuropathy affecting the lower-extremity blood vessels. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied the effects of placebo, the alpha1-adrenoreceptor agonist midodrine (5 to 10 mg), the alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine (0.1 mg), and I.V. saline (1 L) in 13 patients with IOT. Supine and upright blood pressure (BP) and HR were measured before and at 1 and 2 hours after intervention. Midodrine decreased both supine and upright HR (all HR values are given as bpm) at 2 hours (from 78+/-2 supine to 108+/-5 upright before treatment and from 69+/-2 supine to 95+/-5 upright after treatment, Pdysautonomia and indicates that the use of alpha1-agonists to pharmacologically replace lower-extremity postganglionic sympathetics is an appropriate overall goal of therapy. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that the tachycardia and elevated catecholamine levels associated with IOT are principally due to hypovolemia and loss of adequate lower-extremity vascular tone.

  19. Perception of lactose intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Raffaella; Casellas, Francesc; Mariné-Barjoan, Eugènia; Vivinus-Nébot, Mylène; Schneider, Stéphane M; Hébuterne, Xavier; Piche, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    The importance of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not well defined and these patients often complain of lactose intolerance. To objectively measure lactose malabsorption, a hydrogen breath test (HBT) can be performed, but a discrepancy emerges between the results of the HBT and the symptomatic response during the HBT. To determine in a group of IBS patients whether self-perceived lactose intolerance and the symptomatic response to lactose HBT were conditioned by other factors besides the presence of lactose malabsorption. Oral challenge to lactose (50 g) was tested in 51 IBS patients to assess HBT malabsorption and the symptomatic response to lactose intolerance was scored on a validated questionnaire. Allergological screening for common inhalants and food allergens (including cow's milk) was performed. The presence of psychological factors (e.g. anxiety, depression, fatigue) was evaluated using validated questionnaires. A total of 21 out of 51 patients (41.1%) were self-perceived to be lactose intolerant, 24/51 (47%) had a positive HBT, and 14/51 (27.4%) presented with symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT. The serological screening for inhalant and food allergens was positive in 6/21 (28.6%) and 4/21 (19%) of patients who self-perceived lactose intolerance and in 5/14 (37.5%) and 3/14 (21.4%) in intolerant patients symptomatic during HBT. Only 1/51 (1.9%) presented evidence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cow's milk. Patients who experienced symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT presented more severe IBS symptoms [326 (296-398) vs. 215 (126-295) P=0.05] and a higher score of anxiety, depression, and fatigue. Factors influencing the symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT resulted in an increase in hydrogen produced and in the severity of IBS. In a cohort of 51 IBS patients, the symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT were influenced by the capacity to absorb lactose and the severity of IBS. Other factors, such as

  20. Modern approaches to the treatment of intestinal colic in children with food intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marushko RV

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the effectiveness and safety of simethicone and phytocomponents («Espicol Baby» for the treatment of intestinal colic in infants with food intolerance. Patients and methods. A total of 70 children of the first year of life were under observation. Inclusion criteria for the examination were established diagnosis of food intolerances and the presence of abdominal pain syndrome (intestinal colic. The main group consisted of 45 children who had received in addition to the complex treatment Espicol Baby and the control group — 25 children who had received only non-pharmacological treatment. Results. The high efficiency of «Espicol Baby» preparation (over 90% in the treatment of intestinal colic is found. Most children had pronounced clinical effect during the application of a preparation in a dose of 1.0 ml of the suspension (40 mg simethicone at each baby feeding. The absence of side effects or allergic reactions during the use of preparation certify about its good tolerability and high safety profile. Conclusions. In the pathogenesis of intestinal colic in infants with food intolerances the important role plays flatulence and motility disorders of the digestive tract that is pathogenetically justified the inclusion of preparations with in carminative action (simethicone to the therapeutic complex.

  1. Gut microbial degradation of organophosphate insecticides-induces glucose intolerance via gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Ganesan; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Swaminathan, Krishnan; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Dhivakar, Mani; Parthasarathy, Ayothi; Babu, D D Venkatesh; Thumburaj, Leishman John; Freddy, Allen J; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Puhari, Shanavas Syed Mohamed; Rekha, Balakrishnan; Christy, Yacob Jenifer; Anusha, Sivakumar; Divya, Ganesan; Suganya, Kannan; Meganathan, Boominathan; Kalyanaraman, Narayanan; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Kamaraj, Raju; Karthik, Maruthan; Jeyakumar, Balakrishnan; Abhishek, Albert; Paul, Eldho; Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajmohan, Rajamani Koushick; Velayutham, Kumaravel; Lyon, Alexander R; Ramasamy, Subbiah

    2017-01-24

    Organophosphates are the most frequently and largely applied insecticide in the world due to their biodegradable nature. Gut microbes were shown to degrade organophosphates and cause intestinal dysfunction. The diabetogenic nature of organophosphates was recently reported but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. We aimed to understand the role of gut microbiota in organophosphate-induced hyperglycemia and to unravel the molecular mechanism behind this process. Here we demonstrate a high prevalence of diabetes among people directly exposed to organophosphates in rural India (n = 3080). Correlation and linear regression analysis reveal a strong association between plasma organophosphate residues and HbA1c but no association with acetylcholine esterase was noticed. Chronic treatment of mice with organophosphate for 180 days confirms the induction of glucose intolerance with no significant change in acetylcholine esterase. Further fecal transplantation and culture transplantation experiments confirm the involvement of gut microbiota in organophosphate-induced glucose intolerance. Intestinal metatranscriptomic and host metabolomic analyses reveal that gut microbial organophosphate degradation produces short chain fatty acids like acetic acid, which induces gluconeogenesis and thereby accounts for glucose intolerance. Plasma organophosphate residues are positively correlated with fecal esterase activity and acetate level of human diabetes. Collectively, our results implicate gluconeogenesis as the key mechanism behind organophosphate-induced hyperglycemia, mediated by the organophosphate-degrading potential of gut microbiota. This study reveals the gut microbiome-mediated diabetogenic nature of organophosphates and hence that the usage of these insecticides should be reconsidered.

  2. Effect of Raw Milk on Lactose Intolerance: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummah, Sarah; Oelrich, Beibei; Hope, Jessica; Vu, Quyen; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study aimed to determine whether raw milk reduces lactose malabsorption and/or lactose intolerance symptoms relative to pasteurized milk. METHODS We performed a crossover trial involving 16 adults with self-reported lactose intolerance and lactose malabsorption confirmed by hydrogen (H2) breath testing. Participants underwent 3, 8-day milk phases (raw vs 2 controls: pasteurized, soy) in randomized order separated by 1-week washout periods. On days 1 and 8 of each phase, milk consumption was 473 mL (16 oz); on days 2 to 7, milk dosage increased daily by 118 mL (4 oz), beginning with 118 mL (4 oz) on day 2 and reaching 710 mL (24 oz) on day 7. Outcomes were area under the breath H2 curve (AUC ∆H2) and self-reported symptom severity (visual analog scales: flatulence/gas, audible bowel sounds, abdominal cramping, diarrhea). RESULTS AUC ∆H2 (mean ± standard error of the mean) was higher for raw vs pasteurized on day 1 (113 ± 21 vs 71 ± 12 ppm·min·10−2, respectively, P = .01) but not day 8 (72 ± 14 vs 74 ± 15 ppm·min·10−2, respectively, P = .9). Symptom severities were not different for raw vs pasteurized on day 7 with the highest dosage (P >.7). AUC ∆H2 and symptom severities were higher for both dairy milks compared with soy milk. CONCLUSIONS Raw milk failed to reduce lactose malabsorption or lactose intolerance symptoms compared with pasteurized milk among adults positive for lactose malabsorption. These results do not support widespread anecdotal claims that raw milk reduces the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24615309

  3. Effect of raw milk on lactose intolerance: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummah, Sarah; Oelrich, Beibei; Hope, Jessica; Vu, Quyen; Gardner, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to determine whether raw milk reduces lactose malabsorption and/or lactose intolerance symptoms relative to pasteurized milk. We performed a crossover trial involving 16 adults with self-reported lactose intolerance and lactose malabsorption confirmed by hydrogen (H2) breath testing. Participants underwent 3, 8-day milk phases (raw vs 2 controls: pasteurized, soy) in randomized order separated by 1-week washout periods. On days 1 and 8 of each phase, milk consumption was 473 mL (16 oz); on days 2 to 7, milk dosage increased daily by 118 mL (4 oz), beginning with 118 mL (4 oz) on day 2 and reaching 710 mL (24 oz) on day 7. Outcomes were area under the breath H2 curve (AUC H2) and self-reported symptom severity (visual analog scales: flatulence/gas, audible bowel sounds, abdominal cramping, diarrhea). AUC H2 (mean ± standard error of the mean) was higher for raw vs pasteurized on day 1 (113 ± 21 vs 71 ± 12 ppm·min·10(-2), respectively, P = .01) but not day 8 (72 ± 14 vs 74 ± 15 ppm·min·10(-2), respectively, P = .9). Symptom severities were not different for raw vs pasteurized on day 7 with the highest dosage (P >.7). AUC H2 and symptom severities were higher for both dairy milks compared with soy milk. Raw milk failed to reduce lactose malabsorption or lactose intolerance symptoms compared with pasteurized milk among adults positive for lactose malabsorption. These results do not support widespread anecdotal claims that raw milk reduces the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  4. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term oral exposure to bisphenol A induces glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Min Kyong; Jeong, In-Kyong; Jung Oh, Tae; Ahn, Hwa Young; Kim, Hwan Hee; Park, Young Joo; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo

    2015-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used endocrine disruptor. Recent epidemiologic results have suggested an association between exposure to BPA and cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. We investigated the in vivo effects of long-term oral exposure to BPA on insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. In the present study, 4- to 6-week-old male mice on a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with 50 μg/kg body weight per day of BPA orally for 12 weeks. Long-term oral exposure to BPA along with an HFD for 12 weeks induced glucose intolerance in growing male mice. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that the mice that received an HFD and BPA exhibited a significantly larger area under the curve than did those that received an HFD only (119.9±16.8 vs. 97.9±18.2 mM/min, P=0.027). Body weight, percentage of white adipose tissue, and percentage of body fat did not differ between the two groups of mice. However, treatment with BPA reduced Akt phosphorylation at position Thr308 and GSK3β phosphorylation at position Ser9 in skeletal muscle. BPA tended to decrease serum adiponectin levels and to increase serum interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α, although these findings were not statistically significant. Treatment with BPA did not induce any detrimental changes in the islet area or morphology or the insulin content of β cells. In conclusion, long-term oral exposure to BPA induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in growing mice. Decreased Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle by way of altered serum adipocytokine levels might be one mechanism by which BPA induces glucose intolerance. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Statin intolerance in a referral lipid clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole G; Kelley, Carly E; Siddiqui, Mohammad A; Ahmad, Umar; Lokhnygina, Yuliya V; Guyton, John R

    2016-01-01

    Statins effectively prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, but rates of statin discontinuation after adverse events are high. Describe the range and relative frequencies of adverse events potentially attributable to statins in lipid referral practice and assess statin rechallenge outcomes. Retrospective cohort study of 642 patients with statin-associated adverse events evaluated in a referral lipid clinic between January 1, 2004 and January 27, 2011. Patients experiencing adverse events by organ system included 92% with musculoskeletal, 8% central nervous system, 10% liver, 8% gastrointestinal, 5% peripheral nervous system, 5% skin, and 3% other events. Overlap of organ system involvement occurred in 22.5%. At least 1 follow-up visit was made by 557 patients, among whom overall median follow-up was 25 months. Among patients treated with a statin in the clinic, 71% remained on a statin at the last follow-up visit. Patients with hepatic transaminase increases by history were numerically more likely than the overall group to resume or remain on statin treatment, whereas those reporting central nervous system or gastrointestinal symptoms trended lower for statin maintenance. Among patients who experienced an adverse event after statin rechallenge, the majority (64%) were being treated with intermittent, nondaily dosing at the time of the adverse event. Although musculoskeletal symptoms are reported by 90% of patients with statin intolerance, symptoms involving other organ systems may be more frequent than previously supposed. Understanding the range of symptoms, time course, and impact on daily activities informs counseling in patient-centered practice, but assessment of causation by statins remains challenging. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Spacelab life sciences flight experiments. An integrated approach to the study of cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, F. Andrew

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight produces rapid cardiovascular changes which are adaptive and appropriate in that setting, but are associated with significant deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension on return to Earth's gravity. The rapidity with which these space flight induced changes appear and disappear provides an ideal model for studying the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension, regardless of etiology. Since significant deconditioning is seen after flights of very short duration, muscle atrophy due to inactivity plays, at most, a small role. These changes in circulatory control associated with cephalad fluid shifts, rather than inactivity per se, are probably more important factors. In order to test this hypothesis in a systematic way, a multidisciplinary approach which defines and integrates inputs and responses from a wide variety of circulatory sub-systems is required. The cardiovascular experiments selected for Spacelab Life Sciences flights 1 and 2 provide such an approach. Both human and animal models will be utilized. Pre- and post-flight characterization of the payload crew includes determination of maximal exercise capacity (bicycle ergometry), orthostatic tolerance (lower body negative pressure), alpha and beta adrenergic sensitivity (isoproterenol and phenylephrine infusions), baroreflex sensitivity (ECG-gated, stepwise changes in carotid artery transmural pressure with a pneumatic neck collar), and responses to a 24 h period of 5 deg head-down tilt. Measurements of cardiac output (CO 2 and C 2H 2 rebreathing), cardiac chamber dimensions (phased-array 2-dimensional echocardiography), direct central venous pressure, leg volume (Thornton sock), limb blood flow and venous compliance (occlusion plethysmography), blood and plasma volumes, renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rates, and various hormonal levels including catecholamines and atrial natriuretic factor will also be

  8. Spacelab Life Sciences flight experiments: an integrated approach to the study of cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight produces rapid cardiovascular changes which are adaptive and appropriate in that setting, but are associated with significant deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension on return to Earth's gravity. The rapidity with which these space flight induced changes appear and disappear provides an ideal model for studying the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension, regardless of etiology. Since significant deconditioning is seen after flights of very short duration, muscle atrophy due to inactivity plays, at most, a small role. These changes in circulatory control associated with cephalad fluid shifts, rather than inactivity per se, are probably more important factors. In order to test this hypothesis in a systematic way, a multidisciplinary approach which defines and integrates inputs and responses from a wide variety of circulatory sub-systems is required. The cardiovascular experiments selected for Spacelab Life Sciences flights 1 and 2 provide such an approach. Both human and animal models will be utilized. Pre- and post-flight characterization of the payload crew includes determination of maximal exercise capacity (bicycle ergometry), orthostatic tolerance (lower body negative pressure), alpha and beta adrenergic sensitivity (isoproterenol and phenylephrine infusions), baroreflex sensitivity (ECG-gated, stepwise changes in carotid artery transmural pressure with a pneumatic neck collar), and responses to a 24 h period of 5 deg head-down tilt. Measurements of cardiac output (CO2 and C2H2 rebreathing), cardiac chamber dimensions (phased-array 2-dimensional echocardiography), direct central venous pressure, leg volume (Thornton sock), limb blood flow and venous compliance (occlusion plethysmography), blood and plasma volumes, renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rates, and various hormonal levels including catecholamines and atrial natriuretic factor will also be obtained

  9. Serum diamine oxidase activity in patients with histamine intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzotti, G; Breda, D; Di Gioacchino, M; Burastero, S E

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance to various foods, excluding bona fide coeliac disease and lactose intolerance, represents a growing cause of patient visits to allergy clinics.Histamine intolerance is a long-known, multifaceted clinical condition triggered by histamine-rich foods and alcohol and/or by drugs that liberate histamine or block diamine oxidase (DAO), the main enzyme involved in the metabolism of ingested histamine. Histamine limitation diets impose complex, non-standardized restrictions that may severely impact the quality of life of patients. We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients who visited allergy outpatient facilities in northern Italy with a negative diagnosis for IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity, coeliac disease, conditions related to gastric hypersecretion, and systemic nickel hypersensitivity, and who previously underwent a histamine limitation diet with benefits for their main symptoms. Serum diamine oxidase levels and the clinical response to diamine oxidase supplementation were investigated. We found that 10 out of 14 patients had serum DAO activityintolerance. Moreover, 13 out of 14 patients subjectively reported a benefit in at least one of the disturbances related to food intolerances following diamine oxidase supplementation. The mean value (±SD) of diamine oxidase activity in the cohort of patients with histamine intolerance symptoms was 7.04±6.90 U/mL compared to 39.50±18.16 U/mL in 34 healthy controls (P=0.0031). In patients with symptoms triggered by histamine-rich food, measuring the serum diamine oxidase activity can help identify subjects who can benefit from a histamine limitation diet and/or diamine oxidase supplementation.Properly designed, controlled studies investigating histamine intolerance that include histamine provocation are indispensable for providing insights into the area of food intolerances, which are currently primarily managed with non-scientific approaches in Italy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. SLC9B1 methylation predicts fetal intolerance of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Anna K; Conneely, Karen N; Kilaru, Varun; Cobb, Dawayland; Payne, Jennifer L; Meilman, Samantha; Corwin, Elizabeth J; Kaminsky, Zachary A; Dunlop, Anne L; Smith, Alicia K

    2018-01-01

    Fetal intolerance of labor is a common indication for delivery by Caesarean section. Diagnosis is based on the presence of category III fetal heart rate tracing, which is an abnormal heart tracing associated with increased likelihood of fetal hypoxia and metabolic acidemia. This study analyzed data from 177 unique women who, during their prenatal visits (7-15 weeks and/or 24-32 weeks) to Atlanta area prenatal care clinics, consented to provide blood samples for DNA methylation (HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) and gene expression (Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip) analyses. We focused on 57 women aged 18-36 (mean 25.4), who had DNA methylation data available from their second prenatal visit. DNA methylation patterns at CpG sites across the genome were interrogated for associations with fetal intolerance of labor. Four CpG sites (P value intolerance of labor. DNA methylation and gene expression were negatively associated when examined longitudinally during pregnancy using a linear mixed-effects model. Positive predictive values of methylation of these four sites ranged from 0.80 to 0.89, while negative predictive values ranged from 0.91 to 0.92. The four CpG sites were also associated with fetal intolerance of labor in an independent cohort (the Johns Hopkins Prospective PPD cohort). Therefore, fetal intolerance of labor could be accurately predicted from maternal blood samples obtained between 24-32 weeks gestation. Fetal intolerance of labor may be accurately predicted from maternal blood samples obtained between 24-32 weeks gestation by assessing DNA methylation patterns of SLC9B1. The identification of pregnant women at elevated risk for fetal intolerance of labor may allow for the development of targeted treatments or management plans.

  11. Extra digestive manifestations of irritable bowel syndrome: intolerance to drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitras, Pierre; Gougeon, Alexandre; Binn, Muriel; Bouin, Mickael

    2008-08-01

    Patients with IBS frequently complain of medication side effects. The goals of this study were to assess the prevalence of drug intolerance as an extra GI manifestation in patients with IBS and to verify the association between drug intolerance and psychological comorbidity. Female patients followed in a tertiary care center completed questionnaires assessing the presence of drug intolerance as well as somatic and psychological extra GI conditions. IBS patients (Rome II criteria; n = 71) were compared to inflammatory bowel disease patients (IBD; n = 96) or to healthy controls (HC; n = 67). The relationship to psychological comorbidity was verified in two different paradigms: (1) by looking at the statistical correlation between drug intolerance and the psychological extra GI symptoms in our IBS patients, and (2) by comparing in a meta-analysis the side effects to placebo (the nocebo effect is presumably increased due to hypervigilance or amplification in psychological disorders) in IBS patients or in patients with comparable medical conditions included in various drug trials approved by Health Canada. Our results show that prevalence of drug intolerance was significantly more elevated in IBS (41% patients) than in HC (7%) or in IBD (27%); somatic and psychological extra GI symptoms were also markedly increased in IBS. In addition, drug intolerance in our IBS patients was significantly associated with somatic comorbidities such as fatigue or multiple symptoms (P mood instability, or sleep disorder. A meta-analysis revealed that the nocebo effect was not different in patients with IBS than in control patients. In conclusion, drug intolerance is a frequent extra GI manifestation of IBS that is not associated with psychological comorbidity; thus, a somatic origin must be explored.

  12. [Determination of lactose intolerance frequency in children with food allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutyra, Tomasz; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2008-10-01

    Lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance symptoms are the most common alimentary tract disorders in children. Lactose intolerance is a result of lactase deficiency or lack of lactase and lactose malabsorption. Hypersensitivity in food allergy is connected with the presence of specific IgE (specific antibodies against some allergens) or lymphocytes. Lactose intolerance and food allergy may coexist in the same patient. The aim of this study was determination of lactose intolerance frequency in children with food allergy who were below and above 5 years of age. The number of 87 children with food allergy aged from 0.7 to 18 years were included in the study (48 boys and 39 girls). 51 patients above 5 years of age and 36 patients below 5 years of age were studied. Lactose intolerance symptoms, hydrogen breath test, activity of lactase and villous atrophy were investigated. Decreased absorption of lactose in hydrogen breath test was observed in 28% of children above 5 years of age and in 5% in younger children. Positive result of biological trial in hydrogen breath test was observed in 10% of patients who were below 5 years of age and in 26% patients above 5 years. There was no statistically significant difference in lactose intolerance frequency and in decreased activity of lactase in intestinal mucosa between these two groups. Frequent partial villous atrophy was observed in younger patients (41,38%) than in children above 5 years of age (17.86%). Lactose intolerance was observed in 10% patients who were below 5 years of age and in 26% patients above 5 years of age with food allergy. There was no statistically significant difference between these two groups.

  13. Environmental Intolerance, Symptoms and Disability Among Fertile-Aged Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuokko, Aki; Karvala, Kirsi; Lampi, Jussi; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Pasanen, Markku; Voutilainen, Raimo; Pekkanen, Juha; Sainio, Markku

    2018-02-08

    The purpose was to study the prevalence of environmental intolerance (EI) and its different manifestations, including behavioral changes and disability. Fertile-aged women ( n = 680) of the Kuopio Birth Cohort Study were asked about annoyance to 12 environmental factors, symptoms and behavioral changes. We asked how much the intolerance had disrupted their work, household responsibilities or social life. We chose intolerance attributed to chemicals, indoor molds, and electromagnetic fields to represent typical intolerance entities. Of the respondents, 46% reported annoyance to chemicals, molds, or electromagnetic fields. Thirty-three percent reported symptoms relating to at least one of these three EIs, 18% reported symptoms that included central nervous system symptoms, and 15% reported behavioral changes. Indicating disability, 8.4% reported their experience relating to any of the three EIs as at least "somewhat difficult", 2.2% "very difficult" or "extremely difficult", and 0.9% "extremely difficult". Of the latter 2.2%, all attributed their intolerance to indoor molds, and two thirds also to chemicals. As the number of difficulties increased, the number of organ systems, behavioral changes and overlaps of the three EIs also grew. EI is a heterogeneous phenomenon and its prevalence depends on its definition. The manifestations of EI form a continuum, ranging from annoyance to severe disability.

  14. [Prevalence of intolerance to salicylates in patients with nasal polyposis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Briceño, Rodrigo Alberto; Galicia-Tapia, Jorge; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Salicylates intolerance is related to alteration in the metabolism of arachidonic acid leading to increased leukotrienes. The condition may be manifested with respiratory, skin or systemic symptoms or associated with sinonasal polyposis. Salicylates are present in anti-inflammatory drugs, cosmetics products and food. To determine the prevalence of salicylates intolerance in patients with sinonasal polyposis presenting to Clinical Immunology and Allergy and Otolaryngology Service, CMN 20 Noviembre, Mexico City. An observational, descriptive, cross sectional study included patients with sinonasal polyposis. The sample size was 49 patients, and variables were compared using STATISTICA 8.0. The prevalence of sinonasal polyposis was 4% of the study group, predominantly in females; only 24% of the population had an ideal weight, the salicylates intolerance prevalence was 53%, and the Samter triad was 31%. Sinonasal polyposis has an inflammatory disease pattern. Its pathophysiology is not yet fully established and in this study was related to obesity and persistent sinusitis. The most feared complication recurrence is associated with salicylates intolerance. The study found a slight increase of recurrence in the group of intolerance, with no statistically significant difference, possibly related to the sample size.

  15. Rapid resolution of milk protein intolerance in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazare, Farrah B; Brand, Donald A; Marciano, Tuvia A; Daum, Fredric

    2014-08-01

    Infants with milk protein intolerance are usually switched to a casein hydrolysate or amino acid-based formula, which they continue to receive until 1 year of age, when they are rechallenged with a cow's-milk or soy protein formula. To investigate whether some of these infants actually become tolerant sooner, this study gathered preliminary data for establishing an empirical timetable for the resolution of milk protein intolerance. This prospective, longitudinal cohort study enrolled infants food challenge and data collection protocol. Negative stool guaiac tests following rechallenge indicated resolution of milk protein intolerance by the time subjects reached an average age of 6.7 ± 1.0 months (mean ± standard deviation). By the age of 7 months, milk protein intolerance was resolved in 12 of the 16 infants, the remainder having resolved by 10 months. It may be reasonable to treat infants with milk protein intolerance for 2 to 3 months with a hypoallergenic formula, then rechallenge them at 6 months of age, usually without causing recurrence of the hematochezia. Rechallenging before 12 months old could result in cost savings to families and insurers.

  16. Salicylate Food Intolerance and Aspirin Hypersensitivity in Nasal Polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzedeh, Hossein; Esmaeilzadeh, Elmira; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Nabavi, Mohammad; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    A clear association between allergy and nasal polyposis (NP) is not determined and the role of food intolerance in patients with NP is not investigated by oral food challenge (OFC). To investigate the relation of salicylate food intolerance and atopy in patients with NP according to recurrence and aspirin sensitivity. A cross sectional multicenter study was done in two tertiary centers for allergy in Iran. Adult patients with NP were selected for the study that had been referred to allergy clinics. The oral aspirin challenge (OAC) test was performed to identify aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) and the OFC test was used to investigate food intolerance. Atopic evaluation was performed by skin-prick tests, nasal smear and blood eosinophil count as well as serum total IgE. One hundred and nineteen Iranian patients (female to male ratio 1.05) with NP were enrolled (mean age, 38 ± 11 years). Recurrence of nasal polyposis was 64.7%. OAC was performed in all cases; 43.79% cases had aspirin hypersensitivity. In addition, OFC tests determined that 69.9% of patients had salicylate food allergy. Salicylate food intolerance was significantly higher in NP cases with AERD than in aspirin tolerant patients (pfood intolerance was associated with AERD in nasal polyposis.

  17. Acquired intolerance to organic solvents and results of vestibular testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyntelberg, F.; Vesterhauge, S.; Fog, P.; Isager, H.; Zillstorff, K.

    1986-01-01

    Among 160 consecutive patients referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, for symptoms connected with exposure to organic solvents, 20 exhibited symptoms of acquired intolerance to minor amounts of organic solvents. Later, an additional 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of acquired intolerance were included, yielding a total of 43 men and 7 women. The characteristics of the clinical syndrome described are complaints of dizziness, nausea, and weakness after exposure to minimal solvent vapor concentrations. After having tolerated long-term occupational exposure to moderate or high air concentrations of various organic solvents, the patients became intolerant within a short period of time. Since dizziness was a frequent complaint, we tried to obtain a measure of the patients' complaints using vestibular tests. As a diagnostic test the combined vestibular tests had a sensitivity of 0.55 and a specificity of 0.87. No differences between patients with and without intolerance could be detected by the vestibular tests used. We conclude that acquired intolerance to organic solvents is a new but characteristic and easily recognizable syndrome, often with severe consequences for the patient's working ability.

  18. Expert opinion: the therapeutic challenges faced by statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaideep; Martin, Seth S; Banach, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    Statin intolerance is largely defined by muscle related symptoms, leading to intolerability and cessation. The nocebo effect coupled with the challenges of diagnosing statin myopathy undermines drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lipid-lowering and cardiovascular risk reduction. A temporal relationship should be made between the initiation of therapy and development of symptoms to aid in diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is statin cessation or statin dose reduction and evaluation of alternative causes for muscle related symptoms. Most symptoms usually resolve within 2 weeks of discontinuing therapy. The patient can be re-challenged with the same statin at a lower dose or an alternative statin. Non-statin lipid lowering therapies offer an alternative to patients who cannot tolerate statins. We discuss current guideline-focused management of patients with statin intolerance. When initiating statin therapy, attention to risk factors for statin intolerance is strongly recommended. Most patients will tolerate some degree of statin therapy; thus statin re-challenge is advisable. If alternative dosing regimens are not tolerated, non-statin medications are acceptable alternatives. To limit errors in the diagnosis of statin intolerance, improvements in clinician-patient communication about the side effects and benefits of statins should be attempted.

  19. Food allergy and food intolerance: towards a sociological agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleton, Sarah; Woods, Brian; Burrows, Roger; Kerr, Anne

    2009-11-01

    This article asks what sociological insights an analysis of food allergy and food intolerance might afford. We outline the parameters of debates around food allergy and food intolerance in the immunological, clinical and epidemiological literatures in order to identify analytic strands which might illuminate our sociological understanding of the supposed increase in both. Food allergy and food intolerance are contested and contingent terms and it is salient that the term true food allergy is replete throughout medico-scientific, epidemiological and popular discourses in order to rebuff spurious or 'nonallergic' claims of food-related symptoms. Complexity theory is introduced as a means of gaining analytic purchase on the food allergy debate. The article concludes that the use of this perspective provides a contemporary example of the 'double hermeneutic', in that the meanings and interpretations of contemporary explanations of food allergy are both permeated by, and can be made sense of, through recourse to complexity thinking.

  20. Clinical symptoms of food allergy/intolerance in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S

    1997-01-01

    Food allergy is principally a problem in infancy and early childhood. Food allergy/intolerance may cause a broad spectrum of symptoms and signs in children, including generalized reactions, such as anaphylactic shock. Reactions are localized mainly in the gastrointestinal tract, but food allergy....../intolerance may also cause local symptoms in other organs such as the skin and the respiratory tract. About 50-70% demonstrate cutaneous symptoms, 50-60% gastrointestinal symptoms, and 20-30% respiratory symptoms. Among young children with food allergy/intolerance the majority have two or more symptoms...... with symptoms occurring in two or more organ systems. The symptoms occur primarily within a few minutes after food exposure (immediate reactions), however delayed reactions in the skin, gastrointestinal tract and lungs may also occur. Among children with symptoms suggestive of food allergy...

  1. [Lactose intolerance in neonates with non-infectious diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui-Min; Jiang, Yi; Hu, Yu-Lian; Yang, Hui; Dong, Tian-Jin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the development of lactose intolerance in neonates with non-infectious diarrhea and its association with diarrhea, and to evaluate the diagnostic values of fecal pH value and urine galactose determination for neonatal lactase deficiency. Seventy hospitalized neonates who developed non-infectious diarrhea between October 2012 and June 2015 were enrolled as the diarrhea group, and 162 hospitalized neonates without non-infectious diarrhea were enrolled as the non-diarrhea group. Test paper was used to determine fecal pH value. The galactose oxidase method was used to detect urine galactose. The neonates with positive galactose oxidase were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, and those with lactase deficiency and diarrhea were diagnosed with lactose intolerance. According to the results of urine galactose detection, 69 neonates in the diarrhea group who underwent urine galactose detection were classified into lactose intolerance group (45 neonates) and lactose tolerance group (24 neonates), and their conditions after treatment were compared between the two groups. The follow-up visits were performed for neonates with diarrhea at 3 months after discharge. Fecal pH value and positive rate of urine galactose (65% vs 54%) showed no significant differences between the diarrhea and non-diarrhea groups (P>0.05). Fecal pH value showed no significant difference between the lactose intolerance and lactose tolerance groups (P>0.05), while the neonates in the lactose intolerance group had a significantly longer time to recovery of defecation than those in the lactose tolerance group (Pintolerance tends to occur. Determination of fecal pH value has no significance in the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in neonates with diarrhea.

  2. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric; Ho, Ngoc J

    2012-02-01

    Population-based data on the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with multiple unrelated drug class intolerances noted in their medical records are lacking. To provide population-based drug "allergy" incidence rates and prevalence, and to identify individuals with multiple drug intolerance syndrome (MDIS) defined by 3 or more unrelated drug class "allergies," and to provide demographic and clinical information on MDIS cases. Electronic medical record data from 2,375,424 Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan members who had a health care visit and at least 11 months of health care coverage during 2009 were reviewed. Population-based drug "allergy" incidence rates and prevalence were determined for 23 unrelated medication classes. On January 1, 2009, 478,283 (20.1%) health plan members had at least one reported "allergy." Individuals with a history of at least 1 "allergy" and females, in general, reported higher population-based new "allergy" incidence rates. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome was present in 49,582 (2.1%). The MDIS cases were significantly older, 62.4 ± 16.1 years; heavier, body mass index 29.3 ± 7.1; and likely to be female, 84.9%, compared with average health plan members. They had high rates of health care utilization, medication usage, and new drug "allergy" incidence. They sought medical attention for common nonmorbid conditions. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome is in part iatrogenic. It is associated with overweight elderly women who have high rates of health care and medication usage. Urticarial syndromes only explain a small fraction of MDIS cases. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome is associated with anxiety, but not predominately with immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or life-threatening illness. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome can be managed by medication avoidance and judicious rechallenge. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Coping strategies, social support and responsibility in chemical intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Maria; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven

    2010-08-01

    To study coping strategies, social support and responsibility for improvement in chemical intolerance (CI). Limited knowledge of CI among health professionals and lay persons places demands on the chemically intolerant individual's coping strategies and perception of social support and ability to take responsibility for improvement. However, there is sparse literature on these issues in CI. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, quasi-experimental study. Fifty-nine persons with mild, 92 with moderate and 31 with severe CI participated by rating (i) usage and effectiveness of six problem- and six emotion-focused coping strategies, (ii) emotional, instrumental and informative support provided by various sources and (iii) society's and the inflicted individual's responsibility for improvement. The participants reported that the most commonly used and effective coping strategies were avoiding odorous/pungent environments and asking persons to limit their use of odorous/pungent substances (problem-focused strategies) as well as accepting the situation and reprioritising (emotion-focused strategies). High intolerance severity was associated with problem-focused coping strategies and relatively low intolerance with emotion-focused strategies. More emotional than instrumental and informative support was perceived, predominantly from the partner and other family members. Responsibility attributed to society was also found to increase from mild to moderate/severe intolerance. Certain coping strategies are more commonly used and perceived as more effective than others in CI. However, intolerance severity plays a role regarding both coping strategies and responsibility. Emotional support appears to be the most available type of support. For improved care, certain coping strategies may be suggested by nurses, the healthcare system needs to provide better social support to these patients and the issue of responsibility for improvement may be discussed with the patient.

  4. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith

    2013-01-01

    experience exercise intolerance due to insufficient carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. Six patients aged 17-36-years were studied. We determined VO 2peak (peak oxygen consumption), the response to forearm exercise, and the metabolic and cardiovascular responses to cycle exercise at 70% of VO 2peak...... caused exercise intolerance with dynamic skeletal muscle symptoms (excessive fatigue and muscle pain), and hypoglycemia in 4 subjects. In this study we combined anaerobic and aerobic exercise to systematically study skeletal muscle metabolism and exercise tolerance in patients with GSD IIIa. Exercise...

  5. Fat distribution and glucose intolerance among Greenland inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Stolk, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    circumference [WC], and percentage of body fat) and the indices of glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-h glucose levels, insulin resistance per homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR], and the insulin sensitivity index [ISI0,120]) among Greenland Inuit. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 3,108 adult Inuit...... associated with glucose intolerance, fasting and 2-h plasma glucose levels, HOMA-IR, and ISI0,120. VAT was more strongly associated with all outcomes than was SAT. After further adjustment for BMI or WC, VAT was associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, whereas there was a trend toward...

  6. Lysinuric protein intolerance in a 5-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viplav Narayan Deogaonkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI, also known as cationic aminoaciduria, hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2, or familial protein intolerance, is an autosomal recessive defect of diamino acid transport. LPI is characterized by the inability of the body to digest and utilize certain amino acids, namely lysine, arginine, and ornithine. As a result, there is an increased excretion of these amino acids, which in turn affects the liver, the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, immune system, spleen, and organs producing blood. We report a 5-month-old girl born of third degree consanguineous marriage who presented with hepatosplenomegaly with sepsis and worsening jaundice due to LPI.

  7. Feeding Intolerance and Gastric Acid Levels of the Neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Kışlalı, Fatih Mehmet; Havan, Merve; Sarıcı, Dilek; Kılıç, Mustafa; Razi, Cem Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between feeding intolerance, a common problem at neonatal intensive care units, and gastric pH levels. The gastric fluid pH levels of the preterm and term infants with feeding intolerance has been measured and compared with those of a control group. Material and Methods: A total of forty-one preterm and term infants were included in the study (17 females, 24 males). There were 12 newborns (six preterms and six terms) in the stu...

  8. Repressive coping and alexithymia in ideopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously...... participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS...

  9. Dairy Intake, Dietary Adequacy, and Lactose Intolerance12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite repeated emphasis in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans on the importance of calcium in the adult American diet and the recommendation to consume 3 dairy servings a day, dairy intake remains well below recommendations. Insufficient health professional awareness of the benefits of calcium and concern for lactose intolerance are among several possible reasons, This mini-review highlights both the role of calcium (and of dairy, its principal source in modern diets) in health maintenance and reviews the means for overcoming lactose intolerance (real or perceived). PMID:23493531

  10. [Efficacy and safety of a herbal drug containing hawthorn berries and D-camphor in hypotension and orthostatic circulatory disorders/results of a retrospective epidemiologic cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Bernd; Kroll, Michael; Schneider, Berthold

    2005-01-01

    Korodin Herz-Kreislauf-Tropfen, a herbal drug containing D-camphor (CAS 76-22-2; 2.5 %) and a liquid extract of fresh hawthorn berries (97.3%), has been used since many years for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension. The combination as well as its constituents were tested in clinical trials against placebo with healthy volunteers and patients using tilt-tests. The objective of this study was to investigate efficacy and safety of the drug under the conditions of medical practice in comparison to other drugs admitted for this indication. The study was performed as an epidemiological retrospective cohort study in 46 medical practices in Germany. In the practices the files were reviewed for patients who were treated between 1st January 2000 and 31st December 2002 for orthostatic hypotension. Included in the study were all patients who were treated either with the test drug or a control drug containing etilefrine, oxilofrine, midodrine, norfenefrine or dihydroergotamine and who met the inclusion criteria. The data of the files were coded, transferred to case report forms and augmented by the physician's statements about symptoms and success. Effect criteria were the improvement of symptoms and change of blood pressure during treatment. The correctness of the data was controlled using anonymous copies of the files. A total of 490 patients (399 in the test-group and 91 in the control group) between 11 and 102 years were included in the study. To correct heterogeneities in baseline conditions, treatment results were adjusted by regression and stratification to equal baseline conditions using the propensity score. The adjusted odds ratio for improvement was 5.6, the adjusted mean increase of the systolic blood pressure the 2-fold compared to the control group. The difference was highly significant and did not depend on age or initial blood pressure. In the test group two adverse events were observed which had no relation to the medication; in the control group one

  11. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia.

  12. Orthostatic hypertension as a predisposing factor for masked hypertension: the J-SHIPP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Igase, Michiya; Miki, Tetsuro; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Masked hypertension (HT) is a known risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes. Postural blood pressure (BP) dysregulation is another BP phenomenon representing cardiovascular frailty. Given their several shared risk factors, we suspected an inter-relationship between these two BP phenomena. Here we investigated a possible relationship between masked HT and postural BP dysregulation in a general population. Study subjects were 884 apparently healthy individuals (aged 66.3±8.9 years). Masked HT was assessed on the basis of the ambulatory monitored average awake BP and office-measured BP values. Orthostatic BP change was measured at our office after a subject was asked to actively stand up. A strong inverse relationship was noted for orthostatic systolic BP (SBP) change and office-to-awake SBP differences (office-awake BP) (r=-0.422, P10 mm Hg, 3 min after standing (P=0.001), but not transient HT at only 1 min (P=0.767), was associated with greater office-to-awake SBP differences than in orthostatic normotensive subjects. Among apparently normotensive subjects, the frequency of masked HT was therefore significantly greater in subjects who showed OHT 3 min after standing (52.1%) compared with controls (27.5%) (odds ratio=3.01, P=0.001). We observed an intra-individual relationship between the postural BP change and the office-to-awake BP differences, and subjects who showed OHT were likely to have masked HT irrespective of antihypertensive treatment.

  13. On a problem of religious intolerance manifestations against neopagan organiozations in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Smoulsky Ie.

    2013-01-01

    Author describes some aspects of religious intolerance against neopagan organizations in modern Ukraine. The phenomenon of intolerance is taken both in dimensions of confession-confession and state-confession relationships. The article discovers rich factual evidence towards mentioned problem.

  14. Gutron treatment of patients suffering from essential orthostatic hypotony. Part One--Hemodynamic non-invasive investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenti, I; Petelenz, T; Sosnoski, M; Slomińska-Petelenz, T

    1993-06-01

    Essential orthostatic hypotony (EOH) seems to present a rarely occurring and not well recognized syndrome. Group of 20 patients (pts) with EOH were treated with midodrine (Gutron, Gu) 5 mg i.v. Non-invasive hemodynamic variables, such as systolic time intervals and their derivates, based on polycardiographic recordings, were analysed. Heart rate and blood pressure measurements during orthostatic test were measured before and after Gu administration. The results of the orthostatic trial were compared to the control group of 20 volunteers. In healthy subjects, up-right position resulted in heart rate (HR) acceleration, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total peripheral resistance (TPR), double and triple product (DP, TP), contraction coefficient (PEP/LVET) and dicrotic coefficient ('d') elevation, prejection period (PEP), electromechanical delay (QS1) and isovolumic contraction time (ICT) prolongation and lastly stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and middle rate of left ventricle ejection time (MRLVET) reduction. Patients with EOH showed a reduction of the degree of tilt-induced changes of the parameters. DBP fell down. After Gu these unfavourable changes were corrected to the values nearer the control group levels in three compensatory mechanisms. After Gu application in EOH-pts were seen: 1) favourable translocation of the resting (supine) values, but with the same reactivity to tilt, as before Gu (HR, TPR); 2) positive influences on orthostatic reaction, but inversely without any changes of resting values (PEPI, ICT, PEP/LVET, DP, DBP) and finally 3) favourable translocation of resting values together with inversed orthostatic reaction (SBP, QS2,TP). We stated clinical valuable efficacy of Gu. Gu influenced mainly the initial state of circulatory hemodynamics in resting and also in a lower degree in orthostatic reaction.

  15. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on orthostatic hypotension: data from the vitamin D in isolated systolic hypertension randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Price, Rosemary J G; Struthers, Allan D; Donnan, Peter T; Messow, Martina; McConnachie, Alex; Ford, Ian; McMurdo, Marion E T

    2014-08-01

    Orthostatic hypotension commonly accompanies supine hypertension, and is associated with low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. We tested whether high-dose intermittent oral vitamin D therapy could ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension. We conducted a subgroup analysis of data from a parallel-group, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Patients aged over 70 years with supine office SBP above 140 mmHg and DBP below 90 mmHg received 100 000 units oral vitamin D3 or matching placebo every 3 months for 1 year. Office supine and standing blood pressure were measured at baseline, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, along with arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. Of 159 patients randomized to the main trial, 75 patients with orthostatic hypotension at baseline were included in this analysis. The mean age was 78 (SD 5) years, baseline blood pressure was 162/76 mmHg and the mean baseline orthostatic fall in blood pressure on standing was 32/5 mmHg. After adjustment for baseline age, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, SBP and orthostatic fall, the fall in SBP was less in the vitamin D group at 3 months [treatment effect 6 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0 to 12], but repeated-measures analysis showed no significant treatment effect (3 mmHg for systolic fall, 95% CI -1 to 8; 1 mmHg for diastolic fall, 95% CI -1 to 3). Twelve months of intermittent, high-dose oral vitamin D3 did not significantly improve orthostatic hypotension in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension.

  16. Extrusion of the medial meniscus in knee osteoarthritis assessed with a rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Astengo, Davide; Camellino, Dario; Puntoni, Matteo; Muda, Alessandro; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the influence of weight-bearing on tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, including medial meniscal extrusion, by using a low-field (0.25 T) rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, and to analyse correlations of medial meniscal extrusion with the patient's Kellgren-Lawrence score, body mass index, and all the osteoarthritis features of the WORMS scoring system. Twenty-six patients (69.2% women and 30.8% men; mean age 67 ± 9.7 years) with medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were prospectively enrolled and MR sequences were acquired in both clino- and orthostatic position. MR images were assessed by two independent radiologists, according to the WORMS scale. Medial meniscal extrusion was measured and its clino-orthostatic difference (∆MME) was calculated. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the WORMS Global Score readings was high by Cohen's K test (>0.81). No significant clino-orthostatic changes in the scoring parameters of the medial tibiofemoral joint were shown by Wilcoxon's test. Medial meniscal extrusion measured on orthostatic images was significantly higher than that measured in clinostatic position (p < 0.0001). At univariate analysis, the Kellgren-Lawrence score, WORMS Global Score, cartilage loss, meniscal damage, and osteophytes were significantly correlated to ∆MME (p < 0.005). Using a multiple regression model, tibiofemoral cartilage loss was found to correlate independently with ∆MME (p = 0.0499). Medial meniscal extrusion, evaluated with an open-configuration, rotating MR scanner, increased from the clinostatic to the orthostatic position. ∆MME, a new meniscal parameter, correlated with several important features of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

  17. Prolonged bed rest impairs rapid CPI-17 phosphorylation and contraction in rat mesenteric resistance arteries to cause orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Toshio; Kitazawa, Kazuyo

    2017-12-01

    Prolonged bed rest (PBR) causes orthostatic hypotension (OH). Rapid constriction of splanchnic resistance arteries in response to a sudden increase in sympathetic tone contributes to the recovery of orthostatic arterial pressure upon standing. However, the molecular mechanism of PBR-induced dysfunction in arterial constriction is not fully understood. Previously, we showed that CPI-17, a regulatory protein for myosin phosphatase, mediates α 1A -adrenergic receptor-induced rapid contraction of small mesenteric arteries. Here, we tested whether PBR associated with OH affects the α 1 -adrenergic receptor-induced CPI-17 signaling pathway in mesenteric arteries using rats treated by head-down tail-suspension hindlimb unloading (HDU), an experimental OH model. In normal anesthetized rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP) rapidly reduced upon 90° head-up tilt from supine position and then immediately recovered without change in heart rate, suggesting a rapid arterial constriction. On the other hand, after a 4-week HDU treatment, the fast orthostatic MAP recovery failed for 1 min. Alpha1A subtype-specific antagonist suppressed the orthostatic MAP recovery with a small decrease in basal blood pressure, whereas non-specific α 1 -antagonist prazosin strongly reduced both basal MAP and orthostatic recovery. The HDU treatment resulted in 68% reduction in contraction in parallel with 83% reduction in CPI-17 phosphorylation in denuded mesenteric arteries 10 s after α 1 -agonist stimulation. The treatment with either Ca 2+ -release channel opener or PKC inhibitor mimicked the deficiency in HDU arteries. These results suggest that an impairment of the rapid PKC/CPI-17 signaling pathway downstream of α 1A -adrenoceptors in peripheral arterial constriction, as an end organ of orthostatic blood pressure reflex, is associated with OH in prolonged bed rest patients.

  18. The hydrostatic pressure indifference point underestimates orthostatic redistribution of blood in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L G; Carlsen, Jonathan F.; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-01-01

    The hydrostatic indifference point (HIP; where venous pressure is unaffected by posture) is located at the level of the diaphragm and is believed to indicate the orthostatic redistribution of blood, but it remains unknown whether HIP coincides with the indifference point for blood volume (VIP...... of pressure and filling of the inferior caval vein as well as fluid distribution, we found HIP located corresponding to the diaphragm while VIP was placed low in the abdomen, and that medical antishock trousers elevated both HIP and VIP. The low indifference point for volume shows that the gravitational...

  19. Blood flow in internal carotid and vertebral arteries during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Kohei; Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    measured using Doppler ultrasonography. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was also determined during supine (Supine) and HUT conditions, from the rate of regulation (RoR) in cerebrovascular conductance of the ICA and VA during acute hypotension induced by the release of bilateral thigh cuffs. The HUT...... during HUT and the magnitude of the attenuation in RoR was greater in the VA [0.25 ± 0.03 /s Supine vs. 0.16 ± 0.02 /s HUT (-33.9 ± 5.8 %), P 0.05]. These data indicate that orthostatic stress evokes regional...

  20. Orthostatic leg blood volume changes assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, J; Kim, Y S; Krediet, C T P

    2012-01-01

    Standing up shifts blood to dependent parts of the body, and blood vessels in the leg become filled. The orthostatic blood volume accumulation in the small vessels is relatively unknown, although these may contribute significantly. We hypothesized that in healthy humans exposed to the upright...... and [HHb] remained above baseline, whereas all NIRS signals gradually returned to baseline. Spatial heterogeneity was observed, and for two probes [tHb] was highly correlated between days (r(2) = 0.92 ± 0.09 and 0.91 ± 0.12), but less for the third probe (r(2) = 0.44 ± 0.36). The results suggest a non...

  1. Prolonged supine hypertension due to midodrine use in an orthostatic hypotensive child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgar, S; Omeroglu, R E

    2007-01-01

    Midodrine hydrochloride is a potent peripherally-acting alpha1 agonist that is well absorbed and rapidly metabolized to its active metabolite. It has been used for the treatment of refractory syncope but has the important side effect of supine hypertension. A 10-year-old boy with severe symptomatic orthostatic hypotension was treated with midodrine. After therapy, syncope attacks ceased but he suffered nighttime headaches, nausea, transient rash and itchy/prickly scalp. Midodrine was discontinued when supine hypertension was noticed. However, his supine hypertension continued until day 19 after discontinuation. This case shows that patients receiving midodrine should be observed for supine hypertension for a prolonged period.

  2. Minimal cross-intolerance with nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase who are intolerant to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Andreas; le Coutre, Philipp D.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Jabbour, Elias; Gillis, Kathryn; Woodman, Richard C.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Giles, Francis J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Baccarani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Nilotinib has significant efficacy in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) and in patients with CML-CP or CML in accelerated phase (CML-AP) after imatinib failure. We investigated the occurrence of cross-intolerance to nilotinib in imatinib-intolerant patients with CML. Only 1/75 (1%) patients with nonhematologic imatinib intolerance experienced a similar grade 3/4 adverse event (AE), and 3/75 (4%) experienced a similar persistent grade 2 nonhematologic AE on nilotinib. Only 7/40 (18%) patients with hematologic imatinib intolerance discontinued nilotinib, all because of grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. Ninety percent of imatinib-intolerant patients with CML-CP who did not have complete hematologic response (CHR) at baseline (n = 52) achieved CHR on nilotinib. Nilotinib induced a major cytogenetic response in 66% and 41% of patients with imatinib-intolerant CML-CP and CML-AP (complete cytogenetic response in 51% and 30%), respectively. Minimal cross-intolerance was confirmed in patients with imatinib-intolerant CML. The favorable tolerability of nilotinib in patients with imatinib intolerance leads to alleviation of AE-related symptoms and significant and durable responses. In addition to its established clinical benefit in patients with newly diagnosed CML and those resistant to imatinib, nilotinib is effective and well-tolerated for long-term use in patients with imatinib intolerance. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471497 PMID:21467546

  3. [The clinical and immunological manifestations of food intolerance in obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentsova, T B; Gapparova, K M; Grigor'ian, O N; Vorozhko, I V; Kirillova, O O; Chekhonina, Iu G

    2012-01-01

    The clinical and immunological manifestations of food intolerance in obese patients were studied. Food intolerance was diagnosed in 32.6 and 33.4% in obese patients stage 2 and stage 3 respectively, and was basically determined by 13 proteinaceous food products. The changes in immune status in obese patients created conditions for development of food intolerance. The timely diagnose food intolerance allows to personalize the diet therapy.

  4. Food intolerance and intestinal microbiota. Whether there is a relationship between them?

    OpenAIRE

    Gubskaya, O. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    In the article the modern view on the problem of food intolerance, food intolerance relationships, and food allergy with the state of the intestinal microbiota are shown. Special attention is focused on the new therapeutic possibilities and approaches for correction of food intolerance manifestations, including the appointment of probiotics among which the Bacillus subtillis and Bacillus licheniformis is justified, effective and safe measure. Key words: food intolerance, food allergy, hypers...

  5. Prevalence, risk factors, clinical consequences, and treatment of enteral feed intolerance during critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungabissoon, Usha; Hacquoil, Kimberley; Bains, Chanchal; Irizarry, Michael; Dukes, George; Williamson, Russell; Deane, Adam M; Heyland, Daren K

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to determine the incidence of enteral feed intolerance and factors associated with intolerance and to assess the influence of intolerance on nutrition and clinical outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from an international observational cohort study of nutrition practices among 167 intensive care units (ICUs). Data were collected on nutrition adequacy, ventilator-free days (VFDs), ICU stay, and 60-day mortality. Intolerance was defined as interruption of enteral nutrition (EN) due to gastrointestinal (GI) reasons (large gastric residuals, abdominal distension, emesis, diarrhea, or subjective discomfort). Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for intolerance and their clinical significance. A sensitivity analysis restricted to sites specifying a gastric residual volume ≥200 mL to identify intolerance was also conducted. Data from 1,888 ICU patients were included. The incidence of intolerance was 30.5% and occurred after a median 3 days from EN initiation. Patients remained intolerant for a mean (±SD) duration of 1.9 ± 1.3 days . Intolerance was associated with worse nutrition adequacy vs the tolerant (56% vs 64%, P intolerance remained associated with negative outcomes. Although mortality was greater among the intolerant patients, this was not statistically significant. Intolerance occurs frequently during EN in critically ill patients and is associated with poorer nutrition and clinical outcomes. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  6. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health'' to be held... the public. Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, a sugar...

  7. Cold Intolerance of the hand measured by the CISS questionnaire in a normative study population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J; Jaquet, J-B.; Daanen, H. A M; Hovius, S.E.R.

    2006-01-01

    Cold intolerance has been recognized as one of the most disabling sequelae of upper extremity trauma, especially when neurovascular structures are involved. In this study, we aimed to describe cold intolerance in a normative study population, validate the Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity (CISS)

  8. Factors predicting walking intolerance in patients with peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine which physiological variables conduce to walking intolerance in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design. The physiological response to a graded treadmill exercise test (GTT) in patients with PAD was characterised. Setting. Patients were recruited from the Department of. Vascular ...

  9. Hemodynamic causes of exercise intolerance in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Anders; Jensen, Annette S; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance is frequent among Fontan patients and an important determinant for quality of life. This study investigated the hemodynamic causes of impaired exercise capacity in Fontan patients with particular focus on the influence of stroke volume index (SVI) and heart rate (HR...

  10. The clinical impact of mild carbohydrate intolerance in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, P; Sørensen, B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the clinical impact of mild carbohydrate intolerance in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. STUDY DESIGN: This was a historical cohort study of 2904 pregnant women examined for gestational diabetes on the basis of risk factors...

  11. Towards understanding (religious) (in)tolerance in education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, schools and education authorities world wide have been paying increasing attention to issues surrounding diversity and religious (in)tolerance. The term 'tolerance' is, however, clouded by considerable confusion and vagueness. This article seeks to contribute to recent scholarly attempts at understanding ...

  12. Discomfort Intolerance Scale: A Study of Reliability and Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir ÖZDEL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Discomfort Intolerance Scale was developed by Norman B. Schmidt et al. to assess the individual differences of capacity to withstand physical perturbations or uncomfortable bodily states (2006. The aim of this study is to investigate the validity and reliability of Discomfort Intolerance Scale-Turkish Version (RDÖ. Method: From two different universities, total of 225 students (male=167, female=58 were participated in this study. In order to determine the criterion validity, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used. Construct validity was evaluated by factor analysis after the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO and Barlett test had been performed. To assess the test-retest reliability the scale was re-applied to 54 participants 6 weeks later. Results: To assess construct validity of DIS, factor analyses were performed using varimax principal components analysis with varimax rotation. The factor analysis resulted in two factors named “discomfort (in tolerance” and “discomfort avoidance”. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the entire scale, discomfort-(intolerance subscale, discomfortavoidance subscale were, .592, .670, .600 respectively. Correlations between two factors of DIS, discomfort intolerance and discomfort avoidance, and Trait Anxiety Inventory of STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were statistically significant at the level of 0.05. Test-retest reliability was statistically significant at the level of 0.01. Conclusion: Analysis demonstrated that DIS had a satisfactory level of reliability and validity in Turkish university students.

  13. Boko Haram group in Nigeria: religious intolerance and proliferation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In problematising the motivations behind Boko Haram's activities against the state, academic debates have remained divided. On the one hand are scholars who attribute the violence of Boko Haram as a fallout of religious intolerance, while on the other hand, others consider the proliferation – or the widespread availability ...

  14. Remedies for glucose intolerance – are traditional herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes in prediabetes has the potential to reduce the disease prevalence. Objective:The effectiveness of traditional herbal concoctions for diabetes in ameliorating glucose intolerance was investigated. Material and Methods:Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was carried ...

  15. The prevalence of glucose intolerance among antenatal clients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of and associated factors for glucose intolerance among antenatal clients at Kenyatta National Hospital at 24-36 weeks of gestation. Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital antenatal clinic. Subjects: One hundred and two (102) antenatal mothers ...

  16. The role of colonic microbiota in lactose intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, Y; Priebe, M. G.; Vonk, R. J.; Huang, CY; Antoine, JM; He, T; Harmsen, HJM; Welling, GW

    In a previous study we observed a clear difference in lactose intolerance symptoms after a 25-g lactose load in two groups of persons with lactase nonpersistence and similar small intestinal lactase activity. From this observation we hypothesized a colon resistance factor. To identify this factor,

  17. Tolerating extremism : to what extent should intolerance be tolerated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guiora, Amos Neuser

    2013-01-01

    In discussing extremism, the key questions are: to whom is a duty owed and what are the limits of intolerance that are to be tolerated? Answering these questions requires examining limits and rights; analyzing them in the context of extremism is the ‘core’ of this book. While freedom of speech and

  18. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients.

  19. Initial circulatory response to active standing in Parkinson's disease without typical orthostatic hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Delgado

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While the circulatory response to orthostatic stress has been already evaluated in Parkinson's disease patients without typical orthostatic hypotension (PD-TOH, there is an initial response to the upright position which is uniquely associated with active standing (AS. We sought to assess this response and to compare it to that seen in young healthy controls (YHC. Method In 10 PD-TOH patients (8 males, 60±7 years, Hoehn and Yahr ≤3 the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate that occur in the first 30 seconds (sec of standing were examined. Both parameters were non-invasively and continuously monitored using the volume-clamp method by Peñáz and the Physiocal criteria by Wesseling. The choice of sample points was prompted by the results of previous studies. These sample points were compared to those of 10 YHC (8 males, 32±8 years. Results The main finding of the present investigation was an increased time between the AS onset and SBP overshoot in PD-TOH group (24±4 vs. 19±3 sec; p<0.05. Conclusion This delay might reflect a prolonged latency in the baroreflex-mediated vascular resistance response, but more studies are needed to confirm this preliminary hypothesis.

  20. [A case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension without orthostatic headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kazuki; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Masuda, Yosuke; Kin, Hidehiro; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-04-01

    We herein present a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma(bilateral CSDH)caused by spontaneous intracranial hypotension(SIH)without orthostatic headache. A 67-year-old male patient with mild head injury suffered from a chronic, non-postural headache. Computed tomography of the brain showed bilateral CSDH. The hematomas were surgically evacuated using a closed drainage method. His headache immediately disappeared, but it recurred after 2 weeks. We further performed hematoma irrigation;however, his neurological status deteriorated with the development of pneumocephalus. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium-DTPA showed diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement. His cerebrospinal fluid pressure was 3cmH2O, and radioisotope cisternography revealed cerebrospinal fluid leakage at the level of the cervicothoracic transition. No recurrence was found after 6 weeks of horizontal bed rest. The possibility of SIH should be considered in patients with CSDH, especially bilateral CSDH, even in elderly patients with a history of mild head trauma, and absence of orthostatic headache. Closed drainage method may be preferable in cases where surgical treatment is used.

  1. Compression garments do not alter cerebrovascular responses to orthostatic stress after mild passive heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S A; Ainslie, P N; Lucas, R A I; Cheung, S S; Cotter, J D

    2014-04-01

    Whole-body heating increases the likelihood of syncope, whereas utilizing lower-body compression garments may reduce syncope risk. We hypothesized that graded compression garments would reduce the typically observed large postural reductions in arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery velocity, in normothermia and especially once passively heat stressed. Fifteen men (age: 27 ± 4 years, aerobic fitness range: 30-75 mL/kg(/) min) completed a supine-to-stand orthostatic challenge for 3 min at normothermia and after passive heating (esophageal temperature, +0.5 °C from baseline) on two occasions (> 7 days): once wearing commercially available compression trousers and once wearing low-compression placebo trousers (randomized order). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), mean arterial blood pressure (mean BP: Finometer) and end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure were measured continuously. During normothermia, compression, garments did not alter the magnitude of the postural changes in mean BP or middle cerebral artery velocity. After passive heating, although the magnitudes of these changes were exaggerated, they were not significantly affected by compression garments. Compression garments did not attenuate the initial or sustained orthostatic hypotension associated with posture change, either during normothermia or following passive heat stress. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hemodynamic Effects of Midodrine After Space Flight in Astronauts Without Orthostatic Hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Ziegler, Michael G.; Waters, Wendy W.; Meck, Janice V.

    2006-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension and presyncope are common and potentially serious risks for astronauts returning from space. Susceptible subjects fail to generate an adequate adrenergic response to upright posture. The -1 adrenergic agonist, midodrine, may be an effective countermeasure. We tested the hypothesis that midodrine would have no negative hemodynamic effect on healthy astronauts returning from space. Five male astronauts participated in preflight and postflight tilt testing on a control flight as well as on the test flights, where midodrine (10 mg, orally) was administered after landing, approximately 1 hour before testing. None of these astronauts exhibited orthostatic hypotension or presyncope before or after either flight. Midodrine did not cause any untoward reactions in these subjects before or after flight, in fact a modest beneficial effect was seen on postflight tachycardia (p=0.036). These data show that midodrine protected against post-spaceflight increases in heart rate, without having any adverse hemodynamic effects on non-presyncopal, male astronauts. Among these subjects, midodrine was a safe cardiovascular countermeasure.

  3. The molecular basis for oat intolerance in patients with celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Arentz-Hansen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disorder characterized by malabsorption, nutrient deficiency, and a range of clinical manifestations. It is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten and is treated with a gluten-free diet. Recent feeding studies have indicated oats to be safe for celiac disease patients, and oats are now often included in the celiac disease diet. This study aimed to investigate whether oat intolerance exists in celiac disease and to characterize the cells and processes underlying this intolerance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We selected for study nine adults with celiac disease who had a history of oats exposure. Four of the patients had clinical symptoms on an oats-containing diet, and three of these four patients had intestinal inflammation typical of celiac disease at the time of oats exposure. We established oats-avenin-specific and -reactive intestinal T-cell lines from these three patients, as well as from two other patients who appeared to tolerate oats. The avenin-reactive T-cell lines recognized avenin peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2. These peptides have sequences rich in proline and glutamine residues closely resembling wheat gluten epitopes. Deamidation (glutamine-->glutamic acid conversion by tissue transglutaminase was involved in the avenin epitope formation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that some celiac disease patients have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells that can cause mucosal inflammation. Oat intolerance may be a reason for villous atrophy and inflammation in patients with celiac disease who are eating oats but otherwise are adhering to a strict gluten-free diet. Clinical follow-up of celiac disease patients eating oats is advisable.

  4. Optimal therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and resistance or intolerance to sorafenib: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray EM

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Emily M Ray, Hanna K Sanoff Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: The only US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved first-line systemic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is sorafenib; however, resistance or intolerance to sorafenib is unfortunately common. In this review, we briefly describe systemic therapies that can be considered for patients with HCC who show resistance or intolerance to sorafenib. For all patients with HCC who need systemic therapy, we strongly advocate for participation in clinical trials. Cytotoxic chemotherapy plays a minor role in the treatment of advanced HCC, with some data supporting the use of FOLFOX (infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin and GEMOX (gemcitabine-oxaliplatin. Multi-target kinase inhibitors such as lenvantinib and regorafenib have recently met their primary endpoints as first- and second-line therapy, respectively, with regorafenib now representing the only FDA-approved drug for second-line treatment of HCC. Other targeted therapies remain under investigation, but results so far have not significantly changed clinical practice. Immunotherapy is an interesting area of research in the treatment of HCC with preclinical and early clinical data demonstrating exciting results; thus numerous investigational studies are currently focusing on immunotherapy in the treatment of HCC. While systemic treatment options in HCC remain a challenge for providers, in this review, we summarize the current literature and highlight areas of progress with respect to the treatment of patients with HCC and resistance or intolerance to sorafenib. Keywords: liver cancer, chemotherapy, immunotherapy

  5. Evaluation of left ventricular outflow tract gradient during treadmill exercise and in recovery period in orthostatic position, in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Pedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an independent predictor of adverse outcome in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. The classical quantification of intraventricular obstruction is performed in resting conditions in supine position, but this assessment does not reflect what happens in HCM patients (pts in their daily activities, neither during effort nor during orthostatic recovery. Aim- To assess intraventricular gradients with echocardiography during treadmill exercise and in the recovery period in upright position, in HCM pts. Methods- We studied 17 HCM pts (9 males, mean age 53 ± 16 years, 11 with obstructive HCM. Each pt had 2 echocardiographic evaluations at rest (left lateral decubitus (LLD and orthostatic position. The pts then underwent a treadmill exercise test and intraventricular gradients were measured at peak exercise and during recovery in orthostatic position. Results- 3 pts with non-obstructive HCM at rest developed intraventricular gradients during exercise. 1 pt developed this gradient only during orthostatic recovery. The mean intraventricular gradient in LLD was 49 ± 24 mmHg; in orthostatic position was 62 ± 29 mmHg (p Conclusion- In HCM pts the intraventricular gradient increases in orthostatic position, increases significantly during treadmill exercise and continues increasing in the recovery period in orthostatic position. This type of evaluation can help us to better understand the physiopathology, the symptoms and the efficacy of different therapeutic modalities in this disease and should be routinely used in the assessment of HCM pts.

  6. Non-invasive continuous finger blood pressure measurement during orthostatic stress compared to intra-arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, B. P.; Settels, J. J.; van der Meiracker, A. H.; Wesseling, K. H.; Wieling, W.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether invasive blood pressure responses to orthostatic stress can be replaced by non-invasive continuous finger blood pressure responses. DESIGN - Intrabrachial and Finapres blood pressures were simultaneously measured during passive head up tilt and during

  7. Flow-mediated vasodilation as a predictor of therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride in children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying; Yang, Jinyan; Zhang, Fengwen; Chen, Stella; Liu, Xueqin; Zhang, Qingyou; Ai, Yi; Wang, Yuli; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2013-09-15

    This study was designed to explore the value of flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) as a predictor of therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride (MD) in children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). One hundred and eight children diagnosed with POTS and 20 healthy control children were enrolled. All children with POTS received MD and were followed up for 3 months. FMD of brachial artery for each participant was measured by vascular ultrasound. Symptom scores, FMD values, and head-up test (HUT)/head-up tilt test (HUTT) outcomes were investigated before and after treatment. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to explore the value of FMD as a predictor. Baseline FMD (%) and increased heart rate (beats per minute) during HUT/HUTT were significantly greater in children with POTS compared with control children (FMD: 11 ± 3% vs 6 ± 2%, p <0.001; increased heart rate: 38 ± 9 vs 7 ± 7 beats/min, p <0.001, respectively). Before treatment, MD responders had greater FMD values than MD nonresponders (p <0.05). Symptom scores, excessive increases in heart rate during HUT, and increased FMD values were all reduced significantly after treatment (all p <0.05). The receiver operating characteristic curve for the predictive value of FMD showed the area under the curve to be 0.790 (95% confidence interval: 0.679 to 0.902; p <0.001) at 1-month and 0.803 (95% confidence interval: 0.669 to 0.936; p <0.01) at 3-month therapy. FMD of 9.85% had a high sensitivity (1-month therapy: 71.6%; 3-month therapy: 74.4%) and specificity (1-month therapy 77.8%; 3-month therapy: 80%). In conclusion, FMD is a predictor of the efficacy of MD for treating children with POTS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Errata Corrige. Orthostatic Reactivity in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period. http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.090

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileva, Danche; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta

    2015-01-01

    [See http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.090 and http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.094] AIM: This study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on orthostatic reactivity in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: An active orthostatic test is used for the evaluation of the orthostatic reactions. The arterial blood pressure and heart rate were defined in the 10 minutes of supine position, before...

  9. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension presenting without orthostatic headache complicated by acute subdural hematoma after drainage for chronic subdural hematoma--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramae, Takumi; Inamasu, Joji; Nakagawa, Yu; Nakatsukasa, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) manifesting as a bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) without orthostatic headache. He developed life-threatening acute SDH as a complication of CSDH drainage. Neurosurgeons should be aware that SIH patients do not always present with orthostatic headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium may be recommended for young adults with non-traumatic CSDH before drainage to exclude SIH, even if they do not present with orthostatic headache.

  10. Protective effect of ketotifen and disodium cromoglycate against bronchoconstriction induced by aspirin, benzoic acid or tartrazine in intolerant asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    1979-01-01

    Oral challenge tests with acetylsalicylic acid, tartrazine or benzoic acid were performed in 7 intolerant asthmatic patients after a 3-day treatment with either orally taken ketotifen (1 mg twice daily) or inhaled disodium cromoglycate (20 mg four times daily) at random. Protection was noted with ketotifen in 5, with DSCG in 3 patients. On the evaluation of the mean percentage of the maximum decline in the forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) only ketotifen afforded significant protection statistically (p less than 0.05). All the intolerant asthmatics studies showed, as an immunological abnormity, a slight, but significant decrease of the C1-inhibitor levels. Moreover, in three out of these the alpha 1-antitrypsin serum values were under the lower normal range.

  11. Fermented Moringa oleifera Decreases Hepatic Adiposity and Ameliorates Glucose Intolerance in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Hyunchae; Kim, Bobae; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Kyuyeon; Kim, Hee-Hoon; Sim, Ho-Cheol; Do, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Chang-Kee; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as glucose intolerance and nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD), are primary risk factors for life-threatening conditions such as diabetes, heart attack, stroke, and hepatic cancer. Extracts from the tropical tree Moringa oleifera show antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Fermentation can further improve the safety and nutritional value of certain foods. We investigated the efficacy of fermented M. oleifera extract (FM) against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic lipid accumulation and investigated the underlying mechanisms by analyzing expression of proteins and genes involved in glucose and lipid regulation. C57BL/6 mice were fed with normal chow diet (ND) or HFD supplemented with distilled water (DW, control), nonfermented M. oleifera extract (NFM), or FM for 10 weeks. Although body weights were similar among HFD-fed treatment groups, liver weight was decreased, and glucose tolerance test (GTT) results improved in the FM group compared with DW and NFM groups. Hepatic lipid accumulation was also lower in the FM group, and expressions of genes involved in liver lipid metabolism were upregulated. In addition, HFD-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity in quadriceps muscles were decreased by FM. Finally, proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression was decreased by FM in the liver, epididymal adipose tissue, and quadriceps of HFD-fed mice. FMs may decrease glucose intolerance and NAFLD under HFD-induced obesity by decreasing ER stress, oxidative stress, and inflammation.

  12. [Deep brain stimulation in parkinsonian patients with dopa intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Pedro J; Feliz-Feliz, Cici; Ayerbe Gracia, Joaquín; Matías Arbelo, José; Salvador, Carlos; Val Fernández, Javier Del; García-Caldentey, Juan

    2017-10-28

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is at present, a useful treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and motor complications. The crucial step toward consistent DBS outcomes remains careful patient selection; several conditions must be fulfilled including excellent levo dopa response. We report two cases of early onset Parkinson's disease with severe intolerance to levo dopa but excellent and sustained response to DBS. DBS can be a useful alternative for parkinsonian patients with severe intolerance to levo dopa, provided a positive acute response to levo dopa or apomorphine is obtained. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Prostatic cancer: intolerance and morbidity of external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douchez, J.; Fregevu, Y.; Allain, Y.M.; Cellier, P.; Fenton, J.; Hay, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Vincent, F.

    1985-01-01

    The pertherapeutic intolerance and morbidity are analyzed in a groupe of 597 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1975 and 1982. Minimum follow-up is 2 years, median is 46 months. The results are compared to following parameters: associated diseases, associated surgical treatments, doses and irradiated target volumes. Pertherapeutic intolerance manifestations were found in 73% of patients and lead to complications. Urinary incontinence and chronic cystitis were more frequent after transurethral resection or prostatic target volume and by split course irradiation. Chronic diarrhea was more frequent when using large target volume. Leg edema was closely associated with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The control of pertherapeutic manifestations and the prevention of complications should improve survival in patients treated by external radiotherapy [fr

  14. Diagnosis of Allergic and Nonallergic Food Intolerance in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Cheburkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the incorrect food avoidance affects quality of life and nutrition, especially in children, there is possible harm in over-diagnosing food allergy. The approach to the proper diagnosis of food allergy and nonallergic intolerance requires consideration of the medical history, tests for food-specific IgE antibodies, skin puncture tests. Pediatrist must appreciate that a positive test for food-specific IgE or skin puncture test primarily denotes sensitization and may not confirm clinical allergy. Food elimination diet or oral food challenge is required for diagnosis confirmation. Additional procedures may be needed, depending on the differential diagnosis of IgE mediated or non-IgE mediated food intolerance.

  15. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-09

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

  16. The effects of probiotics in lactose intolerance: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Sophia J; Jha, Rajesh

    2018-02-09

    Over 60 percent of the human population has a reduced ability to digest lactose due to low levels of lactase enzyme activity. Probiotics are live bacteria or yeast that supplements the gastrointestinal flora. Studies have shown that probiotics exhibit various health beneficial properties such as improvement of intestinal health, enhancement of the immune responses, and reduction of serum cholesterol. Accumulating evidence has shown that probiotic bacteria in fermented and unfermented milk products can be used to alleviate the clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance (LI). In this systematic review, the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of LI was evaluated using 15 randomized double-blind studies. Eight probiotic strains with the greatest number of proven benefits were studied. Results showed varying degrees of efficacy but an overall positive relationship between probiotics and lactose intolerance.

  17. Gluten Intolerance: Sex- and Age-Related Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Llorente-Alonso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Gluten intolerance is an immune-mediated enteropathy associated with gluten-containing foods in genetically susceptible patients. The typical form mainly affecting children shows failure to thrive and/or gastrointestinal symptoms. The adult form is less typical, presenting vague gastrointestinal symptoms, iron deficiency (with or without anemia or nonspecific serum chemistry abnormalities. The present study aims to analyze clinical and biochemical differences of celiac disease (CD according to sex and age.

  18. [Soluble apoptosis markers in obese patients with food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorozhko, I V; Sentsova, T B; Kirillova, O O; Gapparova; Chekhonina, Iu G

    2014-01-01

    For the soluble apoptosis markers study 151 patients with obesity (92 women and 59 men) aged between 18 and 63 years were examined. Diagnosis and degree of obesity was based on the body mass index (38.2 +/- 5.4 kg/m2). Generally food intolerance was identified in 36.4% of obese patients. Four groups of patients were formed: three groups of patients with obesity stage I (15 patients), II (18 patients) and III (22 patients), respectively, and with food intolerance, and a group of obese patients without food intolerance (control group, n = 31). Obese patients with food intolerance received standard version of hypocaloric diet with the exception of specific food allergens. Duration of observation was 39-43 days. Such soluble apoptosis markers as sFas-L, Caspase-9, Caspase-8 and sCD153 were significantly higher in stage III obesity patients compared obese patients without food allergy (0.120 +/- 0.030 vs 0.035 +/- 0.010; 13.2 +/- 3.2 vs 5.9 +/- 0.4; 1.4 +/- 0.18 vs 0.6 +/- 0.24; 0.123 +/- 0.010 vs 0.025 +/- 0.002 ng/ml respectively). Positive dynamic of sFas-L, Caspase-9 and Caspase-8 (decrease to 0.052 +/- 0.030; 7.7 +/- 2.2 and 0.4 +/- 0.18 ng/ml respectively) in patients with obesity stage III and intactness sCD153 during diet therapy course were revealed. Significant differences for only Caspase-9 in patients with obesity stage II were obtained. The data obtained are considered as normalization of apoptosis due to nutritional correction of immunological disorders. Study of sFas-L, Caspase-9 and Caspase-8 allows to predict the course of disease, as immunological research for early detection of food allergy makes possible to implement the principles of personalized diet therapy.

  19. Fructose intolerance/malabsorption and recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Lustig, Daniel; Pflugeisen, Bethann M; Amoroso, Paul J; Sherif, Dalia; Saeed, Rasha; Shamdeen, Shaza; Tuider, Judith; Abdullah, Bisher

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to ascertain whether pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain had concurrent fructose intolerance as determined by a standardized dose breath hydrogen test (BHT), and whether symptoms would improve with a low-fructose diet. The fructose BHT test was administered to patients evaluated in clinic with unexplained chronic abdominal pain alone or associated with constipation, gas or bloating, and/or diarrhea. The patients were given a standard dose of 1 g/kg fructose to maximum of 25 g. Hydrogen and methane were measured at 8 time points. The test was presumed positive if breath hydrogen exceeded 20 ppm above baseline. If positive, patients were given a dietitian-prescribed low-fructose diet. A total of 222 patients were part of the study. Ages ranged from 2 to 19 years with a mean of 10.5. BHT for fructose was performed in all of the patients and it was positive for fructose intolerance in 121 of 222 patients (54.5%). A total of 101 of 222 (45.5%) patients had negative BHT for fructose intolerance. All BHT-positive patients had a nutrition consult with a registered dietitian and were placed on a low-fructose diet. Using a standard pain scale for children, 93 of 121 patients (76.9%) reported resolution of symptoms on a low-fructose diet (P fructose reported resolution of symptoms without a low-fructose diet (P = 0.37). Fructose intolerance/malabsorption is common in children with recurrent/functional abdominal pain and a low-fructose diet is an effective treatment.

  20. Predicting intolerance of uncertainty in individuals with eating disorder symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sternheim, Lot C; Fisher, Martin; Harrison, Amy; Watling, Rosamond

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is recognized for its contribution to various psychopathologies, in particular anxiety and depression. Studies highlight the relevance of IU for Eating Disorders (EDs) however, potential factors contributing to IU in EDs remain unstudied. METHODS: Three hundred and forty-nine women with ED symptoms and 214 individuals without ED symptoms were recruited and compared on levels of IU, insecure (anxious and avoidant) attachment styles, extraversion and ...

  1. Predicting intolerance of uncertainty in individuals with eating disorder symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sternheim, Lot C.; Fisher, Martin; Harrison, Amy; Watling, Rosamond

    2017-01-01

    Background Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is recognized for its contribution to various psychopathologies, in particular anxiety and depression. Studies highlight the relevance of IU for Eating Disorders (EDs) however, potential factors contributing to IU in EDs remain unstudied. Methods Three hundred and forty-nine women with ED symptoms and 214 individuals without ED symptoms were recruited and compared on levels of IU, insecure (anxious and avoidant) attachment styles, extraversion and op...

  2. [Lactose-containing tablets for patients with lactose intolerance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picksak, Gesine; Stichtenoth, Dirk O

    2009-01-01

    Lactose is often used as an excipient in tablets because of its ideal characteristics. Most patients with lactose intolerance tolerate small amounts of lactose. However, the nocebo effect must be considered. Thus, patients should be informed about the very small amounts of lactose in the medication. If the patient is still suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms and there is no lactose-free alternative, the enzyme lactase can be substituted individually.

  3. Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Anna-Sara; Palmquist, Eva; Nordin, Steven

    2018-04-01

    Individuals with environmental intolerance (EI) react to exposure from different environmental sources at levels tolerated by most people and that are below established toxicological and hazardous thresholds. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of attributing symptoms to chemical and physical sources in the environment among individuals with different forms of self-reported EI and in referents. Cross-sectional data from a population-based study, the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406), were used and individuals with self-reported EI to chemicals, buildings, electromagnetic fields and sounds as well as a group with multiple EIs were identified. The Environmental-Symptom Attribution Scale was used to quantify degree to which health symptoms are attributed to 40 specific environmental exposures and sources, with subscales referring to the four types of EI. All EI groups, except the group with building related intolerance (BRI), reported more symptoms from the expected sources compared to the referents. In addition, individuals with chemical and sound intolerance reported symptoms from building related trigger factors, and individuals with electromagnetic hypersensitivity reported symptoms from chemical trigger factors. The study suggests that individuals with BRI react to fewer and more specific trigger factors than do individuals with other EIs, and that it is important to ask about different sources since three of the EI groups attribute their symptoms to a wide variety of sources in addition to the sources to which their EI implicates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Does food intolerance play a role in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nalin J; Jenzarli, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential role of food intolerances in the management of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). This is a retrospective case review of 4 pediatric patients with RRP. All of the patients, cared for by the primary author between 2005 and 2010, were managed using microdebrider resection, intralesional injection of cidofovir, and required multiple surgeries. Skin prick test (SPT) and/or radioallergosorbent test (RAST) were obtained for 2 patients. Oral food challenge was utilized in all 4 patients. Standard SPT and RAST did not identify any immunoglobulin E (IgE)-based allergens. A detailed medical history followed by an oral food challenge was successful at identifying food intolerances in all 4 patients. When specific food elimination was implemented in these patients' treatments in addition to microdebrider resection and cidofovir injection, statistically significant long-term remissions were achieved. Food intolerance and its impact on RRP and immune dysfunction deserve further investigation and may benefit some patients with RRP. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  5. [Food Allergy and Intolerance : Distinction, Definitions and Delimitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Waßmann-Otto, Anja; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Immunologically mediated hypersensitivity to foods is defined as food allergy, mainly due to immunglobulins of class E (IgE) triggering immediate reactions (type I hypersensitivity) with possible involvement of mucosa, skin, airways, intestinal tract, and the vascular system. Primary food allergy is based on (early) IgE sensitization against animal (e. g., cow's milk, hen's eggs) or plant proteins (e. g. peanut, hazelnut or wheat). In the case of secondary food allergies, IgE against pollen proteins (e. g., birch) reacts to structurally related food proteins (with cross-reactions to stone and pit fruits). Non-immunological food intolerance reactions are mostly based on carbohydrate malassimilation (e. g., lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption) and are rarely due to pseudo-allergies (e. g., flavors, dyes, preservatives) primarily in patients with chronic urticaria. Common intestinal symptoms are mainly due to functional disorders (e. g., irritable bowel disease), rarely because of inflammatory intestinal diseases (e. g., celiac disease). Histamine intolerance, gluten hypersensitivity, and so-called food type III hypersensitivities are controversial diagnoses. The aforementioned disease entities/models are of variable importance for the affected individuals, the public health system, and society in general.

  6. Properties of Gluten Intolerance: Gluten Structure, Evolution, Pathogenicity and Detoxification Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Balakireva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Theterm gluten intolerance may refer to three types of human disorders: autoimmune celiac disease (CD, allergy to wheat and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. Gluten is a mixture of prolamin proteins present mostly in wheat, but also in barley, rye and oat. Gluten can be subdivided into three major groups: S-rich, S-poor and high molecular weight proteins. Prolamins within the groups possess similar structures and properties. All gluten proteins are evolutionarily connected and share the same ancestral origin. Gluten proteins are highly resistant to hydrolysis mediated by proteases of the human gastrointestinal tract. It results in emergence of pathogenic peptides, which cause CD and allergy in genetically predisposed people. There is a hierarchy of peptide toxicity and peptide recognition by T cells. Nowadays, there are several ways to detoxify gluten peptides: the most common is gluten-free diet (GFD, which has proved its effectiveness; prevention programs, enzymatic therapy, correction of gluten pathogenicity pathways and genetically modified grains with reduced immunotoxicity. A deep understanding of gluten intolerance underlying mechanisms and detailed knowledge of gluten properties may lead to the emergence of novel effective approaches for treatment of gluten-related disorders.

  7. Properties of Gluten Intolerance: Gluten Structure, Evolution, Pathogenicity and Detoxification Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakireva, Anastasia V.; Zamyatnin, Andrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Theterm gluten intolerance may refer to three types of human disorders: autoimmune celiac disease (CD), allergy to wheat and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). Gluten is a mixture of prolamin proteins present mostly in wheat, but also in barley, rye and oat. Gluten can be subdivided into three major groups: S-rich, S-poor and high molecular weight proteins. Prolamins within the groups possess similar structures and properties. All gluten proteins are evolutionarily connected and share the same ancestral origin. Gluten proteins are highly resistant to hydrolysis mediated by proteases of the human gastrointestinal tract. It results in emergence of pathogenic peptides, which cause CD and allergy in genetically predisposed people. There is a hierarchy of peptide toxicity and peptide recognition by T cells. Nowadays, there are several ways to detoxify gluten peptides: the most common is gluten-free diet (GFD), which has proved its effectiveness; prevention programs, enzymatic therapy, correction of gluten pathogenicity pathways and genetically modified grains with reduced immunotoxicity. A deep understanding of gluten intolerance underlying mechanisms and detailed knowledge of gluten properties may lead to the emergence of novel effective approaches for treatment of gluten-related disorders. PMID:27763541

  8. Effect of longitudinal physical training and water immersion on orthostatic tolerance in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Dunn, E. R.; Nesvig, C.; Keil, L. C.; Harrison, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of six months of moderately intense aerobic training on 60-deg head-up tilt tolerance was assessed before and after 6 hrs of water-immersion deconditioning by comparing the orthostatic and fluid-electrolyte-endocrine responses of five male subjects before and after these tests. It was found that six months of training has no significant effect on 60-deg head-up tilt tolerance. Thus, during pretraining, the water immersion tilt-tolerance was found to decrease from about 74 min before to 34 min after water immersion, while during posttraining, water immersion tilt tolerance decreased from 74 min to 44 min. Fluid-electrolyte-endocrine responses were also essentially the same during all four tilts. Plasma volume decreased by 9.0 to 12.6 percent; plasma sodium and osmotic concentrations were unchanged; and serum protein and plasma renin activity increased.

  9. Entropy Analysis of RR and QT Interval Variability during Orthostatic and Mental Stress in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Baumert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic activity affects beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and QT interval. The aim of this study was to explore whether entropy measures are suitable to detect changes in neural outflow to the heart elicited by two different stress paradigms. We recorded short-term ECG in 11 normal subjects during an experimental protocol that involved head-up tilt and mental arithmetic stress and computed sample entropy, cross-sample entropy and causal interactions based on conditional entropy from RR and QT interval time series. Head-up tilt resulted in a significant reduction in sample entropy of RR intervals and cross-sample entropy, while mental arithmetic stress resulted in a significant reduction in coupling directed from RR to QT. In conclusion, measures of entropy are suitable to detect changes in neural outflow to the heart and decoupling of repolarisation variability from heart rate variability elicited by orthostatic or mental arithmetic stress.

  10. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with increased erythrocytic hydrogen sulfide and response to midodrine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyan; Zhao, Juan; Du, Shuxu; Liu, Die; Fu, Chunhin; Li, Xueying; Chen, Stella; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the use of erythrocytic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in predicting the therapeutic efficacy of midodrine hydrochloride for children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Fifty-five children were included in this study, involving 28 children with POTS (POTS group) and 27 healthy children (control group). Children in the POTS group received midodrine hydrochloride treatment. Erythrocytic H2S production was measured; a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess if erythrocytic H2S could predict the therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride treatment. H2S production from erythrocytes was significantly higher in the POTS group than in the control group (P midodrine hydrochloride than in non-responders (P midodrine hydrochloride therapy for children with POTS. Erythrocytic H2S could serve as a useful predictor of therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride in children with POTS. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV-related social intolerance and risky sexual behavior in a high HIV prevalence environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavande, Adeline; Sampaio, Mafalda; Sood, Neeraj

    2014-06-01

    Although most countries state that fighting social intolerance against persons with HIV is part of their national HIV strategy, the impact of reducing intolerance on risky sexual behavior is largely unknown. In this paper, we estimate the effect of social intolerance against HIV+ persons on risky sexual behavior in rural Malawi using data from roughly 2000 respondents from the 2004 and 2006 waves of the Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH). The effect of social intolerance on risky behavior is a priori ambiguous. On the one hand, higher social intolerance or stigma can lead people to disassociate from the stigmatized group and hence promote risky behavior. On the other hand, intolerance can be viewed as a social tax on being HIV+ and thus higher intolerance may reduce risky behavior. We find that a decrease in social intolerance is associated with a decrease in risky behavior, including fewer partners and a lower likelihood of having extra-marital relations. This effect is mainly driven by the impact of social intolerance on men. Overall the results suggests that reducing social intolerance might not only benefit the HIV positive but might also forestall the spread of HIV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Symmetry of healthy adult feet: role of orthostatic footprint at computerized baropodometry and of digital formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridola, C; Palma, A; Cappello, F; Gravante, G; Russo, G; Truglio, G; Pomara, F; Amato, G

    2001-01-01

    Morphological aspects of orthostatic footprints (anterior heel, isthmus, posterior heel), using computerized baropodometry and of the digital formula were studied in 97 subjects (37 males, 60 females; median age: 20.9+/-1.56) at the Medical School of Palermo, Italy. The aim of this study was to contribute to our knowledge of the bilateral symmetry and asymmetry of the human feet in ethnically similar groups. We evaluated the length of the footprints (FL) and the widths of the anterior heel (AHW), isthmus (IW), and the posterior heel (PHW). Values were compared in the left and right feet of each subjects. The general morphology of the footprints was considered to determine bilateral correspondence or divergence. We also evaluated the digital formula to verify any bilateral correspondence. The linear measurements of the footprints did not show any particular bilateral conformity. The general morphology of the footprint showed bilateral correspondence in 76 subjects (78%): in 21 subjects (22%) it did not show any. Typological results of the bilateral orthostatic footprints showed normalfootprints in 54 subjects (55.5%): the isthmus included 1/3 to 2/3 of the AHW. Hollow footprints were found in 20 subjects (20.5%): the isthmus was less than 1/3 of the AHW. At clinical examination, using the digital formula, we found that Egyptian foot (1 degree > 2 degrees) was the most frequent (68%). The standard foot (1 degree = 2 degrees) and the Greek foot (1 degree digital formulas: 1 degree > 2 degrees in 59 subjects (62%), 1 degree = 2 degrees in 9 subjects (9%), and 1 degree footprints and of the digital formulas showed that bilateral correspondence was prevalent.

  13. Effects of Vestibular Loss on Orthostatic Responses to Tilts in the Pitch Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Serrador, Jorge M.; Black, F. Owen; Rupert,Angus H.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vestibular loss might impair orthostatic responses to passive tilts in the pitch plane in human subjects. Data were obtained from six subjects having chronic bilateral vestibular loss and six healthy individuals matched for age, gender, and body mass index. Vestibular loss was assessed with a comprehensive battery including dynamic posturography, vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and ocular counterrolling. Head up tilt tests were conducted using a motorized two-axis table that allowed subjects to be tilted in the pitch plane from either a supine or prone body orientation at a slow rate (8 deg/s). The sessions consisted of three tilts, each consisting of20 min rest in a horizontal position, tilt to 80 deg upright for 10 min, and then return to the horizontal position for 5 min. The tilts were performed in darkness (supine and prone) or in light (supine only). Background music was used to mask auditory orientation cues. Autonomic measurements included beat-to-beat recordings of blood pressure (Finapres), heart rate (ECG), cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), end tidal CO2, respiratory rate and volume (Respritrace), and stroke volume (impedance cardiography). For both patients and control subjects, cerebral blood flow appeared to exhibit the most rapid adjustment following transient changes in posture. Outside of a greater cerebral hypoperfusion in patients during the later stages of tilt, responses did not differ dramatically between the vestibular loss and control subjects, or between tilts performed in light and dark room conditions. Thus, with the 'exception of cerebrovascular regulation, we conclude that orthostatic responses during slow postural tilts are not substantially impaired in humans following chronic loss of vestibular function, a result that might reflect compensation by nonvisual graviceptor

  14. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson's disease: evaluation, management, and emerging role of droxidopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacson SH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stuart H Isaacson, Julia Skettini Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL, USA Abstract: Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH is due to failure of the autonomic nervous system to regulate blood pressure in response to postural changes due to an inadequate release of norepinephrine, leading to orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. nOH is common in Parkinson's disease (PD. Prevalence varies throughout the course of PD, ranging from 40% to 60%, and resulting in symptomatic nOH in approximately half. Symptomatic nOH, including lightheadedness, can limit daily activities and lead to falls. Symptomatic nOH can also limit therapeutic options for treating PD motor symptoms. Clinical evaluation should routinely include symptom assessment and blood pressure measurement of supine, sitting, and 3-minute standing; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can also be helpful. Non-pharmacological management of symptomatic nOH involves education, physical maneuvers, and adequate hydration. Current pharmacological treatment of symptomatic nOH includes salt supplement, fludrocortisone, midodrine, pyridostigmine, and other empiric medications. Despite these options, treatment of symptomatic nOH remains suboptimal, often limited by severe increases in supine blood pressure. Droxidopa, an oral prodrug converted by decarboxylation to norepinephrine, is a promising therapeutic option for symptomatic nOH in PD, improving symptoms of nOH, daily activities, falls, and standing systolic blood pressure in several recent trials. These trials demonstrated short-term efficacy and tolerability, with comparable increases in standing and supine blood pressures. Longer-term studies are ongoing to confirm durability of treatment effect. Keywords: (presyncope, norepinephrine, autonomic, lightheadedness, treatment, falls

  15. A double-blind assessment of additive intolerance in children using a 12 day challenge period at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, N; Scott, A

    1989-05-01

    Alleged food-additive intolerance (respiratory, dermatological, behavioural or abdominal) was assessed in 19 children using daily challenge drinks of either, base product alone, base product plus sunset yellow/tartrazine, or base product plus sodium metabisulphite/sodium benzoate. The same type of drink was given for 12 days, double-blind and in random order. During the trial the children were maintained on an additive-free diet under supervision. Diary cards were used to record symptoms and medication usage. If there was an apparent association between symptoms and drink ingredient the trial was repeated, again double-blind. Additive intolerance was confirmed by a consistent deterioration of symptoms in only three children. In one, urticaria was induced by the colourings, in another extremely abnormal behaviour was induced by the preservatives and a third child was only free of asthma and abdominal pain on placebo. This form of individual trial, using 12 daily drinks, overcomes some of the objections to a single challenge study. Despite this, intolerance to the additives was only confirmed in 3/19 children in whom it had been believed to occur.

  16. Alantolactone Improves Prolonged Exposure of Interleukin-6-Induced Skeletal Muscle Inflammation Associated Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The pro-inflammatory cytokine, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, has been proposed to be one of the mediators that link chronic inflammation to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Many studies have demonstrated the effects of IL-6 on insulin action in the skeletal muscle. However, few studies have investigated the effect of long-term treatment of IL-6, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. In the present study, we observed protective effects of alantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Inula helenium against glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by prolonged exposure of IL-6. Alantolactone has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects through IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling pathway. The relationship between IL-6 exposure and expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, involved in inflammation in the skeletal muscle, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. We observed maximum dysregulation of glucose uptake after 40 ng/ml IL-6 induction for 24 h in L6 myotubes. Prolonged IL-6 exposure suppressed glucose uptake regulating alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT phosphorylation; however, pretreatment with alantolactone activated AKT phosphorylation and improved glucose uptake. Alantolactone also attenuated IL-6-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation, followed by an increase in expression of negative regulator suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3. Furthermore, IL-6-induced expression of pathogen recognition receptor, TLR4, was also suppressed by alantolactone pretreatment. Post-silencing of STAT3 using siRNA approach, IL-6-stimulated siRNA-STAT3 improved glucose uptake and suppressed TLR4 gene expression. Taken together, we propose that, as a STAT3 inhibitor, alantolactone, improves glucose regulation in the skeletal muscle by inhibiting IL-6-induced STAT3-SOCS3 signaling followed by inhibition of the TLR4 gene expression. Therefore

  17. Prevalence and Characteristics of Chemical Intolerance: A Japanese Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Iwao; Katoh, Takahiko; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Population-based cross-sectional study was performed to estimate the prevalence of chemical intolerance and to examine the characteristics of the sample. A Web-based survey was conducted that included 7,245 adults in Japan. The criteria for chemical intolerance proposed by Skovbjerg yielded a prevalence of 7.5% that was approximately consistent with that reported from a Danish population-based survey. Female gender, older age, and renovation in the house during the past 7 years were positively associated with chemical intolerance. Improvements in the condition were observed with daily ventilation habits. Medical history of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, multiple chemical sensitivity, and depression were associated with chemical intolerance. Fatigue, depressed mood, and somatic symptoms were also positively correlated with chemical intolerance. Better elucidation of the causes, comorbidities, concomitants, and consequences of chemical intolerance has the potential to provide effective solutions for its prevention and treatment.

  18. Abundance and diversity of GI microbiota rather than IgG4 levels correlate with abdominal inconvenience and gut permeability in consumers claiming food intolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Berit; Remely, Marlene; Bartosiewicz, Natalie; Riedel, Monika; Nichterl, Claudia; Schatz, Lulit; Pummer, Sandra; Haslberger, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Food intolerances are an increasing global health problem. Interactions between genetics and environmental changes such as microbial- and stress factors remain poorly understood. Whereas the analyses of IgE mediated allergic responses is based on solid concepts, the roles of microbiota, gut permeability, and IgG antibodies remain widely unclear and are under fierce discussion for scientific relevance. The present pilot study analyzes forty participants, under consultation of nutritional health professionals, for gastrointestinal discomfort and claimed food intolerances. Food frequency questionnaire addresses nutrition, lifestyle and present discomfort. Feces samples are analyzed for dominant microbiota using 16S rDNA based methods and the fecal marker Calprotectin. Blood samples are analyzed for IgG4 levels. The total microbial abundance significantly correlates with claimed discomfort (R=-0.37; p=0.02). The abundance and diversity of microbiota significantly correlates with low Calprotectin values (R=-0.35; p=0.01) and with higher abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (R=0.78; pdiversity is also correlating with reduced antibodies against IgG4 of egg white (R=0.68; pgut permeability and reduced inflammation with an established microbial equilibrium. Self-reported abdominal inconvenience of participants relates mainly to characteristics of microbiota and gut permeability. Anti-inflammatory effects of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii or Lactobacilli and gut barrier functions of Akkermansia may have a key role in food intolerances. The role of IgG4 linking food immune responses with intolerances remains unclear.

  19. Fecal calprotectin levels in preterm infants with and without feeding intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, Rehab; Khashana, Abdelmoneim; Kamel, Noha; Elsharqawy, Sonia Elsharqawy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To assess the level of fecal calprotectin in preterm neonates with feeding intolerance, as well as to evaluate it as a marker of feeding intolerance and to determine a cut-off level of fecal calprotectin in feeding intolerance. Methods: Analytical, multicenter, case-control study, which was carried out in neonatal intensive care units in Egypt, in a period from August 1, 2014 to March 1, 2015 on 52 preterm neonates. Neonates were classified into two groups; a study grou...

  20. Fructose and lactose intolerance and malabsorption testing: the relationship with symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder-Smith, C H; Materna, A; Wermelinger, C; Schuler, J

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of fructose and lactose intolerance and malabsorption with the symptoms of different functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) remains unclear. Aim To investigate the prevalence of fructose and lactose intolerance (symptom induction) and malabsorption and their association with clinical gastrointestinal (GI) as well as non-GI symptoms in FGID and the outcome of dietary intervention. Methods Fructose and lactose intolerance (defined by positive symptom index) and ...

  1. The Investigation of Relationship Between Procrastination and Discomfort Intolerance in University Students.

    OpenAIRE

    Levent Sutcigil; Asiye Nur Nihan Yurdakul; M.Hakan Turkcapar

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to compare the strengths of people with high and low procrastination tendencies towards discomfort intolerance and to examine the relation between procrastination behavior and discomfort intolerance. The working group constitutes 70 university students who are staying in Istanbul and accepting voluntary participation. In this research; The General Procrastination Scale" and "Academic Procrastination Scale", "Resilience Scale", Discomfort Intolerance Scale and ...

  2. The association between Internet addiction and belief of frustration intolerance: the gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Chung-Sheng; Wang, Shing-Yaw

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance, the gender difference of frustration intolerance, and the gender differences of the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance. Participants were 2,114 students (1,204 male and 910 female) who were recruited to complete the Chen Internet Addiction Scale and Frustration Discomfort scale. Females had higher scores on the subscale of entitlement and emotional intolerance and the total scale of the frustration intolerance. There was a significant gender difference on the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance. The association was higher in male adolescents. Regression analysis revealed male adolescents with Internet addiction had higher intolerance to frustration of entitlement and emotional discomfort, and female adolescents with it had higher intolerance to emotional discomfort and lower tolerance to frustration of achievement. Frustration intolerance should be evaluated for adolescents with Internet addiction, especially for males. Rational emotive behavior therapy focusing on different irrational beliefs should be provided to male and female adolescents with Internet addiction.

  3. Lactose and Fructose Intolerance in Turkish Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Ozlem; Kalayci, Ayhan Gazi; Comba, Atakan; Eren, Esra; Caltepe, Gonul

    2016-05-08

    To investigate the prevalence of lactose and fructose intolerance in children with chronic abdominal pain. Hydrogen breath tests were done to detect lactose and fructose malabsorption in 86 children with chronic abdominal pain (44 irritable bowel syndrome, 24 functional abdominal pain and 17 functional abdominal pain syndrome as per Rome III criteria) presenting to a Pediatric Gastroentreology department. 14 (16.3%) of patients were diagnosed with lactose intolerance and 11 (12.8%) with fructose intolerance. Lactose and fructose intolerance in children can lead to chronic abdominal pain and symptoms improve with dietary modifications.

  4. Blood pressure regulation, cognition, and depression in response to orthostatic challenge in African American children: an initial investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    Poor blood pressure regulation (BPR) in response to orthostasis could contribute to cerebral hypoperfusion and cell damage. The authors of this study examined neuropsychological function and mood in relation to BPR following orthostatic challenge in African American children, aged 6 to 9 years. Participants (N = 33) laid supine for 5 minutes, before having their BP taken. Participants then stood and had BP measured again at 1, 3, and 5 minutes. After a rest, the authors administrated neuropsychological and depression tests while the participants were seated. The authors calculated the difference between supine and 1-minute standing systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) scores. In response to orthostatic challenge, smaller increases in SBP were predictive of decreased verbal memory whereas smaller increases in PP were associated with increased depressive symptomatology and poor prospective memory. In conclusion, less effective BPR was associated with increased depression and poor performance on some neuropsychological tests.

  5. Aspirin Intolerance: Experimental Models for Bed-to-Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masamichi

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the oldest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and it sometimes causes asthma-like symptoms known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which can be serious. Unwanted effects of aspirin (aspirin intolerance) are also observed in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, a type I allergy disease, and aspirin-induced urticaria (AIU). However the target and the mechanism of the aspirin intolerance are still unknown. There is no animal or cellular model of AERD, because its pathophysiological mechanism is still unknown, but it is thought that inhibition of cyclooxygenase by causative agents leads to an increase of free arachidonic acid, which is metabolized into cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) that provoke airway smooth muscle constriction and asthma symptoms. As the bed-to-bench approach, to confirm the clinical discussion in experimental cellular models, we have tried to develop a cellular model of AERD using activated RBL-2H3 cells, a rat mast cell like cell line. Indomethacin (another NSAID and also causes AERD), enhances in vitro cysLTs production by RBL-2H3 cells, while there is no induction of cysLTs production in the absence of inflammatory activation. Since this suggests that all inflammatory cells with activation of prostaglandin and cysLT metabolism should respond to NSAIDs, and then I have concluded that aspirin intolerance should be separated from subsequent bronchoconstriction. Evidence about the cellular mechanisms of NSAIDs may be employed for development of in vitro AERD models as the approach from bench-to-bed. PMID:27719658

  6. Probiotic Supplementation in Preterm: Feeding Intolerance and Hospital Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Indrio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that giving the probiotic strain Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri DSM 17938 to preterm, formula-fed infants would prevent an early traumatic intestinal inflammatory insult modulating intestinal cytokine profile and reducing the onset of feeding intolerance. Newborn were randomly allocated during the first 48 h of life to receive either daily probiotic (108 colony forming units (CFUs of L. reuteri DSM 17938 or placebo for one month. All the newborns underwent to gastric ultrasound for the measurement of gastric emptying time. Fecal samples were collected for the evaluation of fecal cytokines. Clinical data on feeding intolerance and weight gain were collected. The costs of hospital stays were calculated. The results showed that the newborns receiving L. reuteri DSM 17938 had a significant decrease in the number of days needed to reach full enteral feeding (p < 0.01, days of hospital stay (p < 0.01, and days of antibiotic treatment (p < 0.01. Statistically significant differences were observed in pattern of fecal cytokine profiles. The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-10, was increased in newborns receiving L. reuteri DSM 17938. Pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-17, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha levels were increased in newborns given placebo. Differences in the gastric emptying and fasting antral area (FAA were also observed. Our study demonstrates an effective role for L. reuteri DSM 17938 supplementation in preventing feeding intolerance and improving gut motor and immune function development in bottle-fed stable preterm newborns. Another benefit from the use of probiotics is the reducing cost for the Health Care service.

  7. Applying the Implicit Association Test to Measure Intolerance of Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Oriana; Dentale, Francesco; Lauriola, Marco; Leone, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is a key trans-diagnostic personality construct strongly associated with anxiety symptoms. Traditionally, IU is measured through self-report measures that are prone to bias effects due to impression management concerns and introspective difficulties. Moreover, self-report scales are not able to intercept the automatic associations that are assumed to be main determinants of several spontaneous responses (e.g., emotional reactions). In order to overcome these limitations, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) was applied to measure IU, with a particular focus on reliability and criterion validity issues. The IU-IAT and the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory (IUI) were administered to an undergraduate student sample (54 females and 10 males) with a mean age of 23 years (SD = 1.7). Successively, participants were asked to provide an individually chosen uncertain event from their own lives that may occur in the future and were requested to identify a number of potential negative consequences of it. Participants' responses in terms of cognitive thoughts (i.e., cognitive appraisal) and worry reactions toward these events were assessed using the two subscales of the Worry and Intolerance of Uncertainty Beliefs Questionnaire. The IU-IAT showed an adequate level of internal consistency and a not significant correlation with the IUI. A path analysis model, accounting for 35% of event-related worry, revealed that IUI had a significant indirect effect on the dependent variable through event-related IU thoughts. By contrast, as expected, IU-IAT predicted event-related worry independently from IU thoughts. In accordance with dual models of social cognition, these findings suggest that IU can influence event-related worry through two different processing pathways (automatic vs. deliberative), supporting the criterion and construct validity of the IU-IAT. The potential role of the IU-IAT for clinical applications was discussed. © The Author

  8. Perceived psychosocial stress and glucose intolerance among pregnant Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M L; Whitcomb, B W; Pekow, P; Braun, B; Markenson, G; Dole, N; Manson, J E; Solomon, C G; Carbone, E T; Chasan-Taber, L

    2014-12-01

    Prior literature suggests a positive association between psychosocial stress and the risk of diabetes in non-pregnant populations, but studies during pregnancy are sparse. We evaluated the relationship between stress and glucose intolerance among 1115 Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) prenatal care patients in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study in Western Massachusetts (2006-2011). Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14) was administered in early (mean = 12.3 weeks gestation; range 4.1-18 weeks) and mid- (mean = 21.3 weeks gestation; range 18.1-26 weeks) pregnancy. Participants were classified as having a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and abnormal glucose tolerance, based on the degree of abnormality on glucose tolerance testing between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and abnormal glucose tolerance was 4.1%, 7.2%, and 14.5%, respectively. Absolute levels of early or mid-pregnancy stress were not significantly associated with glucose intolerance. However, participants with an increase in stress from early to mid-pregnancy had a 2.6-fold increased odds of gestational diabetes mellitus (95% confidence intervals: 1.0-6.9) as compared to those with no change or a decrease in stress after adjusting for age and pre-pregnancy body mass index. In addition, every one-point increase in stress scores was associated with a 5.5mg/dL increase in screening glucose level (β=5.5; standard deviation=2.8; P=0.05), after adjusting for the same variables. In this population of predominantly Puerto Rican women, stress patterns during pregnancy may influence the risk of glucose intolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Lactose intolerance in prostate cancer patients: incidence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Rana, Satyavati V; Mandal, Arup Kumar; Malhotra, Sunita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kumar, Santosh; Acharya, Naveen Chandra; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2008-03-01

    Osteoporosis is common in prostate cancer (CaP) patients both before and after institution of androgen deprivation therapy and is associated with significant morbidity. Lactose intolerance (LI) can affect bone mass but has not been studied in this group of patients. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of LI in CaP patients with that in the general population and to identify factors affecting lactose intolerance in CaP patients. Fifty-five men with CaP planned for bilateral orchidectomy were enrolled in the study and their baseline characteristics including age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), prostate-specific antigen, serum calcium profile, lactose tolerance status, physical activity, alcohol intake and smoking, bone mineral density and calcium intake were registered. The data on lactose tolerance in these patients were compared with those of 81 age-matched controls (data taken from the available database). The incidence of LI in CaP patients was significantly less than that in the control group (36.2% and 58.3%, respectively, p = 0.027). A significantly greater number of CaP patients in the lactose-tolerant group had a calcium intake of >1500 mg/day (p = 0.03) and that of milk >500 ml/day (p = 0.05) than those in the intolerant group. Age >70 years, BMI 163 cm, lower physical activity and co-abuse of alcohol and smoking significantly correlated with the presence of LI (p 25 kg/m2 and weight >65 kg. The incidence of LI in CaP patients is less than that in the general population despite a higher incidence of osteoporosis, indicating a complex etiology of CaP-related osteoporosis. Certain physical characteristics and personal habits are important in determining lactose-tolerant status.

  10. Depressive Symptoms and Orthostatic Hypotension Are Risk Factors for Unexplained Falls in Community-Living Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menant, Jasmine C; Wong, Alfred K W; Trollor, Julian N; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate risk factors for unexplained falls in older community-dwelling individuals. Prospective cohort study. Community population, Sydney, Australia. Older adults (N = 529; mean age 79.8 ± 4.4, 52.2% female). Participants provided information demographic, medical, and medication characteristics and completed cardiovascular (tilt table test, pulse wave velocity), cognitive, and sensorimotor assessments at baseline. Falls were then recorded in monthly fall diaries for 12 months. Unexplained fallers (UFs) were those who reported falls due to a blackout, dizziness, feeling faint, or "found themselves suddenly on the ground." Of the 523 participants available at follow-up, 238 (45.5%) reported one or more falls; 35 participants fulfilled the definition of UFs. UFs were more likely than balance-related fallers (BFs) (n = 203) and nonfallers (n = 291) to have orthostatic hypotension (39.4%, 20.5% and 22.4%, respectively) and depressive symptoms (24.2%, 10.1%, and 7.9% respectively). More UFs (88.6%) than BFs (70.9%) had injurious falls. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that depressive symptoms and orthostatic hypotension were significant and independent determinants of UF status. Approximately 15% of fallers had unexplained falls, which were more likely to result in injuries. Depressive symptoms and orthostatic hypotension increased the risk of unexplained falls, whereas cognitive deficits and sensorimotor and balance impairments did not. Future research should investigate whether psychotherapy and physical exercise to improve mood and medication reviews and nonpharmacological therapies for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension and depression are effective at reducing the risk of unexplained falls in older people. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Twenty-four-hour blood pressure profile, orthostatic hypotension, and cardiac dysautonomia in elderly type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alfredo; Bosone, Daniele; Ramusino, Matteo Cotta; Ghiotto, Natascia; Guaschino, Elena; Zoppi, Annalisa; D'Angelo, Angela; Fogari, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between orthostatic hypotension (OH), defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥20 mmHg and/or a decrease in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥10 mmHg, and 24-h ambulatory BP profile in elderly hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients. After a 2-week antihypertensive wash-out period, 200 hypertensive well-controlled diabetic outpatients, aged 65-75 years, underwent a clinical examination, including BP measurements, ECG, 24-h ABP monitoring (ABPM), an orthostatic test, and three tests for cardiovascular autonomic function assessment [deep breathing, heart rate (HR) variability, resting HR]. According to their nighttime BP profile, patients were divided into three groups: dippers (n = 86) (BP fall during nighttime ≥10 %), non-dippers (n = 80) (BP fall during nighttime 0-10 %), and reverse dippers (n = 34) (nighttime BP > daytime BP). Orthostatic test produced a significantly greater orthostatic SBP fall in dippers and even more in reverse dippers. In these latter, a significant fall was observed also in DBP. Prevalence of OH was 9.3 % in dippers, 30 % in non-dippers, and 79.4 % in reverse dippers. In elderly hypertensive type 2 diabetics, a blunted nocturnal BP fall is associated with OH and autonomic dysfunction. These data suggest that ABPM should be performed in the assessment of hypertensive diabetic patients in whom the cardiovascular dysautonomia is suspected or the signs of it are present (such as OH).

  12. Considerations on the electromagnetic hypersensitivity and idiopathic environmental intolerances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Anne

    2017-01-01

    After having noticed that environmental and health concerns are an important matter of concern in our society, and that always more pathologies are blamed on the environment, the author more particularly addresses electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) which is considered by the WHO as a part of idiopathic environmental intolerances (IEI). He more particularly discusses the various conditions of emergence of these syndromes as they have been noticed, analysed and identified in different countries and in different studies. He discusses the possible definition to be given to these syndromes and their possible meaning

  13. Does mental arithmetic before head up tilt have an effect on the orthostatic cardiovascular and hormonal responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Papousek, Ilona; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Jezova, Daniela; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut G.

    2011-05-01

    Passive head up tilt (HUT) and mental arithmetic (MA) are commonly used for providing mental and orthostatic challenges, respectively. In animal experiments, even a single exposure to a stressor has been shown to modify the response to subsequent stress stimulus. We investigated whether MA applied before HUT elicits synergistic responses in orthostatic heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), heart rate variability and arterial blood pressure. The 15 healthy young males were subjected to two randomized protocols: (a) HUT and (b) HUT preceded by MA, with sessions randomized and ≥2 weeks apart. Beat to beat continuous hemodynamic variables were measured and saliva samples taken for hormonal assay. HUT alone increased HR from 59±7 (baseline) to 80±10 bpm (mean±SD) and mean blood pressure (MBP) from 88±10 to 91±14 mmHg. HUT results after MA were not different from those with HUT alone. The activity of alpha amylase showed differences during the experiments irrespective of the protocols. We conclude that mental challenge does not affect orthostatic cardiovascular responses when applied before; the timing of mental loading seems to be critical if it is intended to alter cardiovascular responses to upright standing.

  14. Endothelin role in the orthostatic stress Papel da endotelina no estresse ortostático

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Cardoso Martins Pinge

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Orthostasis adoption causes hemodynamic changes. Hydrostatic opposition to the venous return, venous return reduction and cardiac output decrease act as stimuli and generate compensatory mechanisms. The central nervous system adjusts the autonomic sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. The autonomous nervous system causes a tonic and reflexive influence on the main variables of the cardiovascular system and, together with hormonal components, extends the adaptation capacity in face of postural changes. Any difficulties in this compensatory mechanism that prevents it from functioning properly may result in hypotension response failure, what, on its turn, can lead to cerebral hypoperfusion, hypoxia and loss of consciousness. Blood pressure maintenance at normal levels is important for the internal medium homeosthasis. Baroreflex plays an important role in the cardiovascular control in the short-term in the adaptation of the orthostatic stress, preventing excessive blood pressure alterations. During the orthostatic stress, neuroendocrinal changes also occur as alteration in endothelin plasma levels. Endothelin, a peptide formed by 21 amino acids, shows a powerful vasoconstrictor action. It also demonstrates that its levels in the blood are increased in response to an orthostatic stress. However, although endothelin-1 levels increase in response to an acute postural stress, its role in cardiovascular homeosthasis and its relation in the release of other hormones are still controversial and quite unknown in humans in vivo. A adoção da ortostase promove alterações hemodinâmicas. A oposição hidrostática ao retorno venoso, a redução do retorno venoso e a diminuição do débito cardíaco atua como estímulos e geram mecanismos compensatórios. O sistema nervoso central ajusta a atividade autonômica simpática e parassimpática. O sistema nervoso autônomo influencia tônica e reflexamente as principais variáveis do sistema cardiovascular

  15. The Usefulness of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) for Detection of Glucose Intolerance in Thai Women of Reproductive Age with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwananuruk, Thanyarat; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Leerasiri, Pichai; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Dangrat, Chongdee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To study the cut-off point of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) as a screening test for detection of glucose intolerance in Thai women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Subject. Two hundred and fifty Thai PCOS women who attended the Gynecologic Endocrinology Unit, during May 2007 to January 2009. Materials and Methods. The paitents were interviewed and examined for weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Venous blood samples were drawn twice, one at 12-hour fasting and the other at 2 hours after glucose loading. Results. The prevalence of glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women was 20.0%. The mean of HOMA-IR was 3.53  ±  7.7. Area under an ROC curve for HOMA-IR for detecting glucose intolerance was 0.82. Using the cut-off value of HOMA-IR >2.0, there was sensitivity at 84.0%, specificity at 61.0%, positive predictive value at 35.0%, negative predictive value at 93.8%, and accuracy at 65.6%. Conclusion. HOMA-IR >2.0 was used for screening test for glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women. If the result was positive, a specific test should be done to prove the diagnosis.

  16. Statin Intolerance: A Literature Review and Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, David R; Eckel, Robert H

    Statin intolerance is a commonly encountered clinical problem for which useful management strategies exist. Although many patients report statin-related muscle symptoms, studies indicate that the majority of these patients can tolerate a statin upon re-challenge. Alternative statin dosing strategies are an effective way to modify and reintroduce statin therapy for patients reporting adverse symptoms. Correction of vitamin D deficiency and hypothyroidism may improve statin tolerability in some patients. CoQ10 supplementation has been found to be of no benefit for statin-related muscle symptoms in most recent clinical trials. PCSK9 inhibitors are a new therapeutic option that if confirmed as safe and effective by outcomes trials may be of substantial benefit to select patients at high ASCVD risk who are unable to achieve adequate low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering on maximally tolerated statin therapy. Other available medications to lower LDL-C in statin intolerant patients include ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, and fibrates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. [Unmet needs: patients with statin intolerance or familial hypercholesterolemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masana, Luis; Civeira, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The achievement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) therapeutic targets is especially difficult in some patients at high cardiovascular risk. These patients include persons with statin intolerance and those with very high LDL cholesterol (LDLc) levels such as persons with familial hypercholesterolemia. The proportion of statin-intolerant patients is between 7% and 29%. Alternative lipid-lowering drugs (including ezetimibe) are less effective and are not free from adverse effects. Both alirocumab, with the ODYSSEY ALTERNATIVE study, and evolocumab, with the GAUSS study, have shown strong lipid-lowering efficacy, with much greater tolerability than currently available alternatives, with the result that a larger number of patients achieve therapeutic targets. In familial hypercholesterolemia, the monogenic metabolic disease most frequently associated with high cardiovascular risk, early intervention is cost-effective. Although statins have substantially improved the prognosis of familial hypercholesterolemia, many affected individuals are far from achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. In this patient group, PCSK9 inhibition with monoclonal antibodies has also been shown to be highly effective in reducing LDLc, especially in heterozygous individuals. The studies performed to date have shown that these drugs are safe and effective and can help many patients with familial hypercholesterolemia to drastically reduce their cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. All rights reserved.

  18. Prosthesis intolerance in patients with transfemoral amputation: a videocapillaroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Claudio; Cassigoli, Silvia; Lova, Raffaele Molino; Roccuzzo, Aurelio; Miniati, Benedetta; Ceppatelli, Simone; Conti, Andrea A; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2004-06-01

    Videocapillaroscopy is a new technique allowing a noninvasive examination of the capillary framework of the skin by using a contact probe with magnifying lenses and a cold-light epiluminescence system. The aim of this article was to investigate, by videocapillaroscopy, the microcirculation of the skin of the stump in 70 consecutive patients with unilateral transfemoral amputation. Patients were divided into two subgroups according to their tolerance (A) or intolerance (B) to a prosthesis with an Icelandic-Swedish-New York socket. Subgroup A included 48 patients, 17 diabetic and 31 nondiabetic, and subgroup B included 22 patients, 16 diabetic and 6 nondiabetic. In subgroup B, the caliber of capillary loops was significantly larger (mean +/-standard deviation, 23.6 +/-2.04 vs. 16.2 +/-1.96 microm; P multiple logistic regression analysis, intolerance to the prosthesis was significantly related to microvascular changes (P = 0.001) but not to diabetes (P = 0.601), although diabetes was unequally distributed in the two subgroups.

  19. A Comparison of the 27-Item and 12-Item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Yu, Lai Ngo Heidi

    2010-01-01

    The 27-item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS) has become one of the most frequently used measures of Intolerance of Uncertainty. More recently, an abridged, 12-item version of the IUS has been developed. The current research used clinical (n = 50) and non-clinical (n = 56) samples to examine and compare the psychometric properties of both…

  20. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Index: Replication and Extension with an English Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton, R. Nicholas; Gosselin, Patrick; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is related to anxiety, depression, worry, and anxiety sensitivity. Precedent IU measures were criticized for psychometric instability and redundancy; alternative measures include the novel 45-item measure (Intolerance of Uncertainty Index; IUI). The IUI was developed in French with 2 parts, assessing general…

  1. Lactose Intolerance: Exploring Reaction Kinetics Governing Lactose Conversion of Dairy Products within the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jimmy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a condition suffered by an estimated 50 million Americans. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75 percent of all African-American, Jewish, Native American, and Mexican-American adults, and 90 percent of Asian-American adults are lactose intolerant. Some populations in Africa…

  2. Colonic fermentation may play a role in lactose intolerance in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T; Priebe, MG; Harmsen, HJM; Stellaard, F; Sun, XH; Welling, GW; Vonk, RJ

    The results of our previous study suggested that in addition to the small intestinal lactase activity and transit time, colonic processing of lactose may play a role in lactose intolerance. We investigated whether colonic fermentation of lactose is correlated with lactose intolerance. After 28

  3. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in multiethnic sample of adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, between 30 and 50 million Americans have the potential for lactose-intolerance symptoms. However, lactose-intolerance prevalence rates in practical life settings may be lower than originally suggested. The goal of thi...

  4. Vitamin E and Vitamin C supplementation does not prevent glucose intolerance in obese-prone rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity-induced glucose intolerance affects over 70 million Americans. Elevated oxidative stress is associated with development of glucose intolerance. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation with the anti-oxidants vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol acetate; 0.4 g/kg diet) and vitamin...

  5. Sources and severity of self-reported food intolerance after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhagen, E.; Roos, de N.M.; Bouwman, C.A.; Laarhoven, van C.J.H.M.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Data on food intolerance after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis are scarce. The aim of this study was to identify foods causing intolerance and to determine the nature and severity of reported symptoms. Patients from the Dutch Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis Association were mailed a survey on food

  6. Clinical Profile of Statin Intolerance in the Phase 3 GAUSS-2 Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, Leslie; Rocco, Michael; Colquhoun, David; Sullivan, David; Rosenson, Robert S.; Dent, Ricardo; Xue, Allen; Scott, Rob; Wasserman, Scott M.; Stroes, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that statin intolerance may be more common than reported in randomized trials. However, the statin-intolerant population is not well characterized. The goal of this report is to characterize the population enrolled in the phase 3 Goal Achievement after Utilizing an

  7. Intolerable wide and narrow QRS complex tachycardia in the same patient: What is your diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Aksu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old female with recurrent syncope was referred to our institution for electrophysiological study. The patient had two documented intolerable tachycardia; one of them was a wide QRS, and the other one was a narrow QRS. As a clinical puzzle format, we aimed to present our basic electrophysiological approach of an intolerable and rare clinical tachycardia.

  8. CORRELATION BETWEEN GUT MICROBIOTA AND DEVELOPMENT OF GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE IN B6.V-Lepob/J LEPTIN DEFICIENT MICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Merete; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    Life style associated diseases such as type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease originate form an adaptive immune response, which can be down regulated by a regulatory immune response and are under heavy stimulation from early life gut microbiota (GM). Today...... correlation was found between blood glucose, HbA1c% and glucose intolerance and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12, supporting the correlation found between gut and disease, as IL-12 is secreted after microbial stimulation of immunological cells – e.g. In the gut. Further investigations concerning...

  9. The influence of fear of falling on orthostatic postural control: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Silva de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Posture is a complex sensory-motor behavior that can be influenced by the fear of falling (FoF during environmental changes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of FoF on orthostatic postural control in healthy individuals by a systematic review. Thirteen articles were selected. Some other articles (31 references were used to contextualize and discuss the topic. Studies in the environment made changes on the environment, in which participants were positioned in high hydraulic platforms at different heights, showed a decrease in the center of pressure in the anteroposterior oscillation where the platform was higher. This change in postural control strategy and the FoF are correlated. It can modulate the activity of the muscle spindle (H-reflex and probably induce postural freezing phenomenon (anticipated postural anxiety. We can conclude that further studies are needed to understand the physiological mechanisms involved in FoF and its relation to changes in postural control strategy.

  10. Disabling Orthostatic Headache after Penetrating Stonemason Pencil Injury to the Sacral Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Brembilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating injuries to the spine, although less common than motor vehicle accidents and falls, are important causes of injury to the spinal cord. They are essentially of two varieties: gunshot or stab wounds. Gunshot injuries to the spine are more commonly described. Stab wounds are usually inflicted by knife or other sharp objects. Rarer objects causing incidental spinal injuries include glass fragments, wood pieces, chopsticks, nailguns, and injection needles. Just few cases of penetrating vertebral injuries caused by pencil are described. The current case concerns a 42-year-old man with an accidental penetrating stonemason pencil injury into the vertebral canal without neurological deficit. After the self-removal of the foreign object the patient complained of a disabling orthostatic headache. The early identification and treatment of the intracranial hypotension due to the posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sacral fistulae were mandatory to avoid further neurological complications. In the current literature acute pattern of intracranial hypotension immediately after a penetrating injury of the vertebral column has never been reported.

  11. Rehabilitation of atrophic anophthalmic cavity with orthostatic ocular prosthesis: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, C F; Cordeiro, J M; Emídio, T C S; Presotto, A G C; Barbosa, C M R

    2016-10-01

    The absence of the eyeball can generate psychosocial and facial harmony changes, such as atrophy of the muscles around it. In these cases, the use of an orthostatic prosthesis with expanding function fosters distension of the tissues for subsequent rehabilitation. This technique consists of making individual ocular prostheses with gradual enlargement of size. The aim of this following clinical report was to describe the technique used in the standing prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient, 73 years old, who underwent enucleation of the right eye as a result of glaucoma. Clinical and laboratory procedures were performed such as impression, adjusting curvature of the sclera, centering the pupil area and processing in heat-cured acrylic resin three prostheses made according to the expansion of the anophthalmic cavity. At the end of treatment, there was a considerable increase of the cavity, allowing for volume replacement similar to that existing in the patient's contralateral orbit, thus generating a satisfactory facial harmony. Copyright © 2016 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcomes in adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome treated with midodrine and beta-blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cindy C; Fischer, Philip R; Brands, Chad K; Fisher, Jennifer L; Porter, Co-Burn J; Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Graner, Kevin K

    2009-02-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is associated with debilitating fatigue, dizziness, and discomfort in previously healthy adolescents. The effects of medical therapy have not been well studied in this patient population. This study assessed the relative efficacy and impact of drug therapy on the functioning and quality of life in adolescents with POTS. A retrospective, single center, chart review analysis with a follow-up written survey was conducted on a group of 121 adolescents who had undergone autonomic reflex screening at the Mayo Clinic from 2002 to 2005 as part of an evaluation for possible POTS. Of 121 surveys sent, 47 adolescents returned a completed survey. In this cohort of patients, the two most commonly prescribed drug therapies were midodrine (n = 13) and beta-blockers (n = 14). Patients in the midodrine group were comparable to patients in the beta-blocker group in gender, age, pretreatment postural heart rate changes, and months from initial evaluation to survey completion. More patients treated with a beta-blocker reported improvement after visiting Mayo Clinic (100% vs 62%, P = 0.016) and more attributed their progress to medication (63.6% vs 36.4%, P = 0.011) than did those treated with midodrine. Treatment with both midodrine and beta-blockers was associated with overall improvement in POTS patients' general health; however, adolescents taking beta-blockers were more likely than those taking midodrine to credit the role of medications in their improvement.

  13. Midodrine hydrochloride is effective in the treatment of children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Wang, Li; Sun, Jinghui; Qin, Jiong; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang; Du, Junbao

    2011-01-01

    The study was carried out to examine the effect of selective α1 adrenoceptor agonist midodrine hydrochloride vs. β-adrenergic blockade metoprolol in the treatment of children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Fifty-three children with POTS were divided into group I (midodrine hydrochloride plus conventional therapy), group II (metoprolol plus conventional therapy) and group III (conventional therapy). Standing test was conducted for all participants. The cure rate, improvement rate, effective rate and score of symptoms were compared among the 3 groups. A Kaplan-Meier survivorship curve was used to describe the proportion of symptom-free cases during a long term follow-up. The cure rate and effective rate at the end of short term follow-up in group I were significantly higher than those of group II and group III (68.42% vs. 42.11% vs. 20.00%, P0.05). Midodrine hydrochloride is effective in the treatment of children with POTS. All rights are reserved to the Japanese Circulation Society.

  14. Midodrine for orthostatic hypotension: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Singh, Balwinder; Altayar, Osama; Mascarenhas, Soniya S; Singh, Shannon K; Erwin, Patricia J; Murad, M Hassan

    2013-11-01

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of midodrine in orthostatic hypotension (OH). We searched major databases and related conference proceedings through June 30, 2012. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool the outcome measures across studies. Seven trials were included in the efficacy analysis (enrolling 325 patients, mean age 53 years) and two additional trials were included in the safety analysis. Compared to placebo, the mean change in systolic blood pressure was 4.9 mmHg (p = 0.65) and the mean change in mean arterial pressure from supine to standing was -1.7 mmHg (p = 0.45). The change in standing systolic blood pressure before and after giving midodrine was 21.5 mmHg (p midodrine. The quality of evidence was limited by imprecision, heterogeneity and increased risk of bias. There is insufficient and low quality evidence to support the use of midodrine for OH.

  15. Energy and environmental intolerance: electromagnetic hypersensitivity, wind turbine syndrome. What is the reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet-Belfais, Monique; Lambrozo, Jacques; Souques, Martine; Piotrowski, Aleksandra; Tossa, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The current debate about means of power generation, in the framework of the energy transition, must necessarily consider questions about different forms of idiopathic environmental intolerance, notably hypersensitivity attributed to electromagnetic fields and the wind turbine syndrome, which incriminates the low frequency- and infra-sound waves emitted by industrial wind turbines. This article attempts to take stock of current knowledge about each of these conditions, highlighting their differences and similarities. Although the offending sources are different, the symptoms, variable and not specific to any particular disease, are very similar. Nor has any consensual clinical definition of these conditions or their diagnostic criteria been established. Despite the lack of objective diagnostic criteria, many studies have investigated the existence of a potential causal link between the symptoms and the environmental factors implicated, attempting to highlight a possible plausible underlying mechanism, either biological or psychological. Although there is no doubt about the reality or the potential severity of the symptoms of electromagnetic hypersensitivity, no causal link with electromagnetic fields has been demonstrated to date, and no biological mechanism appears plausible. For the wind turbine syndrome, no direct health effect on the ear or other organs due to the noise emission of wind turbines, including low frequency and infra-sound waves, has been demonstrated. The frequently mentioned discomfort has most often been linked to a negative perception of wind turbines. Psychological mechanisms have been explored for both syndromes, including a potential nocebo effect. Studies are also beginning to investigate the weight of the collective and sociological aspects that might favor the emergence of these forms of intolerance. Finally, in terms of medical care, the article considers the relation of these emerging environmental sensitivities to functional disorders

  16. Association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance among adult Inuit in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Charlotte; Valera, Beatriz; Nielsen, Nina O; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2015-11-01

    The Arctic diet is partly constituted by traditional food characterized by top predator animals such as whales, walrus, and seals with high mercury content. Mercury exposure has been associated with glucose intolerance in Western populations. We studied the association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance in a highly exposed non-Western population Cross-sectional study of 2640 Inuit (18+ years) with information on ancestry, smoking, waist circumference, total energy intake, and physical activity. Mercury, fasting- and 2-h plasma glucose, insulin, and c-peptide were measured in blood. Fasting participants without diabetes were classified into normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glycemia, or type 2 diabetes. We calculated hepatic insulin resistance with homoeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance index, peripheral insulin sensitivity by ISI0,120., and relative beta cell function by c-peptide/insulin ratio. We conducted adjusted linear- and logistic regression analyses. For an increase in whole blood mercury of 5 µg/L we found a positive association with fasting glucose [% change=0.25 (95% CI: 0.20; 0.30); p<0.001], and 2-h glucose [% change=0.23 (95% CI: 0.05; 0.40); p=0.01]. Mercury was weakly associated with impaired fasting glycemia [OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.02; 1.05)], and type 2 diabetes [OR=1.02 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.04)]. While the study found a weak but statistically significant association between whole blood mercury and both impaired fasting glycemia and type 2 diabetes, no associations were found with measures of underlying disturbances in glucose homoeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of Lactose Malabsorption and Lactose Intolerance in Pediatric Patients with Selected Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Umławska, Wioleta; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Lactase is an enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of lactose. Deficiency of the enzyme (hypolactasia) may be determined genetically or arise secondarily to disease of small intestine. Under this condition, lactose enters the colon where it is fermented by intestinal microflora and turns to gases and short-chain fatty acids, causing gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance (LI). To investigate the incidence of lactose malabsorption (LM), LI and the coexistence of these two conditions in children with upper gastrointestinal tract diseases (UGTD), malabsorption syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Hydrogen breath test (HBT) was conducted in 387 pediatric patients in years 2010-2013. Two hundred thirty two children with gastrointestinal tract diseases were selected and assigned to groups - UGTD, malabsorption syndrome, IBD or FGID. For each group the frequency of LM, frequency and severity of LI and the frequency of their co-occurrence were calculated. Lactose malabsorption was observed in 37.08% of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. Positive HBT result was the most common in children with malabsorption syndrome (52.50%) and less common in UGTD (30.85%), especially in ulcer disease (23.53%). Symptoms after lactose ingestion affected 36.64% of the subjects, and were more specific to lactose malabsorbers than to lactose absorbers (72.10% vs. 15.75%). The higher frequency of LI was noted in children with FGID, especially in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (65.22%). The lowest incidence of symptoms was obtained in children with UGTD, especially in those with ulcer disease (27.44%). The incidence of LM with LI was noted in 27.16% of all patients and was the highest in IBS (47.83%) and the lowest in ulcer disease (15.78%). Lactose malabsorption is a common problem in children with gastrointestinal diseases, especially in children with bowel diseases. Lactose intolerance is related to LM, but does not

  18. Prevalence of wine intolerance: results of a survey from Mainz, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigand, Petra; Blettner, Maria; Saloga, Joachim; Decker, Heinz

    2012-06-01

    Wine is an ancient food product, ubiquitous across cultures all over the world. Its effects on health have been extensively studied, yet there have been only a few case reports of wine intolerance or wine allergy. We studied the prevalence of self-reported wine intolerance in the adult population of Mainz, Germany. In 2010, a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of wine intolerance among adults in Mainz, a city in the wine-cultivating area of Rhine-Hesse. 4000 persons randomly chosen from population lists were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their alcohol intake and the occurrence of various intolerance reactions and allergy-like symptoms after drinking wine. Of the 4000 who received the questionnaire, 948 (23.7%) filled it out and returned it to us. 68 (7.2% of respondents) reported intolerance to wine and/or allergy-like symptoms after drinking wine. Self-reported wine intolerance was more prevalent in women than in men (8.9% vs. 5.2%, p = 0.026). Wine-intolerant persons also more commonly reported intolerance to beer and alcohol in general. Allergy-like symptoms were more common after the consumption of red wine. The most commonly reported reactions to wine were cutaneous flushing, itch, and nasal congestion. Wine intolerance was found to be more common than expected. The data reported here are less suggestive of an immunologically mediated allergy than of intolerance to alcohol, biogenic amines, or other ingredients of wine.

  19. When tolerance leads to intolerance: accessibility effects on social judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Tadesse; Ekehammar, Bo

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the effects of unobtrusively primed constructs that were evocative of tolerance (e.g., tolerant, nonprejudiced) on subsequent task performances and found, contrary to our expectation, contrast effects in the judgment of an ambiguous behavioral description (Study 1 and 2). Suspecting that these results might be the outcome of social-comparison processes, in Study 3, we attempted to corroborate our findings by providing the participants with either an explicit or implicit comparison standard. The results showed that the participants who were provided with the implicit comparison standard evaluated the target behavior as more intolerant as compared to those with the explicit or no comparison standard. The results are discussed in relation to the moderating role of automatic social-comparison processes in the incidence of assimilation and contrast effects and the reduction of prejudice.

  20. β-thalassemia minor, carbohydrate malabsorption and histamine intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J.; Schenk, Michael; Lackner, Sonja; Holasek, Sandra J.; Mangge, Harald

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: β-thalassemia minor is characterized by reduced β-haemoglobin chain synthesis and sometimes mild anaemia, although carriers of β-thalassemia minorare usually clinically asymptomatic.Nonspecific abdominal complaints may be caused by gastrointestinal carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose and fructose) and/or malabsorption of biogenic amines (histamine), or proteins (gluten). Objectives: We report on two patients with β-thalassemia minor suffering nonspecific abdominal symptoms due to a carbohydrate and histamine malabsorption. Design/methods: The diagnosis of β-thalassemia minorwas done with peripheral blood smear and cellulose acetate electrophoresis. Carbohydrate malabsorption was diagnosed with hydrogen breath tests and, histamine intolerance (HIT) with a serum diamine oxidase value malabsorption in these two patients with β-thalassemia minor were treated successfully with an individually-tailored diet free of symptom causing carbohydrates and histamine. PMID:29046748